WorldWideScience

Sample records for mens health

  1. Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

  2. Mens mobile health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Vinie Diana Hvidbak; Castaño, Francisco Mansilla; Jensen, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Preferences Keywords: Men with little or no education, physical health, mobile health application. Types of presentations: First presentation preference: E-Poster presentations Second presentation preference: Pitch presentation Abstract Background: Men mobile health contributes knowledge of how mobile health...... applications affect the physical activity levels by men with little or no education and the frequency of how often they think and do something to promote their health. Men with little or no education have both the lowest life expectancy and longest patient delay, and there are not conducted researches...... and control group. N = 71, 20-62 years old men, little or no education, employed at industrial company. Intervention group N= 35, control group N = 36. There is performed a baseline, an 6 months intervention period, outcome measurement. The intervention: Intervention group use mobile application, registration...

  3. Health screenings for men over age 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - over age 65; Physical exam - men - over age 65; Yearly exam - men - over age 65; Checkup - men - over age 65; Men's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - men - over ...

  4. Health, United States, 2012: Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Americans Health Report Rural-Urban Chartbook NCHS Health, United States, 2015 - Men's Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... among adults aged 18-64, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2013- ...

  5. Promoting mental health in men

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, M.

    2013-01-01

    Health promotion is essential to improve the health status and quality of life of individuals. Promoting mental health at an individual, community and policy level is central to reducing the incidence of mental health problems, including self-harm and suicide. Men may be particularly vulnerable to mental health problems, in part because they are less likely to seek help from healthcare professionals. Although this article discusses mental health promotion and related strategies in general, th...

  6. Health Issues for Gay Men: Prevention First

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as condom use every time you have sex. Gay men and men who have sex with men might be at higher risk of ... long-term health. Makadon HJ. Primary care of gay men and men who have sex with men. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. ...

  7. Men's health and psychosocial issues affecting men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandra P

    2004-06-01

    Contemporary scholars are calling on men to rethink "the male deal." As Samuels describes it, "In the male deal, the little boy, at around the age of 3 or 4. strikes a bargain with the social world in which he lives. If he will turn away from soft things, feminine things, maternal things...then the world will reward his gender certainty by giving him all the goodies in its possession." But the "deal" can have damaging effects, as shown in the studies reviewed in this article. Clinicians can help men to rethink the restrictions of the "male deal" so that they may experience the freedom of a wider emotional repertoire and move toward greater joy and wholeness.

  8. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral ...

  9. Health screenings for men ages 40 to 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - men - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - men - ages 40 to 64; Men's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - men - ages ...

  10. Health screenings for men ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - men - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - men - ages 18 to 39; Men's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care exam - men - ...

  11. Health Inequities among Men who have Sex with Men

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-22

    Dr. Richard Wolitski, Deputy Director for Behavioral and Social Science in CDC's Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, discusses how the health of men who have sex with men may be influenced by prejudice and discrimination and impacted by policies, laws, and economic factors.  Created: 9/22/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 9/22/2010.

  12. Men's Health: Prevent the Top Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can significantly lower your risk of these common killers. Take charge of your health by making better ... other substances, and don't drive while sleepy. Suicide is another leading men's health risk. An important ...

  13. Low Testosterone and Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A genetic condition (Klinefelter syndrome, hemochromatosis, Kallmann syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, myatonic dystrophy) Low testosterone is common in older men. In many cases, the cause is not known. How is low ...

  14. Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

  15. Gay men talking about health: are sexuality and health interlinked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeffery; Braun, Virginia; McCreanor, Tim

    2012-05-01

    Defining and describing health has traditionally been the role of medical experts. Although a rich literature has recently established the importance of lay accounts of health, one important gap relates to gay men's accounts of health. Data from 11 focus groups involving 45 gay men were thematically analyzed to investigate gay men's views of health. Two contrasting positions on a possible relationship between sexuality and health-there is no link or there is a definite link-were identified. In addition, five key ways gay men talked about health were identified: health is the absence of disease, is functional ability, is fitness and exercise, is psychological, and is multifaceted. Although there are similarities in the ways gay and other men talk about health, important differences exist, which suggest that issues of sexuality need to be considered by health policy and service planners so that responsive health services can be provided.

  16. FastStats: Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childbearing Deaths Deaths and Mortality Leading Causes of Death Life Expectancy Race and Ethnicity Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of ...

  17. Men's Health Index: A Pragmatic Approach to Stratifying and Optimizing Men's Health

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hui Meng; Tan, Wei Phin; Wong, Jun Hoe; Ho, Christopher Chee Kong; Teo, Chin Hai; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The proposed Men's Health Index (MHI) aims to provide a practical and systematic framework for comprehensively assessing and stratifying older men with the intention of optimising their health and functional status. Materials and Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed from 1980 to 2012. We specifically looked for instruments which: assess men's health, frailty and fitness; predict life expectancy, mortality and morbidities. The instruments were assessed by the research...

  18. Gender inequality: Bad for men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, M

    2013-01-01

    Men's increased risk of death in ART programmes in sub-Saharan Africa is widely reported but poorly understood. Some studies have attributed this risk to men's poorer health-seeking behaviour, which may prevent them from accessing ART, being adherent to treatment, or remaining in care. In a multicentre analysis of 46 201 adults starting ART in urban and rural settings in South Africa, these factors only partly explained men's increased mortality while receiving ART. Importantly, the gender difference in mortality among patients receiving ART (31% higher for men than women) was substantially smaller than that among HIV-negative South Africans, where men had twice the risk of death compared with women. Yet, this extreme gender inequality in mortality, both within and outside of ART programmes, has not given rise to widespread action. Here it is argued that, despite their dominance in society, men may be subject to a wide range of unfair discriminatory practices, which negatively affect their health outcomes. The health needs of men and boys require urgent attention.

  19. Legal aspects of men's genitourinary health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, J; Waxman, S

    2009-01-01

    Men's health issues have increasingly gained attention not only in the mass media, but also among most health-care providers. The diagnosis and treatment of male-related health problems, unfortunately, can lead to complications and error-related injuries resulting in claims of medical malpractice. This review article will look at the most common claims relating to complications and injuries in the management of men's health issues. Reviews of the literature over the past three decades using multiple search engines including PubMed were utilized. The most pertinent articles were selected on the basis of their relevance to men's health issues, complications and medico-legal ramifications. An evaluation of the literature reveals that although the number of claims against urologists has not increased over the past several decades, indemnity payments have continued to rise significantly. Claims can be divided into those relating to diagnosis and those relating to treatment. Providers of men's health care may become involved in claims of medical malpractice at some time during their careers. Patients' care can result in complications and injuries, most of which do not lead to claims. Certain areas of men's health lead to more claims than others. The keys to prevention and management of those claims are good communication, informed consent and documentation.

  20. Health Care Access and Health Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: The Cost of Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKirnan, David J.; Du Bois, Steve N.; Alvy, Lisa M.; Jones, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) appear to experience barriers to health care compared with general population men. This report examines individual differences in health care access within a diverse sample of urban MSM ("N" = 871). The authors examined demographic differences in health care access and the relation between access and…

  1. Men's Health Index: a pragmatic approach to stratifying and optimizing men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Meng; Tan, Wei Phin; Wong, Jun Hoe; Ho, Christopher Chee Kong; Teo, Chin Hai; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2014-11-01

    The proposed Men's Health Index (MHI) aims to provide a practical and systematic framework for comprehensively assessing and stratifying older men with the intention of optimising their health and functional status. A literature search was conducted using PubMed from 1980 to 2012. We specifically looked for instruments which: assess men's health, frailty and fitness; predict life expectancy, mortality and morbidities. The instruments were assessed by the researchers who then agreed on the tools to be included in the MHI. When there was disagreements, the researchers discussed and reached a consensus guided by the principle that the MHI could be used in the primary care setting targetting men aged 55-65 years. The instruments chosen include the Charlson's Combined Comorbidity-Age Index; the International Index of Erectile Function-5; the International Prostate Symptom Score; the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male; the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe Frailty Instrument; the Sitting-Rising Test; the Senior Fitness Test; the Fitness Assessment Score; and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21. A pilot test on eight men was carried out and showed that the men's health index is viable. The concept of assessing, stratifying, and optimizing men's health should be incorporated into routine health care, and this can be implemented by using the MHI. This index is particularly useful to primary care physicians who are in a strategic position to engage men at the peri-retirement age in a conversation about their life goals based on their current and predicted health status.

  2. Gender inequality: Bad for men's health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morna Cornell

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Men’s increased risk of death in ART programmes in sub-Saharan Africa is widely reported but poorly understood. Some studies have attributed this risk to men’s poorer health-seeking behaviour, which may prevent them from accessing ART, being adherent to treatment, or remaining in care. In a multicentre analysis of 46 201 adults starting ART in urban and rural settings in South Africa, these factors only partly explained men’s increased mortality while receiving ART. Importantly, the gender difference in mortality among patients receiving ART (31% higher for men than women was substantially smaller than that among HIV-negative South Africans, where men had twice the risk of death compared with women. Yet, this extreme gender inequality in mortality, both within and outside of ART programmes, has not given rise to widespread action. Here it is argued that, despite their dominance in society, men may be subject to a wide range of unfair discriminatory practices, which negatively affect their health outcomes. The health needs of men and boys require urgent attention. S Afr J HIV Med 2013;14(1:12-14. DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.894

  3. Men's Sheds function and philosophy: towards a framework for future research and men's health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Doma, Kenji; Misan, Gary; Vaz, Sharmila

    2015-08-01

    The Men's Shed movement supports a range of men's health promotion initiatives. This paper examines whether a Men's Shed typology could inform future research and enable more efficient and targeted health promotion activities through Men's Sheds. The International Men's Shed Survey consisted of a cross-sectional exploration of sheds, their members, and health and social activities. Survey data about shed 'function' and 'philosophy' were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A framework of Men's Sheds based on function and philosophy demonstrated that most sheds serve a primary utility function, a secondary social function, but most importantly a primary social opportunity philosophy. Sheds with a primary health philosophy participated in fewer health promotion activities when compared with sheds without a primary health philosophy. In addition to the uniform health promotion resources distributed by the Men's Shed associations, specific health promotion activities, such as prostate education, are being initiated from an individual shed level. This framework can potentially be used to enable future research and health promotion activities to be more efficiently and effectively targeted. SO WHAT? Men experience poorer health and well being outcomes than women. This framework offers a novel approach to providing targeted health promotion activities to men in an environment where it is okay to talk about men's health.

  4. Challenging machismo: promoting sexual and reproductive health with Nicaraguan men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, P

    2000-03-01

    This article presents the results of a participatory exploration of male attitudes towards sexual and reproductive health issues in Nicaragua. Nicaraguan culture views men in a machismo concept. The study examined the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of men in relation to the social construction of masculinity: sexuality, reproduction, and fatherhood. Employing 90 men from both rural and urban communities, attitudes towards sexuality, reproduction, abortion and fatherhood were discussed. Several insights were gathered from the research, which explains men's behavior. Thus, it was deemed imperative that in empowering women by promoting sexual and reproductive health among men would require challenging male hegemony and persuading men to participate in health promotion. However, the setting and application of a men's agenda for sexual health promotion should not result in the curtailment of services for women because funds are being reallocated to men, nor should it give men the opportunity to more subtle forms of domination and exploitation.

  5. Governing the healthy male citizen: men, masculinity and popular health in Men's Health magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Recent commentators have noted the potential of newer neo-liberal discourses of health care to position responsibility for the management of well-being with the individual. Often promoted through the inculcation of risk avoidance and management, such discourses are played out in myriad settings, including the popular media. Magazines are one such media site in which diverse exhortations for the achievement of health, well-being and the perfectible body are made, and Bunton [1997. Popular health, advanced liberalism and good housekeeping magazine. In A. Petersen & Bunton R. (Eds.) Foucault, health and medicine (pp. 223-247). London: Routledge] has identified 'magazine medicine' as a significant manifestation of more dedifferentiated models of health care. Recent discussions have placed men's health high on research and policy agendas, with a concomitant interest in more popular realms. The UK magazine Men's Health (MH) is indicative of these trends, and represents a site at which discourses of men, health and masculinity are constructed. Typically reflecting neo-liberal models of health, here men are constructed as active and entrepreneurial citizens able to maintain their own health and well-being through the judicious management of risk in contexts appropriate to dominant discourses of hegemonic masculinity. Data which resulted from a critical discourse analysis of a 2-year sample (21 issues) of MH are considered and findings related to medicalisation, individualisation and risk discussed. It is suggested that magazine texts such as MH reflect newer individualised models of health care and neo-liberal strategies of health governance premised upon constructing a healthy male citizen, willing and able to take responsibility for their own well-being.

  6. "Macho men" and preventive health care: implications for older men in different social classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen W; Mouzon, Dawne M

    2011-06-01

    The gender paradox in mortality--where men die earlier than women despite having more socioeconomic resources--may be partly explained by men's lower levels of preventive health care. Stereotypical notions of masculinity reduce preventive health care; however, the relationship between masculinity, socioeconomic status (SES), and preventive health care is unknown. Using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, the authors conduct a population-based assessment of masculinity beliefs and preventive health care, including whether these relationships vary by SES. The results show that men with strong masculinity beliefs are half as likely as men with more moderate masculinity beliefs to receive preventive care. Furthermore, in contrast to the well-established SES gradient in health, men with strong masculinity beliefs do not benefit from higher education and their probability of obtaining preventive health care decreases as their occupational status, wealth, and/or income increases. Masculinity may be a partial explanation for the paradox of men's lower life expectancy, despite their higher SES.

  7. Sexuality and Health: A Study of Tanzanian Men\\'s Experiences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore Tanzanian men\\'s experiences regarding their health and sex life after they had been diagnosed with HIV. In-depth interviews were performed with a purposive sample of ten men living in an urban area in Tanzania and who had been HIV positive for more than one year.

  8. Machismo sustains health and illness beliefs of Mexican American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobralske, Mary

    2006-08-01

    To inform nurse practitioners (NPs) about Mexican American men's health and illness beliefs and the ways in which these are influenced by their masculine identity and how they view themselves as men in their culture. The data sources used were based on a selected review of the literature about Mexican American men's health and illness beliefs and the concept of machismo. Several studies, including the author's study on Mexican American men's healthcare-seeking beliefs and behaviors and experience in providing primary health care to men across cultures, contributed new data. The meaning of manhood in the Mexican American culture is critical in understanding how men perceive health and illness and what they do when they are ill. Machismo enhances men's awareness of their health because they have to be healthy to be good fathers, husbands, brothers, sons, workers, and community members. Pain and disability are motivating factors in finding ways to regain their health. Men's health beliefs across cultures need further investigation by nurse researchers and NPs. How culture influences healthcare delivery to men should be better understood. If NPs are aware of men's views on masculinity, they are better prepared to understand and assist men in becoming more aware of their health status and to seek health care when appropriate.

  9. Fertility Desire and Reproductive Health Care Needs of Men and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding fertility desire and reproductive health care needs of HIV positive men and women in the era of better access to antiretroviral therapy and improved health status is important in planning and organizing appropriate health services. To assess the fertility desire and reproductive health care needs of men and ...

  10. Correlates of health attitudes among homosexual and bisexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Gust

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increased emphasis on physician attention to the overall health and wellness of homosexual and bisexual men, though little is known about the health-related attitudes of these groups. This study determined factors associated with the health attitudes of homosexual and bisexual men and identified preferred sources of health information. For this study, the 2008 ConsumerStyles panel survey was used to create three health attitude scales and to determine factors associated with each scale. The three scales were labeled: (1 health motivation; (2 relationship with health care provider; and (3 self-perception of health literacy. In addition to other factors, higher scores for health motivation and relationship with health care provider were associated with black compared with white men. In contrast, lower scores for self-perception of health literacy were associated with black compared with white men. For information on an unfamiliar health condition, most homosexual and bisexual men chose the Internet. Black homosexual and bisexual men reported being motivated to be healthy and working well with their health care provider to manage their health. However, their perception of their own health motivation was low compared with the white men. Attempts to improve health literacy through Internet sites may be helpful in improving health attitudes and reducing negative health outcomes.

  11. The mental health of men and boys: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peate, Ian

    This article provides insight and understanding into important issues of which nurses need to be aware when caring for men and boys with regard to their mental health. Inequalities in health care are discussed, and suggestions made concerning how all nurses can help redress these inequalities. The mental health of men and boys concerns all nurses; not just those working in mental health settings. The article focuses on a recent review published by the Men's Health Forum (Wilkins, 2010), and considers a number of gender-specific mental health issues that affect the health and wellbeing of men and boys. The role of the nurse is to protect and promote the health of people in their care and this article makes clear that this extends to and includes the mental health of men and boys. Labelling people and categorizing them into homogenous groups is not often helpful or strategically wise; this article does not wish to categorize, but merely attempts to explain.

  12. Barriers to men who have sex with men attending HIV related health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The HIV/ AIDS disease burden is disproportionately high among men who have sex with men (MSM) worldwide. If this group will continue to be ignored they will continue to be the focus of HIV infection to the general population. This study explored barriers impeding MSM utilizing the HIV related health services currently ...

  13. Profile of men's health in Malaysia: problems and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2011-07-01

    Men's health concerns have evolved from the traditional andrology and male sexual health to a more holistic approach that encompasses male psychological, social and physical health. The poor state of health in men compared to their female counterparts is well documented. A review of the epidemiological data from Malaysia noted a similar trend in which men die at higher rates in under 1 and above 15 years old groups and most disease categories compared to women. In Malaysia, the main causes of death in men are non-communicable diseases and injuries. Risk factors, such as risk-taking behaviour, smoking and hypertension, are prevalent and amenable to early interventions. Erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and prostate disorders are also prevalent. However, many of these morbidities go unreported and are not diagnosed early; therefore, opportunities for early intervention are missed. This reflects poor health knowledge and inadequate health-care utilisation among Malaysian men. Their health-seeking behaviour has been shown to be strongly influenced by family members and friends. However, more research is needed to identify men's unmet health-care needs and to develop optimal strategies for addressing them. Because the Malaysian population is aging and there is an increase in sedentary lifestyles, optimizing men's health will remain a challenge unless effective measures are implemented. The existing male-unfriendly health-care system and the negative influence of masculinity on men's health behaviour must be addressed. A national men's health policy based on a male-friendly approach to health-care delivery is urgently needed to provide a framework for addressing these challenges.

  14. Profile of men's health in Malaysia: problems and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2011-01-01

    Men's health concerns have evolved from the traditional andrology and male sexual health to a more holistic approach that encompasses male psychological, social and physical health. The poor state of health in men compared to their female counterparts is well documented. A review of the epidemiological data from Malaysia noted a similar trend in which men die at higher rates in under 1 and above 15 years old groups and most disease categories compared to women. In Malaysia, the main causes of death in men are non-communicable diseases and injuries. Risk factors, such as risk-taking behaviour, smoking and hypertension, are prevalent and amenable to early interventions. Erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and prostate disorders are also prevalent. However, many of these morbidities go unreported and are not diagnosed early; therefore, opportunities for early intervention are missed. This reflects poor health knowledge and inadequate health-care utilisation among Malaysian men. Their health-seeking behaviour has been shown to be strongly influenced by family members and friends. However, more research is needed to identify men's unmet health-care needs and to develop optimal strategies for addressing them. Because the Malaysian population is aging and there is an increase in sedentary lifestyles, optimizing men's health will remain a challenge unless effective measures are implemented. The existing male-unfriendly health-care system and the negative influence of masculinity on men's health behaviour must be addressed. A national men's health policy based on a male-friendly approach to health-care delivery is urgently needed to provide a framework for addressing these challenges. PMID:21358664

  15. Military Service and Men's Health Trajectories in Later Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Andrew S.; Parker, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines differences in the relationship between veteran status and men's trajectories of health conditions, activities of daily living limitations, and self-rated health. Methods. We use data on 12,631 men drawn from the 1992–2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study to estimate growth curve models that examine differences in health trajectories between nonveterans and veterans, veterans with and without wartime service, and war service veterans who served during World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and multiple wars. Results. The results indicate that veterans have better health at the mean age of 66.2 years, but experience greater age-related changes in health than nonveterans. Similarly, men who served during wartime have better health at the mean age, but more age-related changes in health than men who did not serve during wartime. Among war veterans, Vietnam veterans are in poorer health at the mean age, but they experience less substantial age-related health changes than men who served during previous wars. Discussion. Although veterans experience better health relative to nonveterans around retirement age, they have poorer health than nonveterans among the oldest old. These findings inform our understanding of the veteran–nonveteran health-mortality paradox found in previous research and suggest a health crossover among veterans and nonveterans in later life. PMID:20864570

  16. Gender inequality: Bad for men's health | Cornell | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Men's increased risk of death in ART programmes in sub-Saharan Africa is widely reported but poorly understood. Some studies have attributed this risk to men's poorer health-seeking behaviour, which may prevent them from accessing ART, being adherent to treatment, or remaining in care. In a multicentre analysis of 46 ...

  17. Men's Mental Health: Social Determinants and Implications for Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affleck, William; Carmichael, Victoria; Whitley, Rob

    2018-01-01

    Numerous scholars have stated that there is a silent crisis in men's mental health. In this article, we aim to provide an overview of core issues in the field of men's mental health, including a discussion of key social determinants as well as implications for mental health services. Firstly, we review the basic epidemiology of mental disorders with a high incidence and prevalence in men, including suicide and substance use disorder. Secondly, we examine controversies around the low reported rates of depression in men, discussing possible measurement and reporting biases. Thirdly, we explore common risk factors and social determinants that may explain higher rates of certain mental health outcomes in men. This includes a discussion of 1) occupational and employment issues; 2) family issues and divorce; 3) adverse childhood experience; and 4) other life transitions, notably parenthood. Fourthly, we document and analyze low rates of mental health service utilization in men. This includes a consideration of the role of dominant notions of masculinity (such as stubbornness and self-reliance) in deterring service utilization. Fifthly, we note that some discourse on the role of masculinity contains much "victim blaming," often adopting a reproachful deficit-based model. We argue that this can deflect attention away from social determinants as well as issues within the mental health system, such as claims that it is "feminized" and unresponsive to men's needs. We conclude by calling for a multipronged public health-inspired approach to improve men's mental health, involving concerted action at the individual, health services, and societal levels.

  18. What works with men? A systematic review of health promoting interventions targeting men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Garth

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encouraging men to make more effective use of (preventive health services is considered one way of improving their health. The aim of this study was to appraise the available evidence of effective interventions aimed at improving men's health. Methods Systematic review of relevant studies identified through 14 electronic databases and other information resources. Results were pooled within health topic and described qualitatively. Results Of 11,749 citations screened, 338 articles were assessed and 27 met our inclusion criteria. Most studies were male sex-specific, i.e. prostate cancer screening and testicular self-examination. Other topics included alcohol, cardiovascular disease, diet and physical activity, skin cancer and smoking cessation. Twenty-three interventions were effective or partially effective and 18 studies satisfied all quality criteria. Conclusion Most of the existing evidence relates to male sex-specific health problems as opposed to general health concerns relevant to both men and women. There is little published evidence on how to improve men's uptake of services. We cannot conclude from this review that targeting men works better than providing services for all people. Large-scale studies are required to help produce evidence that is sufficiently robust to add to the small evidence base that currently exists in this field.

  19. What Health Issues or Conditions Affect Women Differently Than Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Pharmacology Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a Study ... States abuse alcohol, putting their health, safety, and general well-being at risk. While men are more ...

  20. Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commit" type="submit" value="Submit" /> More CDC Alcohol Topics CDC Alcohol Portal Binge Drinking Drinking & Driving ... type="submit" value="Submit" /> Fact Sheets - Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Men's Health Recommend on ...

  1. Kurdish men's experiences of migration-related mental health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taloyan, Marina; Al-Windi, Ahmad; Johansson, Leena Maria; Saleh-Stattin, Nuha

    2011-10-01

    The migration process may impose stress on the mental health of immigrants. To describe the experiences of immigrant men of Kurdish ethnicity during and after migration to Sweden with regard to mental health issues. Using the grounded theory method, we conducted a focus group interview with four Kurdish men and in-depth individual interviews with 10 other Kurdish men. A model with two major themes and interlinked categories was developed. The themes were (1) protective factors for good mental health (sense of belonging, creation and re-creation of Kurdish identity, sense of freedom, satisfaction with oneself) and (2) risk factors for poor mental health (worry about current political situation in the home country, yearning, lack of sense of freedom, dissatisfaction with Swedish society). The study provides insights into the psychological and emotional experiences of immigrant men of Kurdish ethnicity during and after migration to Sweden. It is important for primary health care providers to be aware of the impact that similar migration-related and life experiences have on the health status of immigrants, and also to be aware that groups are comprised of unique individuals with differing experiences and reactions to these experiences. The findings highlight the common themes of the men's experiences and suggest ways to ameliorate mental health issues, including feeling like one is seen as an individual, is a full participant in society, and can contribute to one's own culture.

  2. What men really want: a qualitative investigation of men's health needs from the Halton and St Helens Primary Care Trust men's health promotion project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Rebecca; Watkins, Francine; Swami, Viren; Jones, Susan; Woolf, Susan; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2010-11-01

    Although a number of recent health promotion interventions targeted at men have recognized the plurality of masculinities and adopted multifaceted approaches, in the main there continues to be a reliance on stereotypes of gendered behaviour that focus on hegemonic masculinities and a 'one-size-fits-all' approach to health care. The present study sought to overcome this limitation. The present study used a qualitative design, in which data were analysed using framework analysis. A total of 82 middle-aged and older men, in a socially deprived area of Britain, took part in focus groups about health promotion. Analysis of focus group transcripts revealed four key themes: (1) that the 'doing' of gender in relation to health must be seen as contingent and in constant flux; (2) that, despite stereotypes of typical behaviour, men were keen to engage with health care services; (3) that men felt there were a number of barriers to help seeking, but generally welcomed the opportunity to discuss their health care needs, and; (4) that they were keen to see the above themes translated into directed advertising and health information for men. These results have practical implications for the way in which health promotion interventions target men, which we discuss in conclusion.

  3. Mental health disorders among homeless, substance-dependent men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jesse B; Reback, Cathy J

    2017-07-01

    Homelessness is associated with increased prevalence of mental health disorders, substance use disorders and mental health/substance use disorder comorbidity in the United States of America. Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) living in the United States are at increased risk for homelessness, and have also evidenced elevated mental health and substance use disorder prevalence relative to their non-MSM male counterparts. Secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial estimating the diagnostic prevalence of substance use/mental health disorder comorbidity among a sample of homeless, substance-dependent MSM (DSM-IV verified; n = 131). The most prevalent substance use/mental health disorder comorbidities were stimulant dependence comorbid with at least one depressive disorder (28%), alcohol dependence comorbid with at least one depressive disorder (26%) and stimulant dependence comorbid with antisocial personality disorder (25%). Diagnostic depression and antisocial personality disorder both demonstrated high rates of prevalence among homeless, substance-dependent (particularly stimulant and alcohol dependent) MSM. [Fletcher JB, Reback CJ. Mental health disorders among homeless, substance-dependent men who have sex with men. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;36:555-559]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  4. The men's health forum: an initiative to address health disparities in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Cathy G; Davis, Jenna L; Rivers, Brian M; Rivera-Colón, Venessa; Ramos, Roberto; Antolino, Prado; Harris, Erika; Green, B Lee

    2012-08-01

    Racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender disparities in health and access to and use of health care services currently exist. Health professionals are continually striving to reduce and eliminate health disparities within their own community. One such effort in the area of Tampa Bay, Florida was the creation of the African American Men's Health Forum, currently referred to as the Men's Health Forum. The African American Men's Health Forum was the result of the community's desire to reduce the gap in health outcomes for African American men. Later, it was recognized that the gap in health outcomes impacts other communities; therefore, it was broadened to include all men considered medically underserved (those who are uninsured, underinsured, or without a regular health care provider). The Men's Health Forum empowers men with the resources, knowledge, and information to effectively manage their health by providing health education and screenings to the community. This article provides an explanation of the key components that have contributed to the success of the Men's Health Forum, including challenges and lessons learned. It is intended that this information be replicated in other communities in an effort to eliminate health disparities.

  5. [Men, health and public policies: gender equality in question].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Marcia Thereza; Gomes, Romeu

    2012-10-01

    The scope of this article is to pose questions on the theme of Men, Health and Public Policies to render debate on the subject viable, based on theoretical and empirical references related to these issues. Initially, some historical landmarks on the theme are presented to provide guidelines for debate. An overview of the gender agenda in public policies is then presented to introduce the discussion about the inclusion of a gender perspective in healthcare policies. After this discussion, queries are raised about whether or not policies geared to men's health promote gender equality. In the closing remarks, the complexity involved in the development, implementation and evaluation of health policies aimed at gender equality is highlighted. The need for the Brazilian policy geared towards men's health to be implemented with other policies such that the gender matrix is transversal in the healthcare field is also stressed.

  6. Role burdens and physical health of women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, L M

    1986-01-01

    This article looks at role burdens experienced by women and men, asking if heavy burdens are linked with poor physical health status and frequent health care. The role burden variables refer to job schedule, feelings about roles and life, time constraints and pressures, family dependency, and levels of role involvement and responsibility. The data source is the Health In Detroit Study, which has health items from a retrospective interview and prospective health diaries. Results show that dissatisfaction with roles/life and feelings of very great or very little time pressure are associated with poor health. To a lesser extent, very low or very high objective time constraints, irregular and short job schedules, no or high family dependency, and very low or very high income responsibility are linked with poor health. By contrast, having numerous roles is associated with good health. Some of these results point toward social causation (how the quantity and quality of roles influence health) and others to social selection (how health influences role involvements). The relationships are similar for women and men. But women are more at risk of poor health because, more often than men, they tend to have few roles (especially nonemployment), more dissatisfaction with their main role and life, low time constraints, low income responsibility, and irregular job schedules. In conclusion, role burdens may lie more in subjective feelings about one's activities than in their objective characteristics. Having low quality roles may jeopardize health, whereas having numerous ones can help maintain or enhance it.

  7. Health promotion and intellectual disability: listening to men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Taking responsibility for your own health has been a central tenet of public health policy internationally for a number of decades. Governments in the UK and internationally continue to promote a plethora of health promotion strategies, encouraging individuals and communities to adopt healthy lifestyle choices. Although it is widely recognised that men are not as proactive in seeking out medical help or taking on health promotion advice as women, limited gender-sensitive research exists in the field of intellectual disability. Despite many health promotion policy and practice strategies targeted at this population, little research exists exploring whether men with intellectual disability acknowledge health promotion advice. The study aimed to explore how men with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability understood and perceived their health and what health promotion messages they acted upon. The study was based on a participatory approach which enabled 11 men with intellectual disability to contribute as steering group members and as participants through one-to-one interviews. Data were collected between September 2011 and July 2012. Thematic analysis was undertaken. The participants demonstrated a capacity to understand their own health. This was inclusive of a concern about associating being obese with being unhealthy. The participants reported good relationships with their general practitioners (GPs) and felt valued, in particular when the GP was prepared to offer specific intellectual disability and health promotion advice. More gendered research inclusive of the views of this male population is required and the study reiterates the importance of promoting the health of men and women with intellectual disability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Sexual Health Promotion for Men Who Have Sex with Other Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Richard P.; Engstrom, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Asserts that the challenge in developing effective campus health-promotion strategies for homosexual men is to provide clear information, opportunities for skill building, enhancement of self-esteem, and community support for those who may not even realize they need interventions. Discusses intimacy, sexual behavior, prejudice, and violence as…

  9. Focus on men's needs with male health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A focused approach to male reproductive health through the development of specialized male health clinics represents a viable strategy for addressing issues such as prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Physicians affiliated with student health centers at San Francisco (California) State University and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University presented information on planning and operating such services at the 1998 meeting of the American College Health Association. A needs assessment survey can identify the particular health interests of the male population. The San Francisco clinic, in operation since 1996, addresses issues such as immunizations; screenings for STDs, cholesterol, and tuberculosis; testicular cancer self-examination; vision testing; and fitness evaluations for sports activities. The men's clinic is open 2 half-days per week and patient visits last an average of 1.5 hours. An evaluation survey indicated that 45% of students who used the men's health clinic returned up to 5 times and all respondents felt the service addressed their major health concerns. At Virginia Tech, where the first such clinic is about to open, a well-attended men's growth group has been offered through the school's counseling center for the past three semesters. In preparation for the clinic's opening, banners and fliers have been developed with the goal of recruiting at least 50 students in the first semester and a men's clinic package that includes information on STDs and other topics is available.

  10. Suicide in older men: The health in men cohort study (HIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; McCaul, Kieran; Hankey, Graeme J; Yeap, Bu B; Golledge, Jonathan; Flicker, Leon

    2016-12-01

    Suicide rates are high in later life, particularly among older men. Mood disorders are known risk factors, but the risk of suicide associated with poor physical health remains unclear. We completed a cohort study of a community representative sample of 38,170 men aged 65-85 in 1996 who were followed for up to 16years. Data on suicide attempts and completion were obtained from the Western Australia Data Linkage System, as was information about medical and mental health diagnoses. 240 (0.6%) participants had a recorded history of past suicide attempt, most commonly by poisoning (85%). Sixty-nine men died by suicide during follow up (0.3% of all deaths), most often by hanging (50.7%). Age-adjusted competing risk regression showed that past suicide attempt was not a robust predictor of future suicide completion (sub-hazard ratio, SHR=1.58, 95% CI=0.39, 6.42), but bipolar (SHR=7.82, 95% CI=3.08, 19.90), depressive disorders (SHR=2.26, 95% CI=1.14, 4.51) and the number of health systems affected by disease (SHR for 3-4 health systems=6.02, 95% CI=2.69, 13.47; SHR for ≥5 health systems=11.18, 95% CI=4.89, 25.53) were. The population fraction of suicides attributable to having 5 or more health systems affected by disease was 79% (95% CI=57%, 90%), and for any mood disorder (bipolar or depression) it was 17% (95% CI=3%, 28%). Older Australian men with multiple health morbidities have the highest risk of death by suicide, even after taking into account the presence of mood disorders. Improving the overall health of the population may be the most effective way of decreasing the rates of suicide in later life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Core principles of sexual health treatments in cancer for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The considerable prevalence of sexual health problems in men after cancer treatment coupled with the severity of impact and challenges to successful intervention make sexual dysfunction one of the most substantial health-related quality of life burdens in all of cancer survivorship. Surgeries, radiation therapies, and nontreatment (e.g., active surveillance) variously result in physical disfigurement, pain, and disruptions in physiological, psychological, and relational functioning. Although biomedical and psychological interventions have independently shown benefit, long-term, effective treatment for sexual dysfunction remains elusive. Recognizing the complex nature of men's sexual health in an oncology setting, there is a trend toward the adoption of a biopsychosocial orientation that emphasizes the active participation of the partner, and a broad-spectrum medical, psychological, and social approach. Intervention research to date provides good insight into the potential active ingredients of successful sexual rehabilitation programming. Combining a biopsychosocial approach with these active intervention elements forecasts an optimistic future for men's sexual rehabilitation programming within oncology. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of patient experience and appropriate sexual health intervention for gay men and men of diverse race and culture.

  12. Effect of age, education and health status on community dwelling older men's health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara

    2012-06-01

    A significant gap in evidence characterizes the process of establishing patient-centered health priorities for older men. A cross-sectional postal survey of 2325 Canadian community dwelling men aged 55-97 years old was conducted in 2008 to gauge older men's level of concern for 24 different health items, to determine the impact of age, education and health status on these perceptions, and to ascertain whether men perceive that their health concerns are being attended to. Health issues of greatest concern to men were mobility impairment (64% of respondents), memory loss (64%), and medication side effects (63%). Respondents with lower educational attainment expressed greater concern about their health and were almost 2-fold times more likely to report being concerned about stroke, heart disease and prostate disorders in analyses that controlled for age and health status. Physical and mental health were independently associated with various concerns about health, but old age was not a reliable predictor, with only younger men (erectile dysfunction. Health items of greatest concern to men tended to be those with the lowest screening or counseling rates: these included incontinence, osteoporosis, mobility impairment, falls, anxiety issues, memory loss and depression. An improved consumer-guided agenda for addressing older men's health in the coming decade is urgently required.

  13. The Association between Penis Size and Sexual Health among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Bimbi, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Larger penis size has been equated with a symbol of power, stamina, masculinity, and social status. Yet, there has been little research among men who have sex with men assessing the association between penis size and social-sexual health. Survey data from a diverse sample of 1,065 men who have sex with men were used to explore the association between perceived penis size and a variety of psychosocial outcomes. Seven percent of men felt their penis was “below average,” 53.9% “average,” and 35.5% “above average.” Penis size was positively related to satisfaction with size and inversely related to lying about penis size (all p penis size was average, many fell outside this “norm.” The disproportionate number of viral skin-to-skin STIs (HSV-2 and HPV) suggest size may play a role in condom slippage/breakage. Further, size played a significant role in sexual positioning and psychosocial adjustment. These data highlight the need to better understand the real individual-level consequences of living in a penis-centered society. PMID:19139986

  14. Oral health of community-dwelling older Australian men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fac; Chu, Sk-Y; Milledge, K L; Valdez, E; Law, G; Hsu, B; Naganathan, V; Hirani, V; Blyth, F M; Le Couteur, D G; Harford, J; Waite, L M; Handelsman, D J; Seibel, M J; Cumming, R G

    2017-08-29

    The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) is a cohort study of the health of a representative sample of Australian men aged 70 years and older. The aim of this report is to describe the oral health of these men. Oral health was assessed when the men were all aged 78 years or older. Two calibrated examiners conducted a standardized intraoral assessment. Descriptive data were analysed by statistical association tests. Participants were excluded from the collection of some periodontal assessments if they had a medical contraindication. Dental assessments of 614 participants revealed 90 (14.6%) were edentate. Men had a mean of 13.8 missing teeth and 10.3 filled teeth. Dentate participants had a mean of 1.1 teeth with active coronal decay. Those in the low-income group had a higher rate of decayed teeth and lower rate of filled teeth. Thirty-four participants (5.5%) had one or more dental implants, and 66.3% relied on substitute natural teeth for functional occlusion. Of those with full periodontal assessments; 90.9% had sites with pocket depths of 3 mm or more, 96.6% had sites with CAL of 5 mm or more, and 79.7% had three or more sites with GI scores of 2 or more. There was a high prevalence of periodontal diseases and restorative burden of dentitions, which suggests that greater attention needs to be given to prevention and health maintenance in older Australian men. © 2017 The Authors. Australian Dental Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Dental Association.

  15. Mental health in immigrant men and women in Australia: the North West Adelaide Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straiton, Melanie; Grant, Janet F; Winefield, Helen R; Taylor, Anne

    2014-10-28

    There is conflicting evidence of the healthy migrant effect with respect to mental health. This study aims to determine if there are differences in mental health and service use between Australian-born and foreign-born individuals living in South Australia and to consider the differing role of socio-demographic characteristics for Australian-born and foreign-born men and women. Data from the North West Adelaide Health study was used to compare foreign-born men and women from English and non-English speaking backgrounds with Australian born men and women on four measures of mental health and service use. A series of logistic regression analyses were conducted. There were no differences between Australian-born and foreign-born individuals from English-speaking backgrounds on any measures. Men from non-English speaking backgrounds had higher odds of depression. Employment and general health were important protectors of mental health for both Australian and foreign-born individuals, while being married was protective for foreign-born men only. Income was generally inversely related to mental health among Australians but the relationship was weaker and less consistent for those born abroad. Men from non-English speaking backgrounds men may be at increased risk of mental health problems but do not have higher levels of treatment. Help-seeking may need to be encouraged among this group, particularly among unmarried, unemployed men from non-English speaking backgrounds.

  16. Health, Anticipated Partner Infidelity, and Jealousy in Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Arnocky; Marlena Pearson; Tracy Vaillancourt

    2015-01-01

    Health has been identified as an important variable involved in mate choice. Unhealthy organisms are generally less able to provide reproductively important resources to partners and offspring and are more likely to pass on communicable disease. Research on human mate preferences has shown that both men and women prefer healthy mates. Yet to date, little research has examined how health relates to one’s own mating experiences. In the present study, 164 participants (87 women) who were current...

  17. Health, Economic Resources and the Work Decisions of Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bound, John; Stinebrickner, Todd; Waidmann, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    We specify a dynamic programming model that addresses the interplay among health, financial resources, and the labor market behavior of men late in their working lives. We model health as a latent variable, for which self reported disability status is an indicator, and allow self-reported disability to be endogenous to labor market behavior. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study. While we find large impacts of health on behavior, they are substantially smaller than in models that treat self-reports as exogenous. We also simulate the impacts of several potential reforms to the Social Security program.

  18. Health disparities among common subcultural identities of young gay men: physical, mental, and sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony; Hosking, Warwick

    2014-11-01

    Researchers, policymakers, and health agencies have tended to treat gay men as a relatively homogeneous population, with little attention given to its many subcultural identities. In this study, we focused on young gay men and investigated a range of health-related differences according to common subcultural identities, such as Bear, Cub, and Twink. In a nationwide cross-sectional online survey of 1,034 Australian gay men aged 18-39 years, 44% reported a subcultural identity, the two most common being Cub (9%) and Twink (20%). Logistic and linear regression analyses compared Cub- and Twink-identified men and those without a subcultural identity (Non-identified) on a range of health-related outcomes. After adjusting for differences in age and body mass index (BMI), Twink-identified men had the highest risk profile overall, including significantly higher rates of smoking tobacco and alcohol consumption. They were also significantly more likely to report engaging in receptive anal sex. In addition, Cub-identified men were significantly more likely to report being in an ongoing relationship while Non-identified men were significantly less likely to report experiences of discrimination in the past 12 months. Differences on measures of mental health between the three groups were no longer significant after adjusting for age and BMI. In summary, we found numerous health-related differences according to subcultural identity that warrant further investigation by researchers, health agencies, and others concerned with further understanding and addressing health-related challenges of gay men.

  19. Health-Promoting Home and Workplace Neighborhoods: Associations With Multiple Facets of Men's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Simon; Meunier, Sophie; Cloutier, Lyne; Auger, Nathalie; Roy, Bernard; Tremblay, Gilles; de Montigny, Francine; Gaboury, Isabelle; Bernard, François-Olivier; Lavoie, Brigitte; Dion, Harold; Houle, Janie

    2017-11-01

    Despite the importance of healthy settings for health promotion, little is known about how neighborhood characteristics affect men's health. The present study aims to explore the associations between perceptions of home and workplace neighborhoods with diverse health outcomes, and to examine mediating mechanisms. A sample of 669 men members of labor unions in Quebec, Canada, completed a questionnaire assessing social and physical aspects of their work and home neighborhoods (the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire) as well as subjective and objective health outcomes (perceived health, positive mental health, body mass index) and potential mediators (health behaviors, self-efficacy). Structural equation modeling (path analysis) revealed that the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire was associated with all three health outcomes, either directly or indirectly through health behaviors and self-efficacy. Both home and workplace neighborhoods were associated with men's health, home neighborhood being more strongly associated. The findings suggest that physical and social aspects of neighborhood might contribute to men's health. The study highlights positive environmental levers for urban planners, policy makers, and health professionals to promote men's health.

  20. Communicating with School Nurses about Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H.; Robin, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health.…

  1. The effect of floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital in older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikman, Johan Michael; Nistrup, Anne; Vorup Petersen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76) were randomized into a group playing...... floorball (n = 22) or a group playing petanque (n = 17) one hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Both groups filled out the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) before and after the 12-week intervention. Linear regression analyses with bootstrapping showed...... that the men in the floorball group improved in the SF-12 composite score for mental health, as well as the HADS subscales anxiety and depression, compared to the men in the petanque group. In addition, 21 interviews were conducted with a sample of the men engaged in floorball. According to the statements...

  2. The Effect of Floorball Training on Health Status, Psychological Health and Social Capital in Older Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76) years were randomized into a group...... playing floorball (n = 22) or a group playing petanque (n = 17) one hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Both groups filled out the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) before and after the 12-week intervention. Linear regression analyses with bootstrapping...... showed that the men in the floorball group improved in the SF-12 composite score for mental health, as well as the HADS subscales anxiety and depression, compared to the men in the petanque group. In addition, 21 interviews were conducted with a sample of the men engaged in floorball. According...

  3. Beyond workers' compensation: men's mental health in and out of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E

    2014-01-01

    The mental health of men is an important issue with significant direct and indirect costs emerging from work-related depression and suicide. Although the merits of men's community-based and workplace mental health promotion initiatives have been endorsed, few programs are mandated or formally evaluated and reported on. Conspicuously absent also are gender analyses detailing connections between masculinities and men's work-related depression and suicide on which to build men-centered mental health promotion programs. This article provides an overview of four interconnected issues, (a) masculinities and men's health, (b) men and work, (c) men's work-related depression and suicide, and (d) men's mental health promotion, in the context of men's diverse relationships to work (including job insecurity and unemployment). Based on the review, recommendations are made for advancing the well-being of men who are in as well as of those out of work.

  4. Malaysian primary care doctors' views on men's health: an unresolved jigsaw puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Shaiful

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men have been noted to utilise health care services less readily then women. Primary care settings provide an opportunity to engage men in health care activities because of close proximity to the target group (men in the community. Understanding attitudes towards men's health among Malaysian primary care doctors is important for the effective delivery of health services to men. We aimed to explore the opinions and attitudes of primary care doctors (PCDs relating to men's health and help-seeking behaviour. Methods A qualitative approach to explore the opinions of 52 PCDs was employed, using fourteen in-depth interviews and eight focus group discussions in public and private settings. Purposive sampling of PCDs was done to ensure maximum variation in the PCD sample. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Open coding with thematic analysis was used to identify key issues raised in the interview. Results The understanding of the concept of men's health among PCDs was fragmented. Although many PCDs were already managing health conditions relevant and common to men, they were not viewed by PCDs as "men's health". Less attention was paid to men's help-seeking behaviour and their gender roles as a potential determinant of the poor health status of men. There were opposing views about whether men's health should focus on men's overall health or a more focused approach to sexual health. There was also disagreement about whether special attention was warranted for men's health services. Some doctors would prioritise more common conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. Conclusions The concept of men's health was new to PCDs in Malaysia. There was wide variation in understanding and opposing attitudes towards men's health among primary care doctors. Creating awareness and having a systematic approach would facilitate PCDs in delivering health service to men.

  5. Malaysian primary care doctors' views on men's health: an unresolved jigsaw puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun; Ismail, Shaiful Bahari; Trevena, Lyndal; Willcock, Simon

    2011-05-12

    Men have been noted to utilise health care services less readily then women. Primary care settings provide an opportunity to engage men in health care activities because of close proximity to the target group (men in the community). Understanding attitudes towards men's health among Malaysian primary care doctors is important for the effective delivery of health services to men. We aimed to explore the opinions and attitudes of primary care doctors (PCDs) relating to men's health and help-seeking behaviour. A qualitative approach to explore the opinions of 52 PCDs was employed, using fourteen in-depth interviews and eight focus group discussions in public and private settings. Purposive sampling of PCDs was done to ensure maximum variation in the PCD sample. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Open coding with thematic analysis was used to identify key issues raised in the interview. The understanding of the concept of men's health among PCDs was fragmented. Although many PCDs were already managing health conditions relevant and common to men, they were not viewed by PCDs as "men's health". Less attention was paid to men's help-seeking behaviour and their gender roles as a potential determinant of the poor health status of men. There were opposing views about whether men's health should focus on men's overall health or a more focused approach to sexual health. There was also disagreement about whether special attention was warranted for men's health services. Some doctors would prioritise more common conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. The concept of men's health was new to PCDs in Malaysia. There was wide variation in understanding and opposing attitudes towards men's health among primary care doctors. Creating awareness and having a systematic approach would facilitate PCDs in delivering health service to men.

  6. Latino men's qualitative perspectives on a lay health advisor intervention to promote their sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kimberly G; Downs, Mario; Alonzo, Jorge; Daniel-Ulloa, Jason; Rhodes, Scott D

    2015-05-01

    Lay health advisor (LHA) approaches are a promising strategy to reduce health disparities among communities considered 'hard to reach' by researchers and practitioners. LHAs have addressed a variety of health issues, but limited studies have included men as LHAs. The purpose of this study was to better understand the roles of male LHAs and their male-helping relationships. We used an inductive approach to explore Latino men's perspectives on serving as LHAs for other Latino men and Latino men's views on receiving sexual health information from a male LHA. We collected qualitative data in 2009 and 2010 as part of an LHA intervention designed to reduce the risk of HIV infection among immigrant Latinos through the social networks of soccer teams. We analysed and interpreted data from 30 in-depth interviews with Latino men who served as LHAs and their social networks in North Carolina, USA. Participants shared perceptions on social network importance for immigrant Latinos, facilitators and challenges of helping other men, recommendations for intervention modification and suggestions for future work involving the Latino community. Findings revealed that Latino men are receptive to fulfilling the roles of health advisors and opinion leaders, and can effectively serve as LHAs. Social network members valued the social support they received. Working through sports teams and identifying existing leaders to be LHAs may be a culturally congruent approach to meeting Latino community needs. More research is needed on the potential of male LHAs to address other health issues. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Access to health care and religion among young American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, R Frank; Jarrett, Nicole; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate cultural correlates of utilization of primary health services by young adult men, we investigated religion in which one was raised and service utilization. Using data from a national survey we tested the hypothesis that religion raised predicts access to and utilization of a regular medical care provider, examinations, HIV and other STD testing and counseling at ages 18-44 years in men born between 1958 and 1984. We also hypothesized that religion raised would be more predictive of utilization for Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic Black Americans than for non-Hispanic White Americans. The study included a national sample of 4276 men aged 18-44 years. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to assess the hypotheses using data on religion raised and responses to 14 items assessing health care access and utilization. Compared to those raised in no religion, those raised mainline Protestant were more likely (p Religion raised was not associated with testicular exams, STD counseling or HIV testing. In multivariate analyses controlling for confounders, significant associations of religion raised with insurance coverage, a physician as usual source of care and physical examination remained which varied by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, although religion is a core aspect of culture that deserves further study as a possible determinant of health care utilization, we were not able to document any consistent pattern of significant association even in a population with high rates of religious participation.

  8. Science and scepticism: Drug information, young men and counterpublic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Adrian; Fraser, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    It is perhaps no surprise that young people can be sceptical of the drug-related information they receive in school-based health education, health promotion and the media. Significant societal anxiety surrounds young people's drug consumption, so it is tempting to approach this scepticism as a problem to be solved. In this article, we look closely at a group of young Australian men (n = 25), all of whom hold deeply sceptical views about the drug information they received in schools, social marketing campaigns and public speech generally. We do not approach their scepticism as a problem to be solved in itself, however. Instead, we analyse its origins and how it relates to the way knowledge is constructed in drug education, health promotion and media accounts of drug use. To conceptualise this scepticism, we draw on Irwin and Michael's analysis of the changing relationship between science and society, Warner's theorisation of publics and counterpublics, and Race's related notion of 'counterpublic health'. The article organises the data into three key themes: scepticism about the accuracy of the claims made about drug risks and dangers, scepticism about representations of drug users, and scepticism about the motivations behind the health messages and drug policy in general. We then draw these different aspects of scepticism together to argue that the young men can be seen to constitute a health 'counterpublic', and we consider the implications of this approach, arguing for what has been described as a more diplomatic engagement between science and publics.

  9. Rural Men's Health, Health Information Seeking, and Gender Identities: A Conceptual Theoretical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Bradley; Leipert, Beverly; Regan, Sandra; Burkell, Jacquelyn

    2016-05-11

    Beginning as early as 2009, recent shifts in Canadian health care delivery indicate that access to health information is essential to promote and maintain a healthy population. It is important to understand how and where various populations, such as underresourced rural populations, access health information so that public health agencies can develop and deliver appropriate information with, for, and in these contexts. There is a paucity of research that specifically examines how rural Canadian men seek health information; therefore, this review aimed to conceptualize this process based on three dynamic key constructs: health patterns of rural Canadians, health information-seeking behaviors, and rural gender identities. This conceptual theoretical literature review included 91 articles at the intersection of these three constructs. Discussion focuses on how residing in a rural region influences men's health and health care access. Health information-seeking behaviors are discussed in terms of social networks and framed with a rural context. Connell's theory of masculinity provides a useful approach to dissecting how rural men's gender identities influence their health attitudes, and how such attitudes are embedded in rural social and cultural norms. Each major construct-health in rural Canada, health information seeking, and rural gender identities-is discussed to highlight how specific embodiments of masculinity may promote and inhibit men's health information-seeking and positive health behaviors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. [Violence and mental suffering among men in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Fernando Pessoa de; Barros, Claudia Renata dos Santos; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the association between male mental health problems and violence experienced. Cross sectional study with 477 males aged between 18 and 60, users of two primary healthcare centers in Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. The selection for the sample was based on a sequentiality criterion, according to the order of arrival of the users. Sociodemographic and health characteristics and reports of having experienced violence at any time and/or having witnessed violence in childhood were collected. Information was also collected on the use of mental health services and/or psychological complaints/diagnoses during consultation at medical clinics by reading medical records, to categorize the dependent variable "mental suffering". The variables were described as absolute and relative frequencies. The association was tested using a confirmatory Poisson model with robust variance adjusted for age, marital status, education, violence witnessed in childhood and psychoactive substance use. The prevalence of mental suffering was 29.4%. Mental suffering was associated with experiencing repeated physical and/or sexual violence (RP 1.75, 95%CI 1.13;2.72). The association with a single episode of violence lost significance after the inclusion of psychoactive substance use in the model. Analysis of the fraction attributable to repetitive physical and/or sexual violence for the mental suffering of the men, verified it as 30.4%. The relationship between violence and mental suffering, already highlighted in studies with women, is also relevant to men's health, drawing attention to the similar need of identification, in the health services, of situations of violence experienced by the male population. For men, this relationship was shown to be influenced by the presence of psychoactive substance use; a situation which must be dealt with, more and in a better way, by the health care service.

  11. The Effect of Floorball Training on Health Status, Psychological Health and Social Capital in Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan M. Wikman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76 were randomized into a group playing floorball (n = 22 or a group playing petanque (n = 17 one hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Both groups filled out the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS before and after the 12-week intervention. Linear regression analyses with bootstrapping showed that the men in the floorball group improved in the SF-12 composite score for mental health, as well as the HADS subscales anxiety and depression, compared to the men in the petanque group. In addition, 21 interviews were conducted with a sample of the men engaged in floorball. According to the statements in the interviews, the men in the floorball group experienced a high degree of solidarity and group cohesion which seemed to have increased their social capital during the intervention. In particular, the fun and joyful experiences of playing led to a high degree of social connectedness, which were mentioned by many of the men as the main reason for their participation throughout the 12-week period. The statistical results and the interview findings suggest that participation in a ball game such as floorball has several benefits regarding health status, psychological health and social capital and in addition that playing floorball is experienced as enjoyable amongst older men. Thus, it can be concluded that floorball is an activity that benefits older men and should be provided in relevant contexts, such as e.g. sport clubs or centres for seniors.

  12. Alternative Locales for the Health Promotion of African American Men: A Survey of African American Men in Chicago Barbershops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A B; Moore, N J; Wright, M; Gipson, J; Keeter, M; Cornelious, T; Reed, D; Russell, J; Watson, K S; Murray, M

    2017-02-01

    African American men (AA) carry unequal burdens of several conditions including cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and HIV. Engagement of diverse populations including AA men in research and health promotion practice is vital to examining the health disparities that continue to plague many racially and ethnically diverse communities. To date, there is little research on best practices that indicate locations, community areas and settings to engage AA men in research and health promotion. Traditionally, the AA church has been a key area to engage AA men and women. However, changing tides in attendance of AA parishioners require additional information to identify areas where AAs, particularly, AA men congregate. The AA barbershop has been identified as a place of social cohesion, cultural immersion and solidarity for AA men but specific sub-populations of AA men may be underrepresented. To further investigate additional locales where AA men congregate, this study engaged AA barbers and clients in several urban community barbershops in Chicago, Illinois. 127 AA men over age 18y/o receiving grooming services in 25 Chicago area barbershops across 14 predominantly AA communities were consented and recruited for a quantitative survey study. The self-administered surveys were completed in ~15 min and $10 compensation was provided to men. Descriptive statistics were reported for demographic variables and for frequency of responses for locations to find AA men of specific age ranges for health promotion and screening activities. Outside of the traditionally used churches or barbershops, the top recommended recruitment sites by age were: 18-29y/o- city park or a recreational center; 30-39y/o- gym, bars or the street; 40-49y/o- various stores, especially home improvement stores, and the mall; and 50y/o+- fast food restaurants in the mornings, such as McDonalds, and individual's homes. The study participants also reported that locations where AA men congregate vary by age

  13. Health Information-Seeking Practices of African American Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, India D.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Annang, Lucy; Lindley, Lisa L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study used a qualitative, phenomenological approach to investigate the health information-seeking practices of African American young men who have sex with men (AAYMSM). Forty-two self-identified AAYMSM, aged 18 to 21, residing in a Southeastern U.S. city participated in a qualitative focus group or face-to-face interview to examine…

  14. Mental health outcomes in elderly men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Praful; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Roghmann, Florian; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Choueiri, Toni K; Menon, Mani; McKay, Rana R; Nguyen, Paul L; Sammon, Jesse D; Sukumar, Shyam; Varda, Briony; Chang, Steven L; Kibel, Adam S; Sun, Maxine; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2014-11-01

    To examine the burden of mental health issues (MHI), namely anxiety, depressive disorders, and suicide, in a population-based cohort of older men with localized prostate cancer and to evaluate associations with primary treatment modality. A total of 50,856 men, who were 65 years of age or older with clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed between 1992 and 2005 and without a diagnosis of mental illness at baseline, were abstracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. The primary outcome of interest was the development of MHI (anxiety, major depressive disorder, depressive disorder not elsewhere classified, neurotic depression, adjustment disorder with depressed mood, and suicide) after the diagnosis of prostate cancer. A total of 10,389 men (20.4%) developed MHI during the study period. Independent risk factors for MHI included age ≥ 75 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.29); higher comorbidity (Charlson comorbidity index ≥ 3, HR = 1.63); rural hospital location (HR = 1.14); being single, divorced, or widowed (HR = 1.12); later year of diagnosis (HR = 1.05); and urinary incontinence (HR = 1.47). Black race (HR = 0.79), very high-income status (HR = 0.87), and definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy [RP], HR = 0.79; radiotherapy [RT], HR= 0.85, all Pmen undergoing watchful waiting (WW), RT, and RP, respectively. Older men with localized prostate cancer had a significant burden of MHI. Men treated with RP or RT were at a lower risk of developing MHI, compared with those undergoing WW, with median time to development of MHI being significantly greater in those undergoing RP compared with those undergoing RT or WW. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Parental alienation: the impact on men's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo

    2015-11-13

    Parental alienation is defined as a mental state in which a child, usually one whose parents are engaged in a high-conflict separation or divorce, allies himself strongly with one parent (the preferred parent) and rejects a relationship with the other parent (the alienated parent) without legitimate justification. Parental alienation may affect men's mental health: a) parental alienation negatively influences mental health of male children and adolescents who are victims of parental alienation. Alienated children/adolescents display guilt, sadness, and depressed mood; low self-esteem and lack of self-confidence; distress and frustration; lack of impulse control, substance abuse and delinquent behavior; separation anxiety, fears and phobias; hypochondria and increased tendency to develop psychosomatic illness; suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; sleep and eating disorders; educational problems; enuresis and encopresis; b) parental alienation negatively affects the mental health of adult men who were victims of parental alienation when they were children and/or adolescents. Long-term effects of parental alienation include low self-esteem, depression, drug/alcohol abuse, lack of trust, alienation from own children, divorce, problems with identity and not having a sense of belonging or roots, choosing not to have children to avoid being rejected by them, low achievement, anger and bitterness over the time lost with the alienated parent; c) parental alienation negatively influences mental health of men who are alienated from their children. Fathers who have lost some or all contact with their children for months or years following separation or divorce may be depressed and suicidal.

  16. Men with disabilities - A cross sectional survey of health promotion, social inclusion and participation at community Men's Sheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Parsons, Richard; Vaz, Sharmila; Buchanan, Angus

    2016-01-01

    The intersections between chronicity, disability and social inequality are well understood. Novel ways to counter the social determinants of health and disability are needed. Men's Sheds are a community space where men can participate in a range of shared activities and potentially experience a health and social benefits. This cross-sectional survey was conducted to inform future research by determining who attended Men's Sheds and the range of health, social, community, and educational activities undertaken there. This paper explores the membership of people with disabilities (PWD) at Men's Sheds and the factors that predict their membership. An online survey link was sent to all known Men's Sheds internationally in 2012. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential (univariate and multivariate) statistics. 32.2% of international sheds and 29% of Australian sheds specifically targeted the inclusion of PWD. 80% of these sheds have significantly more members with disabilities than sheds who do no target PWD. Factors associated with greater membership of PWD included the provision of transport, social outings and promoting occupational skills. PWD are being encouraged to join and are joining Men's Sheds. This is significant as the value of participation and inclusion toward better health and wellbeing is well known. Men's Sheds offer a community space where the social determinants of chronicity and disability can potentially be countered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Social demographic aspects and self-referred health conditions of men attending a health care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissa de Oliveira Martins Cabacinha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at characterizing social demographic aspects and health conditions of men attending a Primary Family Health Care unit in Montes Claros, MG, Brazil, correlating these variables with health self-perception and identifying men’s difficulty in using the health service. 115 adult men were interviewed who had attended the service in April and May, 2013. Most of them had completed high school, were married and adopted healthy practices, although they consumed alcoholic beverages. The main complaint regarding the health service was the long waiting time for attendance. The main factors that contributed for negative self-perception of health were: being married, suffering from chronic diseases and having low education; whereas those that contributed to the positive self-perception of health were: being young, being employed and not making regular use of medication (p<0.05. Those findings can subsidize policies to prevent diseases in promoting men’s health.

  18. Experience of men in the context of Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Peres de Oliveira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To know the experience of male users' in the primary health care and to build data based theory that represents this experience. Methodology. This is a qualitative study, in which was used the reference of Grounded Theory and Symbolic Interactionism, respectively, methodological and theoretical. We interviewed 33 male users of three units of primary health care. Results. After comparative analysis of data was built the data based theory feeling excluded, which includes: living with prejudice; living with the limitations of infra-structure services; reflecting on the health service environment. The analysis showed the need for a change in logistics services and professionals' attitude guided in respectful and effective communication, the problem solving in readiness in attendance, in addressing gender issues. Conclusion. For to take care of men users of the Unified Health System and/or preserve their health, the construction of another rationality in health is imperative, based on reflection and respect for the autonomy and individuality of the male gender.

  19. Health, Anticipated Partner Infidelity, and Jealousy in Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Arnocky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Health has been identified as an important variable involved in mate choice. Unhealthy organisms are generally less able to provide reproductively important resources to partners and offspring and are more likely to pass on communicable disease. Research on human mate preferences has shown that both men and women prefer healthy mates. Yet to date, little research has examined how health relates to one’s own mating experiences. In the present study, 164 participants (87 women who were currently in heterosexual romantic relationships completed measures of frequency and severity of health problems, anticipated partner infidelity, and intensity of jealousy felt in their current relationship. Mediation analyses showed that health problems predicted greater anticipated partner infidelity and jealousy scores and that anticipated partner infidelity mediated the links between health and jealousy for both frequency and severity of health problems, controlling for both sex and relationship duration. These findings suggest that unhealthy people perceive themselves to be at a mating disadvantage, experiencing associated differences in perceptions and emotions surrounding their romantic partners’ fidelity.

  20. Readiness for health behavior changes among low fitness men in a Finnish health promotion campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Karoliina S; Kasila, Kirsti; Komulainen, Jyrki; Malvela, Miia; Poskiparta, Marita

    2016-12-01

    Men have been a hard-to-reach population in health behavior programs and it has been claimed that they are less interested in health issues than women. However, less is known about that how ready men are to adopt new health behaviors. This study examined readiness for change in physical activity (PA) and eating behavior (EB) among low fitness and overweight working-aged Finnish men who participated in a PA campaign. Associations among perceived health knowledge, health behaviors, psychosocial factors and readiness for change were studied. Data comprised 362 men aged 18-64. Physical fitness was assessed with a body fitness index constructed on the basis of the Polar OwnIndex Test, a hand grip test and an Inbody 720 body composition analysis. Health behavior information was gathered by questionnaire. Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted by χ 2 test and Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Associations between health knowledge and health behaviors were explored with logistic regression analyses. Readiness to increase PA and change EB was positively related to higher scores in psychosocial factors, PA and healthy eating habits. Self-rated knowledge on health issues was not related to PA or readiness to change health behaviors; however, it was positively associated with healthy eating and greater perceived promoters of PA. Participants' self-rated knowledge reflected not only an interest in health but also the differences in age and education. Health programs are needed that target both PA and healthy eating in low-fit men at different ages and motivational stages. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Community-based Men's Sheds: promoting male health, wellbeing and social inclusion in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Wilson, Nathan J

    2014-09-01

    Males experience greater mortality and morbidity than females in most Western countries. The Australian and Irish National Male Health Policies aim to develop a framework to address this gendered health disparity. Men's Sheds have a distinct community development philosophy and are thus identified in both policies as an ideal location to address social isolation and positively impact the health and wellbeing of males who attend. The aim of this international cross-sectional survey was to gather information about Men's Sheds, the people who attend Men's Sheds, the activities at Men's Sheds, and the social and health dimensions of Men's Sheds. Results demonstrate that Men's Sheds are contributing a dual health and social role for a range of male subgroups. In particular, Men's Sheds have an outward social focus, supporting the social and mental health needs of men; health promotion and health literacy are key features of Men's Sheds. Men's Sheds have an important role to play in addressing the gendered health disparity that males face. They serve as an exemplar to health promotion professionals of a community development context where the aims of male health policy can be actualized as one part of a wider suite of global initiatives to reduce the gendered health disparity. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Health Profiles and Profile Specific Health Expectancies of Older Women and Men: The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deeg, D.J.; Portrait, F.R.M.; Lindeboom, M.

    2002-01-01

    This study focuses on gender differences in health profiles, and examines which health profiles drive gender differences in remaining life expectancy in women and men aged 65 and over in The Netherlands. Data from the first two cycles of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (n = 2,141 and 1,659,

  3. Physicians and Counselors Collaborate on Men's Avoidance of Mental Health Counseling Services: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey Maurice

    Limited literature exists describing the melding of philosophies aimed at increasing men's use of mental health counseling services. Members of the mental health counseling profession will benefit from collaborating with other health care professional to conceptualize alternative means to encourage men to use mental health counseling services.…

  4. 'Clinics aren't meant for men': sexual health care access and seeking behaviours among men in Gauteng province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Friedman, Allison L; Habel, Melissa A; Vezi, Alex; Sello, Martha; Farirai, Thato; Lewis, David A

    2011-01-01

    Men may be key players in the transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STI), and it is important that STI/HIV health services reach men. The objective of this study was to explore sexual health care access and seeking behaviours in men. This study used focus groups to examine sexual health care access and seeking behaviours in men 5 years after implementation of free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the South African public sector. Six focus groups (N=58) were conducted with men ≫18 years in an urban area of Gauteng province. Men were recruited from various locations throughout the community. Men reported several barriers and facilitators to the use of public and private clinics for sexual health services including HIV testing, and many men reported seeking care from traditional healers. Men often viewed public clinics as a place for women and reported experiences with some female nurses who were rude or judgmental of the men. Additionally, some men reported that they sought sexual health care services at public clinics; however, they were not given physical examinations by health care providers to diagnose their STI syndrome. Most men lacked knowledge about ART and avoided HIV testing because of fear of death or being abandoned by their families or friends. Study findings suggest that men still require better access to high-quality, non-judgmental sexual health care services. Future research is needed to determine the most effective method to increase men's access to sexual health care services.

  5. Prostate cancer support groups, health literacy and consumerism: are community-based volunteers re-defining older men's health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; McKenzie, Michael M; Hislop, T Gregory; Gerbrandt, Julieta S; Oglov, Valerie

    2011-11-01

    In this article we describe the connections between prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) and men's health literacy and consumer orientation to health care services. The study findings are drawn from participant observations conducted at 16 PCSGs in British Columbia, Canada and 54 individual interviews that focused on men's experiences of attending group meetings. Men's communication and interactions at PCSGs provide important insights for how men talk about and conceptualize health and illness. For example, biomedical language often predominated at group meetings, and men used numbers and measures to engage with risk discourses in linking prostate cancer markers to various treatment options and morbidity and mortality rates. Many groups afforded opportunities for men to interact with health care providers as a means to better understand the language and logic of prostate cancer management. The health literacy skills fostered at PCSGs along with specific group-informed strategies could be mobilized in the men's subsequent clinical consultations. Consumer discourses and strategies to contest power relations with health care professionals underpinned many men's search for prostate cancer information and their commitment to assisting other men. Key were patients' rights, and perhaps responsibility, to compare diverse health products and services in making decisions across the entire trajectory of their prostate cancer. Overall, the study findings reveal PCSGs as having the capacity to contest as well as align with medical expertise and services facilitating men's transition from patient to informed health care consumers. The processes through which this occurs may direct the design of older men's health promotion programs.

  6. The relationship between homosexuality, internalized homo-negativity, and mental health in men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, B R Simon; Bockting, Walter O; Ross, Michael W; Miner, Michael H; Coleman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Whether homosexuality or internalized homo-negativity is the critical variable affecting the mental health of men who have sex with men has long been debated. As part of a larger study, 422 Midwestern homosexual men completed questionnaires examining degree of homosexuality, internalized homo-negativity, and depression. Logistic regression modeling identified internalized homo-negativity, but not degree of homosexuality, as significantly associated with greater adjustment depression (OR = 1.5), major depression (OR = 2.6), dysthymia (OR = 1.5), and likelihood of being in therapy (OR = 1.4). Internalized homo-negativity was also negatively associated with overall sexual health, psychosexual maturation, comfort with sexual orientation, "outness," and peer socialization. Internalized homo-negativity, not homosexuality, appears associated with negative health outcomes. Providers should promote sexual health and avoid interventions that reinforce internalized homo-negativity.

  7. Profile of diabetes in men aged 79-97 years: the Western Australian Health in Men Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, M; Alfonso, H; Flicker, L; George, J; Chubb, S A P; Hankey, G J; Almeida, O P; Golledge, J; Norman, P E; Yeap, B B

    2017-06-01

    To investigate behavioural, physical and biochemical characteristics associated with diabetes in the oldest age group of elderly men. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of community-dwelling men aged 79-97 years from Perth, Western Australia. Lifestyle behaviours, self-rated health, physical function, and fasting glucose and HbA 1c levels were assessed. Of 1426 men, 315 had diabetes (22%). Men with diabetes were of similar age to men without (84.9 vs 84.5 years; P = 0.14). Only 26.5% of men with diabetes self-rated their health as excellent or very good, compared with 40.6% of men without diabetes (P < 0.001). Diabetes was associated with less involvement with recreational walking (32.7 vs 41.0%; P < 0.01) and leisure activities (19.0 vs 26.5%; P < 0.01). Men with diabetes had poorer physical function on multiple measures, including longer times for the Timed Up-and-Go test (15.0 ± 6.9 s vs 13.4 ± 5.3 s; P < 0.001) and weaker knee extension (20.2 vs 21.9 kg; P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, diabetes was associated with an increased prevalence of myocardial infarction (odds ratio 1.80, 95% CI 1.25-2.60; P < 0.001) and falls resulting in injury (odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.06-2.26; P = 0.02). Average HbA 1c was 49 ± 8 mmol/mol (6.6 ± 0.8%) in men with diabetes, with 90.6% of these men on diet or oral hypoglycaemic therapy. In older men, diabetes is associated with poorer self-perceived health, reduced healthy lifestyle behaviours and physical function, heart disease and injurious falls. The majority of these men with diabetes had good glycaemic control. Encouraging healthy lifestyle behaviours and improving physical function should be evaluated as interventions to improve quality-of-life and health outcomes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  8. Health insurance and diabetes among multiracial men: the mediation effects of usual source of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Julia F; Hawkins, Jaclynn

    2010-09-01

    Health insurance and having a usual source of care is important in diabetes management for multiethnic men. Few studies focus on determining whether usual source of care mediates the association between health insurance and diabetes among men. Using data from the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, responses from 17,472 men were analyzed to examine the extent to which a usual source of health care mediates the relationship between health insurance and diabetes. Sobel-Goodman tests for mediation indicated the largest effects between Latino and White men. For African American and Asian men, usual source of care did not serve as a significant mediation factor between health insurance and diabetes. Findings highlight a need for more research on the importance of having a usual source of care along with consistent health insurance type for multiracial men.

  9. Health Improvement for Men and Hard-to-Engage-Men Delivered in English Premier League Football Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Andy; Zwolinsky, Stephen; McKenna, James; Robertson, Steven; Daly-Smith, Andy; White, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviours represent modifiable causes of non-communicable disease. In men, concern focuses on those (i) demonstrating the poorest health, exacerbated by a lack of awareness of the risks that their lifestyles pose and (ii) who neither consult their doctor nor use health services. Classed as "hard-to-engage", distinctive…

  10. The Koorie Men's Health Day: an innovative model for early detection of mental illness among rural Aboriginal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Anton; Lampitt, Berwyn

    2014-02-01

    To describe the design, implementation and outcomes of an innovative model for the early detection of mental illness among rural Aboriginal men. Through a collaborative effort between a University' Department of Rural and Indigenous Health, an Aboriginal organisation and a regional mental health service, an all-male team was set up which consisted of a doctor, a mental health nurse and four key individuals from the local Aboriginal community. Invitations to attend a Koorie Men's Health Day were distributed via flyers and posters. Using an assembly line technique and avoiding any reference to the term 'mental', all participants underwent a complete medical examination, a blood test for diabetes and a psychological assessment using the Kessler-10 schedule. The event was attended by 20 men. Of the 17 participants whose data were available, seven scored significantly (25 or higher) on the psychological assessment and were offered follow-up. When conducted on a regular basis, the Koorie Men's Health Day could be a useful method for the early detection of mental illness among rural Aboriginal men in Australia. Further research is needed to study the feasibility and sustainability of the model in different settings.

  11. Health literacy and health seeking behavior among older men in a middle-income nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Bourne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Bourne1, Chloe Morris1, Christopher AD Charles2, Denise Eldemire-Shearer1, Maureen D Kerr-Campbell3, Tazhmoye V Crawford41Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, 4Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica; 2Systems Development Unit, Main Library, Faculty of Humanities and Education, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica; 3King Graduate School, Monroe College, 2375 Jerome Avenue, Bronx, New York 10468 and Center for Victim Support, Harlem Hospital Center, New York, USAAbstract: Health literacy is a measure of the patient’s ability to read, comprehend and act on medical instructions. This research article examines health literacy and health-seeking behaviors among elderly men in Jamaica, in order to inform health policy. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. A 133-item questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 2,000 men, 55 years and older, in St Catherine, Jamaica. In this study, 56.9% of urban and 44.5% of rural residents were health literate. Only 34.0% of participants purchased medications prescribed by the medical doctor and 19.8% were currently smoking. Despite the reported good self-related health status (74.4% and high cognitive functionality (94.1% of the older men, only 7.9% sought medical care outside of experiencing illnesses. Thirty-seven percent of rural participants sought medical care when they were ill compared with 31.9% of their urban counterparts. Thirty-four percent of the participants took the medication as prescribed by the medical doctor; 43% self-reported being diagnosed with cancers such as prostate and colorectal in the last 6 months, 9.6% with hypertension, 5.3% with heart disease, 5.3% with benign prostatic hyperplasia, 5.3% with diabetes mellitus, and 3.8% with kidney/bladder problems. Approximately 14% and 24% of the participants indicated that they were unaware of the signs and symptoms of hypertension

  12. Health-related physical fitness in healthy untrained men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanović, Zoran; Pantelić, Saša; Sporiš, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recreational soccer (SOC) compared to moderate-intensity continuous running (RUN) on all health-related physical fitness components in healthy untrained men. Sixty-nine participants were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups...... weeks and consisted of three 60-min sessions per week. All participants were tested for each of the following physical fitness components: maximal aerobic power, minute ventilation, maximal heart rate, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump with arm swing (CMJ), sit-and-reach flexibility, and body...... improvements in maximal aerobic power after 12 weeks of soccer training and moderate-intensity running, partly due to large decreases in body mass. Additionally soccer training induced pronounced positive effects on jump performance and flexibility, making soccer an effective broad-spectrum fitness training...

  13. Integrating men's health and masculinity theories to explain colorectal cancer screening behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Mosher, Catherine E; Rawl, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. Although CRC screening has been found to reduce CRC incidence and mortality, current screening rates among men are suboptimal due to various practical and psychosocial barriers. One potential barrier to CRC screening identified in qualitative studies with men is the threat to masculinity that endoscopic screening methods pose. Indeed, beliefs about masculinity have been predictive of other preventive health behaviors among men. In this review article, we propose a novel conceptual framework to explain men's CRC screening behavior that integrates masculinity norms, gender role conflict, men's health care experiences, behaviors, and beliefs, and social and background variables. This framework has the potential to guide future research on men's CRC screening behaviors and other health behaviors and may inform gender-sensitive interventions that target masculinity beliefs to increase preventive health behaviors.

  14. Disclosure and Concealment of Sexual Orientation and the Mental Health of Non-Gay-Identified, Behaviorally Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Siegel, Karolynn; Downing, Martin J., Jr.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although bisexual men report lower levels of mental health relative to gay men, few studies have examined the factors that contribute to bisexual men's mental health. Bisexual men are less likely to disclose, and more likely to conceal (i.e., a desire to hide), their sexual orientation than gay men. Theory suggests that this may…

  15. Cultural Variables Underlying Obesity in Latino Men: Design, Rationale and Participant Characteristics from the Latino Men's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Craven, Meredith; Nava, Magdalena; Alonso, Angelica; Dykema-Engblade, Amanda; Rademaker, Alfred; Xie, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with significant health problems and rates of obesity are high among Latino men. This paper describes the design, rationale and participant characteristics of the key demographic variables assessed in an NIH-funded study (R21-CA143636) addressing culture and several obesity-related variables (diet, physical activity, and body image) among Mexican and Puerto Rican men using a community-based participatory research framework. Participants completed objective measures (height, weight, body fat, hip, waist), a health and culture interview, a diet questionnaire, and used an accelerometer to measure their level of physical activity. A total of 203 participants completed the measures and the health and culture interview and 193 completed all study components. Puerto Ricans were older than Mexicans (p cultural factors into a community participatory obesity intervention for Latino men.

  16. Visible and Invisible Trends in Black Men's Health: Pitfalls and Promises for Addressing Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Inequities in Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Keon L; Ray, Rashawn; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Shetty, Shivan; Baker, Elizabeth A; Elder, Keith; Griffith, Derek M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been growing interest in improving black men's health and the health disparities affecting them. Yet, the health of black men consistently ranks lowest across nearly all groups in the United States. Evidence on the health and social causes of morbidity and mortality among black men has been narrowly concentrated on public health problems (e.g., violence, prostate cancer, and HIV/AIDS) and determinants of health (e.g., education and male gender socialization). This limited focus omits age-specific leading causes of death and other social determinants of health, such as discrimination, segregation, access to health care, employment, and income. This review discusses the leading causes of death for black men and the associated risk factors, as well as identifies gaps in the literature and presents a racialized and gendered framework to guide efforts to address the persistent inequities in health affecting black men.

  17. Strengthening HIV health care services for men who have sex with men in coastal Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes work with Kenyan men who have sex with men (MSM) who are highly stigmatized and discriminated against in society, and have not been targeted in HIV prevention programming until recently. Initial work included a size estimation of MSM who sell sex in coastal Kenya in 2006, and a

  18. "Men's health--a little in the shadow": a formative evaluation of medical curriculum enhancement with men's health teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Carol A; Collins, Veronica R; Anderson, Christopher J; Pomeroy, Sylvia; Turner, Richard; Canny, Benedict J; Yeap, Bu B; Wittert, Gary; McLachlan, Rob I

    2015-11-26

    Enhancing a medical school curriculum with new men's health teaching and learning requires an understanding of the local capacity and the facilitators and barriers to implementing new content, and an approach that accommodates the systemic and cultural differences between medical schools. A formative evaluation was undertaken to determine the perspectives of key informants (academics, curriculum developers) from four Australian medical schools about the strategies needed to enhance their curriculum with men's health teaching and learning. Through semi-structured questioning with 17 key informants, interviewees also described the contextual barriers and facilitators to incorporating new topic areas into existing curriculum. Interviews were recorded with consent, transcribed verbatim, and analysed by two researchers to identify key themes. Interviewees were enthusiastic about incorporating men's health content through a men's health curriculum framework but highlighted the need for systems to assist in identifying gaps in their current curriculum where the men's health topics could be integrated. The student experience was identified as a key driver for men's health teaching and learning. Furthermore, core men's health clinical outcomes needed to be defined and topic areas vertically integrated across the curricula. This would ensure that students were appropriately equipped with the skills and knowledge for subsequent clinical practice in a range of geographical settings. Interviewees consistently suggested that the best implementation strategy is to have someone 'on the ground' to work directly with medical school staff and champion the men's health discipline. Providing mechanisms for sharing knowledge and resources across medical schools was highlighted to facilitate implementation, particularly for those medical schools with limited men's health teaching resources. Despite the unanimous support for men's health teaching and learning, the evaluation highlighted

  19. What Do Men Want from a Health Screening Mobile App? A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, Chin Hai; Ng, Chirk Jenn; White, Alan

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of mobile app which aims to improve health screening uptake developed for men. As part of the study to develop an effective mobile app to increase health screening uptake in men, we conducted a needs assessment to find out what do men want from a health screening mobile app. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 31 men from a banking institution in Kuala Lumpur. The participants were purposely sampled according to their job position, age, ethnicit...

  20. [Brazilian men's integral health attention: using indicators for monitoring health's promotion and attention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Erly Catarina de; Lima, Aline Maria Peixoto; Urdaneta, Margarita

    2012-10-01

    This article presents and discusses the initial actions of Brazilian National Men's Health Policy (PNAISH) concerning indicators used for monitoring promotion and assistance actions of men's health. This multiple case study was developed among five Brazilian cities which had implanted the PNAISH: (Goiânia (GO), Joinville (SC), Petrolina (PE), Rio Branco (AC) and Rio de Janeiro (RJ). A questionnaire was applied to verify the use of data and information required to calculate the indicators recommended by the PNAISH, concerning health's promotion, implementation and expansion of the men's health assistance system, according to the planned goals contained in the cities' local action plans. The results revealed a critical situation concerning monitoring of the activities through the proposed indicators taking into account the lack of standardized procedures to calculate them. Another specific limitation encountered was the limited access to or availability of data by age and sex in the health information systems. These results point out a lack of necessary indicators to define a base line situation, which weakens the systematic monitoring and future evaluation of the actions.

  1. Metabolic health across the BMI spectrum in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jordan E; Li, Xiuhong; Palella, Frank J; Erlandson, Kristine M; Wiley, Dorothy; Kingsley, Lawrence; Jacobson, Lisa P; Brown, Todd T

    2018-01-02

    In the general population, metabolic health often declines as BMI increases. However, some obese individuals maintain metabolic health. HIV and antiretroviral therapy have been associated with metabolic disturbances. We hypothesized that HIV-infected (HIV) men on suppressive antiretroviral therapy experience less metabolic health than HIV-uninfected (HIV) men across all BMI categories. In a cross-sectional analysis of 1018 HIV and 1092 HIV men enrolled in the multicenter AIDS cohort study, Poisson regression with robust variance determined associations between HIV serostatus and metabolic health prevalence (defined as meeting ≤2 of 5 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III metabolic syndrome criteria), adjusting for age, race, BMI category, smoking, and hepatitis C virus infection status. HIV men were younger (54 vs. 59 years) and had lower median BMI (25 vs. 27 kg/m). Nonobese HIV men had lower metabolic health prevalence than HIV men (BMI ≤25 kg/m: 80 vs. 94%, P BMI 25-29 kg/m: 64 vs. 71%, P = 0.05), but metabolic health prevalence among obese men did not differ by HIV serostatus (BMI 30-34 kg/m: 35 vs. 39%, P = 0.48; BMI ≥35 kg/m: 27 vs. 25%, P = 0.79). In the adjusted model, nonobese HIV men were less likely to demonstrate metabolic health than nonobese HIV men. Among HIV men, per year darunavir, zidovudine, and stavudine use were associated with lower metabolic health likelihood. Metabolically healthy obesity prevalence does not differ by HIV serostatus. However, among nonobese men, HIV infection is associated with lower metabolic health prevalence, with associations between lack of metabolic health and darunavir and thymidine analog nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure observed.

  2. Engaging men as promotores de salud: perceptions of community health workers among Latino men in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Torres, Laura; Fleming, Paul J; Barrington, Clare

    2015-02-01

    The promotor de salud, or community health worker (CHW) role, is highly feminized and little is known about how men view their participation in CHW programs. We conducted in-depth interviews with Latino men in North Carolina to explore this gap. We used systematic coding and display procedures informed by Grounded Theory to analyze the data. Men described their communities as lacking cohesion, making integration of Latino immigrants difficult. Most did not consider themselves leaders or feel they had leaders in their communities. Their perceptions of the feminized CHW role as well as the volunteer or low-paid nature of CHW work conflicted with men's provider role. They also did not think they could perform the CHW role because they lacked education, skills, and broad networks. Efforts to increase male participation in CHW programs in new Latino immigrant destinations will need to understand and address these gender and migration-related dynamics in order to engage both women and men in improving the health of their communities.

  3. Men report good mental health 20 to 23 years after in vitro fertilisation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydsjö, Gunilla; Vikström, Josefin; Bladh, Marie; Jablonowska, Barbara; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta

    2015-11-25

    Infertility and infertility treatment are known to have negative short-term psychological consequences for men and women, with more long-term consequences for women. The long-term wellbeing and mental health of men who have experienced in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment has not been extensively described in the literature. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the mental health of men 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment. The Symptom Checklist 90 tool was used to assess the self-perceived mental health of men who were part of a couple that underwent IVF treatment at Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, 20 to 23 years earlier. We enrolled 292 out of the 490 men who took part in the hospital's IVF programme from 1986 to 1989 and compared them to an aged-matched control group. In addition, the men who had remained childless were compared to those who had fathered biological children and those who had adopted children. The overall mental health of the men who had received IVF was good. We found that 54% of the men had fathered their own biological children, 21% were childless and the remainder were part of a couple that had gone on to adopt. The childless men displayed more mental health problems than the other men in the study, as did men who were unemployed, single or divorced. This study carried out 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment showed that the majority of the men who took part were in good mental health. Those who remained childless faced an increased risk of negative psychological symptoms and men who were single showed more symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders.

  4. Reports on boys', youth's and men's health in Canadian newspapers: Now what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth Santos; Byam, Aaron Andrew; Solomon, Donna; Jalili, Katayoon; Haag, Carlos; Tallarico, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Background: This media content analysis explored the Canadian newspapers reporting on men's health, and their contribution to public understanding of the social determinants of men's health and lifestyles. Methods: A media content analysis of 44 news articles on boys', youth's and men's health,published from 2010 to 2014 by three national newspapers (The Globe and Mail, National Post,and Metro News). Results: Data indicated that the predominant discourse consists of informative and awareness messages, mostly about men's prostate and sexual health. Very little health news content referred to working conditions, education and income, all of which are significant social determinants of health (SDH). This may reflect the current state of health research, which does not adequately incorporate the effects of these determinants. It may also indicate a reproduction of dominant health knowledge and understanding of masculinity. Little content was found on policy solutions to other publicized health issues, such as limited access to health services or inter-sectoral collaborations; this reflects a lack of government action and a lack of citizen engagement toward the creation of a concerted men's health policy. Conclusion: Despite the acknowledged importance of the media in promoting access to health information and indirectly contributing to improve the general public's level of health literacy, it is also necessary to remember that there must be a greater attention to the structural constraints imposed by socioeconomic inequalities. Future studies should explore media discourses about men's unequal access to health care services and citizens' awareness of ways to overcome those inequalities shortcomings.

  5. How do we improve men's mental health via primary care? An evaluation of the Atlas Men's Well-being Pilot Programme for stressed/distressed men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Anna; Peters, David; Ridge, Damien

    2016-02-02

    Over three-quarters of all suicides are men (England and Wales), this is despite higher levels of anxiety and depression being reported by women. This disparity may in part be explained by atypical presentations of distress in men, and gendered issues around help-seeking. Consequently, the Atlas Men's Well-being Programme was designed to engage stressed/distressed men who were patients at a London-based GP surgery. Atlas encouraged GPs to identify and refer men for counselling and/or acupuncture by raising their awareness of men's distress. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate Atlas in terms of patients' characteristics, service utilisation, patient outcomes and cost implications. All patients using the Programme were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after their Atlas sessions. Outcome measures included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, Perceived Stress Scale, Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, a 11-point scale measuring physical health, and the Psychological Outcome Profiles (PSYCHLOPS), a patient-generated outcome measure. Additionally, for cost calculations, participants were asked about their employment, number of days off work due to illness, and their health and social care service use. 102 participants were recruited, 82 completed pre- and post-treatment questionnaires. Comparisons pre- and post-treatment revealed a statistically significant improvement in anxious mood (p well-being (p = mental and physical health, and demonstrated likely cost savings. It is now important to understand patient and stakeholder perspectives. Further research could compare usual care with the Atlas approach, and investigate full cost-effectiveness.

  6. Hormonal changes and their impact on cognition and mental health of ageing men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Bu B

    2014-10-01

    Demographic changes resulting in ageing of the world's population have major implications for health. As men grow older, circulating levels of the principal androgen or male sex hormone testosterone (T) decline, while the prevalence of ill-health increases. Observational studies in middle-aged and older men have shown associations between lower levels of T and poorer mental health in older men, including worse cognitive performance, dementia and presence of depressive symptoms. The role of T metabolites, the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the oestrogen receptor ligand estradiol (E2) in the pathophysiology of cognitive decline are unclear. Studies of men undergoing androgen deprivation therapy in the setting of prostate cancer have shown subtle detrimental effects of reduced T levels on cognitive performance. Randomised trials of T supplementation in older men have been limited in size and produced variable results, with some studies showing improvement in specific tests of cognitive function. Interventional data from trials of T therapy in men with dementia are limited. Lower levels of T have also been associated with depressive symptoms in older men. Some studies have reported an effect of T therapy to improve mood and depressive symptoms in men with low or low-normal T levels. T supplementation should be considered in men with a diagnosis of androgen deficiency. Beyond this clinical indication, further research is needed to establish the benefits of T supplementation in older men at risk of deteriorating cognition and mental health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceived barriers to access available health services among men ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be highly affected with the HIV infection worldwide. Studies have shown that the organization of healthcare systems and how the MSM perceive it play a major role in granting or denying them access to healthcare services. Little is known in Tanzania regarding ...

  8. Improving mental health and wellbeing for young men in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Australia these alarming statistics have led to the funding of a range of programmes tackling youth suicide and more recently programmes that are aimed at improving help-seeking behaviours of young men. The programme reported in this paper is one such programme that is working with young men in the building and ...

  9. The intersection between masculinity and health among rural immigrant Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Ulloa, Jason; Sun, Christina; Rhodes, Scott D

    2017-01-01

    Latino men experience health disparities in STI/HIV, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Gender roles likely play a role in risk behaviors and outcomes; however, there has been little focus on masculinity in Latino men. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with Latino men living in North Carolina. The interviews, conducted by a trained bilingual/bicultural Latino male, prompted discussion around work, family, and stress. Four themes were identified: masculine roles of being a family provider and protector, sources of stress, family responsibility and interconnectedness to health, and coping mechanism. For Latino men, masculinity may have both positive and negative influences on health. For example, the role of family provider may contribute to coping and be a stressor simultaneously. Future research should examine masculinity as a positive and a negative health influence and the additional impacts of gender roles on mens' health.

  10. Disparities in health-related Internet use among African American men, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jamie A; Thompson, Hayley S; Watkins, Daphne C; Shires, Deirdre; Modlin, Charles S

    2014-03-20

    Given the benefits of health-related Internet use, we examined whether sociodemographic, medical, and access-related factors predicted this outcome among African American men, a population burdened with health disparities. African American men (n = 329) completed an anonymous survey at a community health fair in 2010; logistic regression was used to identify predictors. Only education (having attended some college or more) predicted health-related Internet use (P Internet use.

  11. Educational Needs of Adult Men regarding Sexual and Reproductive Health in Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Hajizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Men’s sexual and reproductive health is one of the most important public health issues. However, less attention has been paid to this matter, compared to women’s health issues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods:This descriptive study was performed on 1,068 adult men (aged 20-60 years, selected via random cluster sampling in Ahvaz city in 2014. In order to determine the educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health, a questionnaire consisting of three major sections (i.e., demographic data, sexual and reproductive health needs, and men’s attitudes was designed. The validity of the questionnaire was determined by content and face validity. Its reliability was assessed by internal consistency (α=85% and test-retest. For data analysis, descriptive statistics, t-test and ANOVA were performed, using SPSS version 19. Results: The majority of men (75.1% had poor knowledge and a moderate attitude (67.3% towards sexual and reproductive health. The three most important educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health were cancers of male reproductive system (83.8%, sexually transmitted diseases (STD/HIV (77.4% and religious attitudes toward sex (77%, respectively. Friends were the most important source of information in all aspects of sexual and reproductive health, while men preferred to receive information from a male physician or counselor. According to the results, men were dissatisfied with the amount of information they received about sexual and reproductive health. Conclusion: Based on the findings, men felt the need for sexual and reproductive health education; these needs were influenced by social and demographic factors, except marital status. If health policymakers pay attention to these educational needs, it is possible to implement suitable programs for improving men's sexual health and

  12. Mental Health Pathways from Interpersonal Violence to Health-Related Outcomes in HIV-Positive Sexual Minority Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalone, David W.; Hessler, Danielle M.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined mental health pathways between interpersonal violence (IPV) and health-related outcomes in HIV-positive sexual minority men engaged with medical care. Method: HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (N = 178) were recruited for this cross-sectional study from 2 public HIV primary care clinics that treated outpatients in an urban…

  13. Early detection of health challenges among middle-aged men in a large Danish municipality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Thomsen, Helle Haslund; Miller, Tanja

    groups, and with limited contact to the health- and social system. Findings The men experienced different challenges regarding their ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. Fieldwork showed that close and frequent contact to health and social workers......’ strengthened the men’s access to and utilization of health services Conclusion Findings suggest that community outreach and a stronger focus on the men’s health needs in both the social- and health system can be one of the keys to addressing health challenges for the group of middle-aged men in a large Danish...

  14. What Men Who Have Sex With Men in Peru Want in Internet-Based Sexual Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacho, Luis; Garcia, Patricia J; Blas, Magaly M; Díaz, Giovani; Zunt, Joseph R

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to gather information among gay men regarding their preferences for online sexual health information; 1,160 Peruvian MSM, 18 years or older, completed an online survey hosted on www.tunexo.org . The mean age was 26.8 years. Around 90% had post-high school education. The self-reported HIV prevalence was 12.3%. The acceptability of sexual health content was greater in the most highly educated group. The highest rated topics and services of interest were those related to improving sexual and mental health. The least educated group was significantly more interested in "getting prevention messages on mobiles" compared to men with the highest level of education (71% vs. 52%; p < 0.001). Men's sexual health was of more interest to the 30-39-year-old group compared to the 18-24-year-old one (97% vs. 87%; p = 0.005). Future Web-based interventions related to sexual health among targeted groups of MSM in Peru can be tailored to meet their preferences.

  15. Financial Hardship, Unmet Medical Need, and Health Self-Efficacy among African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D.; Mitchell, Jamie A.; Shires, Deirdre A.; Modlin, Charles S., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health self-efficacy (the confidence to take care of one's health) is a key component in ensuring that individuals are active partners in their health and health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy among African American men and to determine if unmet…

  16. Mental health differences between German gay and bisexual men and population-based controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Frank A; Franke, Gabriele H; Christiansen, Hanna

    2017-07-21

    International studies have revealed that gay and bisexual men present more mental health problems than the general male population. Furthermore, there is evidence that minority stress predicts mental health problems in gay and bisexual men. The aim of the present study is to provide initial data on mental health differences in Germany and to analyze the effect of minority stress. Mental health data on n = 1903 German gay and bisexual men and n = 958 men from a population-based sample were assessed using a shortened version of the SCL-90-S. The mental health of the two samples was compared. Furthermore, a linear regression was conducted for the gay and bisexual sample: mental health was used as the criterion and minority stressors as predictors. As compared to our population sample, gay and bisexual men demonstrated more mental health problems with a moderate effect size. In the regression, minority stress predicted mental health problems in the gay and bisexual sample. We observed pronounced mental health differences between gay and bisexual men versus the population sample. These differences could be at least partly due to the minority stress gay and bisexual men face. Research should focus on how to reduce and cope with minority stress.

  17. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Incident Falls in Community Dwelling Older Men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Naomi; Chan, Lewis; Cumming, Robert G; Blyth, Fiona M; Handelsman, David J; Seibel, Markus J; Waite, Louise M; Le Couteur, David G; Naganathan, Vasi

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine which lower urinary tract symptoms are associated with incident falls in community dwelling older men. The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project involves a representative sample of community dwelling men 70 years old or older in a defined geographic region in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Included in analysis were 1,090 men without neurological diseases, poor mobility or dementia at baseline. Lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed using I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and incontinence was assessed using ICIQ (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire) at baseline. I-PSS subscores were calculated for storage and voiding symptoms. Incident falls in 1 year were determined by telephone followup every 4 months. I-PSS storage and voiding subscores were associated with falls. Urgency incontinence was associated with falls (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.57, 95% CI 1.54-4.30). In addition, intermediate to high I-PSS storage subscores without urgency incontinence were associated with falls (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.72, 95% CI 1.24-2.38). Other types of incontinence and urgency alone without urgency incontinence were not associated with falls. Lower urinary tract storage and voiding symptoms were associated with falls in community dwelling older men. Of the symptoms of overactive bladder urgency incontinence carried a high risk of falls. Storage symptoms also contributed to the fall risk independently of urgency incontinence. Circumstances of falls among men with lower urinary tract symptoms should be explored to understand how lower urinary tract symptoms increase the fall risk and generate hypotheses regarding potential interventions. Furthermore, trials to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in older men should include falls as an end point. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility of using social networking technologies for health research among men who have sex with men: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Jaganath, Devan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using social networking as a health research platform among men who have sex with men (MSM). Fifty-five MSM (primarily African American and Latino) were invited to join a "secret" group on the social networking website, Facebook. Peer leaders, trained in health education, posted health-related content to groups. The study and analysis used mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods. Facebook conversations were thematically analyzed. Latino and African American participants voluntarily used social networking to discuss health-related knowledge and personal topics (exercise, nutrition, mental health, disease prevention, and substance abuse) with other group participants (N=564 excerpts). Although Latinos comprised 60% of the sample and African Americans 25.5%, Latinos contributed 82% of conversations and African Americans contributed only 15% of all conversations. Twenty-four percent of posts from Latinos and 7% of posts from African Americans were related to health topics. Results suggest that Facebook is an acceptable and engaging platform for facilitating and documenting health discussions for mixed methods research among MSM. An understanding of population differences is needed for crafting effective online social health interventions.

  19. Social Support, Health, and Health Care Access Among Latino Immigrant Men in an Emerging Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Patricia Isabel; Troyer, Mark M; Macia, Laura

    2018-03-01

    To determine the association of social support with alcohol abuse, depression, and health care access among Latino immigrant men in an emerging Latino community (an area with a small yet growing Latino population). Cross-sectional baseline data of 140 men prior to a participatory male-to-male community health worker intervention among Latino immigrants were analyzed using logistic regression. Community health workers recruited community participants in Western Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2013. Participants constituted a vulnerable group: 47% had not finished high school, 36% had moderate to severe depression, and 30% reported binge drinking in the past month. Health care access was low (insurance = 6%, usual source = 20%). In multivariable logistic regression high social support was associated with less binge drinking (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.20, 0.98]) and lower depression (OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.09-0.54]). Social support was associated with having a dentist visit but not with other health care access measures. Results indicate that the role of social support seems important for drinking and depression but remains controversial for health care access. It raises the hypothesis that low social support may be one of the mechanisms for the increase in drinking that happens after immigration.

  20. Partner status and mental and physical health of independently living men aged 70 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byles, Julie; Vo, Kha; Thomas, Louise; Mackenzie, Lynette; Kendig, Hal

    2016-06-01

    To describe and compare the mental health and physical functioning of community-dwelling men aged 70 years and over who live alone, and those who live with their partner/spouse. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the New South Wales 45 and Up Study. Mental health was measured using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and physical health was measured using the Medical Outcome Short Form 36 physical functioning scale. 37 690 community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over were included in the analyses. Men living alone were more likely to have high psychological distress scores and lower physical functioning scores compared to men living with a spouse/partner within each age group, except those 85 and over. Specific health and welfare programs targeted to the increasing number of older men living alone may be needed to address their higher levels of psychological distress and lower levels of physical functioning. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  1. Preconception health: awareness, planning, and communication among a sample of US men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth W; Levis, Denise M; Prue, Christine E

    2012-01-01

    It is important to educate both men and women about preconception health (PCH), but limited research exists in this area. This paper examines men's and women's awareness of exposure to PCH information and of specific PCH behaviors, PCH planning, and PCH discussions with their partners. Data from Porter Novelli's 2007 Healthstyles survey were used. Women and men of reproductive age were included in the analysis (n = 2,736) to understand their awareness, planning, and conversations around PCH. Only 27.9% of women and men reported consistently using an effective birth control method. The majority of men (52%) and women (43%) were unaware of any exposure to PCH messages; few received information from their health care provider. Women were more aware than men of specific pre-pregnancy health behaviors. Women in the sample reported having more PCH conversations with their partners than did men. PCH education should focus on both women and men. Communication about PCH is lacking, both between couples and among men and women and their health care providers. PCH education might benefit from brand development so that consumers know what to ask for and providers know what to deliver.

  2. The future of drugs: recreational drug use and sexual health among gay and other men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Kane; Lea, Toby; Murphy, Dean; Pienaar, Kiran

    2017-02-01

    There are complex historical connections between sexual minoritisation and desires to chemically alter bodily experience. For gay men, drug and alcohol use can be a creative or experimental response to social marginalisation - and not necessarily a problematic one in every instance. Numerous studies have found that infection with HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) is more likely among gay and men who have sex with men (MSM) who use recreational drugs than those who do not, but the causal nature of these relations is uncertain. Sexualised drug use is associated with a range of other problems, including dependence, mental health issues, accident and overdose. A growing body of work in the Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) field demonstrates the action of drugs and their purported effects to be a product of their relations with various other actors, contexts and practices. Given these contingencies, it is impossible to predict the future of drugs or their effect on the sexual health of gay and MSM with any degree of certainty. This article outlines some of the conditions most likely to mediate such futures in the medium term. Public funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer drug issues should not remain restricted to questions of HIV prevention and sexual health. It should be expanded to equip sexual health and AOD service providers with the cultural and sexual literacy to mitigate stigma and allow them to respond constructively to drug problems among sexual and gender minorities as a matter of priority.

  3. Relationship between illness representations and mental health among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Phoenix Kit-Han; Lau, Joseph Tak-Fai; Wu, Xiaobing

    2018-03-04

    Illness representations play a significant role on mental health across various health conditions. The present study explores the associations between illness representations of HIV and mental health (suicidal ideation and depression), and the mediation effects of emotional representations on the associations between cognitive representations and mental health among men who have sex with men who were newly diagnosed with HIV (ND-MSM) in China. A total of 225 ND-MSM were recruited from a non-governmental organisation and were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey. Results showed that 48.0% had suicidal ideation since HIV diagnosis and 48.4% scored higher than the cut-off for mild depression or above. Stepwise regression analyses showed that higher levels of emotional representations of HIV and lower levels of treatment control were associated with both suicidal ideation and depression. Emotional representations were shown to mediate the associations between some cognitive representations variables and mental health. Findings suggest that both cognitive and emotional representations of HIV were important factors of mental health among ND-MSM. Interventions to promote the mental health of ND-MSM are warranted and should seek to improve their cognitive and emotional representations of HIV.

  4. Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Comorbidity among Methamphetamine-Using Men Who have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jesse B; Swendeman, Dallas; Reback, Cathy J

    2018-04-02

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) exhibit elevated rates of mental health and substance use disorder relative to their non-MSM male counterparts. Methamphetamine use in particular has been associated with both neuronal damage and mental health disorders among MSM, and this study reports on the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-5 mental health and substance use disorders in a sample of methamphetamine-using MSM. From March 2014 through January 2015, 286 methamphetamine-using MSM enrolled in a study to reduce methamphetamine use and sexual risk behaviors. At baseline, participants demonstrated high rates of current major depressive episode (35.8%), antisocial personality disorder (23.9%), suicide risk (23.2%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (23.2%), and social phobia (20.4%), as well as methamphetamine use disorder (89.1%), marijuana use disorder (41.0%), alcohol use disorder (39.6%), cocaine use disorder (30.9%), and inhalants use disorder (15.4%). Analyses revealed significant (p mental health disorders, as well as between alcohol use disorder and all listed mental health disorders. Mental health disorder prevalence and substance use disorder severity were both elevated, and both methamphetamine and alcohol use disorder severity were associated with increased likelihood of comorbid mental health disorder.

  5. Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rosie; Gerressu, Makeda; Michie, Susan; Estcourt, Claudia; Anderson, Jane; Ang, Chee Siang; Murray, Elizabeth; Rait, Greta; Stephenson, Judith; Bailey, Julia V

    2015-07-03

    Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these. The MenSS (Men's Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it. Content was informed by a literature review regarding men's barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework. The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users. This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

  6. Strengths and weaknesses of the Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) Facebook project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daphne C; Allen, Julie Ober; Goodwill, Janelle R; Noel, Blake

    2017-01-01

    The Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) project is a Facebook-based intervention that provides mental health education and social support to young Black men. The YBMen project was created to better understand and address the pressures and needs of young Black men, particularly with regard to issues related to their conceptualization of masculinity and mental health. Black men from a 2-year liberal arts college in the Midwest (United States) enrolled in the YBMen pilot project. The purpose of this study is to report what participants in the YBMen pilot project liked and disliked about the intervention, along with their suggestions for improvement. Qualitative results from the 8 Black men who actively participated in the YBMen Facebook intervention and completed the postintervention interview are reported. A systematic analysis identified 9 subthemes that described participants' reactions to different components and characteristics of the Facebook intervention. Results indicated that opportunities for relationship building and connectivity, coupled with engaging popular culture references used in the intervention encouraged young Black men to actively participate in the YBMen Facebook intervention. The YBMen project has potential to improve the health and well-being of young Black men by providing nontraditional resources that are easily accessible, culturally sensitive, and gender-specific. Implications of the YBMen project as an effective Internet-based program that promotes mental health and increases social support among young Black men are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Examining the Correlates of Online Health Information-Seeking Behavior Among Men Compared With Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoloudakis, Irene A; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Rebar, Amanda L; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Alley, Stephanie; Duncan, Mitch J; Short, Camille E

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to identify and compare the demographic, health behavior, health status, and social media use correlates of online health-seeking behaviors among men and women. Cross-sectional self-report data were collected from 1,289 Australian adults participating in the Queensland Social Survey. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the correlates of online health information seeking for men and women. Differences in the strength of the relation of these correlates were tested using equality of regression coefficient tests. For both genders, the two strongest correlates were social media use (men: odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.78, 3.71]; women: OR = 2.93, 95% CI [1.92, 4.45]) and having a university education (men: OR = 3.63, 95% CI [2.37, 5.56]; women: OR = 2.74, 95% CI [1.66, 4.51]). Not being a smoker and being of younger age were also associated with online health information seeking for both men and women. Reporting poor health and the presence of two chronic diseases were positively associated with online health seeking for women only. Correlates of help seeking online among men and women were generally similar, with exception of health status. Results suggest that similar groups of men and women are likely to access health information online for primary prevention purposes, and additionally that women experiencing poor health are more likely to seek health information online than women who are relatively well. These findings are useful for analyzing the potential reach of online health initiatives targeting both men and women. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Sexual Health of Trans Men Who Are Gay, Bisexual, or Who Have Sex with Men: Results from Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Nik; Bradley, Kaitlin; Scheim, Ayden I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent reports have addressed the sexual health of female-to-male transgender or transsexual people who are gay, bisexual, and/or have sex with men (trans GB-MSM) using urban convenience samples. The Trans PULSE Project conducted a multimode, respondent-driven sampling survey in Ontario, Canada, in 2009–2010. Weighted estimates were calculated for trans GB-MSM (n = 173) for sexual orientation, behavior, partners, and HIV-related risk, as well as for psychosocial stressors and sexual satisfaction. An estimated 63.3% (95% CI [50.4, 73.5]) of trans men were GB-MSM (173/227). Results indicate great diversity in sexual behavior and experiences. Implications for sexual health promotion, counseling, and medical care are addressed. PMID:24971043

  9. Sociodemographic Factors Contribute to Mental Health Disparities and Access to Services Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City

    OpenAIRE

    Storholm, Erik David; Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Moeller, Robert W.; Eddy, Jessica A.; Bare, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may be at increased risk for mental health problems including depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), and suicidality. The overriding goal of the current investigation was to examine mental health and mental health services in a diverse sample of YMSM. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a cohort study of 598 YMSM, including sociodemographics, mental health, and mental health care. We then tested for bivariate associations, and used multivariable mod...

  10. Sexual Health in Adult Men with Spina Bifida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Bong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical and surgical advances in the treatment of spina bifida (SB have resulted in increasing numbers of patients reaching adulthood. As such, issues related to sexual maturity are being investigated to offer optimal healthcare to men with spina bifida. This report constitutes a review of the current literature relating to adults with spina bifida and issues of sexuality, erectile dysfunction and fertility. In general, adult males with spina bifida have normal sexual desires and an interest in addressing these issues with healthcare providers. Sexual education and access to intimacy are delayed compared to the general population. 75% of men achieve erections, but maintaining erections is a problem and some may be merely reflexive in nature. The many of these men show marked improvement with sildenafil. In SB erectile dysfunction and infertility are related to the level of neurological lesion with the best performance status in those with sacral lesions and intact reflexes. Men with lesions higher than T10 are at risk for azoospermia. There is an increased risk of neural tube defects in the children of men with spina bifida, but the current incidence with modern folic acid therapy is unknown. As the number of males with spina bifida reaching sexual maturity increases, further investigation into sexuality, sex education, intimacy, and treatments for erectile dysfunction and infertility will be needed.

  11. Men's health in primary care: an emerging paradigm of sexual function and cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Martin M

    2012-02-01

    An office evaluation of men's health in primary care requires a thorough understanding of the implications of male sexual dysfunctions, hypogonadism, and cardiometabolic risk stratification and aggressive risk management. The paradigm of the men's health office visit in primary care is the recognition and assessment of male sexual dysfunction, specifically erectile dysfunction, and its value as a signal of overall cardiometabolic health, including the emerging evidence linking low testosterone and the metabolic syndrome. Indeed, erectile dysfunction may now be thought of as a harbinger of cardiovascular clinical events and other systemic vascular diseases in some men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predisposing, enabling and need correlates of mental health treatment utilization among homeless men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Harmony; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett

    2014-11-01

    There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization.

  13. Gay Men's Health and Identity: Social Change and the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Phillip L; Frost, David M; Meyer, Ilan H; Pletta, David R

    2018-01-01

    Due to significant historical change in the late 20th and early 21st century related to both health and cultural attitudes toward homosexuality, gay men of distinct birth cohorts may diverge considerably in their health and identity development. We argue that research on gay men's health has not adequately considered the significance of membership in distinct generation-cohorts, and we present a life course paradigm to address this problem. Focusing on the U.S. as an exemplar that can be adapted to other cultural contexts, we identify five generations of gay men alive today and review unique issues related to health and identity development for each. Implications for research, practice, and advocacy on gay men's health and development are discussed.

  14. Young Men, Help-Seeking, and Mental Health Services: Exploring Barriers and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Louise; Long, Maggie; Moorhead, Anne

    2018-01-01

    International research has identified young men as reluctant to seek help for mental health problems. This research explored barriers and solutions to professional help seeking for mental health problems among young men living in the North West of Ireland. A qualitative approach, using two focus groups with six participants each and five face-to-face interviews, was conducted with men aged 18 to 24 years (total N = 17). Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Seven key themes of barriers to professional help seeking were identified: "acceptance from peers," "personal challenges," "cultural and environmental influences," "self-medicating with alcohol," "perspectives around seeking professional help," "fear of homophobic responses," and "traditional masculine ideals." Five key themes of solutions to these barriers included "tailored mental health advertising," "integrating mental health into formal education," "education through semiformal support services," "accessible mental health care," and "making new meaning." Interesting findings on barriers include fear of psychiatric medication, fear of homophobic responses from professionals, the legacy of Catholic attitudes, and the genuine need for care. This study offers an in-depth exploration of how young men experience barriers and uniquely offers solutions identified by participants themselves. Youth work settings were identified as a resource for engaging young men in mental health work. Young men can be encouraged to seek help if services and professionals actively address barriers, combining advertising, services, and education, with particular attention and respect to how and when young men seek help and with whom they want to share their problems.

  15. Trends in chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men attending a large urban sexual health service in Australia, 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Fairley, Christopher K; Fehler, Glenda; Leslie, David; Walker, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Hocking, Jane S

    2011-06-05

    To determine whether chlamydia positivity among heterosexual men (MSW) and chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among men who have sex with men (MSM), are changing. Computerized records for men attending a large sexual health clinic between 2002 and 2009 were analyzed. Chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity were calculated and logistic regression used to assess changes over time. 17769 MSW and 8328 MSM tested for chlamydia and 7133 MSM tested for gonorrhea. In MSW, 7.37% (95% CI: 6.99-7.77) were chlamydia positive; the odds of chlamydia positivity increased by 4% per year (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.07; p = 0.02) after main risk factors were adjusted for. In MSM, 3.70% (95% CI: 3.30-4.14) were urethral chlamydia positive and 5.36% (95% CI: 4.82-5.96) were anal chlamydia positive; positivity could not be shown to have changed over time. In MSM, 3.05% (95% CI: 2.63-3.53) tested anal gonorrhea positive and 1.83% (95% CI: 1.53-2.18) tested pharyngeal gonorrhea positive. Univariate analysis found the odds of anal gonorrhea positivity had decreased (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-1.00; p = 0.05), but adjusting for main risk factors resulted in no change. Urethral gonorrhea cases in MSM as a percentage of all MSM tested for gonorrhea also fell (p Australia may explain differences in STI trends between MSM and MSW.

  16. Identifying Health Beliefs Influencing Hispanic College Men's Willingness to Vaccinate against HPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Thomas, Tami L.; Eaton, Asia

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies health beliefs influencing Hispanic college men's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake decision making processes. Hispanic college men were interviewed about their HPV vaccine knowledge, and information seeking behaviors. Overall, participants did not view HPV infection or vaccination as an immediate concern or priority;…

  17. 'Clinics aren't meant for men': Sexual health care access and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Clinics aren't meant for men': Sexual health care access and seeking behaviours among men in Gauteng province, South Africa. JS Leichliter, G Paz-Bailey, AL Friedman, MA Habel, A Vezi, M Sello, T Farirai, DA Lewis ...

  18. Social determinants of self-reported health in women and men: understanding the role of gender in population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpoor, Ahmad Reza; Stewart Williams, Jennifer; Amin, Avni; Araujo de Carvalho, Islene; Beard, John; Boerma, Ties; Kowal, Paul; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    Women and men share similar health challenges yet women report poorer health. The study investigates the social determinants of self-reported health in women and men, and male-female differences in health. Data on 103154 men and 125728 women were analysed from 57 countries in the World Health Survey 2002-2004. Item Response Theory was used to construct a composite measure of health. Associations between health and determinants were assessed using multivariate linear regression. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition partitioned the inequality in health between women and men into an "explained" component that arises because men and women differ in social and economic characteristics, and an "unexplained" component due to the differential effects of these characteristics. Decomposition was repeated for 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) African region and 19 countries in the WHO European region. Women's health was significantly lower than men's. Health was associated with education, household economic status, employment, and marital status after controlling for age. In the pooled analysis decomposition showed that 30% of the inequality was "explained", of which almost 75% came from employment, education, marital status. The differential effects of being in paid employment increased the inequality. When countries in Africa and Europe were compared, the "explained" component (31% and 39% respectively) was largely attributed to the social determinants in the African countries and to women's longevity in the European countries. Being in paid employment had a greater positive effect on the health of males in both regions. Ways in which age and the social determinants contribute to the poorer health status of women compared with men varies between groups of countries. This study highlights the need for action to address social structures, institutional discrimination and harmful gender norms and roles that differently influence health with ageing.

  19. Social determinants of self-reported health in women and men: understanding the role of gender in population health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Hosseinpoor

    Full Text Available Women and men share similar health challenges yet women report poorer health. The study investigates the social determinants of self-reported health in women and men, and male-female differences in health.Data on 103154 men and 125728 women were analysed from 57 countries in the World Health Survey 2002-2004. Item Response Theory was used to construct a composite measure of health. Associations between health and determinants were assessed using multivariate linear regression. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition partitioned the inequality in health between women and men into an "explained" component that arises because men and women differ in social and economic characteristics, and an "unexplained" component due to the differential effects of these characteristics. Decomposition was repeated for 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO African region and 19 countries in the WHO European region.Women's health was significantly lower than men's. Health was associated with education, household economic status, employment, and marital status after controlling for age. In the pooled analysis decomposition showed that 30% of the inequality was "explained", of which almost 75% came from employment, education, marital status. The differential effects of being in paid employment increased the inequality. When countries in Africa and Europe were compared, the "explained" component (31% and 39% respectively was largely attributed to the social determinants in the African countries and to women's longevity in the European countries. Being in paid employment had a greater positive effect on the health of males in both regions.Ways in which age and the social determinants contribute to the poorer health status of women compared with men varies between groups of countries. This study highlights the need for action to address social structures, institutional discrimination and harmful gender norms and roles that differently influence health with ageing.

  20. Perceived barriers to access available health services among men ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Braden Kingdon

    regardless of their motivation for doing so or identification of a specific sexual orientation. (WHO 2011; UNAIDS 2006). The term encompasses both gay men and .... Kiswahili transcripts were translated to English, creating categories from the quotations, and developing themes recorded qualitative data. Verbatim quotations ...

  1. Men: good health and high mortality. Sex differences in health and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Juel, Knud; Vaupel, James W

    2008-01-01

    This review examines sex differences in health and survival, with a focus on the Nordic countries. There is a remarkable discrepancy between the health and survival of the sexes: men are physically stronger and have fewer disabilities, but have substantially higher mortality at all ages compared...... with women: the so-called male-female health-survival paradox. A number of proposed explanations for this paradox are rooted in biological, social, and psychological interpretations. It is likely to be due to multiple causes that include fundamental biological differences between the sexes such as genetic...... factors, immune system responses, hormones, and disease patterns. Behavioral differences such as risk-taking and reluctance to seek and comply with medical treatment may also play a role. Another consideration is that part of the difference may be due to methodological challenges, such as selective non...

  2. Factors related to positive mental health in a stigmatized minority: an investigation of older gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Grierson, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates factors related to the positive mental health of older Australian gay men, who are challenged by both age- and sexuality-related stigma. A national online survey was conducted among 422 gay-identified men aged 40 years and older. Positive mental health was measured using the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (SWEMWBS). Regression analyses revealed men were psychologically healthier if they were employed full-time, had a higher income, were in a relationship, received greater social support, had many close friends, felt connected to the gay community, believed the public felt positively toward their group, and had not experienced discrimination in the past year. A multivariate linear regression found social support to be the most important of all these factors, with support from friends particularly critical. These findings provide new guidance to health agencies that seek to improve the mental health and well-being of older gay men.

  3. Barriers to men who have sex with men attending HIV related health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... discrimination affect MSM attendance to HIV related health services; (ii) determine how health care worker's (HCW's) practices and .... Of the adults aged 15-49 years in Dar es Salaam 93.2% knew where to get tested and 59.7% had ... age and refusal to participate in the study. Data collection. Interviews ...

  4. Are Men's Reproductive Health Problems and Sexual Behavior Predictors of Welfare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoo, Emmanuel O; Oni, Gholahan A; Ajayi, Mofoluwake P; Idowu, Adenike E; Fadayomi, Theophilus O; Omideyi, Adekunbi K

    2017-05-01

    The study examined men's reproductive health problems and sexual behavior and their implications for men's welfare in Nigeria. It used the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data set of 2013. The analysis used only male recode files, representing 17,359 males. The dependent variable is the computed wealth index, which was selected as proxy for welfare condition. Analysis involved univariate and multivariate levels. The findings indicated that 49.3% of the respondents currently have more than one sexual partner. The total lifetime sexual partner index identifies 70.2% of the men interviewed have had at least two sexual partners in their lifetime. It revealed that men who experience reproductive health challenges, such as sexually transmitted infections and genital ulcer, are 44% and 93%, respectively, less likely to enjoy good welfare condition. It also indicated that men in urban area are 7.256 times more likely to enjoy good welfare condition compared with their rural counterparts. There is a negative association between total lifetime sexual partnerships and exposure to good welfare. The study concludes that social workers, marriage counselors, other health personnel, and policy makers need to focus on the practice of multiple sexual partnership and reproductive health diseases as major determinants of men's welfare. The authors suggest that the index of welfare should include reproductive health issues and indicators of sexual behavior. Also, there is need for the establishment of specialized reproductive health care services and centers that are accessible to all men for effective servicing of reproductive health needs of men in the country.

  5. Multiple Dimensions of Stigma and Health Related Factors Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Katherine; Voisin, Dexter R.; Bouris, Alida; Jaffe, Kate; Kuhns, Lisa; Eavou, Rebecca; Schneider, John

    2016-01-01

    This study is among the first to examine the association between multiple domains of HIV-related stigma and health-related correlates including viral load and medication adherence among young Black men who have sex with men (N = 92). Individual logistic regressions were done to examine the hypothesized relationships between HIV-related stigma and various health and psychosocial outcomes. In addition to examining total stigma, we also examined four domains of HIV stigma. Findings revealed the various domains of stigma had differential effects on health-related outcomes. Individuals who reported higher levels of total stigma and personalized stigma were less likely to be virally suppressed (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.91–1.00 and OR 0.50, 95 % CI 0.25–1.02, respectively). Concerns about public attitudes toward HIV were positively related to medication adherence (OR 2.18, 95 % CI 1.20–3.94) and psychological distress (OR 5.02, 95 % CI 1.54–16.34). The various domains of HIV stigma differentially affected health and psychosocial outcomes, and our findings suggest that some forms of HIV stigma may significantly affect viral load and medication adherence among this population. Stigma-informed approaches to care and treatment are needed, along with incorporated psychological and social supports. PMID:27233249

  6. Mental health and suicidal ideation among Chinese women who have sex with men who have sex with men (MSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhong; Zhang, Beichuan; Li, Yang; Antonio, Anna Liza Malazarte; Chen, Yunliang; Williams, Ann Bartley

    2016-01-01

    In China, men who have sex with men (MSM) are the fastest growing population at risk for HIV. They face social stigma due to both MSM behavior and HIV. In addition, concern has been raised about the mental health of wives of MSM. In this cross-sectional study, the authors examine the mental health status of a sample of 135 of these women. Participants completed an Internet-administered questionnaire in Xi'an from April to June, 2012. Most were unaware at the time of marriage that their husbands were MSM. Physical abuse was frequently reported; depressive symptom and mental health (Symptom Checklist, SCL-90) scores were significantly higher than those of the general Chinese adult female population. A majority (59.8%) of women reported suicidal thoughts after discovering their husbands' MSM behavior; about 10% had attempted suicide. Multiple logistic regression revealed that women's experience with anal sex was associated with 7.8 times (95% CI: 1.3-65.9) greater odds of suicidal ideation. Also, women who demonstrated mental symptoms on the SCL-90 had 2.3 times (95% CI: 1.04-5.2) the odds of suicidal ideation. These results suggest that wives of MSM have a significant need for mental health care, suicide prevention, HIV education, and social support.

  7. The role of trust in health decision making among African American men recruited from urban barbershops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kristina B; Hart, Alton; Belgrave, Faye Z; Tademy, Raymond H; Jones, Randy A

    2012-01-01

    To examine factors within the patient-provider relationship that influence which role African American men aged 40-70 years prefer when making health care decisions. We recruited 40 African American men from barbershops in the Richmond, Virginia, metropolitan area to participate in semistructured interviews. At the completion of each interview, participants completed a brief self-administered demographic survey. The semistructured interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and then imported into a qualitative software program for organizing, sorting, and coding data. The principles of thematic analysis and template approach were used in this study. The survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Trust was a major theme that emerged from the semistructured interviews. The men listed trust in the health care provider as the primary reason for choosing a collaborative or active role in the decision-making process. Within the theme of trust, 4 subthemes emerged: expertise, information sharing, active listening, and relationship length. Thirty-five out of the 40 men interviewed preferred an active or collaborative role in the decision-making process; only 5 preferred passive decision making. Trust emerged as an important factor that influenced role preference for African American men when making health care decisions in the context of the patient-provider relationship. Future studies that help identify which other factors influence health care decision-making roles among African American men may have implications for addressing health disparities among this population and improve the quality of their health care.

  8. Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing with Men and Boys: What Works?

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, S; White, A; Gough, B; Robinson, R; Seims, A; Raine, G; Hanna, E

    2015-01-01

    In May 2014 the Movember Foundation commissioned the Centre for Men’s Health, Leeds Beckett University, in collaboration with the Men’s Health Forum (England & Wales), to gather the current research evidence and practical (‘tacit’) knowledge about the core elements that make for successful work with boys and men around mental health promotion, early intervention and stigma reduction.

  9. Successful mental health promotion with men: the evidence from 'tacit knowledge'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Steve; Gough, Brendan; Hanna, Esmée; Raine, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Seims, Amanda; White, Alan

    2018-04-01

    There remains significant concern about men's mental health, particularly in terms of personal and societal barriers to help-seeking, negative coping mechanisms and high suicide rates. This article presents findings from a multi-phase study looking at 'what works' in mental health promotion for men. Work here reports the collection and analysis of the tacit knowledge of those working within mental health promotion interventions for men. A 'multiple hub and spoke' approach was used to assist data collection. Thirteen key players, active in the men's mental health field, half from the UK and half beyond, formed an Investigative Network collecting data, mainly through interviews, from wider geographical and professional community contexts where they had networks. The focus of data collection was on 'what works' in mental health promotion for men. Data was analysed using thematic analysis techniques. Findings suggest that settings which created safe male spaces acted to promote trust, reduce stigma and normalize men's engagement in interventions. Embedding interventions within the communities of men being engaged, fully involving these men, and holding 'male-positive' values engendered familiarity and consolidated trust. Using 'male-sensitive' language and activity-based approaches allowed for positive expressions of emotions, facilitated social engagement, and provided a base for open communication. Appropriate partnerships were also seen as a necessary requirement for success and as crucial for maximizing intervention impact. The importance of gender and 'masculinity' was apparent throughout these findings and taking time to understand gender could facilitate positive ways of working alongside men, increasing levels of engagement and successful outcomes.

  10. The men's health center: Disparities in gender specific health services among the top 50 “best hospitals” in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Choy

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: A considerable disparity exists between the prevalence of gender-specific health services, with WHCs being much more numerous than MHCs. All but one leading institution had WHCs compared to less than one-third having MHCs. Our findings also highlight the heterogeneous nature of men's health programs, as they exhibit great variability in program type and focus, yet are all being marketed under the “Men's Health” banner.

  11. Danger zone: Men, masculinity and occupational health and safety in high risk occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Bezo, Randy; Colantonio, Angela; Garritano, Enzo; Lafrance, Marc; Lewko, John; Mantis, Steve; Moody, Joel; Power, Nicole; Theberge, Nancy; Westwood, Eleanor; Travers, Krista

    2015-12-01

    The workplace is a key setting where gender issues and organizational structures may influence occupational health and safety practices. The enactment of dominant norms of masculinity in high risk occupations can be particularly problematic, as it exposes men to significant risks for injuries and fatalities. To encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and advance knowledge in the intersecting areas of gender studies, men's health, work and workplace health and safety, a national network of thirteen researchers and health and safety stakeholders completed a critical literature review examining the intersection between masculinities and men's workplace health and safety in order to: (i) account for research previously undertaken in this area; (ii) identify themes that may inform our understanding of masculinity and workplace health and safety and; (iii) identify research and practice gaps in relation to men's workplace health and safety. In this paper we present key themes from this review. Recommendations are made regarding: (i) how to define gender; (ii) how to attend to and identify how masculinities may influence workers' identities, perceptions of occupational risks and how institutionalized practices can reinforce norms of masculinity; (iii) the importance of considering how masculinities may intersect with other variables (e.g. historical context, age, class, race, geographical location) and; (iv) the added significance of present-day labour market forces on men's occupational health and safety.

  12. Perception of adult men on their preventive practices and health support networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Oliveira de Arruda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to know the preventive practices adopted by adult men in daily life and to identify health support networks. Methods: a descriptive qualitative study, made during the months of November and December 2012, at two emergency units, along with 32 men aged between 20 and 59 years. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and subjected to content analysis with thematic modality. Results: men highlighted different preventive practices such as sanitizing hands, eating properly, having screening tests, avoiding psychoactive substance abuse, using personal protective equipment at work and condoms during sex. Most of the participants had nuclear family and its members were their primary support network regarding the health-disease process. Conclusion: it is for health team members to try to leverage the adoption of preventive practices by adult men from the support networks they consider significant.

  13. Young men, mental health, and technology: implications for service design and delivery in the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Louise A; Collin, Philippa; Davenport, Tracey A; Hurley, Patrick J; Burns, Jane M; Hickie, Ian B

    2012-11-22

    Young men are particularly vulnerable to suicide, drug, and alcohol problems and yet fail to seek appropriate help. An alternative or adjunct to face-to-face services has emerged with widespread uptake of the Internet and related communication technologies, yet very little evidence exists that examines the capacity of the Internet to engage young men and promote help seeking. To explore young people's attitudes and behaviors in relation to mental health and technology use. The aim was to identify key gender differences to inform the development of online mental health interventions for young men. A cross-sectional online survey of 1038 young people (aged 16 to 24 years) was used. Young men are more likely than young women to play computer games, access online video/music content, and visit online forums. More than half of young men and women reported that they sought help for a problem online, and the majority were satisfied with the help they received. Significant gender differences were identified in relation to how young people would respond to a friend in need, with young men being less likely than young women to confront the issue directly. Online interventions for young men need to be action-oriented, informed by young men's views and everyday technology practices, and leverage the important role that peers play in the help-seeking process.

  14. Effects of Racial Discrimination and Health Behaviors on Mental and Physical Health of Middle-Class African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Sherrill L.; Bonham, Vence; Neighbors, Harold W.; Amell, James W.

    2009-01-01

    This research is an examination of the effects of racial discrimination and health-promoting behaviors on the physical and mental health of a sample of 399 well-educated African American men. One would think that the attainment of higher education would increase health-promoting behaviors and might decrease discriminatory experiences that impact…

  15. Non-consensual sex experienced by men who have sex with men: prevalence and association with mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Pamela A; Johnson, Joy L; Shoveller, Jean A; Chan, Keith; Martindale, Steve L; Schilder, Arn J; Botnick, Michael R; Hogg, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the psychosocial factors associated with sexual assault experienced by males. Men (N=358), 19-35 years of age, recruited by community outreach, completed questionnaires. Eligibility criteria included: being HIV-negative and self-identifying as gay or bisexual. Lifetime prevalence rates of childhood sexual abuse, juvenile prostitution, and adult sexual assault were determined. The mental health of this population was explored including associations between sexual victimization and mental health disorders (alcohol abuse, suicidal ideation and attempts, mood disorders, and poor self-esteem). Almost 1 in 10 of the men had engaged in juvenile prostitution, 14% were forced into sexual activity before 14 years of age, and 14% were sexually victimized after the age of 14. Those exposed to non-consensual sex were 2.9 (95% CI: 1.8-4.7) times more likely to abuse alcohol than those free of victimization. Those who reported childhood sexual abuse were 3.3 (95% CI: 1.7-6.4) times more likely to have attempted suicide. Juvenile prostitution was associated with current depression (OR=6.4; 95% CI: 2.8-14.9). Health professionals have the responsibility to respond competently and sensitively to victims of sexual violence. To do this, many need to recognize the prevalence of male sexual trauma, to deconstruct their personal beliefs about same-sex sexual violence, and to learn to ask sensitive questions in their assessment interviews.

  16. Longitudinal Associations Between Vitamin D Metabolites and Sarcopenia in Older Australian men: The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Vasant; Cumming, Robert G; Naganathan, Vasi; Blyth, Fiona; Le Couteur, David G; Hsu, Benjumin; Handelsman, David J; Waite, Louise M; Seibel, Markus J

    2017-12-12

    To explore the associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) levels at baseline and incidence of sarcopenia over time in older Australian community-dwelling older men. Of the 1,705 men aged ≥70 years (2005-2007) participating in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, those without sarcopenia at baseline (n = 1,312 for 25D and n = 1,231 for 1,25D), 2 years (n = 1,024 for 25D and n = 956 for 1,25D), and 5-year follow-up (n = 709 for 25D and n = 663 for 1,25D) were included in the study. The main outcome measurement was the incidence of sarcopenia defined as appendicular lean mass adjusted for body mass index sarcopenia was 3.9% in men at the 2-year follow-up and 8.6% at the 5-year follow-up. In adjusted analysis, men with vitamin D levels in the lowest quartiles (25D sarcopenia compared to those with vitamin D levels in the highest quartiles over 5 years. [25D: odds ratio (OR) 2.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14, 5.64) p = .02; 1,25D: OR 2.67 (95% CI 1.28, 5.60) p = .01]. After further adjustments for the respective other serum vitamin D measure, (either 25D or 1,25D), the association remained significant [25D: OR 2.40 (95% CI 1.02, 5.64) p = .04; 1,25D: OR 2.23 (95% CI 1.04, 4.80) p = .04]. Low serum 1,25D and 25D concentrations at baseline are independently associated with the incidence of sarcopenia over the subsequent 5 years. Although our data do not prove any causal relationship, it is conceivable that maintaining vitamin D sufficiency may reduce the incidence of sarcopenia in ageing men. © Crown copyright 2017

  17. Sexual Health of Trans Men Who Are Gay, Bisexual, or Who Have Sex with Men: Results from Ontario, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Greta R.; Redman, Nik; Bradley, Kaitlin; Scheim, Ayden I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent reports have addressed the sexual health of female-to-male transgender or transsexual people who are gay, bisexual, and/or have sex with men (trans GB-MSM) using urban convenience samples. The Trans PULSE Project conducted a multimode, respondent-driven sampling survey in Ontario, Canada, in 2009–2010. Weighted estimates were calculated for trans GB-MSM (n = 173) for sexual orientation, behavior, partners, and HIV-related risk, as well as for psychosocial stressors and sexual ...

  18. Sexual health and life experiences: Voices from behaviourally bisexual Latino men in the Midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Schnarrs, Philip; Rhodes, Scott; Goncalves, Gabriel; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Kelle, Guadalupe; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Research on behaviourally bisexual Latino men in the USA has not yet examined sexual health issues among men living in diverse areas of the nation, including the Midwest. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was used to engage a diverse sample of 75 behaviourally bisexual men (25 White, 25 Black, and 25 Latino). Semi-structured interviews were conducted and, in this paper, standard qualitative analysis procedures were used to explore data from the 25 Latino participants. Men described their unique migration experiences as behaviourally bisexual men in this area of the USA, as well as related sexual risk behaviours and health concerns. Lack of culturally congruent public health and community resources for behaviourally bisexual men in the Midwestern USA were identified as significant barriers. As in other studies, familial and community relationships were significant for the participants, especially in terms of the decision to disclose or not disclose their bisexuality. Additionally, alcohol and other drugs were often used while engaging in sexual behaviours particularly with male and transgender, as well as female, partners. Behaviourally bisexual Latino men may benefit from receiving positive and affirmative individual- and structural-level support in regards to their unique experiences in this and other settings. PMID:21815839

  19. Trends in chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men attending a large urban sexual health service in Australia, 2002-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether chlamydia positivity among heterosexual men (MSW and chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among men who have sex with men (MSM, are changing. Methods Computerized records for men attending a large sexual health clinic between 2002 and 2009 were analyzed. Chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity were calculated and logistic regression used to assess changes over time. Results 17769 MSW and 8328 MSM tested for chlamydia and 7133 MSM tested for gonorrhea. In MSW, 7.37% (95% CI: 6.99-7.77 were chlamydia positive; the odds of chlamydia positivity increased by 4% per year (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.07; p = 0.02 after main risk factors were adjusted for. In MSM, 3.70% (95% CI: 3.30-4.14 were urethral chlamydia positive and 5.36% (95% CI: 4.82-5.96 were anal chlamydia positive; positivity could not be shown to have changed over time. In MSM, 3.05% (95% CI: 2.63-3.53 tested anal gonorrhea positive and 1.83% (95% CI: 1.53-2.18 tested pharyngeal gonorrhea positive. Univariate analysis found the odds of anal gonorrhea positivity had decreased (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-1.00; p = 0.05, but adjusting for main risk factors resulted in no change. Urethral gonorrhea cases in MSM as a percentage of all MSM tested for gonorrhea also fell (p Conclusions These data suggest that chlamydia prevalence in MSW is rising and chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence among MSM is stable or declining. High STI testing rates among MSM in Australia may explain differences in STI trends between MSM and MSW.

  20. Trends in chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men attending a large urban sexual health service in Australia, 2002-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine whether chlamydia positivity among heterosexual men (MSW) and chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among men who have sex with men (MSM), are changing. Methods Computerized records for men attending a large sexual health clinic between 2002 and 2009 were analyzed. Chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity were calculated and logistic regression used to assess changes over time. Results 17769 MSW and 8328 MSM tested for chlamydia and 7133 MSM tested for gonorrhea. In MSW, 7.37% (95% CI: 6.99-7.77) were chlamydia positive; the odds of chlamydia positivity increased by 4% per year (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.07; p = 0.02) after main risk factors were adjusted for. In MSM, 3.70% (95% CI: 3.30-4.14) were urethral chlamydia positive and 5.36% (95% CI: 4.82-5.96) were anal chlamydia positive; positivity could not be shown to have changed over time. In MSM, 3.05% (95% CI: 2.63-3.53) tested anal gonorrhea positive and 1.83% (95% CI: 1.53-2.18) tested pharyngeal gonorrhea positive. Univariate analysis found the odds of anal gonorrhea positivity had decreased (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-1.00; p = 0.05), but adjusting for main risk factors resulted in no change. Urethral gonorrhea cases in MSM as a percentage of all MSM tested for gonorrhea also fell (p gonorrhea prevalence among MSM is stable or declining. High STI testing rates among MSM in Australia may explain differences in STI trends between MSM and MSW. PMID:21639943

  1. Examining the health and health service utilization of heterosexual men with HIV: a community-informed scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Nancy; Djiometio, Joseph Nguemo; Agha, Ayda; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Antoniou, Tony

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of HIV infection among heterosexual men has increased. Consequently, the need for health and support services for this group is likely to increase. We conducted a scoping review of studies regarding the health and health service use of heterosexual men with HIV that was informed by research priorities identified by this community. We searched six databases from inception to August 2014. We included all English-language qualitative and quantitative studies examining the health and health service use of heterosexual men with HIV. Our search strategy yielded 2665 references, of which 70 were included in the scoping review. We summarized the research into the following domains identified by summit participants: treatment of HIV and its complications (n = 9), health and social support services utilization (n = 27), social determinants of health (n = 20), prevention (n = 11), family planning (n = 4) and psychosocial research (n = 33). Key findings from the review included poor mental health-related well-being, over-representation among "late presenters" to care and greater fear of disclosure of HIV status relative to men who have sex with men. In general, research conducted to date was not well aligned with the priorities identified by the community.

  2. Mental health functioning among men who use the Internet specifically to find partners for unprotected sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Klein

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown a link between mental health functioning and involvement in HIV risk practices. The present research examines how well one specific group of men who have sex with other men (MSM fare in terms of their mental health functioning, and then focuses on how mental health functioning relates to HIV risk practices in this population. The study was based on a national random sample of 332 MSM who use the Internet to seek men with whom they can engage in unprotected sex. Data collection was conducted via telephone interviews between January 2008 and May 2009. Depression is more common among men in this population than in the adult male population-at-large. All other measures of mental health functioning that were examined (self-esteem, impulsivity, current life satisfaction, optimism about the future indicated low rates of mental health problem. Contrary to expectations, in nearly all instances, mental health functioning was not related to HIV risk practices. More work needs to be done to understand the causes of depression among these men, and to assess how, if at all, depression relates to risk practices in this population. These findings suggest that factors other than mental health problems must be considered if one wishes to understand HIV risk taking in this population.

  3. Mental Health Functioning Among Men who Use the Internet Specifically to Find Partners for Unprotected Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hugh

    2013-02-11

    Previous studies have shown a link between mental health functioning and involvement in HIV risk practices. The present research examines how well one specific group of men who have sex with other men (MSM) fare in terms of their mental health functioning, and then focuses on how mental health functioning relates to HIV risk practices in this population. The study was based on a national random sample of 332 MSM who use the Internet to seek men with whom they can engage in unprotected sex. Data collection was conducted via telephone interviews between January 2008 and May 2009. Depression is more common among men in this population than in the adult male population-at-large. All other measures of mental health functioning that were examined (self-esteem, impulsivity, current life satisfaction, optimism about the future) indicated low rates of mental health problem. Contrary to expectations, in nearly all instances, mental health functioning was not related to HIV risk practices. More work needs to be done to understand the causes of depression among these men, and to assess how, if at all, depression relates to risk practices in this population. These findings suggest that factors other than mental health problems must be considered if one wishes to understand HIV risk taking in this population.

  4. Fear of crime and its relationship to self-reported health and stress among men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macassa, Gloria; Winersjö, Rocio; Wijk, Katarina; McGrath, Cormac; Ahmadi, Nader; Soares, Joaquim

    2017-12-13

    Fear of crime is a growing social and public health problem globally, including in developed countries such as Sweden. This study investigated the impact of fear of crime on self-reported health and stress among men living in Gävleborg County. The study used data collected from 2993 men through a cross sectional survey in the 2014 Health in Equal Terms survey. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were carried out to study the relationship between fear of crime and self-reported health and stress. There was a statistically significant association between fear of crime and self-reported poor health and stress among men residing in Gävleborg County. In the bivariate analysis, men who reported fear of crime had odds of 1.98 (CI 1.47-2.66) and 2.23 (CI 1.45-3.41) respectively. Adjusting for demographic, social and economic variables in the multivariate analysis only reduced the odds ratio for self-reported poor health to 1.52 (CI 1.05-2.21) but not for self-reported stress with odds of 2.22 (1.27-3.86). Fear of crime among men was statistically significantly associated with self-reported poor health and stress in Gävleborg County. However, the statistically significant relationship remained even after accounting for demographic, social and economic factors, which warrants further research to better understand the role played by other variables.

  5. Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors among Teen and Young Adult Men: A Descriptive Portrait. Research Brief. Publication #2008-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Jennifer; Terry-Humen, Elizabeth; Ikramullah, Erum; Holcombe, Emily

    2008-01-01

    When it comes to the reproductive health behaviors of teens and young adults, far more public attention has focused on women than on men. That's not surprising. After all, men don't actually have the babies. Yet the importance of understanding men's reproductive health behaviors should not be overlooked, given their potential implications for men…

  6. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Men's Use of Mental Health Treatments. NCHS Data Brief. Number 206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Stephen J.; Clarke, Tainya C.; Blackwell, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Compared with white Americans, persons of other races in the United States are less likely to have access to and receive needed mental health care (1-4). Few studies, however, have explored such disparities specifically among men. Mental health and treatment have traditionally received less attention for men than women, perhaps because men are…

  7. Osteoporosis Health Beliefs among Younger and Older Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. Shanthi; McLeod, William; Kennedy, Laura; McLeod, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare osteoporosis health beliefs among different age and gender groups. This study used a cross-sectional design, involved 300 participants that represent both genders and three age groups (18 to 25, 30 to 50, and 50-plus), and assessed osteoporosis health beliefs using the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale…

  8. Health and lifestyle factors associated with sexual difficulties in men – results from a study of Australian men aged 18 to 55 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Schlichthorst

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual difficulties (SD are common among men of all ages and can have considerable impact on quality of life and indications for future health. SD are associated with mental and physical wellbeing and with relationship satisfaction, yet they are rarely discussed with medical professionals who are often ill equipped to assess and manage them. This paper provides an updated overview on the status of SD in Australian men from 18 to 55 years of age and will form a baseline comparison for future analyses of SD based on Ten to Men data. Methods We used data from Ten to Men, the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. SD was measured using eight items capturing specific sexual difficulties. We examined associations of a range of health and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, obesity and new sexual partners, self-rated health status, disability, pain medication, diagnosed physical and mental health conditions with each SD using logistic regression. The sample included 12,636 adult males who had previously been sexually active. Analysis was stratified by age (18–34 years versus 35–55 years. Results This paper shows that experiencing SD is relatively common among Australian men – overall half the sample (54 %; 95 % CI: 0.53–0.55 experienced at least one SD for more than 3 months over the past 12 months. While more common in older men aged 45 to 55 years, almost half the 18 to 24 year old men (48 % also reported at least one SD highlighting that SD affects men of all ages. We found that SDs were associated with both lifestyle and health factors, although the strongest associations were observed for health factors in both age groups, in particular poor self-rated health, having a disability and at least one mental health condition. Lifestyle factors associated with SDs in men of all ages included smoking, harmful alcohol consumption and drug use in the past 12 months. Obesity was

  9. Health promotion for socially disadvantaged groups: the case of homeless older men in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quine, Susan; Kendig, Hal; Russell, Cherry; Touchard, Denise

    2004-06-01

    There is extensive evidence that health promotion routinely benefits those who are already most socioeconomically advantaged. While the government's healthy ageing policy recognizes that improving health outcomes will require a range of strategies involving different target groups, recommendations focus on the issues and needs of the comfortable majority. This paper examines the scope and relevance of health promotion for one disadvantaged minority with extensive health needs: homeless older men. In an ethnographic study of older men (> or = 50 years of age) living alone in the inner city (Sydney), 32 men were identified as homeless and are the focus of this paper. Face to face semi-structured interviews were used to record the men's accounts of their everyday lives, including their health and use of services. The conditions in which these men were living were observed and recorded, and the researchers were aware of health and other services available in the geographic area. All informants were living on or below the poverty line. They reported a range of health conditions, for which many accessed available mainstream and specialist health services. Some obstacles to accessing services were noted. Information relevant to widely endorsed prescriptions for 'healthy ageing' also emerged. These included physical activity (especially walking), healthy eating, social activity and adopting healthy lifestyle habits. Findings highlight the extent to which these men lack the basic requirements for healthy ageing, notably adequate incomes and housing. At the same time, within the constraints of the lifestyle they lead, they are motivated to maintain their health and independence. While there are limits to what can be achieved for such people at a local level of service delivery, it is possible to identify feasible health promotion goals and service strategies.

  10. Assessing young unmarried men's access to reproductive health information and services in rural India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the accessibility of reproductive health information and contraceptives in a relatively less developed area of rural central India and assessed the risks facing young unmarried men. Methods This cross-sectional study used both qualitative and quantitative methods. Participants included 38 unmarried rural men in four focus-group discussions and a representative sample of 316 similarly profiled men, aged 17-22 years, in a survey. Information was collected on the men's socioeconomic characteristics; awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of family planning; attitudes toward future contraceptive use; intra-family communication; knowledge about STIs/HIV/AIDS; and access and use of condoms. Content analysis for qualitative information and descriptive analysis for survey data were used to draw conclusions. Results Young unmarried rural Indian men's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge is limited, although the majority is familiar with condoms (99%). The young men identified electronic mass media (67%) as the prime source of reproductive health information, yet they lacked detailed knowledge of various contraceptives and felt ignored by health providers, who, they felt, would be capable of providing SRH information through interpersonal communication. Young men are more concerned about avoiding infections and securing sexual pleasure and less concerned about avoiding potential pregnancies. For example, 68% of the young men were aware of condoms and their HIV/AIDS preventive role, but only about two-fifths mentioned condom use to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Although most young men (96%) knew where to access a condom, they felt uncomfortable or embarrassed doing so in their own villages or close by because of socio-cultural norms that prevented them from using contraceptives. Very few respondents (4%) disclosed using condoms themselves, but 59% said they knew someone from their peer group who had used them. Conclusions Young unmarried

  11. Socioeconomic status and bone health in community-dwelling older men: the CHAMP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabipour, I; Cumming, R; Handelsman, D J; Litchfield, M; Naganathan, V; Waite, L; Creasey, H; Janu, M; Le Couteur, D; Sambrook, P N; Seibel, M J

    2011-05-01

    The association between socioeconomic status (SES) and bone health, specifically in men, is unclear. Based upon data from the large prospective Concord Health in Ageing Men Project (CHAMP) Study of community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over, we found that specific sub-characteristics of SES, namely, marital status, living circumstances, and acculturation, reflected bone health in older Australian men. Previous studies reported conflicting results regarding the relationship between SES and bone health, specifically in men. The main objective of this study was to investigate associations of SES with bone health in community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over who participated in the baseline phase of the CHAMP Study in Sydney, Australia. The Australian Socioeconomic Index 2006 (AUSEI06) based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations was used to determine SES in 1,705 men. Bone mineral density and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone-related biochemical and hormonal parameters, including markers of bone turnover, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D, were measured in all men. General linear models adjusted for age, weight, height, and bone area revealed no significant differences across crude AUSEI06 score quintiles for BMC at any skeletal site or for any of the bone-related biochemical measures. However, multivariate regression models revealed that in Australian-born men, marital status was a predictor of higher lumbar BMC (β = 0.07, p = 0.002), higher total body BMC (β = 0.05, p = 0.03), and lower urinary NTX-I levels (β=-0.08, p = 0.03), while living alone was associated with lower BMC at the lumbar spine (β=-0.05, p = 0.04) and higher urinary NTX-I levels (β=0.07, p = 0.04). Marital status was also a predictor of higher total body BMC (β = 0.14, p = 0.003) in immigrants from Eastern and South Eastern Europe. However, in immigrants from Southern

  12. Internet Use and Sexual Health of Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Lyons, Tom; Garcia, Steve C.

    2010-01-01

    Young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) experience sexual health disparities due to a lack of support in settings that traditionally promote positive youth development. The Internet may help to fill this void, but little is known about how it is used for sexual health purposes among young MSM. This mixed-methods study reports quantitative results of a large survey of 18–24 year old MSM in an HIV testing clinic (N = 329) as well as qualitative results from interviews. Level of Internet use was high in this sample and the majority of participants reported using the Internet to find HIV/AIDS information. Black and Latino youth used the Internet less frequently than White youth, and after controlling for age, education, and frequency of Internet use, Black youth were 70% less likely to use the Internet to find HIV/AIDS information. Qualitative analyses identified themes related to the role of the Internet in finding sexual health information, sexual minority identity development, and sexual risk taking behaviors. Participants reported that the Internet filled an important and unmet need for sexual health education. It allowed for connections to the gay community and support during the coming out process, but also exposure to homophobic messages. There was no evidence of increased risk behaviors with partners met online, but at the same time the potential for the use of the Internet to facilitate safer sex communication was largely untapped. Our findings generally present an optimistic picture about the role of the Internet in the development of sexual health among young MSM. PMID:20182787

  13. Young men's health promotion and new information communication technologies: illuminating the issues and research agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve

    2010-09-01

    The article examines the use of newer, interactive information and communication technologies (ICTs) in young men's health promotion (HP), drawing on gender theory, HP research and evidence on young men's Internet usage. The focus is on highlighting an agenda for research in terms of emerging issues. New forms of social media ICT (for example 'web 2'-based on-line social networking sites, micro-blogging services, i-phones and podcasts) have the potential to enable young men to engage with health information in new and interesting ways. Given concerns about young men's engagement with health services, innovative ICT formats, particularly using the Internet, have been tried. However, issues persist around surfing 'addiction', quality control and equal access. Approaches to HP using new ICTs offer distributed control over information content and quality and a lay social context for accessing information. Online communities can potentially legitimize young men's participation in discourses around health, and support sustained engagement. The article discusses how this could support young men to re-conceptualize healthy choices in the context of masculine imperatives and responsible citizenship if specific conditions are met (for trusting engagement) and risks addressed (such as commercial disinformation). The skill requirements for young men to engage effectively with new ICTs are explored, focusing on health literacy (HL). It is predicted that social marketing approaches to HP for young men will increasingly include new ICTs, making specific requirements for HL. These approaches may appeal narrowly to hegemonic masculinities or broadly to multiple masculinities, including those historically marginalized. Recommendations are made for future research.

  14. Racial Disparities in Men's Health and the Transition to Marriage Among Unmarried Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Eva C; Mincy, Ronald; Miller, Daniel

    2010-03-23

    This article uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Survey to examine the association between transitioning to marriage and general health status or serious health problems among low-income men. Beginning with a sample of 3,631 unmarried fathers, the study observes the relationship between their transitions to marriage within 3 years after the birth of their child and their health status 5 years postbirth. The authors also explore if unmarried fathers benefit from marrying mothers who have health insurance. Results indicate that transitions to marriage and transitions to marriage with mothers who have health insurance, are associated with fewer serious health problems. The authors did not observe a significant relationship between transitioning to marriage and general health, likely because the sample comprised men who were young (average age was 26 years) and in very good health.

  15. Financial hardship, unmet medical need, and health self-efficacy among African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Mitchell, Jamie A; Shires, Deirdre A; Modlin, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Health self-efficacy (the confidence to take care of one's health) is a key component in ensuring that individuals are active partners in their health and health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy among African American men and to determine if unmet medical need due to cost potentially mediates this association. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from a convenience sample of African American men who attended a 1-day annual community health fair in Northeast Ohio (N = 279). Modified Poisson regression models were estimated to obtain the relative risk of reporting low health self-efficacy. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, those reporting financial hardship were 2.91 times, RR = 2.91 (confidence interval [1.24, 6.83]; p report low health self-efficacy. When unmet medical need due to cost was added to the model, the association between financial hardship and low health self-efficacy was no longer statistically significant. Our results suggest that the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy can be explained by unmet medical need due to cost. Possible intervention efforts among African American men with low financial resources should consider expanding clinical and community-based health assessments to capture financial hardship and unmet medical need due to cost as potential contributors to low health self-efficacy. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. Assessing trauma, substance abuse, and mental health in a sample of homeless men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mimi M; Ford, Julian D; Howard, Daniel L; Bradford, Daniel W

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the impact of physical and sexual trauma on a sample of 239 homeless men. Study participants completed a self-administered survey that collected data on demographics, exposure to psychological trauma, physical health and mental health problems, and substance use or misuse. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relative significance of demographic factors and the four types of trauma exposure associated with three outcomes: mental health, substance abuse, and physical health problems. The authors found that trauma history was significantly associated with more mental health problems but was not associated with substance abuse problems for homeless men. This study reinforces service providers' perceptions that because many homeless men experience the long-term, deleterious effects of not only current stressors, but also abuse and victimization that often begin in childhood, homeless men are a subpopulation in need of proactive prevention services that emphasize long-term continuity of care rather than sporadic crisis-based services. Study findings suggest that mentally ill, homeless men need proactive services that address the sequelae of abuse with care that is specialized and distinctly different from care for homeless adults with substance abuse or physical health care issues.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to health screening in men: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Chin Hai; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Booth, Andrew; White, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Men have poorer health status and are less likely to attend health screening compared to women. This systematic review presents current evidence on the barriers and facilitators to engaging men in health screening. We included qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method studies identified through five electronic databases, contact with experts and reference mining. Two researchers selected and appraised the studies independently. Data extraction and synthesis were conducted using the 'best fit' framework synthesis method. 53 qualitative, 44 quantitative and 6 mixed-method studies were included. Factors influencing health screening uptake in men can be categorized into five domains: individual, social, health system, healthcare professional and screening procedure. The most commonly reported barriers are fear of getting the disease and low risk perception; for facilitators, they are perceived risk and benefits of screening. Male-dominant barriers include heterosexual -self-presentation, avoidance of femininity and lack of time. The partner's role is the most common male-dominant facilitator to screening. This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of barriers and facilitators to health screening in men including the male-dominant factors. The findings are particularly useful for clinicians, researchers and policy makers who are developing interventions and policies to increase screening uptake in men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Social determinants of self-evaluated good health status of rural men in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, P A

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review revealed a gap in health research regarding the determinants of good health for rural men in Jamaica. This study seeks to fill this void by examining cross-sectional survey data to model the social determinants of the self-reported good health status of rural men in Jamaica. A sample of 5041 males (> or = 15 years) was extracted from a national cross-sectional survey of 25 018 respondents. A stratified random probability sampling technique was used to draw the sample. Data were stored, retrieved and analyzed using SPSS for Windows 16.0 (SPSS; Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were used to provide pertinent socio-demographic characteristics of the sample, and logistic regression was used to establish a predictive model for good self-reported health status in rural Jamaican males. Seventeen percent of rural men claimed that they had poor health, 4.9% had health insurance, 61.6% visited a healthcare practitioner, 96.0% purchased prescribed medications and 45.3% completed the course of prescribed medications. The social determinants of good health status of rural men in Jamaica are cost of medical care (OR = 0.916, 95% CI = 0.841-0.997); retirement income (OR = 0.0.382, 95% CI = 0.206-0.707); marital status: separated, divorced or widowed with reference to those never married (OR = 0.270, 95% CI = 0.178-0.410), and married with reference to never married men (OR = 0.465, 95% CI = 0.356-0.609); health insurance coverage (OR = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.027-0.063); number of children in household (OR = 1.200, 95% CI = 1.069-1.347); and number of durable goods owned (OR = 1.107, 95% CI = 1.050-1.166). Children continue to be not only futuristic assets to parents, but they also currently improve the health status of rural men.

  19. Perceived Discrimination and Physical Health among HIV-Positive Black and Latino Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M.; Landrine, Hope; Galvan, Frank H.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Klein, David J.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted the first study to examine health correlates of discrimination due to race/ethnicity, HIV-status, and sexual orientation among 348 HIV-positive Black (n=181) and Latino (n=167) men who have sex with men. Participants completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews. In multivariate analyses, Black participants who experienced greater racial discrimination were less likely to have a high CD4 cell count [OR=0.7, 95%CI=(0.5, 0.9), p=.02], and an undetectable viral load [OR=0.8, 95%CI=(0.6, 1.0), p=.03], and were more likely to visit the emergency department [OR=1.3, 95%CI=(1.0, 1.7), p=.04]; the combined three types of discrimination predicted greater AIDS symptoms [F (3,176)=3.8, pdiscrimination predicted greater medication side effect severity [F (3,163)=4.6, pdiscrimination plays a role in health outcomes. PMID:23297084

  20. Perceived discrimination and physical health among HIV-positive Black and Latino men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Landrine, Hope; Galvan, Frank H; Wagner, Glenn J; Klein, David J

    2013-05-01

    We conducted the first study to examine health correlates of discrimination due to race/ethnicity, HIV-status, and sexual orientation among 348 HIV-positive Black (n = 181) and Latino (n = 167) men who have sex with men. Participants completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews. In multivariate analyses, Black participants who experienced greater racial discrimination were less likely to have a high CD4 cell count [OR = 0.7, 95 % CI = (0.5, 0.9), p = 0.02], and an undetectable viral load [OR = 0.8, 95 % CI = (0.6, 1.0), p = 0.03], and were more likely to visit the emergency department [OR = 1.3, 95 % CI = (1.0, 1.7), p = 0.04]; the combined three types of discrimination predicted greater AIDS symptoms [F (3,176) = 3.8, p discrimination predicted greater medication side effect severity [F (3,163) = 4.6, p discrimination plays a role in health outcomes.

  1. Communicating With School Nurses About Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H; Robin, Leah

    2015-10-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected from Black and Latino YMSM aged 13-19 through web-based questionnaires (N = 415) and interviews (N = 32). School nurses were the staff members youth most often reported willingness to talk to about HIV testing (37.8%), STD testing (37.1%), or condoms (37.3%), but least often reported as safe to talk to about attraction to other guys (11.4%). Interviews revealed youth reluctance to talk with school staff including nurses when uncertain of staff members' perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) people or perceiving staff to lack knowledge of LGBTQ issues, communities, or resources. Nurses may need additional training to effectively reach Black and Latino YMSM. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. (Un)healthy prison masculinities: Theorising men's health in prison

    OpenAIRE

    De Viggiani, N.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis explores the interconnections between masculinity, health and prison. It contests reductionist, individualist and biomedical approaches to health care management in prisons and challenges gender-blindness within criminology and social science where masculinities have been overlooked as key factors of prison culture and organisation. The research set out to explore how masculinities manifest at institutional, social and cultural levels in prison as key determinants of health.\\ud \\u...

  3. Street football is a feasible health-enhancing activity for homeless men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Eva Wulff; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Hornstrup, Therese

    2014-01-01

    This case-control study investigated the feasibility of street football as a health-enhancing activity for homeless men, specifically the musculoskeletal effects of 12 weeks of training. Twenty-two homeless men participated in the football group (FG) and 10 served as controls (C). Plasma.......095 to 0.969 ± 0.090 g/cm(2) (P = 0.02). No effects were observed in C. In conclusion, street football appears to be a feasible training activity with musculoskeletal health benefits for homeless men. The attendance rate and the training intensity were high, and 12 weeks of training resulted...... in a substantial anabolic response in bone metabolism. Postural balance improved markedly, and the overall risk of falling, and hospitalization due to sudden trauma, could be reduced by street football for homeless men....

  4. Modeling minority stress effects on homelessness and health disparities among young men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Douglas; Stall, Ron; Fata, Aimee; Campbell, Richard T

    2014-06-01

    Sexual minority youth are more likely to experience homelessness, and homeless sexual minority youth report greater risk for mental health and substance abuse symptoms than homeless heterosexual youth, yet few studies have assessed determinants that help explain the disparities. Minority stress theory proposes that physical and mental health disparities among sexual minority populations may be explained by the stress produced by living in heterosexist social environments characterized by stigma and discrimination directed toward sexual minority persons. We used data from a sample of 200 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) (38 % African American, 26.5 % Latino/Hispanic, 23.5 % White, 12 % multiracial/other) to develop an exploratory path model measuring the effects of experience and internalization of sexual orientation stigma on depression and substance use via being kicked out of home due to sexual orientation and current homelessness. Direct significant paths were found from experience of sexual orientation-related stigma to internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma, having been kicked out of one's home, experiencing homelessness during the past year, and major depressive symptoms during the past week. Having been kicked out of one's home had a direct significant effect on experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months and on daily marijuana use. Internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma and experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months partially mediated the direct effect of experience of sexual orientation-related stigma on major depressive symptoms. Our empirical testing of the effects of minority stress on health of YMSM advances minority stress theory as a framework for investigating health disparities among this population.

  5. The changes of plasma adrenomedullin level in Han and tibetan health adult men in plateau area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shaolin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the changes and clinical significance of plasma adrenomedullin in Han and Tibetan health adult men at the state of chronic hypoxia. The Han health adult who migrated and lived above sea level 4200 meter for 1∼3 years and the native Tibetan were involved in this study. The plasma adrenomedullin levels in both Han and Tibetan health adult men were measured by RIA. The results showed that the plasma adrenomedullin levels of native Tibetan were significantly higher than that of migrated Han worker (P<0.05). The plasma adrenomedullin might play a regulatory role on the physiological function in the health adult men who live in high altitude hypoxic state. (authors)

  6. Young Men, Help-Seeking, and Mental Health Services: Exploring Barriers and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Louise; Long, Maggie; Moorhead, Anne

    2016-01-01

    International research has identified young men as reluctant to seek help for mental health problems. This research explored barriers and solutions to professional help seeking for mental health problems among young men living in the North West of Ireland. A qualitative approach, using two focus groups with six participants each and five face-to-face interviews, was conducted with men aged 18 to 24 years (total N = 17). Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Seven key themes of barriers to professional help seeking were identified: “acceptance from peers,” “personal challenges,” “cultural and environmental influences,” “self-medicating with alcohol,” “perspectives around seeking professional help,” “fear of homophobic responses,” and “traditional masculine ideals.” Five key themes of solutions to these barriers included “tailored mental health advertising,” “integrating mental health into formal education,” “education through semiformal support services,” “accessible mental health care,” and “making new meaning.” Interesting findings on barriers include fear of psychiatric medication, fear of homophobic responses from professionals, the legacy of Catholic attitudes, and the genuine need for care. This study offers an in-depth exploration of how young men experience barriers and uniquely offers solutions identified by participants themselves. Youth work settings were identified as a resource for engaging young men in mental health work. Young men can be encouraged to seek help if services and professionals actively address barriers, combining advertising, services, and education, with particular attention and respect to how and when young men seek help and with whom they want to share their problems. PMID:27365212

  7. The relationship between education and health among incarcerated men and women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Kathryn M; Masters, Ryan K; Boardman, Jason D

    2016-09-01

    This paper contributes to research on the education-health association by extending the scope of inquiry to adult inmates. Not only are inmates excluded from most nationally representative studies of health but they also represent a highly select group in terms of both education and health. As such, our study provides new information about the health of incarcerated populations and it extends the generalizability of the education-health association beyond the non-institutionalized population. We use a prison-level fixed-effects regression model with the 2004 Survey of Inmates in State Correctional Facilities (n = 287 facilities) to evaluate the effects of education on a standardized morbidity scale of 11 lifetime and current health conditions among incarcerated men (n = 10,493) and women (n = 2,797). Education prior to incarceration is negatively associated with lifetime health problems for both women and men and the association is stronger among women. Among inmates who enter prison with less than a GED level of education, attaining a GED in prison is associated with better current health outcomes for men, but not women. The generalization of the education-health association among prisoners further highlights the fundamental nature of education as a health promotive resource. Discussed are the implications for the education-health literature in general and health promotion efforts among incarcerated adults specifically.

  8. Assessing Trauma, Substance Abuse, and Mental Health in a Sample of Homeless Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mimi M.; Ford, Julian D.; Howard, Daniel L.; Bradford, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of physical and sexual trauma on a sample of 239 homeless men. Study participants completed a self-administered survey that collected data on demographics, exposure to psychological trauma, physical health and mental health problems, and substance use or misuse. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to…

  9. Racial Disparities in Men's Health and the Transition to Marriage among Unmarried Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Eva C.; Mincy, Ronald B.; Miller, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Survey to examine the association between transitioning to marriage and general health status or serious health problems among low-income men. Beginning with a sample of 3,631 unmarried fathers, the study observes the relationship between their transitions to marriage within 3…

  10. Cognitive health messages in popular women's and men's magazines, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniela B; Laditka, James N; Laditka, Sarah B; Mathews, Anna E

    2010-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that physical activity, healthy diets, and social engagement may promote cognitive health. Popular media helps establish the public health agenda. In this study, we describe articles about cognitive health in top-circulating women's and men's magazines. To identify articles on cognitive health, we manually searched all pages of 4 top-circulating women's magazines and 4 top-circulating men's magazines published in 2006 and 2007 to identify articles on cognitive health. We examined article volume, narrative and illustrative content, information sources, and contact resources. Women's magazines had 27 cognitive health articles (5.32/1,000 pages), and men's magazines had 26 (5.26/1,000 pages). Diet was the primary focus (>75% of content) in 30% of articles in women's magazines and 27% of men's magazines. Vitamins/supplements were the focus of 15% of articles in men's magazines and 11% in women's magazines. Articles mentioned physical activity, cognitive activity, and social interaction, although these subjects were rarely the focus. Articles focused more on prevention than treatment. Topics were primarily "staying sharp," memory, and Alzheimer's disease. Colleges/universities were most often cited as sources; contacts for further information were rare. Most articles were illustrated. Although the volume of cognitive health articles was similar in the magazines, content differed. More articles in men's magazines discussed multiple chronic conditions (eg, Alzheimer's disease), whereas more in women's magazines discussed memory. Including more articles that focus on physical activity and direct readers to credible resources could enhance the quality of cognitive health communication in the popular media.

  11. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. Aim  To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. Study design  The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty‐two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user‐led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Results  Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high‐quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. Conclusions  The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. PMID:21645185

  12. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2013-03-01

    Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty-two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user-led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high-quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. What Health Issues or Conditions Affect Women Differently Than Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/women-and-depression-discovering-hope/complete-index.shtml Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Arthritis-related statistics . Retrieved August 22, 2012, from http://www.cdc. ...

  14. Understanding Prostate Changes: A Health Guide for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flow. Like TURP, laser surgery requires anesthesia. One advantage of laser surgery over TURP is that laser ... National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact ...

  15. Participatory assessment of the health of Latino immigrant men in a community with a growing Latino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documėt, Patricia I; Kamouyerou, Andrea; Pesantes, Amalia; Macia, Laura; Maldonado, Hernan; Fox, Andrea; Bachurski, Leslie; Morgenstern, Dawn; Gonzalez, Miguel; Boyzo, Roberto; Guadamuz, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Latino immigrant men are an understudied population in the US, especially in areas with small yet growing Latino populations. For this community-based participatory health assessment we conducted four focus groups and 66 structured surveys with Latino immigrant men, and 10 openended interviews with service providers. We analyzed transcripts using content analysis and survey data using Pearson Chi-square tests. Overall, 53% of participating men had not completed high school. Our findings suggest that their social circumstances precluded men from behaving in a way they believe would protect their health. Loneliness, fear and lack of connections prompted stress among men, who had difficulty locating healthcare services. Newly immigrated men were significantly more likely to experience depression symptoms. Latino immigrant men face social isolation resulting in negative health consequences, which are amplified by the new growth community context. Men can benefit from interventions aimed at building their social connections.

  16. Mental health literacy and the experience of depression in a community sample of gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen; Häusermann, Michael; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2014-02-01

    Gay men are at higher risk of suffering from a variety of psychiatric disorders, yet the mental health literacy of this population has remained largely unknown. In 2007 and 2011, surveys were conducted among gay men in Geneva, Switzerland, recruited by probability-based time-space sampling. Based on a case vignette of a man with major depression, respondents were asked a series of questions about labelling, perceived risk, and help-seeking beliefs. Men meeting caseness for major depression were asked open questions about perceived causes and additional help-seeking/self-help. Among the 762 respondents, 14.7% met diagnostic criteria for major depression (MDD) in the past 12 months. The vignette was labelled depression by 44.1% of the entire sample, and 61.9% of the men with MDD. Discrimination (33.2%), acceptance or rejection by others (21.4%), and loneliness (24.9%) were the most common reasons given for greater susceptibility among gay men, yet men with MDD reported problems with love/relationship (32.5%) and work (28.9%) as the most common perceived causes of recent depression, and problems with love/relationship (21.9%), accepting one's homosexuality (21.1%), and family (20.2%) at initial outset. The highest proportions of gay men rated non-medical options such as a close friend (91.6%), relaxation exercises or meditation (84.4%), and physical activity (83.5%) as being helpful for the depression vignette. No probes used for open questions, and findings generalizable only to gay men in the sampling scheme. There are many commonalities in labelling, perceived causes, and help-seeking with general populations, but also numerous specificities in mental health literacy and experience among gay men. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Involving men to improve maternal and newborn health: A systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Tokhi

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence and program experience indicate that engaging men in maternal and newborn health can have considerable health benefits for women and children in low- and middle-income countries. Previous reviews have identified male involvement as a promising intervention, but with a complex evidence base and limited direct evidence of effectiveness for mortality and morbidity outcomes.To determine the effect of interventions to engage men during pregnancy, childbirth and infancy on mortality and morbidity, as well as effects on mechanisms by which male involvement is hypothesised to influence mortality and morbidity outcomes: home care practices, care-seeking, and couple relationships.Using a comprehensive, highly sensitive mapping of maternal health intervention studies conducted in low- and middle-income countries between 2000 and 2012, we identified interventions that have engaged men to improve maternal and newborn health. Primary outcomes were care-seeking for essential services, mortality and morbidity, and home care practices. Secondary outcomes relating to couple relationships were extracted from included studies.Thirteen studies from nine countries were included. Interventions to engage men were associated with improved antenatal care attendance, skilled birth attendance, facility birth, postpartum care, birth and complications preparedness and maternal nutrition. The impact of interventions on mortality, morbidity and breastfeeding was less clear. Included interventions improved male partner support for women and increased couple communication and joint decision-making, with ambiguous effects on women's autonomy.Interventions to engage men in maternal and newborn health can increase care-seeking, improve home care practices, and support more equitable couple communication and decision-making for maternal and newborn health. These findings support engaging men as a health promotion strategy, although evidence gaps remain around

  18. What Do Men Want from a Health Screening Mobile App? A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Hai Teo

    Full Text Available There is a lack of mobile app which aims to improve health screening uptake developed for men. As part of the study to develop an effective mobile app to increase health screening uptake in men, we conducted a needs assessment to find out what do men want from a health screening mobile app. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 31 men from a banking institution in Kuala Lumpur. The participants were purposely sampled according to their job position, age, ethnicity and screening status. The recruitment was stopped once data saturation was achieved. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic approach. Three themes emerged from the analysis and they were: content, feature and dissemination. In terms of the content, men wanted the app to provide information regarding health screening and functions that can assess their health; which must be personalized to them and are trustable. The app must have user-friendly features in terms of information delivery, ease of use, attention allocation and social connectivity. For dissemination, men proposed that advertisements, recommendations by health professionals, providing incentive and integrating the app as into existing systems may help to increase the dissemination of the app. This study identified important factors that need to be considered when developing a mobile app to improve health screening uptake. Future studies on mobile app development should elicit users' preference and need in terms of its content, features and dissemination strategies to improve the acceptability and the chance of successful implementation.

  19. What Do Men Want from a Health Screening Mobile App? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of mobile app which aims to improve health screening uptake developed for men. As part of the study to develop an effective mobile app to increase health screening uptake in men, we conducted a needs assessment to find out what do men want from a health screening mobile app. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 31 men from a banking institution in Kuala Lumpur. The participants were purposely sampled according to their job position, age, ethnicity and screening status. The recruitment was stopped once data saturation was achieved. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic approach. Three themes emerged from the analysis and they were: content, feature and dissemination. In terms of the content, men wanted the app to provide information regarding health screening and functions that can assess their health; which must be personalized to them and are trustable. The app must have user-friendly features in terms of information delivery, ease of use, attention allocation and social connectivity. For dissemination, men proposed that advertisements, recommendations by health professionals, providing incentive and integrating the app as into existing systems may help to increase the dissemination of the app. This study identified important factors that need to be considered when developing a mobile app to improve health screening uptake. Future studies on mobile app development should elicit users’ preference and need in terms of its content, features and dissemination strategies to improve the acceptability and the chance of successful implementation. PMID:28060953

  20. The Geneva gay men's health project : a community-research collaboration to assess and improve the health of gay men in Geneva, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive overviews of research in the late 1990s on health issues relevant to gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender people (LGBT) identified issues which appear to affect sexual minorities disproportionately, but the quality of the available data was deemed too poor to translate into policy initiatives. Dialogai, a gay organization in Geneva active in HIV prevention work, embarked on a community-research partnership with the Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, Universi...

  1. Transitions among Health States Using 12 Measures of Successful Aging in Men and Women: Results from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thielke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Successful aging has many dimensions, which may manifest differently in men and women at different ages. Methods. We characterized one-year transitions among health states in 12 measures of successful aging among adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. The measures included self-rated health, ADLs, IADLs, depression, cognition, timed walk, number of days spent in bed, number of blocks walked, extremity strength, recent hospitalizations, feelings about life as a whole, and life satisfaction. We dichotomized variables into “healthy” or “sick,” states, and estimated the prevalence of the healthy state and the probability of transitioning from one state to another, or dying, during yearly intervals. We compared men and women and three age groups (65–74, 75–84, and 85–94. Findings. Measures of successful aging showed similar results by gender. Most participants remained healthy even into advanced ages, although health declined for all measures. Recuperation, although less common with age, still occurred frequently. Men had a higher death rate than women regardless of health status, and were also more likely to remain in the healthy state. Discussion. The results suggest a qualitatively different experience of successful aging between men and women. Men did not simply “age faster” than women.

  2. 2016 United Kingdom national guideline on the sexual health care of men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Dan; Asboe, David; Barber, Tristan; Emerson, Carol; Field, Nigel; Gibson, Stuart; Hughes, Gwenda; Jones, Rachael; Murchie, Martin; Nori, Achyuta V; Rayment, Michael; Sullivan, Ann

    2018-01-01

    This guideline is intended for use in UK Genitourinary medicine clinics and sexual health services but is likely to be of relevance in all sexual health settings, including general practice and Contraception and Sexual Health (CASH) services, where men who have sex with men (MSM) seek sexual health care or where addressing the sexual health needs of MSM may have public health benefits. For the purposes of this document, MSM includes all gay, bisexual and all other males who have sex with other males and both cis and trans men. This document does not provide guidance on the treatment of particular conditions where this is covered in other British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) Guidelines but outlines best practice in multiple aspects of the sexual health care of MSM. Where prevention of sexually transmitted infections including HIV can be addressed as an integral part of clinical care, this is consistent with the concept of combination prevention and is included. The document is designed primarily to provide guidance on the direct clinical care of MSM but also makes reference to the design and delivery of services with the aim of supporting clinicians and commissioners in providing effective services. Methodology This document was produced in accordance with the guidance set out in the BASHH CEG's document 'Framework for guideline development and assessment' published in 2010 at http://www.bashh.org/guidelines and with reference to the Agree II instrument. Following the production of the updated framework in April 2015, the GRADE system for assessing evidence was adopted and the draft recommendations were regraded. Search strategy (see also Appendix 1) Ovid Medline 1946 to December 2014, Medline daily update, Embase 1974 to December 2014, Pubmed NeLH Guidelines Database, Cochrane library from 2000 to December 2014. Search language English only. The search for Section 3 was conducted on PubMed to December 2014. Priority was given to peer

  3. Resveratrol blunts the positive effects of exercise training on cardiovascular health in aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybholt, Lasse Gliemann; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Olesen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    signaling and through an improved antioxidant capacity. We tested the hypothesis that resveratrol supplementation enhances training-induced improvements in cardiovascular health parameters in aged men. Twenty-seven healthy physically inactive aged men (age: 65 ± 1 years; BMI: 25.4 ± 0.7 kg/m2; MAP: 95.8 ± 2...... on atherosclerosis marker VCAM-1. Sirtuin 1 protein levels were not affected by resveratrol supplementation. These findings indicate that, whereas exercise training effectively improves several cardiovascular health parameters in aged men, concomitant resveratrol supplementation blunts most of these effects.......Aging is thought to be associated with decreased vascular function partly due to oxidative stress. Resveratrol is a polyphenol, which, in animal studies has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, improve cardiovascular health and physical capacity, in part through its effects on Sirtuin 1...

  4. Impact of perceived HIV stigma within men who have sex with men community on mental health of seropositive MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Eddie S K; Mak, Winnie W S; Tam, Terence C Y; Zhu, Chen; Chung, Rita W Y

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) do not only face biased treatment from the general public but also from members of the MSM community. We conceptualized such biases perpetuated within the MSM community as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in-group stigma. This study examined the pathways by which perceived HIV in-group stigma impacted the mental health of seropositive MSM in Hong Kong. Internalized HIV stigma, serostatus disclosure concerns, and negative reactions towards HIV stigma were hypothesized as intermediate factors. Based on 100 Chinese seropositive MSM who were on antiretroviral therapy, results of a path analysis partially supported our hypotheses. Only negative reactions towards HIV stigma within the MSM community was a significant intermediate factor. The findings highlight the importance of understanding seropositive MSM's different reactions to HIV stigma perpetuated within the MSM community. On top of stigma reduction research, further research may explore ways that help seropositive MSM cope with HIV in-group stigma and foster resilience.

  5. Methods Used and Topics Addressed in Quantitative Health Research on Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, David J; Bauer, Greta R; Bradley, Kaitlin; Tran, Oth Vilaythong

    2017-01-01

    Research on sexual minority men (gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men) was examined with regard to the measures of sexual orientation used, the methods of research, and the main health outcomes under study. A systematic review of English-language quantitative studies was conducted focused on the health of sexual minority men published in 2010 (n = 250). The results provide a snapshot of the literature and revealed that research on sexual minority men overwhelmingly focused on HIV, STIs, and sexual health for which sexual orientation was most commonly defined behaviorally. For topics of mental health or body/fitness outcomes, sexual orientation was most commonly defined by identity. Most study samples were venue-based, and only 8.8% of published papers drew data from population-based samples. The findings suggest that there exists a need for research on sexual minority men's health beyond STIs and HIV that will examine mental and physical health outcomes beyond sexual risk, uses probability-based samples, and addresses intersectional concerns related to race/ethnicity and age.

  6. "It's sort of like being a detective": Understanding how Australian men self-monitor their health prior to seeking help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braunack-Mayer Annette

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly held that men delay help seeking because they are ignorant about and disinterested in their health. However, this discussion has not been informed by men's lay perspectives, which have remained almost entirely absent from scholarship relating to men's help seeking practices. Methods In this qualitative paper, we draw on semi-structured interviews with 36 South Australian men to examine their understandings of help seeking and health service use. Results & Discussion We use participants' talk about self-monitoring to challenge the assumption that men are disinterested in their health, arguing instead that the men in our study monitored their health status and made conscious decisions about when and how to seek help. Using an inductive approach during the thematic analysis we were able to identify four key factors that influenced how men monitored their health and explain how these intersect with the way men sought help and used health services. Conclusion We show that the men in our study were actively engaged in the self-monitoring of their health. We suggest that these findings offer an alternative approach for understanding how we can promote men's interaction with health services.

  7. Improving mental health and wellbeing for young men in the building and construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Robyn; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Statistics on causes of death gathered by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (2010) report that suicide was the leading cause amongst young men in Australia between the ages of 15-24. The figures have been similarly high for over a decade. In Australia these alarming statistics have led to the funding of a range of programmes tackling youth suicide and more recently programmes that are aimed at improving help-seeking behaviours of young men. The programme reported in this paper is one such programme that is working with young men in the building and construction industry who are regarded at even greater risk of poor mental health outcomes. The research that was undertaken uncovered some of the impact of a universal programme on improving the protective factors of young men in this industry. Young men can present themselves in a very positive light as robust and resilient human beings, contrary to much of the research that has been undertaken with a focus on young men in building and construction and living in rural and remote communities. This paper discusses the data and uses the material to consider how resilient young men in this industry can become key informants and informal peer mentors.

  8. Perspectives of Fitness and Health in College Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Dieser, Rodney B.

    2010-01-01

    Because many college students engage in low levels of physical activity, the current study used a qualitative framework to interview 11 college students to examine the meaning physically active college students assign to the practice of fitness and health. Students discussed the importance of healthy eating, but that it was difficult to accomplish…

  9. Prevalence of recreational drug use reported by men who have sex with men attending sexual health clinics in Manchester, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, A; Ahmad, S; Cannon, L; Higgins, S P; Kliner, M; Kolyva, A; Ward, C; Vivancos, R

    2018-03-01

    Recreational drug use (RDU) has been reported to be disproportionately higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) when compared to their heterosexual counterparts. To identify RDU, links to risky sexual practices and infections for MSM attending three sexual health clinics across Manchester, United Kingdom, a retrospective case note review was conducted using a random powered sample of service users attending three sites during 2014. Three hundred and fifty-seven case notes were reviewed across three sites. Eighteen per cent of service users reported any type of RDU. Use of at least one of the three drugs associated with chemsex (crystal methamphetamine, mephedrone, gamma hydroxybutyrate/gamma butyrolactone) was reported by 3.6%. A statistically significant difference was identified between non-drug users and any-drug users reporting: group sex (odds ratio [OR] 5.88, p = 0.013), condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) (OR 2.77, p = 0.003) and condomless oral intercourse (OR 2.52, p = 0.016). A statistically significant difference was identified between chemsex-related drug user and non-drug user groups reporting: group sex (OR 13.05, p = 0.023), CRAI (OR 3.69, p = 0.029) and condomless insertive anal intercourse (OR 1.27, p = 0.039). There was also a statistically higher incidence of gonorrhoea infection in chemsex-related drug use compared with those not using drugs (p = 0.002, OR 6.88). This study identifies that substance use is common in MSM attending sexual health clinics in Manchester. High-risk sexual practices and certain sexually transmitted infections are more common in MSM reporting RDU.

  10. The Significance of Privacy and Trust in Providing Health-Related Services to Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggests that bisexual men face unique health concerns in comparison to their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. However, little is known about behaviorally bisexual men's experiences with health services, including ways of providing services that would be most appropriate to meet the health needs of this…

  11. The Perspectives of Young Men and Their Teenage Partners on Maternity and Health Services during Pregnancy and Early Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Nicola J.; Church, Stephanie; Hill, Malcolm; Seaman, Pete; Roberts, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This study discusses young couples' interactions with maternity and health services paying particular attention to men's perspectives. Findings are based on research conducted in Scotland with men (aged 16-25) and their teenage partners (aged 16-19). Most young men were very involved in their child's life and provided support and care to their…

  12. Oral health as a risk factor for mortality in middle-aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabbah, Wael; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Sheiham, Aubrey

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence of an association between poor oral health and mortality. This association is usually attributed to inflammatory and nutrition pathways. However, the role of health behaviours and socioeconomic position has not been adequately examined. The aims of this study were...... to examine the association between oral health and premature death among middle-aged men and to test whether it was explained by socioeconomic position and behaviours. METHODS: Data were from the Vietnam Experience Study, a prospective cohort study of Vietnam War-era (1965-1971), American male army personnel....... The authors examined risk of cause-specific and all-cause mortality in relation to poor oral health in middle age, adjusting for age, ethnicity, socioeconomic position, IQ, behavioural factors and systemic conditions. RESULTS: Men with poor oral health experienced a higher risk of cause-specific and all...

  13. Similar but different. Health behaviour pathways differ between men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei C; Worsley, Anthony; Hunter, Wendy

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine middle to older aged Australians' healthy eating, eating out, and physical activity behaviours and to investigate their relationships with likely antecedents such as demographics, personal values, health background, and attention to weight and health habits. A mail survey was conducted among a random sample of men and women aged between 38 and 79 years; 1105 usable questionnaires were obtained. Structural equation modelling was used to examine relationships between the variables. The results showed that there were distinct relationships between predictive variables and behavioural and BMI outcomes for men and women. For example, healthy eating, eating out behaviours were positively associated with body weight for women but not men while attention to weight and health habits was positively related to hedonism values for women but not for men. The interrelationships among the predictors and the outcome variables appear to be more complex for women than men. The implications of the findings for nutrition communication are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 'What men don't know can hurt women's health': a qualitative study of the barriers to and opportunities for men's involvement in maternal healthcare in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganle, John Kuumuori; Dery, Isaac

    2015-10-10

    The importance of men's involvement in facilitating women's access to skilled maternal healthcare in patriarchal societies such as Ghana is increasingly being recognised. However, few studies have been conducted to examine men's involvement in issues of maternal healthcare, the barriers to men's involvement, and how best to actively involve men. The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to and opportunities for men's involvement in maternal healthcare in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Qualitative focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and key informant interviews were conducted with adult men and women aged 20-50 in a total of seven communities in two geographic districts and across urban and rural areas in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Attride-Stirling's thematic network analysis framework was used to analyse and present the qualitative data. Findings suggest that although many men recognise the importance of skilled care during pregnancy and childbirth, and the benefits of their involvement, most did not actively involve themselves in issues of maternal healthcare unless complications set in during pregnancy or labour. Less than a quarter of male participants had ever accompanied their wives for antenatal care or postnatal care in a health facility. Four main barriers to men's involvement were identified: perceptions that pregnancy care is a female role while men are family providers; negative cultural beliefs such as the belief that men who accompany their wives to receive ANC services are being dominated by their wives; health services factors such as unfavourable opening hours of services, poor attitudes of healthcare providers such as maltreatment of women and their spouses and lack of space to accommodate male partners in health facilities; and the high cost associated with accompanying women to seek maternity care. Suggestions for addressing these barriers include community mobilisation programmes to promote greater male involvement

  15. Think You Can Shrink? A Proof-of-Concept Study for Men's Health Education Through Edutainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Thomas; Norman, Cameron D; Knaak, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Connecting people to useful, actionable health resources is a substantive challenge that sits at the heart of health communication. Digital media provides means of producing, distributing and revising content and creates possibilities for new and multiple channels for reaching and engaging audiences, particularly when combined with social media. While there is much promise of digital media forms to deliver audiences and promote engagement, the health communication landscape is still largely hit-and-miss with few 'best practice' examples to follow. Proof-of-concept studies allow for a structured, focused exploration of ways to leverage the potential of digital media and learn what approaches have the promise to invest resources in amid a sea of possible options. Think You Can Shrink? (TYCS) is a multi-episode web series modelled on a reality TV show format. The show's key objective is to educate men and demonstrate, through modelling, ways men can support other men to encourage help-seeking behaviours and greater health communication, which in turn, may also lead to better health outcomes. Given the newness of the approach, the project was launched as a proof-of-concept study to explore: (a) whether this approach could engage the interest of men, (b) what initial impact this approach might induce and (c) the kind of audiences this approach might most appeal to.

  16. Fear of crime and its relationship to self-reported health and stress among men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Macassa

    2018-01-01

    Design and Methods: The study used data collected from 2993 men through a cross sectional survey in the 2014 Health in Equal Terms survey. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were carried out to study the relationship between fear of crime and self-reported health and stress. Results: There was a statistically significant association between fear of crime and self-reported poor health and stress among men residing in Gävleborg County. In the bivariate analysis, men who reported fear of crime had odds of 1.98 (CI 1.47- 2.66 and 2.23 (CI 1.45-3.41 respectively. Adjusting for demographic, social and economic variables in the multivariate analysis only reduced the odds ratio for self-reported poor health to 1.52 (CI 1.05-2.21 but not for self-reported stress with odds of 2.22 (1.27-3.86. Conclusions: Fear of crime among men was statistically significantly associated with self-reported poor health and stress in Gävleborg County. However, the statistically significant relationship remained even after accounting for demographic, social and economic factors, which warrants further research to better understand the role played by other variables.

  17. Questioning gender norms with men to improve health outcomes: evidence of impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, G; Ricardo, C; Nascimento, M; Olukoya, A; Santos, C

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a review of 58 evaluation studies of programmes with men and boys in sexual and reproductive health (including HIV prevention, treatment, care and support); father involvement; gender-based violence; maternal, newborn and child health; and gender socialisation more broadly. While few of the programmes go beyond the pilot stage, or a relatively short-term timeframe, they offer compelling evidence that well-designed programmes with men and boys can lead to positive changes in their behaviours and attitudes related to sexual and reproductive health; maternal, newborn and child health; their interaction with their children; their use of violence against women; their questioning of violence with other men; and their health-seeking behaviour. The evidence indicates that programmes that incorporate a gender-transformative approach and promote gender-equitable relationships between men and women are more effective in producing behaviour change than narrowly focused interventions, as are programmes which reach beyond the individual level to the social context.

  18. Men's health: non-communicable chronic diseases and social vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidinotto, Daniele Natália Pacharone Bertolini; Simonetti, Janete Pessuto; Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini

    2016-08-15

    to evaluate the relationship between absences in scheduled appointments and the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and to investigate the relationship between spatial distribution of these diseases and social vulnerability, using geoprocessing. a quantitative study of sequential mixed approach by analyzing 158 medical records of male users to relate the absences and 1250 medical records for geoprocessing. the higher the number of absences in the scheduled medical appointments, the less were the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and the ones listed in the International Classification of Diseases in single men. There were 21 significant geostatistically cases of glucose intolerance in the urban area. Of these, 62% lived in a region with a social vulnerability rating of Very Low, Medium 19%, 14% Low and 5% High. it was observed that the older the men, the greater is the number of chronic diseases and the less they miss scheduled appointments. Regarding the use of geoprocessing, we obtained a significant number of cases of glucose intolerance in urban areas, the majority classified as Very Low social vulnerability. It was possible to relate the spatial distribution of these diseases with the social vulnerability classification; however, it was not possible to perceive a relationship of them with the higher rates of social vulnerability. avaliar a relação entre as faltas em consultas agendadas e o número de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e averiguar a relação entre distribuição espacial dessas doenças e vulnerabilidade social, utilizando-se o geoprocessamento. estudo quantitativo, de abordagem mista sequencial, sendo analisados 158 prontuários de usuários do sexo masculino para se relacionar as faltas e 1250 prontuários para o geoprocessamento. quanto maior o número de faltas nas consultas médicas agendadas, menores foram a quantidade de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e as listadas na Classificação Internacional de

  19. Mental health in deployed and nondeployed veteran men and women in comparison with their civilian counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Mark W; Schwartz, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the mental health of deployed and nondeployed veterans compared with civilians, exploring gender differences. We sampled 41,903 respondents from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Respondents self-reported how many of the previous 30 days mental health was not good; 14 days or more indicated adverse mental health. Women exhibited greater prevalence of adverse mental health than men among civilians (odds ratio [OR] = 1.783 (1.653, 1.924), p mental health for men [OR = 1.361 (1.055, 1.755), p = 0.018] and possibly women [OR = 1.521 (0.930, 2.487), p = 0.095]. Compared with civilian status, nondeployed status was associated with adverse mental health for women [OR = 1.525 (1.152, 2.018), p = 0.003], but not for men [OR = 1.169 (0.943, 1.448), p = 0.155]. We controlled for age, general health, employment status, marital status, education, race/ethnicity, and state of residence. Adverse mental health affects male and female combat veterans, as well as women in noncombat military occupations. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Diet quality and its implications on the cardio-metabolic, physical and general health of older men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosilene V; Hirani, Vasant; Senior, Alistair M; Gosby, Alison K; Cumming, Robert G; Blyth, Fiona M; Naganathan, Vasi; Waite, Louise M; Handelsman, David J; Kendig, Hal; Seibel, Markus J; Simpson, Stephen J; Stanaway, Fiona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Le Couteur, David G

    2017-07-01

    The revised Dietary Guideline Index (DGI-2013) scores individuals' diets according to their compliance with the Australian Dietary Guideline (ADG). This cross-sectional study assesses the diet quality of 794 community-dwelling men aged 74 years and older, living in Sydney, Australia participating in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project; it also examines sociodemographic and lifestyle factors associated with DGI-2013 scores; it studies associations between DGI-2103 scores and the following measures: homoeostasis model assessment - insulin resistance, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG, blood pressure, waist:hip ratio, BMI, number of co-morbidities and medications and frailty status while also accounting for the effect of ethnicity in these relationships. Median DGI-2013 score was 93·7 (54·4, 121·2); most individuals failed to meet recommendations for vegetables, dairy products and alternatives, added sugar, unsaturated fat and SFA, fluid and discretionary foods. Lower education, income, physical activity levels and smoking were associated with low scores. After adjustments for confounders, high DGI-2013 scores were associated with lower HDL-cholesterol, lower waist:hip ratios and lower probability of being frail. Proxies of good health (fewer co-morbidities and medications) were not associated with better compliance to the ADG. However, in participants with a Mediterranean background, low DGI-2013 scores were not generally associated with poorer health. Older men demonstrated poor diet quality as assessed by the DGI-2013, and the association between dietary guidelines and health measures and indices may be influenced by ethnic background.

  1. Exploring the implications for health professionals of men coming out as gay in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cant, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Coming out as gay is a social process which redefines the relationship between the persons who have decided to disclose their homosexuality and their listeners. This paper, drawing upon Bakhtin's (1984) theories of dialogue, the coming-out literature of gay men and lesbians and contemporary literature on doctor-patient communication, explores the coming-out experiences of gay men with their general practitioners and sexual health clinic staff. The findings are based upon a study of 38 gay men and 12 health service managers in London. The informants were recruited purposively to reflect some of the diversity of the London setting; recruitment was carried out through the channels of gay voluntary organisations and through snowballing. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and a grounded-theory approach was adopted. It was found that coming out in general practice was often/mostly followed by silence/noncommunication on the part of the practitioner; coming out could, however, result in an improvement in communication if the patients were well supported and assertive. If coming out in sexual health clinics did not result in improved communication, the informants in this study were likely to change clinics until they did find improved communication. This paper raises questions about the communication and training needs of general practitioners. It also raises questions about inequalities of access to 'respectful' sexual health clinics; while men who are articulate about the narratives of their lives as gay men are able to exercise informed choices, there were grounds for concern about the choice behaviours of men who are less articulate about their life narratives.

  2. Chemsex and the city: sexualised substance use in gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men attending sexual health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, A; Lee, M J; Whittaker, W; Green, S; Simms, R; Cutts, R; Nagington, M; Nathan, B; Pakianathan, M R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse associations between sexualised substance use (chemsex), STI diagnoses and sexual behaviour among gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men accessing sexual health clinics to better inform clinical pathways. A retrospective case notes review was undertaken following the introduction of more detailed and holistic profomas for all gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men attending two London sexual health clinics between 1 June 2014 and 31 January 2015. Chemsex status was documented for 655/818. Overall, 30% disclosed recreational drug use of whom 113 (57%) disclosed chemsex and 27 (13.5%) injecting drugs. HIV-positive gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men were more likely to disclose chemsex (AOR 6.68; 95% CI 3.91-11.42; p sex, group sex, fisting, sharing sex toys, injecting drug use, higher alcohol consumption and the use of 'bareback' sexual networking applications (p sex with a discordant HIV or hepatitis C-infected partner (p < 0.001). Chemsex disclosure is associated with higher risk-taking behaviours, acute bacterial STIs, rectal STIs and hepatitis C incidence. HIV incidence was higher but not significantly so in the study period. Chemsex disclosure in sexual health clinics should prompt an opportunity for prevention, health promotion and wellbeing interventions.

  3. Physical health-related quality of life in relation to metabolic health and obesity among men and women in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truthmann, Julia; Mensink, Gert B M; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Hapke, Ulfert; Scheidt-Nave, Christa; Schienkiewitz, Anja

    2017-06-10

    This study examined sex-specific differences in physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across subgroups of metabolic health and obesity. We specifically asked whether (1) obesity is related to lower HRQoL independent of metabolic health status and potential confounders, and (2) whether associations are similar in men and women. We used cross-sectional data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey 2008-11. Physical HRQoL was measured using the Short Form-36 version 2 physical component summary (PCS) score. Based on harmonized ATPIII criteria for the definition of the metabolic health and a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m 2 to define obesity, individuals were classified as metabolically healthy non-obese (MHNO), metabolically unhealthy non-obese (MUNO), metabolically healthy obese (MHO), and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO). Sex-specific analyses including multivariable linear regression analyses were based on PCS as the dependent variable, metabolic health and obesity category as the independent variable with three categories and MHNO as the reference, and age, education, lifestyle and comorbidities as confounders. This study included 6860 participants (3298 men, 3562 women). Compared to MHNO, all other metabolic health and obesity categories had significantly lower PCS in both sexes. As reflected by the beta coefficients [95% confidence interval] from bivariable linear regression models, a significant inverse association with PCS was strongest for MUO (men: -7.0 [-8.2; -5.8]; women: -9.0 [-10.2; -7.9]), intermediate for MUNO (men: -4.2 [-5.3; -3.1]; women: -5.6 [-6.8; -4.4]) and least pronounced for MHO (men: -2.2 [-3.6; -0.8]; women -3.9 [-5.4; -2.5]). Differences in relation to MHNO remained statistically significant for all groups after adjusting for confounders, but decreased in particular for MUNO (men:-1.3 [-2.3; -0.3]; women: -1.5 [-2.7; -0.3]. Obesity was significantly related to lower physical HRQoL, independent of metabolic

  4. 2016 Survey of State-Level Health Resources for Men and Boys: Identification of an Inadvertent and Remediable Service and Health Disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadich, Ana; Llamas, Ramon P; Giorgianni, Salvatore; Stephenson, Colin; Nwaiwu, Chimezie

    2018-03-01

    This survey evaluated resources available to men and boys at the state level including state public health departments (SPHDs), other state agencies, and governor's offices. Most of the resources and programs are found in the SPHDs and these administer state-initiated and federally funded health programs to provide services and protection to a broad range of populations; however, many men's health advocates believe that SPHDs have failed to create equivalent services for men and boys, inadvertently creating a health disparity. Men's Health Network conducts a survey of state resources, including those found in SPHDs, every 2 years to identify resources available for men and women, determine the extent of any disparity, and establish a relationship with SPHD officials. Data were obtained from all 50 states and Washington, D.C. An analysis of the 2016 survey data indicates that there are few resources allocated and a lack of readily available information on health and preventive care created specifically for men and boys. The data observed that most health information intended for men and boys was scarce among states or oftentimes included on websites that primarily focused on women's health. A potential result of this is a loss of engagement with appropriate health-care providers due to a lack of information. This study continues to validate the disparity between health outcomes for women and men. It continues to highlight the need for better resource allocation, outreach, and health programs specifically tailored to men and boys in order to improve overall community well-being.

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life, Psychological Distress, and Sexual Changes Following Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Gay and Bisexual Men with Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette; Kellett, Andrew; Chambers, Suzanne; Latini, David; Davis, Ian D; Rose, Duncan; Dowsett, Gary W; Williams, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Decrements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and sexual difficulties are a recognized consequence of prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. However little is known about the experience of gay and bisexual (GB) men. HRQOL and psychosexual predictors of HRQOL were examined in GB and heterosexual men with PCa to inform targeted health information and support. One hundred twenty-four GB and 225 heterosexual men with PCa completed a range of validated psychosexual instruments. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) was used to measure HRQOL, with validated psychosexual measures, and demographic and treatment variables used as predictors. GB men were significantly younger (64.25 years) than heterosexual men (71.54 years), less likely to be in an ongoing relationship, and more likely to have casual sexual partners. Compared with age-matched population norms, participants in both groups reported significantly lower sexual functioning and HRQOL, increased psychological distress, disruptions to dyadic sexual communication, and lower masculine self-esteem, sexual confidence, and sexual intimacy. In comparison with heterosexual men, GB men reported significantly lower HRQOL (P = .046), masculine self-esteem (P psychological distress (P = .005), cancer related distress (P psychological distress, cancer-related distress, masculine self-esteem, and satisfaction with treatment were predictors of HRQOL for GB men (R2Adj = .804); psychological distress and sexual confidence were predictors for heterosexual men (R2Adj = .690). These findings confirm differences between GB and heterosexual men in the impact of PCa on HRQOL across a range of domains, suggesting there is a need for GB targeted PCa information and support, to address the concerns of this "hidden population" in PCa care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Implications of Sex Tourism on Men's Social, Psychological, and Physical Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Furman, Rich

    2004-01-01

    This article explores sex tourism and possible concerns for the male sex tourist through a content analysis of sex tourism web sites. This qualitative, exploratory study describes the manner in which sex tour web sites attract and maintain male customers. Findings related to mens psychosocial health are placed within an international context.…

  7. The Effect of Children and Employment on the Mental Health of Married Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, Walter R.; Geerken, Michael R.

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses data which indicate that the main reason married women tend to be in poorer mental health than men is because of the roles they typically occupy. The kinds of demands found in the home and associated with children create stress in the spouse (usually the wife) responsible for meeting these demands. (Author/GC)

  8. Towards 'men who have sex with menappropriate' health services in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Brian Rebe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health programming for men who have sex with men (MSM in South Africa has been ignored or absent until fairly recently, despite this population being at high risk for HIV acquisition and transmission. Anova Health Institute, with support from the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR/United States Agency for International Development (USAID and in collaboration with the South African National Department of Health, launched the first state sector MSM-targeted sexual health clinic in 2010. The clinic has been successful in attracting and retaining MSM in care, and lessons learned are described in this article. Components contributing to the creation of MSM-appropriate healthcare services are discussed.

  9. Factors related to obesity among Iranian men: results from the National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Mohammad, Kazem; Eshraghian, Mohammad R; Seifi, Behjat

    2010-09-01

    To our knowledge, only a few Iranian studies have investigated factors associated with obesity among men. The aims of the present study were to explore the associations between sociodemographic factors, smoking and obesity in Iranian men and compare these associations between Iranian men and women. We used data from the National Health Survey in Iran. A generalised estimating equations model included 11,697 men and 14,854 women aged 20-69 years (12,850 households). Body weight and height were objectively measured. BMI was calculated as kg/m2, and subjects were classified into obese (BMI >or= 30 kg/m2) and non-obese (BMI men, adjusted obesity OR were 0.62 (95 % CI 0.52, 0.74), 1.09 (95 % CI 0.90, 1.32), 1.003 (95 % CI 1.00, 1.007) and 0.57 (95 % CI 0.40, 0.81) for smokers, married, economic index and active workforce groups, respectively. Using low education as the reference group, the obesity OR for men were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.89, 1.26) and 0.75 (95 % CI 0.57, 0.99) for the moderate and high education groups, respectively. Using rural as the reference group, the obesity OR was 1.87 (95 % CI 1.56, 2.26) for urban men. Our findings may point towards a better understanding of the social and cultural mechanisms of obesity in Iranian men. The above sociodemographic factors are large contributors to obesity and provide the greatest opportunity for actions and interventions designed for prevention and treatment.

  10. Joblessness and homelessness as precursors of health problems in formerly incarcerated African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Cheryl L

    2004-01-01

    To explore how joblessness and homelessness influence the health of men leaving prison. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 17 formerly incarcerated African American men. Participants were interviewed for 1-2 hours in a private setting. Data were collected over 3 months in late 2001. Questions were focused on the experiences of participants during incarceration and after release from prison. Discourse analysis was used to analyze the data. Findings related to unemployment included, (a) being incarcerated was associated with decreased types of employment available after release from prison, (b) a history of incarceration altered how participants were able to conduct job searches, and (c) men who did well after release were those who were self-employed. Findings related to homelessness showed that barriers in either systems or relationships interfered with finding homes. If formerly incarcerated African American men are to reenter society in meaningful ways, steady, living-wage employment and a stable living environment are needed for these men to be able to successfully reintegrate into both families and the larger society, and to avoid conditions that are precursors of health problems.

  11. 'Enhance her pleasure - and your grip strength': Men's Health magazine and pseudo-reciprocal pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Chelsey Nicole; Douglas, Nick; Collumbien, Martine

    2017-07-01

    This paper provides a snapshot of the Top Ten free, digital Men's Health magazine articles, accessed on a randomly selected day, that can be viewed as a collection; both a product for readership consumption and a construct of readership priorities. Through close textual analysis, we examine how discourses about masculinity, heterosex and consumerism have intersected to create a model of masculinity based on the discipline of male pleasure, which impacts on men's approach to female pleasure and gender dynamics. The analysis contributes to the developing research about the sexual and bodily discourses the magazine promotes and identifies a model of masculinity where men can 'have their cake and eat it'; seeming to adhere to ideals of gender equality and reciprocity while retaining their traditional patriarchal position of producer/provider. They are encouraged to do so by approaching female orgasm as a product, which they can 'purchase' through adhering to Men's Health magazine's sexual advice and bodily labour at control, delay and discipline of their own pleasure and orgasm. We argue that this approach to sex disenfranchises men, and in turn their partners, of opportunities to access alternative models of embodied pleasure.

  12. Nurse-led primary health care for homeless men: a multimethods descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, M A; Duffield, C; Smith, J; Kelly, D; Cook, R; Bichel-Findlay, J; Saunders, C; Carter, D J

    2017-12-21

    To explore the primary healthcare needs and health service use of homeless men in inner Sydney. People experiencing homelessness have greater health needs than the general population and place high demands on tertiary care, which is expensive and may not be the optimum service for their needs. Accessible, approachable and affordable primary healthcare services could improve the health of homeless persons and potentially decrease costs to the healthcare system. A multimethod design using a cross-sectional survey (n = 40) and administrative data (n = 2 707 daily summaries) collected from a nurse-led primary healthcare clinic for homeless men in Sydney. Survey respondents were aged 27-76 years. Health problems reflected multimorbidity, with mental health issues present in almost all respondents. The majority had attended the clinic more than 20 times in the past year and said the services, treatments and referrals helped them avoid the emergency department. Administrative data indicated that medication administration was the most frequent service provided. Referrals to other health services doubled over the 7-year period. Multiple morbidities, particularly mental health issues, are associated with homelessness. A proactive approach by nurses including preventative services appeared to overcome barriers to health service use. This nurse-led primary healthcare clinic highlights the importance of providing services to homeless men with multiple comorbidities. Respect and trust in addition to easy access to health services appear to be important facilitators of health service use. A greater number of primary health services that collaborate with specialist services, including nurse-led clinics, may facilitate health care for persons who are homeless, reducing the burden on acute services. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Sociodemographic Factors Contribute to Mental Health Disparities and Access to Services Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storholm, Erik David; Siconolfi, Daniel E; Halkitis, Perry N; Moeller, Robert W; Eddy, Jessica A; Bare, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may be at increased risk for mental health problems including depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), and suicidality. The overriding goal of the current investigation was to examine mental health and mental health services in a diverse sample of YMSM. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a cohort study of 598 YMSM, including sociodemographics, mental health, and mental health care. We then tested for bivariate associations, and used multivariable modeling to predict depression, PTSD, suicidality and mental health care utilization. Lower socioeconomic status, unstable housing, and school non-enrollment predicted depression and PTSD scores, while unstable housing and school non-enrollment predicted recent suicide attempt(s). These recent suicide attempt(s) also predicted current utilization of counseling or treatment, any history of psychiatric hospitalization, and any history of psychiatric diagnosis. Black and API men were less likely to have ever accessed mental health counseling or treatment. There were significant class-based differences with regard to mental health outcomes, but not mental health services. Further, recent crises (i.e., suicide attempt, hospitalization) were strong predictors of accessing mental health services. Improving the mental health of YMSM requires addressing the underlying structural factors that influence mental health outcomes and service access.

  14. The men's health center: Disparities in gender specific health services among the top 50 "best hospitals" in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Jeremy; Kashanian, James A; Sharma, Vidit; Masson, Puneet; Dupree, James; Le, Brian; Brannigan, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Gender-specific integrated health services have long existed in the arena of women's health care, but men's health centers (MHCs) have only recently emerged as a novel practice model. Here, we seek to evaluate the prevalence and format of MHCs found in the leading academic medical centers in the United States. The US News & World Report's Top 50 Ranked Hospitals for Urology was used as our cohort. Data were gathered on the presence of MHCs and types of providers and conditions treated. An equivalent search was performed for women's health centers (WHCs). Sixteen of 50 (32%) promoted some type of MHC, compared to 49 of 50 (98%) offering a WHC. Eight of the top 15 ranked institutions (53%) had an MHC compared to eight of 35 (23%) remaining programs. Six of 16 MHCs incorporated providers from a variety of medical disciplines, including urologists, internists, endocrinologists, cardiologists, and psychologists, while another six of 16 MHCs were staffed solely by urologists. Eight of 16 provided services for exclusively urologic issues, four of 16 offered additional services in treatment of other medical conditions, and four of 16 did not specify. A considerable disparity exists between the prevalence of gender-specific health services, with WHCs being much more numerous than MHCs. All but one leading institution had WHCs compared to less than one-third having MHCs. Our findings also highlight the heterogeneous nature of men's health programs, as they exhibit great variability in program type and focus, yet are all being marketed under the "Men's Health" banner.

  15. Quality of life and sexual health after sex reassignment surgery in transsexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierckx, Katrien; Van Caenegem, Eva; Elaut, Els; Dedecker, David; Van de Peer, Fleur; Toye, Kaatje; Weyers, Steven; Hoebeke, Piet; Monstrey, Stan; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2011-12-01

    Although sexual health after genital surgery is an important outcome factor for many transsexual persons, little attention has been attributed to this subject. To provide data on quality of life and sexual health after sex reassignment surgery (SRS) in transsexual men. A single-center, cross-sectional study in 49 transsexual men (mean age 37 years) after long-term testosterone therapy and on average 8 years after SRS. Ninety-four percent of the participants had phalloplasty. Self-reported physical and mental health using the Dutch version of the Short Form-36 Health Survey; sexual functioning before and after SRS using a newly constructed specific questionnaire. Compared with a Dutch reference population of community-dwelling men, transsexual men scored well on self-perceived physical and mental health. The majority reported having been sexually active before hormone treatment, with more than a quarter having been vaginally penetrated frequently before starting hormone therapy. There was a tendency toward less vaginal involvement during hormone therapy and before SRS. Most participants reported an increase in frequency of masturbation, sexual arousal, and ability to achieve orgasm after testosterone treatment and SRS. Almost all participants were able to achieve orgasm during masturbation and sexual intercourse, and the majority reported a change in orgasmic feelings toward a more powerful and shorter orgasm. Surgical satisfaction was high, despite a relatively high complication rate. Results of the current study indicate transsexual men generally have a good quality of life and experience satisfactory sexual function after SRS. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  16. Does job promotion affect men's and women's health differently? Dynamic panel models with fixed effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Peristera, Paraskevi; Westerlund, Hugo; Johansson, Gunn; Hanson, Linda L Magnusson

    2017-08-01

    Higher occupational status has consistently been shown to be associated with better health, but few studies have to date examined if an upward change in occupational status is associated with a positive change in health. Furthermore, very little is known about whether this association differs by sex. Data were derived from four waves (2008-14) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), a follow-up study of a nationally representative sample of the Swedish working population. The present study comprises 1410 men and 1926 women. A dynamic panel model with fixed effects was used to analyse the lagged association between job promotion on the one hand and self-rated health (SRH) and symptoms of depression on the other. This method allowed controlling for unobserved time-invariant confounders and determining the direction of causality between the variables. Multigroup comparisons were performed to investigate differences between the sexes. The results showed that job promotion was associated with decreased subsequent SRH and increased symptoms of depression among both men and women. Women reported a larger relative worsening of self-rated health following a job promotion than men and men reported a larger relative worsening of depression symptoms. There was limited evidence that SRH and symptoms of depression were associated with subsequent job promotion. The present study indicates that a job promotion could lead to decreased SRH and increased symptoms of depression in a 2-4-year perspective. Associations appear to differ for women and men. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  17. Effects of minority stress processes on the mental health of Latino men who have sex with men and women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ian W; Padilla, Mark B; Willner, Lauren; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Emerging literature on minority stress among sexual minority populations has described the negative consequences that multiple minority statuses may exert on mental health and well-being. This literature has tended to focus on individuals whose self-identifications reflect sexual minority sexual categories, such as gay or bisexual, and has explored the intersection of these definitions with ethnic, racial, and class statuses. Few such studies have explored mental health among men who actively deny a sexual minority sexual identity label while engaging in same-sex sexual behaviors. The present study used ethnographic interview data from 20 non-gay-identified bisexually behaving Dominican and Puerto Rican men in New York City. Participants described discovery of same sex sexual behavior as a threat to their intimate relationships, community affiliation, and counter to expectations of Latino masculinity. Recounting a wide range of information management strategies used to avoid open disclosure about their sexual lives, participants experienced the potential consequences of disclosure as extreme and even life threatening. Men anticipated social isolation, depression, self-injury, and suicidality as possible outcomes from disclosing sexual behavior with other men to their female romantic partners. This analysis provides direction for future research on minority stress processes and mental health service delivery among Latino men who have sex with men and women.

  18. Sexual health status of women who have regular sexual relations with men who have sex with men in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufang; Zhang, Beichuan; Wang, Juan; Li, Yang; Li, Xianhong; Yu, Peiheng; Liu, Minghua; Liu, Xinqiao

    2017-02-06

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a high-risk group for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In China, the vast majority of MSM feel forced to marry or plan to marry women, according to traditional Chinese culture. Women who have regular sexual relations with MSM, called tongqi in mainland China, live with a high risk of STDs or HIV infection, but these risks are often ignored. Our investigation of this group of the women is a preliminary study that aims to understand the sexual health problems of tongqi and related factors. This study relied on website mobilization and was funded by tongqi. Participants were limited to women who had sex with MSM to whom they were married (in-GWs), whom they had divorced (ex-GWs), or with whom they were friends (GGFs). The data were collected using questionnaire software. A total 144 valid surveys were returned from 100 in-GWs, 33 ex-GWs, and 11 GGFs. Average respondent age was 32.8 ± 6.4 years (range 22 to 58 years). Among in-GWs and ex-GWs, over 95% learned that their husbands were MSM after marriage. More than half of respondents had had sex before marriage, and one-third of those women had sex partners other than their husbands. In addition, 35.3% of tongqi had STDs symptoms. About 50% participants had had oral sex with sex partners of MSM and 10% had had passive anal sex, with low condom use during both oral (9.7%) and anal sex (23.1%). Most tongqi had misunderstandings about STDs and HIV and less than 30% had undergone HIV screening. Among participants tested, 5.6% were HIV positive. A total 93.5% of respondents believed that laws should be established to protect the sexual rights of women. Women who have regular sexual relations with MSM face adverse sexual health issues and are susceptible to STDs and HIV infection. Measures must be taken to protect the rights and interests of tongqi in mainland China.

  19. Sexual health status of women who have regular sexual relations with men who have sex with men in mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men who have sex with men (MSM are a high-risk group for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In China, the vast majority of MSM feel forced to marry or plan to marry women, according to traditional Chinese culture. Women who have regular sexual relations with MSM, called tongqi in mainland China, live with a high risk of STDs or HIV infection, but these risks are often ignored. Our investigation of this group of the women is a preliminary study that aims to understand the sexual health problems of tongqi and related factors. Methods This study relied on website mobilization and was funded by tongqi. Participants were limited to women who had sex with MSM to whom they were married (in-GWs, whom they had divorced (ex-GWs, or with whom they were friends (GGFs. The data were collected using questionnaire software. Results A total 144 valid surveys were returned from 100 in-GWs, 33 ex-GWs, and 11 GGFs. Average respondent age was 32.8 ± 6.4 years (range 22 to 58 years. Among in-GWs and ex-GWs, over 95% learned that their husbands were MSM after marriage. More than half of respondents had had sex before marriage, and one-third of those women had sex partners other than their husbands. In addition, 35.3% of tongqi had STDs symptoms. About 50% participants had had oral sex with sex partners of MSM and 10% had had passive anal sex, with low condom use during both oral (9.7% and anal sex (23.1%. Most tongqi had misunderstandings about STDs and HIV and less than 30% had undergone HIV screening. Among participants tested, 5.6% were HIV positive. A total 93.5% of respondents believed that laws should be established to protect the sexual rights of women. Conclusions Women who have regular sexual relations with MSM face adverse sexual health issues and are susceptible to STDs and HIV infection. Measures must be taken to protect the rights and interests of tongqi in mainland China.

  20. A qualitative analysis of men's involvement in maternal and child health as a policy intervention in rural Central Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire, Elizabeth; Hendriks, Sheryl L

    2018-01-19

    Men's involvement in maternal and child health presents an opportunity for the advancement of maternal and child nutrition as men often play a key role in decision-making particularly regarding women's reproductive health. While most research on men's involvement in maternal and child health has focused on men's participation in antenatal care, this study focuses specifically on men's involvement in maternal and child nutrition. The purpose of the study is to explore how men's involvement is conceptualised in rural Central Malawi, highlighting the key factors influencing men's involvement in maternal and child health. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with 26 informants and 44 community members. Critical policy was used as the theoretical framework to inform the analysis of research findings. In this study, we identified several factors that facilitate men's involvement in maternal and child health, but we also identified several barriers. Facilitators of men's involvement included: recognition by men of the impact of their involvement, pride, advocacy, incentives and disincentives and male champions. Barriers included socio-cultural beliefs, stigmatisation and opportunity costs. The study also found that there were several limitations that had unintended consequences on desired programme outcomes. These included: discriminating against women, marginalisation of married women and reinforcing men's decision-making roles. The study findings highlight the importance of involving men in maternal and child health for improved nutrition outcomes. We emphasise the need for nutrition policy-makers to be aware that gender dynamics are changing. It is no longer just women who are involved in nutrition activities, therefore policy-makers need to revise their approach to ensure that they consider men's role in nutrition.

  1. Factors Influencing Access to Sexual Health Care Among Behaviorally Bisexual Men in Vientiane, Laos: A Qualitative Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, Anna L; Pasomsouk, Nakhornphet; Higgs, Peter; Sychareun, Vanphanom; Hellard, Margaret; Power, Robert

    2015-11-01

    In Laos, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV, and bisexual behavior among men is common. We conducted a qualitative study to explore access and influences on sexual health care seeking among bisexual men in Vientiane. In 2013, behaviorally bisexual men were recruited from bars, clubs and dormitories for 5 focus group discussions and 11 in-depth interviews. Participants (aged 18-35 years) commonly reported high-risk sexual behaviors, yet most had never been tested for HIV, and none reported testing for sexually transmitted infections. Common barriers to testing were low perception of risk, expectation of symptoms, fear of HIV, shyness, perceived stigma, confidentiality concerns, and waiting times. Many men were unaware of available services. Most clinics cannot provide comprehensive HIV and sexually transmitted infection services. Strategies are needed to generate demand for testing, improve the capacity of sexual health care providers, and promote available services among behaviorally bisexual men in Vientiane. © 2015 APJPH.

  2. Assessing the Oral Health Needs of African American Men in Low-Income, Urban Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintobi, Tabia Henry; Hoffman, LaShawn M.; McAllister, Calvin; Goodin, Lisa; Hernandez, Natalie D.; Rollins, Latrice; Miller, Assia

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in oral health status in the United States, pronounced racial/ethnic disparities exist. Black men are less likely to visit the dentist, are twice as likely to experience tooth decay, and have a significantly lower 5-year oral cancer survival rate when compared to White men. The Minority Men’s Oral Health Dental Access Program employed a community-based participatory research approach to examine the oral health barriers and opportunities for intervention among Black men in a low-income, urban neighborhood. A cross-sectional study design was implemented through a self-administered survey completed among 154 Black males. The majority reported not having dental insurance (68.8%). Most frequently cited oral health care barriers were lack of dental insurance and not being able to afford dental care. Attitudes related to the significance of dental care centered on cancer prevention and feeling comfortable with one’s smile. The impact of oral health on daily life centered on social interaction, with men citing insecurities associated with eating, talking, and smiling due to embarrassment with how their teeth/mouth looked to others. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that those who had difficulty finding dental care were 4.81 times (odds ratio = 4.65, 95% confidence interval [1.80, 12.85]) more likely to report no dental insurance, and 2.73 times (odds ratio = 3.72; 95% confidence interval [1.12, 6.70]) more likely to report poor oral health. Community-based participatory approaches include assessment of neighborhood residents affected by the health issue to frame interventions that resonate and are more effective. Social, physical, and infrastructural factors may emerge, requiring a multilevel approach. PMID:27008993

  3. Cumulative exposure to poor housing affordability and its association with mental health in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Rebecca; Baker, Emma; Mason, Kate

    2012-09-01

    Poor housing affordability affects around 10% of the Australian population and is increasingly prevalent. The authors tested two hypotheses: that cumulative exposure to housing affordability stress (HAS) is associated with poorer mental health and that effects vary by gender. The authors estimated the relationship between cumulative exposure to HAS and mental health among 15478 participants in an Australian longitudinal survey between 2001 and 2009. Individuals were classified as being in HAS if household income was in the lowest 40% of the national distribution and housing costs exceeded 30% of income. Exposure to HAS ranged from 1 to 8 annual waves. Mental health was measured using the Short Form 36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) score. To test the extent to which any observed associations were explained by compositional factors, random- and fixed-effects models were estimated. In the random-effects models, mental health scores decreased with increasing cumulative exposure to HAS (up until 4+ years). This relationship differed by gender, with a stronger dose-response observed among men. The mean MCS score of men experiencing four to eight waves of housing stress was 2.02 points lower than men not in HAS (95% CI -3.89 to -0.16). In the fixed-effects models, there was no evidence of a cumulative effect of HAS on mental health; however, lower MCS was observed after a single year in HAS (β=-0.70, 95% CI -1.02 to -0.37). While average mental health was lower for individuals with longer exposure to HAS, the mental health effect appears to be due to compositional factors. Furthermore, men and women appear to experience cumulative HAS differently.

  4. What men and women value at work: implications for workplace health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Current research suggests that workplace culture can influence health outcomes. This study was conducted to determine what men and women value at work, how each defines a healthy workplace, and what work factors best predict their health outcomes and stress. A national study was conducted by LLuminari, Inc., a health education company, via a Harris Interactive Inc. online panel that screened for US participants who were employed full-time in organizations with >1000 employees. The online questionnaire used stimulus words/phrases to which respondents verbally free-associated. Each verbatim response was given a weighted score based on the order in which it was written, then thermatically clustered with similar responses to form categories for each stimulus item. A total of 1123 individuals participated in the study (608 males, 515 females). Results indicated that men and women value the same aspects of work but ranked them differently. Men valued pay, money, and benefits, as well as power, authority, and status significantly more than women did (P communication (P workplace differently, with women more than men emphasizing understanding, support, communication (P gender differences may help to effectively motivate employees, increase productivity, foster loyalty, and improve physical and mental well-being.

  5. HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT BASED ON ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICATORS IN MEN IN NEW BELGRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankovic Veroslava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is little data on the association of metabolic syndrome and health status in Serbian men, so our intention was to investigate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in men with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in New Belgrade, Serbia; to determine which of the anthropometric parameters (body mass index—BMI and waist circumference—WC is best for the evaluation of health risks in primary care, especially the risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Research Methods and Procedures: The study involved 132 healthy men ages 44.73 ± 9.37 years. Anthropometric values were measured in all the patients. Blood pressure, blood biochemistry (high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose and analysis of their medical records were also done. Analysis of consistency has been used in testing hypothesis. Results: The sample consisted of 132 patients with mean age 44.73 ± 9.37 years. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 44.7%. Analysis of consistence showed differences in the combined predictive ability of anthropometric indicators and other factors of MetS. Conclusions: BMI andWCare the simple measures of adiposity most strongly associated with metabolic abnormalities. Our findings suggest that WC can not be used as a complementary measurement to identify health risks in any group of men

  6. Discrimination, mental health, and leukocyte telomere length among African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Epel, Elissa S; Nuru-Jeter, Amani M; Lincoln, Karen D; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Thomas, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    African American men in the US experience disparities across multiple health outcomes. A common mechanism underlying premature declines in health may be accelerated biological aging, as reflected by leukocyte telomere length (LTL). Racial discrimination, a qualitatively unique source of social stress reported by African American men, in tandem with poor mental health, may negatively impact LTL in this population. The current study examined cross-sectional associations between LTL, self-reported racial discrimination, and symptoms of depression and anxiety among 92 African American men 30-50 years of age. LTL was measured in kilobase pairs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Controlling for sociodemographic factors, greater anxiety symptoms were associated with shorter LTL (b=-0.029, standard error [SE]=0.014; pmen. Consistent with research on other populations, greater anxiety may reflect elevated stress associated with shorter LTL. Racial discrimination may represent an additional source of social stress among African American men that has detrimental consequences for cellular aging among those with lower levels of depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Discipline's Escalating Whisper: Social Work and Black Men's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daphne C.; Hawkins, Jaclynn; Mitchell, Jamie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Though sparse in previous years, research on the mental health of Black men has recently experienced a gradual increase in social work journals. This article systematically organizes and critically examines peer-reviewed, social work evidence on the mental health of Black men. Methods: Twenty-two peer-reviewed articles from social work…

  8. Poor sleep health and its association with mental health, substance use, and condomless anal intercourse among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Goedel, William C; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A; Palamar, Joseph J; Hagen, Daniel; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of poor sleep health (ie, poor sleep quality and short sleep duration) in a sample of men who have sex with men (MSM). In addition, this study examined whether poor sleep health was associated with depressive symptoms, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors in this sample. Cross-sectional survey. Broadcast advertisements were placed on a popular smartphone application for MSM in January 2016 to recruit users in the London metropolitan area (n=202) to complete a Web-based survey, which included validated measures of sleep quality and duration. Poor sleep quality was defined based on self-report as very or fairly bad. Short sleep duration was defined as less than 7 hours each night. Regression models were used to assess associations between sleep variables and self-reported depressive symptoms, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. About one-third (34.6%) of the respondents reported poor sleep quality and almost half (43.6%) reported sleeping less than 7 hours every night. Several poor sleep health variables were independently associated with depressive symptoms, substance use (eg, use of alcohol or marijuana), and condomless anal intercourse. For example, typical nightly sleep duration of less than 7 hours was associated with condomless receptive anal intercourse with a higher number of sexual partners (incidence rate ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval: 1.63-4.30; P<.001). Sleep health promotion interventions should be developed for MSM, which may promote positive mental health as well as reduce substance use and sexual risk behaviors in this population. Copyright \\© 2016 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inequalities in maintenance of health and performance between young adult women and men in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löve, Jesper; Dellve, Lotta; Eklöf, Mats; Hagberg, Mats

    2009-04-01

    Because of ageing populations, most high-income countries are facing an imminent scarcity of labour. Maintenance of health and performance in young adults therefore becomes a crucial prerequisite for sustainable societies. One major obstruction to this accomplishment is the striking health inequalities between young women and young men. Previously these inequalities have mainly been studied in a cross-sectional way, focusing on ill-health. In this study, we compared the prevalence of maintained health and performance between young adult women and men and the predictors for this outcome. The cohort consisted of 1266 participants from a homogenous sample of university students in Sweden. A combined assessment of self-rated 'very good' health and un-impaired performance took place at three time points (i.e. maintained health and performance). Potential predictors covered stable conditions in health-related behaviours, conditions at work/school and work-home interference. Young women had less maintained health and performance than young men. No major differences in predictors were found. However, there was a tendency for psychosocial factors to be the most important predictors, especially in women. That young women had less maintained health and performance in a homogenous sample beyond well-known differentiating factors suggests explanations other than observable structural differences between the sexes. This was also indicated by the importance attached to perceived demands, and work-home interference, especially in women. The combination of less scheduled, and more unscheduled, schoolwork (i.e. time-flexibility) negatively affected the maintenance of health and performance in our study population, suggesting a focus for future studies.

  10. A Men's Workplace Health Intervention: Results of the POWERPLAY Program Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven T; Stolp, Sean; Seaton, Cherisse; Sharp, Paul; Caperchione, Cristina M; Bottorff, Joan L; Oliffe, John L; Jones-Bricker, Margaret; Lamont, Sonia; Medhurst, Kerensa; Errey, Sally; Healy, Theresa

    2016-08-01

    To explore physical activity and eating behaviors among men following the implementation of a gender-sensitive, workplace health promotion program. Using a pre-post within-subjects design, computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) was used to collect health-related information along with physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake at baseline and after 6 months. At baseline, participants (N = 139) consumed 3.58 servings of fruit and vegetables/day and engaged in an average of 229.77 min/week moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). At 6 months, daily fruit/vegetable intake did not increase, whereas MVPA increased by 112.3 min/week. The POWERPLAY program successfully increased weekly MVPA. Engaging men in health promotion can be a challenge; here, the workplace served as a valuable environment for achieving positive change.

  11. Exploring First Sexual Intercourse, Sexual Orientation, and Sexual Health in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, Alexis; Van Houtte, Mieke; Symons, Katrien; Buysse, Ann

    2017-01-01

    In this study the characteristics of the sexual debut of men who have sex with men (MSM) and men who have sex with women (MSW) age 35 or younger (N = 1,201) were compared with one another. We investigated whether these characteristics were associated with sexual health and behavior, and to what extent. Compared to MSW, MSM tended to be older when they had their first sexual intercourse; their first sex partner was older, they felt less ready, and they experienced more pain. We also found that they reported a higher number of lifetime sexual partners and less condom use compared to MSW. Similarities were also ascertained, such as the fact that individuals from both groups do not differ significantly regarding how they experienced their first sexual intercourse emotionally. Many differences between these groups should not always be seen as problematic, whereas others still indicate a need for targeted interventions.

  12. Sleep Architecture and Mental Health Among Community-Dwelling Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagula, Stephen F; Reynolds, Charles F; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Dam, Thuy-Tien; Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Paudel, Misti; Redline, Susan; Stone, Katie L; Cauley, Jane A

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the association of mood and anxiety symptoms with sleep architecture (the distribution of sleep stages) in community-dwelling older men. We used in-home unattended polysomnography to measure sleep architecture in older men. Men were categorized into 4 mental health categories: (a) significant depressive symptoms only (DEP+ only, Geriatric Depression Scale ≥ 6), (b) significant anxiety symptoms only (ANX+ only, Goldberg Anxiety Scale ≥ 5), (c) significant depressive and anxiety symptoms (DEP+/ANX+), or (d) no significant depressive or anxiety symptoms (DEP-/ANX-). Compared with men without clinically significant symptomology, men with depressive symptoms spent a higher percentage of time in Stage 2 sleep (65.42% DEP+ only vs 62.47% DEP-/ANX-, p = .003) and a lower percentage of time in rapid eye movement sleep (17.05% DEP+ only vs 19.44% DEP-/ANX-, p = .0005). These differences persisted after adjustment for demographic/lifestyle characteristics, medical conditions, medications, and sleep disturbances, and after excluding participants using psychotropic medications. The sleep architecture of ANX+ or DEP+/ANX+ men did not differ from asymptomatic men. Depressed mood in older adults may be associated with accelerated age-related changes in sleep architecture. Longitudinal community-based studies using diagnostic measures are needed to further clarify relationships among common mental disorders, aging, and sleep. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Vernacular Knowledge and Critical Pedagogy: Conceptualising Sexual Health Education for Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Over 30 years after HIV was first recognised in the USA, the epidemic continues to pose a disproportionate threat to vulnerable and marginalised populations. Increasing HIV incidence among young men who have sex with men has spurred debate around the content and approach to HIV prevention interventions directed towards this vulnerable population.…

  14. Implementing Health Policy: Lessons from the Scottish Well Men's Policy Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Flora; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Smith, Cairns; Moffat, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how health professionals translate national government health policy directives into action. This paper examines that process using the so-called Well Men's Services (WMS) policy initiative as a 'real world' case study. The WMS were launched by the Scottish Government to address men's health inequalities. Our analysis aimed to develop a deeper understanding of policy implementation as it naturally occurred, used an analytical framework that was developed to reflect the 'rational planning' principles health professionals are commonly encouraged to use for implementation purposes. A mixed-methods qualitative enquiry using a data archive generated during the WMS policy evaluation was used to critically analyze (post hoc) the perspectives of national policy makers, and local health and social care professionals about the: (a) 'policy problem', (b) interventions intended to address the problem, and (c) anticipated policy outcomes. This analysis revealed four key themes: (1) ambiguity regarding the policy problem and means of intervention; (2) behavioral framing of the policy problem and intervention; (3) uncertainty about the policy evidence base and outcomes, and; (4) a focus on intervention as outcome . This study found that mechanistic planning heuristics (as a means of supporting implementation) fails to grapple with the indeterminate nature of population health problems. A new approach to planning and implementing public health interventions is required that recognises the complex and political nature of health problems; the inevitability of imperfect and contested evidence regarding intervention, and, future associated uncertainties.

  15. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: a 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Baltzer, Maria; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo

    2013-08-01

    Research has suggested that gender is related to perceptions of work-family conflict (WFC) and an underlying assumption is that interference of paid work with family life will burden women more than men. There is, however, mixed evidence as to whether men and women report different levels of WFC. Even less studies investigate gender differences in health outcomes of WFC. Also the number of longitudinal studies in this field is low. Based on the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, we prospectively examined the effects of WFC on three different health measures representing a wide spectrum off ill health (i.e. self-rated health, emotional exhaustion and problem drinking). Logistic regression analyses were used to analyse multivariate associations between WFC in 2008 and health 2 years later. The results show that WFC was associated with an increased risk of emotional exhaustion among both men and women. Gender differences are suggested as WFC was related to an increased risk for poor self-rated health among women and problem drinking among men. Interaction analyses revealed that the risk of poor self-rated health was substantially more influenced by WFC among women than among men. We conclude that, despite the fact that women experience conflict between work and family life slightly more often than men, both men's and women's health is negatively affected by this phenomenon.

  16. Public/community engagement in health research with men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Sassy; Sariola, Salla; Allman, Dan; Dijkstra, Maartje; Gichuru, Evans; Graham, Susan; Kamuya, Dorcas; Gakii, Gloria; Kayemba, Brian; Kombo, Bernadette; Maleche, Allan; Mbwambo, Jessie; Marsh, Vicki; Micheni, Murugi; Mumba, Noni; Parker, Michael; Shio, Jasmine; Yah, Clarence; van der Elst, Elise; Sanders, Eduard

    2016-05-27

    Community engagement, incorporating elements of the broader concepts of public and stakeholder engagement, is increasingly promoted globally, including for health research conducted in developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, community engagement needs and challenges are arguably intensified for studies involving gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, where male same-sex sexual interactions are often highly stigmatised and even illegal. This paper contextualises, describes and interprets the discussions and outcomes of an international meeting held at the Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust in Kilifi, Kenya, in November 2013, to critically examine the experiences with community engagement for studies involving men who have sex with men. We discuss the ethically charged nature of the language used for men who have sex with men, and of working with 'representatives' of these communities, as well as the complementarity and tensions between a broadly public health approach to community engagement, and a more rights based approach. We highlight the importance of researchers carefully considering which communities to engage with, and the goals, activities, and indicators of success and potential challenges for each. We suggest that, given the unintended harms that can emerge from community engagement (including through labelling, breaches in confidentiality, increased visibility and stigma, and threats to safety), representatives of same-sex populations should be consulted from the earliest possible stage, and that engagement activities should be continuously revised in response to unfolding realities. Engagement should also include less vocal and visible men who have sex with men, and members of other communities with influence on the research, and on research participants and their families and friends. Broader ethics support, advice and research into studies involving men who have sex with men is needed to ensure that ethical challenges

  17. Family Planning and Preconception Health Among Men in Their Mid-30s: Developing Indicators and Describing Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Frances E; Sonenstein, Freya L; Astone, Nan M; Pleck, Joseph H; Dariotis, Jacinda K; Marcell, Arik V

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthy People 2020 call for improvements in meeting men's reproductive health needs but little is known about the proportion of men in need. This study describes men aged 35 to 39 in need of family planning and preconception care, demographic correlates of these needs, and contraception use among men in need of family planning. Using data from Wave 4 (2008-2010) of the National Survey of Adolescent Males, men were classified in need of family planning and preconception care if they reported sex with a female in the last year and believed that they and their partner were fecund; the former included men who were neither intentionally pregnant nor intending future children and the latter included men intending future children. Men were classified as being in need of both if they reported multiple sex partners in the past year. About 40% of men aged 35 to 39 were in need of family planning and about 33% in need of preconception care with 12% in need of both. Current partner's age, current union type, and sexually transmitted infection health risk differentiated men in need of family planning and preconception care (all ps family planning reported none of the time current partner hormonal use (55%) or condom use (52%) during the past year. This study identified that many men in their mid-30s are in need of family planning or preconception care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Effects of media violence on health-related outcomes among young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sonya S; Matthews, Karen A

    2006-04-01

    To test the effects of media violence exposure on blood pressure, negative affect, hostile social information processing, uncooperative behavior, and attitudes toward health risk behaviors among young men varying in lifetime violence exposure within the home and community. Experimental laboratory study. University campus situated within an urban environment. One hundred male undergraduates aged 18 to 21 years. Men who had previously reported differing amounts of lifetime home and community violence were randomly assigned to play The Simpsons: Hit and Run (low-violence condition) or Grand Theft Auto III (high-violence condition). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure; negative affect; hostile social information processing; uncooperative behavior; and permissive attitudes toward violence, alcohol use, marijuana use, and sexual activity without condom use. Men randomly assigned to play Grand Theft Auto III exhibited greater increases in diastolic blood pressure from a baseline rest period to game play, greater negative affect, more permissive attitudes toward using alcohol and marijuana, and more uncooperative behavior in comparison with men randomly assigned to play The Simpsons. Only among participants with greater exposure to home and community violence, play of Grand Theft Auto III led to elevated systolic blood pressure in comparison with play of The Simpsons (mean, 13 vs 5 mm Hg). Media violence exposure may play a role in the development of negative attitudes and behaviors related to health. Although youth growing up in violent homes and communities may become more physiologically aroused by media violence exposure, all youth appear to be at risk for potentially negative outcomes.

  19. Health procrastination: The experience of 35-44 years old men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silkane V.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The focal concept of this study is health procrastination. Delay in seeking help from medical practitioners is an increasing problem in Latvia, particularly with men between the ages of 35-44. Failures in primary and secondary prevention create a number of negative consequences, for instance, longer and more complex treatment; lower recovery prognosis as well as higher treatment costs. Nevertheless, the aforementioned group often avoids medical treatment. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of 35-44 years old men in terms of their health procrastination in qualitative terms. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 48 men within the age range of 35-44 years were conducted. Data was analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The following dominant themes are: delay of health behaviour, time management, motivation emerged during the analysis: conscientiousness, task avoidance, effort, short-term vs. long-term thinking, gains and losses assessment, and time discounting. Conclusions followed: there are three main concepts – personality traits, discounting and task characteristics – that bring together the experience of health procrastination for 35-44 years old males.

  20. Labour exploitation and health: a case series of men and women seeking post-trafficking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Moss, Eleanor; Zimmerman, Cathy; Howard, Louise M; Oram, Siân

    2014-06-01

    Research on the health of trafficked men and on the health problems associated with trafficking for labor exploitation are extremely limited. This study analysed data from a case series of anonymised case records of a consecutive sample of 35 men and women who had been trafficked for labor exploitation in the UK and who were receiving support from a non-governmental service between June 2009 and July 2010. Over three-quarters of our sample was male (77 %) and two-thirds aged between 18 and 35 years (mean 32.9 years, SD 10.2). Forty percent reported experiencing physical violence while they were trafficked. Eighty-one percent (25/31) reported one or more physical health symptoms. Fifty-seven percent (17/30) reported one or more post-traumatic stress symptoms. A substantial proportion of men and women who are trafficked for labor exploitation may experience violence and abuse, and have physical and mental health symptoms. People who have been trafficked for forced labor need access to medical assessment and treatment.

  1. Comparison of outpatient health care utilization among returning women and men Veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattocks Kristin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of women serving in the United States military increased during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF, leading to a subsequent surge in new women Veterans seeking health care services from the Veterans Administration (VA. The objective of this study was to examine gender differences among OEF/OIF Veterans in utilization of VA outpatient health care services. Methods Our retrospective cohort consisted of 1,620 OEF/OIF Veterans (240 women and 1380 men who enrolled for outpatient healthcare at a single VA facility. We collected demographic data and information on military service and VA utilization from VA electronic medical records. To assess gender differences we used two models: use versus nonuse of services (logistic regression and intensity of use among users (negative binomial regression. Results In our sample, women were more likely to be younger, single, and non-white than men. Women were more likely to utilize outpatient care services (odds ratio [OR] = 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.09, 1.98, but once care was initiated, frequency of visits over time (intensity did not differ by gender (incident rate ratio [IRR] = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.27. Conclusion Recently discharged OEF/OIF women Veterans were more likely to seek VA health care than men Veterans. But the intensity of use was similar between women and men VA care users. As more women use VA health care, prospective studies exploring gender differences in types of services utilized, health outcomes, and factors associated with satisfaction will be required.

  2. The University Hospital Zurich Offers a Medical Online Consultation Service for Men With Intimate Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Weitmann, Sabine; Schulz, Urs; Schmid, Daniel Max; Brockes, Christiane

    2017-05-01

    The University Hospital of Zurich offers a text-based, Medical Online Consultation Service to the public since 1999. Users asked health questions anonymously to tele-doctors. This study focused on the characteristics of male enquirers with intimate health problems, the content of their questions, the medical advice given by tele-doctors and the rating of the service to prove the benefit of an online service for medical laymen. This retrospective study included 5.1% of 3,305 enquiries from 2008 to 2010 using the International Classification of Diseases-10 and International Classification of Primary Care codes relevant for intimate and sexual health problems in men. A professional text analysis program (MAXQDA) supported the content analysis, which is based on the procedure of inductive category development described by Mayring. The average age was 40 years, 63.1% enquirers had no comorbidity, in 62.5% it was the first time they consulted a doctor, and 70.2% asked for a specific, single, intimate health issue. In 64.3%, the most important organ of concern was the penis. Overall, 30.4% asked about sexually transmitted diseases. In 74.4% a doctor visit was recommended to clarify the health issue. The rating of the problem solving was very good. The service was mainly used by younger men without comorbidity and no previous contact with a doctor with regard to an intimate health problem. The anonymous setting of the teleconsultation provided men individual, professional medical advice and decision support. Teleconsultation is suggested to empower patients by developing more health literacy.

  3. Effectiveness of educational interventions to raise men's awareness of bladder and bowel health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Brent; Tuckett, Anthony; Hegney, Desley; Paterson, Jan; Kralik, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) has been defined as a condition in which the involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable. Urinary incontinence is a common health problem that carries with it significant medical, psychosocial and economic burdens. Fecal incontinence has been defined as the involuntary or inappropriate passing of liquid or solid stool and can also include the incontinence of flatus. Studies suggest that twice as many men suffer from fecal incontinence compared to urinary incontinence whilst more than three times as many women suffer from urinary incontinence compared to fecal incontinence. The general consensus in the literature is that barriers exist for seeking help for those with incontinence. REVIEW QUESTION: 'How effective are educational interventions at raising men's awareness of bladder and bowel health?' Adult and adolescent males (age 12 years and over). Any intervention, program or action that provided information, or attempted to raise awareness of men's bladder and bowel health. The primary outcomes of interest included any measure defined by included studies such as: TYPES OF STUDIES: As this review attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention or interventions, reviewers considered studies using concurrent controls. The search strategy was designed to identify both published and unpublished material and was restricted to English language publications with a publication date of 10 years prior to the search with the exception of a review of seminal papers before this time. The quality of included studies was assessed by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Checklists for experimental and observational studies. For each included paper the type of information that was extracted and tabulated in a database followed the JBI Data Extraction Form for Experimental and Observational Studies. Where possible relative risk (RR), odds ratios (OR), Mean differences and associated 95

  4. Health Status and Labour Force Status of Older Working-Age Australian Men

    OpenAIRE

    Lixin Cai; Guyonne Kalb

    2005-01-01

    The trend of declining labour force participation by older working-age men, combined with an ageing population, has led many industrialised nations to develop policies encouraging older male workers to remain in the labour force. A better understanding of how an individual’s health influences the labour force participation decision among this group of workers would facilitate the development of effective policies. The current research uses the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australi...

  5. Representações dos corpos masculinos na revista Men's Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar Faria Duarte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central point of this article is masculinity, one of the controversial issues of gender studies. Therefore, our goal was to detect, define and analyze a form of masculinity constructed by the print media. For this, a survey was conducted in 12 editions of the magazine Brazilian Men's Health, published between 2011 and 2012. The results demonstrate that this is an important segment pedagogical diffusion of ideas from one type of masculinity, which assimilates the condition identity to muscular bodies.

  6. Impact of health counselling on cardiovascular disease risk in middle aged men: influence of socioeconomic status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijo Siren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The inverse association between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease is well documented. We examined whether the impact of health counselling on cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged men differed according to socioeconomic status. METHODS: We used data from a community based study assessing the risk for cardiovascular disease among middle-aged men in Helsinki, Finland. Traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors were measured and cardiovascular disease risk was assessed by a modified risk tool used in the North Karelia project (CVD Risk Score. Those men with increased risk for cardiovascular disease at their baseline visit in 2006 received lifestyle counselling. After two years these high-risk men were invited to a follow-up visit. The same measurements and risk assessments were repeated. RESULTS: Based on the CVD Risk Score there were significant differences between the groups at baseline (p = 0.001 and at follow-up (p<0.001 with the highest scores in the lowest educational group. There were no significant differences in traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to educational attainment between groups either at baseline or at follow-up. Baseline lifestyle characteristics differed between the groups regarding use of soft fat (p = 0.019. All groups responded positively to lifestyle counselling. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that lifestyle counselling is feasible in high-risk middle-aged men and lifestyle intervention works in all educational groups. Interestingly the traditional risk factors did not show improvement, but the risk score improved. From a practical point of view our findings stress the importance of using risk score calculators in health counselling instead of looking at individual cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  7. Mens Perspectives on Family Planning and Their Knowledge on Reproductive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Cakir Gungor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Many training programs for females about contraception have been developed. In this study, we aimed to investigate the perspectives of males on contraception and their knowledge on reproductive health. Material and Method: Husbands of pregnant women who presented in our obstetric clinic were invited to complete a questionnaire. Results: A total of 178 men answered our questionnaire. Among their wives, 11.1% (17/153 terminated their at least one unintended pregnancy. 142 of them (79.8% knew about modern contraceptive methods, and 104 (58.4% of them used at least one of these methods. Condoms were perceived as the best contraceptive method for 46.1% (35/76 because of their easiness to use and cheapness, and 41.7% (25/60 of the participants stated that they would like to use condom from then on. 55.6% (40/72 stated that they would never use oral contraceptives because of their possible side effects on their wives. 20 of the questions addressed to the participants were about reproductive health. The participants answered approximately 70% of all questions correctly. The correct answering rate for every question ranged between 39.6% and 96.1%. Discussion: In our study, we investigated attitudes and knowledge about contraception and reproductive health among men who were married and fertile. The findings from this study can provide a foundation for further education programs for men in these areas.

  8. The relationship between health-related quality of life, obesity and testosterone levels in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Torben Leo; Wraae, Kristian; Hougaard, David; Gudex, Claire; Brixen, Kim; Andersen, Marianne

    2014-03-01

    quality of life evaluated by Short-Form 36 (SF-36) is decreased in obesity and hypogonadism, but the importance of regional fat mass is unknown. In the present study, we evaluated associations between SF-36, regional fat deposits and bioavailable testosterone (BioT) in ageing men. a population-based cross-sectional study in older men. Data included SF-36 questionnaires with the dimensions such as physical function, role limitations physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, role limitations emotional and mental health. Furthermore, waist, lean body mass (measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry), visceral adipose tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (measured by magnetic resonance imaging) and BioT were established. five hundred and ninety-eight men aged 60-74 years were included. The SF-36 dimensions such as physical function, general health, vitality and role limitations functional were inversely associated with waist and SAT and positively associated with BioT. In multiple regression analysis, waist was the body composition measure with the strongest association with SF-36 dimension scores. SF-36 dimension scores were more closely associated with central obesity than with BioT. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00155961.

  9. Psychosocial Variables Related to Why Women are Less Active than Men and Related Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Skidmore Edwards

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews psychosocial influences on women's participation in physical activity as they differ from men and how associated activity differences impact women's risk for a number of chronic diseases. This topic directly aligns with the mission of this special edition related to disparities in women's health as the typically lower level of physical activity in females directly impacts their health. On average, females participate in physical activity at lower rates than their male counterparts. These lower rates of physical activity are directly related to both incidence of and outcomes from cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and gynecological cancers. The relationship between psychosocial factors that are understood to affect physical activity differs between men and women. Specifically, self-efficacy, social support, and motivation are empirically substantiated factors that found to impact physical activity participation among women differently than men. Understanding these relationships is integral to designing effective interventions to target physical activity participation in women so that the related health risks are adequately addressed.

  10. Determinants of male reproductive health disorders: the Men in Australia Telephone Survey (MATeS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittert Gary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between reproductive health disorders and lifestyle factors in middle-aged and older men is not clear. The aim of this study is to describe lifestyle and biomedical associations as possible causes of erectile dysfunction (ED, prostate disease (PD, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and perceived symptoms of androgen deficiency (pAD in a representative population of middle-aged and older men, using the Men in Australia Telephone Survey (MATeS. Methods A representative sample (n = 5990 of men aged 40+ years, stratified by age and State, was contacted by random selection of households, with an individual response rate of 78%. All men participated in a 20-minute computer-assisted telephone interview exploring general and reproductive health. Associations between male reproductive health disorders and lifestyle and biomedical factors were analysed using multivariate logistic regression (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]. Variables studied included age, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, co-morbid disease and medication use for hypertension, high cholesterol and symptoms of depression. Results Controlling for age and a range of lifestyle and co-morbid exposures, sedentary lifestyle and being underweight was associated with an increased likelihood of ED (1.4 [1.1-1.8]; 2.9 [1.5-5.8], respectively and pAD (1.3 [1.1-1.7]; 2.7 [1.4-5.0], respectively. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease were both associated with ED, with hypertension strongly associated with LUTS and pAD. Current smoking (inverse association and depressive symptomatology were the only variables independently associated with PD. All reproductive disorders showed consistent associations with depression (measured either by depressive symptomatology or medication use in both age-adjusted and multivariate analyses. Conclusion A range of lifestyle factors, more often associated with chronic disease, were

  11. Exploring a Dutch paradox: an ethnographic investigation of gay men's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sanjay; Gerrets, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Netherlands' reputation as a world leader with respect to gay rights, homosexual Dutch men have much higher rates of mood disorders, anxiety disorders and suicide attempts than heterosexual Dutch men. Epidemiologists report similar disparities elsewhere in Western Europe and North America. These findings have been the focus of a blossoming psychological literature, inspired by minority stress theory and deploying quantitative methods. Our investigation aims to complement this body of work by adopting an ethnographic approach. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in the Netherlands from 2009 to 2010, we explore sociocultural and contextual factors that have received relatively little attention with respect to gay mental health. In the Netherlands - considered a model for gay equality - how can one understand high rates of psychiatric disorders among gay men? This study points to heteronormativity, complex dynamics involving long-term relationships and processes within gay subcultures as key issues. Notwithstanding their putative socioeconomic, legal and political equality, gay men struggled - at various stages of the life cycle - with internalised norms that they found difficult to fulfil. The desire to embody these ideals, and structural constraints in meeting them, could be potent sources of disappointment and distress.

  12. Adequacy of nutritional intake among older men living in Sydney, Australia: findings from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waern, Rosilene V R; Cumming, Robert G; Blyth, Fiona; Naganathan, Vasi; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Le Couteur, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Kendig, Hal; Hirani, Vasant

    2015-09-14

    Previous research shows that older men tend to have lower nutritional intakes and higher risk of under-nutrition compared with younger men. The objectives of this study were to describe energy and nutrient intakes, assess nutritional risk and investigate factors associated with poor intake of energy and key nutrients in community-dwelling men aged ≥75 years participating in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project - a longitudinal cohort study on older men in Sydney, Australia. A total of 794 men (mean age 81·4 years) had a detailed diet history interview, which was carried out by a dietitian. Dietary adequacy was assessed by comparing median intakes with nutrient reference values (NRV): estimated average requirement, adequate intake or upper level of intake. Attainment of NRV of total energy and key nutrients in older age (protein, Fe, Zn, riboflavin, Ca and vitamin D) was incorporated into a 'key nutrients' variable dichotomised as 'good' (≥5) or 'poor' (≤4). Using logistic regression modelling, we examined associations between key nutrients with factors known to affect food intake. Median energy intake was 8728 kJ (P5=5762 kJ, P95=12 303 kJ), and mean BMI was 27·7 (sd 4·0) kg/m2. Men met their NRV for most nutrients. However, only 1 % of men met their NRV for vitamin D, only 19 % for Ca, only 30 % for K and only 33 % for dietary fibre. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only country of birth was significantly associated with poor nutritional intake. Dietary intakes were adequate for most nutrients; however, only half of the participants met the NRV of ≥5 key nutrients.

  13. Getting the terminology right in sexual health research: the importance of accurately classifying fuck buddies among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellhouse, Clare; Walker, Sandra; Fairley, Christopher K; Chow, Eric Pf; Bilardi, Jade E

    2017-03-29

    The aim of this report was to raise the issue of the definition and classification of partner terminology in men who have sex with men (MSM) research, particularly in regards to 'fuck buddies'. If definitions in research differ from general consensus in the MSM population, it is possible that public health strategies will be ineffective as the target population may be inaccurate. Thirty semistructured interviews with MSM attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre were conducted, focusing on the willingness to change sexual practices to reduce the risk of pharyngeal gonorrhoea. As part of these interviews, men were also asked their views on the terminology they used to describe their relationships and sexual partners. The degree of emotional attachment often defined the type or classification of relationships. There was a consensus among men that partners they engaged with for 'sex only' were classified as casual partners and partners with whom there was an emotional attachment or formalisation of the relationship were classified as 'regular partners'. However, the classification of 'fuck buddy' as a regular or casual partner was less clear. Further research is needed to ascertain the ways in which men conceptualise sexual relationships and define or classify partner types, particularly 'fuck buddy' relationships. A third category for sexual relationships should be considered to encapsulate fuck buddy relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Mental health among men who have sex with men in Cambodia: Implications for integration of mental health services within HIV programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Pal, Khuondyla; Choub, Sok Chamreun; Mburu, Gitau

    2016-03-24

    Poor mental health contributes to poor HIV prevention, treatment and care outcomes. This paper documents factors associated with psychological distress among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Cambodia and discusses potential ways in which routine mental health management could be integrated into HIV services. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 394 MSM randomly selected from two provinces using a two-stage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire was used to assess psychological distress, sexual behaviors, substance use, adverse childhood experiences and family dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to explore factors associated with levels of psychological distress. In total, 10.7 % of the respondents reported having suicidal thoughts and 6.6 % reported having attempted to commit suicide in the past three months, while 38.8 % had a higher level of psychological distress (GHQ-12 > 3), which indicates poor mental health. Higher levels of psychological distress were independently associated with older age (AOR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03-1.14), alcohol use (AOR = 3.3, 95 % CI 1.36-7.83), illicit drug use (AOR = 3.53, 95 % CI 1.12-11.18), poor self-reported quality of life (AOR = 7.45, 95 % CI 1.79-3.04), and reduced condom use at last sex (AOR = 0.40, 95 % CI 0.21-0.73). MSM with higher levels of psychological distress were significantly more likely to report that a family member said hurtful things to them (AOR = 1.80, 95 % CI 1.10-2.97), a parent or guardian had been physically abused (AOR = 3.51, 95 % CI 1.86-6.62), and a family member had been mentally ill (AOR = 4.01, 95 % CI 2.06-7.81) when they were growing up. In order to mitigate psychological distress among MSM in Cambodia, integration of mental health interventions within HIV programmes should be strengthened. To achieve optimal impact, these interventions should also address alcohol and other substance use, and low

  15. Sexual violence against men and boys in conflict and forced displacement: implications for the health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, Sarah K; Freccero, Julie; Touquet, Heleen

    2017-11-01

    Sexual violence against men and boys is commonplace in many conflict-affected settings and may be frequent in relation to forced displacement as well. Adolescent boys, forming the majority of unaccompanied minors globally, are a particularly vulnerable group. Yet sensitised health services for adult and adolescent male sexual violence survivors are scarce, and barriers to accessing care remain high. We describe current challenges and gaps in the provision of health care for male survivors in settings affected by conflict and forced displacement, and provide suggestions on how to improve service provision and uptake.

  16. Comparison of mental health treatment status and use of antidepressants in men and women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Priyanka; Mitchison, Deborah; Miller, Caroline; Bowden, Jacqueline; Alejandro González-Chica, David; Stocks, Nigel; Touyz, Stephen; Hay, Phillipa

    2017-11-21

    Mental health treatment status and antidepressant use were investigated among men and women with an eating disorder (ED) who were interviewed in a general population survey of 3005 adults (aged ≥15 years). Compared to women, men with an ED were significantly less likely to receive treatment for a mental health problem or to be currently using an antidepressant. On multivariate analyses, female gender, lower mental health-related quality of life, and lower weight/shape overvaluation were significant predictors of receiving treatment and antidepressant use. Treatment was less likely in men and in people with higher ED cognitions.

  17. " . . . I Should Maintain a Healthy Life Now and Not Just Live as I Please . . . ": Men's Health and Fatherhood in Rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosegood, Victoria; Richter, Linda; Clarke, Lynda

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the social context of men's health and health behaviors in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, particularly in relationship to fathering and fatherhood. Individual interviews and focus groups were conducted with 51 Zulu-speaking men. Three themes related to men's health emerged from the analysis of transcripts: (a) the interweaving of health status and health behaviors in descriptions of "good" and "bad" fathers, (b) the dominance of positive accounts of health and health status in men's own accounts, and (c) fathers' narratives of transformations and positive reinforcement in health behaviors. The study reveals the pervasiveness of an ideal of healthy fathers, one in which the health of men has practical and symbolic importance not only for men themselves but also for others in the family and community. The study also suggests that men hold in esteem fathers who manage to be involved with their biological children who are not coresident or who are playing a fathering role for nonbiological children (social fathers). In South Africa, men's health interventions have predominantly focused on issues related to HIV and sexual health. The new insights obtained from the perspective of men indicate that there is likely to be a positive response to health interventions that incorporate acknowledgment of, and support for, men's aspirations and lived experiences of social and biological fatherhood. Furthermore, the findings indicate the value of data on men's involvement in families for men's health research in sub-Saharan Africa. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Men's health: it is imperative to teach scrotal and rectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbank, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Men's health has been a neglected area. Both their general health and their sexual health impact on morbidity and mortality. To improve this situation we need to educate men to attend their doctor and discuss their concerns. But, we also need medical professionals who are both competent and confident in initiating discussions and dealing with men's concerns. Studies of graduating students in both Australia and Ireland show that they have had little experience in performing rectal examinations, and have little confidence in their findings when they do perform them. We decided to implement a pilot study of a Urological Teaching Associate (UTA) Programme, aiming to teach students during their urological rotation the technique and communication skills of hernia, genital and rectal examinations. We recruited men from the community, trained them in these skills, and in feedback skills, and the UTAs then teach the students whilst being examined themselves. Each tutorial begins with an introduction followed by a demonstration by the UTAs, where one plays the role of the doctor and the other plays the patient. The students then have a turn at examining a UTA, obtaining feedback from UTAs on their performance. The students complete an evaluation form before and after the tutorial. Part of this is to assess their confidence in performing these examinations. The results show a dramatic increase in confidence in performing these examinations after the tutorial. If these results are confirmed by a larger study then consideration needs to be given to these programmes becoming a standard part of the curriculum. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  19. The Significance of Privacy and Trust in Providing Health-Related Services to Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggests that bisexual men face unique health concerns in comparison to their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. However, little is known about behaviorally bisexual men’s experiences with health services, including ways of providing services that would be most appropriate to meet the health needs of this population. This study sought to understand preferences for health-related services among behaviorally bisexual men in the Midwestern United States. Using a community-based research approach, a diverse sample of 75 behaviorally bisexual men was recruited for in-depth interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed utilizing inductive coding through established team-based protocols to ensure reliability. Themes emerged involving the importance of privacy and trust when reaching, recruiting, and engaging behaviorally bisexual men in health services. Findings suggest that multifaceted approaches are needed, including those that provide relevant and confidential services while allowing for the development and ongoing maintenance of trust. PMID:22676463

  20. The promises and limitations of gender-transformative health programming with men: critical reflections from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Shari L; Fleming, Paul J; Colvin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, researchers and practitioners have engaged in a series of efforts to shift health programming with men from being gender-neutral to being more gender-sensitive and gender-transformative. Efforts in this latter category have been increasingly utilised, particularly in the last decade, and attempt to transform gender relations to be more equitable in the name of improved health outcomes for both women and men. We begin by assessing the conceptual progression of social science contributions to gender-transformative health programming with men. Next, we briefly assess the empirical evidence from gender-transformative health interventions with men. Finally, we examine some of the challenges and limitations of gender-transformative health programmes and make recommendations for future work in this thriving interdisciplinary area of study.

  1. The role of civic engagement for men's health and well being in Norway-a contribution to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goth, Ursula S; Småland, Erik

    2014-06-18

    Using the example of older men volunteering on teams that restore historic ships, this article examines the effects of volunteering on the well-being of older adults. We consider particularly how volunteering impacts levels of social engagement and explore how the men's reminiscences as they bond with their fellows in highly skilled work helps integrate their life experiences. Data are based on 14 in-depth interviews with volunteers working on historic vessels in Norway. Self-rated health, functional dependency, and well-being measures were collected using semi-structured questionnaire. Volunteering in a context of skilled, group-bonded, culturally prestigious activity adds considerably to social capital among elderly men in Norway. Respondents explain their involvement in terms of prior relationships and current social benefits. They spoke of the value of maintaining past personal connections to a particular ship, shipping company, or local community. These were reinforced by current social benefits, such as the experience of companionship, unity, and the feeling of making an important contribution to the society. The group dynamics and strong collective aspect of these voluntary associations maintains internal cohesion, and members only leave when forced by increasing age, poor health, or insufficient financial resources. This article illuminates a case study of gender-specific engagement of older adults in volunteer roles returning high benefits both to participants and society, and adds knowledge to public-health programs and policies in the volunteer- and cultural-heritage sector.

  2. Being Better and Doing Better: Men's Health and Mental Health on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmartin, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This article was written by Christopher Kilmartin to share some of what he has learned in his career as Emeritus college professor, author, actor, playwright, consultant, and professional psychologist about the needs of campus males and what is believed to work when addressing and intervening to keep men from hurting themselves and others.…

  3. Fatherhood in a New Country: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of Afghan Men and Implications for Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Elisha; Yelland, Jane; Szwarc, Josef; Wahidi, Sayed; Casey, Sue; Chesters, Donna; Fouladi, Fatema; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Giallo, Rebecca; Brown, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    Fathers of refugee background are dealing with multiple, interrelated stressors associated with forced migration and establishing their lives in a new country. This has implications for the role of men in promoting the health and well-being of their families. Afghan community researchers conducted interviews with 30 Afghan women and men who had recently had a baby in Australia. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with health professionals working with families of refugee background. Fourteen men, 16 women, and 34 health professionals participated. Afghan men reported playing a major role in supporting their wives during pregnancy and postnatal care, accompanying their wives to appointments, and providing language and transport support. Although men embraced these roles, they were rarely asked by health professionals about their own concerns related to their wife's pregnancy, or about their social circumstances. Perinatal health professionals queried whether it was their role to meet the needs of men. There are many challenges for families of refugee background navigating maternity services while dealing with the challenges of settlement. There is a need to move beyond a narrow conceptualization of antenatal and postnatal care to encompass a broader preventive and primary care approach to supporting refugee families through the period of pregnancy and early years of parenting. Pregnancy and postnatal care needs to be tailored to the social and psychological needs of families of refugee background, including men, and incorporate appropriate language support, in order to improve child and family health outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Perceived Discrimination and Mental Health Symptoms among Black Men with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Galvan, Frank H.; Landrine, Hope; Klein, David J.; Sticklor, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective People living with HIV (PLWH) exhibit more severe mental health symptoms than do members of the general public (including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder/PTSD symptoms). We examined whether perceived discrimination, which has been associated with poor mental health in prior research, contributes to greater depression and PTSD symptoms among HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men (MSM), who are at high risk for discrimination from multiple stigmatized characteristics (HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation). Method A total of 181 Black MSM living with HIV completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews (ACASI) that included measures of mental health symptoms (depression, PTSD) and scales assessing perceived discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Results In bivariate tests, all three perceived discrimination scales were significantly associated with greater symptoms of depression and PTSD (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, and arousal subscales) (all p-values discrimination types (p discrimination was negatively associated with depression symptoms when considered in isolation from other forms of discrimination, but positively associated when all three types of discrimination were present. In multivariate tests, only perceived HIV-related discrimination was associated with PTSD symptoms (p discrimination contribute to poor mental health among PLWH. Researchers need to take into account intersecting stigmas when developing interventions to improve mental health among PLWH. PMID:21787061

  5. Performing masculinity, influencing health: a qualitative mixed-methods study of young Spanish men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Jorge Marcos; Avilés, Nuria Romo; Lozano, María del Río; Cuadros, Juan Palomares; Calvente, María del Mar García

    2013-01-01

    Background The literature shows how gender mandates contribute to differences in exposure and vulnerability to certain health risk factors. This paper presents the results of a study developed in the south of Spain, where research aimed at understanding men from a gender perspective is still limited. Objective The aim of this paper is to explore the lay perceptions and meanings ascribed to the idea of masculinity, identifying ways in which gender displays are related to health. Design The study is based on a mixed-methods data collection strategy typical of qualitative research. We performed a qualitative content analysis focused on manifest and latent content. Results Our analysis showed that the relationship between masculinity and health was mainly defined with regard to behavioural explanations with an evident performative meaning. With regard to issues such as driving, the use of recreational drugs, aggressive behaviour, sexuality, and body image, important connections were established between manhood acts and health outcomes. Different ways of understanding and performing the male identity also emerged from the results. The findings revealed the implications of these aspects in the processes of change in the identity codes of men and women. Conclusions The study provides insights into how the category ‘man’ is highly dependent on collective practices and performative acts. Consideration of how males perform manhood acts might be required in guidance on the development of programmes and policies aimed at addressing gender inequalities in health in a particular local context. PMID:24044583

  6. Perceived discrimination and mental health symptoms among Black men with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Galvan, Frank H; Landrine, Hope; Klein, David J; Sticklor, Laurel A

    2011-07-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) exhibit more severe mental health symptoms, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, than do members of the general public. We examined whether perceived discrimination, which has been associated with poor mental health in prior research, contributes to greater depression and PTSD symptoms among HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men (MSM), who are at high risk for discrimination from multiple stigmatized characteristics (HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation). A total of 181 Black MSM living with HIV completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews (ACASI) that included measures of mental health symptoms (depression, PTSD) and scales assessing perceived discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. In bivariate tests, all three perceived discrimination scales were significantly associated with greater symptoms of depression and PTSD (i.e., reexperiencing, avoidance, and arousal subscales; all p values discrimination types (p discrimination was negatively associated with depression symptoms when considered in isolation from other forms of discrimination, but positively associated when all three types of discrimination were present. In multivariate tests, only perceived HIV-related discrimination was associated with PTSD symptoms (p discrimination contribute to poor mental health among PLWH. Researchers need to take into account intersecting stigmata when developing interventions to improve mental health among PLWH.

  7. Application of a modified health belief model to HIV preventive behavioral intentions among gay and bisexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Siero, F.W.; van den Eynden, R.J.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The utility of a modified health belief model (Janz and Pecker, 1984) for predicting the intention to use condoms was tested in a study among gay and bisexual men. The model explained a reasonable amount of variance. It was found that younger men's decision to have safe sex was guided by factors

  8. Reaching Suburban Men Who Have Sex With Men for STD and HIV Services Through Online Social Networking Outreach: A Public Health Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampkin, Darryl; Crawley, Adam; Lopez, Teresa P; Mejia, Christopher M; Yuen, Wesley; Levy, Vivian

    2016-05-01

    Technology-enabled approaches may reach suburban and rural men who have sex with men (MSM) who lack physical venues, where they live for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV prevention efforts. We evaluated using Grindr, an all-male social networking platform, for STD/HIV prevention services to MSM by a suburban Public Health department. Phase 1 (October 2012-March 2013) focused on acceptability of prevention messages by MSM on Grindr and phase 2 (October 2013-March 2014) Grindr use for implementing testing and linkage-to-care. We compared the number of Public Health encounters with MSM before and after initiation of Grindr use and the proportion of users who remained engaged with Public Health staff after being told they were interacting with a health educator. For a 6-month period before Grindr outreach, Public Health had 60 contacts with MSM. Contacts increased to 305 MSM in phase 1, of which 168/213 (79%) remained engaged. In phase 2, among 903 MSM contacts, 69% remained engaged. Asian and Hispanic MSM were more likely to remain engaged with outreach staff; white men were more likely to be not engaged. No significant difference in age between engaged and nonengaged MSM was seen. Grindr outreach by Public Health in a suburban county seems acceptable to MSM and leads to a 14-fold increase in MSM reached for counseling and education compared with a traditional outreach period. Further evaluation of technology-enabled approaches for STD/HIV prevention in suburban and rural MSM is warranted.

  9. Health problems of partner violence victims: comparing help-seeking men to a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise A; Douglas, Emily M

    2015-02-01

    National population-based studies show that 40%-50% of physical partner violence victims in a 1-year time period are men. However, studies assessing the health concerns related to partner violence victimization tend to focus on women, and none have assessed the health of male physical partner violence victims who sought help for their victimization. To understand men's mental and physical health concerns that may be related to partner violence victimization. In 2012-2013, two samples of men-611 physical partner violence victims who sought help and 1,601 men from a population-based sample-completed online questionnaires on their demographics, various types of partner violence victimization, physical health, mental health, and other risks. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, log binomial models, and robust Poisson models in 2013. In comparison to the population-based sample of men, male partner violence victims who sought help had significantly poorer health, particularly with regard to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, high blood pressure, sexually transmitted diseases, and asthma. These differences remained after controlling for sample differences in demographics, substance use, previous traumatic exposure, and social support. Practitioners should assess for health problems among partner violence victims and for partner violence victimization among men presenting with health problems. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gender Expression and Mental Health in Black South African Men Who Have Sex with Men: Further Explorations of Unexpected Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Theo G M; Bos, Henny; Reddy, Vasu

    2018-02-20

    Unlike studies conducted in Western countries, two studies among Black South African men who have sex with men (MSM) found no support for the association between gender nonconformity and mental distress, even though gender-nonconforming men experienced more discrimination and discrimination was associated with mental distress (Cook, Sandfort, Nel, & Rich, 2013; Sandfort, Bos, Knox, & Reddy, 2016). In Sandfort et al., gender nonconformity was assessed as a continuous variable, validated by comparing scores between a categorical assessment of gender presentation (masculine, feminine, no preference). Using the same dataset, we further explored this topic by (1) testing differences between gender expression groups in sexual minority stressors, resilience factors, and mental distress; (2) testing whether the impact of elevated discrimination in the feminine group was counterbalanced by lower scores on other stressors or higher scores on resilience factors; and (3) exploring whether relationships of stressors and resilience factors with mental distress varied between gender expression groups. Controlling for demographics, we found several differences between the gender expression groups in the stressors and resilience factors, but not in mental distress. We found no support for the idea that the lack of differences in mental distress between the gender expression groups was a consequence of factors working in opposite directions. However, internalized homophobia had a differential impact on depression in feminine men compared to masculine men. In our discussion of these findings, we explored the meaning of our participants' self-categorization as it might relate to gender instead of sexual identities.

  11. [Data on the sexual health of providers and clients of sexual services for men who have sex with men in Germany].

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, S; Schmidt, AJ; Marcus, U

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the sexual health of male providers and clients of transactional sex. The data of participants of the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS-DE; N = 50,086) who live in Germany were analysed. The outcomes were testing for and diagnoses of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), partner numbers, illicit drug use, and sexual happiness in two populations: (1) men who offered and (2) men who paid for transactional sex in the past 12 months.In the age group of under...

  12. Health Care Providers’ Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Lesbian Women and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskind, Rachel G.; Nosek, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined providers’ implicit and explicit attitudes toward lesbian and gay people by provider gender, sexual identity, and race/ethnicity. Methods. We examined attitudes toward heterosexual people versus lesbian and gay people in Implicit Association Test takers: 2338 medical doctors, 5379 nurses, 8531 mental health providers, 2735 other treatment providers, and 214 110 nonproviders in the United States and internationally between May 2006 and December 2012. We characterized the sample with descriptive statistics and calculated Cohen d, a standardized effect size measure, with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Among heterosexual providers, implicit preferences always favored heterosexual people over lesbian and gay people. Implicit preferences for heterosexual women were weaker than implicit preferences for heterosexual men. Heterosexual nurses held the strongest implicit preference for heterosexual men over gay men (Cohen d = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.28, 1.32 among female nurses; Cohen d = 1.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.32, 1.44 among male nurses). Among all groups, explicit preferences for heterosexual versus lesbian and gay people were weaker than implicit preferences. Conclusions. Implicit preferences for heterosexual people versus lesbian and gay people are pervasive among heterosexual health care providers. Future research should investigate how implicit sexual prejudice affects care. PMID:26180976

  13. Attitudes toward the health of men that regularly occupy in a trainer hall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamchhuk Ja.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted to consider that by motivation for people that practice in a trainer hall is an improvement of health and original appearance. The aim of this research was to determine whether there is training by part of forming of positive attitude toward the health of men-sportsmen-amateurs that occupy in a trainer hall. In research took part 100 men that engage in the power training in one of three trainer halls of Warsaw. Investigational divided by two groups: 50 persons that occupy in a trainer hall more than one year, but no more than 3 years (group A and 50 persons that practice more than 3 (group B. It is well-proven that training positively influences on the emotional state of men. It was discovered at the same time, that than greater experience of sportsman-amateur, the considerably more often he used additions (including by a stimulant. There was no medical control in both groups. Positive influence of the power training shows that they can be the important element of prophylaxis and physiotherapy.

  14. Masculinity constructs as protective buffers and risk factors for men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Ronald F; Wimer, David J

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to replicate the study of Levant, Wimer, and Williams (2011), which reported complex relationships between masculinity and health behaviors using a more diverse sample and updated measures. A sample of 589 college and community-dwelling men responded to an online survey consisting of five scales. Levant et al.'s (2011) study was partially replicated-some masculinity constructs were identified as protective buffers for some health behaviors and others as risk factors. The vast majority of the findings that were replicated were risk factors, suggesting that traditional masculinity is more of risk than a buffer, and occurred in the analyses involving Avoiding Anger and Stress and Avoiding Substance Use subscales, suggesting that these health behaviors are most closely associated with masculinity. The results are discussed in terms of limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for health care practice.

  15. Men and women in the same prison: interpersonal needs and psychological health of prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcedo, Rodrigo J; López, Félix; Begoña Orgaz, M; Toth, Katalin; Fernández-Rouco, Noelia

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gender differences in the state of interpersonal needs and psychological health of male and female prison inmates who live in the same prison. The authors conducted in-person interviews with 118 male and 70 female inmates. The results show that women present a better interpersonal state and psychological health than do men. For both genders, the consequences of fulfilling or not fulfilling interpersonal needs-specifically, social loneliness and sexual satisfaction-are associated with psychological health. These findings suggest the importance of the state of prison inmates' interpersonal needs in promoting psychological health in the context of the prison, where these needs are generally difficult to be met. Making contacts possible between male and female inmates who are in the same prison might help them to better fulfill some of their interpersonal needs, especially those related to their sexual lives.

  16. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men.

  17. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone and incident ischaemic stroke in men in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, Molly M; Arnold, Alice M; Biggs, Mary L; Longstreth, W T; Smith, Nicholas L; Kizer, Jorge R; Cappola, Anne R; Hirsch, Calvin H; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2014-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly men. Our main objective was to examine whether testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was associated with incident ischaemic stroke in elderly men. Cohort study. Elderly men in the Cardiovascular Health Study who had no history of stroke, heart disease or prostate cancer as of 1994 and were followed until December 2010. Adjudicated ischaemic stroke. Among 1032 men (mean age 76, range 66-97), followed for a median of 10 years, 114 had an incident ischaemic stroke. Total T and free T were not significantly associated with stroke risk, while DHT had a nonlinear association with incident stroke (P = 0·006) in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. The lowest risk of stroke was at DHT levels of 50-75 ng/dl, with greater risk of stroke at DHT levels above 75 ng/dl or below 50 ng/dl. Results were unchanged when SHBG was added to the model. Calculated free DHT had an inverse linear association with incident ischaemic stroke with HR 0·77 (95% CI, 0·61, 0·98) per standard deviation in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. Dihydrotestosterone had a nonlinear association with stroke risk in which there was an optimal DHT level associated with the lowest stroke risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to clarify whether there is an optimal androgen range associated with the least risk of adverse outcomes in elderly men. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Psychological Factors and Their Association with Ideal Cardiovascular Health Among Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Lena; Ogunmoroti, Oluseye; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S; Utuama, Ovie A; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Veledar, Emir; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur; Zhao, Di; Michos, Erin D

    2018-01-29

    The cardiovascular effects of stress and other psychological factors may be different between women and men. We assessed whether self-perceived adverse psychological factors were associated with achievement of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) as measured by the American Heart Association's Life's Simple Seven (LS7) and whether this differed by sex. This was a cross-sectional study of employees from a large healthcare organization. The LS7 metrics (smoking, physical activity, diet, body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose) were each scored as ideal (2), intermediate (1), or poor (0). Total scores were categorized as optimal (11-14), average (9-10), and inadequate (0-8). Using logistic regression, we tested whether psychological factors obtained by questionnaire (self-perceived stress, low life satisfaction, hopelessness, sadness, depression, and anxiety) were associated with CVH, after adjustment for age, ethnicity, and education. Among 9,056 participants, the mean (SD) age was 43 (12) years, 74% were women, 57% Hispanic/Latino, 17% white, and 16% black. Stress was associated with reduced odds of having optimal/average CVH [OR 0.58 (95% CI 0.50-0.66) and 0.63 (0.50-0.81), for women and men, respectively]. Similarly, depression was associated with reduced odds of optimal/average CVH [0.58 (0.43-0.78) and 0.44 (0.26-0.76), for women and men, respectively]. Low life satisfaction, hopelessness, sadness, and anxiety were also associated with statistically significantly lower odds of optimal/average CVH in women, but not in men; however, there were no interactions by sex. In an ethnically diverse population, both women and men with several adverse self-perceived psychological factors were less likely to have optimal or adequate CVH. Future studies are needed to determine whether addressing psychological stressors can improve CVH.

  19. Masculinity, Medical Mistrust, and Preventive Health Services Delays Among Community-Dwelling African-American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Derrick; Mohottige, Dinushika; Agyemang, Amma; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The contribution of masculinity to men’s healthcare use has gained increased public health interest; however, few studies have examined this association among African-American men, who delay healthcare more often, define masculinity differently, and report higher levels of medical mistrust than non-Hispanic White men. OBJECTIVE To examine associations between traditional masculinity norms, medical mistrust, and preventive health services delays. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional analysis using data from 610 African-American men age 20 and older recruited primarily from barbershops in the North, South, Midwest, and West regions of the U.S. (2003-2009). MEASUREMENTS Independent variables were endorsement of traditional masculinity norms around self-reliance, salience of traditional masculinity norms, and medical mistrust. Dependent variables were self-reported delays in three preventive health services: routine check-ups, blood pressure screenings, and cholesterol screenings. We controlled for socio-demography, healthcare access, and health status. RESULTS After final adjustment, men with a greater endorsement of traditional masculinity norms around self-reliance (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.60–0.98) were significantly less likely to delay blood pressure screening. This relationship became non-significant when a longer BP screening delay interval was used. Higher levels of traditional masculinity identity salience were associated with a decreased likelihood of delaying cholesterol screening (OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.45–0.86). African-American men with higher medical mistrust were significantly more likely to delay routine check-ups (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.34–5.20), blood pressure (OR: 3.03; 95% CI: 1.45–6.32), and cholesterol screenings (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.03–4.23). CONCLUSIONS Contrary to previous research, higher traditional masculinity is associated with decreased delays in African-American men’s blood pressure and cholesterol screening. Routine

  20. Implementing health policy: lessons from the Scottish Well Mens policy initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Douglas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about how health professionals translate national government health policy directives into action. This paper examines that process using the so-called Well Men's Services (WMS policy initiative as a ‘real world’ case study. The WMS were launched by the Scottish Government to address men's health inequalities. Our analysis aimed to develop a deeper understanding of policy implementation as it naturally occurred, used an analytical framework that was developed to reflect the ‘rational planning' principles health professionals are commonly encouraged to use for implementation purposes. Methods and materials: A mixed-methods qualitative enquiry using a data archive generated during the WMS policy evaluation was used to critically analyze (post hoc the perspectives of national policy makers, and local health and social care professionals about the: (a ‘policy problem’, (b interventions intended to address the problem, and (c anticipated policy outcomes. Results and conclusions: This analysis revealed four key themes: (1 ambiguity regarding the policy problem and means of intervention; (2 behavioral framing of the policy problem and intervention; (3 uncertainty about the policy evidence base and outcomes, and; (4 a focus on intervention as outcome. This study found that mechanistic planning heuristics (as a means of supporting implementation fails to grapple with the indeterminate nature of population health problems. A new approach to planning and implementing public health interventions is required that recognises the complex and political nature of health problems; the inevitability of imperfect and contested evidence regarding intervention, and, future associated uncertainties.

  1. Obesity and metabolic syndrome increase the risk of incident depression in older men: the health in men study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Calver, Janine; Jamrozik, Konrad; Hankey, Graeme J; Flicker, Leon

    2009-10-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased risk of prevalent depression among young and middle-aged adults, but the association between obesity (and its various measures, including the metabolic syndrome [MetS]) and incident depression has not been examined adequately in the elderly. This study evaluated the association between various measures of obesity and incident depression over a 10-year period in a large cohort of community-based older men. The authors recruited 12,216 men aged 65-84 years living in Perth, Australia, between 1996 and 1998, and measured their height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and blood pressure. Participants also completed a questionnaire that included information about the clinical diagnosis and treatment for diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol or triglycerides. The authors then used the Western Australian Linked Data System to retrieve information about the following ICD-10 diagnoses between January 1, 1966, and December 31, 2006: depressive episode, recurrent depressive disorder, and dysthymia. The authors excluded 150 men from these analyses because of prior history of depression or missing data. The mean age of our 12,066 participants was 72 +/- 4 years at the time of recruitment, and they were followed up for an average of 8 +/- 2 years. There were 3,623 deaths during follow-up, and 481 men received the diagnosis of depression. The incidence of depression was 5 per 1,000 person-years. Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models showed that men with body mass index (BMI) > or =30 had a 31% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5%-64%) increase in the risk of depression compared with that of nonobese men (BMI depression and waist circumference > or =102 cm and waist/hip > or =1 did not reach statistical significance. Men with MetS at the time of recruitment had a 137% (95% CI = 60%-251%) increase in the adjusted risk of incident depression. Our results indicate that obesity and MetS are associated with an increase in the risk of

  2. Exploring men's and women's experiences of depression and engagement with health professionals: more similarities than differences? A qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziebland Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is argued that the ways in which women express emotional distress mean that they are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, while men's relative lack of articulacy means their depression is hidden. This may have consequences for communicating with health professionals. The purpose of this analysis was to explore how men and women with depression articulate their emotional distress, and examine whether there are gender differences or similarities in the strategies that respondents found useful when engaging with health professionals. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews with 22 women and 16 men in the UK who identified themselves as having had depression, recruited through general practitioners, psychiatrists and support groups. Results We found gender similarities and gender differences in our sample. Both men and women found it difficult to recognise and articulate mental health problems and this had consequences for their ability to communicate with health professionals. Key gender differences noted were that men tended to value skills which helped them to talk while women valued listening skills in health professionals, and that men emphasised the importance of getting practical results from talking therapies in their narratives, as opposed to other forms of therapy which they conceptualised as 'just talking'. We also found diversity among women and among men; some respondents valued a close personal relationship with health professionals, while others felt that this personal relationship was a barrier to communication and preferred 'talking to a stranger'. Conclusion Our findings suggest that there is not a straightforward relationship between gender and engagement with health professionals for people with depression. Health professionals need to be sensitive to patients who have difficulties in expressing emotional distress and critical of gender stereotypes which suggest that women invariably find it easy to

  3. Rural-urban differences in mental health, resilience, stigma, and social support among young Australian gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony; Hosking, Warwick; Rozbroj, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are common among young gay men, particularly in comparison with their heterosexual counterparts. Little is known about the mental health and well-being of those living in rural areas, where access to support and opportunities for connecting with other gay men may be relatively limited. We examined differences in the well-being of young rural and urban Australian gay men, including mental health, resilience, stigma-related challenges, and social support. A national online survey was conducted involving 1,034 Australian gay-identified men aged 18-39 years. All analyses adjusted for sociodemographic differences between the rural and urban samples. On average, rural men had significantly lower self-esteem, lower life satisfaction, lower social support, and were significantly more likely to be psychologically distressed, concerned about acceptance from others, and to conceal their sexual orientation compared to urban gay men. While resilience among the rural group was lower, this was no longer significant following sociodemographic adjustment. An examination of psychosocial predictors of psychological distress in the rural sample revealed that lower education and lower tangible support independently predicted greater distress. Young rural Australian gay men appear to be at a considerable disadvantage with regard to mental health and well-being compared with their urban counterparts, and they may need particular attention in mental health prevention and treatment programs. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Social Pension Income Associated With Small Improvements In Self-Reported Health Of Poor Older Men In Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Philipp; Avendano, Mauricio; Rodríguez-Castelán, Carlos; Pfutze, Tobias

    2018-03-01

    The countries of Latin American are aging rapidly. Because most countries in the region lack adequate social protection systems, many Latin American governments have introduced noncontributory pension programs to reduce poverty and food shortages. This study assessed the effects of a large national noncontributory pension program on the health and health care use of older people in Colombia. Using an instrumental variables approach that exploited differential rollout of the program across municipalities, we found evidence that the program led to significant but small improvements in self-reported health and reductions in hospitalizations among men. No significant effects were found among women or among men for other health and health care use outcomes. A small noncontributory pension was associated with improvements in self-reported measures of health for vulnerable older men, but these effects are small in magnitude. Researchers and policy makers should assess ways to maximize the health benefits of cash transfers to poor older people.

  5. Sarcopenic Obesity and Its Temporal Associations With Changes in Bone Mineral Density, Incident Falls, and Fractures in Older Men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David; Seibel, Markus; Cumming, Robert; Naganathan, Vasi; Blyth, Fiona; Le Couteur, David G; Handelsman, David J; Waite, Louise M; Hirani, Vasant

    2017-03-01

    Body composition and muscle function have important implications for falls and fractures in older adults. We aimed to investigate longitudinal associations between sarcopenic obesity and its components with bone mineral density (BMD) and incident falls and fractures in Australian community-dwelling older men. A total of 1486 men aged ≥70 years from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) study were assessed at baseline (2005-2007), 2-year follow-up (2007-2009; n = 1238), and 5-year follow-up (2010-2013; n = 861). At all three time points, measurements included appendicular lean mass (ALM), body fat percentage and total hip BMD, hand-grip strength, and gait speed. Participants were contacted every 4 months for 6.1 ± 2.1 years to ascertain incident falls and fractures, the latter being confirmed by radiographic reports. Sarcopenic obesity was defined using sarcopenia algorithms of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia (EWGSOP) and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) and total body fat ≥30% of total mass. Sarcopenic obese men did not have significantly different total hip BMD over 5 years compared with non-sarcopenic non-obese men (p > 0.05). EWGSOP-defined sarcopenic obesity at baseline was associated with significantly higher 2-year fall rates (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-2.37), as were non-sarcopenic obesity (1.30; 1.04-1.62) and sarcopenic non-obesity (1.58; 1.14-2.17), compared with non-sarcopenic non-obese. No association with falls was found for sarcopenic obesity using the FNIH definition (1.01; 0.63-1.60), but after multivariable adjustment, the FNIH-defined non-sarcopenic obese group had a reduced hazard for any 6-year fracture compared with sarcopenic obese men (hazard ratio 0.44; 95% CI 0.23-0.86). In older men, EWGSOP-defined sarcopenic obesity is associated with increased fall rates over 2 years, and FNIH-defined sarcopenic obese men have increased

  6. What do men who serve as lay health advisers really do?: Immigrant Latino men share their experiences as Navegantes to prevent HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissman, Aaron T; Eng, Eugenia; Aronson, Robert E; Bloom, Fred R; Leichliter, Jami S; Montaño, Jaime; Rhodes, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    HoMBReS was a lay health adviser (LHA) intervention designed to reduce sexual risk among recently arrived, nonEnglish-speaking Latino men who were members of a multicounty soccer league in central NC. Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership collected, analyzed, and interpreted qualitative life-story narratives to characterize the roles of male LHAs known as Navegantes. Nine Navegantes were interviewed. Their mean age was 39 years (range: 26-62 years); six were from Mexico and three from El Salvador. Navegantes described the function and facilitators of serving as LHAs and identified leverage points for future HIV and STD prevention strategies. They highlighted psychosocial and sociocultural influences on HIV risk, settings for risky behavior, and personal changes from serving as Navegantes. This study provides preliminary evidence that an LHA approach is feasible and appropriate for Latino men, and can be effective in reaching men who might otherwise be difficult to reach.

  7. Individual and Social Factors Related to Mental Health Concerns among Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Reece, Michael; Martinez, Omar; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Research has not yet explored the potential impact of social stress, biphobia, and other factors on the mental health of bisexual men. In-depth interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Interviewers explored potential mental health stressors and supports. Many participants reported personal and social challenges associated with bisexuality, which in turn influenced their mental health. Reported instances of stigma toward bisexuality, from both homosexual and heterosexual individuals, impacted participants’ feelings regarding their own sexualities. Isolation was also commonly reported. Programs are greatly needed that focus on the specific mental health and other concerns voiced by these men. Based on our study findings, such programs should emphasize self-acceptance, social network and community building, and ways to maximize available social support, similar to community-level empowerment interventions that have shown success among gay-identified men. PMID:22745591

  8. Disclosure and Concealment of Sexual Orientation and the Mental Health of Non-Gay-Identified, Behaviorally-Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Siegel, Karolynn; Downing, Martin J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although bisexual men report lower levels of mental health relative to gay men, few studies have examined the factors that contribute to bisexual men’s mental health. Bisexual men are less likely to disclose, and more likely to conceal (i.e., a desire to hide), their sexual orientation than gay men. Theory suggests that this may adversely impact their mental health. This report examined the factors associated with disclosure and with concealment of sexual orientation, the association of disclosure and concealment with mental health, and the potential mediators (i.e., internalized homophobia, social support) of this association with mental health. Method An ethnically-diverse sample of 203 non-gay-identified, behaviorally-bisexual men who do not disclose their same-sex behavior to their female partners were recruited in New York City to complete a single set of self-report measures. Results Concealment was associated with higher income, a heterosexual identification, living with a wife or girlfriend, more frequent sex with women, and less frequent sex with men. Greater concealment, but not disclosure to friends and family, was significantly associated with lower levels of mental health. Multiple mediation analyses revealed that both internalized homophobia and general emotional support significantly mediated the association between concealment and mental health. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that concealment and disclosure are independent constructs among bisexual men. Further, they suggest that interventions addressing concerns about concealment, emotional support, and internalized homophobia may be more beneficial for increasing the mental health of bisexual men than those focused on promoting disclosure. PMID:23276123

  9. Communication technology use and mHealth acceptance among HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Peru: implications for HIV prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Archana; Ferro, Enrico G; Weikum, Damian; Vagenas, Panagiotis; Lama, Javier R; Sanchez, Jorge; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in Peru is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). Given that MSM have been documented as early adopters of emerging technology, we examined communication technology access and utilization, and mobile health (mHealth) acceptance among Peruvian MSM and transgender women (TGW) in order to gauge opportunities for mHealth-enabled HIV interventions. A convenience sample of 359 HIV-infected MSM and TGW recruited from three sites in Lima, Peru completed standardized assessments of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), risky sexual behavior, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence along with self-constructed measures of communication technology access and utilization, and mHealth acceptance. Most participants (86%) had daily access to any cell phone, including smartphones (30%). The most frequent communication activities were receiving and making calls, and receiving and sending text messages using cell phones. On a 5-point Likert scale, participants expressed interest in using mHealth for medication reminders (M = 3.21, SD = 1.32) and engaging in anonymous online interactions with health professionals to discuss HIV-related issues (M = 3.56, SD = 1.33). Importantly, no significant differences were found in communication technology use and mHealth acceptance among participants with AUDs, depression, and suboptimal ART adherence, all of which are associated with poor HIV treatment outcomes. Findings show support for implementing mHealth-based intervention strategies using cell phones to assess and reduce HIV-risk behaviors among HIV-infected MSM and TGW.

  10. Burden of poor oral health in older age: findings from a population-based study of older British men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, S E; Whincup, P H; Watt, R G; Tsakos, G; Papacosta, A O; Lennon, L T; Wannamethee, S G

    2015-12-29

    Evidence of the extent of poor oral health in the older UK adult population is limited. We describe the prevalence of oral health conditions, using objective clinical and subjective measures, in a population-based study of older men. Cross-sectional study. A representative sample of men aged 71-92 years in 2010-2012 from the British Regional Heart Study, initially recruited in 1978-1980 from general practices across Britain. Physical examination among 1660 men included the number of teeth, and periodontal disease in index teeth in each sextant (loss of attachment, periodontal pocket, gingival bleeding). Postal questionnaires (completed by 2147 men including all participants who were clinically examined) included self-rated oral health, oral impacts on daily life and current perception of dry mouth experience. Among 1660 men clinically examined, 338 (20%) were edentulous and a further 728 (43%) had 5.5 mm) affecting 1-20% of sites while 303 (24%) had >20% sites affected. The prevalence of gingival bleeding was 16%. Among 2147 men who returned postal questionnaires, 35% reported fair/poor oral health; 11% reported difficulty eating due to oral health problems. 31% reported 1-2 symptoms of dry mouth and 20% reported 3-5 symptoms of dry mouth. The prevalence of edentulism, loss of attachment, or fair/poor self-rated oral health was greater in those from manual social class. These findings highlight the high burden of poor oral health in older British men. This was reflected in both the objective clinical and subjective measures of oral health conditions. The determinants of these oral health problems in older populations merit further research to reduce the burden and consequences of poor oral health in older people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. It's Not About "Freudian Couches and Personality Changing Drugs": An Investigation Into Men's Mental Health Help-Seeking Enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christine; Fox, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Enabling factors that influenced men to seek assistance for mental health concerns--a previous underresearched area--was the primary focus of this research. Past research spanning four decades has focused on men's barriers to mental health help-seeking with limited research positing social norms within men's peer groups and reciprocity as potential mental health help-seeking enablers. Using a qualitative design, nine men were interviewed to identify the positive factors they believed assisted their help-seeking decisions. Social norms, reciprocity, a significant other, and helpfulness of their general practitioner were domains identified in the analysis of participant narratives. The study revealed the participants' mental health and treatment illiteracy. Ignorance and misplaced stereotypes, initially acted as barriers to help-seeking, leading to denial of illness, impeding treatment, and perpetuating stigma. Sportsmen disclosing their mental health issues were identified as a positive influence for other men's help-seeking and assisted in the development of help-seeking as a social norm. The results of this study contribute to understanding the factors that enable men to seek mental health help. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Surveying Situation of Active and Inactive Elder Men Nutrition Health in Shiraz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolsaleh Zar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Toady with growth of different sciences, amount of dies decrease and life hope is going to increase, so world population tends to old ages. In old ages physiologic changes effect on nutrition needs, therefore nutrition cares have the most important role in their health improvement. The goal of this study is the surveying situation of active and inactive elder men nutrition health in shiraz city. Methods & Materials: This study has a descriptive method and for these purpose, we randomly selected 156 elder men upper than 60 years old from 4 main park's of shiraz as statistical sample. They divided into two elder groups by their physical activities' active elder' and 'inactive elder'. We use of investigate health situation questioner as our instrument in this study. Results: Findings show that 34.61% of 156 elder men (35 active and 19 inactive elder have a suitable nutrition situation and 37.81% of them (28 active and 31 inactive elder are in average danger of malnutrition and 27.56% (15 active and 28 inactive elder of them are in high danger of malnutrition. Conclusion: Results of this study show that generally old ages don't have a satisfy nutrition situation, although active old age have a better level rather than inactive ones. Therefore physical activities could have a positive role in old age healthy nutrition. It is necessary to plan suitable strategies for protecting and educating old age nutrition in order to improve and correct their diet. Also propagation of physical activities by organization and vast media is suggested.

  13. Mental health, drug use and sexual risk behavior among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, Garrett; Hammoud, Mohamed; Jin, Fengyi; Degenhardt, Louisa; Bourne, Adam; Maher, Lisa

    2018-02-08

    Compared to the general population, among gay and bisexual men (GBM) prevalence rates of anxiety and depression, and of drug use, are high. This paper explores the relationship between mental health, sexual risk behavior, and drug use among Australian GBM. We identify factors associated with indicators of poor mental health. Between September 2014 and July 2017, 3017 GBM responded to measures of anxiety and depression in an online cohort study of drug use. Mean age was 35.3 years (SD 12.8). 17.9% screened positive for current moderate-severe anxiety and 28.3% for moderate-severe depression. The majority (52.2%) reported use of illicit drugs in the previous six months, including 11.2% who had used methamphetamine. One third had high (20.4%) or severe (10.6%) risk levels of alcohol consumption, and 18.3% who were current daily smokers. Most illicit drug use in general was not associated with either anxiety or depression, but men who used cannabis were more likely to show evidence of depression (p = 0.005). Among recent methamphetamine users, 28.0% were assessed as dependent: dependent users were more likely to show evidence of both depression and anxiety than were non-dependent users. High or severe risk drinking was associated with depression and daily tobacco use was associated with both anxiety and depression. Depression and anxiety was associated with: less personal support, viewing oneself as 'feminine', and being less socially engaged with gay men. Sexual risk behavior was not associated with either depression or anxiety. Prevalence of anxiety and depression was high, as was prevalence of licit and illicit drug use. Substance use was associated with anxiety and depression only when the use was considered problematic or dependent. Social isolation and marginalization are strong drivers of poor mental health, even within this population for whom anxiety and depression are common. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of physical fitness with health-related quality of life in Finnish young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häkkinen, Arja; Rinne, Marjo; Vasankari, Tommi; Santtila, Matti; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2010-01-29

    Currently, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the relationship between level of physical fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in younger adults. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of measured cardiovascular and musculoskeletal physical fitness level on HRQoL in Finnish young men. In a cross-sectional study, we collected data regarding the physical fitness index, including aerobic endurance and muscle fitness, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), body composition, health, and HRQoL (RAND 36) for 727 men [mean (SD) age 25 (5) years]. Associations between HRQoL and the explanatory parameters were analyzed using the logistic regression analysis model. Of the 727 participants who took part in the study, 45% were in the poor category of the physical fitness, while 37% and 18% were in the satisfactory and good fitness categories, respectively. A higher frequency of LTPA was associated with higher fitness (p fitness. When the HRQoL of the study participants were compared with that of the age- and gender-weighted Finnish general population, both the good and satisfactory fitness groups had higher HRQoL in all areas other than bodily pain. In a regression analysis, higher LTPA was associated with three dimensions of HRQoL, higher physical fitness with two, and lower number of morbidities with all dimensions, while the effect of age was contradictory. Our study of Finnish young men indicates that higher physical fitness and leisure-time physical activity level promotes certain dimensions of HRQoL, while morbidities impair them all. The results highlight the importance of health related physical fitness while promoting HRQoL.

  15. Women's status and the health of women and men: a view from the States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, I; Kennedy, B P; Gupta, V; Prothrow-Stith, D

    1999-01-01

    We examined the status of women in the 50 American states in relation to women's and men's levels of health. The status of women in each state was assessed by four composite indices measuring women's political participation, economic autonomy, employment and earnings, and reproductive rights. The study design was cross-sectional and ecologic. Our main outcome measures were total female and male mortality rates, female cause-specific death rates and mean days of activity limitations reported by women during the previous month. Measures of women's status were strikingly correlated with each of these health outcomes at the state level. Higher political participation by women was correlated with lower female mortality rates (r = -0.51), as well as lower activity limitations (-0.47). A smaller wage gap between women and men was associated with lower female mortality rates (-0.30) and lower activity limitations (-0.31) (all correlations, P Gender inequality and truncated opportunities for women may be one of the pathways by which the maldistribution of income adversely affects the health of women.

  16. "Mens Sana": The Growth of Mental Health in the American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In 1910, the first college mental health service sought to help college students with personality development and building a healthy mind. In 1920, the meeting that founded the American College Health Association (ACHA) identified "mental hygiene" as important, although a separate Mental Health Section was not established in ACHA until 1957.…

  17. Measuring health-related quality of life in men with osteoporosis or osteoporotic fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solà Silvia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis is a serious health problem that worsens the quality of life and the survival rate of individuals with this disease on account the osteoporotic fractures. Studies have long focused on women, and its presence in men has been underestimated. While many studies conducted in different countries mainly assess health-related quality of life and identify fracture risks factors in women, few data are available on a Spanish male population. Methods/Design Observational study. Study population Men ≥ 40 years of age with/without diagnosed osteoporosis and with/without osteoporotic fracture included by their family doctor. Measurements The relationship between customary clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fracture and health-related quality of life in a Spanish male population. A telephone questionnaire on health-related quality of life is made. Statistical analysis The association between qualitative variables will be assessed by the Chi-square test. The distribution of quantitative variables by Student's t-test. If the conditions for using this test are not met, the non-parametric Mann-Whitney's U test will be used. The validation of the results obtained by the FRAX™ tool will be performed by way of the Hosmer-Lemeshow test and by calculating the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve (AUC. All tests will be performed with a confidence intervals set at 95%. Discussion The applicability and usefulness of Health-related quality of life (HRQOL studies are well documented in many countries. These studies allow implementing cost-effective measures in cases of a given disease and reducing the costly consequences derived therefrom. This study attempts to provide objective data on how quality of life is affected by the clinical aspects involved in osteoporosis in a Spanish male population and can be useful as well in cost utility analyses conducted by health authorities. The sample selected is not based

  18. Health-related physical fitness and quality of life in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileski, K S L; Bottaro, M; Grossi-Porto, L G; Lofrano-Porto, A

    2018-02-11

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is a rare disorder characterised by impaired testosterone secretion since birth, and represents a valuable model for studying the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in humans. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate all health-related physical fitness (HRPF) components and quality of life in a series of eight men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism under regular TRT. The study group was compared to a control group of 16 healthy subjects paired for age, body mass index and physical activity. Body composition, aerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and joint flexibility were evaluated in two different 7-day interval time points, based on the pharmacokinetics of testosterone in the hypogonadal group. Quality of life was assessed by the WHOQOL-brief questionnaire. Both groups had similar performances in all HRPF components evaluated, independently of plasma testosterone levels (p > .05). Quality of life was also similar in the four domains analysed (p > .05). The results of this pilot study suggest that regular testosterone replacement was efficient in providing HRPF and quality of life in a series of congenitally hypogonadal men to levels like those observed in healthy men. In addition, acute fluctuations in plasma testosterone did not correlate with changes in muscle strength and endurance. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Health Related Quality of Life among Omani Men and Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Melba Sheila; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Ruppert, Susan D.; Karkada, Subrahmanya Nairy; Jacob, Devakirubai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore predictors of health related quality of life (HRQoL) among men and women with type 2 diabetes. This cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of a random sample of 300 adults with type 2 diabetes in a selected public hospital. Euro-QoL and Revised Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities scales were used to collect data between January and June 2010. Schooling and ability to manage positively were highly significant predictors of quality of life (QoL) am...

  20. Unmet needs among men with human immunodeficiency virus in community mental health care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna; Sirotich, Frank; Antoniou, Tony; Roesslein, Kay; Durbin, Janet; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-07-01

    While community-based mental health services play an important role in caring for persons with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and co-existing mental health disorders, the extent to which their support needs are addressed in this setting is unknown. Accordingly, we examined if HIV infection was associated with unmet support needs among men living with and without HIV receiving community mental health care. This cross-sectional study examined 215 men (135 living with HIV and 80 without HIV) receiving case management services in urban Ontario. Using the Camberwell Assessment of Need, we ascertained the prevalence of support needs in 13 domains grouped into three clusters: Basic needs (accommodation, food, benefits, and money management); self-care/functional needs (daytime activities, self-care, and looking after the home); and health/safety needs (physical, psychological distress, psychotic symptoms, safety to self, and safety to others). We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to examine the association between HIV and unmet need in each domain. Compared to HIV-negative men, men with HIV were more likely to have mood and concurrent disorders, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. Following multivariable analyses, men with HIV had greater unmet needs related to food (odds ratio + 95% confidence interval: 9.36 (4.03, 21.75), p health and safety domains]. Despite living in a setting with universal health insurance, men with HIV receiving community mental health support had greater unmet need in basic and health domains than HIV-negative men receiving such support. Further research is required to develop and evaluate interventions to best support community-dwelling persons with HIV and mental health disorders.

  1. "Normative content" and health inequity enculturation: a logic model of men's health advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E; Rovito, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies and related literature consistently report that males have fewer years of life expectancy than females. Moreover, males experience fewer quality years of life in that they tend to live with greater rates of morbidity such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes among other conditions. Causal evidence traditionally highlights the role of biology in determining the life course for males. However, emerging literature suggests that social determinants of health play a more central role in male morbidity and mortality, and thus contribute to health inequities between the sexes. The purpose of this article is to explore core concepts of social determinants of health as they pertain to male health inequities and provide a systematic conceptualization of how society has become encultured to view these inequities as "normative." Strategies to improve male health are discussed using a logic model to illustrate male health advocacy in the face of the social climes of encultured health inequities.

  2. Factors Associated With HIV Testing Among Men in Haiti: Results From the 2012 Demographic and Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conserve, Donaldson F; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Whembolua, Guy-Lucien; Sofolahan-Oladeinde, Yewande; Teti, Michelle; Surkan, Pamela J

    2017-09-01

    HIV testing serves as the gateway to HIV prevention and treatment. However, research examining men's HIV testing behaviors in the Caribbean remains limited. The Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization was used to examine factors associated with HIV testing among 7,354 men who participated in the 2012 Demographic and Health Survey conducted in Haiti. Few men (35%) reported having ever been tested for HIV. Logistic regression analyses revealed that HIV testing increased with education and wealth. Marital status was associated with HIV testing, with married men more likely to have been tested (adjusted odds ratio: 2.57, 95% CI [2.07, 3.19]) than unmarried men. Positive attitudes toward people living with HIV, indicated by willing to care for a relative who has HIV/AIDS, was also correlated with higher odds of having been tested (adjusted odds ratio: 1.28, 95% CI [1.08, 1.51]). Men who reported condom use during last sex were more likely to have been tested (odds ratio: 1.58, 95% CI [1.33, 1.88). The findings indicate that HIV testing rates remain low among men in Haiti and more efforts are needed to increase HIV testing among men who are not married, have low level of education, and engage in unprotected sex.

  3. Reconciling Epidemiology and Social Justice in the Public Health Discourse Around the Sexual Networks of Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Derrick D; Smith, Justin C; Brown, Andre L; Malebranche, David J

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have implicated the sexual networks of Black men who have sex with men (MSM) as facilitating disproportionally high rates of new HIV infections within this community. Although structural disparities place these networks at heightened risk for infection, HIV prevention science continues to describe networks as the cause for HIV disparities, rather than an effect of structures that pattern infection. We explore the historical relationship between public health and Black MSM, arguing that the current articulation of Black MSM networks is too often incomplete and counterproductive. Public health can offer a counternarrative that reconciles epidemiology with the social justice that informs our discipline, and that is required for an effective response to the epidemic among Black MSM.

  4. The Body and the Beautiful: Health, Attractiveness and Body Composition in Men's and Women's Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Mary-Ellen; Brooks, Kevin R; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J; Stephen, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of physical attraction posits that attractiveness reflects physiological health, and attraction is a mechanism for identifying a healthy mate. Previous studies have found that perceptions of the healthiest body mass index (weight scaled for height; BMI) for women are close to healthy BMI guidelines, while the most attractive BMI is significantly lower, possibly pointing to an influence of sociocultural factors in determining attractive BMI. However, less is known about ideal body size for men. Further, research has not addressed the role of body fat and muscle, which have distinct relationships with health and are conflated in BMI, in determining perceived health and attractiveness. Here, we hypothesised that, if attractiveness reflects physiological health, the most attractive and healthy appearing body composition should be in line with physiologically healthy body composition. Thirty female and 33 male observers were instructed to manipulate 15 female and 15 male body images in terms of their fat and muscle to optimise perceived health and, separately, attractiveness. Observers were unaware that they were manipulating the muscle and fat content of bodies. The most attractive apparent fat mass for female bodies was significantly lower than the healthiest appearing fat mass (and was lower than the physiologically healthy range), with no significant difference for muscle mass. The optimal fat and muscle mass for men's bodies was in line with the healthy range. Male observers preferred a significantly lower overall male body mass than did female observers. While the body fat and muscle associated with healthy and attractive appearance is broadly in line with physiologically healthy values, deviations from this pattern suggest that future research should examine a possible role for internalization of body ideals in influencing perceptions of attractive body composition, particularly in women.

  5. Prevalence of Mental Health problems in sentenced men in prisons from Andalucía (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M; Saavedra, F J; López, A; Laviana, M

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of different mental health problems in men serving prison sentences in Andalusia. Descriptive, cross-sectional study of a random sample of 472 men interned in two prisons located in Andalusia. We collected socio-demographic and general criminal and penitentiary data, and we identified mental health problems with two validated instruments for epidemiological research in mental health: the SCID-I interview to diagnose Axis 1 disorders of the DSM-IV and the self-applied questionnaire IPDE to estimate personality disorders. We analyzed the data (proportions and confidence intervals) with the SPSS-18 statistical package. 82.6% of the sample had a history of having suffered some type of mental health problem throughout their life (prevalence-life) and 25.8 have suffered from them in the past month (month prevalence). The most common disorders of the Axis I (DSM-IV) are related to abuse of and dependence on psychoactive substances (prevalence life of 65.9% and month prevalence of 6.6%), with an important but less frequent presence of affective (31.4%-9.3%), anxiety (30.9%-10, 4%) and psychotic disorders (9.5%-3, 4%). As regards personality disorders, the estimated probable prevalence lies between the 56.6% ("5" cutoff point) and the 79.9 ("4" cut-off point). The male inmate population in prisons in Andalucía shows a high prevalence of mental health problems, similar to that found in other Spanish and international prisons, but their care needs should take into account the different pathologies that they present.

  6. Prevalence of Mental Health problems in sentenced men in prisons from Andalucía (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. López

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of different mental health problems in men serving prison sentences in Andalusia. Methods: Descriptive, cross-sectional study of a random sample of 472 men interned in two prisons located in Andalusia. We collected socio-demographic and general criminal and penitentiary data, and we identified mental health problems with two validated instruments for epidemiological research in mental health: the SCID-I interview to diagnose Axis 1 disorders of the DSM-IV and the self-applied questionnaire IPDE to estimate personality disorders. We analyzed the data (proportions and confidence intervals with the SPSS-18 statistical package. Results: 82.6% of the sample had a history of having suffered some type of mental health problem throughout their life (prevalence-life and 25.8 have suffered from them in the past month (month prevalence. The most common disorders of the Axis I (DSM-IV are related to abuse of and dependence on psychoactive substances (prevalence life of 65.9% and month prevalence of 6.6%, with an important but less frequent presence of affective (31.4%-9.3%, anxiety (30.9%-10, 4% and psychotic disorders (9.5%-3, 4%. As regards personality disorders, the estimated probable prevalence lies between the 56.6% ("5" cutoff point and the 79.9 ("4" cut-off point. Conclusions: The male inmate population in prisons in Andalucía shows a high prevalence of mental health problems, similar to that found in other Spanish and international prisons, but their care needs should take into account the different pathologies that they present.

  7. The "knucklehead" approach and what matters in terms of health for formerly incarcerated Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Perry, Ashley; Bobet, Ilka; Bobet, Santos; Ramos, Hector; Quiñones, Francisco; Lloyd, Kaity

    2012-06-01

    In terms of the examination of the relationship between masculinity and health, there has been limited exploration of how the ways in which formerly incarcerated Latino men (FILM) construct their masculinities may conflict with public health messages. Using information gained from three years of ethnographic research that was conducted with formerly incarcerated Puerto Rican males in three urban communities in New York City, the authors examine what matters to FILM in terms of their health and well-being and what conflicts exist between public health prevention messages and FILM masculinity. Our results indicate the following: (1) major threats to the health of FILM, such as HIV risk behavior, alcohol and drug use and high caloric intake, are perceived as irrelevant to most of the FILM in the study; (2) young FILM believe that they engage in risky behaviors because of their "knucklehead" mentality and diminish their risks by becoming "street-smart;" and (3) social isolation, loneliness and general risk-taking behavior among FILM are salient issues that have yet to be effectively addressed. Of our sample of 32 FILM, we identified 7 individuals who have transitioned from having a "knucklehead" approach in their lives to possessing a greater sense of awareness of health and social matters. These seven individuals followed either or both of the following pathways: (1) pursuing a college education or (2) becoming community leaders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mental Health of Aging Immigrants and Native-Born Men Across 11 European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Though working-age immigrants exhibit lower mortality compared with those domestic-born immigrants, consequences of immigration for mental health remain unclear. We examine whether older immigrants exhibit a mental advantage and whether factors believed to underlie immigrant vulnerability explain disparities. Method. The sample includes 12,247 noninstitutionalized men more than 50 years in 11 European countries. Multivariate logistic regression models estimated the impact of physical health, health behaviors, availability of social support, social participation, citizenship, time since immigration, socioeconomic status (SES), and employment on the mental health of immigrants. Results. Immigrants face 1.60 increased odds of depression despite a physical health advantage, evidenced by 0.74 lower odds of chronic illness. SES and availability of social support were predictive, though acculturation measures were not. Decomposition analysis revealed that only approximately 20% of the variation in depression rates between immigrants and native-born peers were explained by commonly cited risk factors. Conclusions. Despite physical health advantages, older immigrants suffer substantially higher depression rates. Time since immigration does not appear to mitigate depressive symptoms. PMID:23325505

  9. Psychological distress, health protection, and sexual practices among young men who have sex with men: Using social action theory to guide HIV prevention efforts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W Holloway

    Full Text Available The present study addresses gaps in the literature related to theory development for young men who have sex with men (YMSM sexual practices through the application and modification of Social Action Theory. Data come from the Healthy Young Men study (N = 526, which longitudinally tracked a diverse cohort of YMSM ages 18-24 to characterize risk and protective factors associated with drug use and sexual practices. Structural equation modeling examined the applicability of, and any necessary modifications to a YMSM-focused version of Social Action Theory. The final model displayed excellent fit (CFI = 0.955, TLI = 0.947, RMSEA = 0.037 and suggested concordance between social support and personal capacity for sexual health promotion. For YMSM, practicing health promotion and avoiding practices that may put them at risk for HIV was associated with both social isolation and psychological distress (β = -0.372, t = -4.601, p<0.001; psychological distress is an internalized response to environmental and cognitive factors and sexual practices are an externalized response. Results point to the utility of Social Action Theory as a useful model for understanding sexual practices among YMSM, the application of which shows health protective sexual practices are a function of sociocognitive factors that are influenced by environmental contexts. Social Action Theory can help prevention scientists better address the needs of this vulnerable population.

  10. Psychological distress, health protection, and sexual practices among young men who have sex with men: Using social action theory to guide HIV prevention efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ian W.; Traube, Dorian E.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Tan, Diane; Dunlap, Shannon; Kipke, Michele D.

    2017-01-01

    The present study addresses gaps in the literature related to theory development for young men who have sex with men (YMSM) sexual practices through the application and modification of Social Action Theory. Data come from the Healthy Young Men study (N = 526), which longitudinally tracked a diverse cohort of YMSM ages 18–24 to characterize risk and protective factors associated with drug use and sexual practices. Structural equation modeling examined the applicability of, and any necessary modifications to a YMSM-focused version of Social Action Theory. The final model displayed excellent fit (CFI = 0.955, TLI = 0.947, RMSEA = 0.037) and suggested concordance between social support and personal capacity for sexual health promotion. For YMSM, practicing health promotion and avoiding practices that may put them at risk for HIV was associated with both social isolation and psychological distress (β = -0.372, t = -4.601, pcognitive factors and sexual practices are an externalized response. Results point to the utility of Social Action Theory as a useful model for understanding sexual practices among YMSM, the application of which shows health protective sexual practices are a function of sociocognitive factors that are influenced by environmental contexts. Social Action Theory can help prevention scientists better address the needs of this vulnerable population. PMID:28886128

  11. Experiences of discrimination and their impact on the mental health among African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, and Latino men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Paul, Jay; Ayala, George; Boylan, Ross; Gregorich, Steven E

    2013-05-01

    We examined the associations between specific types and sources of discrimination and mental health outcomes among US racial/ethnic minority men who have sex with men (MSM) and how these associations varied by race/ethnicity. A chain-referral sample of 403 African American, 393 Asian and Pacific Islander (API), and 400 Latino MSM recruited in Los Angeles County, California completed a standardized questionnaire. Data were obtained from the Ethnic Minority Men's Health Study from May 2008 to October 2009. Past-year experiences of racism within the general community and perceived homophobia among heterosexual friends were positively associated with depression and anxiety. Past-year homophobia experienced within the general community was also positively associated with anxiety. These statistically significant associations did not vary across racial/ethnic groups. The positive association of perceived racism within the gay community with anxiety differed by race/ethnicity, and was statistically significant only for APIs. Perceived homophobia within the family was not associated with either depression or anxiety. Higher levels of experiences of discrimination were associated with psychological distress among MSM of color. However, specific types and sources of discrimination were differentially linked to negative mental health outcomes among African American, API, and Latino MSM.

  12. Reproducibility and validity of the Shanghai Men's Health Study physical activity questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurj, Adriana L; Wen, Wanqing; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Matthews, Charles E; Liu, Dake; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2007-05-15

    Reproducibility and validity of the physical activity questionnaire (PAQ) used in the Shanghai Men's Health Study (2003-2006, People's Republic of China) was evaluated in a random sample of 196 participants aged 40-74 years. Participants completed a PAQ at baseline and again 1 year later, 12 monthly 7-day physical activity recalls, and four quarterly 1-week physical activity logs. Reproducibility was evaluated by using the two PAQs and validity by comparing the PAQs with 1-year averages of the two criterion measures: 7-day physical activity recall and physical activity log. The PAQ had moderate to high reproducibility for measuring adult exercise participation (kappa = 0.60) and energy expenditure (r(s) = 0.68), nonexercise activities (correlation coefficients = 0.42-0.68), and total daily energy expenditure (r(s) = 0.68, kappa(quartiles) = 0.47). Correlations between the PAQ and criterion measures of adult exercise were 0.45 (7-day physical activity recall) and 0.51 (physical activity log) for the first PAQ and 0.62 (7-day physical activity recall) and 0.71 (physical activity log) for the second PAQ. Correlations between PAQ nonexercise activities and the physical activity log and 7-day physical activity recall were 0.31-0.86. Correlations for total energy expenditure were high (0.62-0.77). Results indicate that the Shanghai Men's Health Study PAQ has reasonable reproducibility and validity for classifying men by their level of exercise and nonexercise activities in this cohort.

  13. The role of men as partners and fathers in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and in the promotion of sexual and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Ferrero, Eric; Lusti-Narasimhan, Manjula

    2012-12-01

    Despite ample evidence documenting the positive impact of men on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and other sexual and reproductive health programs, men's engagement remains very low. This paper examines the current level and nature of male involvement and identifies opportunities for the advancement of men's constructive engagement in PMTCT and sexual and reproductive health. Conceptual and policy barriers have encouraged the inadvertent exclusion of men from PMTCT and other reproductive health services. The historic institutionalization of reproductive health as women's health has generally resulted in health services that are not welcoming of men and has undermined efforts to engage couples. This paper argues that to maximize the health outcomes of PMTCT and sexual and reproductive health programs for women and men, we must move beyond seeing men as simply "facilitating factors" that enable women to access health-care services. Men need to instead be recognized as a constituent part of reproductive health policy and practice. The paper proposes strategies for policy makers and program leaders to engage men and couples to foster communication and shared decision-making. This approach can both help to achieve health goals and engender more equitable relationships between men and women. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Young men in juvenile detention centers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: gender, sexuality, masculinity and health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Marcos Antonio Ferreira do; Uziel, Anna Paula; Hernández, Jimena de Garay

    2018-02-19

    This article presents results for young men's health based on an intervention-study on gender, sexuality, and health of adolescents and young men in conflict with the law, deprived of their freedom, and subject to socio-educational confinement in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The themes addressed included questions on overall health, mental health, and sexual and reproductive health, analyzed from a relational gender perspective and social construction of masculinities. The majority of these young men are black, from low-income communities, with low schooling levels, and ranging in age from 14 to 21 years of age; some of them are fathers. The study showed that these young men have been exposed to police and social violence from a very early age and have been deprived of their freedom due to involvement with the drug traffic, homicides, or episodes of sexual violence. The male and female health professionals that work with them report that the most common health problems are skin conditions, mental disorders, and sexually transmissible infections. Male chauvinism and rigid notions of gender and sexuality are important factors in the views of these young men on health (especially sexual and reproductive). Their discourse takes violence and paternity for granted as important signs in the public demonstration of masculinity. There is an urgent need to include discussions on gender and sexuality in health professionals' training and activities with these young men. It is also necessary to call attention to the strong influence of gender concepts, social group, and sexual orientation in practices, interpersonal relations, and health promotion.

  15. How Do Discrepancies between Victimization and Rejection Expectations in Gay and Bisexual Men Relate to Mental Health Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Frank A; Christiansen, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Victimization and rejection expectations predict mental health problems in gay and bisexual men. Furthermore, it was shown that victimization predicts rejection expectations. Nevertheless, the levels of these two variables do not necessarily correspond as indicated by low inter-correlations, resulting in the question "How do discrepancies in the two variables relate to mental health problems?" This study tests if non-corresponding levels of victimization and rejection expectations in gay and bisexual men relate to mental health problems differently than corresponding levels of victimization and rejection expectations. It furthermore tests for linear and curvilinear relationships between victimization, rejection expectations, and mental health problems. Methods: Data from N = 1423 gay and bisexual men were obtained online. Victimization and rejection expectations were tested for discrepant values (differing 0.5 SD or more) and those that were in agreement (differing less than 0.5): 33.7% of participants were in agreement, 33.0% reported higher rejection expectations than victimization, and 33.3% v.v. Then, a polynomial regression and a surface analysis were conducted. Results: Discrepant values in victimization and rejection expectations or the direction of the discrepancy did not relevantly predict mental health problems. Findings indicate that victimization and rejection expectations predict mental health problems linearly as well as convexly (upward curving) in gay and bisexual men. Discussion: This study replicates findings that gay and bisexual men with more experiences of victimization and rejection expectations demonstrated more mental health problems. Furthermore, this study is the first one to find a convex relationship between these predictors and mental health problems, implicating that disproportionally high mental health problems exist in those gay and bisexual men with high levels of victimization and rejection expectations. On the other

  16. Religious affiliation, internalized homophobia, and mental health in lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David M; Meyer, Ilan H

    2012-10-01

    Most religious environments in the United States do not affirm homosexuality. The authors investigated the relationship between exposure to nonaffirming religious environments and internalized homophobia and mental health in a sample of lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) in New York City. Guided by minority stress theory, the authors hypothesized that exposure to nonaffirming religious settings would lead to higher internalized homophobia, more depressive symptoms, and less psychological well-being. The authors hypothesized that Black and Latino LGBs would be more likely than White LGBs to participate in nonaffirming religious settings and would therefore have higher internalized homophobia than White LGBs. Participants were 355 LGBs recruited through community-based venue sampling and evenly divided among Black, Latino, and White race or ethnic groups and among age groups within each race or ethnic group, as well as between women and men. Results supported the general hypothesis that nonaffirming religion was associated with higher internalized homophobia. There was no main effect of nonaffirming religion on mental health, an unexpected finding discussed in this article. Latinos, but not Blacks, had higher internalized homophobia than Whites, and as predicted, this was mediated by their greater exposure to nonaffirming religion. © 2012 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  17. Reproductive health of men of industrial territories: risk factors, pre-nosologic diagnostics, prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdyuk A.M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration of the environment in the XX-XXI century under the influence of chemical, physical, radiological and other factors is not only and not just an ecological catastrophe of modern times, but a direct threat to the health and life of human society as a whole. Among the most important factors influencing people's health occupy chemical the leading place, because since 1957 more than 50 million chemical substances were synthesized, but only 15% of them have a toxicological evaluation, and 30% of the diseases in Europe are associated with chemical factor (ECHA-EXA. Chemical "pressing" determines a significant reduction in the reproduction of the population of Europe, and for Ukraine it means a large-scale depopulation, among possible reasons of which a significant role belongs to the deterioration of the reproductive capacity of population, men in particular, and this work is devoted to this problem. On the basis of profound analysis of literature data, complex ecologic-hygienic researches we identified markers of exposure, prognosticaly significant markers of impact for the early diagnostics of disorders of male generative system in conditions of low-dose impact of xenobiotics. We achieved convincing evidence of ecologically determined character of unogenital diseases and fertility decrease, we developed scientifically-justified principles of management of risk of development of ecologically-determined reproductive pathology in men.

  18. Representações do corpo masculino na revista Men's Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jefferson Gomes Eufrásio

    Full Text Available Resumo Esta pesquisa aborda a relação entre o corpo e a estética, compreendida como padrão corporal. O objetivo foi analisar o corpo masculino na revista Men's Health. A metodologia usada foi à análise de conteúdo como proposta por Bardin (1979. O corpus de análise foi composto por 12 edições da revista, veiculadas de janeiro a dezembro de 2011. A partir da análise feita, pode-se afirmar que na revista Men's Health a aparência encontra-se ligada a um corpo magro e musculoso. Para a obtenção do modelo propagado pela revista, são necessários investimentos e práticas de consumo. Nota-se ainda que o discurso do bem-estar e da felicidade usa a publicidade para incentivar os leitores a comprar as novidades lançadas pela sociedade de consumo.

  19. "If you do nothing about stress, the next thing you know, you're shattered": Perspectives on African American men's stress, coping and health from African American men and key women in their lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katrina R; Griffith, Derek M; Allen, Julie Ober; Thorpe, Roland J; Bruce, Marino A

    2015-08-01

    Stress has been implicated as a key contributor to poor health outcomes; however, few studies have examined how African American men and women explicitly describe the relationships among stress, coping, and African American men's health. In this paper, we explore strategies men use to cope with stress, and beliefs about the consequences of stress for African American men's health behaviors, morbidity and mortality from the perspectives of African American men and women. A phenomenological analytic approach was used to examine focus group data collected from 154 African American men (18 focus groups) and 77 African American women (8 focus groups). Women's perspectives were captured because women often observe men under stress and can provide support to men during stressful times. Our findings indicate that African American men in this study responded to stress by engaging in often identified coping behaviors (i.e., consumption of calorie dense food, exercise, spiritually-related activities). Men in our study, however, did not always view their responses to stress as explicit coping mechanisms. There was also some discordance between men's and women's perceptions of men's coping behaviors as there were occasions where they seemed to interpret the same behavior differently (e.g., resting vs. avoidance). Men and women believed that stress helped to explain why African American men had worse health than other groups. They identified mental, physical and social consequences of stress. We conclude by detailing implications for conceptualizing and measuring coping and we outline key considerations for interventions and further research about stress, coping and health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Social Support and the Mental Health of Older Gay Men: Findings From a National Community-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    This study examines different types and sources of social support in relation to psychological distress levels among older Australian gay men. A national community-based survey was conducted involving 242 gay-identified men aged 50 years and older. In univariable regressions, psychological distress was less likely if men were receiving emotional support, practical support, or had a sense of belonging, and also if they had a greater number of close friends and received some or a lot of support from family and gay friends but not from straight friends. Of all these factors, a multivariable regression showed that receiving emotional support was the only significant independent factor. Emotional support appears to play a greater role in the mental health of older gay men than many other types and sources of support. Ensuring access to emotional support may need to be considered when promoting healthier aging among gay men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Differences in Health and Social Support between Homeless Men and Women Entering Permanent Supportive Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winetrobe, Hailey; Wenzel, Suzanne; Rhoades, Harmony; Henwood, Benjamin; Rice, Eric; Harris, Taylor

    Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is the leading intervention to end chronic homelessness. Little is known, however, about gender differences, including potential disparities in physical and mental health and social support, that might inform services available through PSH. This study included 421 homeless adults, at least 39 years old, English- or Spanish-speaking, who were moving into PSH through 26 different agencies in the Los Angeles area. Compared with men entering PSH, homeless women (28% of the sample) were younger (p social networks (Coefficient, 0.79, p social support among homeless adults moving into PSH. PSH cannot be a one-size-fits-all approach. Supportive services within housing should be tailored based on gender and other individual needs. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of social determinants of health with self-rated health among Australian gay and bisexual men living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmeyer, Rachel; English, Dallas R; Smith, Anthony; Grierson, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Despite a vast improvement in the survival of people living with HIV (PLHIV) since the introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART), little change in the self-rated health of PLHIV has been observed since the introduction of cART in Australia. Difficulties with attaining employment or achieving financial security have been noted as some of the key challenges still facing PLHIV in the post-cART era. As a result, we investigated the independent association of a number of key social determinants of health with self-rated health among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in Australia. Data from two recent national, cross-sectional surveys of PLHIV (the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys) were used. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent association of ethnicity, region of residence, education level, employment status, after-tax income, experience of HIV-related discrimination, level of social support, relationship status and recent sexual activity with reporting good-excellent self-rated health, after adjusting for clinical factors and other social determinants of health. Multiple imputation was used to estimate missing data for variables with >5% missing data. Of the 1713 HIV-positive gay/bisexual men who responded to the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys, information on self-rated health was available for 99.3%. Close to three-quarters of these respondents (72.1%) reported their self-rated health as good or excellent; the remainder (27.9%) reported their self-rated health as poor or fair. In multivariable analysis involving 89.3% of respondents, being employed, reporting recent sexual activity, a greater number of sources of social support and a higher weekly after-tax income were found to be independently associated with reporting good-excellent self-rated health. Despite the inability of this study to detect causal associations, addressing barriers to employment and sexual activity, and mechanisms to increase social support, is likely to have

  3. Worse Cardiometabolic Health in African Immigrant Men than African American Men: Reconsideration of the Healthy Immigrant Effect

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Michelle Y.; Thoreson, Caroline K.; Ricks, Madia; Courville, Amber B.; Thomas, Francine; Yao, Jianhua; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Sumner, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The healthy immigrant effect is a phrase that has been used for decades to describe better cardiometabolic health in African immigrants than African Americans. The recent global increase in cardiometabolic diseases raises the possibility that immigrant health may be changing. Therefore, a new assessment of cardiometabolic health in African immigrants is warranted.

  4. Experience of physical violence and mental health among young men and women: a population-based study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridh, Maria; Lindström, Martin; Rosvall, Maria

    2014-01-11

    In Sweden mental ill-health has increased among the young, especially among young women. Our aim was to investigate the association between experience of physical violence during the past year and self rated psychological health among young men and women. The study population consisted of men (n = 2,624) and women (n = 3,569) aged 18-34 years who participated in the 2008 public health survey study in Skåne. The survey was a cross-sectional stratified random sample postal questionnaire study with a 54.1% participation rate. Associations were investigated by logistic regression models. The prevalence of poor psychological health was 18.9% among men and 27.7% among women. One in ten men and one in twenty women had experienced physical violence during the past year. Most men were violated in public places, while women were most often violated at home. Women who had experienced violence during the past year showed more than doubled odds of poor psychological health, odds ratio (OR): 2.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00, 3.53). Such an association could not be seen in men OR: 1.12 (95% CI: 0.85, 1.47). Adjustment for covariates (i.e. age, country of birth, socioeconomic status, economic stress, alcohol risk consumption, emotional support, instrumental support and generalized trust in other people) did not change the association found among women. Violated women, but not men, showed nearly doubled odds of poor psychological health after multiple adjustments. There was also a gender difference regarding location of violence. Awareness of gender differences regarding context and mental impact of violence may assist public health workers in reducing the consequences of violence and to design preventive strategies.

  5. Walking habits and health-related factors in 75-year-old Iranian women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Salavati, Mahyar; Sotoudeh, Gholam Reza; Nilsson Wikmar, Lena; Frändin, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    An active life style can postpone the aging process, prevent many aspects of functional decline and improve health and quality of life. The aim of this study was to compare elderly people who walked at least 30 min a day with others who walked less, from a gender perspective, regarding perceived health and fitness, physiological capacity and functional performance. A representative sample of 75-year-olds born 1932-33 and living in Tehran, in 2007-2008 was included by randomly selecting 1100 subjects from the latest Iranian census records (1996) by the Statistical Centre of Iran using computerized methods. Participants answered questions regarding health status and physical activity and performed functional tests. Better results for Walkers were observed in most subjective and objective outcome measures. Walkers were less likely to feel generally tired, more likely to have better physical fitness and to have the maximum score on the Falls Efficacy Scale, less likely to feel unstable during walking outdoors and less likely to be dependent or unsafe in ADL. Walkers of both genders performed better in the following tests: chair stand, one leg stance, maximal walking speed and six min walking. The difference between Walkers and Non-Walkers was greater in men. In general, older women and men who walked at least 30 min daily/almost daily showed better results in most health-related outcomes, ADL and functional performance than people who walked less. This study showed gender differences in the level of physical activity and functioning that must be taken into account when planning intervention programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S Kathleen; Mushquash, Christopher J; Haggarty, John M

    2017-03-24

    The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care differed when symptoms were affecting them in the work domain; and (2) empirically re-evaluate the effectiveness of a SMHC model for work-related disability using a pre-post chart review of N = 3960 referrals to SMHC. ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to examine symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ) and disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2) at entry and discharge. Men were RR (relative risk) = 1.8 (95% C.I.: 1.60-2.05) times more likely to be referred to SMHC with work problems than women. Having greater disability and more severe somatic symptoms increased the likelihood of a work-related referral. There were no significant differences after treatment. Problems in the work domain may play an important role in men's treatment seeking and clinicians' recognition of a mental health care need. This study is relevant because men are underrepresented in mental health (MH) treatment and primary care is the main gateway to accessing MH care. Asking men about functioning in the work domain may increase access to helpful psychiatric services.

  7. Sarcopenia Is Associated With Incident Disability, Institutionalization, and Mortality in Community-Dwelling Older Men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Vasant; Blyth, Fiona; Naganathan, Vasi; Le Couteur, David G; Seibel, Markus J; Waite, Louise M; Handelsman, David J; Cumming, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Sarcopenia is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between severity of sarcopenia and incident activities of daily living (ADL) disability, institutionalization, and all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older men participating in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP). Longitudinal analysis of 1705 participants aged 70 years or older at baseline (2005-2007) living in the community in Sydney, Australia. The main outcome measures were incident ADL disability, institutionalization, and mortality. Of the 1705 participants who completed the baseline assessments, a total of 1678 men (mean age 77 years) had complete measures by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, to assess sarcopenia in terms of low appendicular lean mass (ALM), using the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) criteria. To differentiate between severity of sarcopenia we used low ALM alone (sarcopenia I), low ALM with weakness (sarcopenia II), and sarcopenia with weakness and poor gait speed (sarcopenia III). Cox proportional hazard models and logistic regression models were used to assess the risk of mortality and institutionalization, and incidence of ADL disability. From baseline to follow-up, 103 (11.3%) men had incident ADL disability, 191 (11.2%) men were institutionalized, and 535 (31.9%) had died. At baseline, 14.2% had sarcopenia I, 5.3% had sarcopenia II, and 3.7% had sarcopenia III. Fully adjusted analysis (adjusted for demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities and health conditions, and blood measures) showed that sarcopenia I, II, and III were associated with increased risk of disability, institutionalization, and mortality. Associations between sarcopenia I, II, and III and risk of incident disability were as follows: odds ratio (OR) 2.77 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-5.87, OR 3.78 95% CI 1.23-11.64, and OR 4.53 95% CI 0.90-22.72; associations with institutionalization were

  8. Dr Google, porn and friend-of-a-friend: where are young men really getting their sexual health information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litras, Amy; Latreille, Sarah; Temple-Smith, Meredith

    2015-11-01

    Background Young men are vulnerable when it comes to sexual health. They attend the general practitioner (GP) less often than females and are less likely to be offered testing for sexually transmissible infections. Access to accurate health information and education is a cornerstone of primary prevention, yet we know very little about how, where and why young people obtain information about sexual health. One-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 male students aged 16-19 years from two Victorian educational institutions for trade skills until data saturation was reached. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The young men were poorly informed about sexual health. Their existing knowledge mainly came from school-based sexual health education, which while valued, was generally poorly recalled and provided only a narrow scope of physiological information. Young men seek sexual health information from various sources including family, the Internet, friends and pornography, with information from the latter three sources perceived as unreliable. GPs were seen as a source of trust-worthy information but were not accessed for this purpose due to embarrassment. Young men preferred the GP to initiate such conversations. A desire for privacy and avoidance of embarrassment heavily influenced young men's preferences and behaviours in relation to sexual health information seeking. The current available sources of sexual health information for young men are failing to meet their needs. Results identify potential improvements to school-based sexual education and online resources, and describe a need for innovative technology-based sources of sexual health education.

  9. The Impact of Victimization and Neuroticism on Mental Health in Young Men who have Sex with Men: Internalized Homophobia as an Underlying Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Jae A; Newcomb, Michael E; Garofalo, Robert; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Sexual minorities experience greater mental health issues compared to heterosexuals due to minority stressors. This study focused on the impact of victimization and neuroticism on mental health in young men who have sex with men (YMSM), and the mediating role of internalized homophobia (IH). IH refers to when a sexual minority person internalizes social bias and develops a negative view of themselves, which is a likely process through which victimization and neuroticism impact mental health. Data were collected over three time points across 12 months, with 450 YMSM (mean age = 18.9) and an 80.7% retention rate. Two mediation analyses with bias-corrected bootstrapping using 1000 samples were conducted, controlling for age, race, and sexual orientation. Results revealed that victimization [ F (9, 440) = 4.83, p mental health via increased levels of IH. These findings show how external experiences of stigma and personality level characteristics may impact YMSM in terms of their sense of self. Furthermore, these results support addressing social conditions that marginalize YMSM in order to promote better mental health through decreasing IH.

  10. Social determinants of tobacco consumption among Nepalese men: findings from Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Vishnu; Adhikari, Mandira; Karki, Sujan

    2013-12-20

    In the 20th century, 100 million people across the globe lost their lives due to consumption of tobacco. Every year 15,000 deaths in Nepal are attributable to tobacco smoking and using other products of tobacco. This study aimed to establish the proportion and the social determinants of tobacco use among Nepalese men based on the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS), 2011. This study used the NDHS 2011 data. The prevalence of cigarette smoking, other forms of tobacco 16 smoking and use of tobacco in any form is reported as a percentage (%). The significance of association of the statistically significant variables established using Chi-square test was further tested by using multiple logistic regression. Of the 4121 participants, the prevalence of consuming any form of tobacco was 51.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) (49.6%- 54.3%)]; chewing/sniffing tobacco was 34.8% (95% CI: 32.4%- 37.3%) and tobacco smoking was 33.6% (95% CI 31.3%-36.0%).Men with no education [Odds Ratio (OR) 3.477; 95% CI (2.380-5.080)], from an older age group (36-49) [OR 2.399; 95% CI (1.858-3.096)] who were from a manual occupation [OR 1.538; 95% CI (1.188-1.985)], who were married[OR 1.938; 95% CI ( 1.552-2.420)], and who were from the Terai region [OR 1.351; 95% CI (1.083-1.684)] were more likely to consume tobacco. Men who watched television at least once a week [OR 0.642; 95% CI (0.504-0.819)] were less likely to consume tobacco. The current study showed that over half of Nepalese men consume tobacco. There is an urgent need to fully implement Nepal's Tobacco Control and Regulation Act which will ban smoking in public places; enforced plain packaging and display of health warnings over 75% of the packaging, and has banned selling of tobacco products to those under 18 years of age. There is a need to increase the social unacceptability of tobacco in Nepal by raising awareness through different electronic and cultural media. Anti-tobacco campaigns should focus on those who are less

  11. Listening to immigrant latino men in rural Oregon: exploring connections between culture and sexual and reproductive health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S Marie; Branch, Meredith R; Hudson, Deanne; Torres, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    This study explored factors that affect access to and use of sexual and reproductive health services including family planning among immigrant Latino men residing in rural Oregon communities that have experienced a high growth in their Latino population. In-depth interviews were conducted with 49 sexually active men aged 18 to 30 years who recently immigrated to the United States. Findings from content analysis identified multiple overlapping individual-level barriers, including lack of knowledge, perception of personal risk for unintended pregnancy and STIs, and fear of disease. On a service delivery level, structural factors and the importance of confianza when interacting with providers and clinic staff were dominant themes. The majority of these themes were grounded in a cultural context and linked to men's cultural background, beliefs, and experiences. Examining the needs of immigrant Latino men through this cultural lens may be critically important for improving access and use of sexual and reproductive health services.

  12. Young men's attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology: implications for the development of online mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Louise A; Collin, Philippa; Hurley, Patrick J; Davenport, Tracey A; Burns, Jane M; Hickie, Ian B

    2013-04-20

    This mixed-methods study was designed to explore young Australian men's attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology use to inform the development of online mental health services for young men. National online survey of 486 males (aged 16 to 24) and 17 focus groups involving 118 males (aged 16 to 24). Young men are heavy users of technology, particularly when it comes to entertainment and connecting with friends, but they are also using technology for finding information and support. The focus group data suggested that young men would be less likely to seek professional help for themselves, citing a preference for self-help and action-oriented strategies instead. Most survey participants reported that they have sought help for a problem online and were satisfied with the help they received. Focus group participants identified potential strategies for how technology could be used to overcome the barriers to help-seeking for young men. The key challenge for online mental health services is to design interventions specifically for young men that are action-based, focus on shifting behaviour and stigma, and are not simply about increasing mental health knowledge. Furthermore, such interventions should be user-driven, informed by young men's views and everyday technology practices, and leverage the influence of peers.

  13. Fertility treatment and reproductive health of male offspring: a study of 1,925 young men from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Asklund, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Little is known the about the reproductive health of offspring after fertility treatment. In 2001-2005, the authors approached young Danish men attending a compulsory physical examination to determine their fitness for military service. A total of 1,925 men volunteered, delivered a semen sample...... subject. After control for confounders, men whose mothers had received fertility treatment to conceive them had a 46% lower sperm concentration (95% confidence interval (CI): -63, -20) and a 45% lower total sperm count (95% CI: -64, -16). They had a smaller testis size (-0.9 ml, 95% CI: -2.2, 0.4), fewer...

  14. Effects of Spirituality on Health-Related Quality of Life in Men with HIV/AIDS: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Marsha Wiggins; Uphold, Constance R.; Shehan, Constance L.; Reid, Kimberly J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the association of spirituality and health-related quality of life among 226 HIV-positive men. Two measures of spirituality were used: the Spiritual Growth subscale from the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (S. N. Walker, K. R. Sechrist, & N. J. Pender, 1987) and the Spirituality subscale of the HIV Coping Instrument (L.…

  15. Age-related use and perceptions of eHealth in men with prostate cancer: a web-based survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rising, C.J.; Bol, N.; Kreps, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Men with prostate cancer require ample information and support along the continuum of care, and eHealth is one way to meet such critical information and support needs. Currently, evidence about how age influences use and perceptions about prostate cancer eHealth information and support

  16. The Mental Health Impact of Physical Appearance Concerns in the Context of Other Life Domains Among Australian Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Warwick; Lyons, Anthony; van der Rest, Brittany

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have identified gay men as a high-risk population for body image disturbances. However, little research has examined the mental health impact of gay men's physical appearance concerns in the context of other major life domains. The present study addressed this gap by investigating how mental health outcomes (satisfaction with life, self-esteem, positive well-being, and psychological distress) were associated with satisfaction with and importance of physical appearance, work, family relationships, friendships, health and fitness, and sex life among Australian gay men aged 18-39. The possible moderating role of intimate relationship status was also examined. Results from an online survey revealed that greater satisfaction with physical appearance, work, family, and friendships all had similar positive associations with mental health. However, more importance placed on physical appearance was more consistently associated with poorer mental health compared with the subjective importance of other domains. Findings also indicated the associations between physical appearance satisfaction and life satisfaction, and between physical appearance importance and positive well-being, were weaker for those in relationships. Thus, physical appearance matters in gay men's lives, but was only one factor when considered in the broader context of other life areas that contributed to overall well-being. These findings suggest the need for a nuanced and contextualized understanding of how physical appearance concerns fit into gay men's lives.

  17. Association Rules Analysis of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity: The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Fabian P; Blyth, Fiona; Gnjidic, Danijela; Hirani, Vasant; Naganathan, Vasikaran; Waite, Louise M; Seibel, Markus J; Rollo, Jennifer; Handelsman, David J; Cumming, Robert G; Le Couteur, David G

    2016-05-01

    Comorbidity and multimorbidity are common in older people. Here we used a novel analytic approach called Association Rules together with network analysis to evaluate multimorbidity (two or more disorders) and comorbidity in old age. A population-based cross-sectional study was undertaken where 17 morbidities were analyzed using network analysis, cluster analysis, and Association Rules methodology. A comorbidity interestingness score was developed to quantify the richness and variability of comorbidities associated with an index condition. The participants were community-dwelling men aged 70 years or older from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, Sydney, Australia, with complete data (n = 1,464). The vast majority (75%) of participants had multimorbidity. Several morbidity clusters were apparent (vascular cluster, metabolic cluster, neurodegenerative cluster, mental health and other cluster, and a musculoskeletal and other cluster). Association Rules revealed unexpected comorbidities with high lift and confidence linked to index diseases. Anxiety and heart failure had the highest comorbidity interestingness scores while obesity, hearing impairment, and arthritis had the lowest (zero) scores. We also performed Association Rules analysis for the geriatric syndromes of frailty and falls to determine their association with multimorbidity. Frailty had a very complex and rich set of frequent and interesting comorbidities, while there were no frequent and interesting sets associated with falls. Old age is characterized by a complex pattern of multimorbidity and comorbidity. Single disease definitions do not account for the prevalence and complexity of multimorbidity in older people and a new lexicon may be needed to underpin research and health care interventions for older people. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Sexual health knowledge and stigma in a community sample of HIV-positive gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Edgardo J.; Rodríguez-Díaz, Carlos E.; Jovet-Toledo, Gerardo G.; Santiago-Rodríguez, Edda I.; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L.; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) are at increased risk for HIV infection and disease progression. Also, HIV-positive GBMSM are among those less likely to be retained in care. In this study we analyzed sexual health knowledge (SHK) and various manifestations of stigma in a community sample of HIV-positive GBMSM in Puerto Rico. The sample reports overall low SHK scores, and lower score were associated with low educational attainment, unemployment, low income, and with self-identifying heterosexual participants. Almost half of the sample reported moderate to severe perceived gay stigma, 68.4% reported moderate to severe hidden-gay stigma, and 30.6% reported moderate to severe HIV-felt stigma. Further research is recommended to obtain culturally congruent information and develop interventions addressing the multiple layers of stigma in the social context where the interventions will be delivered. PMID:29033695

  19. Conscientiousness, hair cortisol concentration, and health behaviour in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Easterlin, Emma; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2017-12-01

    Conscientious is associated with greater longevity and other favourable health outcomes, but the processes underlying these links are poorly understood. Health behaviours such as physical activity and avoidance of smoking and excessive alcohol consumption may contribute, but direct associations with neuroendocrine and inflammatory processes may also be relevant. We tested the associations between conscientiousness and hair cortisol concentration in 2318 older men and women (mean age 66.2 years) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Conscientiousness was positively associated with physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption, and negatively related to alcohol intake, sedentary behaviour, body mass index and depressive symptoms (all phair cortisol concentration that was independent of age, sex, education and wealth (β=-0.053, p=0.012), and the relationship remained significant with additional adjustment for health behaviour and depressive symptoms (β=-0.048, p=0.025). The observation that greater conscientiousness was correlated with lower hair cortisol indicates that this trait might impact central nervous regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical function, with effects that are possibly advantageous for health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential Impact of Types of Social Support in the Mental Health of Formerly Incarcerated Latino Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Severson, Nicolette; Perry, Ashley; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The role of social support in the mental health of formerly incarcerated Latino men (FILM) is an issue overlooked in public health prevention efforts. The objectives of this analysis were to (a) describe the levels of social support perceived and received by FILM; (b) identify the associations, if any, between levels of social support and mental health indicators such as depression and anxiety; and (c) explore the impact of familism and hypermasculinity on the receptivity of social support and the potential role of these factors in mediating associations between social support and mental health indicators. To accomplish the objectives, we conducted a cross-sectional survey with FILM (n = 259), ages 18 to 59, in New York City, and one nominated member of their social network (n = 130 dyads). In this analysis, we examined four dimensions of social support (instrumental, informational, appraisal, and emotional) from two perspectives: provided (as reported by members of the social networks) and perceived (as reported by FILM). The major outcome variables for this analysis were the presence/absence of major anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our logistic regression analyses suggest that perceived emotional support was inversely associated with both anxiety and depression. Our findings suggest that familism mediated the association between perceived emotional support and anxiety/depression. Therefore, we must consider designing network enhancement interventions that focus on both FILM and their social support systems. PMID:24323767

  1. Association between pain and the frailty phenotype in older men: longitudinal results from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megale, Rodrigo Z; Ferreira, Manuela L; Ferreira, Paulo H; Naganathan, Vasi; Cumming, Robert; Hirani, Vasant; Waite, Louise M; Seibel, Markus J; Le Couteur, David G; Handelsman, David J; Blyth, Fiona M

    2018-02-21

    to determine whether pain increases the risk of developing the frailty phenotype and whether frailty increases the risk of developing chronic or intrusive pain, using longitudinal data. longitudinal data from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP), a prospective population based cohort study. a total of 1,705 men aged 70 years or older, living in an urban area of New South Wales, Australia. data on the presence of chronic pain (daily pain for at least 3 months), intrusive pain (pain causing moderate to severe interference with activities) and the criteria for the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) frailty phenotype were collected in three waves, from January 2005 to October 2013. Data on age, living arrangements, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidities, cognitive function, depressive symptoms and history of vertebral or hip fracture were also collected and included as covariates in the analyses. a total of 1,705 participants were included at baseline, of whom 1,332 provided data at the 2-year follow-up and 940 at the 5-year follow-up. Non-frail (robust and pre-frail) men who reported chronic pain were 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-2.51, P = 0.039) times more likely to develop frailty at follow-up, compared to those with no pain. Intrusive pain did not significantly increase the risk of future frailty. Likewise, the frailty status was not associated with future chronic or intrusive pain in the adjusted analysis. the presence of chronic pain increases the risk of developing the frailty phenotype in community-dwelling older men.

  2. Polysubstance use and HIV/STD risk behavior among Massachusetts men who have sex with men accessing Department of Public Health mobile van services: implications for intervention development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Reisner, Sari L; Vanderwarker, Rodney; Gaucher, Michael J; O'Connor, Catherine A; Medeiros, M Susana; Safren, Steven A

    2008-09-01

    Polysubstance use has been posited to be a significant contributor to excess burden of HIV disease among men who have sex with men (MSM). The current study investigated polysubstance use and sexual risk among men who utilize Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) van services (such as HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis testing; Hepatitis A and B vaccinations) at venues targeting MSM. Participants (n = 214) completed a one-time, cross-sectional survey via an audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) in English or Spanish between June 2007 and September 2007. Fifteen percent of the overall sample did not know their HIV status; 11% reported polysubstance use (concurrent use of three or more: poppers, ecstasy, GHB, cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, Viagra) during sex in the 12 months prior to study enrollment. Polysubstance users were more likely to be HIV infected (odds ratio [OR] = 4.62; p = 0.03) and to have a history of one or more sexually transmitted diseases (STDs; OR = 4.74; p = 0.03) relative to participants who did not report polysubstance use during sex. After controlling for covariates of age, race/ethnicity, education level, insurance status, sexual orientation, STD history, HIV status, and depression, multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that polysubstance users were 9 times more likely to have reported unprotected anal (insertive or receptive) sex in the 12 months prior to study enrollment (adjusted OR = 9.53; p = 0.007) compared to nonpolysubstance-using MSM. Polysubstance users lacked access to care (21% were uninsured) and the overwhelming majority (96%) were first time users of mobile health van services. Accessible outreach services for MSM such as mobile van services need to include drug screening and interventions that triage men into treatment programs; year-round availability of van services is warranted.

  3. Gender Nonconformity, Discrimination, and Mental Health Among Black South African Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Further Exploration of Unexpected Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Theo; Bos, Henny; Knox, Justin; Reddy, Vasu

    2016-04-01

    Using data from a study about HIV risk among Black South African MSM, we aimed to ascertain whether unexpected findings about the relationship between gender nonconformity, discrimination, and mental health in this population, as reported by Cook, Sandfort, Nel, and Rich (2013), could be replicated, and to explore more in-depth how gender nonconformity relates to health. Cook et al. found that feminine men were not more likely to be depressed despite the observation that they were more likely to be discriminated against and that discrimination increased the likelihood of depression. This is in contrast to what studies among gay and bisexual men in Western countries have consistently shown. In the current study, 196 Black South African MSM (ages between 18 and 40; M age, 26.65 years) were surveyed. Assessments included stressors (identity confusion, internalized homophobia, and sexual orientation-based discrimination) and resilience factors (openness about one's sexual orientation, social support, and identification with the gay community). We observed that gender-nonconforming men were not more likely to be depressed despite having experienced more discrimination, which was associated with depression. The same relationships were observed when considering anxiety as the mental health outcome. We found an indirect negative effect of gender nonconformity on depression through internalized homophobia, suggesting that, in this population, internalized homophobia masks the effect of discrimination on mental distress. Implications for the sexual minority stress model, used to guide our analyses, are discussed. Further research is needed to disentangle the complex relationship between gender nonconformity and mental health among MSM populations.

  4. Gender Nonconformity, Discrimination, and Mental Health among Black South African Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Further Exploration of Unexpected Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Theo; Bos, Henny; Knox, Justin; Reddy, Vasu

    2015-01-01

    Using data from a study about HIV risk among Black South African MSM, we aimed to ascertain whether unexpected findings about the relationship between gender nonconformity, discrimination, and mental health in this population, as reported by Cook, Sandfort, Nel, and Rich (2013), could be replicated, and to explore more in-depth how gender nonconformity relates to health. Cook et al. found that feminine men were not more likely to be depressed despite the observation that they were more likely to be discriminated against and that discrimination increased the likelihood of depression. This is in contrast to what studies among gay and bisexual men in Western countries have consistently shown. In the current study, 196 Black South African MSM (ages between 18 and 40; mean age, 26.65 years) were surveyed. Assessments included stressors (identity confusion, internalized homophobia, and sexual orientation-based discrimination) and resilience factors (openness about one’s sexual orientation, social support, and identification with the gay community). We observed that gender-nonconforming men were not more likely to be depressed despite having experienced more discrimination, which was associated with depression. The same relationships were observed when considering anxiety as the mental health outcome. We found an indirect negative effect of gender nonconformity on depression through internalized homophobia, suggesting that, in this population, internalized homophobia masks the effect of discrimination on mental distress. Implications for the sexual minority stress model, used to guide our analyses, are discussed. Further research is needed to entangle the complex relationship between gender nonconformity and mental health among MSM populations. PMID:26067298

  5. Young men in juvenile detention centers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: gender, sexuality, masculinity and health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Ferreira do Nascimento

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article presents results for young men’s health based on an intervention-study on gender, sexuality, and health of adolescents and young men in conflict with the law, deprived of their freedom, and subject to socio-educational confinement in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The themes addressed included questions on overall health, mental health, and sexual and reproductive health, analyzed from a relational gender perspective and social construction of masculinities. The majority of these young men are black, from low-income communities, with low schooling levels, and ranging in age from 14 to 21 years of age; some of them are fathers. The study showed that these young men have been exposed to police and social violence from a very early age and have been deprived of their freedom due to involvement with the drug traffic, homicides, or episodes of sexual violence. The male and female health professionals that work with them report that the most common health problems are skin conditions, mental disorders, and sexually transmissible infections. Male chauvinism and rigid notions of gender and sexuality are important factors in the views of these young men on health (especially sexual and reproductive. Their discourse takes violence and paternity for granted as important signs in the public demonstration of masculinity. There is an urgent need to include discussions on gender and sexuality in health professionals’ training and activities with these young men. It is also necessary to call attention to the strong influence of gender concepts, social group, and sexual orientation in practices, interpersonal relations, and health promotion.

  6. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A Sattler

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1 it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2 group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively.Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity, group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism, and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support. A moderated multiple regression was conducted.Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems.The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men.

  7. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Frank A; Wagner, Ulrich; Christiansen, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1) it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2) group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively. Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity), group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism), and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support). A moderated multiple regression was conducted. Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems. The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men.

  8. A Life Course Approach to Inequality: Examining Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Relationship between Early Life Socioeconomic Conditions and Adult Health Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Taylor W; Brown, Tyson H

    2015-08-07

    Previous research has documented a relationship between childhood socioeconomic conditions and adult health, but less is known about racial/ethnic differences in this relationship, particularly among men. This study utilizes a life course approach to investigate racial/ethnic differences in the relationships among early and later life socioeconomic circumstances and health in adulthood among men. Panel data from the Health and Retirement Study and growth curve models are used to examine group differences in the relationships among childhood and adult socioeconomic factors and age-trajectories of self-rated health among White, Black and Mexican American men aged 51-77 years (N=4147). Multiple measures of childhood socioeconomic status (SES) predict health in adulthood for White men, while significantly fewer measures of childhood SES predict health for Black and Mexican American men. Moreover, the health consequences of childhood SES diminish with age for Black and Mexican American men. The childhood SES-adult health relationship is largely explained by measures of adult SES for White men. The life course pathways linking childhood SES and adult health differ by race/ethnicity among men. Similar to arguments that the universality of the adult SES-health relationship should not be assumed, results from our study suggest that scholars should not assume that the significance and nature of the association between childhood SES and health in adulthood is similar across race/ethnicity among men.

  9. Nonmarital romantic relationships and mental health in early adulthood: does the association differ for women and men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robin W; Barrett, Anne E

    2010-06-01

    Although social scientists have long assumed that intimate social relationships are more closely associated with women's than men's mental health, recent research indicates that there are no gender differences in the advantages of marriage and disadvantages of unmarried statuses when males' and females' distinct expressions of emotional distress are considered. These findings have led to the conclusion that there has been a convergence in the importance of intimate relationships for men's and women's mental health. However, these patterns may not be evident for nonmarital romantic relationships among current cohorts of young adults. In this article, we examine the associations among several dimensions of these relationships and symptoms of both depression and substance abuse/dependence in a diverse sample of young adults in Miami, Florida. We find gender differences that vary across dimensions of relationships: While current involvements and recent breakups are more closely associated with women's than men's mental health, support and strain in an ongoing relationship are more closely associated with men's than women's emotional well-being. Our findings highlight the need to consider the period in the life course as well as experiences of specific cohorts of men and women when theorizing about gender differences in the importance of intimate relationships for mental health.

  10. Family networks and the role of men in maternal health care among Mexican indigenous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Rosa Berrio Palomo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on maternal mortality among indigenous women in Mexico and the changes that have occurred in care practices during pregnancy and childbirth. Through ethnographic qualitative research in the state of Guerrero between 2008 and 2012, which included over a year of fieldwork as well as in-depth interviews and surveys with indigenous women, the article analyzes the increasing medicalization of reproduction, the role of family networks in gestation, delivery and postpartum care, and the participation of men during childbirth, in dialogue with other anthropological research on maternal health in Mexico. Medical anthropology allows us to understand the medicalization of reproduction in indigenous contexts and identify the tension that characterizes family care networks, which both operate as protectors and mobilizers in seeking care and reproduce power relations marked by gender and generational conditions.

  11. Disparities in preventive health behaviors among non-Hispanic White men: heterogeneity among foreign-born Arab and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallo, Florence J; Kindratt, Tiffany B

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate and compare the age-adjusted prevalence of not receiving a flu vaccine, pneumonia vaccine, or prostate cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born White men by region of birth (Europe/Russia and the Arab Nations) and examine these associations while controlling for potential confounders. Twelve years of restricted data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) including 91,636 U.S.- and foreign-born men were used. Chi-squares were used to compare descriptive statistics, and odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were used for inferential statistics. In crude and adjusted analyses, foreign-born Arab American men were less likely to report receiving a flu (OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.21, 0.67) and pneumonia (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.16, 0.70) vaccine compared with U.S.-born White men. There were no statistically significant differences for PSA testing between Arab American and White men. This national study examining uptake of flu and pneumonia vaccines suggests estimates are lower for foreign-born Arab American men compared with U.S.-born White men. Future studies should collect qualitative data that assesses the cultural context surrounding prevention and screening behaviors among Arab Americans. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Suicide attempts among men with histories of child sexual abuse: examining abuse severity, mental health, and masculine norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Scott D; Renner, Lynette M; O'Leary, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Men who were sexually abused during childhood are at risk for a variety of long-term mental health problems, including suicidality. However, little is known about which factors are related to recent suicide attempts for this vulnerable, under-researched population. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between abuse severity, mental health, masculine norms and recent suicide attempts among men with histories of child sexual abuse (CSA). We analyzed survey data gathered from a purposive sample of 487 men who were sexually abused during childhood. The age of the sample ranged from 19 to 84 years (μ = 50.4 years). Recent suicide attempts served as the dependent variable in the study. Self-reported measures of sexual abuse severity, child physical abuse, mental health, masculine norms, and demographic information (age, race) represented the independent variables. The results from logistic regression modeling found that five variables - duration of the sexual abuse, use of force during the sexual abuse, high conformity to masculine norms, level of depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation - increased the odds of a suicide attempt in the past 12 months. To improve mental health services for men with histories of CSA, mental health practitioners should incorporate sexual abuse severity, current mental health, and adherence to masculine norms into assessment and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Paradoxical Impact of Companionship on the Mental Health of Older African American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jamie A; Cadet, Tamara; Burke, Shanna; Williams, Ed-Dee; Alvarez, Daniel

    2018-01-11

    African Americans comprise 9% of the 46 million U.S. adults over age 65. Two thirds of older African American men (AAM) reside with companions. This study investigated the assumption that frequent contact with companions confers mainly health-related benefits for AAM. Utilizing secondary data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, the relationship between older AAM's mental health and related conditions (depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances), companion living arrangements, and frequency of contact with the participants for 3,423 older AAM and their 1,161 companions, was examined. The mean age of participants and companions was 74 years and 90% of AAM lived in a private residence. Logistic regression models indicated that an increased risk for anxiety was found when companions lived in (OR = 1.66), called daily (OR = 1.089), or visited daily (OR = 1.079). Finally, AAM had an increased likelihood of nonmedical sleep disturbances when companions lived in (OR = 1.67), called daily (1.105), or visited daily (1.078). The frequency of contact with companions may be consequential for select mental health outcomes and associated physiological conditions for older AAM; the timing of contact requires further investigation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Psychosocial health problems associated with increased HIV risk behavior among men who have sex with men in Nepal: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Deuba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men (MSM are marginalized, hidden, underserved and at high risk for HIV in Nepal. We examined the association between MSM sub-populations, psychosocial health problems and support, access to prevention and non-use of condoms. METHODS: Between September-November of 2010, a cross-sectional survey on HIV-related risk behavior was performed across Nepal through snowball sampling facilitated by non-governmental organizations, recruiting 339 MSM, age 15 or older. The primary outcomes were: (a non-use of condoms at least once in last three anal sex encounters with men and (b non-use of condoms with women in the last encounter. The secondary outcome was participation in HIV prevention interventions in the past year. RESULTS: Among the 339 MSM interviewed, 78% did not use condoms at their last anal sex with another man, 35% did not use condoms in their last sex with a woman, 70% had experienced violence in the last 12 months, 61% were experiencing depression and 47% had thought of committing suicide. After adjustment for age, religion, marital status, and MSM subpopulations (bisexual, ta, meti, gay, non-use of condoms at last anal sex with a man was significantly associated with non-participation in HIV interventions, experience of physical and sexual violence, depression, repeated suicidal thoughts, small social support network and being dissatisfied with social support. Depression was marginally associated with non-use of condoms with women. The findings suggest that among MSM who reported non-use of condoms at last anal sex, the ta subgroup and those lacking family acceptance were the least likely to have participated in any preventive interventions. CONCLUSIONS: MSM in Nepal have a prevalence of psychosocial health problems in turn associated with high risk behavior for HIV. Future HIV prevention efforts targeting MSM in Nepal should cover all MSM subpopulations and prioritize psychosocial health interventions.

  15. Needs Assessment on the Use of Health Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Huyen T; Mai, Thi D A; Nguyen, Ngoc Anh; Thu, Nguyen Tan; Van Hiep, Nguyen; Le, Bao; Colby, Donn J

    2015-12-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam are at high risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI). However, few MSM in Vietnam routinely utilize HIV/STI testing and treatment services. We conducted a survey among MSM in Ho Chi Minh City to assess practices and preferences for accessing health services. In this qualitative study, 19 individual interviews and 3 focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 50 MSM. All participants self-identified as gay or bisexual and were stratified by age group. Recruitment was by convenience sampling through social networks. Semi-structured interview guides included experience accessing health services, stigma and discrimination in the health care setting, and preferences for HIV and STI counseling and services. Fifty MSM aged 17 to 40 participated in the assessment. The majority had post-secondary education (92%) and above-average incomes. Almost all participants appreciated the cleanliness and quicker service in the private sector, while services in public hospitals were described as lower in quality but acceptable and uniform. The majority of the participants expressed a preference for MSM-specific services focusing on HIV/STI counseling, testing, and treatment. There was a strong preference for accessing HIV and STI services at a stand-alone clinic independent from other health facilities, where confidentiality could be assured. The majority were willing to pay a higher cost for private sector services, provided the service was of high quality, confidential, and non-stigmatizing. This study confirms the need for high quality, nonjudgmental, and confidential HIV/STI health services for MSM in Vietnam. There is generally a willingness to pay for health services provided that the services are seen to be tolerant and friendly to MSM.

  16. Perceived Neighborhood Safety Is Associated with Poor Sleep Health among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in Paris, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Park, Su Hyun; Goedel, William C; Kreski, Noah T; Morganstein, Jace G; Hambrick, H Rhodes; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Chaix, Basile

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have examined sleep health among men who have sex with men (MSM), but no studies have examined associations of neighborhood characteristics and sleep health among this population. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood safety and sleep health among a sample of MSM in Paris, France. We placed broadcast advertisements on a popular smartphone application for MSM in October 2016 to recruit users in the Paris (France) metropolitan area (n = 580). Users were directed to complete a web-based survey, including previously used items measuring perceptions of neighborhood safety, validated measures of sleep health, and socio-demographics. Modified Poisson models were used to estimate risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between perceived neighborhood safety and the following outcomes: (1) poor sleep quality, (2) short sleep duration, and (3) self-reported sleep problems. Poor sleep health was common in our sample; e.g., 30.1% reported poor sleep quality and 44.7% reported problems falling asleep. In multivariate regression models, perceived neighborhood safety was associated with poor sleep quality, short sleep duration, and having sleep problems. For example, reporting living in a neighborhood perceived as unsafe during the daytime (vs. safe) was associated with poor sleep quality (aRR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.01, 2.52), short sleep duration (aRR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.26, 2.94), problems falling asleep (aRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.17, 2.11), and problems staying awake in the daytime (aRR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.05, 4.43). Interventions to increase neighborhood safety may improve sleep health among MSM.

  17. Protective effects of dietary carotenoids on risk of hip fracture in men: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoli; Wang, Renwei; Ang, Li-Wei; Low, Yen-Ling; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that carotenoids in vegetables and fruits may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties. The relationship between dietary total and specific carotenoids, as well as vegetables and fruits, and risk of hip fracture was examined among Chinese in Singapore. We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 men and women who were of ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998. At recruitment, subjects were interviewed on lifestyle factors and medical history. Usual diet was measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 9.9 years, we identified 1630 hip fracture incident cases. Among men, consumption of vegetables was associated with lower hip fracture risk. Similarly, dietary total carotenoids and specific carotenoids, α-carotene, β-carotene, and lutein/zeaxanthin were inversely associated with hip fracture risk. Compared to men in the lowest quartile of nutrient density, men in the highest quartile had statistically significant 26% to 39% risk reduction (all p for trend vegetables and carotenoids were found in men with BMI vegetables/fruits and hip fracture risk among women. This study suggests that adequate intake of vegetables may reduce risk of osteoporotic fractures among elderly men and that the antioxidant effects of carotenoids may counteract the mechanism of osteoporosis related to leanness. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  18. Once a Navegante, Always a Navegante: Latino Men Sustain Their Roles as Lay Health Advisors to Promote General and Sexual Health to Their Social Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christina J; Mann, Lilli; Eng, Eugenia; Downs, Mario; Rhodes, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the sustainability of male- and men's health-focused lay health advisors. HoMBReS Por un Cambio was a community-level social network intervention designed to improve sexual health among Latino men who were members of soccer teams. During the year after the intervention implementation, lay health advisors (Navegantes) continued to promote sexual health; over 84% (16 of the 19) Navegantes conducted 9 of 10 primary health promotion activities. Describing where to get condoms was the activity that the most Navegantes reported having conducted. Navegantes had broad reach with their social networks, although the number of Navegantes that conducted each activity differed across the categories of social network members (soccer teammates, nonteammates, and women). Results suggest that HIV-related health disparities may be addressed through lay health advisor interventions because they are sustained after the intervention ends and reach large numbers of community members.

  19. Stigma, Subsistence, Intimacy, Face, Filial Piety, and Mental Health Problems Among Newly HIV-Diagnosed Men Who Have Sex With Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haochu Howard; Holroyd, Eleanor; Lau, Joseph; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    High rates of mental health problems among people living with HIV (PLWH) have been widely reported in the literature; however, an understanding of the socioecological contexts of these presentations remains limited, particularly in China. In order to explore potential socioecological factors associated with mental health problems among newly diagnosed HIV-infected migrant men who have sex with men (MSM), we employed a life profile approach conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews with 31 newly diagnosed HIV-infected MSM residing in a city in Southern China. Participants' life profile accounts outlined their concerns, including internalized stigma, subsistence living, difficulties finding a lover or a stable partner, loss of face, and deviation from filial piety. We contend that targeted interventions should address socio-ecological issues such as migrant adversities, social suffering, and cultural trauma when providing culturally based mental health services for this marginalized population within the context of Chinese society. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Online Hookup Sites for Meeting Sexual Partners Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Rhode Island, 2013: A Call for Public Health Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philip A; Towey, Caitlin; Poceta, Joanna; Rose, Jennifer; Bertrand, Thomas; Kantor, Rami; Harvey, Julia; Santamaria, E Karina; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Nunn, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Frequent use of websites and mobile telephone applications (apps) by men who have sex with men (MSM) to meet sexual partners, commonly referred to as "hookup" sites, make them ideal platforms for HIV prevention messaging. This Rhode Island case study demonstrated widespread use of hookup sites among MSM recently diagnosed with HIV. We present the advertising prices and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs of the top five sites used by newly diagnosed HIV-positive MSM to meet sexual partners: Grindr, Adam4Adam, Manhunt, Scruff, and Craigslist. Craigslist offered universal free advertising. Scruff offered free online advertising to selected nonprofit organizations. Grindr and Manhunt offered reduced, but widely varying, pricing for nonprofit advertisers. More than half (60%, 26/43) of newly diagnosed MSM reported meeting sexual partners online in the 12 months prior to their diagnosis. Opportunities for public health agencies to promote HIV-related health messaging on these sites were limited. Partnering with hookup sites to reach high-risk MSM for HIV prevention and treatment messaging is an important public health opportunity for reducing disease transmission risks in Rhode Island and across the United States.

  1. What do men who serve as lay health advisors really do?: Immigrant Latino men share their experiences as Navegantes to prevent HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissman, Aaron T.; Eng, Eugenia; Aronson, Robert E.; Bloom, Fred R.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Montaño, Jaime; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2018-01-01

    Background HoMBReS was a lay health advisor (LHA) intervention designed to reduce sexual risk among recently-arrived, non-English-speaking Latino men who were members of a multi-county soccer league in central NC. Methods Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership collected, analyzed, and interpreted qualitative life-story narratives to characterize the roles of male LHAs known as Navegantes. Results Nine Navegantes were interviewed. Their mean age was 39 years (range 26–62 years); 6 were from Mexico and 3 from El Salvador. Navegantes described the function and facilitators of serving as LHAs and identified leverage points for future HIV and STD prevention strategies. They highlighted psychosocial and sociocultural influences on HIV risk, settings for risky behavior, and personal changes from serving as Navegantes. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that an LHA approach is feasible and appropriate for Latino men, and can be effective in reaching men who might otherwise be difficult to reach. PMID:19519237

  2. Gender role conflict among African American men who have sex with men and women: associations with mental health and sexual risk and disclosure behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Trista A; Harawa, Nina T; Williams, John K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether high gender role conflict (GRC; internal conflict with traditional gender-role stereotypes and an individual's perceived need to comply with these roles) is associated with psychological distress and HIV-related risk behaviors in a sample of African American men who have sex with men and women (MSMW). We analyzed baseline data collected from questionnaires completed by 400 MSMW participating in the Men of African American Legacy Empowering Self project in Los Angeles, California, in 2007 to 2010 for associations between participants' GRC and experiences of poor mental health and HIV risk outcomes. MSMW who reported higher levels of GRC than other participants also reported more psychological distress, lower self-esteem, greater internalized homophobia, less HIV knowledge, lower risk reduction skills, less disclosure of same-sex behaviors to others, and more unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse with female partners. Future research should consider how high GRC affects African American MSMW's lives and identify specific approaches to help alleviate the psychological distress and other negative behavioral outcomes associated with internal conflict caused by rigid gender role socialization.

  3. Men: good health and high mortality. Sex differences in health and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Juel, Knud; Vaupel, James W

    2008-01-01

    with women: the so-called male-female health-survival paradox. A number of proposed explanations for this paradox are rooted in biological, social, and psychological interpretations. It is likely to be due to multiple causes that include fundamental biological differences between the sexes such as genetic...... factors, immune system responses, hormones, and disease patterns. Behavioral differences such as risk-taking and reluctance to seek and comply with medical treatment may also play a role. Another consideration is that part of the difference may be due to methodological challenges, such as selective non...

  4. 'The full has never been told': building a theory of sexual health for heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Candice N; Delgado-Romero, Edward A; Mosley, Della V; Huynh, Sophia

    2016-08-01

    Research on Black sexual health often fails to represent the heterogeneity of Black ethnic groups. For people of Caribbean descent in the USA, ethnicity is a salient cultural factor that influences definitions and experiences of sexual health. Most research on people of Caribbean descent focuses on the relatively high rate of STIs, but sexual health is defined more broadly than STI prevalence. Psychological and emotional indicators and the voice of participants are important to consider when exploring the sexual health of a minority culture. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore how heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent define and understand sexual health for themselves. Eleven men who self-identified as Black, Caribbean and heterosexual participated in three focus groups and were asked to define sexual health, critique behaviours expertly identified as healthy and address what encourages and discourages sexual health in their lives. Findings point to six dimensions of sexual health for heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent. These include: heterosexually privileged, protective, contextual, interpersonal, cultural and pleasurable dimensions. There were some notable departures from current expert definitions of sexual health. Recommendations for further theory development are provided.

  5. Is Sex Good for Your Health? A National Study on Partnered Sexuality and Cardiovascular Risk Among Older Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Waite, Linda; Shen, Shannon; Wang, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Working from a social relationship and life course perspective, we provide generalizable population-based evidence on partnered sexuality linked to cardiovascular risk in later life using national longitudinal data from the NSHAP (N=2204). We consider characteristics of partnered sexuality of older men and women, particularly sexual activity and sexual quality, as they affect cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular risk is defined as hypertension, rapid heart rate, elevated CRP, and general cardiovascular events. We find that older men are more likely to report being sexually active, report having sex more often and more enjoyably than are older women. Results from cross-lagged models suggest that high frequency of sex is positively related to later risk of cardiovascular events for men but not women, whereas good sexual quality seems to protect women but not men from cardiovascular risk in later life. We find no evidence that poor cardiovascular health interferes with later sexuality for either gender. PMID:27601406

  6. Health care in a homophobic climate: the SPEND model for providing sexual health services to men who have sex with men where their health and human rights are compromised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Ross

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a model for developing health services for men who have sex with men (MSM in sub-Saharan Africa and other places where MSM are heavily stigmatized and marginalized. The processes of the SPEND model include Safe treatment for sexually transmissible infections (STIs and HIV; Pharmacy sites for treatment of STIs in countries where pharmacies and drug stores are the source of medical advice and treatment; Education in sexual health issues for health professionals to reduce discrimination against MSM patients; Navigation for patients who have HIV and are rejected or discriminated against for treatment; and Discrimination reduction through educating potential leaders in tertiary education in issues of human sexuality. Supporting empirical evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies is summarized, and barriers to implementation are discussed. Health care for MSM is one of the casualties of anti-homosexual social and legal climates. There is no amnesty for MSM in health care settings, where the stigma and discrimination that they face in the rest of society is replicated. Such conditions, however, make it necessary to consider ways of providing access to health care for MSM, especially where rates of HIV and STIs in MSM populations are high, and stigma and discrimination encourages high proportions of MSM to marry. This in itself enhances the status of MSM as an important bridge population for STIs including HIV. Where anti-homosexual laws encourage, or are believed to encourage, the reporting of MSM to authorities, health care may be seen as an agent of authority rather than an agency for care.

  7. Masculinity and Race-Related Factors as Barriers to Health Help-Seeking Among African American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Wizdom; Adams, Leslie B; Cole-Lewis, Yasmin; Agyemang, Amma; Upton, Rachel D

    2016-01-01

    Men's tendency to delay health help-seeking is largely attributed to masculinity, but findings scarcely focus on African American men who face additional race-related, help-seeking barriers. Building principally on reactance theory, we test a hypothesized model situating racial discrimination, masculinity norms salience (MNS), everyday racism (ERD), racial identity, sense of control (SOC), and depressive symptomatology as key barriers to African American men's health help-seeking. A total of 458 African American men were recruited primarily from US barbershops in the Western and Southern regions. The primary outcome was Barriers to Help-Seeking Scale (BHSS) scores. The hypothesized model was investigated with confirmatory factor and path analysis with tests for measurement invariance. Our model fit was excellent [Formula: see text] CFI = 0.99; TLI = 1.00; RMSEA = 0.00, and 90% CI [0.00, 0.07] and operated equivalently across different age, income, and education strata. Frequent ERD and higher MNS contributed to higher BHHS scores. The relationship between ERD exposure and BHHS scores was partially mediated by diminished SOC and greater depressive symptomatology. Interventions aimed at addressing African American men's health help-seeking should not only address masculinity norms but also threats to sense of control, and negative psychological sequelae induced by everyday racism.

  8. The impact of a depression awareness campaign on mental health literacy and mental morbidity among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen; Häusermann, Michael; Berrut, Sylvie; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2013-09-05

    High prevalences of depression and suicidality have been found among gay men. This paper assesses the possible impact of Blues-out, a depression awareness campaign based on the European Alliance Against Depression targeting the gay/lesbian community in Geneva, Switzerland. In 2007 and 2011, pre- and post-intervention surveys were conducted among two distinct samples of gay men in Geneva, recruited by probability-based time-space sampling. Effect sizes and net percent changes are reported for mental health literacy and mental health outcomes in 2007 and 2011 as well as among men aware and unaware of Blues-out in 2011. 43% of the respondents correctly recognized depression in 2011 with no change vis-à-vis 2007. Despite small effect sizes, significant net decreases (from -18% to -28%) were seen in lifetime suicide plans, 12-month suicidal ideation, lifetime depression, and 4-week psychological distress between 2007 and 2011. These decreases were not accompanied by changes in any of the numerous items on attitudes/knowledge, found only when comparing men aware and unaware of Blues-out in 2011. More men aware of Blues-out found specialists and psychological therapies helpful than their counterparts and correctly identified depression and gay men's greater risk for depression. Community-level assessment with no control. Although improvement in depression recognition and decrease in suicide attempts could not be replicated unequivocally in this adapted intervention among gay men, there are indications that this evidence-based depression awareness campaign may have lessened suicidality and mental morbidity and improved mental health literacy and help-seeking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic adolescent marijuana use as a risk factor for physical and mental health problems in young adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Jordan; Simpson, Theresa; White, Helene R; Pardini, Dustin

    2015-09-01

    Some evidence suggests that youth who use marijuana heavily during adolescence may be particularly prone to health problems in later adulthood (e.g., respiratory illnesses, psychotic symptoms). However, relatively few longitudinal studies have prospectively examined the long-term physical and mental health consequences associated with chronic adolescent marijuana use. The present study used data from a longitudinal sample of Black and White young men to determine whether different developmental patterns of marijuana use, assessed annually from early adolescence to the mid-20s, were associated with adverse physical (e.g., asthma, high blood pressure) and mental (e.g., psychosis, anxiety disorders) health outcomes in the mid-30s. Analyses also examined whether chronic marijuana use was more strongly associated with later health problems in Black men relative to White men. Findings from latent class growth curve analysis identified 4 distinct subgroups of marijuana users: early onset chronic users, late increasing users, adolescence-limited users, and low/nonusers. Results indicated that the 4 marijuana use trajectory groups were not significantly different in terms of their physical and mental health problems assessed in the mid-30s. The associations between marijuana group membership and later health problems did not vary significantly by race. Findings are discussed in the context of a larger body of work investigating the potential long-term health consequences of early onset chronic marijuana use, as well as the complications inherent in studying the possible link between marijuana use and health effects. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Interpersonal discrimination and health-related quality of life among black and white men and women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Sherrill; Cherepanav, Dasha; Hanmer, Janel; Fryback, Dennis G; Palta, Mari

    2013-08-01

    We assessed associations between discrimination and health-related quality of life among black and white men and women in the United States. We examined data from the National Health Measurement Study, a nationally representative sample of 3,648 adults aged 35-89 in the non-institutionalized US population. These data include self-reported lifetime and everyday discrimination as well as several health utility indexes (EQ-5D, HUI3, and SF-6D). Multiple regression was used to compute mean health utility scores adjusted for age, income, education, and chronic diseases for each race-by-gender subgroup. Black men and women reported more discrimination compared to white men and women. Health utility tended to be worse as reported discrimination increased. With a few exceptions, differences between mean health utility scores in the lowest and highest discrimination groups exceeded the 0.03 difference generally considered to be a clinically significant difference. Persons who experienced discrimination tended to score lower on health utility measures. The study also revealed a complex relationship between experiences of discrimination and race and gender. Because of these differential social and demographic relationships caution is urged when interpreting self-rated health measures in research, clinical, and policy settings.

  11. Psychosocial, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on mental health help-seeking among African-American men

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, Kisha B.; McGregor, Brian S.; Blanks, Starla H.; Mahaffey, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The social determinants unique to African-American men’s health contribute to limited access and utilization of health and mental health care services and can have a deleterious effect on their overall health and well-being. There is a need to examine the complex issues concerning African-American men’s help-seeking behaviors relative to mental health concerns. Current research estimates that African-American men are approximately 30% more likely to report having a mental illness compared to ...

  12. Clues to the Blues: Predictors of Self-Reported Mental and Emotional Health Among Older African American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jamie A; Watkins, Daphne C; Shires, Deirdre; Chapman, Robert A; Burnett, Janice

    2017-09-01

    The mental health needs of aging African American men have been overlooked and few studies have distinguished between more severe clinically diagnosable mental health challenges and less severe emotional states for this population. African American men may not identify with or internalize the terminology of "depression" despite exhibiting the symptom criteria. This exploratory cross-sectional study examined correlates of "downheartedness" as an alternative indicator of emotional health. The authors examined the self-reported responses of 1,666 older African American men on a baseline questionnaire from a larger longitudinal study. Demographic, physical, mental and emotional health, and health system factors were examined as possible correlates of downheartedness. The mean age of participants was 73.6 years and 74.8% of men described themselves as "downhearted and blue" most or all of the time while only 18.5% of them reported feeling moderate to severe anxiety or depression. When other factors were controlled, mobility problems (odds ratio [ OR] = 2.36), problems getting health care ( OR = 2.69), having a doctor who never listens ( OR = 2.18), physical or mental problems that interfere with social activities ( OR = 1.34), accomplishing less due to physical health ( OR = 1.35), and accomplishing less due to mental/emotional health ( OR = 1.57) were all associated with greater odds of being downhearted. The current findings indicate that this sample more closely identified with language accurately describing their emotional health state (i.e., downhearted) and not with clinical mental health terminology (i.e., depression) that may be culturally stigmatized.

  13. ru2hot?: A public health education campaign for men who have sex with men to increase awareness of symptoms of acute HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekler, Joanne D; Baldwin, Heather D; Louella, Michael W; Katz, David A; Golden, Matthew R

    2013-08-01

    Teach HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) symptoms of acute HIV infection (AHI) and direct them to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) though Public Health--Seattle & King County (PHSKC). Cross-sectional surveys, retrospective database analysis and chart review. Beginning in June 2009, the ru2hot? campaign described AHI symptoms and NAAT. Two preintervention and two postintervention surveys assessed campaign visibility, symptom knowledge, and healthcare-seeking behaviour. Regression analyses evaluated secular trends in case-finding. 366 MSM completed surveys. In survey 4, 23% of 100 men reported seeing the campaign, and 25% knew 'ru2hot?' referred to AHI. From survey 1 to survey 4, the proportion of subjects who knew ≥2 symptoms or that AHI was a 'flu-like' illness was unchanged (61% vs 57%, p=0.6). However, in survey 4, 13 (72%) of 18 subjects who saw the campaign named fever as a symptom of AHI compared with 19 (35%) of 55 subjects who had not seen the campaign (p=0.005). From 9/2003 to 12/2010, 622 (2.2%) of 27 661 MSM tested HIV-positive, and 111 (18%) were identified by the Public Health--Seattle & King County NAAT programme. In terms of the impact of the campaign on case-finding, diagnosis of EIA-negative/NAAT-positive and OraQuick-negative/EIA-positive cases increased from six in 2004 to 20 in 2010 (p=0.01), but postcampaign numbers were unchanged. 23 (51%) of 45 cases identified before and 8 (44%) of 18 cases identified after the campaign reported symptoms at initial testing (p=0.6). Although a quarter of MSM surveyed saw the campaign and knowledge of fever (the symptom of emphasis) was high, case-finding was unchanged. Increasing campaign visibility could have had greater impact.

  14. Demographic, Mental Health, Behavioral, and Psychosocial Factors Associated with Cigarette Smoking Status Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: The P18 Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avanzo, Paul A; Halkitis, Perry N; Yu, Kalvin; Kapadia, Farzana

    2016-10-01

    Young sexual minority men smoke at higher rates relative to heterosexual peers. The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of smoking in a sample of young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) who might differ from more general and age-diverse samples of sexual minority individuals and, thus, inform tailored approaches to addressing tobacco use within this population. Data on smoking status were examined in relation to demographics, mental health, substance use behavior, and psychosocial factors. Using multinomial logistic regression, factors were identified that differentiate current and former smokers from never smokers. In bivariate analysis, smoking status was related to demographic, mental health, substance use, and psychosocial factors. Most significantly, smoking status was associated with school enrollment status, current alcohol and marijuana use, and symptoms of depression. Multivariate modeling revealed that, compared to being a never smoker, the odds of current or former smoking were highest among those currently using either alcohol or marijuana. The odds of both current and former smoking were also higher among those reporting greater levels of gay community affinity. Finally, the odds of being a former smoker were higher for those reporting internalized antihomosexual prejudice. This study identifies several factors related to smoking status in a diverse sample of young sexual minority males. These findings should encourage investigations of smoking disparities among younger MSM to look beyond common smoking risk factors in an attempt to understand etiologies that may be unique to this group. Such findings may indicate multiple points of potential intervention aimed at decreasing cigarette smoking within this vulnerable population.

  15. Endurance training per se increases metabolic health in young, moderately overweight men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Pernille; Auerbach, Pernille L; Rosenkilde, Mads; Kristiansen, Lasse; Thomasen, Jan R; Rygaard, Lisbeth; Groth, Rasmus; Brandt, Nina; Helge, Jørn W; Richter, Erik A; Ploug, Thorkil; Stallknecht, Bente

    2012-11-01

    Health benefits of physical activity may depend on a concomitant weight loss. In a randomized, controlled trial, we compared the effects of endurance training with or without weight loss to the effect of weight loss induced by an energy-reduced diet in 48 sedentary, moderately overweight men who completed a 12-week intervention program of training (T), energy-reduced diet (D), training and increased diet (T-iD), or control (C). An energy deficit of 600 kcal/day was induced by endurance training or diet in T and D and a similar training regimen plus an increased dietary intake of 600 kcal/day defined the T-iD group. Primary end point was insulin sensitivity as evaluated by HOMA-IR (mainly reflecting hepatic insulin sensitivity) and hyperinsulinemic, isoglycemic clamps (primarily reflecting peripheral insulin sensitivity). Body mass decreased in T and D by 5.9 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 0.7 kg, respectively, whereas T-iD and C remained weight stable. Total and abdominal fat mass were reduced in an additive manner in the T-iD, D, and T groups by 1.9 ± 0.3/0.2 ± 0.1, 4.4 ± 0.7/0.5 ± 0.1, and 7.7 ± 0.8/0.9 ± 0.1 kg, respectively. HOMA-IR was improved in T, D, and T-iD, whereas insulin-stimulated glucose clearance and suppression of plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were increased only in the two training groups. Thus, loss of fat mass (diet or training induced) improves hepatic insulin sensitivity, whereas peripheral insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is increased by endurance training only. This demonstrates that endurance training per se increases various metabolic health parameters and that endurance training should preferably always be included in any intervention regimen for improving metabolic health in moderately overweight men.

  16. Male preventive health behaviors: perceptions from men, women, and clinical staff along the U.S. Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer B; Fernandez, Maria Lourdes; Lacy-Martinez, Charles R; Dunne-Sosa, Andrea M; Coe, M Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Mexican American males have higher levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, higher body mass indexes, and a higher prevalence of diabetes than do non-Hispanic White males. They are the least likely Hispanic subgroup to be insured, to have recently visited a physician, or to have preventive exams. To explore factors related to the use of preventive exams among mature men, and specifically among Mexican American men residing along the Arizona, United States/Sonora, Mexico border, information on barriers and motivating factors to male participation in preventive screening exams was collected. Interviews were conducted with mature men and women from a single border community and with clinical staff from three different border communities who deliver services to similar populations. Responses were triangulated. Common themes identified include health education/information/advertisement and female/family support as motivating factors and machismo/denial/fatalism as a barrier to male health-seeking behavior.

  17. The Association of Benefit Finding to Psychosocial and Health Behavior Adaptation Among HIV+ Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Rae A.; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Blair, Donald C.

    2008-01-01

    Psychological and behavioral adaptation to HIV is integral to long-term survival. Although most research on coping with HIV has focused on factors associated with poor adaptation, recent research has expanded to include positive concomitants of adaptation, such as benefit finding. This study examined the occurrence of benefit finding among HIV+ men and women and evaluated the potential relevance of benefit finding to positive health behavior and psychosocial adaptation. HIV+ participants (N = 221) recruited during outpatient care completed self-report assessments of benefit finding, social support, depression, HAART adherence, substance use, and physical activity. In a series of multivariate analyses that controlled for demographic and health status variables, benefit finding was associated with lower depression scores, greater social support, and more physical activity, but showed no association to HAART adherence or substance use. The association of benefit finding to depression was partially mediated by differences in social support. Thus, benefit finding may improve psychological adjustment by motivating patients who experience stress-related growth to seek improved social support. PMID:18157689

  18. Internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness of gay/bisexual men from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjian; Zheng, Lijun; Xu, Yin; Zheng, Yong

    2017-02-17

    Social attitudes toward male homosexuality in China so far are still not optimistic. Sexual minorities in China have reported high levels of internalized homophobia. This Internet-based study examined the associations among internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness among 435 gay/bisexual men in Southwest China from 2014 to 2015. Latent profile analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, univariate logistic regression, and separate multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. This descriptive study found the Internalized Homophobia Scale to be suitable for use in China. The sample demonstrated a high prevalence of internalized homophobia. Latent profile analysis suggested a 2-class solution as optimal, and a high level of internalized homophobia was significantly associated with greater psychological distress (Wald = 6.49, AOR = 1.66), transactional sex during the previous 6 months (Wald = 5.23, AOR = 2.77), more sexual compulsions (Wald = 14.05, AOR = 2.12), and the concealment of sexual identity from others (Wald = 30.70, AOR = 0.30) and parents (Wald = 6.72, AOR = 0.49). These findings contribute to our understanding of internalized homophobia in China, and highlight the need to decrease gay-related psychological stress/distress and improve public health services.

  19. Effectiveness of integrated HIV prevention interventions among Chinese men who have sex with men: evaluation of a 16-city public health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaodong; Xiao, Yan; Jin, Canrui; Cassell, Holly; Blevins, Meridith; Sun, Jiangping; Vermund, Sten H; Qian, Han-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impacts of a multi-city HIV prevention public health program (China Global Fund Round 5 Project) on condom use and HIV infection, we analyzed four yearly cross-sectional surveys from 2006 through 2009 among 20,843 men who have sex with men (MSM) in 16 Chinese cities. Self-reported condom use at last sex with a male partner increased from 58% in 2006 to 81% in 2009 (trend test, P<0.001). HIV prevalence increased from 2.3% in 2006 to 5.3% in 2009 (P<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that self-reported receipt of interventions was an independent predictor of increased condom use at last sex with a male partner over time (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.63 in 2006 to 2.33 in 2009; P<0.001), and lower HIV prevalence (aOR, 1.08 in 2006 to 0.45 in 2009; P<0.001). HIV prevalence increased from 2006-2009 for participants with no self-reported receipt of interventions (2.1% in 2006 to 10.3% in 2009) and less so for those with interventions (2.4% to 4.7%). This Chinese public health program had positive impacts on both behaviors and disease rate among MSM population. Escalation of the coverage and intensity of effective interventions is needed for further increasing condom use and for reversing the rising trend of HIV epidemic.

  20. The Health Belief Model: A Qualitative Study to Understand High-risk Sexual Behavior in Chinese Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhong; Lei, Yunxiao; Wang, Honghong; He, Guoping; Williams, Ann Bartley

    2016-01-01

    The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been widely used to explain rationales for health risk-taking behaviors. Our qualitative study explored the applicability of the HBM to understand high-risk sexual behavior in Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) and to elaborate each component of the model. HIV knowledge and perception of HIV prevalence contributed to perceived susceptibility. An attitude of treatment optimism versus hard life in reality affected perceived severity. Perceived barriers included discomfort using condoms and condom availability. Perceived benefits included prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted illnesses. Sociocultural cues for Chinese MSM were elaborated according to each component. The results demonstrated that the HBM could be applied to Chinese MSM. When used with this group, it provided information to help develop a population- and disease-specific HBM scale. Results of our study also suggested behavioral interventions that could be used with Chinese MSM to increase condom use. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between disclosure of same-sex sexual activity to providers, HIV diagnosis and sexual health services for men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Brian E; Moore, David; Michelow, Warren; Hogg, Robert; Gustafson, Réka; Robert, Wayne; Kanters, Steve; Thumath, Meaghan; McGuire, Marissa; Gilbert, Mark

    2014-04-16

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) report challenges to accessing appropriate health care. We sought to understand the relationship between disclosure of same-sex sexual activity to a health care practitioner (HCP), sexual behaviour and measures of sexual health care. Participants recruited through community venues and events completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample. This analysis includes only individuals with self-reported HIV negative or unknown serostatus. We compared participants who had disclosed having same-sex partners with those who had not using chi-square, Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Fisher's exact tests and used logistic regression to examine those variables associated with receiving an HIV test. Participants who had disclosed were more likely to have a higher level of education (p<0.001) and higher income (p<0.001), and to define themselves as "gay" or "queer" (p<0.001). Those who had not disclosed were less likely to report having risky sex (p=0.023) and to have been tested for HIV in the previous two years (adjusted odds ratio 0.23, 95% confidence interval: 0.16-0.34). There was no difference in undiagnosed HIV infection (3.9% versus 2.6%, p=0.34). Individuals who had disclosed were also more likely to have been tested for gonorrhea and syphilis, and more likely to have ever been vaccinated against hepatitis A and hepatitis B (p<0.001 for all). While generally reporting lower risk behaviour, MSM who did not disclose same-sex sexual activity to their HCP did have undiagnosed HIV infections and were less likely to have been tested or vaccinated. Strategies to improve access to appropriate sexual health care for MSM are needed.

  2. The use of technology to find sexual health information online among men who have sex with men in Hanoi, Vietnam, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh X; Krishnan, Aparna; Le, Giang M; Nguyen, Quynh T; Bhadra, Nia M; Nguyen, Sang M; Miller, William C; Go, Vivian F

    2018-04-01

    In an era where mobile phones and computers are ubiquitous, technology-based interventions to reduce HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have great potential to reach high-risk groups, including men who have sex with men (MSM). This study aimed to examine technology usage to find sexual health information online among MSM in Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 205 MSM in Hanoi was conducted from February to May 2016. Overall, 50.7% of participants reported having used a smartphone, computer, or tablet to find HIV/STI testing locations in the past year, and 75.1% reported having used such devices to find other HIV/STI information online. Unemployment (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR]: 1.13, 95%CI: 1.00-1.28) and having been tested for HIV (aPR: 1.27, 95%CI: 1.07-1.51) were significantly associated with using technology to find online sexual health information. MSM who had ever exchanged sex for money or drugs (aPR: 0.80; 95%CI: 0.68-0.94) were less likely to use technology to find sexual health information online. Technology is a promising platform for HIV/STI prevention programs among MSM, with the potential to reach different subgroups. Further efforts to develop technology-based interventions tailored to the needs of the MSM communities in Hanoi and to encourage MSM who were not currently seeking sexual health information and testing services online to do so are necessary.

  3. Health and Work in Women and Men in the Welding and Electrical Trades: How Do They Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Nicola; Arrandale, Victoria; Beach, Jeremy; Galarneau, Jean-Michel F; Mannette, Antonia; Rodgers, Laura

    2018-02-17

    There is little information on how work tasks, demands, and exposures differ between women and men in nominally the same job. This is critical in setting workplace standards that will protect the health of both men and those women moving into less traditional work roles. Information used in setting standards is currently based almost entirely on male workers. This paper describes differences in work and health, and the relation between them, in women and men who have undergone the same trade training for the welding or electrical trades. Four cohorts were established. Two were women across Canada in the welding and electrical trades who had been in an apprenticeship since 2005. Cohorts of men in the same trades during the same period were established in the province of Alberta, Canada. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire at recruitment and were followed up every 6 months to collect detailed information on work carried out and on their health and habits. At the end of the study (up to 5 years for women and up to 3 years for men), the cohort members completed a final questionnaire including questions on mental health, harassment, and gender. The four cohorts comprised 1001 welders (447 female; 554 male) and 885 in the electrical trades (438 female; 447 male). Follow-up information was available for 89%. Women were more likely than men to have had some post-secondary education before starting their trade and were less likely to be living as married or to have a child. More welders smoked, and more men were heavy drinkers. At recruitment, more welders than those in the electrical trades reported rhinitis (sneezing and runny nose), depression, and anxiety. Female welders reported more depression (38%) than male welders (30%), compared to 24% in the electrical trades. At first follow-up, new-onset shoulder pain was more frequent in men and new-onset asthma or wheezing in welders. Within each trade, women reported less variety in tasks. Women welders were less

  4. Nonmarital Romantic Relationships and Mental Health in Early Adulthood: Does the Association Differ for Women and Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robin W.; Barrett, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Although social scientists have long assumed that intimate social relationships are more closely associated with women's than men's mental health, recent research indicates that there are no gender differences in the advantages of marriage and disadvantages of unmarried statuses when males' and females' distinct expressions of emotional distress…

  5. The Relationship between Sexual Trauma, Peritraumatic Dissociation, PTSD, and HIV-Related Health in HIV-Positive Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiaslas, Themis A.; Kamen, Charles; Arteaga, Ana; Lee, Susanne; Briscoe-Smith, Allison; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a novel extension of Schnurr and Green’s (2004) model of the relationships between trauma symptoms and health outcomes, with the specific application to HIV-positive men. A diverse sample of 167 HIV-positive men recruited from San Francisco Bay Area HIV Clinics completed demographic, medical, trauma history and symptom questionnaires. Mediation analyses were conducted using the method proposed by Baron and Kenny (1986). Regression analyses found sexual revictimization (SR) significantly mediated the relationship between child sexual abuse (CSA) and peritraumatic dissociation (PD) and PD mediated the relationship between SR and current posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptom severity. PTS symptoms partially mediated the relationship between SR and current HIV symptom severity. The findings indicate that among HIV-positive men, sexually revictimized men constitute a vulnerable group that is prone to peritraumatic dissociation, which places them at risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and worsened HIV-related health. Furthermore, traumatic stress symptoms were associated with worse HIV-related symptoms, suggesting that PTS symptoms mediate the link between trauma and health outcomes. This study highlights the need for future research to identify the bio-behavioral mediators of the PTSD-health relationship in HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24354509

  6. Development and Evaluation of an Internet-Based Program to Improve the Mental Health and Wellbeing of Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Louise A.; McCabe, Kathryn; Davenport, Tracey; Burns, Jane M.; Rahilly, Kitty; Nicholas, Mariesa; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the development of WorkOut, an Internet-based program designed to help young men overcome the barriers towards help-seeking and to build the skills they need to understand and manage their own mental health. Information and communication technologies (ICT) hold great potential to significantly improve mental…

  7. Diabetes in young adult men: social and health-related correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Koelmeyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a global public health issue. It is associated with significant disability, morbidity and mortality risks and substantial healthcare costs. Of great concern is the fact that its prevalence is rising, particularly amongst the young, while epidemiological data regarding the incidence, prevalence and complications of early-onset type 2 diabetes is noted to be sparse. Methods We used data from the baseline wave of Ten to Men, a national cohort study of Australian males, to investigate the social and health-related correlates of Australian males aged 18–49 years reporting being diagnosed with diabetes. Results The estimated prevalence of a self-reported diabetes diagnosis amongst Australian males aged 18–49 years was 2.95 % (95 % CI: 2.54–3.43 %. Within this age group, approximately 75 % of those diagnosed with diabetes are expected to be living with a known diagnosis of type 2 diabetes; the remainder are expected to be living with type 1 diabetes. Of the 20 social and health-related factors considered, we found evidence to support the association of eighteen factors after adjusting for age and body mass index. The strongest correlates of reporting a diabetes diagnosis, associated with a ≥2-fold increase in the odds of reporting diabetes were being aged 35–49 years, being unemployed, being obese, seeing a doctor for a check-up more frequently, reporting comorbid high blood pressure or physical or mental health comorbidities and worse self-rated and physical health status. Conclusion Australian males aged 18–49 years who are living with a known diagnosis of diabetes are more likely to be socio-economically disadvantaged and suffer substantially worse health status than Australian males aged 18–49 years living without a diabetes diagnosis. Based on the associations detected in this study, older, single males living in regional areas who are socioeconomically disadvantaged, obese and/or who have other

  8. Association of sleep duration and incidence of diabetes modified by tea consumption: a report from the Shanghai men's health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fei; Cai, Hui; Li, Honglan; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu-Tian; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the association between sleep duration and the incidence of diabetes stratified by sleep-related factors among Chinese men. This study included 34,825 men who provided information on sleep-related questions in the Shanghai Men's Health Study, a population-based cohort study conducted in Shanghai, China from 2002 to 2011. Participants were excluded who had a history of diabetes or who were diagnosed with diabetes within 2 years of recruitment. Cox regression was employed to evaluate the influence of sleep duration and its interaction with sleep-related factors on diabetes risk. A total of 1521 incident cases were documented during a median of 5.6 follow-up years. Adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.0 (0.9-1.1) and 1.2 (1.0-1.3) for men who slept <7 and ≥8 h per day, respectively, compared with those who slept 7 h per day (p trend  = 0.01). Stratified analyses revealed that the association between sleep duration and risk of diabetes was only statistically significant among current smokers and regular drinkers, never tea drinkers, men with a high body mass index, hypertension or comorbidity, and men who did not work nightshift or who snored. A statistically significant interaction between tea drinking and sleep duration was observed (p interaction  = 0.01). The above association patterns remained when daytime nappers were excluded from the analyses. The data suggested that longer sleep duration, particularly among individuals already exhibiting factors linked to poor quality of sleep, was associated with diabetes. The association between sleep duration and diabetes may be modified by tea drinking, especially in older men or men with more sleep-related factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of prostate cancer care among rural men in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Chan, Stephanie; Shelton, Jeremy B; Antonio, Anna Liza; Sales, Anne E; Malin, Jennifer L; Saigal, Christopher S

    2013-10-15

    Patient travel distances, coupled with variation in facility-level resources, create barriers for prostate cancer care in the Veterans Health Administration integrated delivery system. For these reasons, the authors investigated the degree to which these barriers impact the quality of prostate cancer care. The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2008. Patient residence was characterized using Rural Urban Commuting Area codes. The authors then examined whether rural residence, compared with urban residence, was associated with less access to cancer-related resources and worse quality of care for 5 prostate cancer quality measures. Approximately 25% of the 11,368 patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2008 lived in either a rural area or a large town. Rural patients tended to be white (62% urban vs 86% rural) and married (47% urban vs 63% rural), and they tended to have slightly higher incomes (all Purban patients. Rural patients were significantly less likely to be treated at facilities with comprehensive cancer resources, although they received a similar or better quality of care for 4 of the 5 prostate cancer quality measures. The time to prostate cancer treatment was similar (rural patients vs urban patients, 96.6 days vs 105.7 days). Rural patients with prostate cancer had less access to comprehensive oncology resources, although they received a similar quality of care, compared with their urban counterparts in the Veterans Health Administration integrated delivery system. A better understanding of the degree to which facility factors contribute to the quality of cancer care may assist other organizations involved in rural health care delivery. This article is US. Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  10. Dietary advice for muscularity, leanness and weight control in Men's Health magazine: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Toni M; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2014-10-11

    The dietary content of advice in men's lifestyle magazines has not been closely scrutinised. We carried out an analysis of such content in all 2009 issues (n = 11) of Men's Health (MH) focusing on muscularity, leanness and weight control. Promotion of a mesomorphic body image underpinned advice to affect muscle building and control weight. Diet advice was underpinned by a strong pseudo-scientific discourse, with citation of expert sources widely used to legitimise the information. Frequently multiple dietary components were advocated within one article e.g. fat, omega-3 fatty acids, thiamine, zinc and high-glycaemic index foods. Furthermore advice would cover numerous nutritional effects, e.g. strengthening bones, reducing stress and boosting testosterone, with little contextualisation. The emphasis on attainment of a mesomorphic body image permitted promotion of slimming diets.Advice to increase calorie and protein intake to augment muscle mass was frequent (183 and 262 references, respectively). Such an anabolic diet was advised in various ways, including consumption of traditional protein foods (217 references) and sports foods (107 references), thereby replicating muscle magazines' support for nutritional supplements. Although advice to increase consumption of red meat was common (52 references), fish and non-flesh sources of protein (eggs, nuts & pulses, and soy products) together exceeded red meat in number of recommendations (206 references). Advice widely asserted micronutrients and phytochemicals from plant food (161 references) as being important in muscle building. This emphasis diverges from stereotypical gender-based food consumption patterns.Dietary advice for control of body weight largely replicated that of muscularity, with strong endorsement to consume fruits and vegetables (59 references), diets rich in nuts and pulses and fish (66 references), as well as specific micronutrients and phytochemicals (62 references). Notably there was emphasis on

  11. Protective effects of dietary carotenoids on risk of hip fracture in men: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Zhaoli; Wang, Renwei; Ang, Li-Wei; Low, Yen-Ling; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that carotenoids in vegetables and fruits may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties. The relationship between dietary total and specific carotenoids, as well as vegetables and fruits, and risk of hip fracture was examined among Chinese in Singapore. We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 men and women who were of ages 45–74 years between 1993 and 1998. At recruitment, subjects were inte...

  12. Psoriasis and Sexual Behavior in Men: examination of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Harskamp, Caitlin T; Schupp, Clayton W

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiologic data on sexual behavior in psoriasis patients are lacking. We aim to examine and compare the sexual behaviors between men with and without psoriasis in the United States. We analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2006 and 2009 to 2010. Responses from male participants to the dermatology and sexual behavior questionnaires of the NHANES were collated and analyzed. Outcome measures included sexual orientation, age of first sexual encounter, number of oral and non-oral sexual partners, and frequency of unprotected sex. Among 6,444 U.S. men that responded to the psoriasis question, 170 (2.6%) reported a physician-given diagnosis of psoriasis. Heterosexual men accounted for 95.5% and nonheterosexual men 4.5% of the overall study population. On multivariate analysis, psoriasis was not associated with differences in sexual orientation (odds ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-4.15). Heterosexual men with psoriasis experienced first sexual encounter at an earlier age than those without psoriasis (weighted difference -0.9 years, P = 0.002). Heterosexual men with psoriasis had significantly fewer female oral sexual partners compared with heterosexual men without psoriasis on multivariate analysis (lifetime partner number: rate ratio [RR] 0.65, 95% CI 0.45-0.95; past-year partner number: RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-0.97). No significant differences existed between heterosexual men with and without psoriasis regarding frequency of unprotected sex (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.85-1.09). Among nonheterosexual men with and without psoriasis, no significant differences existed in age first had sex, number of sexual partners, or frequency of unprotected sex. Heterosexual men with psoriasis have significantly fewer lifetime female oral sexual partners compared with those without psoriasis. Dermatologists and other healthcare providers need to examine the genital region routinely and initiate appropriate therapy to improve

  13. Mental health indicators fifty years later: A population-based study of men with histories of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Scott D; Kong, Jooyoung

    2017-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a widely acknowledged trauma that affects a substantial number of boys/men and has the potential to undermine mental health across the lifespan. Despite the topic's importance, few studies have examined the long-term effects of CSA on mental health in middle and late life for men. Most empirical studies on the effects of CSA have been conducted with women, non-probability samples, and samples of young or emerging adults with inadequate control variables. Based on complex trauma theory, the current study investigated: a) the effect of CSA on mental health outcomes (depressive symptoms, somatic symptom severity, hostility) in late life for men, and b) the moderating effects of childhood adversities and masculine norms in the relationship between CSA and the three mental health outcomes. Using a population-based sample from the 2004-2005 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, multivariate analyses found that CSA was positively related to both depressive and somatic symptoms and increased the likelihood of hostility for men who reported a history of CSA. Both childhood adversities and masculine norms were positively related to the three outcomes for the entire sample. Among CSA survivors, childhood adversities exerted a moderating effect in terms of depressive symptoms. Mental health practitioners should include CSA and childhood adversities in assessment and treatment with men. To more fully understand the effects of CSA, future studies are needed that use longitudinal designs, compare male and female survivors, and examine protective mechanisms such as social support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of family environment on future mental health professionals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Daniel B; Lee, Sang Min; Twitty, Lisa; Kisner, Harrison

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between dimensions of functioning in the family of origin of graduate students in helping profession programs and their attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. One hundred forty-three participants completed the Family Environment Scale (FES-R: Moos & Moos, 1986), the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men scale (ATLG: Herek, 1994), and demographic questions. Results suggest that three family dimensions (conflict, intellectual-cultural orientation, and moral-religious emphasis) significantly predicted attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The results also revealed that younger students held more negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men than their older peers. Implications for educators, researchers, and practitioners are discussed.

  15. eHealth Literacy and Partner Involvement in Treatment Decision Making for Men With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lixin; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Chen, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    To examine how the eHealth literacy of partners of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer affects their involvement in decision making, and to identify the factors that influence their eHealth literacy.
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
. North Carolina.
. 142 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. 
. A telephone survey and descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses were used.
. The partners' eHealth literacy, involvement in treatment decision making, and demographics, and the health statuses of the patients and their partners. 
. Higher levels of eHealth literacy among partners were significantly associated with their involvement in getting a second opinion, their awareness of treatment options, and the size of the social network they relied on for additional information and support for treatment decision making for prostate cancer. The factor influencing eHealth literacy was the partners' access to the Internet for personal use, which explained some of the variance in eHealth literacy.
. This study described how partners' eHealth literacy influenced their involvement in treatment decision making for prostate cancer and highlighted the influencing factors (i.e., partners' access to the Internet for personal use).
. When helping men with prostate cancer and their partners with treatment decision making, nurses need to assess eHealth literacy levels to determine whether nonelectronically based education materials are needed and to provide clear instructions on how to use eHealth resources.

  16. Health, sexuality and place: the different geographies of HIV-positive gay men in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper employs interview narratives alongside participant-led photography and caption writing to examine the different daily geographies of 15 HIV-positive gay men in Auckland, New Zealand. Difference for these men is rooted in both their HIV status and their sexuality, and this difference has implications for their engagement with the world at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Giving voice to such experiences begins to answer calls for geographers to consider more deeply the connections between health, sexuality and place.

  17. The efficacy of a brief intervention in reducing hazardous drinking in working age men in Russia: the HIM (Health for Izhevsk men individually randomised parallel group exploratory trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Elizabeth

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Russia has particularly low life expectancy for an industrialised country, with mortality at working ages having fluctuated dramatically over the past few decades, particularly among men. Alcohol has been identified as the most likely cause of these temporal variations. One approach to reducing the alcohol problem in Russia is 'brief interventions' which seek to change views of the personal acceptability of excessive drinking and to encourage self-directed behaviour change. Very few studies to evaluate the efficacy of brief interventions in Russia have been conducted. Motivational Interviewing (MI is a person-centred counselling style which can be adapted to brief interventions in which help is offered in thinking through behaviour in the context of values and goals, to decide whether change is needed, and if so, how it may best be achieved. Methods This paper reports on an individually randomised two-armed parallel group exploratory trial. The primary hypothesis is that a brief adaptation of MI will be effective in reducing self-reported hazardous and harmful drinking at 3 months. Participants were drawn from the Izhevsk Family Study II, with eligibility determined based on proxy reports of hazardous and harmful drinking in the past year. All participants underwent a health check, with MI subsequently delivered to those in the intervention arm. Signed consent was obtained from those in the intervention arm only at this point. Both groups were then invited for 3 and 12 month follow ups. The control group did not receive any additional intervention. Results 441 men were randomised. Of these 61 did not have a health check leaving 190 in each trial arm. Follow up at 3 months was high (97% of those having a health check, and very similar in the two trial arms (183 in the intervention and 187 in the control. No significant differences were detected between the randomised groups in either the primary or the secondary outcomes at

  18. Rupture, resilience, and risk: relationships between mental health and migration among gay-identified men in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathaniel M

    2014-05-01

    An established body of research in psychology, psychiatry and epidemiology links social stigma and stress with poor mental and sexual health outcomes among gay-identified men. Less work considers how these linkages are mediated by place and almost none considers the role of movement across places. This qualitative study, based on the migration narratives of 48 gay-identified men living in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and Washington, D.C., U.S.A. gives more careful consideration to the ways in which mental and emotional health issues (e.g., anxiety, depression, substance use) in this population both precipitate migration and stem from migration. The narratives show that decisions to migrate often emerge from men׳s experiences of place-based minority stress and associated health outcomes. At the same time, moving to urban gay communities, when coupled with other life circumstances, can create or reinforce physical and emotional insecurities that lead to low self-esteem, substance use and sexual risk-taking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for impaired health status differ in women and men treated with percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stent era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Ong, Andrew T L; Lemos, Pedro A

    2006-01-01

    In patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the drug-eluting stent era, we compared women's and men's health status 6 and 12 months post-PCI and investigated whether predictors of poor health status at 12 months are similar for women and men....

  20. [Sexuality in the elderly: The role of the physicians in maintaining sexual health of older men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkalakal, D; Weißbach, L

    2015-12-01

    Sexuality in the elderly is still a social taboo. A commitment by medical practices to address the topic of sexuality in later life is essential, given that the sexual health is part of the quality of life. Identification of barriers and discourse of effects in the physician's behavior when dealing with the sexuality of older people. Review and discussion of interdisciplinary literature and social discourse. Compilation of expert opinions. Although the introduction of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors led to a removal of taboos concerning erectile dysfunction, the sexuality of older men became narrowed to physiological aspects. The elderly still complain that consultations concerning their sexuality receives too little attention in medical practice. Problems are boundaries of shame and disregard of the sexuality of elderly. Sexuality in old age will have to become more prominent in medical practices, due to demographic changes and changing self-images of the elderly. The social role of physicians enables straightforward discussions about sexuality. Taking a sexual history and choosing an active approach proved to be practicable to discuss sexual problems with older people.

  1. Short-term street soccer improves fitness and cardiovascular health status of homeless men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Petersen, Jesper; Andersen, Lars Juel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 12 weeks of small-sided street soccer (2.2 ± 0.7 sessions/week) and fitness center training (0.5 ± 0.2 sessions/week) on physical fitness and cardiovascular health profile for homeless men. Exercise capacity, maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), body composition (DXA...... scans), blood pressure (BP), and blood lipid profile were determined before and after the intervention period for 22 soccer-group subjects (SG) and 10 waiting list controls (CO). In addition, time-motion analyses, HR measurements, and pedometer recordings were performed during street soccer training...... and daily-life activities. During a 60 min 4 versus 4 street soccer session 182 ± 62 intense running bouts were performed; mean HR was 82 ± 4% HR(max) and HR was >90% HR(max) for 21 ± 12% (±SD) of total time. On a day without training the participants performed 10,733 ± 4,341 steps and HR was >80% HR...

  2. Endurance training per se increases metabolic health in young, moderately overweight men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Pernille; Auerbach, Pernille L; Rosenkilde, Mads

    2012-01-01

    clearance and suppression of plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were increased only in the two training groups. Thus, loss of fat mass (diet or training induced) improves hepatic insulin sensitivity, whereas peripheral insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is increased by endurance......Health benefits of physical activity may depend on a concomitant weight loss. In a randomized, controlled trial, we compared the effects of endurance training with or without weight loss to the effect of weight loss induced by an energy-reduced diet in 48 sedentary, moderately overweight men who......, respectively, whereas T-iD and C remained weight stable. Total and abdominal fat mass were reduced in an additive manner in the T-iD, D, and T groups by 1.9 ± 0.3/0.2 ± 0.1, 4.4 ± 0.7/0.5 ± 0.1, and 7.7 ± 0.8/0.9 ± 0.1 kg, respectively. HOMA-IR was improved in T, D, and T-iD, whereas insulin-stimulated glucose...

  3. Dilemas da masculinidade em comunidades de leitores da revista Men's Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair de Souza Ramos

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, analiso as representações sobre masculinidade e cuidado de si em comunidades de leitores da revista Men's Health. Com base na análise de tópicos e postagens em comunidades online, abordo desde as tensões em torno da oposição homossexual / heterossexual na autodefinição dos leitores, até a ênfase em um corpo concebido, a um só tempo, como saudável e masculino. Meu objetivo é examinar a construção de uma imagem de si masculina entre estes leitores, que se valem de temas, problemas e técnicas de si que estão presentes na revista, mas, sobretudo, além dela, e que dizem respeito a um determinado estilo de masculinidade, em que a expressão de si através da exposição do corpo desempenha um papel primordial.

  4. Sexual Identity, Stigma, and Depression: the Role of the "Anti-gay Propaganda Law" in Mental Health among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Emily; Wirtz, Andrea L; Zelaya, Carla E; Latkin, Carl; Peryshkina, Alena; Mogilnyi, Vladmir; Dzhigun, Petr; Kostetskaya, Irina; Galai, Noya; Beyrer, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a major public health problem in the Russian Federation and is particularly of concern for men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM living in Moscow City were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and participated in a cross-sectional survey from October 2010 to April 2013. Multiple logistic regression models compared the relationship between sexual identity, recent stigma, and probable depression, defined as a score of ≥23 on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. We investigated the interactive effect of stigma and participation in the study after the passage of multiple "anti-gay propaganda laws" in Russian provinces, municipalities, and in neighboring Ukraine on depression among MSM. Among 1367 MSM, 36.7% (n = 505) qualified as probably depressed. Fifty-five percent identified as homosexual (n = 741) and 42.9% identified as bisexual (n = 578). Bisexual identity had a protective association against probable depression (reference: homosexual identity AOR 0.71; 95%CI 0.52-0.97; p gay laws AOR 1.67; 95%CI 1.04-2.68; p gay propaganda law is urgent but other social interventions may address depression and stigma in the current context.

  5. The Association of Poor Mental Health Status and Sociocultural Factors in Men: A Population-Based Study in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Jafar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Ghaem, Haleh; Kassani, Aziz; Niazi, Mohsen; Menati, Rostam

    2018-01-01

    Mental ill-health has increased among Iranian men in the recent years. Mental health is complexly determined by sociocultural, psychological, demographic characteristics, and some health-risk behaviors such as smoking. This study aimed to explore the association(s) between demographic factors, smoking status, social capital, and poor mental health status in a sample of Iranian men. The data were derived from a survey titled "Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool-2" in Tehran, Iran ( n = 11,064). A multistage sampling method was applied in the study. The General Health Questionnaire-28 was used to assess poor mental health status (range = 0-84, scores higher than 23 indicated poor mental health status). The data were analyzed using t test, chi-square test, and multivariate logistic regression. The means of age and family size were 47.14 ± 17.26 years (range = 20-91) and 3.54 ± 1.32 individuals (range = 1-15), respectively. The majority of the participants were employed (57%, n = 6,361). The prevalence of poor mental health was 36.36%, 95% confidence interval (CI) [35.46, 37.26]. The components of social capital were positively associated with poor mental health status. Family size (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.93; 95% CI [0.90, 0.96]), job status (unemployed vs. employed, AOR = 1.34; 95% CI [1.16, 1.55]), marital status (widowed and divorced vs. single, AOR = 1.09; 95% CI [1.02, 1.17]), education level (illiterate vs. academic, AOR = 1.18; 95% CI [1.09, 1.29]), and smoking status (smokers vs. nonsmokers, AOR = 1.46; 95% CI [1.31, 1.62]) were directly associated with poor mental health status in the logistic regression model. These results suggest that social capital could be an important approach for men to attain suitable mental health and reduce mental disorders. The high prevalence of poor mental health in men merits more attention in mental health policy and program planning.

  6. The Association of Poor Mental Health Status and Sociocultural Factors in Men: A Population-Based Study in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Jafar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Ghaem, Haleh; Kassani, Aziz; Niazi, Mohsen; Menati, Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Mental ill-health has increased among Iranian men in the recent years. Mental health is complexly determined by sociocultural, psychological, demographic characteristics, and some health-risk behaviors such as smoking. This study aimed to explore the association(s) between demographic factors, smoking status, social capital, and poor mental health status in a sample of Iranian men. The data were derived from a survey titled “Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool–2” in Tehran, Iran (n = 11,064). A multistage sampling method was applied in the study. The General Health Questionnaire–28 was used to assess poor mental health status (range = 0-84, scores higher than 23 indicated poor mental health status). The data were analyzed using t test, chi-square test, and multivariate logistic regression. The means of age and family size were 47.14 ± 17.26 years (range = 20-91) and 3.54 ± 1.32 individuals (range = 1-15), respectively. The majority of the participants were employed (57%, n = 6,361). The prevalence of poor mental health was 36.36%, 95% confidence interval (CI) [35.46, 37.26]. The components of social capital were positively associated with poor mental health status. Family size (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.93; 95% CI [0.90, 0.96]), job status (unemployed vs. employed, AOR = 1.34; 95% CI [1.16, 1.55]), marital status (widowed and divorced vs. single, AOR = 1.09; 95% CI [1.02, 1.17]), education level (illiterate vs. academic, AOR = 1.18; 95% CI [1.09, 1.29]), and smoking status (smokers vs. nonsmokers, AOR = 1.46; 95% CI [1.31, 1.62]) were directly associated with poor mental health status in the logistic regression model. These results suggest that social capital could be an important approach for men to attain suitable mental health and reduce mental disorders. The high prevalence of poor mental health in men merits more attention in mental health policy and program planning. PMID:26883076

  7. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not seem comfortable with you as a gay man, find another provider. 2. HIV/AIDS, Safe Sex Many men who have sex with men are ... rate of HIV infection is one of the gay community’s great success stories. ... a good HIV provider. Safe sex is proven to reduce the risk of receiving ...

  8. Mental Health Consequences in Men Exposed to Sexual Abuse during the War in Croatia and Bosnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, Mladen; Henigsberg, Neven; Hrabac, Pero

    2010-01-01

    In the research project on sexual abuse of men during the war in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, detailed information from 60 victims of such crimes was gathered. The aim of the research was to define key attributes of sexual abuse of men in war as well as consequences it had on the victims. A method of structured interview was used. Also, the…

  9. Exploring a Dutch paradox: an ethnographic investigation of gay men's mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aggarwal, S.; Gerrets, R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Netherlands' reputation as a world leader with respect to gay rights, homosexual Dutch men have much higher rates of mood disorders, anxiety disorders and suicide attempts than heterosexual Dutch men. Epidemiologists report similar disparities elsewhere in Western Europe and North

  10. [Oral health in young adults in Germany--a comparison between women and men of the German army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebolz, Dirk; Schwerdtfeger, Bernd; Brunner, Edgar; Hornecker, Else; Mausberg, Rainer F

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare oral health in young German women and men. We paired female and male soldiers of the German armed force (Bundeswehr) on the basis of age, school qualification and origin. All participants underwent a clinical examination. Oral health was assessed using the decayed, missing and filled surfaces index (DMF-S), an oral hygiene index (QHI), and a periodontal index (CPITN). In addition, we collected data on the subjects' smoking habits. The study included 90 women (mean age: 21.7 years) and 90 men (mean age: 21.4 years). The mean DMF-S was 20.7 +/- 13.7 for women and 21.0 +/- 19.8 for men (p>0.05). In the female group, dental restorations were present in 71% of the teeth affected by caries. In the male group, restorations were present in 61.2% (p=0.04). The female group showed a less marked polarisation of caries than the male group (p=0.03). Oral hygiene (QHI) was poor in the entire study population. Women (QHI: 2.16 +/- 0.6), however, exhibited significantly better oral hygiene than men (QHI: 2.53 +/- 0.5) (p= 0.01). Deeper probing depths (CPITN scores of 3 and 4) were less frequently seen in females than in males (p= 0.04). In both groups more than half of the participants were smokers (56.7%) since at least four years with more than ten cigarettes per day. Smoking had a significant influence on periodontal health (p=0.02). Men showed poorer oral health than women. The study emphasizes that the proportion of young adults requiring curative dental treatment remains high in Germany. It also underlines the need for intensive preventive care including cessation of smoking.

  11. Sexual Trauma and Adverse Health and Occupational Outcomes Among Men Serving in the U.S. Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millegan, Jeffrey; Wang, Lawrence; LeardMann, Cynthia A; Miletich, Derek; Street, Amy E

    2016-04-01

    Although absolute counts of U.S. service men who experience sexual trauma are comparable to service women, little is known about the impact of sexual trauma on men. The association of recent sexual trauma (last 3 years) with health and occupational outcomes was investigated using longitudinal data (2004-2013) from the Millennium Cohort Study. Of 37,711 service men, 391 (1.0%) reported recent sexual harassment and 76 (0.2%) sexual assault. In multivariable models, sexual harassment or assault, respectively, was associated with poorer mental health: AOR = 1.60, 95% CI [1.22, 2.12], AOR = 4.39, 95% CI [2.40, 8.05]; posttraumatic stress disorder: AOR = 2.50, 95% CI [1.87, 3.33], AOR = 6.63, 95% CI [3.65, 12.06]; depression: AOR = 2.37, 95% CI [1.69, 3.33], AOR = 5.60, 95% CI [2.83, 11.09]; and multiple physical symptoms: AOR = 2.22, 95% CI [1.69, 2.92]; AOR = 3.57, 95% CI [1.98, 6.42], after adjustment for relevant covariates. Sexual harassment was also associated with poorer physical health: AOR = 1.68, 95% CI [1.27, 2.22]. Men who reported sexual trauma were more likely to have left military service: AOR = 1.60, 95% CI [1.14, 2.24], and be disabled/unemployed postservice: AOR = 1.76, 95% CI [1.02, 3.02]. Results suggest that sexual trauma was significantly associated with adverse health and functionality extending to postmilitary life. Findings support the need for developing better prevention strategies and services to reduce the burden of sexual trauma on service men. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  12. Ethnic differences in blood pressure control among men at Veterans Affairs clinics and other health care sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shakaib U; Hutchison, Florence N; Hendrix, Katharine; Okonofua, Eni C; Egan, Brent M

    2005-05-09

    Differential access to health care may contribute to lower blood pressure (BP) control rates to under 140/90 mm Hg in African American compared with white hypertensive patients, especially men (26.5% vs 36.5% of all hypertensive patients in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, which provides access to health care and medications across ethnic and economic boundaries, may reduce disparities in BP control. To test this hypothesis, BP treatment and control groups were compared between African American (VA, n = 4379; non-VA, n = 2754) and white (VA, n = 7987; non-VA, n = 4980) hypertensive men. In both groups, whites were older than African Americans (Pcardiovascular risk.

  13. The mental health benefits of relationship formalisation among lesbians and gay men in same-sex relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariola, Emily; Lyons, Anthony; Leonard, William

    2015-12-01

    To examine links between same-sex relationship formalisation - such as registered domestic partnerships and commitment ceremony unions - and mental health among lesbians and gay men, after controlling for differences in other relationship characteristics. Data were collected via an online survey of a national sample of Australian lesbians and gay men aged 16 years and older, with the sample for analysis confined to those in a same-sex relationship (n=1,420). The K10 Psychological Distress Scale was used as an indicator of mental health. Being in a formalised relationship was associated with lower distress for those aged 16-39 years but not for those aged 40+ years; whereas, intending to formalise was associated with higher distress among the older group. These associations remained significant after controlling for cohabitation, feeling able to seek partner emotional support, relationship tenure and financial arrangements. Relationship formalisation appears to be an important protective factor for mental health among gay men and lesbians, especially among younger sexual minority individuals. These findings suggest that affording same-sex couples the opportunity to formalise their relationship is not only a civil rights issue but also a public health issue. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. The Role of Sex, Gender, Health Factors, and Job Context in Workplace Accommodation Use Among Men and Women with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Smith, Peter M; Kristman, Vicki; Beaton, Dorcas E; Mustard, Cameron A

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background With the aging of populations in many countries, workers are expected to remain employed longer but may struggle with the onset of common, chronic conditions like arthritis. To date, few studies have examined workplace policies and practices that could help accommodate individuals with arthritis, and fewer still have used a sex and gender-based approach to explore similarities and differences between women and men. Objectives This study compared the health and work contexts of workers aged ≥50 years to better understand similarities and differences between women and men in accommodation availability, need, use, and unmet needs. Methods A cross-sectional survey of men and women with osteoarthritis (OA), inflammatory arthritis (IA), or both OA and IA was administered online or by telephone and assessed demographics (e.g. age, education), health (e.g. pain, fatigue, workplace activity limitations), work context factors (e.g. job sector, full/part-time work, job control), and workplace accommodations (e.g. health benefits, flexible hours, special equipment/adaptations, modified duties). Sex and gender-based analyses examined similarities and differences between men and women and included descriptive statistics, multivariable multinomial analyses, and nested regression analyses. Results There was a 58.9% response rate and final sample of 463 participants (women, n = 266; men, n = 197; OA = 59.0%; IA/both IA and OA = 23.7%; unsure = 17.3%). Women and men were significantly different in a number of health (e.g. fatigue, health variability, workplace activity limitations) and work context factors (e.g. job sector, part-time work, job stress). However, in other respects, they were similar (e.g. pain, job involving physical demands, size of organization, shift work, union membership, job control). There were no differences between men and women in the availability or use of workplace accommodations. However, women reported significantly more

  15. The Role of Sex, Gender, Health Factors, and Job Context in Workplace Accommodation Use Among Men and Women with Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Smith, Peter M; Kristman, Vicki; Beaton, Dorcas E; Mustard, Cameron A

    2018-02-06

    With the aging of populations in many countries, workers are expected to remain employed longer but may struggle with the onset of common, chronic conditions like arthritis. To date, few studies have examined workplace policies and practices that could help accommodate individuals with arthritis, and fewer still have used a sex and gender-based approach to explore similarities and differences between women and men. This study compared the health and work contexts of workers aged ≥50 years to better understand similarities and differences between women and men in accommodation availability, need, use, and unmet needs. A cross-sectional survey of men and women with osteoarthritis (OA), inflammatory arthritis (IA), or both OA and IA was administered online or by telephone and assessed demographics (e.g. age, education), health (e.g. pain, fatigue, workplace activity limitations), work context factors (e.g. job sector, full/part-time work, job control), and workplace accommodations (e.g. health benefits, flexible hours, special equipment/adaptations, modified duties). Sex and gender-based analyses examined similarities and differences between men and women and included descriptive statistics, multivariable multinomial analyses, and nested regression analyses. There was a 58.9% response rate and final sample of 463 participants (women, n = 266; men, n = 197; OA = 59.0%; IA/both IA and OA = 23.7%; unsure = 17.3%). Women and men were significantly different in a number of health (e.g. fatigue, health variability, workplace activity limitations) and work context factors (e.g. job sector, part-time work, job stress). However, in other respects, they were similar (e.g. pain, job involving physical demands, size of organization, shift work, union membership, job control). There were no differences between men and women in the availability or use of workplace accommodations. However, women reported significantly more accommodation needs and had greater unmet needs

  16. Working in the Same Sector, in the Same Organization and in the Same Occupation: Similarities and Differences Between Women and Men Physicians’ Work Climate and Health Complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Falkenberg; Katharina Näswall; Petra Lindfors; Magnus Sverke

    2015-01-01

    Due to the segregated labor market, gender differences in health are often confounded by factors such as sector or occupation. This study explored similarities and differences in work climate and health complaints among women and men working in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation. First, work climate and health complaints were compared between women and men. Second, relations between the work climate and health complaints were investigated in both genders. Qu...

  17. Mycoplasma genitalium: prevalence in men presenting with urethritis to a South Australian public sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzini, T M; Waddell, R G; Douglas, R J; Sadlon, T A

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium infection among male patients with dysuria and/or urethral discharge. An analysis of the clinical, demographic and microbiological factors associated with M. genitalium infection was also conducted. From May 2007 to June 2011, men presenting to the clinic with self-reported symptoms of dysuria and/or urethral discharge were identified and underwent urethral swab, which was microscopically assessed for objective non-gonococcal urethritis. A first-void urine sample was tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae using the Aptima Combo-2 assay. A portion of the urine sample was sent for polymerase chain reaction analysis for M. genitalium. One thousand, one hundred and eighty-two men with dysuria and/or urethral discharge were tested for M. genitalium. Of those, 96 men (8.1%) were positive for M. genitalium. Men identifying as solely MSM (men who have sex with men) constituted 16.3% (n = 193) of the sample. Their infection rate was 3.1% (n = 6). The infection rate for heterosexual and bisexual men was 9.1%. For all men, the M. genitalium co-infection rate was 14.6% (n = 14) with C. trachomatis and 3.1% (n = 3) with N. gonorrhoeae. Factors associated with M. genitalium infection were analysed by univariate analysis. We determined that five investigated predictors were significantly associated with M. genitalium infection, urethral discharge, non-gonococcal urethritis on Gram stain of urethral smears, identification as heterosexual or bisexual, and absence of co-infection with C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae. In Adelaide, M. genitalium is an important sexually transmitted infection among men with dysuria and/or urethral discharge, and is primarily an infection of heterosexual and bisexual men. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Combined impact of health behaviours and mortality in men and women: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Tee Khaw

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is overwhelming evidence that behavioural factors influence health, but their combined impact on the general population is less well documented. We aimed to quantify the potential combined impact of four health behaviours on mortality in men and women living in the general community.We examined the prospective relationship between lifestyle and mortality in a prospective population study of 20,244 men and women aged 45-79 y with no known cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline survey in 1993-1997, living in the general community in the United Kingdom, and followed up to 2006. Participants scored one point for each health behaviour: current non-smoking, not physically inactive, moderate alcohol intake (1-14 units a week and plasma vitamin C >50 mmol/l indicating fruit and vegetable intake of at least five servings a day, for a total score ranging from zero to four. After an average 11 y follow-up, the age-, sex-, body mass-, and social class-adjusted relative risks (95% confidence intervals for all-cause mortality(1,987 deaths for men and women who had three, two, one, and zero compared to four health behaviours were respectively, 1.39 (1.21-1.60, 1.95 (1.70--2.25, 2.52 (2.13-3.00, and 4.04 (2.95-5.54 p < 0.001 trend. The relationships were consistent in subgroups stratified by sex, age, body mass index, and social class, and after excluding deaths within 2 y. The trends were strongest for cardiovascular causes. The mortality risk for those with four compared to zero health behaviours was equivalent to being 14 y younger in chronological age.Four health behaviours combined predict a 4-fold difference in total mortality in men and women, with an estimated impact equivalent to 14 y in chronological age.

  19. Sex partnerships, health, and social risks of young men leaving jail: analyzing data from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freudenberg Nicholas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young men involved in the criminal justice system face disproportionately high rates of sexual risk behavior, drug, use, and violence. Little is known about how their involvement in sex partnerships might mitigate their unique health and social risks. This study explores whether sex partner experience protects against harmful sexual behaviors, drug problems, violence, and recidivism in 16-18-year-old Black and Latino men leaving a US jail. Methods Data were drawn from the Returning Educated African-American and Latino Men to Enriched Neighborhoods (REAL MEN study conducted between 2003-2007, which tracked 552 adolescents during their time in a New York City jail and 397 of them one year after their release. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between sex partner experience and sex behavior, drug use, violence, and recidivism. Results This study indicates that young men who have long-term sex partners prior to incarceration are less likely to be inconsistent condom users (OR = 0.50, p ≤ 0.01, have sex while high on drugs/alcohol (OR = 0.14, p ≤ 0.001, use marijuana daily (OR = 0.45, p ≤ 0.001, and carry weapons during illegal activity (OR = 0.58, p ≤ 0.05, especially compared with peers who simultaneously are involved with long-term and casual "short-term" sex partners. However, the positive effects of having a long-term sex partner generally do not apply over time - in this case, one year after being released from jail. Aside from sexual partners, factors such as employment and housing stability predict whether these young men will experience positive or negative outcomes post-incarceration. Conclusions This study highlights the importance and potential benefits of health interventions that engage young Black and Latino men who are involved in the criminal justice system in the US, as well as their sex partners, in health promotion programs. The study also confirms the need for programs that

  20. The Obesity Epidemic in the Veterans Health Administration: Prevalence Among Key Populations of Women and Men Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Jessica Y; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Hoggatt, Katherine J; Washington, Donna L; Lee, Jimmy; Haskell, Sally; Uchendu, Uchenna S; Saechao, Fay S; Zephyrin, Laurie C; Frayne, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    Most US adults are overweight or obese. Understanding differences in obesity prevalence across subpopulations could facilitate the development and dissemination of weight management services. To inform Veterans Health Administration (VHA) weight management initiatives, we describe obesity prevalence among subpopulations of VHA patients. Cross-sectional descriptive analyses of fiscal year 2014 (FY2014) national VHA administrative and clinical data, stratified by gender. Differences ≥5% higher than the population mean were considered clinically significant. Veteran VHA primary care patients with a valid weight within ±365 days of their first FY2014 primary care visit, and a valid height (98% of primary care patients). We used VHA vital signs data to ascertain height and weight and calculate body mass index, and VHA outpatient, inpatient, and fee basis data to identify sociodemographic- and comorbidity-based subpopulations. Among nearly five million primary care patients (347,112 women, 4,567,096 men), obesity prevalence was 41% (women 44%, men 41%), and overweight prevalence was 37% (women 31%, men 38%). Across the VHA's 140 facilities, obesity prevalence ranged from 28% to 49%. Among gender-stratified subpopulations, obesity prevalence was high among veterans under age 65 (age 18-44: women 40%, men 46%; age 45-64: women 49%, men 48%). Obesity prevalence varied across racial/ethnic and comorbidity subpopulations, with high obesity prevalence among black women (51%), women with schizophrenia (56%), and women and men with diabetes (68%, 56%). Overweight and obesity are common among veterans served by the VHA. VHA's weight management initiatives have the potential to avert long-term morbidity arising from obesity-related conditions. High-risk groups-such as black women veterans, women veterans with schizophrenia, younger veterans, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native veterans-may require particular attention to ensure that

  1. Social support and suicide in Japanese men and women - the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC)-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Yumi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-12-01

    Although the important role of social support in mental health is acknowledged, no prospective study has yet examined the relation of social support to suicide. Here, we investigated the association between social support and suicide in a cohort of Japanese men and women. A total of 26,672 men and 29,865 women aged 40-69 years enrolled in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study in 1993-1994 completed a self-administered questionnaire which included four items of social support, and were followed for death through December 2005. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of suicidal death by social support index were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 180 suicidal deaths were recorded during an average of 12 years' follow-up. Men and women with the highest level of social support had a significantly decreased risk of suicide, with HRs (95% CI) for the highest versus lowest social support group of 0.56 (0.33-0.94) and 0.38 (0.16-0.89) in men and women, respectively. Esteem support and having four or more friends were associated with a lower risk of suicide in women [0.32 (0.13-0.77)] and in both sexes [men: 0.56 (0.36-0.88); women: 0.65 (0.32-1.30)], respectively, whereas confident support was not. These findings suggest that social support may be important for suicide prevention. Avoiding social isolation may decrease the incidence of suicide in men and women, and esteem support can provide additional benefit for women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. "Do You Want to Go Forward or Do You Want to Go Under?" Men's Mental Health in and Out of Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Hanberg, Debra; Hannan-Leith, Madeline N; Bergen, Cara; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2018-03-01

    More than 11 million people are currently imprisoned worldwide, with the vast majority of incarcerated individuals being male. Hypermasculine environments in prison are often tied to men's health risks, and gathering information about mental health is fundamental to improving prison as well as community services. The purpose of the current study was to describe the connections between masculinities and men's mental health among prisoners transitioning into and out of a Canadian federal correctional facility. Two focus groups were conducted with a total of 18 men who had recently been released from a federal correctional facility. The focus group interviews were analyzed to inductively derive patterns pertaining to men's mental health challenges and resiliencies "on the inside" and "on the outside." Participant's challenges in prison related to heightened stresses associated with being incarcerated and the negative impact on preexisting mental illness including imposed changes to treatment regimens. Men's resiliencies included relinquishing aggression and connecting to learn from other men "on the inside." Mental health challenges "on the outside" included a lack of work skills and finances which increased the barriers that many men experienced when trying to access community-based mental health services. Mental health resiliencies employed by participants "on the outside" included self-monitoring and management to reduce negative thoughts, avoiding substance use and attaining adequate exercise and sleep. The current study findings offer practice and policy guidance to advance the well-being of this vulnerable subgroup of men in as well as out of prison.

  3. Frontline Health Service Providers' Perspectives on HIV Vaccine Trials among Female Sex Workers and Men Who Have Sex with Men in Karnataka, South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayana Ramanaik

    Full Text Available Little qualitative research is available on the role of frontline health service providers (FHSPs in the implementation of clinical trials, particularly in developing countries. This paper presents findings from a qualitative study about the perspectives of FHSPs on future HIV vaccine trials involving female sex workers (FSWs and men who have sex with men (MSM in three districts of Karnataka, India. In particular, we explore FHSPs' knowledge of and views on clinical trials in general, and examine their potential willingness to play a role if such trials were introduced or implemented in the region.A field team of four researchers from Karnataka-two of whom self-identified with FSW or MSM communities ("community researchers" and two with backgrounds in social work-conducted in-depth interviews with FHSPs. Including community researchers in the study helped to build rapport with FSW and MSM participants and facilitate in-depth discussions. A coding scheme for transcribed and translated data was developed using a framework analysis approach. Data was then analysed thematically using a combination of a priori and emergent codes.Over half of FHSPs demonstrated limited knowledge or understanding of clinical trials. Despite reported skepticism around the testing of HIV vaccines in developing countries and concerns around potential side effects, most FHSPs strongly advocated for the implementation of HIV vaccine clinical trials in Karnataka. Further, most FHSPs expressed their willingness to be involved in future HIV vaccine clinical trials in varying capacities.Given that FHSPs are often directly involved in the promotion of health and well-being of FSWs and MSM, they are well-positioned to play leadership, ethical, and communicative roles in future HIV vaccine trials. However, our findings reveal a lack of awareness of clinical trials among FHSP participants, suggesting an important area for capacity building and staff development before viable and

  4. Influence of stigma and homophobia on mental health and on the uptake of HIV/sexually transmissible infection services for Cameroonian men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cange, Charles W; LeBreton, Matthew; Billong, Serge; Saylors, Karen; Tamoufe, Ubald; Papworth, Erin; Yomb, Yves; Baral, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) in Cameroon consistently face significant stigma and discrimination. The urban HIV prevalence in MSM is estimated at 35%. This study investigates the effect of stigma, discrimination and alienation on Cameroonian MSM's engagement of the HIV treatment cascade. Qualitative interviews were semi-structured using a guide. Participants in Douala, Ngaoundere, Bamenda, Bertoua and Yaoundé were asked to describe the MSM social and structural context, MSM knowledge of existing HIV-related services in public and MSM-focussed non-governmental organisation (NGO) clinics. Using a codebook, coded text was extracted from 40 transcripts with Microsoft Word Macros. These texts were analysed for recurring themes that were developed into results. There were three main themes that emerged. First, among those MSM participants seeking HIV services, many commonly reported experiences of discrimination and physical violence outside the healthcare setting. Second, a few respondents used services provided by the Ministry of Health and local NGOs. However, most participants observed limited clinical and cultural competency of public clinic staff. Third, MSM declared that lack of social support and healthcare access caused them much stress. Several individuals recounted their alienation greatly discouraged them from seeking HIV prevention, treatment and care services. Community-level and public healthcare-related stigma impacts the mental wellbeing of Cameroonian MSM. Alienation among MSM also represents a common obstacle to the uptake of MSM-oriented HIV/AIDS services. Improving provider cultural and clinical competency among Cameroonian health care workers combined with a broader stigma-reduction intervention for Cameroonian healthcare may increase the uptake of HIV prevention, treatment and care among MSM.

  5. [Mediating effect of self-efficacy in the relationship between anger and functional health of homeless men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su In; Kim, Sunah

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediation of self-efficacy in the relationship between anger and the functional health of homeless men in order to provide a basis for planning nursing interventions to improve the functional health of homeless persons. The participants were 137 homeless men who lived in homeless shelters or visited one center serving free meals for homeless persons in Seoul. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires and analyzed with the SPSS-WIN 20.0 program. The instruments were the Functional Health Pattern Screening Assessment Tool (FHPAST), Self-efficacy Scale (SES), and State-trait Anger Expression Inventory-Korean version (STAXI-K). The mean score for functional health was 2.41. Overall self-efficacy was 70.82. state anger was 16.53, trait anger was 19.54, and anger expression was 25.31. There were signigicant correlations among the 3 variables, functional health, self-efficacy, and anger. Also, self-efficacy had a complete mediating effect in the relationship between anger and functional health. Based on the findings of this study, health management programs focusing on anger management and self-efficacy improvement are highly recommended to promote functional health in homeless persons.

  6. Premarital sexual experience and preferred sources of reproductive health information among young men in Kumbotso, northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, Z; Zubairu, I; Abubakar, I S; Isa, S A; Galadanci, H S; Hadiza, S G; Babam Maryam, A; Babam-Maryam, A; Aliyu, M H; Muktar, H A

    2012-01-01

    Despite well known risks associated with unprotected premarital sex, this phenomenon has not been well explored among young men in rural northern Nigeria. We studied the predictors of premarital sex and preferred sources of sexual and reproductive health information among young unmarried men in Kumbotso, northern Nigeria. A cross section of 400 young men were interviewed using structured questionnaires with mostly closed ended questions. Of the 385 respondents, 39 (10.1%) were sexually experienced. Less than half of respondents (48.7%) used a condom at sexual debut, and an equal proportion reported having multiple sex partners. Only 41.0% of sexually experienced respondents reported subsequent consistent condom use Age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.24-5.20 and educational attainment [AOR = 3.57; 95% CI (1.49-9.10)] were significant predictors of sexual experience. The current versus preferred sources of sexual and reproductive health information included friends (51.3% vs. 93.3%), Islamic school teachers (41.0% vs. 72.7%) and school teachers (8.8% vs. 15.1%). Although the prevalence of premarital sex among young men in this community in northern Nigeria as low, those that did engage in such activity were likely to not use condoms and to have multiple partners. Preferred and trusted sources of information included peers and religious leaders. The findings in this study could be used to develop innovative strategies for reaching young men with accurate sexual and reproductive health information.

  7. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum in men with urethritis attending an urban sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, N; Bradbury, C; Chalker, V; Koh, G C K W; Smit, E; Wilson, S; Watson, J

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) in men with urethritis, attending an urban sexual health clinic, in order to inform screening and treatment policies. Men attending an urban sexual health clinic between June 2011 and January 2012 were evaluated. Urine samples were collected from men with urethritis and tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and TV using transcription-mediated amplification and for MG and UU using polymerase chain reaction. Eighty-three samples were analysed. The prevalence of CT was 33.7% (28/83), GC was 16.8% (14/83), TV was 3.6% (3/83), MG was 12.0% (10/83) and UU was 4.8% (4/83). Fifteen men had recurrent urethritis. Of these, three were found to have had TV, five to have had MG and none to have had UU, at initial presentation. Given the prevalence of MG in this study, there is an urgent need for further larger studies looking at optimal treatment regimens and screening strategies in urethritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Male involvement in maternal healthcare through Community- based Health Planning and Services: the views of the men in rural Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassoumah Bougangue

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to promote maternal health in Ghana has committed the government to extend maternal healthcare services to the door steps of rural families through the community-based Health Planning and Services. Based on the concerns raised in previous studies that male spouses were indifferent towards maternal healthcare, this study sought the views of men on their involvement in maternal healthcare in their respective communities and at the household levels in the various Community-based Health Planning and Services zones in Awutu-Senya West District in the Central Region of Ghana. Methods A qualitative method was employed. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with married men, community health officers, community health volunteers and community leaders. The participants were selected using purposive, quota and snowball sampling techniques. The study used thematic analysis for analysing the data. Results The study shows varying involvement of men, some were directly involved in feminine gender roles; others used their female relatives and co-wives to perform the women's roles that did not have space for them. They were not necessarily indifferent towards maternal healthcare, rather, they were involved in the spaces provided by the traditional gender division of labour. Amongst other things, the perpetuation and reinforcement of traditional gender norms around pregnancy and childbirth influenced the nature and level of male involvement. Conclusions Sustenance of male involvement especially, husbands and CHVs is required at the household and community levels for positive maternal outcomes. Ghana Health Service, health professionals and policy makers should take traditional gender role expectations into consideration in the planning and implementation of maternal health promotion programmes.

  9. Exploring the relationship of emotional intelligence with mental health status in polish unemployed persons – differences between men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopp Katarzyna A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between EI and the state of mental health of unemployed persons. Gender differences were also identified in terms of mental health and its correlation with EI. A sample of 160 Polish unemployed persons aged 35 to 45 years filled in self-descriptive measures of EI and mental health. Significant gender differences were found - unemployed women were characterised by a greater intensity of mental health disorders than unemployed men. EI was negatively correlated with mental health disorders, but the correlations were few and weaker than expected. However, when unemployed persons with a low, average and high EI were compared, it turned out that participants with a low EI were characterised by a significantly worse condition of mental health than participants with a average or high EI.

  10. [Homeless men in inpatient psychiatric treatment--a controlled study. 1: Health status and self assessment at intake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellinghaus, C; Lowens, S; Eikelmann, B; Reker, T

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the objective and the subjectively reported state of health, the social network and the utilisation of mental health services in a representative group of homeless men (n = 50) at time of admission to a psychiatric hospital and compares these results with a control group (matched by diagnosis) of non-homeless men. The BPRS, the SF-12 Health Survey and a neglection index were administered. The main psychiatric diagnosis (ICD-10) were alcohol addiction (n = 29), drug addiction (n = 13), schizophrenia (n = 7) or personality disorder (n = 1). No differences were found according to sociodemographic basis data, but the homeless group had a smaller social network and less financial resources. There was a higher rate of involuntary admission in the homeless group, less contact to mental health services in the weeks before admission, more psychopathological symptoms and more physical neglection. Self-rating of mental and physical health, however, did not differ significantly. There was a positive correlation between thought disturbance and positive self-rating of mental health. The mental and physical health of the homeless patients was markedly worse. Beneath structural barriers symptoms, the extreme distress of their living situation and the decreased insight and motivation for treatment are characteristics of this group of patients which make them difficult to treat.

  11. Judging the difference between attractiveness and health: does exposure to model images influence the judgments made by men and women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D Stephen

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown facial adiposity (apparent weight in the face to be a significant predictor of both attractiveness and health, thus making it an important determinant of mate selection. Studies looking at the relationship between attractiveness and health have shown that individuals differentiate between the two by preferring a lower weight for attractiveness than for health in female faces. However, these studies have either been correlational studies, or have investigated weight perceived from only the face. These differences have been discussed with regard to sociocultural factors such as pressure from parents, peers and also media, which has been seen to have the highest influence. While exposure to media images has been shown to influence women's own-body image, no study has yet directly tested the influence of these factors on people's preferred weight in other women's bodies. Here we examine how a short exposure to images of models influences men's and women's judgments of the most healthy looking and attractive BMI in Malaysian Chinese women's bodies by comparing differences in preferences (for attractiveness and health between groups exposed to images of models of varying attractiveness and body weight. Results indicated that participants preferred a lower weight for attractiveness than for health. Further, women's but not men's preferred BMI for attractiveness, but not health, was influenced by the type of media images to which they were exposed, suggesting that short term exposure to model images affect women's perceptions of attractiveness but not health.

  12. The effect of walnut intake on factors related to prostate and vascular health in older men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Sheila G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tocopherols may protect against prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods We assessed the effect of walnuts, which are rich in tocopherols, on markers of prostate and vascular health in men at risk for prostate cancer. We conducted an 8-week walnut supplement study to examine effects of walnuts on serum tocopherols and prostate specific antigen (PSA. Subjects (n = 21 consumed (in random order their usual diet +/- a walnut supplement (75 g/d that was isocalorically incorporated in their habitual diets. Prior to the supplement study, 5 fasted subjects participated in an acute timecourse experiment and had blood taken at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 8 h after consuming walnuts (75 g. Results During the timecourse experiment, triglycerides peaked at 4 h, and gamma-tocopherol (γ-T increased from 4 to 8 h. Triglyceride – normalized γ-T was two-fold higher (P = 0.01 after 8 versus 4 h. In the supplement study, change from baseline was +0.83 ± 0.52 μmol/L for γ-T, -2.65 ± 1.30 μmol/L for alpha-tocopherol (α-T and -3.49 ± 1.99 for the tocopherol ratio (α-T: γ-T. A linear mixed model showed that, although PSA did not change, the ratio of free PSA:total PSA increased and approached significance (P = 0.07. The α-T: γ-T ratio decreased significantly (P = 0.01, partly reflecting an increase in serum γ-T, which approached significance (P = 0.08. Conclusion The significant decrease in the α-T: γ-T ratio with an increase in serum γ-T and a trend towards an increase in the ratio of free PSA:total PSA following the 8-week supplement study suggest that walnuts may improve biomarkers of prostate and vascular status.

  13. Receipt of Selected Preventive Health Services for Women and Men of Reproductive Age - United States, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazol, Karen; Robbins, Cheryl L; Black, Lindsey I; Ahrens, Katherine A; Daniels, Kimberly; Chandra, Anjani; Vahratian, Anjel; Gavin, Lorrie E

    2017-10-27

    Receipt of key preventive health services among women and men of reproductive age (i.e., 15-44 years) can help them achieve their desired number and spacing of healthy children and improve their overall health. The 2014 publication Providing Quality Family Planning Services: Recommendations of CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs (QFP) establishes standards for providing a core set of preventive services to promote these goals. These services include contraceptive care for persons seeking to prevent or delay pregnancy, pregnancy testing and counseling, basic infertility services for those seeking to achieve pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease (STD) services, and other preconception care and related preventive health services. QFP describes how to provide these services and recommends using family planning and other primary care visits to screen for and offer the full range of these services. This report presents baseline estimates of the use of these preventive services before the publication of QFP that can be used to monitor progress toward improving the quality of preventive care received by women and men of reproductive age. 2011-2013. Three surveillance systems were used to document receipt of preventive health services among women and men of reproductive age as recommended in QFP. The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) collects data on factors that influence reproductive health in the United States since 1973, with a focus on fertility, sexual activity, contraceptive use, reproductive health care, family formation, child care, and related topics. NSFG uses a stratified, multistage probability sample to produce nationally representative estimates for the U.S. household population of women and men aged 15-44 years. This report uses data from the 2011-2013 NSFG. The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) is an ongoing, state- and population-based surveillance system designed to monitor selected maternal behaviors and experiences

  14. Perceived importance of five different health issues for gay and bisexual men: implications for new directions in health education and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H Jonathon; Jimenez, Ruben H; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2013-07-01

    This study assessed the perceived importance of five health issues for gay and bisexual men (N = 660) using time-space sampling in gay bars/clubs and bathhouses in New York City: "HIV & STDs," "Drugs & Alcohol," "Body Image," "Mental Health," and "Smoking." This study compared ratings based on demographic differences, recent substance use, recent sexual risk behavior, and whether or not participants owned a smart device (e.g., "smart" phone, iPad, iPod touch). Contrary to research indicating that gay and bisexual men may be experiencing HIV prevention fatigue, this study identified that HIV and STIs were perceived as most important. Drugs and alcohol and mental health were also rated high, suggesting that providers may be well served to include mental health and drugs and alcohol as part of their comprehensive approach to HIV prevention. A majority of participants (72%) owned a smart device. Smart device owners rated health issues similarly to those who did not, suggesting that such devices may be a useful platform to reach gay and bisexual men for health education and prevention.

  15. Traumatic episodes and mental health effects in young men and women in Rwanda, 17 years after the genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugema, Lawrence; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Krantz, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate mental health effects associated with exposure to trauma in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide period, and over the lifetime, in Rwandan men and women aged 20–35 years. Setting This was a cross-sectional population-based study conducted in the southern province of Rwanda. Data was collected during December 2011 to January 2012. Participants A total population of 917 individuals were included, 440 (48%) men and 477 (52%) women aged 20–35 years. Number of households for inclusion in each village was selected proportional to the total number of households in each selected village. The response rate was 99.8%. Face-to-face interviewing was done by experienced and trained clinical psychologists, following a structured questionnaire. Results Women were slightly less exposed during the genocide period (women 35.4% and men 37.5%; p=0.537), but more women than men were exposed to traumatic episodes over their lifetime (women 83.6%, n=399; men 73.4%, n=323; pgenocide period severely affected men's current mental health status with relative risk (RR) 3.02 (95% CI 1.59 to 5.37) for MDE past and with RR 2.15 (95% CI 1.21 to 3.64) for suicidality. Women's mental health was also affected by trauma experienced in the genocide period but to an even higher extent, by similar trauma experienced in the lifetime with RR 1.91 (95% CI 1.03 to 3.22) for suicidality and RR 1.90 (95% CI 1.34 to 2.42) for generalised anxiety disorder, taking spousal physical/sexual violence into consideration. Conclusions Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and suicidal attempts are prevalent in Rwanda, with rates twice as high in women compared with men. For women, exposure to physical and sexual abuse was independently associated with all these disorders. Early detection of gender-based violence through homes and community interventions is important. PMID:26109109

  16. Traumatic episodes and mental health effects in young men and women in Rwanda, 17 years after the genocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugema, Lawrence; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Krantz, Gunilla

    2015-06-24

    To investigate mental health effects associated with exposure to trauma in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide period, and over the lifetime, in Rwandan men and women aged 20-35 years. This was a cross-sectional population-based study conducted in the southern province of Rwanda. Data was collected during December 2011 to January 2012. A total population of 917 individuals were included, 440 (48%) men and 477 (52%) women aged 20-35 years. Number of households for inclusion in each village was selected proportional to the total number of households in each selected village. The response rate was 99.8%. Face-to-face interv