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Sample records for membrane-derived phagosomes phagosomes

  1. Molecular characterization of phagosomes

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    Desjardins, M.; Celis, J.E.; van Meer, G.; Dieplinger, H.; Jahraus, A.; Griffiths, G.; Huber, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    The transformation of newly formed phagosomes into mature phagolysosomes is a process that involves a complex series of interactions between phagosomes and other vacuolar organelles. The machinery required by phagosomes to mediate these interactions is poorly understood. In this study, we allowed

  2. Autophagosome and phagosome.

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    Deretic, Vojo

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy and phagocytosis are evolutionarily ancient processes functioning in capture and digestion of material found in the cellular interior and exterior, respectively. In their most primordial form, both processes are involved in cellular metabolism and feeding, supplying cells with externally obtained particulate nutrients or using portions of cell's own cytoplasm to generate essential nutrients and energy at times of starvation. Although autophagy and phagocytosis are commonly treated as completely separate biological phenomena, they are topologically similar and can be, at least morphologically, viewed as different manifestations of a spectrum of related processes. Autophagy is the process of sequestering portions of cellular interior (cytosol and intracellular organelles) into a membranous organelle (autophagosome), whereas phagocystosis is its topological equivalent engaged in sequestering cellular exterior. Both autophagosomes and phagosomes mature into acidified, degradative organelles, termed autolysosomes and phagolysosomes, respectively. The basic role of autophagy as a nutritional process, and that of phagocytosis where applicable, has survived in present-day organisms ranging from yeast to man. It has in addition evolved into a variety of specialized processes in metazoans, with a major role in cellular/cytoplasmic homeostasis. In humans, autophagy has been implicated in many health and disease states, including cancer, neurodegeneration, aging and immunity, while phagocytosis plays a role in immunity and tissue homeostasis. Autophagy and phagocytosis cooperate in the latter two processes. In this chapter, we briefly review the regulatory and execution stages of both autophagy and phagocytosis.

  3. A Drosophila Model to Image Phagosome Maturation

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    Douglas A. Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo.

  4. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

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    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  5. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

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    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  6. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

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    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  7. Rab20 regulates phagosome maturation in RAW264 macrophages during Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

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    Youhei Egami

    Full Text Available Rab20, a member of the Rab GTPase family, is known to be involved in membrane trafficking, however its implication in FcγR-mediated phagocytosis is unclear. We examined the spatiotemporal localization of Rab20 during phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (IgG-Es in RAW264 macrophages. By the live-cell imaging of fluorescent protein-fused Rab20, it was shown that Rab20 was transiently associated with the phagosomal membranes. During the early stage of phagosome formation, Rab20 was not localized on the membranes of phagocytic cups, but was gradually recruited to the newly formed phagosomes. Although Rab20 was colocalized with Rab5 to some extent, the association of Rab20 with the phagosomes persisted even after the loss of Rab5 from the phagosomal membranes. Then, Rab20 was colocalized with Rab7 and Lamp1, late endosomal/lysosomal markers, on the internalized phagosomes. Moreover, our analysis of Rab20 mutant expression revealed that the maturation of phagosomes was significantly delayed in cells expressing the GDP-bound mutant Rab20-T19N. These data suggest that Rab20 is an important component of phagosome and regulates the phagosome maturation during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis.

  8. Mycobacterial mutants with defective control of phagosomal acidification.

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    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of mycobacterial infection is associated with an ability to interfere with maturation of the phagosomal compartment after ingestion by macrophages. Identification of the mycobacterial components that contribute to this phenomenon will allow rational design of novel approaches to the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Microarray-based screening of a transposon library was used to identify mutations that influence the fate of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG following uptake by macrophages. A screen based on bacterial survival during a 3-d infection highlighted genes previously implicated in growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages and in mice, together with a number of other virulence genes including a locus encoding virulence-associated membrane proteins and a series of transporter molecules. A second screen based on separation of acidified and non-acidified phagosomes by flow cytometry identified genes involved in mycobacterial control of early acidification. This included the KefB potassium/proton antiport. Mutants unable to control early acidification were significantly attenuated for growth during 6-d infections of macrophages. Early acidification of the phagosome is associated with reduced survival of BCG in macrophages. A strong correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those required for growth of M. tuberculosis in mice. In contrast, very little correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those that are up-regulated during intracellular adaptation of M. tuberculosis. This study has identified targets for interventions to promote immune clearance of tuberculosis infection. The screening technologies demonstrated in this study will be useful to the study of pathogenesis in many other intracellular microorganisms.

  9. Quantitative and dynamic assessment of the contribution of the ER to phagosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touret, Nicolas; Paroutis, Paul; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Harrison, Rene E.; Trombetta, Sergio; Pypaert, Marc; Chow, Amy; Jiang, Aimin; Shaw, James; Yip, Christopher; Moore, Hsiao-Ping; van der Wel, Nicole; Houben, Diane; Peters, Peter J.; de Chastellier, Chantal; Mellman, Ira; Grinstein, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Phagosomes were traditionally thought to originate from an invagination and scission of the plasma membrane to form a distinct intracellular vacuole. An alternative model implicating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a major component of nascent and maturing phagosomes was recently proposed (Gagnon

  10. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes.

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    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-02-11

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrin-based diffusion barrier separates membrane domains enabling the formation of microbiostatic frustrated phagosomes

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    Maxson, Michelle E; Naj, Xenia; O'Meara, Teresa R; Plumb, Jonathan D; Cowen, Leah E

    2018-01-01

    Candida albicans hyphae can reach enormous lengths, precluding their internalization by phagocytes. Nevertheless, macrophages engulf a portion of the hypha, generating incompletely sealed tubular phagosomes. These frustrated phagosomes are stabilized by a thick cuff of F-actin that polymerizes in response to non-canonical activation of integrins by fungal glycan. Despite their continuity, the surface and invaginating phagosomal membranes retain a strikingly distinct lipid composition. PtdIns(4,5)P2 is present at the plasmalemma but is not detectable in the phagosomal membrane, while PtdIns(3)P and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 co-exist in the phagosomes yet are absent from the surface membrane. Moreover, endo-lysosomal proteins are present only in the phagosomal membrane. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed the presence of a diffusion barrier that maintains the identity of the open tubular phagosome separate from the plasmalemma. Formation of this barrier depends on Syk, Pyk2/Fak and formin-dependent actin assembly. Antimicrobial mechanisms can thereby be deployed, limiting the growth of the hyphae. PMID:29553370

  12. Class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p110α regulates phagosome maturation.

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    Emily P Thi

    Full Text Available Of the various phosphatidylinositol 3- kinases (PI3Ks, only the class III enzyme Vps34 has been shown to regulate phagosome maturation. During studies of phagosome maturation in THP-1 cells deficient in class IA PI3K p110α, we discovered that this PI3K isoform is required for vacuole maturation to progress beyond acquisition of Rab7 leading to delivery of lysosomal markers. Bead phagosomes from THP-1 cells acquired p110α and contained PI3P and PI(3,4,5P3; however, p110α and PI(3,4,5P3 levels in phagosomes from p110α knockdown cells were decreased. Phagosomes from p110α knock down cells showed normal acquisition of both Rab5 and EEA-1, but were markedly deficient in the lysosomal markers LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the lysosomal hydrolase, β-galactosidase. Phagosomes from p110α deficient cells also displayed impaired fusion with Texas Red dextran-loaded lysosomes. Despite lacking lysosomal components, phagosomes from p110α deficient cells recruited normal levels of Rab7, Rab-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP and homotypic vacuole fusion and protein sorting (HOPs components Vps41 and Vps16. The latter observations demonstrated that phagosomal Rab7 was active and capable of recruiting effectors involved in membrane fusion. Nevertheless, active Rab7 was not sufficient to bring about the delivery of lysosomal proteins to the maturing vacuole, which is shown for the first time to be dependent on a class I PI3K.

  13. SHIP-1 Increases Early Oxidative Burst and Regulates Phagosome Maturation in Macrophages1

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    Kamen, Lynn A.; Levinsohn, Jonathan; Cadwallader, Amy; Tridandapani, Susheela; Swanson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1 is generally thought to inhibit signaling for Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, the product of its activity, phosphatidylinositol 3,4 bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) has been implicated in activation of the NADPH oxidase. This suggests that SHIP-1 positively regulates generation of reactive oxygen species after phagocytosis. To examine how SHIP-1 activity contributes to Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, we measured and compared phospholipid dynamics, membrane trafficking and the oxidative burst in macrophages from SHIP-1-deficient and wild-type mice. SHIP-1-deficient macrophages showed significantly elevated ratios of PI(3,4,5) P3 to PI(3,4)P2 on phagosomal membranes. Imaging reactive oxygen intermediate activities in phagosomes revealed decreased early NADPH oxidase activity in SHIP-1-deficient macrophages. SHIP-1-deficiency also altered later stages of phagosome maturation, as indicated by the persistent elevation of PI(3)P and the early localization of Rab5a to phagosomes. These direct measurements of individual organelles indicate that phagosomal SHIP-1 enhances the early oxidative burst through localized alteration of the membrane 3′ phosphoinositide composition. PMID:18490750

  14. Identification of Candida glabrata genes involved in pH modulation and modification of the phagosomal environment in macrophages.

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    Lydia Kasper

    Full Text Available Candida glabrata currently ranks as the second most frequent cause of invasive candidiasis. Our previous work has shown that C. glabrata is adapted to intracellular survival in macrophages and replicates within non-acidified late endosomal-stage phagosomes. In contrast, heat killed yeasts are found in acidified matured phagosomes. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the processes leading to inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. We show that phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata cells do not fuse with pre-labeled lysosomes and possess low phagosomal hydrolase activity. Inhibition of acidification occurs independent of macrophage type (human/murine, differentiation (M1-/M2-type or activation status (vitamin D3 stimulation. We observed no differential activation of macrophage MAPK or NFκB signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors after internalization of viable compared to heat killed yeasts, but Syk activation decayed faster in macrophages containing viable yeasts. Thus, delivery of viable yeasts to non-matured phagosomes is likely not triggered by initial recognition events via MAPK or NFκB signaling, but Syk activation may be involved. Although V-ATPase is abundant in C. glabrata phagosomes, the influence of this proton pump on intracellular survival is low since blocking V-ATPase activity with bafilomycin A1 has no influence on fungal viability. Active pH modulation is one possible fungal strategy to change phagosome pH. In fact, C. glabrata is able to alkalinize its extracellular environment, when growing on amino acids as the sole carbon source in vitro. By screening a C. glabrata mutant library we identified genes important for environmental alkalinization that were further tested for their impact on phagosome pH. We found that the lack of fungal mannosyltransferases resulted in severely reduced alkalinization in vitro and in the delivery of C. glabrata to acidified phagosomes. Therefore

  15. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis phagosome is a HLA-I processing competent organelle.

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    Jeff E Grotzke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb resides in a long-lived phagosomal compartment that resists maturation. The manner by which Mtb antigens are processed and presented on MHC Class I molecules is poorly understood. Using human dendritic cells and IFN-gamma release by CD8(+ T cell clones, we examined the processing and presentation pathway for two Mtb-derived antigens, each presented by a distinct HLA-I allele (HLA-Ia versus HLA-Ib. Presentation of both antigens is blocked by the retrotranslocation inhibitor exotoxin A. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that, after reaching the cytosol, both antigens require proteasomal degradation and TAP transport, but differ in the requirement for ER-golgi egress and new protein synthesis. Specifically, presentation by HLA-B8 but not HLA-E requires newly synthesized HLA-I and transport through the ER-golgi. Phenotypic analysis of the Mtb phagosome by flow organellometry revealed the presence of Class I and loading accessory molecules, including TAP and PDI. Furthermore, loaded HLA-I:peptide complexes are present within the Mtb phagosome, with a pronounced bias towards HLA-E:peptide complexes. In addition, protein analysis also reveals that HLA-E is enriched within the Mtb phagosome compared to HLA-A2. Together, these data suggest that the phagosome, through acquisition of ER-localized machinery and as a site of HLA-I loading, plays a vital role in the presentation of Mtb-derived antigens, similar to that described for presentation of latex bead-associated antigens. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of this presentation pathway for an intracellular pathogen. Moreover, these data suggest that HLA-E may play a unique role in the presentation of phagosomal antigens.

  16. Two PI 3-kinases and one PI 3-phosphatase together establish the cyclic waves of phagosomal PtdIns(3P critical for the degradation of apoptotic cells.

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    Nan Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3P is a signaling molecule important for many membrane trafficking events, including phagosome maturation. The level of PtdIns(3P on phagosomes oscillates in two waves during phagosome maturation. However, the physiological significance of such oscillation remains unknown. Currently, the Class III PI 3-kinase (PI3K Vps34 is regarded as the only kinase that produces PtdIns(3P in phagosomal membranes. We report here that, in the nematode C. elegans, the Class II PI3K PIKI-1 plays a novel and crucial role in producing phagosomal PtdIns(3P. PIKI-1 is recruited to extending pseudopods and nascent phagosomes prior to the appearance of PtdIns(3P in a manner dependent on the large GTPase dynamin (DYN-1. PIKI-1 and VPS-34 act in sequence to provide overlapping pools of PtdIns(3P on phagosomes. Inactivating both piki-1 and vps-34 completely abolishes the production of phagosomal PtdIns(3P and disables phagosomes from recruiting multiple essential maturation factors, resulting in a complete arrest of apoptotic-cell degradation. We have further identified MTM-1, a PI 3-phosphatase that antagonizes the activities of PIKI-1 and VPS-34 by down-regulating PtdIns(3P on phagosomes. Remarkably, persistent appearance of phagosomal PtdIns(3P, as a result of inactivating mtm-1, blocks phagosome maturation. Our findings demonstrate that the proper oscillation pattern of PtdIns(3P on phagosomes, programmed by the coordinated activities of two PI3Ks and one PI 3-phosphatase, is critical for phagosome maturation. They further shed light on how the temporally controlled reversible phosphorylation of phosphoinositides regulates the progression of multi-step cellular events.

  17. Single-cell Raman and fluorescence microscopy reveal the association of lipid bodies with phagosomes in leukocytes

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    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2005-01-01

    Cellular imaging techniques based on vibrational spectroscopy have become powerful tools in cell biology because the molecular composition of subcellular compartments can be visualized without the need for labeling. Using high-resolution, nonresonant confocal Raman microscopy on individual cells, we demonstrate here that lipid bodies (LBs) rich in arachidonate as revealed by their Raman spectra associate with latex bead-containing phagosomes in neutrophilic granulocytes. This finding was corroborated in macrophages and in PLB-985 cells, which can be induced to differentiate into neutrophil-like cells, by selective staining of LBs and visualization by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We further show that the accumulation of LBs near phagosomes is mediated at least in part by the flavohemoprotein gp91phox (in which “phox” is phagocyte oxidase), because different LB distributions around phagocytosed latex beads were observed in WT and gp91phox-deficient PLB-985 cells. gp91phox, which accumulates in the phagosomal membrane, is the catalytic subunit of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase, a critical enzyme in the innate immune response. Finally, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy experiments on neutrophils revealed that the LB-phagosome association is transient, similar to the “kiss-and-run” behavior displayed by endosomes involved in phagosome maturation. Because arachidonic acid (AA) has been shown to be involved in NADPH oxidase activation and phagosome maturation in neutrophils and macrophages, respectively, the findings reported here suggest that LBs may provide a reservoir of AA for local activation of these essential leukocyte functions. PMID:16002471

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Controls Phagosomal Acidification by Targeting CISH-Mediated Signaling.

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    Queval, Christophe J; Song, Ok-Ryul; Carralot, Jean-Philippe; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Deloison, Gaspard; Deboosère, Nathalie; Jouny, Samuel; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Delorme, Vincent; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Park, Sei-Jin; Gouveia, Joana Costa; Tomavo, Stanislas; Brosch, Roland; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Yeramian, Edouard; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-09-26

    Pathogens have evolved a range of mechanisms to counteract host defenses, notably to survive harsh acidic conditions in phagosomes. In the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it has been shown that regulation of phagosome acidification could be achieved by interfering with the retention of the V-ATPase complexes at the vacuole. Here, we present evidence that M. tuberculosis resorts to yet another strategy to control phagosomal acidification, interfering with host suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) protein functions. More precisely, we show that infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis leads to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion, inducing STAT5-mediated expression of cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH), which selectively targets the V-ATPase catalytic subunit A for ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Consistently, we show that inhibition of CISH expression leads to reduced replication of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Our findings further broaden the molecular understanding of mechanisms deployed by bacteria to survive. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Controls Phagosomal Acidification by Targeting CISH-Mediated Signaling

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    Christophe J. Queval

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens have evolved a range of mechanisms to counteract host defenses, notably to survive harsh acidic conditions in phagosomes. In the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it has been shown that regulation of phagosome acidification could be achieved by interfering with the retention of the V-ATPase complexes at the vacuole. Here, we present evidence that M. tuberculosis resorts to yet another strategy to control phagosomal acidification, interfering with host suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS protein functions. More precisely, we show that infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis leads to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF secretion, inducing STAT5-mediated expression of cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH, which selectively targets the V-ATPase catalytic subunit A for ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Consistently, we show that inhibition of CISH expression leads to reduced replication of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Our findings further broaden the molecular understanding of mechanisms deployed by bacteria to survive.

  20. Decoupling internalization, acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion during phagocytosis of InlA coated beads in epithelial cells.

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    Craig D Blanchette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple method to measure and decouple particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK and Caco-2 epithelial cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA, a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated phagocytosis. We were able to independently measure the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads with antibody quenching, a pH sensitive dye and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we exploited the phagosomal acidification process to demonstrate an additional, real-time method for tracking bead binding, internalization and phagosomal acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using this method, we found that the time scales for internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion ranged from 23-32 min, 3-4 min and 74-120 min, respectively, for MDCK and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Both the static and real-time methods developed here are expected to be readily and broadly applicable, as they simply

  1. Phagosome maturation in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium: the presence of RILP, Rab7 and LAMP-2 homologues

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    E Wyroba

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Phagosome maturation is a complex process enabling degradation of internalised particles. Our data obtained at the gene, protein and cellular level indicate that the set of components involved in this process and known up to now in mammalian cells is functioning in unicellular eukaryote. Rab7-interacting partners: homologues of its effector RILP (Rab-interacting lysosomal protein and LAMP-2 (lysosomal membrane protein 2 as well as a7 subunit of the 26S proteasome were revealed in Paramecium phagolysosomal compartment. We identified the gene/transcript fragments encoding RILP-related proteins (RILP1 and RILP2 in Paramecium by PCR/RT-PCR and sequencing. The deduced amino acid sequences of RILP1 and RILP2 show 60.5% and 58.3% similarity, respectively, to the region involved in regulating of lysosomal morphology and dynein-dynactin recruitment of human RILP. RILP colocalised with Rab7 in Paramecium lysosomes and at phagolysosomal membrane during phagocytosis of both the latex beads and bacteria. In the same compartment LAMP-2 was present and its expression during latex internalisation was 2.5-fold higher than in the control when P2 protein fractions (100 000 x g of equal load were quantified by immunoblotting. LAMP-2 crossreacting polypeptide of ~106 kDa was glycosylated as shown by fluorescent and Western analysis of the same blot preceded by PNGase F treatment. The a7 subunit of 26S proteasome was detected close to the phagosomal membrane in the small vesicles, in some of which it colocalised with Rab7. Immunoblotting confirmed presence of RILPrelated polypeptide and a7 subunit of 26S proteasome in Paramecium protein fractions. These results suggest that Rab7, RILP and LAMP-2 may be involved in phagosome maturation in Paramecium.

  2. Coin Tossing Explains the Activity of Opposing Microtubule Motors on Phagosomes.

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    Sanghavi, Paulomi; D'Souza, Ashwin; Rai, Ashim; Rai, Arpan; Padinhatheeri, Ranjith; Mallik, Roop

    2018-05-07

    How the opposing activity of kinesin and dynein motors generates polarized distribution of organelles inside cells is poorly understood and hotly debated [1, 2]. Possible explanations include stochastic mechanical competition [3, 4], coordinated regulation by motor-associated proteins [5-7], mechanical activation of motors [8], and lipid-induced organization [9]. Here, we address this question by using phagocytosed latex beads to generate early phagosomes (EPs) that move bidirectionally along microtubules (MTs) in an in vitro assay [9]. Dynein/kinesin activity on individual EPs is recorded as real-time force generation of the motors against an optical trap. Activity of one class of motors frequently coincides with, or is rapidly followed by opposite motors. This leads to frequent and rapid reversals of EPs in the trap. Remarkably, the choice between dynein and kinesin can be explained by the tossing of a coin. Opposing motors therefore appear to function stochastically and independently of each other, as also confirmed by observing no effect on kinesin function when dynein is inhibited on the EPs. A simple binomial probability calculation based on the geometry of EP-microtubule contact explains the observed activity of dynein and kinesin on phagosomes. This understanding of intracellular transport in terms of a hypothetical coin, if it holds true for other cargoes, provides a conceptual framework to explain the polarized localization of organelles inside cells. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The SecA2 pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exports effectors that work in concert to arrest phagosome and autophagosome maturation.

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    Zulauf, Katelyn E; Sullivan, Jonathan Tabb; Braunstein, Miriam

    2018-04-30

    To subvert host defenses, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) avoids being delivered to degradative phagolysosomes in macrophages by arresting the normal host process of phagosome maturation. Phagosome maturation arrest by Mtb involves multiple effectors and much remains unknown about this important aspect of Mtb pathogenesis. The SecA2 dependent protein export system is required for phagosome maturation arrest and consequently growth of Mtb in macrophages. To better understand the role of the SecA2 pathway in phagosome maturation arrest, we identified two effectors exported by SecA2 that contribute to this process: the phosphatase SapM and the kinase PknG. Then, utilizing the secA2 mutant of Mtb as a platform to study effector functions, we identified specific steps in phagosome maturation inhibited by SapM and/or PknG. By identifying a histidine residue that is essential for SapM phosphatase activity, we confirmed for the first time that the phosphatase activity of SapM is required for its effects on phagosome maturation in macrophages. We further demonstrated that SecA2 export of SapM and PknG contributes to the ability of Mtb to replicate in macrophages. Finally, we extended our understanding of the SecA2 pathway, SapM, and PknG by revealing that their contribution goes beyond preventing Mtb delivery to mature phagolysosomes and includes inhibiting Mtb delivery to autophagolysosomes. Together, our results revealed SapM and PknG to be two effectors exported by the SecA2 pathway of Mtb with distinct as well as cumulative effects on phagosome and autophagosome maturation. Our results further reveal that Mtb must have additional mechanisms of limiting acidification of the phagosome, beyond inhibiting recruitment of the V-ATPase proton pump to the phagosome, and they indicate differences between effects of Mtb on phagosome and autophagosome maturation.

  4. Molecular cloning of Rab5 (ApRab5) in Aiptasia pulchella and its retention in phagosomes harboring live zooxanthellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chyuan; Cheng, Ying-Min; Hong, Min-Chang; Fang, Lee-Shing

    2004-11-19

    The intracellular association of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) with marine cnidarians is the very foundation of the highly productive and diversified coral reef ecosystems. To reveal its underlying molecular mechanisms, we previously cloned ApRab7, a Rab7 homologue of the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, and demonstrated its selective exclusion from phagosomes containing live zooxanthellae, but not from those containing either dead or photosynthesis-impaired algae. In this study, Rab5 was characterized, due to its key role in endocytosis and phagocytosis acting upstream of Rab7. The Aiptasia Rab5 homologue (ApRab5) is 79.5% identical to human Rab5C and contains all Rab-specific signature motifs. Subcellular fractionation study showed that ApRab5 is mainly cytosolic. EGFP reporter and phagocytosis studies indicated that membrane-associated ApRab5 is present in early endocytic and phagocytic compartments, and is able to promote their fusion. Significantly, immunofluorescence study showed that the majority of phagosomes containing either resident or newly internalized live zooxanthellae were labeled with ApRab5, while those containing either heat-killed or photosynthesis-impaired algae were mostly negative for ApRab5 staining whereas the opposite was observed for ApRab7. We propose that active phagosomal retention of ApRab5 is part of the mechanisms employed by live zooxanthellae to: (1) persist inside their host cells and (2) exclude ApRab7 from their phagosomes, thereby, establishing and/or maintaining an endosymbiotic relationship with their cnidarian hosts.

  5. Molecular cloning of Rab5 (ApRab5) in Aiptasia pulchella and its retention in phagosomes harboring live zooxanthellae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.-C.; Cheng, Y.-M; Hong, M.-C.; Fang, L.-S.

    2004-01-01

    The intracellular association of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) with marine cnidarians is the very foundation of the highly productive and diversified coral reef ecosystems. To reveal its underlying molecular mechanisms, we previously cloned ApRab7, a Rab7 homologue of the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, and demonstrated its selective exclusion from phagosomes containing live zooxanthellae, but not from those containing either dead or photosynthesis-impaired algae. In this study, Rab5 was characterized, due to its key role in endocytosis and phagocytosis acting upstream of Rab7. The Aiptasia Rab5 homologue (ApRab5) is 79.5% identical to human Rab5C and contains all Rab-specific signature motifs. Subcellular fractionation study showed that ApRab5 is mainly cytosolic. EGFP reporter and phagocytosis studies indicated that membrane-associated ApRab5 is present in early endocytic and phagocytic compartments, and is able to promote their fusion. Significantly, immunofluorescence study showed that the majority of phagosomes containing either resident or newly internalized live zooxanthellae were labeled with ApRab5, while those containing either heat-killed or photosynthesis-impaired algae were mostly negative for ApRab5 staining whereas the opposite was observed for ApRab7. We propose that active phagosomal retention of ApRab5 is part of the mechanisms employed by live zooxanthellae to: (1) persist inside their host cells and (2) exclude ApRab7 from their phagosomes, thereby, establishing and/or maintaining an endosymbiotic relationship with their cnidarian hosts

  6. Molecular identification of Rab7 (ApRab7) in Aiptasia pulchella and its exclusion from phagosomes harboring zooxanthellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chyuan; Cheng, Ying-Min; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Kuo, Cham-En; Fang, Lee-Shing

    2003-08-29

    The establishment and maintenance of the intracellular association between marine cnidarians and their symbiotic microalgae is essential to the well being of coral reef ecosystems; however, little is known concerning its underlying molecular mechanisms. In light of the critical roles of the small GTPase, Rab7, as a key regulator of vesicular trafficking, we cloned and characterized the Rab7 protein in the endosymbiosis system between the sea anemone, Aiptasia pulchella and its algal symbiont, Symbiodinium spp. The Aiptasia homologue of Rab7 proteins, ApRab7 is 88% identical to human Rab7 protein and contains all Rab-specific signature motifs. Results of EGFP reporter analysis, protein fractionation, and immunocytochemistry support that ApRab7 is located in late endocytic and phagocytic compartments and is able to promote their fusion. Significantly, the majority of phagosomes containing live symbionts that either have taken long residency in, or were newly internalized by Aiptasia digestive cells did not contain detectable levels of ApRab7, while most phagosomes containing either heat-killed or photosynthesis-impaired symbionts were positive for ApRab7 staining. Overall, our data suggest that live algal symbionts persist inside their host cells by actively excluding ApRab7 from their phagosomes, and thereby, establish and/or maintain an endosymbiotic relationship with their cnidarian hosts.

  7. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Rac1 switching at the right time and location is essential for Fcγ receptor-mediated phagosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yuka; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Ikawa, Akira; Kawamoto, Kyoko; Egami, Youhei; Araki, Nobukazu

    2017-08-01

    Lamellipodia are sheet-like cell protrusions driven by actin polymerization mainly through Rac1, a GTPase molecular switch. In Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (IgG-Es), Rac1 activation is required for lamellipodial extension along the surface of IgG-Es. However, the significance of Rac1 deactivation in phagosome formation is poorly understood. Our live-cell imaging and electron microscopy revealed that RAW264 macrophages expressing a constitutively active Rac1 mutant showed defects in phagocytic cup formation, while lamellipodia were formed around IgG-Es. Because activated Rac1 reduced the phosphorylation levels of myosin light chains, failure of the cup formation is probably due to inhibition of actin/myosin II contractility. Reversible photo-manipulation of the Rac1 switch in macrophages fed with IgG-Es could phenocopy two lamellipodial motilities: outward-extension and cup-constriction by Rac1 ON and OFF, respectively. In conjunction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging of Rac1 activity, we provide a novel mechanistic model of phagosome formation spatiotemporally controlled by Rac1 switching within a phagocytic cup. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Transfer of phagocytosed particles to the parasitophorous vacuole of Leishmania mexicana is a transient phenomenon preceding the acquisition of annexin I by the phagosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H L; Schaible, U E; Ernst, J D; Russell, D G

    1997-01-01

    The eukaryotic intracellular pathogen Leishmania mexicana resides inside macrophages contained within a membrane bound parasitophorous vacuole which, as it matures, acquires the characteristics of a late endosomal compartment. This study reports the selectivity of fusion of this compartment with other particle containing vacuoles. Phagosomes containing zymosan or live Listeria monocytogenes rapidly fused with L. mexicana parasitophorous vacuoles, while those containing latex beads or heat killed L. monocytogenes failed to do so. Fusigenicity of phagosomes was not primarily dependent on the receptor utilized for ingestion, as opsonization with defined ligands could not overcome the exclusion of either latex beads or heat killed organisms. However modulation of intracellular pH by pharmacological agents such as chloroquine and ammonium chloride increased delivery of live Listeria and also induced transfer of previously excluded particles. The absence of fusion correlated with the acquisition of annexin I, a putative lysosomal targeting, molecule, on the phagosome membrane. We propose that the acquisition of cellular membrane constituents such as annexin I during phagosome maturation can ultimately direct the fusion pathway of the vesicles formed and have described a model system to further document changes in vesicle fusigenicity within cells.

  10. aprABC: A Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex-specific locus that modulates pH-driven adaptation to the macrophage phagosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitch, Robert B.; Rohde, Kyle H.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Russell, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Following phagocytosis by macrophages, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) senses the intracellular environment and remodels its gene expression for growth in the phagosome. We have identified an Acid and Phagosome Regulated (aprABC) locus that is unique to the Mtb complex and whose gene expression is induced during growth in acidic environments in vitro and in macrophages. Using the aprA promoter, we generated a strain that exhibits high levels of inducible fluorescence in response to growth in acidic medium in vitro and in macrophages. aprABC expression is dependent on the two-component regulator phoPR, linking phoPR signaling to pH sensing. Deletion of the aprABC locus causes defects in gene expression that impact aggregation, intracellular growth, and the relative levels of storage and cell wall lipids. We propose a model where phoPR senses the acidic pH of the phagosome and induces aprABC expression to fine-tune processes unique for intracellular adaptation of Mtb complex bacteria. PMID:21401735

  11. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Modulate Antigen Cross-Processing via Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Alkalinization of Phagosomal Compartment in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Battisti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the only antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and cross-prime antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Their functionality is a requirement for the induction and maintenance of long-lasting cancer immunity. Albeit intensively investigated, the in vivo mechanisms underlying efficient antigen cross-processing and presentation are not fully understood. Several pieces of evidence indicate that antigen transfer to DCs mediated by microvesicles (MVs enhances antigen immunogenicity. This mechanism is also relevant for cross-presentation of those tumor-associated glycoproteins such as MUC1 that are blocked in HLA class II compartment when internalized by DCs as soluble molecules. Here, we present pieces of evidence that the internalization of tumor-derived MVs modulates antigen-processing machinery of DCs. Employing MVs derived from ovarian cancer ascites fluid and established tumor cell lines, we show that MV uptake modifies DC phagosomal microenvironment, triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation and early alkalinization. Indeed, tumor MVs carry radical species and the MV uptake by DCs counteracts the chemically mediated acidification of the phagosomal compartment. Further pieces of evidence suggest that efficacious antigen cross-priming of the MUC1 antigen carried by the tumor MVs results from the early signaling induced by MV internalization and the function of the antigen-processing machinery of DCs. These results strongly support the hypothesis that tumor-derived MVs impact antigen immunogenicity by tuning the antigen-processing machinery of DCs, besides being carrier of tumor antigens. Furthermore, these findings have important implications for the exploitation of MVs as antigenic cell-free immunogen for DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  12. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  13. The Legionella Kinase LegK2 Targets the ARP2/3 Complex To Inhibit Actin Nucleation on Phagosomes and Allow Bacterial Evasion of the Late Endocytic Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michard, Céline; Sperandio, Daniel; Baïlo, Nathalie; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; LeClaire, Lawrence; Chadeau-Argaud, Elise; Pombo-Grégoire, Isabel; Hervet, Eva; Vianney, Anne; Gilbert, Christophe; Faure, Mathias; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of legionellosis, replicates within phagocytic cells. Crucial to biogenesis of the replicative vacuole is the Dot/Icm type 4 secretion system, which translocates a large number of effectors into the host cell cytosol. Among them is LegK2, a protein kinase that plays a key role in Legionella infection. Here, we identified the actin nucleator ARP2/3 complex as a target of LegK2. LegK2 phosphorylates the ARPC1B and ARP3 subunits of the ARP2/3 complex. LegK2-dependent ARP2/3 phosphorylation triggers global actin cytoskeleton remodeling in cells, and it impairs actin tail formation by Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known ARP2/3-dependent process. During infection, LegK2 is addressed to the Legionella-containing vacuole surface and inhibits actin polymerization on the phagosome, as revealed by legK2 gene inactivation. Consequently, LegK2 prevents late endosome/lysosome association with the phagosome and finally contributes to remodeling of the bacterium-containing phagosome into a replicative niche. The inhibition of actin polymerization by LegK2 and its effect on endosome trafficking are ARP2/3 dependent since it can be phenocopied by a specific chemical inhibitor of the ARP2/3 complex. Thus, LegK2-ARP2/3 interplay highlights an original mechanism of bacterial virulence with an unexpected role in local actin remodeling that allows bacteria to control vesicle trafficking in order to escape host defenses. PMID:25944859

  14. Lysophosphatidylcholine Promotes Phagosome Maturation and Regulates Inflammatory Mediator Production Through the Protein Kinase A–Phosphatidylinositol 3 Kinase–p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway During Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mouse Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Ji Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by the infectious agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Mtb has various survival strategies, including blockade of phagosome maturation and inhibition of antigen presentation. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC is a major phospholipid component of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and is involved in various cellular responses, such as activation of second messengers and bactericidal activity in neutrophils. In this study, macrophages were infected with a low infectious dose of Mtb and treated with LPC to investigate the bactericidal activity of LPC against Mtb. In macrophages infected with Mtb strain, H37Ra or H37Rv, LPC suppressed bacterial growth; however, this effect was suppressed in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs isolated from G2A (a G protein-coupled receptor involved in some LPC actions knockout mice. LPC also promoted phagosome maturation via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-mediated reactive oxygen species production and intracellular Ca2+ release during Mtb infection. In addition, LPC induced increased levels of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β in Mtb-infected macrophages. Protein kinase A (PKA-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β suppressed activation of NF-κB in LPC-treated macrophages during Mtb infection, leading to decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that LPC can effectively control Mtb growth by promoting phagosome maturation via cAMP-induced activation of the PKA–PI3K–p38 MAPK pathway. Moreover, LPC can regulate excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with bacterial infection of macrophages.

  15. DMPD: Linking inflammasome activation and phagosome maturation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  16. Measurement of bacterial capture and phagosome maturation of Kupffer cells by intravital microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surewaard, Bas G.J.; Kubes, Paul

    2017-01-01

    It is central to the field of bacterial pathogenesis to define how bacteria are killed by phagocytic cells. During phagocytosis, the microbe is localized to the phagolysosome where crucial defense mechanisms such as acidification and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are initiated. This

  17. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of

  18. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  19. TLR signals induce phagosomal MHC-I delivery from the endosomal recycling compartment to allow cross-presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair-Gupta, Priyanka; Baccarini, Alessia; Tung, Navpreet; Seyffer, Fabian; Florey, Oliver; Huang, Yunjie; Banerjee, Meenakshi; Overholtzer, Michael; Roche, Paul A.; Tampé, Robert; Brown, Brian D.; Amsen, Derk; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Blander, J. Magarian

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pathway for MHC class I (MHC-I) presentation in dendritic cells enables cross-presentation of peptides derived from phagocytosed microbes, infected cells, or tumor cells to CD8 T cells. How these peptides intersect with MHC-I molecules remains poorly

  20. Staphylococcus aureus ?-Toxin-Dependent Induction of Host Cell Death by Membrane-Derived Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Thay, Bernard; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-dependent induction of host cell death by membrane-derived vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Thay

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs, which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity.

  2. Metabolism of periplasmic membrane-derived oligosaccharides by the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, E.G.; McCabe, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane-derived oligosaccharides (MDO), a class of osmotically active carbohydrates, are the major organic solutes present in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and many other gram-negative bacteria when cells are grown in a medium of low osmolarity. Analyses of growing cells of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, a gram-negative predator of other bacteria, have confirmed that they also synthesize a characteristic MDO-like class of oligosaccharides. The natural growth environment of bdellovibrios is the periplasm of other gram-negative bacteria. Because of this location, prey cell MDO constitute a potential source of organic nutrients for growing bdellovibrios. Using cells of E. coli whose MDO were 3 H labeled, we examined the extent to which B. bacteriovorus 109J metabolizes these prey cell components. Interestingly, there was neither significant degradation nor incorporation of prey cell MDO by bdellovibrios during the course of their intracellular growth. In fact, bdellovibrios had little capability either to degrade extracellular MDO that was made available to them or to transport glucose, the major monomeric constituent of prey cell MDO. Instead, periplasmic MDO were irreversibly lost to the extracellular environment during the period of bdellovibrio attack and penetration. Thus, although prey cell periplasmic proteins are retained, other important periplasmic components are released early in the bdellovibrio growth cycle. The loss of these MDO may aid in the destabilization of the prey cell plasma membrane, increasing the availability of cytoplasmic constituents to the periplasmic bdellovibrio

  3. Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles that induce host cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Gurung

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles that play a role in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. However, little is known about the membrane-derived vesicles (MVs produced by gram-positive bacteria. The present study examined the production of MVs from Staphylococcus aureus and investigated the delivery of MVs to host cells and subsequent cytotoxicity. Four S. aureus strains tested, two type strains and two clinical isolates, produced spherical nanovesicles during in vitro culture. MVs were also produced during in vivo infection of a clinical S. aureus isolate in a mouse pneumonia model. Proteomic analysis showed that 143 different proteins were identified in the S. aureus-derived MVs. S. aureus MVs were interacted with the plasma membrane of host cells via a cholesterol-rich membrane microdomain and then delivered their component protein A to host cells within 30 min. Intact S. aureus MVs induced apoptosis of HEp-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysed MVs neither delivered their component into the cytosol of host cells nor induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this study is the first report that S. aureus MVs are an important vehicle for delivery of bacterial effector molecules to host cells.

  4. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes Derived from Tröger's Base-Based Microporous Polyimide for Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenggong; Ren, Huiting; Zhang, Shenxiang; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Jian

    2018-03-09

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS)-based membranes have attracted great attention because of their outstanding gas-separation performance. The polymer precursor is a key point for the preparation of high-performance CMS membranes. In this work, a microporous polyimide precursor containing a Tröger's base unit was used for the first time to prepare CMS membranes. By optimizing the pyrolysis procedure and the soaking temperature, three TB-CMS membranes were obtained. Gas-permeation tests revealed that the comprehensive gas-separation performance of the TB-CMS membranes was greatly enhanced relative to that of most state-of-the-art CMS membranes derived from polyimides reported so far. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Allogeneic amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cell transplantation in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia

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    Kimura M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Amniotic membrane contains a multipotential stem cell population and is expected to possess the machinery to regulate immunological reactions. We investigated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (AMSC transplantation in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia as a preclinical trial. Methods. Porcine AMSCs were isolated from amniotic membranes obtained by cesarean section just before delivery and were cultured to increase their numbers before transplantation. Chronic myocardial ischemia was induced by implantation of an ameroid constrictor around the left circumflex coronary artery. Four weeks after ischemia induction, nine swine were assigned to undergo either allogeneic AMSC transplantation or normal saline injection. Functional analysis was performed by echocardiography, and histological examinations were carried out by immunohistochemistry 4 weeks after AMSC transplantation. Results. Echocardiography demonstrated that left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly improved and left ventricular dilatation was well attenuated 4 weeks after AMSC transplantation. Histological assessment showed a significant reduction in percentage of fibrosis in the AMSC transplantation group. Injected allogeneic green fluorescent protein (GFP-expressing AMSCs were identified in the immunocompetent host heart without the use of any immunosuppressants 4 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry revealed that GFP colocalized with cardiac troponin T and cardiac troponin I. Conclusions. We have demonstrated that allogeneic AMSC transplantation produced histological and functional improvement in the impaired myocardium in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia. The transplanted allogeneic AMSCs survived without the use of any immunosuppressants and gained cardiac phenotype through either their transdifferentiation or cell fusion.

  6. Biocompatibility of quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS ) in human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongping; Zeng, Guangwei; Wang, Caie; Wang, Huasheng; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia; Li, Dongpeng; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-06-01

    Amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAM-dMSCs) are a potential source of mesenchymal stem cells which could be used to repair skin damage. The use of mesenchymal stem cells to repair skin damage requires safe, effective and biocompatible agents to evaluate the effectiveness of the result. Quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS are semiconductor nanocrystals with broad excitation and narrow emission spectra, which have been considered as a new chemical and fluorescent substance for non-invasively labeling different cells in vitro and in vivo. This study investigated the cytotoxic effects of QDs on hAM-dMSCs at different times following labeling. Using 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 μL between quantum dots, labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells were collected on days 1, 2 and 4 and observed morphological changes, performed an MTT cell growth assay and flow cytometry for mesenchymal stem cells molecular markers. Quantum dot concentration 0.75 μg/mL labeled under a fluorescence microscope, cell morphology was observed, The MTT assay showed cells in the proliferative phase. Flow cytometry expression CD29, CD31, CD34, CD44, CD90, CD105 and CD106. Within a certain range of concentrations between quantum dots labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells has good biocompatibility.

  7. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Resch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS, the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response.

  8. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic

  9. Mallik, Prof. Roop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Molecular Motors, Phagosome Dynamics, Lipid Droplets, Triglyceride Secretion from Liver Address: Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (022) 2278 2702. Residence: (022) 2280 4703. Fax: (022) ...

  10. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Winfried; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhaeufl, Martin; Haeussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 μm geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs

  11. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Winfried E-mail: moeller@gsf.de; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhaeufl, Martin; Haeussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-07-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 {mu}m geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs.

  12. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Localization of CORO1A in the Macrophages Containing Mycobacterium leprae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Nakata, Noboru; Ishii, Norihisa; Makino, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacteria have acquired an intracellular lifestyle within the macrophage, which is best exemplified by the enlarged infected histiocytes seen in lepromatous leprosy. To survive within the cell, mycobacteria must escape intracellular bactericidal mechanisms. In a study of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (M. bovis BCG) infection, it was shown that the host protein, CORO1A, also known as tryptophan aspartate-containing coat protein (TACO), accumulates on the phagosomal membrane, resulting in inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and thus augmenting intracellular survival. In this study, we show that CORO1A strongly localizes on the membrane of phagosomes that contain Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), where Toll-like receptor 2 was also visualized by immunostaining. When cultured macrophages were infected with M. leprae, CORO1A recruitment from the plasma membrane to the phagosomal membrane was observed. Moderate to strong CORO1A retention was observed in late lesions that contained foamy histiocytes, in which M. leprae were difficult to detect by acid-fast staining. These results suggest that components accumulating within the phagosome rather than viable bacilli are responsible for the retention of CORO1A, and that there is also a bactericidal mechanism in the macrophage that might counter the effects of CORO1A

  14. Decoupling Internalization, Acidification and Phagosmal-Endosomal/Iysosomal Phagocytosis of Internalin A coated Beads in epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchette, C D; Woo, Y; Thomas, C; Shen, N; Sulchek, T A; Hiddessen, A L

    2008-12-22

    Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established, and in several cases, it was treated as a one-step process. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple and novel method to decouple and accurately measure particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA), a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated internalization. We achieved independent measurements of the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads) with antibody quenching, pH sensitive dyes and endosomal/lysosomal dyes, as follows: the rate of InlA bead internalization was measured via antibody quenching of a pH independent dye (Alexa488) conjugated to InlA-beads, the rate at which phagosomes containing internalized InlA beads became acidified was measured using a pH dependent dye (FITC) conjugated to the beads and the rate of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was measured using a combination of unlabeled InlA-beads and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we also exploited the phagosomal acidification

  15. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  16. Activation-Inactivation Cycling of Rab35 and ARF6 Is Required for Phagocytosis of Zymosan in RAW264 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Egami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis of zymosan by phagocytes is a widely used model of microbial recognition by the innate immune system. Live-cell imaging showed that fluorescent protein-fused Rab35 accumulated in the membranes of phagocytic cups and then dissociated from the membranes of newly formed phagosomes. By our novel pull-down assay for Rab35 activity, we found that Rab35 is deactivated immediately after zymosan internalization into the cells. Phagosome formation was inhibited in cells expressing the GDP- or GTP-locked Rab35 mutant. Moreover, the simultaneous expression of ACAP2—a Rab35 effector protein—with GTP-locked Rab35 or the expression of plasma membrane-targeted ACAP2 showed a marked inhibitory effect on phagocytosis through ARF6 inactivation by the GAP activity of ACAP2. ARF6, a substrate for ACAP2, was also localized on the phagocytic cups and dissociated from the membranes of internalized phagosomes. In support of the microscopic observations, ARF6-GTP pull-down experiments showed that ARF6 is transiently activated during phagosome formation. Furthermore, the expression of GDP- or GTP-locked ARF6 mutants also suppresses the uptake of zymosan. These data suggest that the activation-inactivation cycles of Rab35 and ARF6 are required for the uptake of zymosan and that ACAP2 is an important component that links Rab35/ARF6 signaling during phagocytosis of zymosan.

  17. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  18. Downregulation of host tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Reddy Gogulamudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of mammalian hosts. Promastigotes of Leishmania are internalized by macrophages and transformed into amastigotes in phagosomes, and replicate in phagolysosomes. Phagosomal maturation arrest is known to play a central role in the survival of pathogenic Leishmania within activated macrophages. Recently, tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene has been recognized as playing a crucial role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process. We postulated that a similar association of TACO gene with phagosomes would prevent the vacuole from maturation in the case of Leishmania. In this study we attempted to define the effect of TACO gene downregulation on the uptake/survival of Leishmania donovani intracellularly, by treatment with Vitamin D3/Retinoic acid (RA & Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA/Retinoic acid (RA combinations in human THP-1 macrophages (in vitro. Treatment with these molecules downregulated the TACO gene in macrophages, resulting in reduced parasite load and marked reduction of disease progression in L. donovani infected macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that TACO gene downregulation may play a role in subverting macrophage machinery in establishing the L.donovani replicative niche inside the host. Our study is the first to highlight the importantrole of the TACO gene in Leishmania entry, and to identify TACO gene downregulation as potential drug target against leishmaniasis.

  19. Chronic Granulomatous Disease: The European Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. Merlijn; van Koppen, Elsbeth; Ahlin, Anders; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Bernatowska, Ewa; Corbeel, Lucien; Español, Teresa; Fischer, Alain; Kurenko-Deptuch, Magdalena; Mouy, Richard; Petropoulou, Theoni; Roesler, Joachim; Seger, Reinhard; Stasia, Marie-José; Valerius, Niels H.; Weening, Ron S.; Wolach, Baruch; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2009-01-01

    CGD is an immunodeficiency caused by deletions or mutations in genes that encode subunits of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase complex. Normally, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex in phagosomes of certain phagocytic cells leads to a "respiratory burst'', essential for the clearance of phagocytosed

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease: the European experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J.M.; van Koppen, E.; Åhlin, A.; Belohradsky, B.H.; Bernatowska, E.; Corbeel, L.; Español, T.; Fischer, A.; Kurenko-Deptuch, M.; Mouy, R.; Petropoulou, T.; Roesler, J.; Seger, R.; Stasia, M.J.; Valerius, N.H.; Weening, R.S.; Wolach, B.; Roos, D.; Kuijpers, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    CGD is an immunodeficiency caused by deletions or mutations in genes that encode subunits of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase complex. Normally, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex in phagosomes of certain phagocytic cells leads to a "respiratory burst'', essential for the clearance of phagocytosed

  1. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Connor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH.

  2. Aluminium based adjuvants and their effects on mitochondria and lysosomes of phagocytosing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Lars; Exley, Christopher; Darabi, Anna; Sandén, Emma; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Aluminium oxyhydroxide, Al(OH)3 is one of few compounds approved as an adjuvant in human vaccines. However, the mechanism behind its immune stimulating properties is still poorly understood. In vitro co-culture of an aluminium adjuvant and the human monocytic cell line THP-1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Inhibition occurred at concentrations of adjuvant several times lower than would be found at the injection site using a vaccine formulation containing an aluminium adjuvant. Based on evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, THP-1 cells showed no mitochondrial rupture after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant, instead an increase in mitochondrial activity was seen. The THP-1 cells are phagocytosing cells and after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant the phagosomal pathway was obstructed. Primary or early phagosomes mature into phagolysosomes with an internal pH of 4.5 - 5 and carry a wide variety of hydrolysing enzymes. Co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant yielded a reduced level of acidic vesicles and cathepsin L activity, a proteolytic enzyme of the phagolysosomes, was almost completely inhibited. THP-1 cells are an appropriate in vitro model in order to investigate the mechanism behind the induction of a phagocytosing antigen presenting cell into an inflammatory cell by aluminium adjuvants. Much information will be gained by investigating the phagosomal pathway and what occurs inside the phagosomes and to elucidate the ultimate fate of phagocytosed aluminium particles. © 2013.

  3. Efferocytosis is impaired in Gaucher macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Grey, Richard J; Kirby, Martha; Anderson, Stacie; Lopez, Grisel; Sidransky, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylceramide-laden macrophages resulting from impaired digestion of aged erythrocytes or apoptotic leukocytes. Studies of macrophages from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotypes N370S/N370S, N370S/L444P or N370S/c.84dupG revealed that Gaucher macrophages have impaired efferocytosis resulting from reduced levels of p67 phox and Rab7. The decreased Rab7 expression leads to impaired fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Moreover, there is defective translocation of p67 phox to phagosomes, resulting in reduced intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. These factors contribute to defective deposition and clearance of apoptotic cells in phagolysosomes, which may have an impact on the inflammatory response and contribute to the organomegaly and inflammation seen in patients with Gaucher disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Regulation of Three Virulence Strategies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Jesse C. J.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the deadliest diseases. Emergence of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains makes treating tuberculosis increasingly challenging. In order to develop novel intervention strategies, detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the success of this pathogen is required. Here, we review recent literature to provide a systems level overview of the molecular and cellular components involved in divalent metal homeostasis and their role in regulating the three main virulence strategies of M. tuberculosis: immune modulation, dormancy and phagosomal rupture. We provide a visual and modular overview of these components and their regulation. Our analysis identified a single regulatory cascade for these three virulence strategies that respond to limited availability of divalent metals in the phagosome. PMID:29364195

  5. Bruton's tyrosine kinase mediates the synergistic signalling between TLR9 and the B cell receptor by regulating calcium and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F Kenny

    Full Text Available B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation.

  6. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  7. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans: Tripping on Acid in the phagolysosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Miguel De Leon Rodriguez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is a basidiomycetous pathogenic yeast that is a frequent cause of meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. Cn is a facultative intracellular pathogen in mammals, insects and amoeba. Cn infection occurs after inhalation of spores or desiccated cells from the environment. After inhalation Cn localizes to the lungs where it can be phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages. Cn is surrounded by a polysaccharide capsule that helps the fungus survive in vivo by interfering with phagocytosis, quenching free radical bursts and shedding polysaccharides that negatively modulates the immune system. After phagocytosis, Cn resides within the phagosome that matures to become a phagolysosome, a process that results in the acidification of the phagolysosomal lumen. Cn replicates at a higher rate inside macrophages than in the extracellular environment, possibly as a result that the phagosomal pH is near that optimal for growth. Cn increases the phagolysosomal pH and modulates the dynamics of Rab GTPases interaction with the phagolysosome. Chemical manipulation of the phagolysosomal pH with drugs can result in direct and indirect killing of Cn and reduced non-lytic exocytosis. Phagolysosomal membrane damage after Cn infection occurs both in vivo and in vitro, and is required for Cn growth and survival. Macrophage treatment with IFN-γ reduces the phagolysosomal damage and increases intracellular killing of Cn. Studies on mice and humans show that treatment with IFN-γ can improve host control of the disease. However the mechanism by which Cn mediates phagolysosomal membrane damage remains unknown but likely candidates are phospholipases and mechanical damage from an enlarging capsule. Here we review Cn intracellular interaction with a particular emphasis on phagosomal interactions and develop the notion that the extent of damage of the phagosomal membrane is a key determinant of the outcome of the Cn-macrophage interaction.

  9. Rapamycin-based inducible translocation systems for studying phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohdanowicz, Michal; Fairn, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an immune receptor-mediated process whereby cells engulf large particles. The process is dynamic and requires several localized factors acting in concert with and sequentially after the engagement of immune receptors to envelope the particle. Once the particle is internalized, the nascent -phagosome undergoes a series of events leading to its maturation to the microbicidal phagolysosome. Investigating these dynamic and temporally controlled series of events in live cells requires noninvasive methods. The ability to rapidly recruit the proteins of interest to the sites of phagocytosis or to nascent phagosomes would help dissect the regulatory mechanisms involved during phagocytosis. Here, we describe a general approach to express in RAW264.7 murine macrophages, a genetically encoded rapamycin--induced heterodimerization system. In the presence of rapamycin, tight association between FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and FKBP rapamycin-binding protein (FRB) is observed. Based on this principle, a synthetic system consisting of a targeting domain attached to FKBP can recruit a protein of interest fused to FRB upon the addition of rapamycin. Previously, this technique has been used to target lipid-modifying enzymes and small GTPases to the phagosome or plasma membrane. The recruitment of the FRB module can be monitored by fluorescent microscopy if a fluorescent protein is fused to the FRB sequence. While the focus of this chapter is on phagocytic events, this method can be employed to study any organelle of interest when the appropriate targeting sequence is used.

  10. Stage-specific sampling by pattern recognition receptors during Candida albicans phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid E M Heinsbroek

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a medically important pathogen, and recognition by innate immune cells is critical for its clearance. Although a number of pattern recognition receptors have been shown to be involved in recognition and phagocytosis of this fungus, the relative role of these receptors has not been formally examined. In this paper, we have investigated the contribution of the mannose receptor, Dectin-1, and complement receptor 3; and we have demonstrated that Dectin-1 is the main non-opsonic receptor involved in fungal uptake. However, both Dectin-1 and complement receptor 3 were found to accumulate at the site of uptake, while mannose receptor accumulated on C. albicans phagosomes at later stages. These results suggest a potential role for MR in phagosome sampling; and, accordingly, MR deficiency led to a reduction in TNF-alpha and MCP-1 production in response to C. albicans uptake. Our data suggest that pattern recognition receptors sample the fungal phagosome in a sequential fashion.

  11. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Milagros López de Armentia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila. The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host’s response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections.

  12. Rab39a interacts with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and negatively regulates autophagy induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Seto

    Full Text Available Rab39a has pleiotropic functions in phagosome maturation, inflammatory activation and neuritogenesis. Here, we characterized Rab39a function in membrane trafficking of phagocytosis and autophagy induction in macrophages. Rab39a localized to the periphery of LAMP2-positive vesicles and showed the similar kinetics on the phagosome to that of LAMP1. The depletion of Rab39a did not influence the localization of LAMP2 to the phagosome, but it augments the autophagosome formation and LC3 processing by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation. The augmentation of autophagosome formation in Rab39a-knockdown macrophages was suppressed by Atg5 depletion or an inhibitor for phosphatidylinostol 3-kinase (PI3K. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rab39a interacts with PI3K and that the amino acid residues from 34(th to 41(st in Rab39a were indispensable for this interaction. These results suggest that Rab39a negatively regulates the LPS-induced autophagy in macrophages.

  13. A method for functional trans-complementation of intracellular Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Steele

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types. After uptake, F. tularensis bacteria escape the phagosome, replicate within the cytosol, and suppress cytokine responses. However, the mechanisms employed by F. tularensis to thrive within host cells are mostly unknown. Potential F. tularensis mutants involved in host-pathogen interactions are typically discovered by negative selection screens for intracellular replication or virulence. Mutants that fulfill these criteria fall into two categories: mutants with intrinsic intracellular growth defects and mutants that fail to modify detrimental host cell processes. It is often difficult and time consuming to discriminate between these two possibilities. We devised a method to functionally trans-complement and thus identify mutants that fail to modify the host response. In this assay, host cells are consistently and reproducibly infected with two different F. tularensis strains by physically tethering the bacteria to antibody-coated beads. To examine the efficacy of this protocol, we tested phagosomal escape, cytokine suppression, and intracellular replication for F. tularensis ΔripA and ΔpdpC. ΔripA has an intracellular growth defect that is likely due to an intrinsic defect and fails to suppress IL-1β secretion. In the co-infection model, ΔripA was unable to replicate in the host cell when wild-type bacteria infected the same cell, but cytokine suppression was rescued. Therefore, ΔripA intracellular growth is due to an intrinsic bacterial defect while cytokine secretion results from a failed host-pathogen interaction. Likewise, ΔpdpC is deficient for phagosomal escape, intracellular survival and suppression of IL-1β secretion. Wild-type bacteria that entered through the same phagosome as ΔpdpC rescued all of these phenotypes, indicating that ΔpdpC failed to properly manipulate the host. In summary, functional

  14. The Recombinant Bacille Calmette–Guérin Vaccine VPM1002: Ready for Clinical Efficacy Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie E. Nieuwenhuizen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG, protects against severe extrapulmonary forms of TB but is virtually ineffective against the most prevalent form of the disease, pulmonary TB. BCG was genetically modified at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology to improve its immunogenicity by replacing the urease C encoding gene with the listeriolysin encoding gene from Listeria monocytogenes. Listeriolysin perturbates the phagosomal membrane at acidic pH. Urease C is involved in neutralization of the phagosome harboring BCG. Its depletion allows for rapid phagosome acidification and promotes phagolysosome fusion. As a result, BCGΔureC::hly (VPM1002 promotes apoptosis and autophagy and facilitates release of mycobacterial antigens into the cytosol. In preclinical studies, VPM1002 has been far more efficacious and safer than BCG. The vaccine was licensed to Vakzine Projekt Management and later sublicensed to the Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd., the largest vaccine producer in the world. The vaccine has passed phase I clinical trials in Germany and South Africa, demonstrating its safety and immunogenicity in young adults. It was also successfully tested in a phase IIa randomized clinical trial in healthy South African newborns and is currently undergoing a phase IIb study in HIV exposed and unexposed newborns. A phase II/III clinical trial will commence in India in 2017 to assess efficacy against recurrence of TB. The target indications for VPM1002 are newborn immunization to prevent TB as well as post-exposure immunization in adults to prevent TB recurrence. In addition, a Phase I trial in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients has been completed, and phase II trials are ongoing. This review describes the development of VPM1002 from the drawing board to its clinical assessment.

  15. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    in a soluble form and in association with the membranes of alveolar macrophages. The primary structure of gp-340 has been established by molecular cloning, which yielded a 7,686-bp cDNA sequence encoding a polypeptide chain of 2, 413 amino acids. The domain organization features 13 scavenger receptor cysteine...... in a way that suggested capping, whereas other macrophages showed strong intracellular staining within the phagosome/phagolysosome compartments. In some macrophages, SP-D and gp-340 were located in the same cellular compartment. Immunoreactive gp-340 was also found in epithelial cells of the small...

  16. Efecto de la fagocitosis, la infección po Leishmania amazonenesis y Leshmania braziliensis sobre la distribción de filamentos de actina y microtúbulos en macrófagos murinos

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón Rojas, Marcos Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    Por inmunofluorescencia se estudió la distribución del citoesqueleto en macrófagos activados, con fagosomas de diferentes tamaños e infectados con Leishmania. También se evaluaron los niveles de actina y tubulina en los mismos grupos. Se encontró que fagosomas grandes alteran la distribución del citoesqueleto sin afectar niveles de actina y tubulina. / Abstract. Cytoskeleton distribution was studied in macrophages activated, with phagosomes of different size and infected with Leishmania pa...

  17. Burkholderia pseudomallei Evades Nramp1 (Slc11a1- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Killing in Macrophages and Exhibits Nramp1-Dependent Virulence Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerachat Muangsombut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial survival in macrophages can be affected by the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1; also known as solute carrier family 11 member a1 or Slc11a1 which localizes to phagosome membranes and transports divalent cations, including iron. Little is known about the role of Nramp1 in Burkholderia infection, in particular whether this differs for pathogenic species like Burkholderia pseudomallei causing melioidosis or non-pathogenic species like Burkholderia thailandensis. Here we show that transfected macrophages stably expressing wild-type Nramp1 (Nramp1+ control the net replication of B. thailandensis, but not B. pseudomallei. Control of B. thailandensis was associated with increased cytokine responses, and could be abrogated by blocking NADPH oxidase-mediated production of reactive oxygen species but not by blocking generation of reactive nitrogen species. The inability of Nramp1+ macrophages to control B. pseudomallei was associated with rapid escape of bacteria from phagosomes, as indicated by decreased co-localization with LAMP1 compared to B. thailandensis. A B. pseudomallei bipB mutant impaired in escape from phagosomes was controlled to a greater extent than the parent strain in Nramp1+ macrophages, but was also attenuated in Nramp1− cells. Consistent with reduced escape from phagosomes, B. thailandensis formed fewer multinucleated giant cells in Nramp1+ macrophages at later time points compared to B. pseudomallei. B. pseudomallei exhibited elevated transcription of virulence-associated genes of Type VI Secretion System cluster 1 (T6SS-1, the Bsa Type III Secretion System (T3SS-3 and the bimA gene required for actin-based motility in Nramp1+ macrophages. Nramp1+ macrophages were found to contain decreased iron levels that may impact on expression of such genes. Our data show that B. pseudomallei is able to evade Nramp1- and NADPH oxidase-mediated killing in macrophages and that expression of virulence

  18. Gas Separation Membranes Derived from High-Performance Immiscible Polymer Blends Compatibilized with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panapitiya, Nimanka P; Wijenayake, Sumudu N; Nguyen, Do D; Huang, Yu; Musselman, Inga H; Balkus, Kenneth J; Ferraris, John P

    2015-08-26

    An immiscible polymer blend comprised of high-performance copolyimide 6FDA-DAM:DABA(3:2) (6FDD) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) was compatibilized using 2-methylimidazole (2-MI), a commercially available small molecule. Membranes were fabricated from blends of 6FDD:PBI (50:50) with and without 2-MI for H2/CO2 separations. The membranes demonstrated a matrix-droplet type microstructure as evident with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging where 6FDD is the dispersed phase and PBI is the continuous phase. In addition, membranes with 2-MI demonstrated a uniform microstructure as observed by smaller and more uniformly dispersed 6FDD domains in contrast to 6FDD:PBI (50:50) blend membranes without 2-MI. This compatibilization effect of 2-MI was attributed to interfacial localization of 2-MI that lowers the interfacial energy similar to a surfactant. Upon the incorporation of 2-MI, the H2/CO2 selectivity improved remarkably, compared to the pure blend, and surpassed the Robeson's upper bound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a small molecule to compatibilize a high-performance immiscible polymer blend. This approach could afford a novel class of membranes in which immiscible polymer blends can be compatibilized in an economical and convenient fashion.

  19. Carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from Matrimid® polyimide for nitrogen/methane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Xue; Koros, William J.

    2014-01-01

    A commercial polyimide, Matrimid® 5218, was pyrolyzed under an inert argon atmosphere to produce carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes for nitrogen/methane separation. The resulting CMS dense film separation performance was evaluated

  20. Novel adsorptive ultrafiltration membranes derived from polyvinyltetrazole-co-polyacrylonitrile for Cu(II) ions removal

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Mahendra

    2016-05-04

    Novel adsorptive ultrafiltration membranes were manufactured from synthesized polyvinyltetrazole−co−polyacrylonitrile (PVT−co−PAN) by nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS). PVT−co−PAN with various degree of functionalization (DF) was synthesized via a [3+2] cycloaddition reaction at 60°C using a commercial PAN. PVT−co−PAN with varied DF was then explored to prepare adsorptive membranes. The membranes were characterized by surface zeta potential and static water contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. It was shown that PVT segments contributed to alter the pore size, charge and hydrophilic behavior of the membranes. The membranes became more negatively charged and hydrophilic after addition of PVT segments. The PVT segments in the membranes served as the major binding sites for adsorption of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption of Cu(II) ions by the membranes in static condition and in a continuous ultrafiltration of 10 ppm solution was attained at pH = 5. The adsorption data suggest that the Freundlich isotherm model describes well Cu(II) ions adsorption on the membranes from aqueous solution. The adsorption capacity obtained from the Freundlich isotherm model was 44.3 mg g−1; this value is higher than other membrane adsorption data reported in the literature. Overall, the membranes fabricated from PVT−co−PAN are attractive for efficient removal of heavy metal ions under the optimized conditions.

  1. Anion-exchange membranes derived from quaternized polysulfone and exfoliated layered double hydroxide for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wan; Liang, Na; Peng, Pai; Qu, Rong; Chen, Dongzhi; Zhang, Hongwei, E-mail: hanqiujiang@163.com

    2017-02-15

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) are prepared by controlling urea assisted homogeneous precipitation conditions. Morphology and crystallinity of LDHs are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. After LDHs are incorporated into quaternized polysulfone membranes, transmission electron microscope is used to observe the exfoliated morphology of LDH sheets in the membranes. The properties of the nanocomposite membranes, including water uptake, swelling ratio, mechanical property and ionic conductivity are investigated. The nanocomposite membrane containing 5% LDH sheets shows more balanced performances, exhibiting an ionic conductivity of 2.36×10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at 60 °C. - Graphical abstract: Anion-exchange membrane based on quaternized polysulfone and exfoliated layered double hydroxide is optically transparent and has good ionic properties.

  2. Preparation of hydrophilic and antifouling polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane derived from phenolphthalin by copolymerization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhixiao; Mi, Zhiming; Chen, Chunhai; Zhou, Hongwei; Zhao, Xiaogang; Wang, Daming

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The mechanisms fouling and cleaning process of PSF-COOH membranes (A) the content of carboxyl less than 80%. (B) the content of carboxyl at 80%, 100%. - Highlights: • Phenolphthalin (PPL) containing carboxyl was successfully introduced into the molecule backbone of polysulfone (PSF). • A series of PSF-COOH copolymers with different carboxylation degree was synthesized and prepared as ultrafiltration membranes. • The introduction of PPL significantly improved the hydrophilicity, permeation flux and antifouling property of membranes. • This method is valuable for large-scale industrial production of hydrophilic membrane material. - Abstract: In this task, carboxylated polysulfone (PSF-COOH) was achieved by introducing the monomer of phenolphthalin (PPL) containing carboxyl to the molecule backbone of polysulfone (PSF). And a series of PSF-COOH copolymers with different carboxylation degree was synthesized by adjusting the molar (%) of bisphenol A (BPA) and PPL in direct copolymerization method and was prepared as PSF-COOH ultrafiltration membranes via phase separation method. The effect of PPL molar (%) in copolymers on the morphology, hydrophilicity, permeation flux, antifouling and mechanical properties of membranes was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle, ultrafiltration experiments and universal testing machine, respectively. The results showed that with the increased carboxyl content in membranes, the hydrophilicity, permeation fluxes and antifouling properties of membranes gradually increased. When the molar (%) of PPL to BPA was 100:0, the membrane exhibited the highest pure water flux (329.6 L/m"2 h) and the maximum flux recovery rate (92.5%). When the content of carboxyl in the membrane was 80% or more, after three cycles of BSA solution (1 g/L) filtration, the flux recovery rate was basically constant or showed a slightly increase. Thus, it can achieve the goal of long term usage without compromising flux.

  3. Carbon molecular sieve dense film membranes derived from Matrimid® for ethylene/ethane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2012-04-01

    Development of dense film carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes for ethylene/ethane (C 2H 4/C 2H 6) separation is reported. A commercial polyimide, Matrimid®, was pyrolyzed under vacuum and inert argon atmosphere, and the resultant CMS films were characterized using pure C 2H 4 and C 2H 6 permeation at 35 °C, 50 psia feed pressure. The effects on C 2H 4/C 2H 6 separation caused by different final vacuum pyrolysis temperatures from 500 to 800 °C are reported. For all pyrolysis temperatures separation surpassed the estimated \\'upper bound\\' solution processable polymer line for C 2H 4 permeability vs. C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity. C 2H 4 permeability decreased and selectivity increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature until 650-675 °C where an optimum combination of C 2H 4 permeability ∼14-15 Barrer with C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity ∼12 was observed. A modified heating rate protocol for 675 °C showed further increase in permeability with no selectivity loss. CMS films produced from argon pyrolysis showed results comparable to vacuum pyrolysis. Further, mixed gas (63.2 mol% C 2H 4 + 36.8 mol% C 2H 6) permeation showed a slightly lower C 2H 4 permeability with C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity increase rather than a decrease that is often seen with polymers. The high selectivity of these membranes was shown to arise from a high \\'entropic selection\\' indicating that the \\'slimmer\\' ethylene molecule has significant advantage over ethane in passing through the rigid \\'slit-shaped\\' CMS pore structure. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ZIF-78 membrane derived from amorphous precursors with permselectivity for cyclohexanone/cyclohexanol mixture

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Lili

    2014-07-01

    Cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol are products of selective oxidation of cyclohexane. They are important industrial intermediates and difficult to be separated due to their close boiling points. In this work, well-intergrown ZIF-78 membrane was successfully synthesized on the porous silica substrate by secondary growth method and applied for separation of cyclohexanone/cyclohexanol mixture for the first time. Meanwhile, a facile method for seeding procedure was developed by utilizing the amorphous ZIF-78 precursors to provide better-distributed nucleation sites. Both XRD and SEM results confirmed the good quality of the membrane. The pervaporation separation of cyclohexanone/ cyclohexanol mixture were carried out at room temperature with permselectivity of 1:2 and total flux around 8.7 × 10-2 kg m-2 h-1. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation of hydrophilic and antifouling polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane derived from phenolphthalin by copolymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhixiao; Mi, Zhiming; Chen, Chunhai; Zhou, Hongwei; Zhao, Xiaogang; Wang, Daming, E-mail: wangdaming@jlu.edu.cn

    2017-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The mechanisms fouling and cleaning process of PSF-COOH membranes (A) the content of carboxyl less than 80%. (B) the content of carboxyl at 80%, 100%. - Highlights: • Phenolphthalin (PPL) containing carboxyl was successfully introduced into the molecule backbone of polysulfone (PSF). • A series of PSF-COOH copolymers with different carboxylation degree was synthesized and prepared as ultrafiltration membranes. • The introduction of PPL significantly improved the hydrophilicity, permeation flux and antifouling property of membranes. • This method is valuable for large-scale industrial production of hydrophilic membrane material. - Abstract: In this task, carboxylated polysulfone (PSF-COOH) was achieved by introducing the monomer of phenolphthalin (PPL) containing carboxyl to the molecule backbone of polysulfone (PSF). And a series of PSF-COOH copolymers with different carboxylation degree was synthesized by adjusting the molar (%) of bisphenol A (BPA) and PPL in direct copolymerization method and was prepared as PSF-COOH ultrafiltration membranes via phase separation method. The effect of PPL molar (%) in copolymers on the morphology, hydrophilicity, permeation flux, antifouling and mechanical properties of membranes was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle, ultrafiltration experiments and universal testing machine, respectively. The results showed that with the increased carboxyl content in membranes, the hydrophilicity, permeation fluxes and antifouling properties of membranes gradually increased. When the molar (%) of PPL to BPA was 100:0, the membrane exhibited the highest pure water flux (329.6 L/m{sup 2} h) and the maximum flux recovery rate (92.5%). When the content of carboxyl in the membrane was 80% or more, after three cycles of BSA solution (1 g/L) filtration, the flux recovery rate was basically constant or showed a slightly increase. Thus, it can achieve the goal of long term usage without compromising flux.

  6. Novel adsorptive ultrafiltration membranes derived from polyvinyltetrazole-co-polyacrylonitrile for Cu(II) ions removal

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Mahendra; Shevate, Rahul; Hilke, Roland; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Novel adsorptive ultrafiltration membranes were manufactured from synthesized polyvinyltetrazole−co−polyacrylonitrile (PVT−co−PAN) by nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS). PVT−co−PAN with various degree of functionalization (DF) was synthesized via a [3+2] cycloaddition reaction at 60°C using a commercial PAN. PVT−co−PAN with varied DF was then explored to prepare adsorptive membranes. The membranes were characterized by surface zeta potential and static water contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. It was shown that PVT segments contributed to alter the pore size, charge and hydrophilic behavior of the membranes. The membranes became more negatively charged and hydrophilic after addition of PVT segments. The PVT segments in the membranes served as the major binding sites for adsorption of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption of Cu(II) ions by the membranes in static condition and in a continuous ultrafiltration of 10 ppm solution was attained at pH = 5. The adsorption data suggest that the Freundlich isotherm model describes well Cu(II) ions adsorption on the membranes from aqueous solution. The adsorption capacity obtained from the Freundlich isotherm model was 44.3 mg g−1; this value is higher than other membrane adsorption data reported in the literature. Overall, the membranes fabricated from PVT−co−PAN are attractive for efficient removal of heavy metal ions under the optimized conditions.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystal and nanoporous self-assembled CNC membrane derived from Ceiba pentandra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; W Salleh, W N; Jaafar, Juhana; Ismail, A F; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; M Zain, M F; Awang, Nor Asikin; Mohd Hir, Zul Adlan

    2017-02-10

    This research involves the rare utilisation of the kapok fibre (Ceiba pentandra) as a raw material for the fabrication of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and self-assembled CNC membranes. The isolation of CNC from Ceiba pentandra began with the extraction of cellulose via the chemical alkali extraction by using 5wt% NaOH, followed by the typical acidified bleaching method and, finally, the CNC production through acid hydrolysis with 60wt% H 2 SO 4 at the optimum time of 60min. The prepared CNC was then employed for the preparation of self-assembled membrane through the water suspension casting evaporation technique. The obtained CNC membrane was characterised in terms of its composition, crystallinity, thermal stability, as well as, structural and morphological features with the use of several techniques including FTIR, XRD, AFM, TEM, FESEM, and TGA. The FESEM and AFM analyses had illustrated the achievement of a self-assembled CNC membrane with a smooth surface and a well-distributed nano-porous structure, with the porosity of 52.82±7.79%. In addition, the findings proved that the self-assembled CNC membrane displayed good adsorption capability indicated by the recorded efficiency of 79% and 85% for 10mg/L and 5mg/L of methylene blue in an aqueous solution, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Origin and development of plasma membrane derived invaginations in Vinca rosea l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlberg, P.; Walkinshaw, C.; Olson, K.

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence, morphology, and possible ontogeny of plasma-membrane-related structures are described which can develop into invaginations or intravacuolar formations. An underlying study of meristematic tissues from the shoot of Vinca rosea supports the interpretation that endocytosis does occur in plant cells and that it is appropriate to refer to these structures as endocytoses. The function of these invaginations or their content remains to be elucidated.

  9. Amniotic membrane-derived stem cells: immunomodulatory properties and potential clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insausti CL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carmen L Insausti,1 Miguel Blanquer,1 Ana M García-Hernández,1 Gregorio Castellanos,2 José M Moraleda11Unidad de Trasplante Hematopoyético y Terapia Celular, 2Servicio de Cirugía, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB, Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, El Palmar, Murcia, SpainAbstract: Epithelial and mesenchymal cells isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM possess stem cell characteristics, differentiation potential toward lineages of different germ layers, and immunomodulatory properties. While their expansion and differentiation potential have been well studied and characterized, knowledge about their immunomodulatory properties and the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. These mechanisms have been evaluated on various target cells of the innate and the adaptive system and in animal models of different inflammatory diseases. Some results have evidenced that the immunomodulatory effect of AM-derived cells is dependent on cell-cell contact, but many of them have demonstrated that these properties are mediated through the secretion of suppressive molecules. In this review, we present an update on the described immunomodulatory properties of the derived amniotic cells and some of the proposed involved mechanisms. Furthermore, we describe some assays in animal models of different inflammatory diseases which reveal the potential use of these cells to treat such diseases.Keywords: epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, cell therapy, immunomodulation

  10. Sulfonated copolyimide membranes derived from a novel diamine monomer with pendant benzimidazole groups for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaoxia; Aili, David

    2015-01-01

    . A series of sulfonated copolyimides (SPI) are prepared via random copolymerizatio of 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTDA) with a new diamine monomer with pendant benzimidazole groups, 2,2'-bis(4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenoxy)benzidine (BIPOB), and a sulfonated diamine monomer 4,4'-bis...

  11. Carbon molecular sieve dense film membranes derived from Matrimid® for ethylene/ethane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha; Xu, Liren; Koros, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Development of dense film carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes for ethylene/ethane (C 2H 4/C 2H 6) separation is reported. A commercial polyimide, Matrimid®, was pyrolyzed under vacuum and inert argon atmosphere, and the resultant CMS films were

  12. Carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from Matrimid® polyimide for nitrogen/methane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Xue

    2014-01-01

    A commercial polyimide, Matrimid® 5218, was pyrolyzed under an inert argon atmosphere to produce carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes for nitrogen/methane separation. The resulting CMS dense film separation performance was evaluated using both pure and mixed N2/CH4 permeation tests. The effects of final pyrolysis temperature on N 2/CH4 separation are reported. The separation performance of all CMS dense films significantly exceeds the polymer precursor dense film. The CMS dense film pyrolyzed at 800 C shows very attractive separation performance that surpasses the polymer membrane upper bound line, with N 2 permeability of 6.8 Barrers and N2/CH4 permselectivity of 7.7 from pure gas permeation, and N2 permeability of 5.2 Barrers and N2/CH4 permselectivity of 6.0 from mixed gas permeation. The temperature dependences of permeabilities, sorption coefficients, and diffusion coefficients of the membrane were studied, and the activation energy for permeation and diffusion, as well as the apparent heats of sorption are reported. The high permselectivity of this dense film is shown to arise from a significant entropic contribution in the diffusion selectivity. The study shows that the rigid \\'slit-shaped\\' CMS pore structure can enable a strong molecular sieving effect to effectively distinguish the size and shape difference between N2 and CH4. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlative light and immuno-electron microscopy of retinal tissue cryostat sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Lane, Amelia; Laughlin, William E.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful technique allowing localisation of specific macromolecules within fluorescence microscopy (FM) images to be mapped onto corresponding high-resolution electron microscopy (EM) images. Existing methods are applicable to limited sample types and are technically challenging. Here we describe novel methods to perform CLEM and immuno-electron microscopy (iEM) on cryostat sections utilising the popular FM embedding solution, optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound. Utilising these approaches, we have (i) identified the same phagosomes by FM and EM in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of retinal tissue (ii) shown the correct localisation of rhodopsin on photoreceptor outer segment disc like-structures in iPSC derived optic cups and (iii) identified a novel interaction between peroxisomes and melanosomes as well as phagosomes in the RPE. These data show that cryostat sections allow easy characterisation of target macromolecule localisation within tissue samples, thus providing a substantial improvement over many conventional methods that are limited to cultured cells. As OCT embedding is routinely used for FM this provides an easily accessible and robust method for further analysis of existing samples by high resolution EM. PMID:29315318

  14. Intracellular invasion of Orientia tsutsugamushi activates inflammasome in asc-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Eun Koo

    Full Text Available Orientia tsutsugamushi, a causative agent of scrub typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium, which escapes from the endo/phagosome and replicates in the host cytoplasm. O. tsutsugamushi infection induces production of pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-1β (IL-1β, which is secreted mainly from macrophages upon cytosolic stimuli by activating cysteine protease caspase-1 within a complex called the inflammasome, and is a key player in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. However, the mechanism for IL-1β maturation upon O. tsutsugamushi infection has not been identified. In this study, we show that IL-1 receptor signaling is required for efficient host protection from O. tsutsugamushi infection. Live Orientia, but not heat- or UV-inactivated Orientia, activates the inflammasome through active bacterial uptake and endo/phagosomal maturation. Furthermore, Orientia-stimulated secretion of IL-1β and activation of caspase-1 are ASC- and caspase-1- dependent since IL-1β production was impaired in Asc- and caspase-1-deficient macrophages but not in Nlrp3-, Nlrc4- and Aim2-deficient macrophages. Therefore, live O. tsutsugamushi triggers ASC inflammasome activation leading to IL-1β production, which is a critical innate immune response for effective host defense.

  15. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  16. Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Guerra, Fermin E.; Fevre, Cindy; Voyich, Jovanka M.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Garcia, Brandon L.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Haas, Pieter-Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly adapted to its host and has evolved many strategies to resist opsonization and phagocytosis. Even after uptake by neutrophils, S. aureus shows resistance to killing, which suggests the presence of phagosomal immune evasion molecules. With the aid of secretome phage display, we identified a highly conserved protein that specifically binds and inhibits human myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major player in the oxidative defense of neutrophils. We have named this protein “staphylococcal peroxidase inhibitor” (SPIN). To gain insight into inhibition of MPO by SPIN, we solved the cocrystal structure of SPIN bound to a recombinant form of human MPO at 2.4-Å resolution. This structure reveals that SPIN acts as a molecular plug that prevents H2O2 substrate access to the MPO active site. In subsequent experiments, we observed that SPIN expression increases inside the neutrophil phagosome, where MPO is located, compared with outside the neutrophil. Moreover, bacteria with a deleted gene encoding SPIN showed decreased survival compared with WT bacteria after phagocytosis by neutrophils. Taken together, our results demonstrate that S. aureus secretes a unique proteinaceous MPO inhibitor to enhance survival by interfering with MPO-mediated killing. PMID:28808028

  17. Scrambled Eggs: Apoptotic Cell Clearance by Non-Professional Phagocytes in the Drosophila Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy B. Serizier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For half of a century, it has been known that non-professional phagocytes, such as fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells, are capable of efferocytosis (engulfment of apoptotic cells. Non-professional phagocytes differ from professional phagocytes in the range and efficiency of engulfment. Much of the recognition and underlying signaling machinery between non-professional and professional phagocytes is the same, but it is not known how the engulfment capacity of non-professional phagocytes is controlled. Moreover, the signaling networks involved in cell corpse recognition, engulfment, and phagosome maturation are only partially understood. The Drosophila ovary provides an excellent system to investigate the regulation of phagocytic activity by epithelial cells, a major class of non-professional phagocytes. During Drosophila oogenesis, mid-stage egg chambers undergo apoptosis of the germline in response to nutrient deprivation. Epithelial follicle cells then undergo major cell shape changes and concomitantly engulf the germline material. Our previous work has established that Draper and the integrin α-PS3/β-PS heterodimer are required in follicle cells for germline cell clearance. In addition, we have characterized phagosome maturation pathways, and found that the JNK pathway amplifies the engulfment response. In this review, we discuss recent advances on the interplay between engulfment pathways in the follicular epithelium for cell clearance in the Drosophila ovary. We also provide a comparison to apoptotic cell clearance mechanisms in C. elegans and mammals, illustrating strong conservation of efferocytosis mechanisms by non-professional phagocytes.

  18. Scrambled Eggs: Apoptotic Cell Clearance by Non-Professional Phagocytes in the Drosophila Ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizier, Sandy B; McCall, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    For half of a century, it has been known that non-professional phagocytes, such as fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells, are capable of efferocytosis (engulfment of apoptotic cells). Non-professional phagocytes differ from professional phagocytes in the range and efficiency of engulfment. Much of the recognition and underlying signaling machinery between non-professional and professional phagocytes is the same, but it is not known how the engulfment capacity of non-professional phagocytes is controlled. Moreover, the signaling networks involved in cell corpse recognition, engulfment, and phagosome maturation are only partially understood. The Drosophila ovary provides an excellent system to investigate the regulation of phagocytic activity by epithelial cells, a major class of non-professional phagocytes. During Drosophila oogenesis, mid-stage egg chambers undergo apoptosis of the germline in response to nutrient deprivation. Epithelial follicle cells then undergo major cell shape changes and concomitantly engulf the germline material. Our previous work has established that Draper and the integrin α-PS3/β-PS heterodimer are required in follicle cells for germline cell clearance. In addition, we have characterized phagosome maturation pathways, and found that the JNK pathway amplifies the engulfment response. In this review, we discuss recent advances on the interplay between engulfment pathways in the follicular epithelium for cell clearance in the Drosophila ovary. We also provide a comparison to apoptotic cell clearance mechanisms in C. elegans and mammals, illustrating strong conservation of efferocytosis mechanisms by non-professional phagocytes.

  19. MRP8/14 induces autophagy to eliminate intracellular Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinli; Huang, Chunyu; Wu, Minhao; Zhong, Qiu; Yang, Kun; Li, Miao; Zhan, Xiaoxia; Wen, Jinsheng; Zhou, Lin; Huang, Xi

    2015-04-01

    To explore the role of myeloid-related protein 8/14 in mycobacterial infection. The mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP8 or MRP14 were measured by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Role of MRP8/14 was tested by overexpression or RNA interference assays. Flow cytometry and colony forming unit were used to test the phagocytosis and the survival of intracellular Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), respectively. Autophagy mediated by MRP8/14 was detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The colocalization of BCG phagosomes with autophagosomes or lysosomes was by detected by confocal microscopy. ROS production was detected by flow cytometry. MRP8/14 expressions were up-regulated in human monocytic THP1 cells and primary macrophages after mycobacterial challenge. Silencing of MRP8/14 suppressed bacterial killing, but had no influence on the phagocytosis of BCG. Importantly, silencing MRP8/14 decreased autophagy and BCG phagosome maturation in THP1-derived macrophages, thereby increasing the BCG survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that MRP8/14 promoted autophagy in a ROS-dependent manner. The present study revealed a novel role of MRP8/14 in the autophagy-mediated elimination of intracellular BCG by promoting ROS generation, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis and other intracellular bacterial infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis exploits asparagine to assimilate nitrogen and resist acid stress during infection.

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    Alexandre Gouzy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen. Within macrophages, M. tuberculosis thrives in a specialized membrane-bound vacuole, the phagosome, whose pH is slightly acidic, and where access to nutrients is limited. Understanding how the bacillus extracts and incorporates nutrients from its host may help develop novel strategies to combat tuberculosis. Here we show that M. tuberculosis employs the asparagine transporter AnsP2 and the secreted asparaginase AnsA to assimilate nitrogen and resist acid stress through asparagine hydrolysis and ammonia release. While the role of AnsP2 is partially spared by yet to be identified transporter(s, that of AnsA is crucial in both phagosome acidification arrest and intracellular replication, as an M. tuberculosis mutant lacking this asparaginase is ultimately attenuated in macrophages and in mice. Our study provides yet another example of the intimate link between physiology and virulence in the tubercle bacillus, and identifies a novel pathway to be targeted for therapeutic purposes.

  1. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinli; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Lin; Minhaowu; Wu, Yongjian; Zhu, Min; Lai, Xiaomin; Chen, Tao; Feng, Lianqiang; Li, Meiyu; Huang, Chunyu; Zhong, Qiu; Huang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb), a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  2. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinli Wang

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7 reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb, a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

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    Douglas R Boettner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK, was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932. Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  4. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932)). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932) also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  5. Intracellular events regulating cross-presentation

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    Peter eCresswell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation plays a fundamental role in the induction of CD8-T cell immunity. However, although more than three decades have passed since its discovery, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanisms involved. Here we give an overview of the components involved at different stages of this process. First, antigens must be internalized into the cross-presenting cell. The involvement of different receptors, method of antigen uptake, and nature of the antigen can influence intracellular trafficking and access to the cross-presentation pathway. Once antigens access the endocytic system, different requirements for endosomal/phagosomal processing arise, such as proteolysis and reduction of disulfide bonds. The majority of cross-presented peptides are generated by proteasomal degradation. Therefore, antigens must cross a membrane barrier in a manner analogous to the fate of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER that are retrotranslocated into the cytosol for degradation. Indeed, some components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD machinery have been implicated in cross-presentation. Further complicating the matter, endosomal and phagosomal compartments have been suggested as alternative sites to the ER for loading of peptides on MHC class I molecules. Finally, the antigen presenting cells involved, particularly dendritic cell subsets and their state of maturation, influence the efficiency of cross-presentation.

  6. The role of lipids in host microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Roland; Mattner, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular constituents and serve as signal molecules, energy sources, metabolic precursors and structural membrane components in various organisms. The function of lipids can be modified by multiple biochemical processes such as (de-)phosphorylation or (de-)glycosylation, and the organization of fatty acids into distinct cellular pools and subcellular compartments plays a pivotal role for the morphology and function of various cell populations. Thus, lipids regulate, for example, phagosome formation and maturation within host cells and thus, are critical for the elimination of microbial pathogens. Vice versa, microbial pathogens can manipulate the lipid composition of phagosomal membranes in host cells, and thus avoid their delivery to phagolysosomes. Lipids of microbial origin belong also to the strongest and most versatile inducers of mammalian immune responses upon engagement of distinct receptors on myeloid and lymphoid cells. Furthermore, microbial lipid toxins can induce membrane injuries and cell death. Thus, we will review here selected examples for mutual host-microbe interactions within the broad and divergent universe of lipids in microbial defense, tissue injury and immune evasion.

  7. Essential role of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in the maintenance of lipid storage in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Kazunari; Degang, Yang; Kawashima, Akira; Akama, Takeshi; Yoshihara, Aya; Ishido, Yuko; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), the causative agent of leprosy, parasitizes within the foamy or enlarged phagosome of macrophages where rich lipids accumulate. Although the mechanisms for lipid accumulation in the phagosome have been clarified, it is still unclear how such large amounts of lipids escape degradation. To further explore underlying mechanisms involved in lipid catabolism in M. leprae-infected host cells, we examined the expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a key enzyme in fatty acid mobilization and lipolysis, in human macrophage THP-1 cells. We found that infection by live M. leprae significantly suppressed HSL expression levels. This suppression was not observed with dead M. leprae or latex beads. Macrophage activation by peptidoglycan (PGN), the ligand for toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), increased HSL expression; however, live M. leprae suppressed this increase. HSL expression was abolished in the slit-skin smear specimens from patients with lepromatous and borderline leprosy. In addition, the recovery of HSL expression was observed in patients who experienced a lepra reaction, which is a cell-mediated, delayed-type hypersensitivity immune response, or in patients who were successfully treated with multi-drug therapy. These results suggest that M. leprae suppresses lipid degradation through inhibition of HSL expression, and that the monitoring of HSL mRNA levels in slit-skin smear specimens may be a useful indicator of patient prognosis.

  8. Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase

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    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Guerra, Fermin E.; Nijland, Reindert; Fevre, Cindy; Voyich, Jovanka M.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Garcia, Brandon L.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Haas, Pieter-Jan A.

    2017-08-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly adapted to its host and has evolved many strategies to resist opsonization and phagocytosis. Even after uptake by neutrophils, S. aureus shows resistance to killing, which suggests the presence of phagosomal immune evasion molecules. With the aid of secretome phage display, we identified a highly conserved protein that specifically binds and inhibits human myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major player in the oxidative defense of neutrophils. We have named this protein “staphylococcal peroxidase inhibitor” (SPIN). To gain insight into inhibition of MPO by SPIN, we solved the cocrystal structure of SPIN bound to a recombinant form of human MPO at 2.4-Å resolution. This structure reveals that SPIN acts as a molecular plug that prevents H2O2 substrate access to the MPO active site. In subsequent experiments, we observed that SPIN expression increases inside the neutrophil phagosome, where MPO is located, compared with outside the neutrophil. Moreover, bacteria with a deleted gene encoding SPIN showed decreased survival compared with WT bacteria after phagocytosis by neutrophils. Taken together, our results demonstrate that S. aureus secretes a unique proteinaceous MPO inhibitor to enhance survival by interfering with MPO-mediated killing.

  9. Vitamin E--a selective inhibitor of the NADPH oxidoreductase enzyme system in human granulocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterick, C.J.; Baehner, R.L.; Boxer, L.A.; Jersild, R.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The cellular sites of H 2 O 2 formation in phagocytizing granulocytes have been identified with cerium chloride. A precipitate was visible in phagosomes and on plasma membranes from intact normal cells in the presence of either 0.71 mM NADH or NADPH. X-ray microanalysis permitted identification of cerium deposition within the phagosomes even in the absence of reduced pyridine nucleotides. Catalase ablated the formation of the reaction product. Intact granulocytes obtained from subjects receiving 1600 units of vitamin E daily for 2 weeks exhibited reaction product in the presence of NADH but not NADPH. Intact cells from subjects treated with vitamin E demonstrated diminished numbers of phagocytic vesicles containing reaction product. During phagocytosis the granulocytes treated with vitamin E consumed oxygen but exhibited significantly reduced rates of hydrogen-peroxide-dependent glucose-1- 14 C oxidation to 14 CO 2 . Isolated phagocytic vesicles obtained from granulocytes after ingestion of opsonized lipopolysaccharide-paraffin oil droplets contained reaction product when exposed to 0.71 mM NADPH. No reaction product was evident at 0.71 mM NADH but was evident at 2.0 mM NADH. Isolated phagocytic vesicles from the granulocytes of subjects receiving vitamin E exhibited reaction product only in the presence of NADH. These observations suggest that vitamin E interferes with the electron transport chain apparently required for the oxidation of NADPH to form H 2 O 2 in the phagocytizing granulocyte

  10. Calcineurin orchestrates dimorphic transitions, antifungal drug responses and host-pathogen interactions of the pathogenic mucoralean fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Alicia; Calo, Silvia; Inoue, Makoto; Tonthat, Nam K; Bain, Judith M; Louw, Johanna; Shinohara, Mari L; Erwig, Lars P; Schumacher, Maria A; Ko, Dennis C; Heitman, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    Calcineurin plays essential roles in virulence and growth of pathogenic fungi and is a target of the natural products FK506 and Cyclosporine A. In the pathogenic mucoralean fungus Mucor circinelloides, calcineurin mutation or inhibition confers a yeast-locked phenotype indicating that calcineurin governs the dimorphic transition. Genetic analysis in this study reveals that two calcineurin A catalytic subunits (out of three) are functionally diverged. Homology modeling illustrates modes of resistance resulting from amino substitutions in the interface between each calcineurin subunit and the inhibitory drugs. In addition, we show how the dimorphic transition orchestrated by calcineurin programs different outcomes during host-pathogen interactions. For example, when macrophages phagocytose Mucor yeast, subsequent phagosomal maturation occurs, indicating host cells respond appropriately to control the pathogen. On the other hand, upon phagocytosis of spores, macrophages fail to form mature phagosomes. Cytokine production from immune cells differs following exposure to yeast versus spores (which germinate into hyphae). Thus, the morphogenic transition can be targeted as an efficient treatment option against Mucor infection. In addition, genetic analysis (including gene disruption and mutational studies) further strengthens the understanding of calcineurin and provides a foundation to develop antifungal agents targeting calcineurin to deploy against Mucor and other pathogenic fungi. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  12. Characteristic features of intracellular pathogenic Leptospira in infected murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Claudia; Okura, Nobuhiko; Takayama, Chitoshi; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2011-11-01

    Leptospira interrogans is a spirochaete responsible for a zoonotic disease known as leptospirosis. Leptospires are able to penetrate the abraded skin and mucous membranes and rapidly disseminate to target organs such as the liver, lungs and kidneys. How this pathogen escape from innate immune cells and spread to target organs remains poorly understood. In this paper, the intracellular trafficking undertaken by non-pathogenic Leptospira biflexa and pathogenic L. interrogans in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages was compared. The delayed in the clearance of L. interrogans was observed. Furthermore, the acquisition of lysosomal markers by L. interrogans-containing phagosomes lagged behind that of L. biflexa-containing phagosomes, and although bone marrow-derived macrophages could degrade L. biflexa as well as L. interrogans, a population of L. interrogans was able to survive and replicate. Intact leptospires were found within vacuoles at 24 h post infection, suggesting that bacterial replication occurs within a membrane-bound compartment. In contrast, L. biflexa were completely degraded at 24 h post infection. Furthermore, L. interrogans but not L. biflexa, were released to the extracellular milieu. These results suggest that pathogenic leptospires are able to survive, replicate and exit from mouse macrophages, enabling their eventual spread to target organs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Ohmyungsamycins promote antimicrobial responses through autophagy activation via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Shin, Yern-Hyerk; Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Jin Kyung; Choe, Jin Ho; Jang, Ji-Chan; Um, Soohyun; Jin, Hyo Sun; Komatsu, Masaaki; Cha, Guang-Ho; Chae, Han-Jung; Oh, Dong-Chan; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-06-13

    The induction of host cell autophagy by various autophagy inducers contributes to the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a major pathogenic strain that causes human tuberculosis. In this study, we present a role for the newly identified cyclic peptides ohmyungsamycins (OMS) A and B in the antimicrobial responses against Mtb infections by activating autophagy in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). OMS robustly activated autophagy, which was essentially required for the colocalization of LC3 autophagosomes with bacterial phagosomes and antimicrobial responses against Mtb in BMDMs. Using a Drosophila melanogaster-Mycobacterium marinum infection model, we showed that OMS-A-induced autophagy contributed to the increased survival of infected flies and the limitation of bacterial load. We further showed that OMS triggered AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for OMS-mediated phagosome maturation and antimicrobial responses against Mtb. Moreover, treating BMDMs with OMS led to dose-dependent inhibition of macrophage inflammatory responses, which was also dependent on AMPK activation. Collectively, these data show that OMS is a promising candidate for new anti-mycobacterial therapeutics by activating antibacterial autophagy via AMPK-dependent signaling and suppressing excessive inflammation during Mtb infections.

  14. Vitamin D Is Required for IFN-γ–Mediated Antimicrobial Activity of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Mario; Stenger, Steffen; Shin, Dong-Min; Yuk, Jae-Min; Liu, Philip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Lee, Hye-Mi; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Schenk, Mirjam; Sieling, Peter A.; Teles, Rosane; Montoya, Dennis; Iyer, Shankar S.; Bruns, Heiko; Lewinsohn, David M.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Cheng, Genhong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Control of tuberculosis worldwide depends on our understanding of human immune mechanisms, which combat the infection. Acquired T cell responses are critical for host defense against microbial pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which they act in humans remain unclear. We report that T cells, by the release of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), induce autophagy, phagosomal maturation, the production of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, and antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages via a vitamin D–dependent pathway. IFN-γ induced the antimicrobial pathway in human macrophages cultured in vitamin D–sufficient sera, but not in sera from African-Americans that have lower amounts of vitamin D and who are more susceptible to tuberculosis. In vitro supplementation of vitamin D–deficient serum with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 restored IFN-γ–induced antimicrobial peptide expression, autophagy, phagosome-lysosome fusion, and antimicrobial activity. These results suggest a mechanism in which vitamin D is required for acquired immunity to overcome the ability of intracellular pathogens to evade macrophage-mediated antimicrobial responses. The present findings underscore the importance of adequate amounts of vitamin D in all human populations for sustaining both innate and acquired immunity against infection. PMID:21998409

  15. The LRRC8A Mediated “Swell Activated” Chloride Conductance Is Dispensable for Vacuolar Homeostasis in Neutrophils

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    Philippe Behe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dialysis of human and mouse neutrophils in patch clamp experiments in the conventional whole-cell mode induces the emergence of a chloride (Cl- current that appeared to be primarily regulated by cytoplasmic ionic strength. The characteristics of this current resembled that of the classical, and ubiquitous volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- current: strong outward rectification, selectivity sequence of the Eisenman1 type, insensitivity to external pH and strong inhibition by tamoxifen, DCPIB and WW781. We show that this current is essentially supported by the leucine rich repeat containing 8 A (LRRC8A; the naturally occurring LRRC8A truncation mutant in ebo/ebo mice drastically reduced Cl- conductance in neutrophils. Remarkably, the residual component presents a distinct pharmacology, but appears equally potentiated by reduced ionic strength. We have investigated the role of the LRRC8A-supported current in the ionic homeostasis of the phagosomal compartment. The vacuolar pH, measured using SNARF-1 labeled Candida albicans, normally rises because of NADPH oxidase activity, and this elevation is blocked by certain Cl- channel inhibitors. However, the pH rise remains intact in neutrophils from the ebo/ebo mice which also demonstrate preserved phagocytic and respiratory burst capacities and normal-sized vacuoles. Thus, the LRRC8A-dependent conductance of neutrophils largely accounts for their “swell activated” Cl- current, but is not required for homeostasis of the phagosomal killing compartment.

  16. The cellular prion protein negatively regulates phagocytosis and cytokine expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages.

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    Min Wang

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein on the cell surface. Previous studies have demonstrated contradictory roles for PrP(C in connection with the phagocytic ability of macrophages. In the present work, we investigated the function of PrP(C in phagocytosis and cytokine expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Escherichia coli. E. coli infection induced an increase in the PRNP mRNA level. Knockout of PrP(C promoted bacterial uptake; upregulated Rab5, Rab7, and Eea1 mRNA expression; and increased the recruitment of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 to phagosomes, suggesting enhanced microbicidal activity. Remarkably, knockout of PrP(C suppressed the proliferation of internalized bacteria and increased the expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1β. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of PrP(C as a negative regulator for phagocytosis, phagosome maturation, cytokine expression, and macrophage microbicidal activity.

  17. Circulating Hemocytes from Larvae of the Japanese Rhinoceros Beetle Allomyrina dichotoma (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and the Cellular Immune Response to Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sejung; Bang, Kyeongrin; Lee, Jiae; Cho, Saeyoull

    2015-01-01

    Hemocytes of the last larva of the Japanese rhinoceros beetle A. dichotoma (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) were classified as granulocytes, plasmatocytes, oenocytoids, spherulocytes, prohemocytes, and adipohemocytes. Among these cell types, only the granulocytes became immunologically activated with obvious morphological changes, displaying large amoeba-like, lobopodia-like, and fan-like structures. In addition, their cytoplasmic granules became larger and greatly increased in number. To explore whether these granules could be immunologically generated as phagosomes, total hemocytes were stained with LysoTracker. Greater than 90% of the granulocytes retained the LysoTracker dye at 4 h post-bacterial infection. In flow cytometry analysis, the red fluorescent signal was highly increased at 4 h post-bacterial infection (60.36%) compared to controls (5.08%), as was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. After 12 h post-infection, these signals returned to basal levels. The uptake of pathogens by granulocytes rapidly triggered the translocation of the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha (LC3) to the phagosome, which may result in enhanced pathogen killing.

  18. Circulating Hemocytes from Larvae of the Japanese Rhinoceros Beetle Allomyrina dichotoma (Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae and the Cellular Immune Response to Microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejung Hwang

    Full Text Available Hemocytes of the last larva of the Japanese rhinoceros beetle A. dichotoma (Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae were classified as granulocytes, plasmatocytes, oenocytoids, spherulocytes, prohemocytes, and adipohemocytes. Among these cell types, only the granulocytes became immunologically activated with obvious morphological changes, displaying large amoeba-like, lobopodia-like, and fan-like structures. In addition, their cytoplasmic granules became larger and greatly increased in number. To explore whether these granules could be immunologically generated as phagosomes, total hemocytes were stained with LysoTracker. Greater than 90% of the granulocytes retained the LysoTracker dye at 4 h post-bacterial infection. In flow cytometry analysis, the red fluorescent signal was highly increased at 4 h post-bacterial infection (60.36% compared to controls (5.08%, as was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. After 12 h post-infection, these signals returned to basal levels. The uptake of pathogens by granulocytes rapidly triggered the translocation of the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha (LC3 to the phagosome, which may result in enhanced pathogen killing.

  19. Human Amniotic Membrane-Derived Products in Sports Medicine: Basic Science, Early Results, and Potential Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboh, Jonathan C; Saltzman, Bryan M; Yanke, Adam B; Cole, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM)-derived products have been successfully used in ophthalmology, plastic surgery, and wound care, but little is known about their potential applications in orthopaedic sports medicine. To provide an updated review of the basic science and preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of AM-derived products and to review their current applications in sports medicine. Systematic review. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. The search term amniotic membrane was used alone and in conjunction with stem cell, orthopaedic, tissue engineering, scaffold, and sports medicine. The search identified 6870 articles, 80 of which, after screening of the titles and abstracts, were considered relevant to this study. Fifty-five articles described the anatomy, basic science, and nonorthopaedic applications of AM-derived products. Twenty-five articles described preclinical and clinical trials of AM-derived products for orthopaedic sports medicine. Because the level of evidence obtained from this search was not adequate for systematic review or meta-analysis, a current concepts review on the anatomy, physiology, and clinical uses of AM-derived products is presented. Amniotic membranes have many promising applications in sports medicine. They are a source of pluripotent cells, highly organized collagen, antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory cytokines, immunomodulators, and matrix proteins. These properties may make it beneficial when applied as tissue engineering scaffolds, improving tissue organization in healing, and treatment of the arthritic joint. The current body of evidence in sports medicine is heavily biased toward in vitro and animal studies, with little to no human clinical data. Nonetheless, 14 companies or distributors offer commercial AM products. The preparation and formulation of these products alter their biological and mechanical properties, and a thorough understanding of these differences will help guide the use of AM-derived products in sports medicine research. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Characterization of Yersinia pestis Interactions with Human Neutrophils In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia C. Dudte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, zoonotic, bacterial pathogen, and the causative agent of plague. The bubonic form of plague occurs subsequent to deposition of bacteria in the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Neutrophils are recruited to the site of infection within the first few hours and interactions between neutrophils and Y. pestis have been demonstrated in vivo. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils have been considered non-permissive to Y. pestis intracellular survival. Several studies have shown killing of the vast majority of Y. pestis ingested by human neutrophils. However, survival of 10–15% of Y. pestis after phagocytosis by neutrophils is consistently observed. Furthermore, these surviving bacteria eventually replicate within and escape from the neutrophils. We set out to further characterize the interactions between Y. pestis and human neutrophils by (1 determining the effects of known Y. pestis virulence factors on bacterial survival after uptake by neutrophils, (2 examining the mechanisms employed by the neutrophil to kill the majority of intracellular Y. pestis, (3 determining the activation phenotype of Y. pestis-infected neutrophils, and (4 characterizing the Y. pestis-containing phagosome in neutrophils. We infected human neutrophils in vitro with Y. pestis and assayed bacterial survival and uptake. Deletion of the caf1 gene responsible for F1 capsule production resulted in significantly increased uptake of Y. pestis. Surprisingly, while the two-component regulator PhoPQ system is important for survival of Y. pestis within neutrophils, pre-induction of this system prior to infection did not increase bacterial survival. We used an IPTG-inducible mCherry construct to distinguish viable from non-viable intracellular bacteria and determined the association of the Y. pestis-containing phagosome with neutrophil NADPH-oxidase and markers of primary, secondary and tertiary granules. Additionally, we show that inhibition of

  1. Phagocytic activities of hemocytes from the deep-sea symbiotic mussels Bathymodiolus japonicus, B. platifrons, and B. septemdierum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Akihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Ohishi, Kazue; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    Deep-sea mytilid mussels harbor symbiotic bacteria in their gill epithelial cells that are horizontally or environmentally transmitted to the next generation of hosts. To understand the immune defense system in deep-sea symbiotic mussels, we examined the hemocyte populations of the symbiotic Bathymodiolus mussel species Bathymodiolus japonicus, Bathymodiolus platifrons, and Bathymodiolus septemdierum, and characterized three types of hemocytes: agranulocytes (AGs), basophilic granulocytes (BGs), and eosinophilic granulocytes (EGs). Of these, the EG cells were the largest (diameter, 8.4-10.0 μm) and had eosinophilic cytoplasm with numerous eosinophilic granules (diameter, 0.8-1.2 μm). Meanwhile, the BGs were of medium size (diameter, 6.7-8.0 μm) and contained small basophilic granules (diameter, 0.3-0.4 μm) in basophilic cytoplasm, and the AGs, the smallest of the hemocytes (diameter, 4.8-6.0 μm), had basophilic cytoplasm lacking granules. A lectin binding assay revealed that concanavalin A bound to all three hemocyte types, while wheat germ agglutinin bound exclusively to EGs and BGs. The total hemocyte population densities within the hemolymph of all three Bathymodiolus mussel species were similar (8.4-13.3 × 10(5) cells/mL), and the percentages of circulating AGs, BGs, and EGs in the hemolymph of these organisms were 44.7-48.5%, 14.3-17.6%, and 34.3-41.0%, respectively. To analyze the functional differences between these hemocytes, the phagocytic activity and post-phagocytic phagosome-lysosome fusion events were analyzed in each cell type using a fluorescent Alexa Fluor(®) 488-conjugated Escherichia coli bioparticle and a LysoTracker(®) lysosomal marker, respectively. While the AGs exhibited no phagocytic activity, both types of granulocytes were phagocytic. Of the three hemocyte types, the EGs exhibited the highest level of phagocytic activity as well as rapid phagosome-lysosome fusion, which occurred within 2 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the BGs showed

  2. DNA methylation regulates transcriptional homeostasis of algal endosymbiosis in the coral model Aiptasia

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong; Liew, Yi Jin; Cui, Guoxin; Cziesielski, Maha J; Zahran, Noura Ibrahim Omar; Michell, Craig T; Voolstra, Christian R.; Aranda, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is the cornerstone of coral reef ecosystems. Although research is focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this symbiosis, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation and acclimation to environmental change, is unknown. To assess the role of DNA methylation in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, we analyzed genome-wide CpG methylation, histone associations, and transcriptomic states of symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones in the model system Aiptasia. We find methylated genes are marked by histone H3K36me3 and show significant reduction of spurious transcription and transcriptional noise, revealing a role of DNA methylation in the maintenance of transcriptional homeostasis. Changes in DNA methylation and expression show enrichment for symbiosis-related processes such as immunity, apoptosis, phagocytosis recognition and phagosome formation, and unveil intricate interactions between the underlying pathways. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation provides an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional homeostasis during symbiosis.

  3. DNA methylation regulates transcriptional homeostasis of algal endosymbiosis in the coral model Aiptasia

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong

    2017-11-03

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is the cornerstone of coral reef ecosystems. Although research is focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this symbiosis, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation and acclimation to environmental change, is unknown. To assess the role of DNA methylation in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, we analyzed genome-wide CpG methylation, histone associations, and transcriptomic states of symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones in the model system Aiptasia. We find methylated genes are marked by histone H3K36me3 and show significant reduction of spurious transcription and transcriptional noise, revealing a role of DNA methylation in the maintenance of transcriptional homeostasis. Changes in DNA methylation and expression show enrichment for symbiosis-related processes such as immunity, apoptosis, phagocytosis recognition and phagosome formation, and unveil intricate interactions between the underlying pathways. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation provides an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional homeostasis during symbiosis.

  4. The Crucial Role of Biofilms in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival within Macrophages and Colonization of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Aslanyan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus capable of causing life threatening meningoencephalitis in patients with impaired immunity. This microbe primarily infects the host via inhalation but has the ability to disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS either as a single cell or inside of macrophages. Upon traversing the blood brain barrier, C. neoformans has the capacity to form biofilm-like structures known as cryptococcomas. Hence, we will discuss the C. neoformans elements contributing to biofilm formation including the fungus’ ability to survive in the acidic environment of a macrophage phagosome and inside of the CNS. The purpose of this mini-review is to instill fresh interest in understanding the importance of biofilms on fungal pathogenesis.

  5. Fluorescence microscopic and microautoradiographic studies on apoptosis of bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong; Han Xiaofeng

    1997-09-01

    The apoptosis of bone tumor cells treated with internal irradiation by 153 Sm-EDTMP was studied. The morphological changes in bone tumor cells were observed by fluorescence microscopic and microautoradiographic observations. It was found that bone tumor cells internally irradiated with 153 Sm-EDTMP, displayed significant nuclear fragmentation and marked pyknosis as well as apoptotic bodies formation. The microautoradiographic study showed that 153 Sm-EDTMP could permeate through cell membrane and displayed membrane-seeking condensation in tumor cells. Soon afterwards 153 Sm-EDTMP could be phagocytized by the tumor cells and distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus in the form of phagosome. With the prolongation of observing time, the membrane-bounded apoptotic bodies was observed. With the lengthening of internal irradiation time by 153 Sm-EDTMP, the inhibition rate of proliferation of bone tumor cells increased progressively. (10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.)

  6. Innate immune recognition of Francisella tularensis: activation of type-I interferons and the inflammasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Wiley Jones

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that can cause severe disease in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Primarily residing in host macrophages, F. tularensis escapes phagosomal degradation, and replicates in the macrophage cytosol. The macrophage uses a series of pattern recognition receptors to detect conserved microbial molecules from invading pathogens, and initiates an appropriate host response. In the cytosol, F. tularensis is recognized by the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex responsible for the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-1. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and release of proinflammatory cytokines and host cell death. Here we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation by F. tularensis, and its consequences both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the coordination between the inflammasome and other cytosolic host responses, and the evidence for F. tularensis virulence factors that suppress inflammasome activation.

  7. The use of Listeria monocytogenes as a DNA delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that lyses the phagosomal vacuole of infected cells, proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm and can actively enter adjacent cells. The pathogen is therefore well suited to exploitation as a vector for the delivery of DNA to target cells as the lifecycle favors cellular targeting with vector amplification and the potential for cell-to-cell spread. We have recently demonstrated DNA transfer by L. monocytogenes in growing tumors in murine models. Our approach exploited an ampicillin sensitive stain of L. monocytogenes which can be lysed through systemic administration of ampicillin to facilitate release of plasmid DNA for expression by infected mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the implications of this technology and the potential for future improvements of the system.

  8. The molecular biology and diagnostics of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    The rapid development of biotechnological methods provides the potential of dissecting the molecular structure of microorganisms. In this review the molecular biology of chlamydia is described. The genus Chlamydia contains three species C. trachomatis, C. psittaci, and C. pneumonia which all...... are important human pathogens. Chlamydia is obligate intracellular bacteria with a unique biphasic life cycle. The extracellularly chlamydial elementary bodies (EB) are small, metabolic inactive, infectious particles with a tight outer cell membrane. After internalization into host cells the chlamydial...... of chlamydia have not yet been found. The adhesin(s) is unknown, and no factor of importance for the inhibition of fusion between phagosome and host cell lysosomes has been described. A protein similar to the mip gene product of Legionella pneumofila may be a possible candidate for a pathogenicity factor...

  9. Melanin targets LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP): A novel pathogenetic mechanism in fungal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamilos, Georgios; Akoumianaki, Tonia; Kyrmizi, Irene; Brakhage, Axel; Beauvais, Anne; Latge, Jean-Paul

    2016-05-03

    Intracellular swelling of conidia of the major human airborne fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus results in surface exposure of immunostimulatory pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and triggers activation of a specialized autophagy pathway called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) to promote fungal killing. We have recently discovered that, apart from PAMPs exposure, cell wall melanin removal during germination of A. fumigatus is a prerequisite for activation of LAP. Importantly, melanin promotes fungal pathogenicity via targeting LAP, as a melanin-deficient A. fumigatus mutant restores its virulence upon conditional inactivation of Atg5 in hematopoietic cells of mice. Mechanistically, fungal cell wall melanin selectively excludes the CYBA/p22phox subunit of NADPH oxidase from the phagosome to inhibit LAP, without interfering with signaling regulating cytokine responses. Notably, inhibition of LAP is a general property of melanin pigments, a finding with broad physiological implications.

  10. Phospholipase A and the interaction of Rickettsia prowazekii and mouse fibroblasts (L-929 cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, H.H.; Miller, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    L-929 cells were killed when approximately 50 viable Rickettsia prowazekii organisms per L-cell were centrifuged onto a monolayer. The glycerophospholipids of the L-cell were hydrolyzed to lysophosphatides and free fatty acids. Concomitantly, there was a loss of membrane integrity as shown by release of lactate dehydrogenase and 86Rb and permeability to trypan blue dye. No glycerophospholipid hydrolysis or cytotoxicity occurred when the rickettsiae were inactivated by heat, UV irradiation, N-ethylmaleimide, or metabolic inhibitors before their addition to the L-929 cells. On the other hand, treatment of the L929 cells with the cytoskeleton agents colchicine or cytochalasin B or with N-ethylmaleimide inhibited neither the phospholipase A activity nor the loss of membrane integrity. Cytochalasin B-treated cells could be damaged by even small numbers of rickettsiae. We suggest that this phospholipase A activity is used by the rickettsiae to escape from the phagosomes into the cytoplasm of host cells

  11. Comparative anatomy of phagocytic and immunological synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eNiedergang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of phagocytic synapse. Here we discuss both types of structures, their organization and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated.

  12. Influence of starvation, triton WR-1339 and [131I]-human serum albumin on rat liver lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikumar, P.; Ninjoor, V.

    1986-01-01

    The response of rat liver lysosomes to starvation and administration of lysosomotropic agents viz. Triton WR-1339 and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin, was assessed in terms of their distribution pattern after isopycnic sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Starvation induced changes in lysosomes appeared to be similar to that produced by the detergent uptake. Both the treatments caused a distinct decline in the equilibration densities of the organelles. On the other hand, injected labelled protein failed to comigrate with the lysosomal markers in starved as well as Triton treated rats and conspicuously remained in a region of high specific gravity in the gradient. These findings indicate retarded fusion between secondary lysosomes and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin containing phagosomes in the livers of rats subjected to starvation or detergent treatment. (author)

  13. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  14. Long-term smoking alters abundance of over half of the proteome in bronchoalveolar lavage cell in smokers with normal spirometry, with effects on molecular pathways associated with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxing; Kohler, Maxie; Heyder, Tina; Forsslund, Helena; Garberg, Hilde K; Karimi, Reza; Grunewald, Johan; Berven, Frode S; Magnus Sköld, C; Wheelock, Åsa M

    2018-03-08

    Smoking represents a significant risk factor for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To identify dysregulation of specific proteins and pathways in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells associated with smoking, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based shotgun proteomics analyses were performed on BAL cells from healthy never-smokers and smokers with normal lung function from the Karolinska COSMIC cohort. Multivariate statistical modeling, multivariate correlations with clinical data, and pathway enrichment analysis were performed. Smoking exerted a significant impact on the BAL cell proteome, with more than 500 proteins representing 15 molecular pathways altered due to smoking. The majority of these alterations occurred in a gender-independent manner. The phagosomal- and leukocyte trans endothelial migration (LTM) pathways significantly correlated with FEV 1 /FVC as well as the percentage of CD8 + T-cells and CD8 + CD69 + T-cells in smokers. The correlations to clinical parameters in healthy never-smokers were minor. The significant correlations of proteins in the phagosome- and LTM pathways with activated cytotoxic T-cells (CD69+) and the level of airway obstruction (FEV 1 /FVC) in smokers, both hallmarks of COPD, suggests that these two pathways may play a role in the molecular events preceding the development of COPD in susceptible smokers. Both pathways were found to be further dysregulated in COPD patients from the same cohort, thereby providing further support to this hypothesis. Given that not all smokers develop COPD in spite of decades of smoking, it is also plausible that some of the molecular pathways associated with response to smoking exert protective mechanisms to smoking-related pathologies in resilient individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02627872 ; Retrospectively registered on December 9, 2015.

  15. Pathogenic mycobacteria achieve cellular persistence by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick Type C disease cellular pathway [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fineran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis remains a major global health concern. The ability to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion is a key mechanism by which intracellular mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, achieve long-term persistence within host cells. The mechanisms underpinning this key intracellular pro-survival strategy remain incompletely understood. Host macrophages infected with intracellular mycobacteria share phenotypic similarities with cells taken from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC, a rare lysosomal storage disease in which endocytic trafficking defects and lipid accumulation within the lysosome lead to cell dysfunction and cell death. We investigated whether these shared phenotypes reflected an underlying mechanistic connection between mycobacterial intracellular persistence and the host cell pathway dysfunctional in NPC.  Methods. The induction of NPC phenotypes in macrophages from wild-type mice or obtained from healthy human donors was assessed via infection with mycobacteria and subsequent measurement of lipid levels and intracellular calcium homeostasis. The effect of NPC therapeutics on intracellular mycobacterial load was also assessed.  Results. Macrophages infected with intracellular mycobacteria phenocopied NPC cells, exhibiting accumulation of multiple lipid types, reduced lysosomal Ca 2+ levels, and defects in intracellular trafficking. These NPC phenotypes could also be induced using only lipids/glycomycolates from the mycobacterial cell wall. These data suggest that intracellular mycobacteria inhibit the NPC pathway, likely via inhibition of the NPC1 protein, and subsequently induce altered acidic store Ca 2+ homeostasis. Reduced lysosomal calcium levels may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of phagosome-lysosome fusion in mycobacterial infection. Treatments capable of correcting defects in NPC mutant cells via modulation of host cell calcium were of benefit in

  16. THE DIFFERENCE OF MAP1LC3 LEVEL AS MACROPHAGE AUTOPHAGY MARKER BETWEEN RESISTANT AND SENSITIVE TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS ON RIFAMPICIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian novita W

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB is an intracelular bacteria that live in the host macrophage cells. Several organs can be affected by tuberculosis but most major illnesses are lung diseases. Immediately after infection, MTB will be phagocytosed by the alveolar macrophage cells and can survive in the phagosome. The macrophage plays a role in innate immunity towards an infection using autophagy by removing the microbe directly via phagocytosis. When bacteria phagocytosized, vacuole membrane formed double membranes called autophagosome, and followed by degradation by lysosome, which known as autolysosome. Induction of autophagy can be observed on the formation of microtubule-associated proteins 1B lightchain 3B (MAP1LC3B/LC3. MAP1LC3B is protein that have role at autophagic way for selection autophagy substrate and biogenesis. In this study we are used serum from patients TB with rifampicin resistant and rifampicin sensitive as control. Samples were divided using gene expert to differentiate between resistant and sensitive rifampicin.This research aims to compare MAP1LC3B levels in resistant and sensitive rifampicin to study macrophages respond in autophagic way in tuberculosis patients, and give information for define therapy plan to improve therapy for MDR-TB patients. Type of this research is a case control study design with cross sectional research with each groups sample is 19 from age 18-65 years old. Result, MAP1LC3B serum levels on the rifampicin resistant group are lower compared to rifampicin sensitive group. This occur because MTB is able to hide and evade innate immune defense mechanisms. MTB can maintain intracellular growth inside the phagosome by inhibiting phagolysosome formation in autophagy process especially inhibit MAP1LC3B formation by PDIM.

  17. DotU and VgrG, core components of type VI secretion systems, are essential for Francisella LVS pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette E Bröms

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a disease which requires bacterial escape from phagosomes of infected macrophages. Once in the cytosol, the bacterium rapidly multiplies, inhibits activation of the inflammasome and ultimately causes death of the host cell. Of importance for these processes is a 33-kb gene cluster, the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI, which is believed to encode a type VI secretion system (T6SS. In this study, we analyzed the role of the FPI-encoded proteins VgrG and DotU, which are conserved components of type VI secretion (T6S clusters. We demonstrate that in F. tularensis LVS, VgrG was shown to form multimers, consistent with its suggested role as a trimeric membrane puncturing device in T6SSs, while the inner membrane protein DotU was shown to stabilize PdpB/IcmF, another T6SS core component. Upon infection of J774 cells, both ΔvgrG and ΔdotU mutants did not escape from phagosomes, and subsequently, did not multiply or cause cytopathogenicity. They also showed impaired activation of the inflammasome and marked attenuation in the mouse model. Moreover, all of the DotU-dependent functions investigated here required the presence of three residues that are essentially conserved among all DotU homologues. Thus, in agreement with a core function in T6S clusters, VgrG and DotU play key roles for modulation of the intracellular host response as well as for the virulence of F. tularensis.

  18. Host and Pathogen Copper-Transporting P-Type ATPases Function Antagonistically during Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Khan, Aslam; Shanbhag, Vinit; Cavet, Jennifer S; Chan, Jefferson; Weisman, Gary A; Petris, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Copper is an essential yet potentially toxic trace element that is required by all aerobic organisms. A key regulator of copper homeostasis in mammalian cells is the copper-transporting P-type ATPase ATP7A, which mediates copper transport from the cytoplasm into the secretory pathway, as well as copper export across the plasma membrane. Previous studies have shown that ATP7A-dependent copper transport is required for killing phagocytosed Escherichia coli in a cultured macrophage cell line. In this investigation, we expanded on these studies by generating Atp7a LysMcre mice, in which the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in cells of the myeloid lineage, including macrophages. Primary macrophages isolated from Atp7a LysMcre mice exhibit decreased copper transport into phagosomal compartments and a reduced ability to kill Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium compared to that of macrophages isolated from wild-type mice. The Atp7a LysMcre mice were also more susceptible to systemic infection by S Typhimurium than wild-type mice. Deletion of the S Typhimurium copper exporters, CopA and GolT, was found to decrease infection in wild-type mice but not in the Atp7a LysMcre mice. These studies suggest that ATP7A-dependent copper transport into the phagosome mediates host defense against S Typhimurium, which is counteracted by copper export from the bacteria via CopA and GolT. These findings reveal unique and opposing functions for copper transporters of the host and pathogen during infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown David M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter. Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively, such as elemental carbon (EC90, commercial carbon (Printex 90, diesel particulate matter (DEP and urban dust (UD, were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only.

  20. Pathogenic mycobacteria achieve cellular persistence by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick Type C disease cellular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineran, Paul; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Lack, Nathan A; Platt, Nick; Davis, Lianne C; Morgan, Anthony J; Höglinger, Doris; Tatituri, Raju Venkata V; Clark, Simon; Williams, Ian M; Tynan, Patricia; Al Eisa, Nada; Nazarova, Evgeniya; Williams, Ann; Galione, Antony; Ory, Daniel S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Russell, David G; Brenner, Michael B; Sim, Edith; Platt, Frances M

    2016-11-18

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health concern. The ability to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion is a key mechanism by which intracellular mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis , achieve long-term persistence within host cells. The mechanisms underpinning this key intracellular pro-survival strategy remain incompletely understood. Host macrophages infected with persistent mycobacteria share phenotypic similarities with cells taken from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC), a rare lysosomal storage disease in which endocytic trafficking defects and lipid accumulation within the lysosome lead to cell dysfunction and cell death. We investigated whether these shared phenotypes reflected an underlying mechanistic connection between mycobacterial intracellular persistence and the host cell pathway dysfunctional in NPC. The induction of NPC phenotypes in macrophages from wild-type mice or obtained from healthy human donors was assessed via infection with mycobacteria and subsequent measurement of lipid levels and intracellular calcium homeostasis. The effect of NPC therapeutics on intracellular mycobacterial load was also assessed. Macrophages infected with persistent intracellular mycobacteria phenocopied NPC cells, exhibiting accumulation of multiple lipid types, reduced lysosomal Ca 2+ levels, and defects in intracellular trafficking. These NPC phenotypes could also be induced using only lipids/glycomycolates from the mycobacterial cell wall. These data suggest that persistent intracellular mycobacteria inhibit the NPC pathway, likely via inhibition of the NPC1 protein, and subsequently induce altered acidic store Ca 2+ homeostasis. Reduced lysosomal calcium levels may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of phagosome-lysosome fusion in mycobacterial infection. Treatments capable of correcting defects in NPC mutant cells via modulation of host cell calcium were of benefit in promoting clearance of mycobacteria

  1. Pathogenic mycobacteria achieve cellular persistence by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick Type C disease cellular pathway [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fineran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis remains a major global health concern. The ability to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion is a key mechanism by which intracellular mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, achieve long-term persistence within host cells. The mechanisms underpinning this key intracellular pro-survival strategy remain incompletely understood. Host macrophages infected with persistent mycobacteria share phenotypic similarities with cells taken from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC, a rare lysosomal storage disease in which endocytic trafficking defects and lipid accumulation within the lysosome lead to cell dysfunction and cell death. We investigated whether these shared phenotypes reflected an underlying mechanistic connection between mycobacterial intracellular persistence and the host cell pathway dysfunctional in NPC. Methods. The induction of NPC phenotypes in macrophages from wild-type mice or obtained from healthy human donors was assessed via infection with mycobacteria and subsequent measurement of lipid levels and intracellular calcium homeostasis. The effect of NPC therapeutics on intracellular mycobacterial load was also assessed. Results. Macrophages infected with persistent intracellular mycobacteria phenocopied NPC cells, exhibiting accumulation of multiple lipid types, reduced lysosomal Ca2+ levels, and defects in intracellular trafficking. These NPC phenotypes could also be induced using only lipids/glycomycolates from the mycobacterial cell wall. These data suggest that persistent intracellular mycobacteria inhibit the NPC pathway, likely via inhibition of the NPC1 protein, and subsequently induce altered acidic store Ca2+ homeostasis. Reduced lysosomal calcium levels may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of phagosome-lysosome fusion in mycobacterial infection. Treatments capable of correcting defects in NPC mutant cells via modulation of host cell calcium were

  2. S1PR3 Signaling Drives Bacterial Killing and Is Required for Survival in Bacterial Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, JinChao; Chen, QiXing; Wu, XiaoLiang; Zhao, DongYan; Reuveni, Hadas; Licht, Tamar; Xu, MengLong; Hu, Hu; Hoeft, Andreas; Ben-Sasson, Shmuel A; Shu, Qiang; Fang, XiangMing

    2017-12-15

    Efficient elimination of pathogenic bacteria is a critical determinant in the outcome of sepsis. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) mediates multiple aspects of the inflammatory response during sepsis, but whether S1PR3 signaling is necessary for eliminating the invading pathogens remains unknown. To investigate the role of S1PR3 in antibacterial immunity during sepsis. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments were performed using cell and murine models. S1PR3 levels were determined in patients with sepsis and healthy volunteers. S1PR3 protein levels were up-regulated in macrophages upon bacterial stimulation. S1pr3 -/- mice showed increased mortality and increased bacterial burden in multiple models of sepsis. The transfer of wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages rescued S1pr3 -/- mice from lethal sepsis. S1PR3-overexpressing macrophages further ameliorated the mortality rate of sepsis. Loss of S1PR3 led to markedly decreased bacterial killing in macrophages. Enhancing endogenous S1PR3 activity using a peptide agonist potentiated the macrophage bactericidal function and improved survival rates in multiple models of sepsis. Mechanically, the reactive oxygen species levels were decreased and phagosome maturation was delayed in S1pr3 -/- macrophages due to impaired recruitment of vacuolar protein-sorting 34 to the phagosomes. In addition, S1RP3 expression levels were elevated in monocytes from patients with sepsis. Higher levels of monocytic S1PR3 were associated with efficient intracellular bactericidal activity, better immune status, and preferable outcomes. S1PR3 signaling drives bacterial killing and is essential for survival in bacterial sepsis. Interventions targeting S1PR3 signaling could have translational implications for manipulating the innate immune response to combat pathogens.

  3. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  4. Turnover of rod photoreceptor outer segments. II. Membrane addition and loss in relationship to light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besharse, J.C.; Hollyfield, J.G.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of disk addition to rod outer segments (ROS) varies widely in Xenopus laevis tadpoles kept in cyclic light (12L:12D). When measured as radioactive band ( 3 H-band) displacement during the 2nd day after injection of [ 3 H]leucine, 75% of the daily increment of displacement occurred during the first 8 h of light. During the same interval, the number of open disks at the ROS base increased more than threefold. During the last 8 h of darkness, 3 H-band displacement was undetectable and the number of open disks was reduced. These observations suggest the possibility that disk addition may occur discontinuously. During the 3rd and 4th days after injection of [ 3 H]leucine, maximal displacement of the 3 H-band occurred later in the day than on the 2nd day, its movement no longer corresponding to the increase in open disks. This delay in 3 H-band displacement may reflect a time delay as a result of propagation of compressive stress in an elastic ROS system. Maximal disk loss from ROS as reflected in counts of phagosomes in the pigment epithelium occurred within 1 h of light exposure, and phagosome counts remained high for 4 h before declining to a low level in darkness. Modified lighting regimes affected the daily rhythms of shedding and disk addition differently, suggesting that control mechanisms for the two processes are not directly coupled. During 3 days in darkness, disk addition was reduced 50% compared to controls (12L:12D), whereas shedding was reduced by about 40%. Although reduced in level, shedding occurred as a free-running circadian rhythm

  5. In Vivo Immunotoxicity of SiO2@(Y0.5Gd0.45Eu0.052O3 as Dual-Modality Nanoprobes

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    Xiumei Tian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully synthesized SiO2@(Y0.5Gd0.45Eu0.052O3 nanocomposites as a potential dual-modality nanoprobe for molecular imaging in vitro. However, their immunotoxicity assessment in vivo remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of our dual-modality nanoprobes was assayed in terms of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was investigated by monitoring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, cluster of differentiation (CD markers and cytokines in Balb/c mice. The data show that the in vitro biocompatibility was satisfactory. In addition, the immunotoxicity data revealed there are no significant changes in the expression levels of CD11b and CD71 between the nanoprobe group and the Gd in a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA chelator (Gd-DTPA group 24 h after injection in Balb/c mice (p > 0.05. Importantly, there are significant differences in the expression levels of CD206 and CD25 as well as the secretion of IL-4 and the generation of ROS 24 h after injection (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images showed that few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of liver and lung. In conclusion, the toxic effects of our nanoprobes may mainly result from the aggregation of particles in phagosomes. This accumulation may damage the microstructure of the cells and generate oxidative stress reactions that further stimulate the immune response. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the in vivo immunotoxicity of these rare earth-based biomaterials at the molecular level before molecular imaging in vivo.

  6. A physical/psychological and biological stress combine to enhance endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Emeny, Rebecca T.; Gao, Donghong; Ault, Jeffrey G.; Kasten-Jolly, Jane; Lawrence, David A., E-mail: david.lawrence@health.ny.gov

    2015-12-01

    The generation of an immune response against infectious and other foreign agents is substantially modified by allostatic load, which is increased with chemical, physical and/or psychological stressors. The physical/psychological stress from cold-restraint (CR) inhibits host defense against Listeria monocytogenes (LM), due to early effects of the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE) from sympathetic nerves on β1-adrenoceptors (β1AR) of immune cells. Although CR activates innate immunity within 2 h, host defenses against bacterial growth are suppressed 2–3 days after infection (Cao and Lawrence 2002). CR enhances inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production. The early innate activation leads to cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) changes of immune cells. Lymphocytes from CR-treated mice express fewer surface thiols. Splenic and hepatic immune cells also have fewer proteins with free thiols after CR and/or LM, and macrophages have less glutathione after the in vivo CR exposure or exposure to NE in vitro. The early induction of CR-induced oxidative stress elevates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which could interfere with keeping phagocytized LM within the phagosome or re-encapsuling LM by autophagy once they escape from the phagosome. ER stress-related proteins, such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), have elevated expression with CR and LM. The results indicate that CR enhances the unfolded protein response (UPR), which interferes with host defenses against LM. Thus, it is postulated that increased stress, as exists with living conditions at low socioeconomic conditions, can lower host defenses against pathogens because of oxidative and ER stress processes. - Highlights: • Cold-restraint (physical/psychological stress) induces early oxidative stress. • The oxidative stress relates to catecholamine signaling beta-adrenoceptors. • Physical/psychological stress combines infection enhancing inflammation. • Endoplasmic reticulum

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on the peroxide content of a pure polyunsaturated lipid dispersion and of lipids and membranes derived from Acholeplasma laidlawii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.C.; Cramp, W.A. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit); Chapman, D. (Royal Free Hospital, London (UK))

    1984-01-01

    Dispersions of a pure unsaturated phospholipid, dilinoleoylphosphatidyl choline, formed conjugated diene hydroperoxides when irradiated in air with 7 MeV electrons (150 Gy and 300 Gy). Peroxide formation was optimized when the dispersions were irradiated in air at 37/sup 0/C at a dose rate of 5 Gy/min. No significant loss of linoleic acid from the irradiated phospholipid dispersions was observed after doses of 150 or 300 Gy. Small amounts of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material were formed in irradiated unsaturated phospholipid dispersions. However, lipids or membranes isolated from 48 hour cultures of Acholeplasma laidlawii grown in media supplemented with either linoleic or linolenic acid did not appear to be peroxidized by irradiation under the same conditions.

  8. Comparison of exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells and synovial membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yuchen; Zhao, Bizeng; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Li, Qing; Zhang, Juntao; Ding, Jian; Chen, Yunfeng; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. In the past decade, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used widely for the treatment of OA. A potential mechanism of MSC-based therapies has been attributed to the paracrine secretion of trophic factors, in which exosomes may play a major role. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of exosomes secreted by synovial membrane MSCs (SMMSC-Exos) and exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iMSC-Exos) on the treatment of OA. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs and synovial membrane MSCs were characterized by flow cytometry. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were isolated using an ultrafiltration method. Tunable resistive pulse-sensing analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and western blots were used to identify exosomes. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were injected intra-articularly in a mouse model of collagenase-induced OA and the efficacy of exosome injections was assessed by macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemistry analysis. We also evaluated the effects of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos on proliferation and migration of human chondrocytes by cell-counting and scratch assays, respectively. The majority of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were approximately 50-150 nm in diameter and expressed CD9, CD63, and TSG101. The injection of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos both attenuated OA in the mouse OA model, but iMSC-Exos had a superior therapeutic effect compared with SMMSC-Exos. Similarly, chondrocyte migration and proliferation were stimulated by both iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos, with iMSC-Exos exerting a stronger effect. The present study demonstrated that iMSC-Exos have a greater therapeutic effect on OA than SMMSC-Exos. Because autologous iMSCs are theoretically inexhaustible, iMSC-Exos may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA.

  9. Ethylene/ethane permeation, diffusion and gas sorption properties of carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from the prototype ladder polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1)

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio; Ma, Xiaohua; Litwiller, Eric; Pinnau, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Fine-tuning the microporosity of PIM-1 by heat treatment was applied to develop a suitable carbon molecular sieve membrane for ethylene/ethane separation. Pristine PIM-1 films were heated from 400 to 800 °C under inert N2 atmosphere (< 2 ppm O2

  10. A new mechanism of communication between stem cells involving vertical transfer of mRNA by its intacellular delivery within membrane-derived microvesicles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ratajczak, J.; Miekus, K.; Kucia, M.; Dvořák, Petr; Ratajczak, M. Z.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 11 (2004), s. 1 ISSN 1528-0020. [2004 Annual meeting of American Society of Hematology . 04.12.2004-07.12.2004, San Diego] Keywords : mRNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. A new mechanism of communication between stem cells involving vertacal transfer of mRNA by its intracellular delivery within membrane-derived microvesicles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miekus, K.; Kucia, M.; Dvořák, Petr; Ratajczak, M. Z.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 11 (2004), s. 1 ISSN 1528-0020. [2004 Annual meeting of American Society of Hematology . 04.12.2004-07.12.2004, San Diego] Keywords : ESMV Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Transcription factor σB plays an important role in the production of extracellular membrane-derived vesicles in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria produce extracellular outer membrane vesicles (OMVs that interact with host cells. Unlike Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about the production and role of extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs in Gram-positive bacteria. The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can survive under extreme environmental and energy stress conditions and the transcription factor σ(B is involved in this survival ability. Here, we first determined the production of MVs from L. monocytogenes and evaluated whether general stress transcription factor σ(B affected production of MVs in L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes secreted MVs during in vitro broth culture. The wild-type strain actively produced MVs approximately nine times more and also produced more intact shapes of MVs than those of the isogenic ΔsigB mutant. A proteomic analysis showed that 130 and 89 MV proteins were identified in the wild-type and ΔsigB mutant strains, respectively. Wild-type strain-derived MVs contained proteins regulated by σ(B such as transporters (OpuCA and OpuCC, stress response (Kat, metabolism (LacD, translation (InfC, and cell division protein (FtsZ. Gene Ontology (GO enrichment analysis showed that wild-type-derived MV proteins corresponded to several GO terms, including response to stress (heat, acid, and bile resistance and extracellular polysaccharide biosynthetic process, but not the ΔsigB mutant. Internalin B (InlB was almost three times more contained in MVs derived from the wild-type strain than in MVs derived from the ΔsigB mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that σ(B plays a pivotal role in the production of MVs and protein profiles contained in MVs. L. monocytogenes MVs may contribute to host infection and survival ability under various stressful conditions.

  13. Embryonic cholesterol esterification is regulated by a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in yolk sac membrane-derived endodermal epithelial cells.

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    Siou-Huei Wang

    Full Text Available During avian embryonic development, endodermal epithelial cells (EECs absorb yolk through the yolk sac membrane. Sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT is important for esterification and yolk lipid utilization during development. Because the major enzyme for yolk sac membrane cholesteryl ester synthesis is SOAT1, we cloned the avian SOAT1 promoter and elucidated the cellular functions of SOAT1. Treatments with either glucagon, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX, an adenylate cyclase activator (forskolin, a cAMP analog (dibutyryl-cAMP, or a low glucose concentration all increased SOAT1 mRNA accumulation in EECs from Japanese quail, suggesting that SOAT1 is regulated by nutrients and hormones through a cAMP-dependent pathway. Activity of protein kinase A (PKA was increased by IBMX, whereas co-treatment with the PKA inhibitor, H89 negated the increase in PKA activity. Cyclic AMP-induced EECs had greater cholesterol esterification than untreated EECs. By promoter deletion and point-mutation, the cAMP-response element (-349 to -341 bp was identified as critical in mediating transcription of SOAT1. In conclusion, expression of SOAT1 was regulated by a cAMP-dependent pathway and factors that increase PKA will increase SOAT1 to improve the utilization of lipids in the EECs and potentially modify embryonic growth.

  14. Ethylene/ethane permeation, diffusion and gas sorption properties of carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from the prototype ladder polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1)

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2016-01-05

    Fine-tuning the microporosity of PIM-1 by heat treatment was applied to develop a suitable carbon molecular sieve membrane for ethylene/ethane separation. Pristine PIM-1 films were heated from 400 to 800 °C under inert N2 atmosphere (< 2 ppm O2). At 400 °C, PIM-1 self-cross-linked and developed polar carbonyl and hydroxyl groups due to partial dioxane splitting in the polymer backbone. Significant degradation occurred at 600 °C due to carbonization of PIM-1 and resulted in 30% increase in cumulative surface area compared to its cross-linked predecessor. In addition, PIM-1-based CMS developed smaller ultramicropores with increasing pyrolysis temperature, which enhanced their molecular sieving capability by restricted diffusion of ethylene and ethane through the matrix due to microstructural carbon densification. Consequently, the pure-gas ethylene permeability (measured at 35 °C and 2 bar) decreased from 1600 Barrer for the pristine PIM-1 to 1.3 Barrer for the amorphous carbon generated at 800 °C, whereas the ethylene/ethane pure-gas selectivity increased significantly from 1.8 to 13.

  15. Acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem-like phenotypes within chitosan-hyaluronan membrane-derived 3D tumor spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Jang; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Cancer drug development has to go through rigorous testing and evaluation processes during pre-clinical in vitro studies. However, the conventional two-dimensional (2D) in vitro culture is often discounted by the insufficiency to present a more typical tumor microenvironment. The multicellular tumor spheroids have been a valuable model to provide more comprehensive assessment of tumor in response to therapeutic strategies. Here, we applied chitosan-hyaluronan (HA) membranes as a platform to promote three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid formation. The biological features of tumor spheroids of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells on chitosan-HA membranes were compared to those of 2D cultured cells in vitro. The cells in tumor spheroids cultured on chitosan-HA membranes showed higher levels of stem-like properties and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as NANOG, SOX2, CD44, CD133, N-cadherin, and vimentin, than 2D cultured cells. Moreover, they exhibited enhanced invasive activities and multidrug resistance by the upregulation of MMP2, MMP9, BCRC5, BCL2, MDR1, and ABCG2 as compared with 2D cultured cells. The grafting densities of HA affected the tumor sphere size and mRNA levels of genes on the substrates. These evidences suggest that chitosan-HA membranes may offer a simple and valuable biomaterial platform for rapid generation of tumor spheroids in vitro as well as for further applications in cancer stem cell research and cancer drug screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lactoferricin Peptides Increase Macrophages' Capacity To Kill Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia; Moreira, Ana C; Nazmi, Kamran; Moniz, Tânia; Vale, Nuno; Rangel, Maria; Gomes, Paula; Bolscher, Jan G M; Rodrigues, Pedro N; Bastos, Margarida; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections cause a significant burden of disease and death worldwide. Their treatment is long, toxic, costly, and increasingly prone to failure due to bacterial resistance to currently available antibiotics. New therapeutic options are thus clearly needed. Antimicrobial peptides represent an important source of new antimicrobial molecules, both for their direct activity and for their immunomodulatory potential. We have previously reported that a short version of the bovine antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin with amino acids 17 to 30 (LFcin17-30), along with its variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, killed Mycobacterium avium in broth culture. In the present work, those peptides were tested against M. avium living inside its natural host cell, the macrophage. We found that the peptides increased the antimicrobial action of the conventional antibiotic ethambutol inside macrophages. Moreover, the d-enantiomer of the lactoferricin peptide (d-LFcin17-30) was more stable and induced significant killing of intracellular mycobacteria by itself. Interestingly, d-LFcin17-30 did not localize to M. avium -harboring phagosomes but induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the formation of lysosomes and autophagosome-like vesicles. These results lead us to conclude that d-LFcin17-30 primes macrophages for intracellular microbial digestion through phagosomal maturation and/or autophagy, culminating in mycobacterial killing. IMPORTANCE The genus Mycobacterium comprises several pathogenic species, including M. tuberculosis , M. leprae , M. avium , etc. Infections caused by these bacteria are particularly difficult to treat due to their intrinsic impermeability, low growth rate, and intracellular localization. Antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as potential treatment tools, as they have a high spectrum of activity, low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we

  17. Crucial Role of Legionella pneumophila TolC in the Inhibition of Cellular Trafficking in the Protistan Host Paramecium tetraurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Takashi; Hara, Naho; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Fujishima, Masahiro; Watarai, Masahisa

    2018-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, which is a major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. In the environment, this bacterium survives in free-living protists such as amoebae and Tetrahymena . The association of L. pneumophila and protists leads to the replication and spread of this bacterium. Thus, from a public health perspective, their association can enhance the risk of L. pneumophila infection for humans. Paramecium spp. are candidates of natural hosts of L. pneumophila , but their detailed relationships remain unclear. In the present study, we used an environmental strain, L. pneumophila Ofk308 (Ofk308) and Paramecium tetraurelia st110-1a to reveal the relationship between L. pneumophila and Paramecium spp. Ofk308 was cytotoxic to P. tetraurelia in an infection-dependent manner. We focused on TolC, a component of the type I secretion system, which is a virulence factor of L. pneumophila toward protists and found that cytotoxicity was dependent on TolC but not on other T1SS components. Further, the number of bacteria in P. tetraurelia was not associated with cytotoxicity and TolC was not involved in the mechanism of resistance against the digestion of P. tetraurelia in Ofk308. We used a LysoTracker to evaluate the maturation process of P. tetraurelia phagosomes containing Ofk308. We found that there was no difference between Ofk308 and the tolC -deletion mutant. To assess the phagocytic activity of P. tetraurelia , Texas Red-conjugated dextran-uptake assays were performed. Ofk308 inhibited phagosome formation by P. tetraurelia through a TolC-dependent mechanism. Further, we evaluated the excretion of Legionella -containing vacuoles from P. tetraurelia . We found that P. tetraurelia failed to excrete undigested Ofk308 and that Ofk308 remained within cells through a TolC-dependent mechanism. Our results suggest that TolC is essential for L. pneumophila to remain within Paramecium cells and to show cytotoxicity

  18. Crucial Role of Legionella pneumophila TolC in the Inhibition of Cellular Trafficking in the Protistan Host Paramecium tetraurelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nishida

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, which is a major causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. In the environment, this bacterium survives in free-living protists such as amoebae and Tetrahymena. The association of L. pneumophila and protists leads to the replication and spread of this bacterium. Thus, from a public health perspective, their association can enhance the risk of L. pneumophila infection for humans. Paramecium spp. are candidates of natural hosts of L. pneumophila, but their detailed relationships remain unclear. In the present study, we used an environmental strain, L. pneumophila Ofk308 (Ofk308 and Paramecium tetraurelia st110-1a to reveal the relationship between L. pneumophila and Paramecium spp. Ofk308 was cytotoxic to P. tetraurelia in an infection-dependent manner. We focused on TolC, a component of the type I secretion system, which is a virulence factor of L. pneumophila toward protists and found that cytotoxicity was dependent on TolC but not on other T1SS components. Further, the number of bacteria in P. tetraurelia was not associated with cytotoxicity and TolC was not involved in the mechanism of resistance against the digestion of P. tetraurelia in Ofk308. We used a LysoTracker to evaluate the maturation process of P. tetraurelia phagosomes containing Ofk308. We found that there was no difference between Ofk308 and the tolC-deletion mutant. To assess the phagocytic activity of P. tetraurelia, Texas Red-conjugated dextran-uptake assays were performed. Ofk308 inhibited phagosome formation by P. tetraurelia through a TolC-dependent mechanism. Further, we evaluated the excretion of Legionella-containing vacuoles from P. tetraurelia. We found that P. tetraurelia failed to excrete undigested Ofk308 and that Ofk308 remained within cells through a TolC-dependent mechanism. Our results suggest that TolC is essential for L. pneumophila to remain within Paramecium cells and to show

  19. Molecular characterization of tlyA gene product, Rv1694 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A non-conventional hemolysin and a ribosomal RNA methyl transferase

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    Ahmed Neesar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a virulent bacillus causing tuberculosis, a disease responsible for million deaths each year worldwide. In order to understand its mechanism of pathogenesis in humans and to help control tuberculosis, functions of numerous Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes are being characterized. In this study we report the dual functionality of tlyA gene product of Mycobacterium tuberculosis annotated as Rv1694, a 268 amino acid long basic protein. Results The recombinant purified Rv1694 protein was found to exhibit hemolytic activity in vitro. It showed concentration and time-dependent hemolysis of rabbit and human erythrocytes. Multiple oligomeric forms (dimers to heptamers of this protein were seen on the membranes of the lysed erythrocytes. Like the oligomers of conventional, well-known, pore-forming toxins, the oligomers of Rv1694 were found to be resistant to heat and SDS, but were susceptible to reducing agents like β-mercaptoethanol as it had abolished the hemolytic activity of Rv1694 indicating the role of disulfide bond(s. The Rv1694 generated de novo by in vitro transcription and translation also exhibited unambiguous hemolysis confirming the self assembly and oligomerization properties of this protein. Limited proteolytic digestion of this protein has revealed that the amino terminus is susceptible while in solution but is protected in presence of membrane. Striking feature of Rv1694 is its presence on the cell wall of E. coli as visualized by confocal microscopy. The surface expression is consistent with the contact dependent haemolytic ability of E. coli expressing this protein. Also, immune serum specific to this protein inhibits the contact dependent hemolysis. Moreover, Rv1694 protein binds to and forms stable oligomers on the macrophage phagosomal membranes. In addition to all these properties, E. coli expressing Rv1694 was found to be susceptible to the antibiotic capreomycin as its growth

  20. Immune Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata (Caenogastropoda, Ampullariidae: Phagocytic Hemocytes in the Circulation and the Kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Cueto

    Full Text Available Hemocytes in the circulation and kidney islets, as well as their phagocytic responses to microorganisms and fluorescent beads, have been studied in Pomacea canaliculata, using flow cytometry, light microscopy (including confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Three circulating hemocyte types (hyalinocytes, agranulocytes and granulocytes were distinguished by phase contrast microscopy of living cells and after light and electron microscopy of fixed material. Also, three different populations of circulating hemocytes were separated by flow cytometry, which corresponded to the three hemocyte types. Hyalinocytes showed a low nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, and no apparent granules in stained material, but showed granules of moderate electron density under TEM (L granules and at least some L granules appear acidic when labeled with LysoTracker Red. Both phagocytic and non-phagocytic hyalinocytes lose most (if not all L granules when exposed to microorganisms in vitro. The phagosomes formed differed whether hyalinocytes were exposed to yeasts or to Gram positive or Gram negative bacteria. Agranulocytes showed a large nucleus/cytoplasm ratio and few or no granules. Granulocytes showed a low nucleus/cytoplasm ratio and numerous eosinophilic granules after staining. These granules are electron dense and rod-shaped under TEM (R granules. Granulocytes may show merging of R granules into gigantic ones, particularly when exposed to microorganisms. Fluorescent bead exposure of sorted hemocytes showed phagocytic activity in hyalinocytes, agranulocytes and granulocytes, but the phagocytic index was significantly higher in hyalinocytes. Extensive hemocyte aggregates ('islets' occupy most renal hemocoelic spaces and hyalinocyte-like cells are the most frequent component in them. Presumptive glycogen deposits were observed in most hyalinocytes in renal islets (they also occur in the circulation but less frequently and may mean that

  1. Evidence of the presence of a functional Dot/Icm type IV-B secretion system in the fish bacterial pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

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    Fernando A Gómez

    Full Text Available Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fish bacterial pathogen that has severely challenged the sustainability of the Chilean salmon industry since its appearance in 1989. As this Gram-negative bacterium has been poorly characterized, relevant aspects of its life cycle, virulence and pathogenesis must be identified in order to properly design prophylactic procedures. This report provides evidence of the functional presence in P. salmonis of four genes homologous to those described for Dot/Icm Type IV Secretion Systems. The Dot/Icm System, the major virulence mechanism of phylogenetically related pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii, is responsible for their intracellular survival and multiplication, conditions that may also apply to P. salmonis. Our results demonstrate that the four P. salmonis dot/icm homologues (dotB, dotA, icmK and icmE are expressed both during in vitro tissue culture cells infection and growing in cell-free media, suggestive of their putative constitutive expression. Additionally, as it happens in other referential bacterial systems, temporal acidification of cell-free media results in over expression of all four P. salmonis genes, a well-known strategy by which SSTIV-containing bacteria inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion to survive. These findings are very important to understand the virulence mechanisms of P. salmonis in order to design new prophylactic alternatives to control the disease.

  2. P2X7 receptors regulate multiple types of membrane trafficking responses and non-classical secretion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan; Dubyak, George R

    2009-06-01

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) triggers a remarkably diverse array of membrane trafficking responses in leukocytes and epithelial cells. These responses result in altered profiles of cell surface lipid and protein composition that can modulate the direct interactions of P2X7R-expressing cells with other cell types in the circulation, in blood vessels, at epithelial barriers, or within sites of immune and inflammatory activation. Additionally, these responses can result in the release of bioactive proteins, lipids, and large membrane complexes into extracellular compartments for remote communication between P2X7R-expressing cells and other cells that amplify or modulate inflammation, immunity, and responses to tissue damages. This review will discuss P2X7R-mediated effects on membrane composition and trafficking in the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular organelles, as well as actions of P2X7R in controlling various modes of non-classical secretion. It will review P2X7R regulation of: (1) phosphatidylserine distribution in the PM outer leaflet; (2) shedding of PM surface proteins; (3) release of PM-derived microvesicles or microparticles; (4) PM blebbing; (5) cell-cell fusion resulting in formation of multinucleate cells; (6) phagosome maturation and fusion with lysosomes; (7) permeability of endosomes with internalized pathogen-associated molecular patterns; (8) permeability/integrity of mitochondria; (9) exocytosis of secretory lysosomes; and (10) release of exosomes from multivesicular bodies.

  3. Efferocytosis is an innate antibacterial mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Constance J; Booty, Matthew G; Rosebrock, Tracy R; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Desjardins, Danielle M; Keren, Iris; Fortune, Sarah M; Remold, Heinz G; Behar, Samuel M

    2012-09-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists within macrophages in an arrested phagosome and depends upon necrosis to elude immunity and disseminate. Although apoptosis of M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages is associated with reduced bacterial growth, the bacteria are relatively resistant to other forms of death, leaving the mechanism underlying this observation unresolved. We find that after apoptosis, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages are rapidly taken up by uninfected macrophages through efferocytosis, a dedicated apoptotic cell engulfment process. Efferocytosis of M. tuberculosis sequestered within an apoptotic macrophage further compartmentalizes the bacterium and delivers it along with the apoptotic cell debris to the lysosomal compartment. M. tuberculosis is killed only after efferocytosis, indicating that apoptosis itself is not intrinsically bactericidal but requires subsequent phagocytic uptake and lysosomal fusion of the apoptotic body harboring the bacterium. While efferocytosis is recognized as a constitutive housekeeping function of macrophages, these data indicate that it can also function as an antimicrobial effector mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

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    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  5. Melanogenesis in dermal melanocytes of Japanese Silky chicken embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani-Machado, C F; Freitas, P F; Faraco, C D

    2009-08-01

    The Japanese Silky chicken (SK) shows dermal and visceral hyperpigmentation. This study characterizes ultrastructurally the melanin granules developing in dermal melanocytes of the dorsal skin of SK, in an attempt to better understand the processes of melanogenesis in these permanently ectopic cells. The steps of melanogenesis are similar to those described for epidermal melanocytes, with melanosomes going from stage I to IV but, in SK, the maturation occurs in the cell body, as well as in the cytoplasmic processes. At stage III, the deposition of melanin is cumulative and can aggregate in rounded structures, which combine to turn into the mature granule. The final destiny of mature melanosomes is still unclear, although it was observed that dermal macrophages can accumulate melanin granules in their phagosomes. Even with the close proximity between melanocytes and other dermal cells, the transference of melanosomes was not observed. Our findings indicate that melanogenesis in dermal melanocytes in SK has the same morphological characteristics found in epidermal melanocytes, but the functional aspect still remains to be elucidated.

  6. Phagocytosis in Teleosts. Implications of the New Cells Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ángeles Esteban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is the process by which cells engulf some solid particles to form internal vesicles known as phagosomes. Phagocytosis is in fact a specific form of endocytosis involving the vesicular interiorization of particles. Phagocytosis is essentially a defensive reaction against infection and invasion of the body by foreign substances and, in the immune system, phagocytosis is a major mechanism used to remove pathogens and/or cell debris. For these reasons, phagocytosis in vertebrates has been recognized as a critical component of the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens. Furthermore, more recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis is also crucial for tissue homeostasis and remodeling. Professional phagocytes in teleosts are monocyte/macrophages, granulocytes and dendritic cells. Nevertheless, in recent years phagocytic properties have also been attributed to teleost lymphocytes and thrombocytes. The possible implications of such cells on this important biological process, new factors affecting phagocytosis, evasion of phagocytosis or new forms of phagocytosis will be considered and discussed.

  7. Hijacking of the Host Ubiquitin Network by Legionella pneumophila

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    Jiazhang Qiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is critical for regulation of numerous eukaryotic cellular processes such as protein homeostasis, cell cycle progression, immune response, DNA repair, and vesicular trafficking. Ubiquitination often leads to the alteration of protein stability, subcellular localization, or interaction with other proteins. Given the importance of ubiquitination in the regulation of host immunity, it is not surprising that many infectious agents have evolved strategies to interfere with the ubiquitination network with sophisticated mechanisms such as functional mimicry. The facultative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila is phagocytosed by macrophages and is able to replicate within a niche called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. The biogenesis of LCV is dependent upon the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system which delivers more than 330 effector proteins into host cytosol. The optimal intracellular replication of L. pneumophila requires the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, membranes of the bacterial phagosome are enriched with ubiquitinated proteins in a way that requires its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, suggesting the involvement of effectors in the manipulation of the host ubiquitination machinery. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms exploited by L. pneumophila effector proteins to hijack the host ubiquitination pathway.

  8. Recognition of the mycobacterial cord factor by Mincle: relevance for granuloma formation and resistance to tuberculosis

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    Roland eLang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s most successful intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, survives inside macrophages by blocking phagosome maturation and establishes chronic infection characterized by the formation of granulomas. Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM, the mycobacterial cord factor, is the most abundant cell wall lipid of virulent mycobacteria, is sufficient to cause granuloma formation, and has long been known to be a major virulence factor of MTB. Recently, TDM has been shown to activate the Syk-Card9 signaling pathway in macrophages through binding to the C-type lectin receptor Mincle. The Mincle-Card9 pathway is required for activation of macrophages by TDM in vitro and for granuloma formation in vivo following injection of TDM. Whether this pathway is also exploited by MTB to reprogram the macrophage into a comfortable niche has not been explored yet. Several recent studies have investigated the phenotype of Mincle-deficient mice in mycobacterial infection, yielding divergent results in terms of a role for Mincle in host resistance. Here, we review these studies, discuss possible reasons for discrepant results and highlight open questions in the role of Mincle and other C-type lectin receptors in the infection biology of MTB.

  9. Salmonella Intracellular Lifestyles and Their Impact on Host-to-Host Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    More than a century ago, infections by Salmonella were already associated with foodborne enteric diseases with high morbidity in humans and cattle. Intestinal inflammation and diarrhea are hallmarks of infections caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars, and these pathologies facilitate pathogen transmission to the environment. In those early times, physicians and microbiologists also realized that typhoid and paratyphoid fever caused by some Salmonella serovars could be transmitted by "carriers," individuals outwardly healthy or at most suffering from some minor chronic complaint. In his pioneering study of the nontyphoidal serovar Typhimurium in 1967, Takeuchi published the first images of intracellular bacteria enclosed by membrane-bound vacuoles in the initial stages of the intestinal epithelium penetration. These compartments, called Salmonella -containing vacuoles, are highly dynamic phagosomes with differing biogenesis depending on the host cell type. Single-cell studies involving real-time imaging and gene expression profiling, together with new approaches based on genetic reporters sensitive to growth rate, have uncovered unprecedented heterogeneous responses in intracellular bacteria. Subpopulations of intracellular bacteria displaying fast, reduced, or no growth, as well as cytosolic and intravacuolar bacteria, have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo infection models. Recent investigations, most of them focused on the serovar Typhimurium, point to the selection of persisting bacteria inside macrophages or following an autophagy attack in fibroblasts. Here, we discuss these heterogeneous intracellular lifestyles and speculate on how these disparate behaviors may impact host-to-host transmissibility of Salmonella serovars.

  10. Immune Evasion Strategies of Pathogens in Macrophages: the Potential for Limiting Pathogen Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuwei; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Zhang, Shujun

    2017-01-01

    Preventing pathogen transmission to a new host is of major interest to the immunologist and could benefit from a detailed investigation of pathogen immune evasion strategies. The first line of defense against pathogen invasion is provided by macrophages. When they sense pathogens, macrophages initiate signals to inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) subsequently mediating phagocytosis and inflammation. The macrophage immune machinery classically includes two subsets: the activated M1 and the activated M2 that respond accordingly in diverse immune challenges. The lipid and glycogen metabolic pathways work together with the lysosome to help the mature phagosome to degrade and eliminate intracellular pathogens in macrophages. The viral evasion strategies are even more complex due to the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. However, pathogens evolve several strategies to camouflage themselves against immune responses in order to ensure their survival, replication and transmission. These strategies include the muting of PRRs initiated inflammatory responses, attenuation of M1 and/or induction of M2 macrophages, suppression of autophago-lysosomal formation, interference with lipid and glycogen metabolism, and viral mediation of autophagy and apoptosis cross-talk to enhance viral replication. This review focuses on pathogen immune evasion methods and on the strategies used by the host against camouflaged pathogens.

  11. Inflammasome priming is similar for francisella species that differentially induce inflammasome activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G Ghonime

    Full Text Available Inflammasome activation is a two-step process where step one, priming, prepares the inflammasome for its subsequent activation, by step two. Classically step one can be induced by LPS priming followed by step two, high dose ATP. Furthermore, when IL-18 processing is used as the inflammasome readout, priming occurs before new protein synthesis. In this context, how intracellular pathogens such as Francisella activate the inflammasome is incompletely understood, particularly regarding the relative importance of priming versus activation steps. To better understand these events we compared Francisella strains that differ in virulence and ability to induce inflammasome activation for their relative effects on step one vs. step two. When using the rapid priming model, i.e., 30 min priming by live or heat killed Francisella strains (step 1, followed by ATP (step 2, we found no difference in IL-18 release, p20 caspase-1 release and ASC oligomerization between Francisella strains (F. novicida, F. holarctica -LVS and F. tularensis Schu S4. This priming is fast, independent of bacteria viability, internalization and phagosome escape, but requires TLR2-mediated ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to their efficient priming capacity, Francisella strains LVS and Schu S4 were impaired in inflammasome triggering compared to F. novicida. Thus, observed differences in inflammasome activation by F. novicida, LVS and Schu S4 depend not on differences in priming but rather on their propensity to trigger the primed inflammasome.

  12. Cloning and Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Listeriolysin O in Lactobacillus plantarum

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    Masoumeh Hayati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The protein listeriolysin O (LLO encoded by hly gene, is one of the most important virulence factors of Listeria monocytogenes. This highly potent immunogenic cholesterol binding toxin has hemolytic activity, responsible for phagosomal membrane disruption and bacterial escape to the cytoplasm and facilitating the stimulation of CD8+ T cells and Th1 response. Recently pathobiotechnological vaccination using probiotic bacteria have been proposed. One of these strategies is expression of LLO in non-pathogenic bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria as delivery strains. Objectives: Our aim in this study was cloning of hly gene in a Lactobacillus species via pNZ8110, an inducible expression vector which is specific for Lactococcus species. Materials and Methods: hly gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into pNZ8110 by restriction enzymes cutting and ligation method. After transformation and propagation in E. coli MC1061 intermediate host, it was successfully electrotransformed into Lactobacillus plantarum. Results: Gel electrophoresis of colony PCR, extracted plasmids and restriction analysis along with sequencing confirmed the transformation. After induction using supernatant of nisin producer Lactococcus lactis NZ9700 strain, Expression of LLO was confirmed by SDS PAGE and western blot. Conclusion: Here, we have employed a nonpathogenic probiotic strain; Lactobacillus plantarum for the first time to express hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes in order to propose a new vaccine candidate.

  13. Transcriptional Analysis Allows Genome Reannotation and Reveals that Cryptococcus gattii VGII Undergoes Nutrient Restriction during Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aline Gröhs Ferrareze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii is a human and animal pathogen that infects healthy hosts and caused the Pacific Northwest outbreak of cryptococcosis. The inhalation of infectious propagules can lead to internalization of cryptococcal cells by alveolar macrophages, a niche in which C. gattii cells can survive and proliferate. Although the nutrient composition of macrophages is relatively unknown, the high induction of amino acid transporter genes inside the phagosome indicates a preference for amino acid uptake instead of synthesis. However, the presence of countable errors in the R265 genome annotation indicates significant inhibition of transcriptomic analysis in this hypervirulent strain. Thus, we analyzed RNA-Seq data from in vivo and in vitro cultures of C. gattii R265 to perform the reannotation of the genome. In addition, based on in vivo transcriptomic data, we identified highly expressed genes and pathways of amino acid metabolism that would enable C. gattii to survive and proliferate in vivo. Importantly, we identified high expression in three APC amino acid transporters as well as the GABA permease. The use of amino acids as carbon and nitrogen sources, releasing ammonium and generating carbohydrate metabolism intermediaries, also explains the high expression of components of several degradative pathways, since glucose starvation is an important host defense mechanism.

  14. Comparative proteomic exploration of whey proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk using iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Cao, Xueyan; Wu, Rina; Liu, Biao; Ye, Wenhui; Yue, Xiqing; Wu, Junrui

    2017-09-01

    Whey, an essential source of dietary nutrients, is widely used in dairy foods for infants. A total of 584 whey proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk were identified and quantified by the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic method. The 424 differentially expressed whey proteins were identified and analyzed according to gene ontology (GO) annotation, Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway, and multivariate statistical analysis. Biological processes principally involved biological regulation and response to stimulus. Major cellular components were extracellular region part and extracellular space. The most prevalent molecular function was protein binding. Twenty immune-related proteins and 13 proteins related to enzyme regulatory activity were differentially expressed in human and bovine milk. Differentially expressed whey proteins participated in many KEGG pathways, including major complement and coagulation cascades and in phagosomes. Whey proteins show obvious differences in expression in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk, with consequences for biological function. The results here increase our understanding of different whey proteomes, which could provide useful information for the development and manufacture of dairy products and nutrient food for infants. The advanced iTRAQ proteomic approach was used to analyze differentially expressed whey proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk.

  15. The risk assessment of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Long [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine (China); Tian, Xiumei [Guangzhou Medical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); Liu, Jun [Guangdong Ocean University, School of Electronics and Information Technology (China); Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang, E-mail: frankxie2000@yahoo.com [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine (China); Li, Li, E-mail: li2@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center (China)

    2017-02-15

    Our group has synthesized Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T{sub 1}-weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  16. IFNγ-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes: the double-edged swords in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan

    2017-12-01

    IFNγ-producing CD4 + T cells (IFNγ + CD4 + T cells) are the key orchestrators of protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Primarily, these cells act by enabling Mtb-infected macrophages to enforce phagosome-lysosome fusion, produce reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs), and activate autophagy pathways. However, TB is a heterogeneous disease and a host of clinical and experimental findings has also implicated IFNγ + CD4 + T cells in TB pathogenesis. High frequency of IFNγ + CD4 + T cells is the most invariable feature of the active disease. Active TB patients mount a heightened IFNγ + CD4 + T cell response to mycobacterial antigens and demonstrate an IFNγ-inducible transcriptomic signature. IFNγ + CD4 + T cells have also been shown to mediate TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) observed in a subset of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV- and Mtb-coinfected people. The pathological face of IFNγ + CD4 + T cells during mycobacterial infection is further uncovered by studies in the animal model of TB-IRIS and in Mtb-infected PD-1 -/- mice. This manuscript encompasses the evidence supporting the dual role of IFNγ + CD4 + T cells during Mtb infection and sheds light on immune mechanisms involved in protection versus pathogenesis.

  17. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Houben, Diane; Demangel, Caroline; Van Ingen, Jakko; Perez, Jorge; Baldeó n, Lucy R.; Abdallah, Abdallah; Caleechurn, Laxmee; Bottai, Daria; Van Zon, Maaike; De Punder, Karin; Van Der Laan, Tridia; Kant, Arie; Bossers-De Vries, Ruth; Willemsen, Peter Th J; Bitter, Wilbert M.; Van Soolingen, Dick; Brosch, Roland; Van Der Wel, Nicole N.; Peters, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol remained unclear. In this current study we used electron microscopy techniques to establish a clear link between translocation and mycobacterial virulence. Pathogenic, patient-derived mycobacteria species were found to translocate to the cytosol, while non-pathogenic species did not. We were further able to link cytosolic translocation with pathogenicity by introducing the ESX-1 (type VII) secretion system into the non-virulent, exclusively phagolysosomal Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, we show that translocation is dependent on the C-terminus of the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6. The C-terminal truncation of ESAT-6 was shown to result in attenuation in mice, again linking translocation to virulence. Together, these data demonstrate the molecular mechanism facilitating translocation of mycobacteria. The ability to translocate from the phagolysosome to the cytosol is with this study proven to be biologically significant as it determines mycobacterial virulence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Extracellular Neutrophil Proteases Are Efficient Regulators of IL-1, IL-33, and IL-36 Cytokine Activity but Poor Effectors of Microbial Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Danielle M; Sullivan, Graeme P; Moran, Hannah B T; Henry, Conor M; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2018-03-13

    Neutrophil granule proteases are thought to function as anti-microbial effectors, cooperatively hydrolyzing microorganisms within phagosomes, or upon deployment into the extracellular space. However, evidence also suggests that neutrophil proteases play an important role in the coordination and escalation of inflammatory reactions, but how this is achieved has been obscure. IL-1 family cytokines are important initiators of inflammation and are typically released via necrosis but require proteolytic processing for activation. Here, we show that proteases liberated from activated neutrophils can positively or negatively regulate the activity of six IL-1 family cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ) with exquisite sensitivity. In contrast, extracellular neutrophil proteases displayed very poor bactericidal activity, exhibiting 100-fold greater potency toward cytokine processing than bacterial killing. Thus, in addition to their classical role as phagocytes, neutrophils play an important immunoregulatory role through deployment of their granule proteases into the extracellular space to process multiple IL-1 family cytokines. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of red ginseng saponin fraction-A (RGSF-A) on phagocytosis and intracellular signaling in Brucella abortus infected RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2015-06-01

    This study indicated that RGSF-A caused a marked reduction in the adherence, internalization and intracellular growth of Brucella abortus in RGSF-A-treated cells. Furthermore, a decline in the intensity of F-actin fluorescence was observed in RGSF-A-treated cells compared with untreated B. abortus-infected cells. In addition, an evaluation of phagocytic signaling proteins by Western blot analysis revealed an apparent reduction of ERK and p38α phosphorylation levels in B. abortus-infected RGSF-A-treated cells compared with the control. Upon intracellular trafficking of the pathogen, a higher number of B. abortus-containing phagosomes colocalized with LAMP-1 in RGSF-A-treated cells compared with control cells. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of B. abortus uptake could be mediated by suppression in the activation of MAPKs signaling proteins phospho-ERK 1/2, and p38 levels. On the other hand, inhibition of intracellular replication results from the enhancement of phagolysosome fusion in host macrophages. This study highlights the phagocytic and intracellular modulating effect of RGSF-A and its potential as an alternative remedy to control B. abortus infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Inhibitory effect of red ginseng acidic polysaccharide from Korean red ginseng on phagocytic activity and intracellular replication of Brucella abortus in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-09-30

    Korean red ginseng (KRG) has long been used in traditional Korean and Oriental medicine. However, the anti-bacterial mechanism and therapeutic efficiency of KGR for intracellular Brucella infection are still unclear. In this study, the bactericidal activity of Korean red ginseng acidic polysaccharide (RGAP) on Brucella (B.) abortus and its cytotoxic effects on RAW 264.7 cells were evaluated. In addition, B. abortus internalization and intracellular replication in macrophages were investigated after RGAP treatment. RGAP-incubated cells displayed a marked reduction in the adherence, internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in macrophages. Furthermore, decreased F-actin fluorescence was observed relative to untreated B. abortus-infected cells. Western blot analysis of intracellular signaling proteins revealed reduced ERK, JNK and p38α phosphorylation levels in B. abortus-infected RGAP-treated cells compared to the control. Moreover, elevated co-localization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) were observed in RGAP-treated cells compared with the control. Overall, the results of this study suggest that RGAP can disrupt phagocytic activity of B. abortus via suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling proteins ERK, JNK and p38 levels and inhibit intracellular replication of B. abortus by enhancing phagolysosome fusion, which may provide an alternative control of brucellosis.

  1. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus -infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus -containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  2. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanan Maiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, tauopathies, and Huntington’s diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  3. Intracellular degradation of microspheres based on cross-linked dextran hydrogels or amphiphilic block copolymers: A comparative Raman microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; Verrijk, Ruud; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Otto, Cees

    2007-01-01

    Micro- and nanospheres composed of biodegradable polymers show promise as versatile devices for the controlled delivery of biopharmaceuticals. Whereas important properties such as drug release profiles, biocompatibility, and (bio)degradability have been determined for many types of biodegradable particles, information about particle degradation inside phagocytic cells is usually lacking. Here, we report the use of confocal Raman microscopy to obtain chemical information about cross-linked dextran hydrogel microspheres and amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-terephthalate/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT/PBT) microspheres inside RAW 264.7 macrophage phagosomes. Using quantitative Raman microspectroscopy, we show that the dextran concentration inside phagocytosed dextran microspheres decreases with cell incubation time. In contrast to dextran microspheres, we did not observe PEGT/PBT microsphere degradation after 1 week of internalization by macrophages, confirming previous studies showing that dextran microsphere degradation proceeds faster than PEGT/PBT degradation. Raman microscopy further showed the conversion of macrophages to lipid-laden foam cells upon prolonged incubation with both types of microspheres, suggesting that a cellular inflammatory response is induced by these biomaterials in cell culture. Our results exemplify the power of Raman microscopy to characterize microsphere degradation in cells and offer exciting prospects for this technique as a noninvasive, label-free optical tool in biomaterials histology and tissue engineering. PMID:17722552

  4. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91phox are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91phox. By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91phox are ∼1.38 and ∼1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane. PMID:18223002

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Huoming; Guo, Tiannan; Li, Wenying; Li, Huiyu; Zhu, Yi; Huang, Shiang

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Engineering nanoparticle-coated bacteria as oral DNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinglian; Wu, Min; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Zhao, Mengmeng; Fang, Weihuan; Chu, Paul K; Ping, Yuan; Tang, Guping

    2015-04-08

    Live attenuated bacteria are of increasing importance in biotechnology and medicine in the emerging field of cancer immunotherapy. Oral DNA vaccination mediated by live attenuated bacteria often suffers from low infection efficiency due to various biological barriers during the infection process. To this end, we herein report, for the first time, a new strategy to engineer cationic nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors that can efficiently deliver oral DNA vaccine for efficacious cancer immunotherapy. By coating live attenuated bacteria with synthetic nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic polymers and plasmid DNA, the protective nanoparticle coating layer is able to facilitate bacteria to effectively escape phagosomes, significantly enhance the acid tolerance of bacteria in stomach and intestines, and greatly promote dissemination of bacteria into blood circulation after oral administration. Most importantly, oral delivery of DNA vaccines encoding autologous vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by this hybrid vector showed remarkable T cell activation and cytokine production. Successful inhibition of tumor growth was also achieved by efficient oral delivery of VEGFR2 with nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors due to angiogenesis suppression in the tumor vasculature and tumor necrosis. This proof-of-concept work demonstrates that coating live bacterial cells with synthetic nanoparticles represents a promising strategy to engineer efficient and versatile DNA vaccines for the era of immunotherapy.

  7. Modelling the host-pathogen interactions of macrophages and Candida albicans using Game Theory and dynamic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dühring, Sybille; Ewald, Jan; Germerodt, Sebastian; Kaleta, Christoph; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    The release of fungal cells following macrophage phagocytosis, called non-lytic expulsion, is reported for several fungal pathogens. On one hand, non-lytic expulsion may benefit the fungus in escaping the microbicidal environment of the phagosome. On the other hand, the macrophage could profit in terms of avoiding its own lysis and being able to undergo proliferation. To analyse the causes of non-lytic expulsion and the relevance of macrophage proliferation in the macrophage- Candida albicans interaction, we employ Evolutionary Game Theory and dynamic optimization in a sequential manner. We establish a game-theoretical model describing the different strategies of the two players after phagocytosis. Depending on the parameter values, we find four different Nash equilibria and determine the influence of the systems state of the host upon the game. As our Nash equilibria are a direct consequence of the model parameterization, we can depict several biological scenarios. A parameter region, where the host response is robust against the fungal infection, is determined. We further apply dynamic optimization to analyse whether macrophage mitosis is relevant in the host-pathogen interaction of macrophages and C. albicans For this, we study the population dynamics of the macrophage- C. albicans interactions and the corresponding optimal controls for the macrophages, indicating the best macrophage strategy of switching from proliferation to attacking fungal cells. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Leishmania donovani resides in modified early endosomes by upregulating Rab5a expression via the downregulation of miR-494

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jitender Kumar; Rastogi, Ruchir

    2017-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens arrest the phagosome maturation in the host cells to avoid transport to lysosomes. In contrast, the Leishmania containing parasitophorous vacuole (PV) is shown to recruit lysosomal markers and thus Leishmania is postulated to be residing in the phagolysosomes in macrophages. Here, we report that Leishmania donovani specifically upregulates the expression of Rab5a by degrading c-Jun via their metalloprotease gp63 to downregulate the expression of miR-494 in THP-1 differentiated human macrophages. Our results also show that miR-494 negatively regulates the expression of Rab5a in cells. Subsequently, L. donovani recruits and retains Rab5a and EEA1 on PV to reside in early endosomes and inhibits transport to lysosomes in human macrophages. Similarly, we have also observed that Leishmania PV also recruits Rab5a by upregulating its expression in human PBMC differentiated macrophages. However, the parasite modulates the endosome by recruiting Lamp1 and inactive pro-CathepsinD on PV via the overexpression of Rab5a in infected cells. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of Rab5a or overexpression of miR-494 in human macrophages significantly inhibits the survival of the parasites. These results provide the first mechanistic insights of parasite-mediated remodeling of endo-lysosomal trafficking to reside in a specialized early endocytic compartment. PMID:28650977

  9. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dumkova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  10. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumkova, Jana; Vrlikova, Lucie; Vecera, Zbynek; Putnova, Barbora; Docekal, Bohumil; Mikuska, Pavel; Fictum, Petr; Hampl, Ales; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-06-03

    The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  11. The proteome of neurofilament-containing protein aggregates in blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Adiutori

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation in biofluids is a poorly understood phenomenon. Under normal physiological conditions, fluid-borne aggregates may contain plasma or cell proteins prone to aggregation. Recent observations suggest that neurofilaments (Nf, the building blocks of neurons and a biomarker of neurodegeneration, are included in high molecular weight complexes in circulation. The composition of these Nf-containing hetero-aggregates (NCH may change in systemic or organ-specific pathologies, providing the basis to develop novel disease biomarkers. We have tested ultracentrifugation (UC and a commercially available protein aggregate binder, Seprion PAD-Beads (SEP, for the enrichment of NCH from plasma of healthy individuals, and then characterised the Nf content of the aggregate fractions using gel electrophoresis and their proteome by mass spectrometry (MS. Western blot analysis of fractions obtained by UC showed that among Nf isoforms, neurofilament heavy chain (NfH was found within SDS-stable high molecular weight aggregates. Shotgun proteomics of aggregates obtained with both extraction techniques identified mostly cell structural and to a lesser extent extra-cellular matrix proteins, while functional analysis revealed pathways involved in inflammatory response, phagosome and prion-like protein behaviour. UC aggregates were specifically enriched with proteins involved in endocrine, metabolic and cell-signalling regulation. We describe the proteome of neurofilament-containing aggregates isolated from healthy individuals biofluids using different extraction methods.

  12. Global Liver Proteome Analysis Using iTRAQ Reveals AMPK-mTOR-Autophagy Signaling Is Altered by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in Newborn Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Baisheng; Yin, Cong; Fan, Qiwen; Yan, Guokai; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xiuzhi; Chen, Changqing; Yang, Xingya; Liu, Lu; Zheng, Zilong; Shi, Min; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-04-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) impairs fetal growth and development, perturbs nutrient metabolism, and increases the risk of developing diseases in postnatal life. However, the underlying mechanisms by which IUGR affects fetal liver development and metabolism remain incompletely understood. Here, we applied a high-throughput proteomics approach and biochemical analysis to investigate the impact of IUGR on the liver of newborn piglets. As a result, we identified 78 differentially expressed proteins in the three biological replicates, including 31 significantly up-regulated proteins and 47 significantly down-regulated proteins. Among them, a majority of differentially expressed proteins were related to nutrient metabolism and mitochondrial function. Additionally, many significantly down-regulated proteins participated in the mTOR signaling pathway and the phagosome maturation signaling pathway. Further analysis suggested that glucose concentration and hepatic glycogen storage were both reduced in IUGR newborn piglets, which may contribute to AMPK activation and mTORC1 inhibition. However, AMPK activation and mTORC1 inhibition failed to induce autophagy in the liver of IUGR neonatal pigs. A possible reason is that PP2Ac, a potential candidate in autophagy regulation, is significantly down-regulated in the liver of IUGR newborn piglets. These findings may provide implications for preventing and treating IUGR in human beings and domestic animals.

  13. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Dong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan; Xiao, Jian; Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo; Zhang, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy

  14. Deficiencies of the lipid-signaling enzymes phospholipase D1 and D2 alter cytoskeletal organization, macrophage phagocytosis, and cytokine-stimulated neutrophil recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahida H Ali

    Full Text Available Cell migration and phagocytosis ensue from extracellular-initiated signaling cascades that orchestrate dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The reorganization is mediated by effector proteins recruited to the site of activity by locally-generated lipid second messengers. Phosphatidic acid (PA, a membrane phospholipid generated by multiple enzyme families including Phospholipase D (PLD, has been proposed to function in this role. Here, we show that macrophages prepared from mice lacking either of the classical PLD isoforms PLD1 or PLD2, or wild-type macrophages whose PLD activity has been pharmacologically inhibited, display isoform-specific actin cytoskeleton abnormalities that likely underlie decreases observed in phagocytic capacity. Unexpectedly, PA continued to be detected on the phagosome in the absence of either isoform and even when all PLD activity was eliminated. However, a disorganized phagocytic cup was observed as visualized by imaging PA, F-actin, Rac1, an organizer of the F-actin network, and DOCK2, a Rac1 activator, suggesting that PLD-mediated PA production during phagocytosis is specifically critical for the integrity of the process. The abnormal F-actin reorganization additionally impacted neutrophil migration and extravasation from the vasculature into interstitial tissues. Although both PLD1 and PLD2 were important in these processes, we also observed isoform-specific functions. PLD1-driven processes in particular were observed to be critical in transmigration of macrophages exiting the vasculature during immune responses such as those seen in acute pancreatitis or irritant-induced skin vascularization.

  15. Acidic pH and divalent cation sensing by PhoQ are dispensable for systemic salmonellae virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Kevin G; Delbecq, Scott P; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Dove, Katja K; Prost, Lynne R; Daley, Margaret E; Zeth, Kornelius; Klevit, Rachel E; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-05-23

    Salmonella PhoQ is a histidine kinase with a periplasmic sensor domain (PD) that promotes virulence by detecting the macrophage phagosome. PhoQ activity is repressed by divalent cations and induced in environments of acidic pH, limited divalent cations, and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Previously, it was unclear which signals are sensed by salmonellae to promote PhoQ-mediated virulence. We defined conformational changes produced in the PhoQ PD on exposure to acidic pH that indicate structural flexibility is induced in α-helices 4 and 5, suggesting this region contributes to pH sensing. Therefore, we engineered a disulfide bond between W104C and A128C in the PhoQ PD that restrains conformational flexibility in α-helices 4 and 5. PhoQ(W104C-A128C) is responsive to CAMP, but is inhibited for activation by acidic pH and divalent cation limitation. phoQ(W104C-A128C) Salmonella enterica Typhimurium is virulent in mice, indicating that acidic pH and divalent cation sensing by PhoQ are dispensable for virulence.

  16. Molecular architecture of the N-type ATPase rotor ring from Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Sarah; Wilkes, Martin; Mills, Deryck J; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Meier, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The genome of the highly infectious bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei harbors an atp operon that encodes an N-type rotary ATPase, in addition to an operon for a regular F-type rotary ATPase. The molecular architecture of N-type ATPases is unknown and their biochemical properties and cellular functions are largely unexplored. We studied the B. pseudomallei N 1 N o -type ATPase and investigated the structure and ion specificity of its membrane-embedded c-ring rotor by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. Of several amphiphilic compounds tested for solubilizing the complex, the choice of the low-density, low-CMC detergent LDAO was optimal in terms of map quality and resolution. The cryoEM map of the c-ring at 6.1 Å resolution reveals a heptadecameric oligomer with a molecular mass of ~141 kDa. Biochemical measurements indicate that the c 17 ring is H + specific, demonstrating that the ATPase is proton-coupled. The c 17 ring stoichiometry results in a very high ion-to-ATP ratio of 5.7. We propose that this N-ATPase is a highly efficient proton pump that helps these melioidosis-causing bacteria to survive in the hostile, acidic environment of phagosomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. Cathepsin B Improves ß-Amyloidosis and Learning and Memory in Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embury, Christine M; Dyavarshetty, Bhagyalaxmi; Lu, Yaman; Wiederin, Jayme L; Ciborowski, Pawel; Gendelman, Howard E; Kiyota, Tomomi

    2017-06-01

    Amyloid-ß (Aß) precursor protein (APP) metabolism engages neuronal endolysosomal pathways for Aß processing and secretion. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), dysregulation of APP leads to excess Aß and neuronal dysfunction; suggesting that neuronal APP/Aß trafficking can be targeted for therapeutic gain. Cathepsin B (CatB) is a lysosomal cysteine protease that can lower Aß levels. However, whether CatB-modulation of Aß improves learning and memory function deficits in AD is not known. To this end, progenitor neurons were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing CatB and recovered cell lysates subjected to proteomic analyses. The results demonstrated Lamp1 deregulation and linkages between CatB and the neuronal phagosome network. Hippocampal injections of adeno-associated virus expressing CatB reduced Aß levels, increased Lamp1 and improved learning and memory. The findings were associated with the emergence of c-fos + cells. The results support the idea that CatB can speed Aß metabolism through lysosomal pathways and as such reduce AD-associated memory deficits.

  18. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Lam

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  19. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Karen K Y; Zheng, Xingji; Forestieri, Roberto; Balgi, Aruna D; Nodwell, Matt; Vollett, Sarah; Anderson, Hilary J; Andersen, Raymond J; Av-Gay, Yossef; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  20. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Houben, Diane

    2012-05-08

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol remained unclear. In this current study we used electron microscopy techniques to establish a clear link between translocation and mycobacterial virulence. Pathogenic, patient-derived mycobacteria species were found to translocate to the cytosol, while non-pathogenic species did not. We were further able to link cytosolic translocation with pathogenicity by introducing the ESX-1 (type VII) secretion system into the non-virulent, exclusively phagolysosomal Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, we show that translocation is dependent on the C-terminus of the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6. The C-terminal truncation of ESAT-6 was shown to result in attenuation in mice, again linking translocation to virulence. Together, these data demonstrate the molecular mechanism facilitating translocation of mycobacteria. The ability to translocate from the phagolysosome to the cytosol is with this study proven to be biologically significant as it determines mycobacterial virulence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Purification and proteomics of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Ana eHerweg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain pathogenic bacteria adopt an intracellular lifestyle and proliferate in eukaryotic host cells. The intracellular niche protects the bacteria from cellular and humoral components of the mammalian immune system, and at the same time, allows the bacteria to gain access to otherwise restricted nutrient sources. Yet, intracellular protection and access to nutrients comes with a price, i.e. the bacteria need to overcome cell-autonomous defense mechanisms, such as the bactericidal endocytic pathway. While a few bacteria rupture the early phagosome and escape into the host cytoplasm, most intracellular pathogens form a distinct, degradation-resistant and replication-permissive membranous compartment. Intracellular bacteria that form unique pathogen vacuoles include Legionella, Mycobacterium, Chlamydia, Simkania and Salmonella species. In order to understand the formation of these pathogen niches on a global scale and in a comprehensive and quantitative manner, an inventory of compartment-associated host factors is required. To this end, the intact pathogen compartments need to be isolated, purified and biochemically characterized. Here, we review recent progress on the isolation and purification of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes, as well as their proteomic characterization by mass spectrometry and different validation approaches. These studies provide the basis for further investigations on the specific mechanisms of pathogen-driven compartment formation.

  2. From the Outside-In: the Francisella tularensis Envelope and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M. Rowe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly-infectious bacterium that causes the rapid, and often lethal disease, tularemia. Many studies have been performed to identify and characterize the virulence factors that F. tularensis uses to infect a wide variety of hosts and host cell types, evade immune defenses, and induce severe disease and death. This review focuses on the virulence factors that are present in the F. tularensis envelope, including capsule, LPS, outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, secretion systems, and various molecules in each of aforementioned sub-compartments. Whereas no single bacterial molecule or molecular complex single-handedly controls F. tularensis virulence, we review here how diverse bacterial systems work in conjunction to subvert the immune system, attach to and invade host cells, alter phagosome/lysosome maturation pathways, replicate in host cells without being detected, inhibit apoptosis, and induce host cell death for bacterial release and infection of adjacent cells. Given that the F. tularensis envelope is the outermost layer of the bacterium, we highlight herein how many of these molecules directly interact with the host to promote infection and disease. These and future envelope studies are important to advance our collective understanding of F. tularensis virulence mechanisms and offer targets for future vaccine development efforts.

  3. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Calcineurin Orchestrates Lateral Transfer of Aspergillus fumigatus during Macrophage Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anand; Kannambath, Shichina; Herbst, Susanne; Rogers, Andrew; Soresi, Simona; Carby, Martin; Reed, Anna; Mostowy, Serge; Fisher, Matthew C; Shaunak, Sunil; Armstrong-James, Darius P

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a lethal mold infection in the immunocompromised host. Understanding initial control of infection and how this is altered in the immunocompromised host are key goals for comprehension of the pathogenesis of pulmonary aspergillosis. To characterize the outcome of human macrophage infection with Aspergillus fumigatus and how this is altered in transplant recipients on calcineurin inhibitor immunosuppressants. We defined the outcome of human macrophage infection with A. fumigatus, as well as the impact of calcineurin inhibitors, through a combination of single-cell fluorescence imaging, transcriptomics, proteomics, and in vivo studies. Macrophage phagocytosis of A. fumigatus enabled control of 90% of fungal germination. However, fungal germination in the late phagosome led to macrophage necrosis. During programmed necroptosis, we observed frequent cell-cell transfer of A. fumigatus between macrophages, which assists subsequent control of germination in recipient macrophages. Lateral transfer occurred through actin-dependent exocytosis of the late endosome in a vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein envelope. Its relevance to the control of fungal germination was also shown by direct visualization in our zebrafish aspergillosis model in vivo. The calcineurin inhibitor FK506 (tacrolimus) reduced cell death and lateral transfer in vitro by 50%. This resulted in uncontrolled fungal germination in macrophages and also resulted in hyphal escape. These observations identify programmed, necrosis-dependent lateral transfer of A. fumigatus between macrophages as an important host strategy for controlling fungal germination. This process is critically dependent on calcineurin. Our studies provide fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of pulmonary aspergillosis in the immunocompromised host.

  5. Ultrastructure of photo-sensory cells and pigment epithelium in the retina of the Antarctic fish Notothenia neglecta Nybelin (Nototheniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucelia Donatti

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic nototheniid Notothenia neglecta is the dominant fish in its habitat in Admiralty Bay, King George Island. They are predators, often ambush feeders, with accurate visual behaviour. For that reason, the ultrastructure of retinal photoreceptive cells and the pigment epithelium was analysed through electron microscopy. Their retina has a pigment epithelium, five different photoreceptors : rods, short single, long single, double, and triple cones, and neurones and support cells. The pigment epithelium is characterised by infoldings of the basal membrane, basal mitochondria, smooth reticule, large amount of microtubules, melanin granules, phagosomes and detached membranes of photoreceptors. Cones show bimembranous discs in the outer segment, an accessory outer segment, a connecting cilium, calycal processes, microtubules in the inferior ellipsoid and myoid, centrioles in the ellipsoid, interdigitating myoid fins and apical microvilli of Muller cells in the myoid and elliposid region. All these features allow all sorts of adaptations to the environmental photic variations, and situate N. neglecta among fish with a complex retina, with cells that are arranged in ten layers, allowing horizontal and vertical integration among them. This allows optimal visual behaviour and perception of food and environment in every Antarctic season.

  6. Irgm1-deficient mice exhibit Paneth cell abnormalities and increased susceptibility to acute intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Gulati, Ajay S; Cantillana, Viviana; Henry, Stanley C; Schmidt, Elyse A; Daniell, Xiaoju; Grossniklaus, Emily; Schoenborn, Alexi A; Sartor, R Balfour; Taylor, Gregory A

    2013-10-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the intestine that has been linked to numerous susceptibility genes, including the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) M (IRGM). IRGs comprise a family of proteins known to confer resistance to intracellular infections through various mechanisms, including regulation of phagosome processing, cell motility, and autophagy. However, despite its association with CD, the role of IRGM and other IRGs in regulating intestinal inflammation is unclear. We investigated the involvement of Irgm1, an ortholog of IRGM, in the genesis of murine intestinal inflammation. After dextran sodium sulfate exposure, Irgm1-deficient [Irgm1 knockout (KO)] mice showed increased acute inflammation in the colon and ileum, with worsened clinical responses. Marked alterations of Paneth cell location and granule morphology were present in Irgm1 KO mice, even without dextran sodium sulfate exposure, and were associated with impaired mitophagy and autophagy in Irgm1 KO intestinal cells (including Paneth cells). This was manifested by frequent tubular and swollen mitochondria and increased LC3-positive autophagic structures. Interestingly, these LC3-positive structures often contained Paneth cell granules. These results suggest that Irgm1 modulates acute inflammatory responses in the mouse intestine, putatively through the regulation of gut autophagic processes, that may be pivotal for proper Paneth cell functioning.

  7. Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells by Legionella Pneumophila: A Common Strategy for all Hosts?

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    Paul S Hoffman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental micro-organism capable of producing an acute lobar pneumonia, commonly referred to as Legionnaires’ disease, in susceptible humans. Legionellae are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, where they survive in biofilms or intracellularly in various protozoans. Susceptible humans become infected by breathing aerosols laden with the bacteria. The target cell for human infection is the alveolar macrophage, in which the bacteria abrogate phagolysosomal fusion. The remarkable ability of L pneumophila to infect a wide range of eukaryotic cells suggests a common strategy that exploits very fundamental cellular processes. The bacteria enter host cells via coiling phagocytosis and quickly subvert organelle trafficking events, leading to formation of a replicative phagosome in which the bacteria multiply. Vegetative growth continues for 8 to 10 h, after which the bacteria develop into a short, highly motile form called the ‘mature form’. The mature form exhibits a thickening of the cell wall, stains red with the Gimenez stain, and is between 10 and 100 times more infectious than agar-grown bacteria. Following host cell lysis, the released bacteria infect other host cells, in which the mature form differentiates into a Gimenez-negative vegetative form, and the cycle begins anew. Virulence of L pneumophila is considered to be multifactorial, and there is growing evidence for both stage specific and sequential gene expression. Thus, L pneumophila may be a good model system for dissecting events associated with the host-parasite interactions.

  8. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Jena

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  9. Rhodococcus equi: the many facets of a pathogenic actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boland, José A; Giguère, Steeve; Hapeshi, Alexia; MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Valero-Rello, Ana

    2013-11-29

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil-dwelling pathogenic actinomycete that causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary pyogranulomatous infections in a variety of animal species and people. Young foals are particularly susceptible and develop a life-threatening pneumonic disease that is endemic at many horse-breeding farms worldwide. R. equi is a facultative intracellular parasite of macrophages that replicates within a modified phagocytic vacuole. Its pathogenicity depends on a virulence plasmid that promotes intracellular survival by preventing phagosome-lysosome fusion. Species-specific tropism of R. equi for horses, pigs and cattle appears to be determined by host-adapted virulence plasmid types. Molecular epidemiological studies of these plasmids suggest that human R. equi infection is zoonotic. Analysis of the recently determined R. equi genome sequence has identified additional virulence determinants on the bacterial chromosome. This review summarizes our current understanding of the clinical aspects, biology, pathogenesis and immunity of this fascinating microbe with plasmid-governed infectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of EspB from the ESX-1 type VII secretion system and insights into its export mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonson, Matthew; Setiaputra, Dheva; Makepeace, Karl A T; Lameignere, Emilie; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Conrady, Deborah G; Bergeron, Julien R; Vuckovic, Marija; DiMaio, Frank; Borchers, Christoph H; Yip, Calvin K; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2015-03-03

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) uses the ESX-1 type VII secretion system to export virulence proteins across its lipid-rich cell wall, which helps permeabilize the host's macrophage phagosomal membrane, facilitating the escape and cell-to-cell spread of Mtb. ESX-1 membranolytic activity depends on a set of specialized secreted Esp proteins, the structure and specific roles of which are not currently understood. Here, we report the X-ray and electron microscopic structures of the ESX-1-secreted EspB. We demonstrate that EspB adopts a PE/PPE-like fold that mediates oligomerization with apparent heptameric symmetry, generating a barrel-shaped structure with a central pore that we propose contributes to the macrophage killing functions of EspB. Our structural data also reveal unexpected direct interactions between the EspB bipartite secretion signal sequence elements that form a unified aromatic surface. These findings provide insight into how specialized proteins encoded within the ESX-1 locus are targeted for secretion, and for the first time indicate an oligomerization-dependent role for Esp virulence factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of Nocardia brasiliensis superoxide dismutase during the early infection of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revol, Agnès; Espinoza-Ruiz, Marisol; Medina-Villanueva, Igor; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2006-12-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is the main agent of actinomycetoma in Mexico, but little is known about its virulence and molecular pathogenic pathways. These facultative intracellular bacteria are able to survive and divide within the host phagocytic cells, in part by neutralizing the reactive oxygen intermediates. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) participates in the intracellular survival of several bacterial species and, in particular, constitutes one of Nocardia asteroides virulence factors. To clarify SOD participation in the N. brasiliensis early infective process, we report its isolation and the consequent comparison of its transcript level. A 630 bp polymerase chain reaction fragment that included most of the coding sequence of N. brasiliensis sodA was cloned. A competitive assay was developed, allowing comparison of bacterial sod expression in exponential culture and 1 h after infecting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice. At that time, there were viable bacteria in the macrophages. The intracellular bacteria presented a clear decrease in their sod transcript amount, although their 16S rRNA (used as an internal control) and hsp levels were maintained or slightly increased, respectively. These results indicate that sodA transcription is not maintained within the SOS bacterial response induced by phagosomal conditions. Further kinetics will be necessary to precisely define sod transcriptional regulation during N. brasiliensis intra-macrophage growth.

  12. PLD$ is involved in phagocytosis of microglia: expression and localization changes of PLD4 are correlated with activation state of microglia.

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    Yoshinori Otani

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D4 (PLD4 is a recently identified protein that is mainly expressed in the ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1-positive microglia in the early postnatal mouse cerebellar white matter. Unlike PLD1 and PLD2, PLD4 exhibits no enzymatic activity for conversion of phosphatidylcholine into choline and phosphatidic acid, and its function is completely unknown. In the present study, we examined the distribution of PLD4 in mouse cerebellar white matter during development and under pathological conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PLD4 expression was associated with microglial activation under such two different circumstances. A primary cultured microglia and microglial cell line (MG6 showed that PLD4 was mainly present in the nucleus, except the nucleolus, and expression of PLD4 was upregulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation. In the analysis of phagocytosis of LPS-stimulated microglia, PLD4 was co-localized with phagosomes that contained BioParticles. Inhibition of PLD4 expression using PLD4 specific small interfering RNA (siRNA in MG6 cells significantly reduced the ratio of phagocytotic cell numbers. These results suggest that the increased PLD4 in the activation process is involved in phagocytosis of activated microglia in the developmental stages and pathological conditions of white matter.

  13. Ubiquilin 1 Promotes IFN-γ-Induced Xenophagy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik T Sakowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb as a pathogen rests upon its ability to grow intracellularly in macrophages. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ is critical in host defense against Mtb and stimulates macrophage clearance of Mtb through an autophagy pathway. Here we show that the host protein ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1 promotes IFN-γ-mediated autophagic clearance of Mtb. Ubiquilin family members have previously been shown to recognize proteins that aggregate in neurodegenerative disorders. We find that UBQLN1 can interact with Mtb surface proteins and associates with the bacilli in vitro. In IFN-γ activated macrophages, UBQLN1 co-localizes with Mtb and promotes the anti-mycobacterial activity of IFN-γ. The association of UBQLN1 with Mtb depends upon the secreted bacterial protein, EsxA, which is involved in permeabilizing host phagosomes. In autophagy-deficient macrophages, UBQLN1 accumulates around Mtb, consistent with the idea that it marks bacilli that traffic through the autophagy pathway. Moreover, UBQLN1 promotes ubiquitin, p62, and LC3 accumulation around Mtb, acting independently of the E3 ligase parkin. In summary, we propose a model in which UBQLN1 recognizes Mtb and in turn recruits the autophagy machinery thereby promoting intracellular control of Mtb. Thus, polymorphisms in ubiquilins, which are known to influence susceptibility to neurodegenerative illnesses, might also play a role in host defense against Mtb.

  14. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H(2)O(2) stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H(2)O(2) and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H(2)O(2) stress. Thus, the primary responses to H(2)O(2), including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ufimtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  16. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals. PMID:26064970

  17. Comparison of the virulence of exopolysaccharide-producing Prevotella intermedia to exopolysaccharide non-producing periodontopathic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takeshi; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Furukawa, Tomoyo; Matsumoto-Mashimo, Chiho; Sugimori, Chieko; Nambu, Takayuki; Obata, Noboru; Walker, Clay B; Leung, Kai-Poon; Fukushima, Hisanori

    2011-08-25

    Evidence in the literature suggests that exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by bacterial cells are essential for the expression of virulence in these organisms. Secreted EPSs form the framework in which microbial biofilms are built. This study evaluates the role of EPS in Prevotella intermedia for the expression of virulence. This evaluation was accomplished by comparing EPS-producing P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 with non-producing P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains ATCC 33277, 381 and W83 for their ability to induce abscess formation in mice and evade phagocytosis. EPS-producing P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 induced highly noticeable abscess lesions in mice at 107 colony-forming units (CFU). In comparison, P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, 381 and W83, which all lacked the ability to produce viscous materials, required 100-fold more bacteria (109 CFU) in order to induce detectable abscess lesions in mice. Regarding antiphagocytic activity, P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 were rarely internalized by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but other strains were readily engulfed and detected in the phagosomes of these phagocytes. These results demonstrate that the production of EPS by P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 could contribute to the pathogenicity of this organism by conferring their ability to evade the host's innate defence response.

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis intercepts Golgi-derived sphingolipids through a Rab14-mediated transport required for bacterial development and replication.

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    Anahí Capmany

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular bacteria that survive and replicate in a bacterial-modified phagosome called inclusion. As other intracellular parasites, these bacteria subvert the phagocytic pathway to avoid degradation in phagolysosomes and exploit trafficking pathways to acquire both energy and nutrients essential for their survival. Rabs are host proteins that control intracellular vesicular trafficking. Rab14, a Golgi-related Rab, controls Golgi to endosomes transport. Since Chlamydia establish a close relationship with the Golgi apparatus, the recruitment and participation of Rab14 on inclusion development and bacteria growth were analyzed. Time course analysis revealed that Rab14 associated with inclusions by 10 h post infection and was maintained throughout the entire developmental cycle. The recruitment was bacterial protein synthesis-dependent but independent of microtubules and Golgi integrity. Overexpression of Rab14 dominant negative mutants delayed inclusion enlargement, and impaired bacteria replication as determined by IFU. Silencing of Rab14 by siRNA also decreased bacteria multiplication and infectivity. By electron microscopy, aberrant bacteria were observed in cells overexpressing the cytosolic negative Rab14 mutant. Our results showed that Rab14 facilitates the delivery of sphingolipids required for bacterial development and replication from the Golgi to chlamydial inclusions. Novel anti-chlamydial therapies could be developed based on the knowledge of how bacteria subvert host vesicular transport events through Rabs manipulation.

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis intercepts Golgi-derived sphingolipids through a Rab14-mediated transport required for bacterial development and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, Anahí; Damiani, María Teresa

    2010-11-22

    Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular bacteria that survive and replicate in a bacterial-modified phagosome called inclusion. As other intracellular parasites, these bacteria subvert the phagocytic pathway to avoid degradation in phagolysosomes and exploit trafficking pathways to acquire both energy and nutrients essential for their survival. Rabs are host proteins that control intracellular vesicular trafficking. Rab14, a Golgi-related Rab, controls Golgi to endosomes transport. Since Chlamydia establish a close relationship with the Golgi apparatus, the recruitment and participation of Rab14 on inclusion development and bacteria growth were analyzed. Time course analysis revealed that Rab14 associated with inclusions by 10 h post infection and was maintained throughout the entire developmental cycle. The recruitment was bacterial protein synthesis-dependent but independent of microtubules and Golgi integrity. Overexpression of Rab14 dominant negative mutants delayed inclusion enlargement, and impaired bacteria replication as determined by IFU. Silencing of Rab14 by siRNA also decreased bacteria multiplication and infectivity. By electron microscopy, aberrant bacteria were observed in cells overexpressing the cytosolic negative Rab14 mutant. Our results showed that Rab14 facilitates the delivery of sphingolipids required for bacterial development and replication from the Golgi to chlamydial inclusions. Novel anti-chlamydial therapies could be developed based on the knowledge of how bacteria subvert host vesicular transport events through Rabs manipulation.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus keratinocyte invasion is mediated by integrin-linked kinase and Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Xu, Stacey X; Rudkouskaya, Alena; McGavin, Martin J; McCormick, John K; Dagnino, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major component of the skin microbiota and causes a large number of serious infections. S. aureus first interacts with epidermal keratinocytes to breach the epidermal barrier through mechanisms not fully understood. By use of primary keratinocytes from mice with epidermis-restricted Ilk gene inactivation and control integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-expressing littermates, we investigated the role of ILK in epidermal S. aureus invasion. Heat-killed, but not live, bacteria were internalized to Rab5- and Rab7-positive phagosomes, and incubation with keratinocyte growth factor increased their uptake 2.5-fold. ILK-deficient mouse keratinocytes internalized bacteria 2- to 4-fold less efficiently than normal cells. The reduced invasion by live S. aureus of ILK-deficient cells was restored in the presence of exogenous, constitutively active Rac1. Thus, Rac1 functions downstream from ILK during invasion. Further, invasion by S. aureus of Rac1-deficient cells was 2.5-fold lower than in normal cells. Paradoxically, staphylococcal cutaneous penetration of mouse skin explants with ILK-deficient epidermis was 35-fold higher than that of normal skin, indicating defects in epidermal barrier function in the absence of ILK. Thus, we identified an ILK-Rac1 pathway essential for bacterial invasion of keratinocytes, and established ILK as a key contributor to prevent invasive staphylococcal cutaneous infection. © FASEB.

  1. The risk assessment of Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Long; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Our group has synthesized Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T_1-weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  2. Platinum-Based Drugs Differentially Affect the Ultrastructure of Breast Cancer Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadia Al-Bahlani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although platinum-based drugs (PBDs are effective anticancer agents, responsive patients eventually become resistant. While resistance of some cancers to PBDs has been explored, the cellular responses of BC cells are not studied yet. Therefore, we aim to assess the differential effects of PBDs on BC ultrastructure. Three representative cells were treated with different concentrations and timing of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin. Changes on cell surface and ultrastructure were detected by scanning (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. In SEM, control cells were semiflattened containing microvilli with extending lamellipodia while treated ones were round with irregular surface and several pores, indicating drug entry. Prolonged treatment resembled distinct apoptotic features such as shrinkage, membrane blebs, and narrowing of lamellipodia with blunt microvilli. TEM detected PBDs’ deposits that scattered among cellular organelles inducing structural distortion, lumen swelling, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Deposits were attracted to fat droplets, explained by drug hydrophobic properties, while later they were located close to cell membrane, suggesting drug efflux. Phagosomes with destructed organelles and deposits were detected as defending mechanism. Understanding BC cells response to PBDs might provide new insight for an effective treatment.

  3. Autophagic dedifferentiation induced by cooperation between TOR inhibitor and retinoic acid signals in budding tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kaz; Yoshida, Takuto; Sekida, Satoko

    2018-01-15

    Asexual bud development in the budding tunicate Polyandrocarpa misakiensis involves transdifferentiation of multipotent epithelial cells, which is triggered by retinoic acid (RA), and thrives under starvation after bud isolation from the parent. This study aimed to determine cell and molecular mechanisms of dedifferentiation that occur during the early stage of transdifferentiation. During dedifferentiation, the numbers of autophagosomes, lysosomes, and secondary lysosomes increased remarkably. Mitochondrial degradation and exosome discharge also occurred in the atrial epithelium. Autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) and lysosomal proton pump A gene (PumpA) were activated during the dedifferentiation stage. When target of rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor was administered to growing buds without isolating them from the parent, phagosomes and secondary lysosomes became prominent. TOR inhibitor induced Atg7 only in the presence of RA. In contrast, when growing buds were treated with RA, lysosomes, secondary lysosomes, and mitochondrial degradation were prematurely induced. RA significantly activated PumpA in a retinoid X receptor-dependent manner. Our results indicate that in P. misakiensis, TOR inhibition and RA signals act in synergy to accomplish cytoplasmic clearance for dedifferentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Run; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance.

  5. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dong, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo [Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rongbo, E-mail: lory456@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  6. Pathology and immune reactivity: understanding multidimensionality in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorhoi, Anca; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2016-03-01

    Heightened morbidity and mortality in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are consequences of complex disease processes triggered by the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb modulates inflammation at distinct stages of its intracellular life. Recognition and phagocytosis, replication in phagosomes and cytosol escape induce tightly regulated release of cytokines [including interleukin (IL)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-10], chemokines, lipid mediators, and type I interferons (IFN-I). Mtb occupies various lung lesions at sites of pathology. Bacteria are barely detectable at foci of lipid pneumonia or in perivascular/bronchiolar cuffs. However, abundant organisms are evident in caseating granulomas and at the cavity wall. Such lesions follow polar trajectories towards fibrosis, encapsulation and mineralization or liquefaction, extensive matrix destruction, and tissue injury. The outcome is determined by immune factors acting in concert. Gradients of cytokines and chemokines (CCR2, CXCR2, CXCR3/CXCR5 agonists; TNF/IL-10, IL-1/IFN-I), expression of activation/death markers on immune cells (TNF receptor 1, PD-1, IL-27 receptor) or abundance of enzymes [arginase-1, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-8, MMP-9] drive genesis and progression of lesions. Distinct lesions coexist such that inflammation in TB encompasses a spectrum of tissue changes. A better understanding of the multidimensionality of immunopathology in TB will inform novel therapies against this pulmonary disease.

  7. Phenotypic assays for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Deboosere, Nathalie; Delorme, Vincent; Queval, Christophe J; Deloison, Gaspard; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Lafont, Frank; Baulard, Alain; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global threat, killing more than one million persons each year. With the constant increase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to first- and second-line drugs, there is an urgent need for the development of new drugs to control the propagation of TB. Although screenings of small molecules on axenic M. tuberculosis cultures were successful for the identification of novel putative anti-TB drugs, new drugs in the development pipeline remains scarce. Host-directed therapy may represent an alternative for drug development against TB. Indeed, M. tuberculosis has multiple specific interactions within host phagocytes, which may be targeted by small molecules. In order to enable drug discovery strategies against microbes residing within host macrophages, we developed multiple fluorescence-based HT/CS phenotypic assays monitoring the intracellular replication of M. tuberculosis as well as its intracellular trafficking. What we propose here is a population-based, multi-parametric analysis pipeline that can be used to monitor the intracellular fate of M. tuberculosis and the dynamics of cellular events such as phagosomal maturation (acidification and permeabilization), zinc poisoning system or lipid body accumulation. Such analysis allows the quantification of biological events considering the host-pathogen interplay and may thus be derived to other intracellular pathogens. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. In vivo immunotoxicity evaluation of Gd2O3 nanoprobes prepared by laser ablation in liquid for MRI preclinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiumei; Guan, Xiaoying; Luo, Ningqi; Yang, Fanwen; Chen, Dihu; Peng, Ye; Zhu, Jixiang; He, Fupo; Li, Li; Chen, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    Gd2O3 nanoprobes prepared by laser ablation in liquid can be used as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. However, their immunotoxicity in vivo remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd2O3 nanoprobe was evaluated in terms of cell uptake, cell viability, and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was detected by monitoring the levels of the immunity mediator, cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in Balb/c mice. The results show that no in vitro cytotoxicity was observed, and no significant changes in the expression levels of CD206 and CD69 between the nanoprobe-injected group and the Gd-DTPA group in mice were observed. Importantly, the immunotoxicity data revealed significant differences in the expression levels of CD40, CD80, CD11b, and reactive oxygen species. In addition, transmission electron microscopy images showed that few Gd2O3 nanoprobes were localized in phagosomes by the endocytic pathway. In conclusion, the toxic effects of our Gd2O3 nanoprobe may be due to endocytosis during which the microstructure or ultrastructure of cells is slightly damaged and induces the generation of an oxidative stress reaction that further stimulates the innate immune response. Therefore, it is important to use a sensitive assay for the in vivo immunotoxicity measurements to evaluate the risk assessment of Gd2O3-based biomaterials at the molecular level.

  9. Autophagy in C. elegans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Nicholas J; Meléndez, Alicia

    2018-04-27

    Autophagy involves the sequestration of cytoplasmic contents in a double-membrane structure referred to as the autophagosome and the degradation of its contents upon delivery to lysosomes. Autophagy activity has a role in multiple biological processes during the development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Basal levels of autophagy are required to remove aggregate prone proteins, paternal mitochondria, and spermatid-specific membranous organelles. During larval development, autophagy is required for the remodeling that occurs during dauer development, and autophagy can selectively degrade components of the miRNA-induced silencing complex, and modulate miRNA-mediated silencing. Basal levels of autophagy are important in synapse formation and in the germ line, to promote the proliferation of proliferating stem cells. Autophagy activity is also required for the efficient removal of apoptotic cell corpses by promoting phagosome maturation. Finally, autophagy is also involved in lipid homeostasis and in the aging process. In this review, we first describe the molecular complexes involved in the process of autophagy, its regulation, and mechanisms for cargo recognition. In the second section, we discuss the developmental contexts where autophagy has been shown to be important. Studies in C. elegans provide valuable insights into the physiological relevance of this process during metazoan development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High pressure pure- and mixed-gas separation of CO2/CH4 by thermally-rearranged and carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from a polyimide of intrinsic microporosity

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2013-11-01

    Natural gas sweetening, one of the most promising venues for the growth of the membrane gas separation industry, is dominated by polymeric materials with relatively low permeabilities and moderate selectivities. One strategy towards improving the gas transport properties of a polymer is enhancement of microporosity either by design of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) or by thermal treatment of polymeric precursors. For the first time, the mixed-gas CO2/CH4 transport properties are investigated for a complete series of thermally-rearranged (TR) (440°C) and carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes (600, 630 and 800°C) derived from a polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-6FDA-OH). The pressure dependence of permeability and selectivity is reported up to 30bar for 1:1, CO2:CH4 mixed-gas feeds at 35°C. The TR membrane exhibited ~15% higher CO2/CH4 selectivity relative to pure-gas feeds due to reductions in mixed-gas CH4 permeability reaching 27% at 30bar. This is attributed to increased hindrance of CH4 transport by co-permeation of CO2. Interestingly, unusual increases in mixed-gas CH4 permeabilities relative to pure-gas values were observed for the CMS membranes, resulting in up to 50% losses in mixed-gas selectivity over the applied pressure range. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. High pressure pure- and mixed-gas separation of CO2/CH4 by thermally-rearranged and carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from a polyimide of intrinsic microporosity

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja; Ma, Xiaohua; Litwiller, Eric; Pinnau, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Natural gas sweetening, one of the most promising venues for the growth of the membrane gas separation industry, is dominated by polymeric materials with relatively low permeabilities and moderate selectivities. One strategy towards improving

  12. Characterization of a Rab11-like GTPase, EhRab11, of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGugan, Glen C; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2003-07-01

    The Entamoeba histolytica Rab11 family of small molecular weight GTPases consists of three members, EhRab11, EhRab11B, and EhRab11C. The functions of these Rabs in Entamoeba have not been determined. Therefore, as an approach to elucidate the role of the Rab11 family of GTPases in Entamoeba, immunofluorescence microscopy was undertaken to define the subcellular localization of one member of this family, EhRab11. Under conditions of growth, EhRab11 displayed a punctate pattern in the cytoplasm of trophozoites. EhRab11 did not colocalize with markers for the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum, pinosomes, phagosomes, or compartments formed by receptor-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that this Rab may not play a role in vesicle trafficking between these organelles. Under conditions of iron and serum starvation, EhRab11 was translocated to the periphery of the cell. The altered cellular localization was accompanied by multinucleation of the cells as well as the acquisition of detergent resistance by the cells, features that are characteristic of Entamoeba cysts. The translocation of EhRab11 to the periphery of the cell during iron and serum starvation was specific as the subcellular localizations of two other Rab GTPases, EhRab7 and EhRabA, were not altered under the same conditions. In addition, the formation of multinucleated cells by inhibition of cytokinesis was not sufficient to induce the translocation of EhRab11 to the cell periphery. Taken together, the data suggest that iron and serum starvation may induce encystation in E. histolytica and that EhRab11 may play a role in this process. Moreover, these studies are the first to describe a putative role for a Rab GTPase in encystation in Entamoeba sp.

  13. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Tolmachova, Tanya; Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; da Silva, Mafalda Lopes; Futter, Clare E; Seabra, Miguel C

    2013-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM) is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1). REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  14. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silène T Wavre-Shapton

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1. REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  15. The Scavenger Protein Apoptosis Inhibitor of Macrophages (AIM) Potentiates the Antimicrobial Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Enhancing Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cáceres, Neus; Marzo, Elena; Valeri, Marta; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages (AIM), a scavenger protein secreted by tissue macrophages, is transcriptionally regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Retinoid X Receptor (RXR) heterodimer. Given that LXR exerts a protective immune response against M. tuberculosis, here we analyzed whether AIM is involved in this response. In an experimental murine model of tuberculosis, AIM serum levels peaked dramatically early after infection with M. tuberculosis, providing an in vivo biological link to the disease. We therefore studied the participation of AIM in macrophage response to M. tuberculosis in vitro. For this purpose, we used the H37Rv strain to infect THP-1 macrophages transfected to stably express AIM, thereby increasing infected macrophage survival. Furthermore, the expression of this protein enlarged foam cell formation by enhancing intracellular lipid content. Phagocytosis assays with FITC-labeled M. tuberculosis bacilli indicated that this protein was not involved in bacterial uptake; however, AIM expression decreased the number of intracellular cfus by up to 70% in bacterial killing assays, suggesting that AIM enhances macrophage mycobactericidal activity. Accordingly, M. tuberculosis-infected AIM-expressing cells upregulated the production of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, real-time PCR analysis showed increased mRNA levels of the antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and defensin 4B. These increases were concomitant with greater cellular concentrations of the autophagy-related molecules Beclin 1 and LC3II, as well as enhanced acidification of mycobacterial phagosomes and LC3 co-localization. In summary, our data support the notion that AIM contributes to key macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis. PMID:24223991

  16. A Kinetic Platform to Determine the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Escherichia coli.

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    Kristin J Adolfsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is used by phagocytic cells of the innate immune response to kill engulfed bacteria. H2O2 diffuses freely into bacteria, where it can wreak havoc on sensitive biomolecules if it is not rapidly detoxified. Accordingly, bacteria have evolved numerous systems to defend themselves against H2O2, and the importance of these systems to pathogenesis has been substantiated by the many bacteria that require them to establish or sustain infections. The kinetic competition for H2O2 within bacteria is complex, which suggests that quantitative models will improve interpretation and prediction of network behavior. To date, such models have been of limited scope, and this inspired us to construct a quantitative, systems-level model of H2O2 detoxification in Escherichia coli that includes detoxification enzymes, H2O2-dependent transcriptional regulation, enzyme degradation, the Fenton reaction and damage caused by •OH, oxidation of biomolecules by H2O2, and repair processes. After using an iterative computational and experimental procedure to train the model, we leveraged it to predict how H2O2 detoxification would change in response to an environmental perturbation that pathogens encounter within host phagosomes, carbon source deprivation, which leads to translational inhibition and limited availability of NADH. We found that the model accurately predicted that NADH depletion would delay clearance at low H2O2 concentrations and that detoxification at higher concentrations would resemble that of carbon-replete conditions. These results suggest that protein synthesis during bolus H2O2 stress does not affect clearance dynamics and that access to catabolites only matters at low H2O2 concentrations. We anticipate that this model will serve as a computational tool for the quantitative exploration and dissection of oxidative stress in bacteria, and that the model and methods used to develop it will provide important templates for the

  17. Global transcriptome profile of Cryptococcus neoformans during exposure to hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress.

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    Rajendra Upadhya

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans to resist oxidative stress is one of its most important virulence related traits. To cope with the deleterious effect of cellular damage caused by the oxidative burst inside the macrophages, C. neoformans has developed multilayered redundant molecular responses to neutralize the stress, to repair the damage and to eventually grow inside the hostile environment of the phagosome. We used microarray analysis of cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 at multiple time points in a nutrient defined medium to identify a transcriptional signature associated with oxidative stress. We discovered that the composition of the medium in which fungal cells were grown and treated had a profound effect on their capacity to degrade exogenous H(2O(2. We determined the kinetics of H(2O(2 breakdown by growing yeast cells under different conditions and accordingly selected an appropriate media composition and range of time points for isolating RNA for hybridization. Microarray analysis revealed a robust transient transcriptional response and the intensity of the global response was consistent with the kinetics of H(2O(2 breakdown by treated cells. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes related to oxidation-reduction, metabolic process and protein catabolic processes identified potential roles of mitochondrial function and protein ubiquitination in oxidative stress resistance. Interestingly, the metabolic pathway adaptation of C. neoformans to H(2O(2 treatment was remarkably distinct from the response of other fungal organisms to oxidative stress. We also identified the induction of an antifungal drug resistance response upon the treatment of C. neoformans with H(2O(2. These results highlight the complexity of the oxidative stress response and offer possible new avenues for improving our understanding of mechanisms of oxidative stress resistance in C. neoformans.

  18. The dynamics of heat shock system activation in Monomac-6 cells upon Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzchalski, P; Jastrzebska, M; Link-Lenczowski, P; Leja-Szpak, A; Bonior, J; Jaworek, J; Okon, K; Wojcik, P

    2014-12-01

    Immune system cells, particularly phagocytes, are exposed to direct contact with pathogens. Because of its nature - elimination of pathogenes - their cytoprotective systems supposed to be quick and forceful. Physiological consequence of phagocytosis for the phagocyte is the apoptotic death to prevent the eventual survival of bacteria as intracellular parasites. However, in some cases, defense systems used by the bacteria force the immune cells to prolong the contact with the pathogen for its effective elimination. Experiments were performed on Monomac-6 cells exposed to live CagA, VacA expressing Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) over different period of time. Total cellular RNA, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins were isolated for polymerase chain reaction, Western-blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. We found that Monomac-6 cells infection with H. pylori resulted in the translocation of the entire cellular content of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the cytoplasm, where its presence could protect cell against toxic products of engulfed bacteria and premature apoptosis. At the same time the nuclear translocation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and activation of HSP70 gene transcription was noticed. Action of HSP70 might to postpone monocyte apoptosis through protecting cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins from damaging effect of bacterial products, what could be the defending mechanism against the toxic stress caused by engulfed bacteria and provide the immune cell with the sufficient amount of time required for neutralization of the bacteria from phagosomes, even at the expense of temporary lack of the protection of nuclear proteins.

  19. Identification of M2 macrophages in anterior pituitary glands of normal rats and rats with estrogen-induced prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ken; Yatabe, Megumi; Tofrizal, Alimuddin; Jindatip, Depicha; Yashiro, Takashi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages are present throughout the anterior pituitary gland. However, the features and function of macrophages in the gland are poorly understood. Recent studies have indicated that there are two main macrophage classes: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). In this study, we examine whether both M1 and M2 macrophages are present in the anterior pituitary gland of rats. Our findings indicate that macrophages that are positive for CD68 (a pan-macrophage marker) were localized near capillaries in rat anterior pituitary gland. These macrophages were positive for iNOS or mannose receptor (MR), which are markers of M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. To determine the morphological characteristics of M2 macrophages under pathological conditions, diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated rats were used as an animal model of prolactinoma. After 2 weeks of DES treatment, a number of MR-immunopositive cells were present in the gland. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that MR-immunopositive M2 macrophages had many small vesicles and moderately large vacuoles in cytoplasm. Phagosomes were sometimes present in cytoplasm. Interestingly, M2 macrophages in prolactinoma tissues did not usually exhibit distinct changes or differences during the normal, hyperplasia and adenoma stages. This study is the first to confirm that both M1 and M2 macrophages are present in the anterior pituitary gland of rats. Moreover, the number of M2 macrophages was greatly increased in rats with DES-induced prolactinoma. Future studies should attempt to characterize the functional role of M2 macrophages in the gland.

  20. Gene expression in the scleractinian Acropora microphthalma exposed to high solar irradiance reveals elements of photoprotection and coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Antonio; Dunlap, Walter C; Cullum, John; Shick, J Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F

    2010-11-12

    The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH) from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues. A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a 'shared metabolic adaptation' between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca(2+)-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis. Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching.

  1. The host immune enhancing agent Korean red ginseng oil successfully attenuates Brucella abortus infection in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Park, Soo Jong; Kim, Kwang Dong; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Suk

    2017-02-23

    Panax ginseng Meyer (Araliaceae), is one of the most valuable traditional Chinese medicines and is used for the treatment of various human diseases. In this study, we elucidated the protective mechanism of the essential oil from Korean red ginseng (RGO) against Brucella infection. The effects of RGO on Brucella abortus viability, NO production, uptake and intracellular growth in macrophages were investigated. Mice were intraperitoneally infected with B. abortus and orally treated with RGO for 14 days. The weights and bacterial numbers from each spleen were monitored, and the sera were evaluated for cytokine production. B. abortus viability was not affected, whereas NO production, internalization and intracellular replication were inhibited in RGO-treated macrophages. Bacterial adherence, F-actin polymerization and MAPK signaling protein phosphorylation (ERK1/2, JNK and p38α) were reduced and the co-localization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was augmented in RGO-treated cells compared to untreated cells. RGO displayed protective effects against cell damage by inhibiting nitrite production during B. abortus infection in macrophages. Moreover, the spleen weight and bacterial burden were lower in the RGO-treated group than in the control group. The uninfected RGO-treated mice displayed increased TNF-α and IFN-γ production, whereas the B. abortus-infected RGO-treated mice showed reduced IL-10 production compared to the control. RGO exhibits protective effects against B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo, which emphasize the beneficial effects of RGO in the prevention and treatment of brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Acanthopanax senticosus on Brain Injury Induced by Simulated Spatial Radiation in Mouse Model Based on Pharmacokinetics and Comparative Proteomics

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    Yingyu Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The active compounds in Acanthopanax senticosus (AS have different pharmacokinetic characteristics in mouse models. Cmax and AUC of Acanthopanax senticosus polysaccharides (ASPS were significantly reduced in radiation-injured mice, suggesting that the blood flow of mouse was blocked or slowed, due to the pathological state of ischemia and hypoxia, which are caused by radiation. In contrast, the ability of various metabolizing enzymes to inactivate, capacity of biofilm transport decrease, and lessening of renal blood flow accounts for radiation, resulting in the accumulation of syringin and eleutheroside E in the irradiated mouse. Therefore, there were higher pharmacokinetic parameters—AUC, MRT, and t1/2 of the two compounds in radiation-injured mouse, when compared with normal mouse. In order to investigate the intrinsic mechanism of AS on radiation injury, AS extract’s protective effects on brain, the main part of mouse that suffered from radiation, were explored. The function of AS extract in repressing expression changes of radiation response proteins in prefrontal cortex (PFC of mouse brain included tubulin protein family (α-, β-tubulin subunits, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (CRMP2, γ-actin, 14-3-3 protein family (14-3-3ζ, ε, heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β, and enolase 2. The results demonstrated the AS extract had positive effects on nerve cells’ structure, adhesion, locomotion, fission, and phagocytosis, through regulating various action pathways, such as Hippo, phagosome, PI3K/Akt (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B, Neurotrophin, Rap1 (Ras-related protein RAP-1A, gap junction glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, and HIF-1 (Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 signaling pathways to maintain normal mouse neurological activity. All of the results indicated that AS may be a promising alternative medicine for the treatment of radiation injury in mouse brain. It would be tested that whether the bioactive ingredients of AS could

  3. Experimental oral iron administration: Histological investigations and expressions of iron handling proteins in rat retina with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Kathpalia, Poorti; Maurya, Meenakshi; Gupta, Chandan Lal; Bhatia, Jagriti; Roy, Tara Sankar; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-12-01

    Iron is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to see if long-term, experimental iron administration with aging modifies retinal and choroidal structures and expressions of iron handling proteins, to understand some aspects of iron homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with ferrous sulphate heptahydrate (500mg/kg body weight/week, oral; elemental iron availability: 20%) from 2 months of age onward until they were 19.5 month-old. At 8, 14 and 20 months of age, they were sacrificed and serum and retinal iron levels were detected by HPLC. Oxidative stress was analyzed by TBARS method. The retinas were examined for cell death (TUNEL), histology (electron microscopy) and the expressions of transferrin, transferrin receptor-1 [TFR-1], H- and L-ferritin. In control animals, at any age, there was no difference in the serum and retinal iron levels, but the latter increased significantly in 14- and 20 month-old iron-fed rats, indicating that retinal iron accumulation proceeds with progression of aging (>14 months). The serum and retinal TBARS levels increased significantly with progression of aging in experimental but not in control rats. There was significant damage to choriocapillaris, accumulation of phagosomes in retinal pigment epithelium and increased incidence of TUNEL+ cells in outer nuclear layer and vacuolation in inner nuclear layer (INL) of 20 month-aged experimental rats, compared to those in age-matched controls. Vacuolations in INL could indicate a long-term effect of iron accumulation in the inner retina. These events paralleled the increased expression of ferritins and transferrin and a decrease in the expression of TFR-1 in iron-fed rats with aging, thereby maintaining iron homeostasis in the retina. As some of these changes mimic with those happening in eyes with AMD, this model can be utilized to understand iron-induced pathophysiological changes in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic granulomatous disease: the European experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Merlijn van den Berg

    Full Text Available CGD is an immunodeficiency caused by deletions or mutations in genes that encode subunits of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase complex. Normally, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex in phagosomes of certain phagocytic cells leads to a "respiratory burst", essential for the clearance of phagocytosed micro-organisms. CGD patients lack this mechanism, which leads to life-threatening infections and granuloma formation. However, a clear picture of the clinical course of CGD is hampered by its low prevalence (approximately 1:250,000. Therefore, extensive clinical data from 429 European patients were collected and analyzed. Of these patients 351 were males and 78 were females. X-linked (XL CGD (gp91(phox deficient accounted for 67% of the cases, autosomal recessive (AR inheritance for 33%. AR-CGD was diagnosed later in life, and the mean survival time was significantly better in AR patients (49.6 years than in XL CGD (37.8 years, suggesting a milder disease course in AR patients. The disease manifested itself most frequently in the lungs (66% of patients, skin (53%, lymph nodes (50%, gastrointestinal tract (48% and liver (32%. The most frequently cultured micro-organisms per episode were Staphylococcus aureus (30%, Aspergillus spp. (26%, and Salmonella spp. (16%. Surprisingly, Pseudomonas spp. (2% and Burkholderia cepacia (<1% were found only sporadically. Lesions induced by inoculation with BCG occurred in 8% of the patients. Only 71% of the patients received antibiotic maintenance therapy, and 53% antifungal prophylaxis. 33% were treated with gamma-interferon. 24 patients (6% had received a stem cell transplantation. The most prominent reason of death was pneumonia and pulmonary abscess (18/84 cases, septicemia (16/84 and brain abscess (4/84. These data provide further insight in the clinical course of CGD in Europe and hopefully can help to increase awareness and optimize the treatment of these patients.

  5. Sigma Factor SigB Is Crucial to Mediate Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation during Chronic Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Tuchscherr

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a range of infections from acute invasive to chronic and difficult-to-treat. Infection strategies associated with persisting S. aureus infections are bacterial host cell invasion and the bacterial ability to dynamically change phenotypes from the aggressive wild-type to small colony variants (SCVs, which are adapted for intracellular long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation mechanisms appear to be very dynamic, but are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the role and the crosstalk of the global S. aureus regulators agr, sarA and SigB by generating single, double and triple mutants, and testing them with proteome analysis and in different in vitro and in vivo infection models. We were able to demonstrate that SigB is the crucial factor for adaptation in chronic infections. During acute infection, the bacteria require the simultaneous action of the agr and sarA loci to defend against invading immune cells by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity and to escape from phagosomes in their host cells that enable them to settle an infection at high bacterial density. To persist intracellularly the bacteria subsequently need to silence agr and sarA. Indeed agr and sarA deletion mutants expressed a much lower number of virulence factors and could persist at high numbers intracellularly. SigB plays a crucial function to promote bacterial intracellular persistence. In fact, ΔsigB-mutants did not generate SCVs and were completely cleared by the host cells within a few days. In this study we identified SigB as an essential factor that enables the bacteria to switch from the highly aggressive phenotype that settles an acute infection to a silent SCV-phenotype that allows for long-term intracellular persistence. Consequently, the SigB-operon represents a possible target to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies against chronic and therapy

  6. Sigma Factor SigB Is Crucial to Mediate Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation during Chronic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherr, Lorena; Bischoff, Markus; Lattar, Santiago M; Noto Llana, Mariangeles; Pförtner, Henrike; Niemann, Silke; Geraci, Jennifer; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Fraunholz, Martin J; Cheung, Ambrose L; Herrmann, Mathias; Völker, Uwe; Sordelli, Daniel O; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a range of infections from acute invasive to chronic and difficult-to-treat. Infection strategies associated with persisting S. aureus infections are bacterial host cell invasion and the bacterial ability to dynamically change phenotypes from the aggressive wild-type to small colony variants (SCVs), which are adapted for intracellular long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation mechanisms appear to be very dynamic, but are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the role and the crosstalk of the global S. aureus regulators agr, sarA and SigB by generating single, double and triple mutants, and testing them with proteome analysis and in different in vitro and in vivo infection models. We were able to demonstrate that SigB is the crucial factor for adaptation in chronic infections. During acute infection, the bacteria require the simultaneous action of the agr and sarA loci to defend against invading immune cells by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity and to escape from phagosomes in their host cells that enable them to settle an infection at high bacterial density. To persist intracellularly the bacteria subsequently need to silence agr and sarA. Indeed agr and sarA deletion mutants expressed a much lower number of virulence factors and could persist at high numbers intracellularly. SigB plays a crucial function to promote bacterial intracellular persistence. In fact, ΔsigB-mutants did not generate SCVs and were completely cleared by the host cells within a few days. In this study we identified SigB as an essential factor that enables the bacteria to switch from the highly aggressive phenotype that settles an acute infection to a silent SCV-phenotype that allows for long-term intracellular persistence. Consequently, the SigB-operon represents a possible target to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies against chronic and therapy-refractory infections.

  7. Oxidative Unfolding of the Rubredoxin Domain and the Natively Disordered N-terminal Region Regulate the Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Matthias; Luo, Qi; Kaila, Ville R I; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-12-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes killing in human macrophages by secreting protein kinase G (PknG). PknG intercepts host signaling to prevent fusion of the phagosome engulfing the mycobacteria with the lysosome and, thus, their degradation. The N-terminal NORS (no regulatory secondary structure) region of PknG (approximately residues 1-75) has been shown to play a role in PknG regulation by (auto)phosphorylation, whereas the following rubredoxin-like metal-binding motif (RD, residues ∼74-147) has been shown to interact tightly with the subsequent catalytic domain (approximately residues 148-420) to mediate its redox regulation. Deletions or mutations in NORS or the redox-sensitive RD significantly decrease PknG survival function. Based on combined NMR spectroscopy, in vitro kinase assay, and molecular dynamics simulation data, we provide novel insights into the regulatory roles of the N-terminal regions. The NORS region is indeed natively disordered and rather dynamic. Consistent with most earlier data, autophosphorylation occurs in our assays only when the NORS region is present and, thus, in the NORS region. Phosphorylation of it results only in local conformational changes and does not induce interactions with the subsequent RD. Although the reduced, metal-bound RD makes tight interactions with the following catalytic domain in the published crystal structures, it can also fold in its absence. Our data further suggest that oxidation-induced unfolding of the RD regulates substrate access to the catalytic domain and, thereby, PknG function under different redox conditions, e.g. when exposed to increased levels of reactive oxidative species in host macrophages. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. MicroRNA-125a Inhibits Autophagy Activation and Antimicrobial Responses during Mycobacterial Infection.

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    Kim, Jin Kyung; Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kim, Tae Sung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding nucleotides that play critical roles in the regulation of diverse biological functions, including the response of host immune cells. Autophagy plays a key role in activating the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the pathways associated with autophagy must be tightly regulated at a posttranscriptional level, the contribution of miRNAs and whether they specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages leads to increased expression of miRNA-125a-3p (miR-125a), which targets UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), to inhibit autophagy activation and antimicrobial responses to M. tuberculosis. Forced expression of miR-125a significantly blocked M. tuberculosis-induced activation of autophagy and phagosomal maturation in macrophages, and inhibitors of miR-125a counteracted these effects. Both TLR2 and MyD88 were required for biogenesis of miR-125a during M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase significantly inhibited the expression of miR-125a in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. Moreover, either overexpression of miR-125a or silencing of UVRAG significantly attenuated the antimicrobial effects of macrophages against M. tuberculosis. Taken together, these data indicate that miR-125a regulates the innate host defense by inhibiting the activation of autophagy and antimicrobial effects against M. tuberculosis through targeting UVRAG. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. MIR144* inhibits antimicrobial responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human monocytes and macrophages by targeting the autophagy protein DRAM2.

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    Kim, Jin Kyung; Lee, Hye-Mi; Park, Ki-Sun; Shin, Dong-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Yi Sak; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kim, In Soo; Kim, Jin-Man; Son, Ji-Woong; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Jung, Sung Soo; Chung, Chaeuk; Han, Sang-Bae; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an important antimicrobial effector process that defends against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the human pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous noncoding RNAs, are involved in various biological functions and act as post-transcriptional regulators to target mRNAs. The process by which miRNAs affect antibacterial autophagy and host defense mechanisms against Mtb infections in human monocytes and macrophages is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we show that Mtb significantly induces the expression of MIR144*/hsa-miR-144-5p, which targets the 3'-untranslated region of DRAM2 (DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2) in human monocytes and macrophages. Mtb infection downregulated, whereas the autophagy activators upregulated, DRAM2 expression in human monocytes and macrophages by activating AMP-activated protein kinase. In addition, overexpression of MIR144* decreased DRAM2 expression and formation of autophagosomes in human monocytes, whereas inhibition of MIR144* had the opposite effect. Moreover, the levels of MIR144* were elevated, whereas DRAM2 levels were reduced, in human peripheral blood cells and tissues in TB patients, indicating the clinical significance of MIR144* and DRAM2 in human TB. Notably, DRAM2 interacted with BECN1 and UVRAG, essential components of the autophagic machinery, leading to displacement of RUBCN from the BECN1 complex and enhancement of Ptdlns3K activity. Furthermore, MIR144* and DRAM2 were critically involved in phagosomal maturation and enhanced antimicrobial effects against Mtb. Our findings identify a previously unrecognized role of human MIR144* in the inhibition of antibacterial autophagy and the innate host immune response to Mtb. Additionally, these data reveal that DRAM2 is a key coordinator of autophagy activation that enhances antimicrobial activity against Mtb.

  10. Gene expression in the scleractinian Acropora microphthalma exposed to high solar irradiance reveals elements of photoprotection and coral bleaching.

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    Antonio Starcevic

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues.A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs, which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a 'shared metabolic adaptation' between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca(2+-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis.Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching.

  11. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

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    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  12. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

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    Degang, Yang; Akama, Takeshi; Hara, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Ishido, Yuko; Gidoh, Masaichi; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT). This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN)-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  13. Foveolar cells phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils in chronic active Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

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    Caruso, R A; Fedele, F; Di Bella, C; Mazzon, E; Rigoli, L

    2012-11-01

    The recognition and removal of apoptotic inflammatory cells by tissue macrophages and non-professional phagocytes, in a process called efferocytosis, is required for resolution of inflammation and is actively anti-inflammatory. We have previously demonstrated phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by tumor cells in human gastric carcinoma, but to date, there have been no studies investigating this process in chronic active Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Biopsy specimens from 28 subjects with or without H. pylori infection and active inflammation were examined and graded according to the updated Sydney system. Light microscopy, electron microscopy, and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyltransferase-Mediated UTP End Labeling staining were used to identify apoptosis. H. pylori infection was detected by histology and by molecular assay in 16 out of 28 cases. DNA from paraffin-embedded gastric biopsies was amplified using primers specific for cagA, for the cag "empty site" as well as for the s and m alleles of vacA. The more virulent cagA-positive strains were found in five out of nine patients with chronic active gastritis. The vacA s1/m1 and s2/m1 genotypes were more common in nine patients with chronic active gastritis, while the vacA s2/m2 genotype was more frequent in seven patients with chronic inactive gastritis. Apoptotic neutrophils were also detected within the cytoplasmic vacuoles of the foveolar cells of nine cases with chronic active gastritis. Transmission electron micrographs revealed further apoptotic neutrophils within spacious phagosomes of foveolar cells in a similar manner to those described in late-phase efferocytosis both in vivo and in vitro. These new observations expand the morphological spectrum of gastritis in patients infected with more virulent H. pylori strains, compatible with an anti-inflammatory role for the gastric epithelial cells in their removal of apoptotic neutrophils during active chronic gastritis.

  14. Francisella tularensis Confronts the Complement System

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    Susan R. Brock

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis has developed a number of effective evasion strategies to counteract host immune defenses, not the least of which is its ability to interact with the complement system to its own advantage. Following exposure of the bacterium to fresh human serum, complement is activated and C3b and iC3b can be found covalently attached to the bacterial surface. However, the lipopolysaccharide and capsule of the F. tularensis cell wall prevent complement-mediated lysis and endow the bacterium with serum resistance. Opsonization of F. tularensis with C3 greatly increases its uptake by human neutrophils, dendritic cells and macrophages. Uptake occurs by an unusual looping morphology in human macrophages. Complement receptor 3 is thought to play an important role in opsonophagocytosis by human macrophages, and signaling through this receptor can antagonize Toll-like receptor 2-initiated macrophage activation. Complement C3 also determines the survival of infected human macrophages and perhaps other cell types. C3-opsonization of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis strain SCHU S4 results in greatly increased death of infected human macrophages, which requires more than complement receptor engagement and is independent of the intracellular replication by the pathogen. Given its entry into the cytosol of host cells, F. tularensis has the potential for a number of other complement-mediated interactions. Studies on the uptake C3-opsonized adenovirus have suggested the existence of a C3 sensing system that initiates cellular responses to cytosolic C3b present on invading microbes. Here we propose that C3 peptides enter the cytosol of human macrophages following phagosome escape of F. tularensis and are recognized as intruding molecular patterns that signal host cell death. With the discovery of new roles for intracellular C3, a better understanding of tularemia pathogenesis is likely to emerge.

  15. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

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    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomae in vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus , B. melitensis , and B. suis , B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila , we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitro Brucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Detergent Resistant Membrane Domains during Early Interaction of Macrophages with Rough and Smooth Brucella melitensis

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    Lauer, Sabine A.; Iyer, Srinivas; Sanchez, Timothy; Forst, Christian V.; Bowden, Brent; Carlson, Kay; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains discrete nanometer-sized domains that are resistant to non-ionic detergents, and which are called detergent resistant membrane domains (DRMDs) or lipid rafts. Exposure of host cells to pathogenic bacteria has been shown to induce the re-distribution of specific host proteins between DRMDs and detergent soluble membranes, which leads to the initiation of cell signaling that enable pathogens to access host cells. DRMDs have been shown to play a role in the invasion of Brucella into host macrophages and the formation of replicative phagosomes called Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs). In this study we sought to characterize changes to the protein expression profiles in DRMDs and to respective cellular pathways and networks of Mono Mac 6 cells in response to the adherence of rough VTRM1 and smooth 16 M B. melitensis strains. DRMDs were extracted from Mono Mac 6 cells exposed for 2 minutes at 4°C to Brucella (no infection occurs) and from unexposed control cells. Protein expression was determined using the non-gel based quantitative iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation) mass spectrometry technique. Using the identified iTRAQ proteins we performed enrichment analyses and probed constructed human biochemical networks for interactions and metabolic reactions. We identified 149 proteins, which either became enriched, depleted or whose amounts did not change in DRMDs upon Brucella exposure. Several of these proteins were distinctly enriched or depleted in DRMDs upon exposure to rough and smooth B. melitensis strains which results in the differential engagement of cellular pathways and networks immediately upon Brucella encounter. For some of the proteins such as myosin 9, small G protein signaling modulator 3, lysine-specific demethylase 5D, erlin-2, and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2, we observed extreme differential depletion or enrichment in DRMDs. The identified proteins and pathways could provide

  17. Microevolution of Candida albicans in macrophages restores filamentation in a nonfilamentous mutant.

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    Anja Wartenberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Following antifungal treatment, Candida albicans, and other human pathogenic fungi can undergo microevolution, which leads to the emergence of drug resistance. However, the capacity for microevolutionary adaptation of fungi goes beyond the development of resistance against antifungals. Here we used an experimental microevolution approach to show that one of the central pathogenicity mechanisms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphae transition, can be subject to experimental evolution. The C. albicans cph1Δ/efg1Δ mutant is nonfilamentous, as central signaling pathways linking environmental cues to hyphal formation are disrupted. We subjected this mutant to constant selection pressure in the hostile environment of the macrophage phagosome. In a comparatively short time-frame, the mutant evolved the ability to escape macrophages by filamentation. In addition, the evolved mutant exhibited hyper-virulence in a murine infection model and an altered cell wall composition compared to the cph1Δ/efg1Δ strain. Moreover, the transcriptional regulation of hyphae-associated, and other pathogenicity-related genes became re-responsive to environmental cues in the evolved strain. We went on to identify the causative missense mutation via whole genome- and transcriptome-sequencing: a single nucleotide exchange took place within SSN3 that encodes a component of the Cdk8 module of the Mediator complex, which links transcription factors with the general transcription machinery. This mutation was responsible for the reconnection of the hyphal growth program with environmental signals in the evolved strain and was sufficient to bypass Efg1/Cph1-dependent filamentation. These data demonstrate that even central transcriptional networks can be remodeled very quickly under appropriate selection pressure.

  18. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

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    Megan Elizabeth Bosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss.

  19. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

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    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of a novel virulence-factor deletion strain of Burkholderia mallei that provides partial protection against inhalational glanders in mice

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    Joel A. Bozue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei (Bm is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN, and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  1. Spontaneous Loss of Virulence in Natural Populations of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Mylène M; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Bracq-Dieye, Hélène; Han, Lei; Leclercq, Alexandre; Vales, Guillaume; Moura, Alexandra; Gouin, Edith; Scortti, Mariela; Disson, Olivier; Vázquez-Boland, José A; Lecuit, Marc

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes depends on the ability of this bacterium to escape from the phagosome of the host cells via the action of the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO). Expression of the LLO-encoding gene ( hly ) requires the transcriptional activator PrfA, and both hly and prfA genes are essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Here, we used the hemolytic activity of LLO as a phenotypic marker to screen for spontaneous virulence-attenuating mutations in L. monocytogenes Sixty nonhemolytic isolates were identified among a collection of 57,820 confirmed L. monocytogenes strains isolated from a variety of sources (0.1%). In most cases (56/60; 93.3%), the nonhemolytic phenotype resulted from nonsense, missense, or frameshift mutations in prfA Five strains carried hly mutations leading to a single amino acid substitution (G299V) or a premature stop codon causing strong virulence attenuation in mice. In one strain, both hly and gshF (encoding a glutathione synthase required for full PrfA activity) were missing due to genomic rearrangements likely caused by a transposable element. The PrfA/LLO loss-of-function (PrfA - /LLO - ) mutants belonged to phylogenetically diverse clades of L. monocytogenes , and most were identified among nonclinical strains (57/60). Consistent with the rare occurrence of loss-of-virulence mutations, we show that prfA and hly are under purifying selection. Although occurring at a low frequency, PrfA - /LLO - mutational events in L. monocytogenes lead to niche restriction and open an evolutionary path for obligate saprophytism in this facultative intracellular pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Maury et al.

  2. Insights on the Emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Analysis of Mycobacterium kansasii

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    Wang, Joyce; McIntosh, Fiona; Radomski, Nicolas; Dewar, Ken; Simeone, Roxane; Enninga, Jost; Brosch, Roland; Rocha, Eduardo P.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    By phylogenetic analysis, Mycobacterium kansasii is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet, although both organisms cause pulmonary disease, M. tuberculosis is a global health menace, whereas M. kansasii is an opportunistic pathogen. To illuminate the differences between these organisms, we have sequenced the genome of M. kansasii ATCC 12478 and its plasmid (pMK12478) and conducted side-by-side in vitro and in vivo investigations of these two organisms. The M. kansasii genome is 6,432,277 bp, more than 2 Mb longer than that of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and the plasmid contains 144,951 bp. Pairwise comparisons reveal conserved and discordant genes and genomic regions. A notable example of genomic conservation is the virulence locus ESX-1, which is intact and functional in the low-virulence M. kansasii, potentially mediating phagosomal disruption. Differences between these organisms include a decreased predicted metabolic capacity, an increased proportion of toxin–antitoxin genes, and the acquisition of M. tuberculosis-specific genes in the pathogen since their common ancestor. Consistent with their distinct epidemiologic profiles, following infection of C57BL/6 mice, M. kansasii counts increased by less than 10-fold over 6 weeks, whereas M. tuberculosis counts increased by over 10,000-fold in just 3 weeks. Together, these data suggest that M. kansasii can serve as an image of the environmental ancestor of M. tuberculosis before its emergence as a professional pathogen, and can be used as a model organism to study the switch from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a professional host-restricted pathogen. PMID:25716827

  3. Palmitoylation of the immunity related GTPase, Irgm1: impact on membrane localization and ability to promote mitochondrial fission.

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    Stanley C Henry

    Full Text Available The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein.

  4. A Salmonella typhimurium-translocated Glycerophospholipid:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Promotes Virulence by Binding to the RhoA Protein Switch Regions

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    LaRock, Doris L.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Levin, Itay; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Miller, Samuel I.

    2012-08-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium translocates a glycerophospholipid: cholesterol acyltransferase (SseJ) into the host cytosol after its entry into mammalian cells. SseJ is recruited to the cytoplasmic face of the host cell phagosome membrane where it is activated upon binding the small GTPase, RhoA. SseJ is regulated similarly to cognate eukaryotic effectors, as only the GTP-bound form of RhoA family members stimulates enzymatic activity. Using NMR and biochemistry, this work demonstrates that SseJ competes effectively with Rhotekin, ROCK, and PKN1 in binding to a similar RhoA surface. The RhoA surface that binds SseJ includes the regulatory switch regions that control activation of mammalian effectors. These data were used to create RhoA mutants with altered SseJ binding and activation. This structure-function analysis supports a model in which SseJ activation occurs predominantly through binding to residues within switch region II. We further defined the nature of the interaction between SseJ and RhoA by constructing SseJ mutants in the RhoA binding surface. These data indicate that SseJ binding to RhoA is required for recruitment of SseJ to the endosomal network and for full Salmonella virulence for inbred susceptible mice, indicating that regulation of SseJ by small GTPases is an important virulence strategy of this bacterial pathogen. The dependence of a bacterial effector on regulation by a mammalian GTPase defines further how intimately host pathogen interactions have coevolved through similar and divergent evolutionary strategies.

  5. Host and bacterial proteins that repress recruitment of LC3 to Shigella early during infection.

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    Leigh A Baxt

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are intracytosolic gram-negative pathogens that cause disease by invasion and spread through the colonic mucosa, utilizing host cytoskeletal components to form propulsive actin tails. We have previously identified the host factor Toca-1 as being recruited to intracellular S. flexneri and being required for efficient bacterial actin tail formation. We show that at early times during infection (40 min., the type three-secreted effector protein IcsB recruits Toca-1 to intracellular bacteria and that recruitment of Toca-1 is associated with repression of recruitment of LC3, as well as with repression of recruitment of the autophagy marker NDP52, around these intracellular bacteria. LC3 is best characterized as a marker of autophagosomes, but also marks phagosomal membranes in the process LC3-associated phagocytosis. IcsB has previously been demonstrated to be required for S. flexneri evasion of autophagy at late times during infection (4-6 hr by inhibiting binding of the autophagy protein Atg5 to the Shigella surface protein IcsA (VirG. Our results suggest that IcsB and Toca-1 modulation of LC3 recruitment restricts LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants. Together with published results, our findings suggest that IcsB inhibits innate immune responses in two distinct ways, first, by inhibiting LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants early during infection, and second, by inhibiting autophagy late during infection.

  6. Design of a nanostructured lipid carrier intended to improve the treatment of tuberculosis

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    Pinheiro M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marina Pinheiro,1,* Ricardo Ribeiro,1,* Alexandre Vieira,1,* Fernanda Andrade,2 Salette Reis1 1IUCIBIO, REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This work aimed to design, develop, and characterize a lipid nanocarrier system for the selective delivery of rifabutin (RFB to alveolar macrophages. Lipid nanoparticles, specifically nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC, were synthetized by the high-shear homogenization and ultrasonication techniques. These nanoparticles were designed to exhibit both passive and active targeting strategies to be efficiently internalized by the alveolar macrophages, traffic to the acidified phagosomes and phagolysosomes, and release bactericidal concentrations of the antituberculosis drug intracellularly. NLC that could entrap RFB were prepared, characterized, and further functionalized with mannose. Particles’ diameter, zeta potential, morphology, drug% entrapping efficiency, and drug release kinetics were evaluated. The mannose coating process was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared. Further, the cytotoxicity of the formulations was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in A549, Calu-3, and Raw 264.7 cells. The diameter of NLC formulations was found to be in the range of 175–213 nm, and drug entrapping efficiency was found to be above 80%. In addition, high storage stability for the formulations was expected since they maintained the initial characteristics for 6 months. Moreover, the drug release was pH-sensitive, with a faster drug release at acidic pH than at neutral pH. These results pose a strong argument that the developed nanocarrier can be explored as a promising carrier for safer and more efficient management of tuberculosis by exploiting the pulmonary route of

  7. Subcellular localization of ammonium transporters in Dictyostelium discoideum

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    Davis Carter T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the exception of vertebrates, most organisms have plasma membrane associated ammonium transporters which primarily serve to import a source of nitrogen for nutritional purposes. Dictyostelium discoideum has three ammonium transporters, Amts A, B and C. Our present work used fluorescent fusion proteins to determine the cellular localization of the Amts and tested the hypothesis that the transporters mediate removal of ammonia generated endogenously from the elevated protein catabolism common to many protists. Results Using RFP and YFP fusion constructs driven by the actin 15 promoter, we found that the three ammonium transporters were localized on the plasma membrane and on the membranes of subcellular organelles. AmtA and AmtB were localized on the membranes of endolysosomes and phagosomes, with AmtB further localized on the membranes of contractile vacuoles. AmtC also was localized on subcellular organelles when it was stabilized by coexpression with either the AmtA or AmtB fusion transporter. The three ammonium transporters exported ammonia linearly with regard to time during the first 18 hours of the developmental program as revealed by reduced export in the null strains. The fluorescently tagged transporters rescued export when expressed in the null strains, and thus they were functional transporters. Conclusion Unlike ammonium transporters in most organisms, which import NH3/NH4+ as a nitrogen source, those of Dictyostelium export ammonia/ammonium as a waste product from extensive catabolism of exogenously derived and endogenous proteins. Localization on proteolytic organelles and on the neutral contractile vacuole suggests that Dictyostelium ammonium transporters may have unique subcellular functions and play a role in the maintenance of intracellular ammonium distribution. A lack of correlation between the null strain phenotypes and ammonia excretion properties of the ammonium transporters suggests that it is not

  8. Host Cell Responses to Persistent Mycoplasmas - Different Stages in Infection of HeLa Cells with Mycoplasma hominis

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    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Porcine PBMCs Reveals the Immune Cascade Response and Gene Ontology Terms Related to Cell Death and Fibrosis in the Progression of Liver Failure

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    YiMin Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The key gene sets involved in the progression of acute liver failure (ALF, which has a high mortality rate, remain unclear. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of the transcriptional response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs following ALF. Methods. ALF was induced by D-galactosamine (D-gal in a porcine model. PBMCs were separated at time zero (baseline group, 36 h (failure group, and 60 h (dying group after D-gal injection. Transcriptional profiling was performed using RNA sequencing and analysed using DAVID bioinformatics resources. Results. Compared with the baseline group, 816 and 1,845 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in the failure and dying groups, respectively. A total of five and two gene ontology (GO term clusters were enriched in 107 GO terms in the failure group and 154 GO terms in the dying group. These GO clusters were primarily immune-related, including genes regulating the inflammasome complex and toll-like receptor signalling pathways. Specifically, GO terms related to cell death, including apoptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy, and those related to fibrosis, coagulation dysfunction, and hepatic encephalopathy were enriched. Seven Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, hematopoietic cell lineage, lysosome, rheumatoid arthritis, malaria, and phagosome and pertussis pathways were mapped for DEGs in the failure group. All of these seven KEGG pathways were involved in the 19 KEGG pathways mapped in the dying group. Conclusion. We found that the dramatic PBMC transcriptome changes triggered by ALF progression was predominantly related to immune responses. The enriched GO terms related to cell death, fibrosis, and so on, as indicated by PBMC transcriptome analysis, seem to be useful in elucidating potential key gene sets in the progression of ALF. A better understanding of these gene sets might be of preventive or

  10. MERTK interactions with SH2-domain proteins in the retinal pigment epithelium.

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    Shelby, Shameka J; Colwill, Karen; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Pawson, Tony; Thompson, Debra A

    2013-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK plays an essential role in the phagocytic uptake of shed photoreceptor membranes by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A fundamental aspect of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases involves autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues that recruit Src-homology 2 (SH2)-domain proteins to the receptor intracellular domain. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the interactions of human MERTK with SH2-domain proteins present in the RPE. The MERTK intracellular domain was expressed as a 6xHis-fusion protein (6xHis-rMERTK(571-999)), purified and phosphorylated. Ni(2+)-NTA pull downs were performed using 6xHis-rMERTK(571-999) in incubations with recombinant phosphotyrosine-recognition sequences expressed as GST-fusion proteins. In addition, pull downs of native SH2-domain proteins were performed using 6xHis-rMERTK(571-999) and protein homogenates from rat RPE/choroid. For both recombinant and native proteins, western analysis detected MERTK interactions with GRB2, PIK3R1 (P85α), VAV3, and SRC. Immunohistochemical analysis localized each protein to mouse RPE. In cultured RPE-J cells incubated with rod outer segments (OS), siRNA knockdown of Grb2 had no effect on OS binding, but significantly reduced OS uptake. Pik3r1 localized to early phagosomes along with Rab5 and Eea1. Phosphorylation and activation of Src was detected downstream of phagocytosis and Mertk activation. These findings suggest that MERTK signaling in the RPE involves a cohort of SH2-domain proteins with the potential to regulate both cytoskeletal rearrangement and membrane movement. Identification of the SH2-domain signaling partners of MERTK is an important step toward further defining the mechanism of RPE phagocytosis that is central to the function and survival of the retina.

  11. MERTK interactions with SH2-domain proteins in the retinal pigment epithelium.

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    Shameka J Shelby

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK plays an essential role in the phagocytic uptake of shed photoreceptor membranes by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A fundamental aspect of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases involves autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues that recruit Src-homology 2 (SH2-domain proteins to the receptor intracellular domain. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the interactions of human MERTK with SH2-domain proteins present in the RPE. The MERTK intracellular domain was expressed as a 6xHis-fusion protein (6xHis-rMERTK(571-999, purified and phosphorylated. Ni(2+-NTA pull downs were performed using 6xHis-rMERTK(571-999 in incubations with recombinant phosphotyrosine-recognition sequences expressed as GST-fusion proteins. In addition, pull downs of native SH2-domain proteins were performed using 6xHis-rMERTK(571-999 and protein homogenates from rat RPE/choroid. For both recombinant and native proteins, western analysis detected MERTK interactions with GRB2, PIK3R1 (P85α, VAV3, and SRC. Immunohistochemical analysis localized each protein to mouse RPE. In cultured RPE-J cells incubated with rod outer segments (OS, siRNA knockdown of Grb2 had no effect on OS binding, but significantly reduced OS uptake. Pik3r1 localized to early phagosomes along with Rab5 and Eea1. Phosphorylation and activation of Src was detected downstream of phagocytosis and Mertk activation. These findings suggest that MERTK signaling in the RPE involves a cohort of SH2-domain proteins with the potential to regulate both cytoskeletal rearrangement and membrane movement. Identification of the SH2-domain signaling partners of MERTK is an important step toward further defining the mechanism of RPE phagocytosis that is central to the function and survival of the retina.

  12. Nanodiamond-chymotrypsin and nanodiamond-papain conjugates, their synthesis and activity and visualization of their interaction with cells using optical and electron microscopy.

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    Golyshev, Sergey A; Berkovich, Anna K; Yakovlev, Ruslan Yu; Bystrov, Dmitry M; Ivanov, Nikita M; Balandina, Galina N; Rudenskaya, Galina N

    2017-07-28

    Two novel conjugates of detonation nanodiamonds (dNDs) with the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin and papain were synthesized. The synthesis was performed via functionalization of the dNDs' surface with acidic/alkali treatment followed by carbodiimide-mediated protein binding. Covalent binding of the enzymes was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectrographic analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) amino acid analysis. HPLC also proved the preservation of the enzymes' composition during synthesis. The same assay was used to determine the binding ratios. The ratios were 12% (mass to mass) for chymotrypsin and 7.4% for papain. The enzymatic activity of the conjugates was measured using chromogenic substrates and appeared to be approximately 40% of that of the native enzymes. The optimum pH values and stability under various conditions were determined. The sizes of resulting particles were measured using dynamic light scattering and direct electron microscopic observation. The enzyme conjugates were shown to be prone to aggregation, resulting in micrometer-sized particles. The ζ-potentials were measured and found to be positive for the conjugates. The conjugated enzymes were tested for biological activity using an in vitro model of cultured transformed human epithelial cells (HeLa cell line). It was shown that dND-conjugated enzymes effectively bind to the surface of the cells and that enzymes attack exposed proteins on the plasma membrane, including cell adhesion molecules. Incubation with conjugated enzymes results in morphological changes of the cells but does not affect cell viability, as judged by monitoring the cell division index and conducting ultrastructural studies. dNDs are internalized by the cells via endocytosis, being enclosed in forming coated vesicles by chance, and they accumulate in single membrane-bound vacuoles, presumably late endosomes/phagosomes, along with multimembranous onionlike structures. The authors propose a

  13. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for in-flight experiments under microgravity

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    Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Unruh, Eckehardt

    Life Sciences as Related to Space (F) Influence of Spaceflight Environment on Biological Systems (F44) Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for In-flight experiments under microgravity Sensing approaches for ecosystem and human health Author: Peter D. Hansen Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, a Institute for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany Peter-diedrich.hansen@tu-berlin.de Eckehardt Unruh Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, Institute a for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany An immune response by mussel hemocytes is the selective reaction to particles which are identified as foreign by its immune system shown by phagocytosis. Phagocytotic activity is based on the chemotaxis and adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation. The attachment at the surface of the hemocytes and consequently the uptake of the particles or bacteria can be directly quantified in the format of a fluorescent assay. Another relevant endpoint of phagocytosis is oxidative burst measured by luminescence. Phagocytosis-related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonised zymosan. The hemocytes will be stored frozen at -80oC and reconstituted in-flight for the experiment. The assay system of the TRIPLELUX-B Experiment has been performed with a well-defined quantification and evaluation of the immune function phagocytosis. The indicator cells are the hemocytes of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The signals of the immuno cellular responses are translated into luminescence as a rapid optical reporter system. The results expected will determine whether the observed responses are caused by microgravity and/or radiation (change in permeability, endpoints in genotoxicity: DNA unwinding). The samples for genotoxicity will be processed after returning to earth. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The

  14. Uptake of DNA by cancer cells without a transfection reagent

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    Yanping Kong

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells exhibit elevated levels of glucose uptake and may obtain pre-formed, diet-derived fatty acids from the bloodstream to boost their rapid growth; they may also use nucleic acid from their microenvironment. The study of processing nucleic acid by cancer cells will help improve the understanding of the metabolism of cancer. DNA is commonly packaged into a viral or lipid particle to be transferred into cells; this process is called transfection in laboratory. Cancer cells are known for having gene mutations and the evolving ability of endocytosis. Their uptake of DNAs might be different from normal cells; they may take in DNAs directly from the environment. In this report, we studied the uptake of DNAs in cancer cells without a transfection reagent. Methods A group of DNA fragments were prepared with PCR and labeled with isotope phosphorous-32 to test their uptake by Huh 7 (liver cancer and THLE3 (normal liver cells after incubation overnight by counting radioactivity of the cells’ genomic DNA. Multiple cell lines including breast cancer and lung cancer were tested with the same method. DNA molecules were also labeled with fluorescence to test the location in the cells using a kit of “label it fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH” from Mirus (USA. Results The data demonstrated that hepatocellular carcinoma cells possess the ability to take in large DNA fragments directly without a transfection reagent whereas normal liver cells cannot. Huh7 and MDA-MB231 cells displayed a significantly higher Rhodamine density in the cytoplasmic phagosomes and this suggests that the mechanism of uptake of large DNA by cancer cells is likely endocytosis. The efficacy of uptake is related to the DNA’s size. Some cell lines of lung cancer and breast cancer also showed similar uptake of DNA. Conclusions In the present study, we have revealed the evidence that some cancer cells, but not nontumorigenic cells, can take DNA

  15. Filling Knowledge Gaps for Mimivirus Entry, Uncoating, and Morphogenesis.

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    Andrade, Ana Cláudia Dos Santos Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Andrade, Kétyllen Reis; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; La Scola, Bernard; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-11-15

    Since the discovery of mimivirus, its unusual structural and genomic features have raised great interest in the study of its biology; however, many aspects concerning its replication cycle remain uncertain. In this study, extensive analyses of electron microscope images, as well as biological assay results, shed light on unclear points concerning the mimivirus replication cycle. We found that treatment with cytochalasin, a phagocytosis inhibitor, negatively impacted the incorporation of mimivirus particles by Acanthamoeba castellanii , causing a negative effect on viral growth in amoeba monolayers. Treatment of amoebas with bafilomicin significantly impacted mimivirus uncoating and replication. In conjunction with microscopic analyses, these data suggest that mimiviruses indeed depend on phagocytosis for entry into amoebas, and particle uncoating (and stargate opening) appears to be dependent on phagosome acidification. In-depth analyses of particle morphogenesis suggest that the mimivirus capsids are assembled from growing lamellar structures. Despite proposals from previous studies that genome acquisition occurs before the acquisition of fibrils, our results clearly demonstrate that the genome and fibrils can be acquired simultaneously. Our data suggest the existence of a specific area surrounding the core of the viral factory where particles acquire the surface fibrils. Furthermore, we reinforce the concept that defective particles can be formed even in the absence of virophages. Our work provides new information about unexplored steps in the life cycle of mimivirus. IMPORTANCE Investigating the viral life cycle is essential to a better understanding of virus biology. The combination of biological assays and microscopic images allows a clear view of the biological features of viruses. Since the discovery of mimivirus, many studies have been conducted to characterize its replication cycle, but many knowledge gaps remain to be filled. In this study, we conducted a

  16. Curvature recognition and force generation in phagocytosis

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    Prassler Jana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of particles by actin-powered invagination of the plasma membrane is common to protozoa and to phagocytes involved in the immune response of higher organisms. The question addressed here is how a phagocyte may use geometric cues to optimize force generation for the uptake of a particle. We survey mechanisms that enable a phagocyte to remodel actin organization in response to particles of complex shape. Results Using particles that consist of two lobes separated by a neck, we found that Dictyostelium cells transmit signals concerning the curvature of a surface to the actin system underlying the plasma membrane. Force applied to a concave region can divide a particle in two, allowing engulfment of the portion first encountered. The phagosome membrane that is bent around the concave region is marked by a protein containing an inverse Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (I-BAR domain in combination with an Src homology (SH3 domain, similar to mammalian insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate p53. Regulatory proteins enable the phagocyte to switch activities within seconds in response to particle shape. Ras, an inducer of actin polymerization, is activated along the cup surface. Coronin, which limits the lifetime of actin structures, is reversibly recruited to the cup, reflecting a program of actin depolymerization. The various forms of myosin-I are candidate motor proteins for force generation in particle uptake, whereas myosin-II is engaged only in retracting a phagocytic cup after a switch to particle release. Thus, the constriction of a phagocytic cup differs from the contraction of a cleavage furrow in mitosis. Conclusions Phagocytes scan a particle surface for convex and concave regions. By modulating the spatiotemporal pattern of actin organization, they are capable of switching between different modes of interaction with a particle, either arresting at a concave region and applying force in an attempt to sever the particle

  17. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production.

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    Marques, Maria Angela M; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L S A; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M R; Lery, Leticia M S; Silva, Carlos Adriano M; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Atella, Georgia C; Wheat, William H; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C; Belisle, John T; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-(14)C]cholesterol or [26-(14)C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in understanding the

  18. The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular Mycobacterium leprae survival in SW-10, non-myelinating Schwann cells.

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    Jin, Song-Hyo; An, Sung-Kwan; Lee, Seong-Beom

    2017-06-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated. Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in M.leprae-infected Schwann cells in the nerve biopsies of lepromatous leprosy patients. M.leprae-induced LD formation favors intracellular M.leprae survival in primary Schwann cells and in a myelinating Schwann cell line referred to as ST88-14. In the current study, we initially characterized SW-10 cells and investigated the effects of LDs on M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells, which are non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells express S100, a marker for cells from the neural crest, and NGFR p75, a marker for immature or non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells, however, do not express myelin basic protein (MBP), a marker for myelinating Schwann cells, and myelin protein zero (MPZ), a marker for precursor, immature, or myelinating Schwann cells, all of which suggests that SW-10 cells are non-myelinating Schwann cells. In addition, SW-10 cells have phagocytic activity and can be infected with M. leprae. Infection with M. leprae induces the formation of LDs. Furthermore, inhibiting the formation of M. leprae-induced LD enhances the maturation of phagosomes containing live M.leprae and decreases the ATP content in the M. leprae found in SW-10 cells. These facts suggest that LD formation by M. leprae favors intracellular M. leprae survival in SW-10 cells, which leads to the logical conclusion that M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells can be a new model for investigating the interaction of M.leprae with non-myelinating Schwann cells.

  19. Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation.

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    Min Liao

    Full Text Available The cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals worldwide. Frequent use of fumigants for managing stored-product insects has led to the development of resistance in insects. Essential oils from aromatic plants including the tea oil plant, Melaleuca alternifolia may provide environmentally friendly alternatives to currently used pest control agents. However, little is known about molecular events involved in stored-product insects in response to plant essential oil fumigation.M. alternifolia essential oil was shown to possess the fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais. The constituent, terpinen-4-ol was the most effective compound for fumigant toxicity. M. alternifolia essential oil significantly inhibited the activity of three enzymes in S. zeamais, including two detoxifying enzymes, glutathione S-transferase (GST, and carboxylesterase (CarE, as well as a nerve conduction enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Comparative transcriptome analysis of S. zeamais through RNA-Seq identified a total of 3,562 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, of which 2,836 and 726 were up-regulated and down-regulated in response to M. alternifolia essential oil fumigation, respectively. Based on gene ontology (GO analysis, the majority of DEGs were involved in insecticide detoxification and mitochondrial function. Furthermore, an abundance of DEGs mapped into the metabolism pathway in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database were associated with respiration and metabolism of xenobiotics, including cytochrome P450s, CarEs, GSTs, and ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters. Some DEGs mapped into the proteasome and phagosome pathway were found to be significantly enriched. These results led us to propose a model of insecticide action that M. alternifolia essential oil likely directly affects the hydrogen carrier to block the electron flow and interfere energy synthesis in mitochondrial

  20. Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Min; Xiao, Jin-Jing; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Yang; Wu, Xiang-Wei; Hua, Ri-Mao; Wang, Gui-Rong; Cao, Hai-Qun

    2016-01-01

    The cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals worldwide. Frequent use of fumigants for managing stored-product insects has led to the development of resistance in insects. Essential oils from aromatic plants including the tea oil plant, Melaleuca alternifolia may provide environmentally friendly alternatives to currently used pest control agents. However, little is known about molecular events involved in stored-product insects in response to plant essential oil fumigation. M. alternifolia essential oil was shown to possess the fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais. The constituent, terpinen-4-ol was the most effective compound for fumigant toxicity. M. alternifolia essential oil significantly inhibited the activity of three enzymes in S. zeamais, including two detoxifying enzymes, glutathione S-transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CarE), as well as a nerve conduction enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Comparative transcriptome analysis of S. zeamais through RNA-Seq identified a total of 3,562 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), of which 2,836 and 726 were up-regulated and down-regulated in response to M. alternifolia essential oil fumigation, respectively. Based on gene ontology (GO) analysis, the majority of DEGs were involved in insecticide detoxification and mitochondrial function. Furthermore, an abundance of DEGs mapped into the metabolism pathway in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database were associated with respiration and metabolism of xenobiotics, including cytochrome P450s, CarEs, GSTs, and ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters). Some DEGs mapped into the proteasome and phagosome pathway were found to be significantly enriched. These results led us to propose a model of insecticide action that M. alternifolia essential oil likely directly affects the hydrogen carrier to block the electron flow and interfere energy synthesis in mitochondrial respiratory chain

  1. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

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    Matthew Dale Woolard

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cellular pathways (neither host nor bacterial that result in up-regulation of the PGE2 biosynthetic pathway in F. tularensis infected macrophages. We took a genetic approach to begin to understand the molecular mechanisms of bacterial induction of PGE2 synthesis from infected macrophages. To identify F. tularensis genes necessary for the induction of PGE2 in primary macrophages, we infected cells with individual mutants from the closely related strain Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida U112 (U112 two allele mutant library. Twenty genes were identified that when disrupted resulted in U112 mutant strains unable to induce the synthesis of PGE2 by infected macrophages. Fourteen of the genes identified are located within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI. Genes in the FPI are required for F. tularensis to escape from the phagosome and replicate in the cytosol, which might account for the failure of U112 with transposon insertions within the FPI to induce PGE2. This implies that U112 mutant strains that do not grow intracellularly would also not induce PGE2. We found that U112 clpB::Tn grows within macrophages yet fails to induce PGE2, while U112 pdpA::Tn does not grow yet does induce PGE2. We also found that U112 iglC::Tn neither grows nor induces PGE2. These findings indicate that there is dissociation between intracellular growth and the ability of F. tularensis to induce PGE2 synthesis. These mutants provide a critical entrée into the pathways used

  2. Cytoplasmic Copper Detoxification in Salmonella Can Contribute to SodC Metalation but Is Dispensable during Systemic Infection.

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    Fenlon, Luke A; Slauch, James M

    2017-12-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a leading cause of foodborne disease worldwide. Severe infections result from the ability of S Typhimurium to survive within host immune cells, despite being exposed to various host antimicrobial factors. SodCI, a copper-zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutase, is required to defend against phagocytic superoxide. SodCII, an additional periplasmic superoxide dismutase, although produced during infection, does not function in the host. Previous studies suggested that CueP, a periplasmic copper binding protein, facilitates acquisition of copper by SodCII. CopA and GolT, both inner membrane ATPases that pump copper from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, are a source of copper for CueP. Using in vitro SOD assays, we found that SodCI can also utilize CueP to acquire copper. However, both SodCI and SodCII have a significant fraction of activity independent of CueP and cytoplasmic copper export. We utilized a series of mouse competition assays to address the in vivo role of CueP-mediated SodC activation. A copA golT cueP triple mutant was equally as competitive as the wild type, suggesting that sufficient SodCI is active to defend against phagocytic superoxide independent of CueP and cytoplasmic copper export. We also confirmed that a strain containing a modified SodCII, which is capable of complementing a sodCI deletion, was fully virulent in a copA golT cueP background competed against the wild type. These competitions also address the potential impact of cytoplasmic copper toxicity within the phagosome. Our data suggest that Salmonella does not encounter inhibitory concentrations of copper during systemic infection. IMPORTANCE Salmonella is a leading cause of gastrointestinal disease worldwide. In severe cases, Salmonella can cause life-threatening systemic infections, particularly in very young children, the elderly, or people who are immunocompromised. To cause disease, Salmonella must survive the hostile environment inside host

  3. Neutrophils to the ROScue: Mechanisms of NADPH Oxidase Activation and Bacterial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by NADPH oxidase play an important role in antimicrobial host defense and inflammation. Their deficiency in humans results in recurrent and severe bacterial infections, while their unregulated release leads to pathology from excessive inflammation. The release of high concentrations of ROS aids in clearance of invading bacteria. Localization of ROS release to phagosomes containing pathogens limits tissue damage. Host immune cells, like neutrophils, also known as PMNs, will release large amounts of ROS at the site of infection following the activation of surface receptors. The binding of ligands to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, toll-like receptors, and cytokine receptors can prime PMNs for a more robust response if additional signals are encountered. Meanwhile, activation of Fc and integrin directly induces high levels of ROS production. Additionally, GPCRs that bind to the bacterial-peptide analog fMLP, a neutrophil chemoattractant, can both prime cells and trigger low levels of ROS production. Engagement of these receptors initiates intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in activation of downstream effector proteins, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, and ultimately, the production of ROS by this complex. Within PMNs, ROS released by the NADPH oxidase complex can activate granular proteases and induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. Additionally, ROS can cross the membranes of bacterial pathogens and damage their nucleic acids, proteins, and cell membranes. Consequently, in order to establish infections, bacterial pathogens employ various strategies to prevent restriction by PMN-derived ROS or downstream consequences of ROS production. Some pathogens are able to directly prevent the oxidative burst of phagocytes using secreted effector proteins or toxins that interfere with translocation of the NADPH oxidase complex or signaling pathways needed for its activation

  4. Morphological and functional characterization of hemocytes from two deep-sea vesicomyid clams Phreagena okutanii and Abyssogena phaseoliformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Akihiro; Ozawa, Genki; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2018-03-01

    Deep-sea vesicomyid clams harboring intracellular symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are often dominant in chemosynthetic animal communities. Although they are known to have erythrocytes, little is known about other hemocytes. To investigate the types and roles of various hemocytes in vesicomyid clams, we performed morphological, histochemical and functional characterization of the hemocytes in two species, Phreagena okutanii, collected from 873 to 978 m depth, and Abyssogena phaseoliformis, from 5199 to 5355 m. Both were found to have three types of hemocytes: erythrocytes (ERCs), eosinophilic granulocytes (EGs), and basophilic granulocytes (BGs). The ERCs contain hemoglobin in the cytoplasm, with basophilic vacuoles containing acid polysaccharide, neutral lipids, and peroxidase. The EGs were found to contain acid polysaccharides and eosinophilic granules containing lysosomal enzymes, acid and alkaline phosphatases, chloroacetate esterase, and peroxidase. Although BGs had some basophilic granules with alkaline phosphatase, they lacked acid phosphatase and acid polysaccharides. The EGs and BGs were shown to have phagocytic ability, while the ERCs exhibited no phagocytosis. The EGs showed higher phagocytic activity as well as a higher phagosome-lysosome fusion rate than BGs. The hemocytes of the two vesicomyid species differed in the intracellular structures. In A. phaseoliformis, ERCs additionally contained neutral polysaccharides in vacuoles and had vesicles with acinus-like acidic mucus in the cytoplasm, neither of which were observed in P. okutanii. The eosinophilic granules in the EGs had heteromorphically-elongated shapes containing homogeneously electron-dense material in P. okutanii, but were more spherical and composed of fibrous structures in A. phaseoliformis. The difference in hemocytes between the two clams seems to be reflective of phylogenetically differentiated lineages adapting to differing conditions in their respective deep-sea environments

  5. Brain Transcriptome Profiling Analysis of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus Under Long-Term Hypersaline Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fish brain plays an important role in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and adaptation to environmental change. However, few studies stem from the perspective of whole transcriptome change in a fish brain and its response to long-term hypersaline stress. This study compares the differential transcriptomic responses of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus maintained for 8 weeks in brackish water (16 practical salinity units, psu and in freshwater. Fish brains from each treatment were collected for RNA-seq analysis to identify potential genes and pathways responding to hypersaline stress. A total of 27,089 genes were annotated, and 391 genes were expressed differently in the salinity treatment. Ten pathways containing 40 differentially expressed genes were identified in the tilapia brain. Antigen processing and presentation and phagosome were the two principally affected pathways in the immune system. Thirty-one of 40 genes were involved in various expressions associated with environmental information processing pathways such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, which are the upstream pathways for modulation of immunity and osmoregulation. The most-changed genes (>5-fold were all down-regulated, including four growth hormone/prolactin gene families, i.e., prolactin precursor (−10.62, prolactin-1 (−11, somatotropin (−10.15, somatolactin-like (−6.18, and two other genes [thyrotropin subunit beta (−7.73 and gonadotropin subunit beta-2 (−5.06] that stimulated prolactin release in tilapia. The downregulation pattern of these genes corroborates the decrease in tilapia immunity with increasing salinity and reveals an adaptive mechanism of tilapia to long-term hypersaline stress. Ovarian steroidogenesis, isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, and phenylalanine metabolism are the

  6. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L; Lawhon, Sara D; Nunes, Jairo E S; Figueiredo, Josely F; Rossetti, Carlos A; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Adams, Leslie Garry

    , inhibition of Ca signaling associated with decreased phagosome-lysosome fusion as well as phagocytosis inhibition, bias toward Th2 cell immune response accompanied by cell recruitment, cell proliferation and cell differentiation; leading to persistent infection. Contrarily, MAA infection was related to cellular responses associated with activation of molecular pathways that release chemicals and cytokines involved with containment of infection and a strong bias toward Th1 immune response, resulting in a transient infection.

  7. Differential Metabolism of a Two-Carbon Substrate by Members of the Paracoccidioides Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian C. Baeza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Paracoccidioides comprises known fungal pathogens of humans and can be isolated from different infection sites. Metabolic peculiarities in different members of the Paracoccidioides led us to perform proteomic studies in the presence of the two-carbon molecule acetate, which predominates in the nutrient-poor environment of the phagosome. To investigate the expression rates of proteins of different members of Paracoccidioides, including one isolate of P. lutzii (Pb01 and three isolates of P. brasiliensis (Pb03, Pb339, and PbEPM83, using sodium acetate as a carbon source, proteins were quantified using label-free and data-independent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Protein profiles of the isolates were statistically analyzed, revealing proteins that were differentially expressed when the fungus was cultivated in a non-preferential carbon source rather than glucose. A total of 1,160, 1,211, 1,280, and 1,462 proteins were reproducibly identified and relatively quantified in P. lutzii and the P. brasiliensis isolates Pb03, Pb339, and PbEPM83, respectively. Notably, 526, 435, 744, and 747 proteins were differentially expressed among P. lutzii and the P. brasiliensis isolates Pb03, Pb339, and PbEPM83, respectively, with a fold-change equal to or higher than 1.5. This analysis revealed that reorganization of metabolism occurred through the induction of proteins related to gluconeogenesis, glyoxylic/glyoxylate cycle, response to stress, and degradation of amino acids in the four isolates. The following differences were observed among the isolates: higher increases in the expression levels of proteins belonging to the TCA and respiratory chain in PbEPM83 and Pb01; increase in ethanol production in Pb01; utilization of cell wall components for gluconeogenesis in Pb03 and PbEPM83; and increased β-oxidation and methylcitrate cycle proteins in Pb01and PbEPM83. Proteomic profiles indicated that the four isolates reorganized their metabolism

  8. TUBERCULOSIS AS AN INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov AV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of years’ research of the many research groups around the world able to understand the reason why it will be impossible to create really effective vaccine for the prevention of tuberculosis infection in the near future. The main reason for the impossibility creating such vaccine is an intracellular nature of tuberculosis. In fact, TB is a pathology of the immune system. Mycobacterium tuberculosis persist within macrophages and thereby inhibit the process of phagocytosis completion and digesting the contents of phagosome. The destruction of the lysosomal membrane inside macrophages is blocked by changing the pH in lysosomes. For the presence of lytic activity for most lysosomal enzymes require need acidic environment. Mycobacteria are also getting into the lysosomes of macrophages start to rapidly hydrolysis for urea by urease to form ammonia. Wherein pH in the medium changes to alkaline, this inactivates enzymes and stabilizes lysosomal membrane. Thus mycobacterium prevent lysosome collapse at inactivated lysosomal enzymes and do not allow them to complete macrophage digestion phase by transition lysosomal to phagosomal stage. Stop phagocytolysis process leads to imbalance of the host immune system. Increasing the number of infected macrophages sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, leading to constant hyperfunction of cellular immunity, particularly enhanced immune response to cell wall components of mycobacteria, induction high titers of interferon-gamma in response to a stimulus, a sharp jump IL-2 titers and TNF-α , IFN-γ specific activation CD8 + CTL. Need also focus attention on the main differences from the MBT and human BCG, that is well growth in the human body, persists along host life, but does not cause active TB (except in patients with HIV/AIDS. After MBT cell destruction in the environment gets some additional high allergenic antigens, such as 85B, ESAT6, Rv2660c, HyVaC 4 (Ag85B and TB10.4.. These

  9. Molecular characterization and interactome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A; Robello, Carlos

    2015-04-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, possesses two tryparedoxins (TcTXNI and TcTXNII), belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily. TXNs are oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer between trypanothione and peroxiredoxins. This constitutes a difference with the host cells, in which these activities are mediated by thioredoxins. These differences make TXNs an attractive target for drug development. In a previous work we characterized TcTXNI, including the redox interactome. In this work we extend the study to TcTXNII. We demonstrate that TcTXNII is a transmembrane protein anchored to the surface of the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, with a cytoplasmatic orientation of the redox domain. It would be expressed during the metacyclogenesis process. In order to continue with the characterization of the redox interactome of T. cruzi, we designed an active site mutant TcTXNII lacking the resolving cysteine, and through the expression of this mutant protein and incubation with T. cruzi proteins, heterodisulfide complexes were isolated by affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. This allowed us to identify sixteen TcTXNII interacting proteins, which are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, indicating the relevance of TcTXNII, and contributing to our understanding of the redox interactome of T. cruzi. T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, constitutes a major sanitary problem in Latin America. The number of estimated infected persons is ca. 8 million, 28 million people are at risk of infection and ~20,000 deaths occur per year in endemic regions. No vaccines are available at present, and most drugs currently in use were developed decades ago and show variable efficacy with undesirable side effects. The parasite is able to live and prolipherate inside macrophage phagosomes, where it is exposed to cytotoxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, derived from macrophage activation. Therefore, T. cruzi

  10. 3D Spatially Resolved Models of the Intracellular Dynamics of the Hepatitis C Genome Replication Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus; Reiter, Sebastian; Targett-Adams, Paul; Grillo, Alfio; Herrmann, Eva; Wittum, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    virus (HCV) viral RNA (vRNA) occurs within special replication complexes formed from membranes derived from endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). These regions, termed membranous webs, are generated primarily through specific interactions between nonstructural

  11. Micropore structure stabilization in organosilica membranes by gaseous catalyst post-treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dral, A. Petra; van Eck, Ernst R.H.; Winnubst, Louis; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2018-01-01

    A post-treatment involving repeated exposure to gaseous HCl alternated with heating is demonstrated to strongly accelerate the recently reported structural evolution in organically bridged silica networks. Films, powders and membranes derived from 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane were exposed to

  12. A review of studies of the proteomes of circulating microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer T.; Østergaard, Ole; Rasmussen, Niclas S.

    2017-01-01

    understood, MVs are involved in trafficking of information from cell-to-cell, and are implicated in the regulation of immunity, thrombosis, and coagulation. Different subtypes of extracellular MVs exist. This review focuses on the cell membrane-derived shedded MVs (ranging in size from 200 to 1000 nm...... conditions such as cancer and chronic viral infections. This review highlights the methodology and results of the proteome studies behind these discoveries and places them in a pathophysiological and biomarker perspective....

  13. Precursors-Derived Ceramic Membranes for High-Temperature Separation of Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, Iwamoto

    2007-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the development of hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes derived from organometallic precursors. Microstructure and gas transport property of microporous amorphous silica-based membranes are briefly described. Then, high-temperature hydrogen permselectivity, hydrothermal stability as well as hydrogen/steam selectivity of the amorphous silica-based membranes are discussed from a viewpoint of application to membrane reactors for conversion enhancement...

  14. Synthesis of Nanogels via Cell Membrane-Templated Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Gao, Weiwei; Fang, Ronnie H; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-09-09

    The synthesis of biomimetic hydrogel nanoparticles coated with a natural cell membrane is described. Compared to the existing strategy of wrapping cell membranes onto pre-formed nanoparticle substrates, this new approach forms the cell membrane-derived vesicles first, followed by growing nanoparticle cores in situ. It adds significant controllability over the nanoparticle properties and opens unique opportunities for a broad range of biomedical applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. La matière grasse du lait de dromadaire : composition, microstructure et polymorphisme. Une revue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karray Nadia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In camel milk, fat, that represents about 3.6% of the composition, is dispersed in the form of globules, enveloped in a membrane, derived from the secreting cell and constituted by phospholipidprotein complexes. This review examines the present state of knowledge of the dromedary milk fat. The topics dealt with are : composition (fatty acids and triacylglycerols, microstructure, fat globule size distribution and polymorphism (thermal and structural properties.

  16. Novel silica membranes for high temperature gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Bighane, Neha

    2011-04-01

    This article describes fabrication of novel silica membranes derived via controlled oxidative thermolysis of polydimethylsiloxane and their gas separation performance. The optimized protocol for fabrication of the silica membranes is described and pure gas separation performance in the temperature range 35-80°C is presented. It is observed that the membranes exhibit activated transport for small gas penetrants such as He, H 2 and CO 2. The membranes can withstand temperatures up to 350°C in air and may ultimately find use in H 2/CO 2 separations to improve efficiency in the water-gas shift reactor process. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Dsl1p, Tip20p, and the novel Dsl3(Sec39) protein are required for the stability of the Q/t-SNARE complex at the endoplasmic reticulum in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraynack, Bryan A; Chan, Angela; Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2005-01-01

    The "Dsl1p complex" in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, consisting of Dsl1p and Tip20p, is involved in Golgi-ER retrograde transport and it is functionally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. To further characterize this complex, we analyzed the function of Dsl3p, a protein that interacts with Dsl1p...... in yeast two hybrids screens. DSL3, recently identified in a genome wide analysis of essential genes as SEC39, encodes a cytosolic protein of 82 kDa that is peripherally associated with membranes derived from the ER. There is strong genetic interaction between DSL3 and other factors required for Golgi...

  18. Limited and selective transfer of plasma membrane glycoproteins to membrane of secondary lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haylett, T.; Thilo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Radioactive galactose, covalently bound to cell surface glycoconjugates on mouse macrophage cells, P388D 1 , was used as a membrane marker to study the composition, and the kinetics of exchange, of plasma membrane-derived constituents in the membrane of secondary lysosomes. Secondary lysosomes were separated from endosomes and plasma membrane by self-forming Percoll density gradients. Horseradish peroxidase, taken up by fluid-phase pinocytosis, served as a vesicle contents marker to monitor transfer of endosomal contents into secondary lysosomes. Concurrently, the fraction of plasma membrane-derived label of secondary lysosomes increased by first order kinetics from 4 PAGE, labeled molecules of M/sub r/ 160-190 kD were depleted and of the M/sub r/ 100-120 kD were enriched in lysosome membrane compared with the relative composition of label on the cell surface. No corresponding selectivity was observed for the degradation of label, with all M/sub r/ classes being affected to the same relative extent. The results indicate that endocytosis-derived transfer of plasma membrane constitutents to secondary lysosomes is a limited and selective process, and that only ∼1% of internalized membrane is recycled via a membrane pool of secondary lysosomes

  19. Membrane microparticles and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z-H; Ji, C-L; Li, H; Qiu, G-X; Gao, C-J; Weng, X-S

    2013-09-01

    Membrane microparticles (MPs) are plasma membrane-derived vesicles shed by various types of activated or apoptotic cells including platelets, monocytes, endothelial cells, red blood cells, and granulocytes. MPs are being increasingly recognized as important regulators of cell-to-cell interactions. Recent evidences suggest they may play important functions not only in homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases such as vascular diseases, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes mellitus. Accordingly, inhibiting the production of MPs may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for these diseases. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism underlying the generation of MPs and the role of MPs in vascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, and pathogen infection.

  20. A Rab-centric perspective of bacterial pathogen-occupied vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Racquel Kim; Roy, Craig R

    2013-09-11

    The ability to create and maintain a specialized organelle that supports bacterial replication is an important virulence property for many intracellular pathogens. Living in a membrane-bound vacuole presents inherent challenges, including the need to remodel a plasma membrane-derived organelle into a novel structure that will expand and provide essential nutrients to support replication, while also having the vacuole avoid membrane transport pathways that target bacteria for destruction in lysosomes. It is clear that pathogenic bacteria use different strategies to accomplish these tasks. The dynamics by which host Rab GTPases associate with pathogen-occupied vacuoles provide insight into the mechanisms used by different bacteria to manipulate host membrane transport. In this review we highlight some of the strategies bacteria use to maintain a pathogen-occupied vacuole by focusing on the Rab proteins involved in biogenesis and maintenance of these novel organelles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypochlorite- and hypobromite-mediated radical formation and its role in cell lysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Brown, B E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    . In this study it is shown that HOBr induces red blood cell lysis at approximately 10-fold lower concentrations than HOCl, whereas with monocyte (THP1) and macrophage (J774) cells HOCl and HOBr induce lysis at similar concentrations. The role of radical formation during lysis has been investigated by EPR spin...... trapping, and it is shown that reaction of both oxidants with each cell type generates cell-derived radicals. Red blood cells exposed to nonlytic doses of HOCl generate novel nitrogen-centered radicals whose formation is GSH dependent. In contrast, HOBr gives rise to nitrogen-centered, membrane......-derived protein radicals. With lytic doses of either oxidant, protein (probably hemoglobin)-derived, nitrogen-centered radicals are observed. Unlike the red blood cells, treatment of monocytes and macrophages with HOCl gives significant radical formation only under conditions where cell lysis occurs concurrently...

  2. Direct Assessment of the Effect of the Gly380Arg Achondroplasia Mutation on FGFR3 Dimerization Using Quantitative Imaging FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placone, Jesse; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The Gly380Arg mutation in FGFR3 is the genetic cause for achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of human dwarfism. The mutation has been proposed to increase FGFR3 dimerization, but the dimerization propensities of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 have not been compared. Here we use quantitative imaging FRET to characterize the dimerization of wild-type FGFR3 and the ACH mutant in plasma membrane-derived vesicles from HEK293T cells. We demonstrate a small, but statistically significant increase in FGFR3 dimerization due to the ACH mutation. The data are consistent with the idea that the ACH mutation causes a structural change which affects both the stability and the activity of FGFR3 dimers in the absence of ligand. PMID:23056398

  3. Direct assessment of the effect of the Gly380Arg achondroplasia mutation on FGFR3 dimerization using quantitative imaging FRET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Placone

    Full Text Available The Gly380Arg mutation in FGFR3 is the genetic cause for achondroplasia (ACH, the most common form of human dwarfism. The mutation has been proposed to increase FGFR3 dimerization, but the dimerization propensities of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 have not been compared. Here we use quantitative imaging FRET to characterize the dimerization of wild-type FGFR3 and the ACH mutant in plasma membrane-derived vesicles from HEK293T cells. We demonstrate a small, but statistically significant increase in FGFR3 dimerization due to the ACH mutation. The data are consistent with the idea that the ACH mutation causes a structural change which affects both the stability and the activity of FGFR3 dimers in the absence of ligand.

  4. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1982-01-01

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with β-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to β-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants

  5. Graphene oxide doped ionic liquid ultrathin composite membranes for efficient CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Karunakaran, Madhavan

    2016-11-28

    Advanced membrane systems with high flux and sufficient selectivity are required for industrial gas separation processes. In order to achieve high flux and high selectivity, the membrane material should be as thin as possible and it should have selective sieving channels and long term stability. This could be achieved by designing a three component material consisting of a blend of an ionic liquid and graphene oxide covered by a highly permeable low selective polymeric coating. By using a simple dip coating technique, we prepared high flux and CO selective ultrathin graphene oxide (GO)/ionic liquid membranes on a porous ultrafiltration support. The ultrathin composite membranes derived from GO/ionic liquid complex displays remarkable combinations of permeability (CO flux: 37 GPU) and selectivity (CO/N selectivity: 130) that surpass the upper bound of ionic liquid membranes for CO/N separation. Moreover, the membranes were stable when tested for 120 hours.

  6. Critical Role of the Sphingolipid Pathway in Stroke: a Review of Current Utility and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya; Xi, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    Sphingolipids are a series of cell membrane-derived lipids which act as signaling molecules and play a critical role in cell death and survival, proliferation, recognition, and migration. Sphingosine-1-phosphate acts as a key signaling molecule and regulates lymphocyte trafficking, glial cell activation, vasoconstriction, endothelial barrier function, and neuronal death pathways which plays a critical role in numerous neurological conditions. Stroke is a second leading cause of death all over the world and effective therapies are still in great demand, including ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke as well as poststroke repair. Significantly, sphingolipid activities change after stroke and correlate with stroke outcome, which has promoted efforts to testify whether the sphingolipid pathway could be a novel therapeutic target in stroke. The sphingolipid metabolic pathway, the connection between the pathway and stroke, as well as therapeutic interventions to manipulate the pathway to reduce stroke-induced brain injury are discussed in this review.

  7. The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcock, Harry R.; Benesi, Alan; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2010-08-27

    The research carried out under grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46371, "The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes", during the period June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2010 was comprised of three related parts. These are: 1. An examination of the state of water in classical proton conduction membranes with the use of deuterium T1 NMR spectroscopy (Allcock and Benesi groups). 2. A dielectric relaxation examination of the behavior of water in classical ionomer membranes (Macdonald program). 3. Attempts to synthesize new proton-conduction polymers and membranes derived from the polyphosphazene system. (Allcock program) All three are closely related, crucial aspects of the design and development of new and improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes on which the future of fuel cell technology for portable applications depends.

  8. Bone formation in cranial, mandibular, tibial and iliac bone grafts in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Talsnes, O

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that grafts from membranous derived bone (e.g., calvarial grafts) retain their volume better than those from endochondral derived bone (e.g., iliac bone grafts). Increased osteogenesis in grafts of the former type has been offered as the explanation. However, simple...... volume measurements of the recovered grafts do not differentiate between viable and dead bone. We studied fresh syngeneic full-thickness bone grafts from calvaria, mandibula, tibia diaphysis, and iliac bone implanted in the back muscles of young Lewis rats. Bone formation in grafts recovered 3 weeks...... that the anatomical area of harvest is important regarding new bone formation in syngeneic bone grafts. However, the results do not support the contention that better maintenance of volume of calvarial grafts compared with iliac bone grafts is due to enhanced osteogenesis in the former....

  9. Macrophages discriminate glycosylation patterns of apoptotic cell-derived microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyy, Rostyslav O; Shkandina, Tanya; Tomin, Andriy; Muñoz, Luis E; Franz, Sandra; Antonyuk, Volodymyr; Kit, Yuriy Ya; Zirngibl, Matthias; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Janko, Christina; Lauber, Kirsten; Schiller, Martin; Schett, Georg; Stoika, Rostyslav S; Herrmann, Martin

    2012-01-02

    Inappropriate clearance of apoptotic remnants is considered to be the primary cause of systemic autoimmune diseases, like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we demonstrate that apoptotic cells release distinct types of subcellular membranous particles (scMP) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the plasma membrane. Both types of scMP exhibit desialylated glycotopes resulting from surface exposure of immature ER-derived glycoproteins or from surface-borne sialidase activity, respectively. Sialidase activity is activated by caspase-dependent mechanisms during apoptosis. Cleavage of sialidase Neu1 by caspase 3 was shown to be directly involved in apoptosis-related increase of surface sialidase activity. ER-derived blebs possess immature mannosidic glycoepitopes and are prioritized by macrophages during clearance. Plasma membrane-derived blebs contain nuclear chromatin (DNA and histones) but not components of the nuclear envelope. Existence of two immunologically distinct types of apoptotic blebs may provide new insights into clearance-related diseases.

  10. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  11. Functional desensitization to isoproterenol without reducing cAMP production in canine failing cardiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, C E; Cardinal, R; Rousseau, G; Vermeulen, M; Bouchard, C; Wilkinson, M; Armour, J A; Bouvier, M

    2001-02-01

    To corroborate alterations in the functional responses to beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) stimulation with changes in beta-AR signaling in failing cardiomyocytes, contractile and L-type Ca(2+) current responses to isoproterenol along with stimulated cAMP generation were compared among cardiomyocytes isolated from canines with tachycardia-induced heart failure or healthy hearts. The magnitude of shortening of failing cardiomyocytes was significantly depressed (by 22 +/- 4.4%) under basal conditions, and the maximal response to isoproterenol was significantly reduced (by 45 +/- 18%). Similar results were obtained when the responses in the rate of contraction and rate of relaxation to isoproterenol were considered. The L-type Ca(2+) current amplitude measured in failing cardiomyocytes under basal conditions was unchanged, but the responses to isoproterenol were significantly reduced compared with healthy cells. Isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP generation was similar in sarcolemmal membranes derived from the homogenates of failing (45 +/- 6.8) and healthy cardiomyocytes (52 +/- 8.5 pmol cAMP. mg protein(-1). min(-1)). However, stimulated cAMP generation was found to be significantly reduced when the membranes were derived from the homogenates of whole tissue (failing: 67 +/- 8.1 vs. healthy: 140 +/- 27.8 pmol cAMP. mg protein(-1). min(-1)). Total beta-AR density was not reduced in membranes derived from either whole tissue or isolated cardiomyocyte homogenates, but the beta(1)/beta(2) ratio was significantly reduced in the former (failing: 45/55 vs. healthy: 72/28) without being altered in the latter (failing: 72/28, healthy: 77/23). We thus conclude that, in tachycardia-induced heart failure, reduction in the functional responses of isolated cardiomyocytes to beta-AR stimulation may be attributed to alterations in the excitation-contraction machinery rather than to limitation of cAMP generation.

  12. Advanced structures in electrodeposited tin base anodes for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Haipeng; Jiang Changyin; He Xiangming; Ren Jianguo; Wan Chunrong

    2007-01-01

    A novel composite anode material consisted of electrodeposited Sn dispersing in a conductive micro-porous carbon membrane, which was directly coated on Cu current collector, was investigated. The composite material was prepared by: (1) casting a polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/dimethylformamide (DMF) solution that contained silica particles on a copper foil, (2) removing the solvent by evaporation, (3) dissolving the silica particles by immersing the copper foil into an alkaline solution, (4) drying the copper foil coated by micro-porous membrane, (5) electrodepositing Sn onto the copper foil through the micro-pores in the micro-porous membrane, and (6) annealing as-obtained composite material. This method provided the composite material with high decentralization of Sn and supporting medium purpose of conductive carbon membrane deriving from pyrolysis of PAN. SEM, XRD and EDS analysis confirmed this structure. The characteristic structure was beneficial to inhibit the aggregation between Sn micro-particles, to relax the volume expansion during cycling, and to improve the cycleability of electrode. Galvanostatic tests indicated the discharge capacity of the composite material remained over 550 mAh g -1 and 71.4% of charge retention after 30 cycles, while that of the electrode prepared by electrodepositing Sn on a bare Cu foil decreased seriously to 82.5 mAh g -1 and 13%. These results show that the composite material is a promising anode material with larger specific capacity and long cycle life for lithium ion batteries

  13. DNA methylation analysis as novel tool for quality control in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapko, Stephen; Baron, Udo; Hoffmüller, Ulrich; Model, Fabian; Wolfe, Leslie; Olek, Sven

    2007-09-01

    Cell-based regenerative medicine, including tissue engineering, is a novel approach to reconstituting tissues that do not spontaneously heal, such as damaged cartilage, and to curing diseases caused by malfunctioning cells. Typically, manufacturing processes to generate cartilage for replacement therapies involve isolation and expansion of cells from cartilage biopsies. A challenge in the field is potential contamination by other cell types (e.g., fibroblast-like cells), which can overgrow the desired cells during culturing and may ultimately compromise clinical efficacy. No standard analytical system has been absolutely effective in ensuring the identity of these cell-based products. Therefore, we tested deoxyribonucleic acid methylation analysis as a quality assessment tool, applying it to Genzyme's Carticel product, a chondrocyte implant that the Food and Drug Administration has approved. We identified 7 potent discriminators by assaying candidate genomic regions derived from methylation discovery approaches and literature searches regarding a functional role of genes in chondrocyte biology. Using a support vector machine, we trained an optimal cell type classifier that was absolutely effective in discriminating chondrocytes from synovial membrane derived cells, the major potential contaminant of chondrocyte cultures. The abundant marker availability and high quality of this assay format also suggest it as a potential quality control test for other cell types grown or manipulated in vitro.

  14. (125I)Iodoazidococaine, a photoaffinity label for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahoun, J.R.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    A carrier-free radioiodinated cocaine photoaffinity label, (-)-3-( 125 I)iodo-4-azidococaine [( 125 I)IACoc], has been synthesized and used as a probe for cocaine-binding proteins. Photoaffinity labeling with 0.5 nM ( 125 I)IACoc resulted in selective derivatization of a 26-kDa polypeptide with the pharmacology of a sigma receptor in membranes derived from whole rat brain, rat liver, and human placenta. ( 125 I)IACoc labeling of the 26-kDa polypeptide was also inhibited by 10 μM imipramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, benztropine, and tetrabenazine. The size of the ( 125 I)I-ACoc-labeled proteins is consistent with the size of proteins photolabeled in guinea pig brain and liver membranes by using the sigma photolabel azido-[ 3 H]DTG. Kinetic analysis of ( 125 I)IACoc binding to rat liver microsomes revealed two sites with K d values of 19 and 126 pM, respectively. The presence or absence of proteolytic inhibitors during membrane preparation did not alter the size of the photolabeled sigma receptor, indicating that the 26-kDa polypeptide was not derived from a larger protein. In summary, ( 125 I)IACoc is a potent and highly specific photoaffinity label for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor and will be useful for its biochemical and molecular characterization

  15. Pyrolytic carbon membranes containing silica: morphological approach on gas transport behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho Bum; Lee, Sun Yong; Lee, Young Moo

    2005-04-01

    Pyrolytic carbon membrane containing silica (C-SiO 2) is a new-class material for gas separation, and in the present work we will deal with it in view of the morphological changes arising from the difference in the molecular structure of the polymeric precursors. The silica embedded carbon membranes were fabricated by a predetermined pyrolysis step using imide-siloxane copolymers (PISs) that was synthesized from benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydrides (BTDA), 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), and amine-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To induce different morphologies at the same chemical composition, the copolymers were prepared using one-step (preferentially a random segmented copolymer) sand two-step polymerization (a block segmented copolymer) methods. The polymeric precursors and their pyrolytic C-SiO 2 membranes were analyzed using thermal analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, etc. It was found that the C-SiO 2 membrane derived from the random PIS copolymer showed a micro-structure containing small well-dispersed silica domains, whereas the C-SiO 2 membrane from the block PIS copolymer exhibited a micro-structure containing large silica domains in the continuous carbon matrix. Eventually, the gas transport through these C-SiO 2 membranes was significantly affected by the morphological changes of the polymeric precursors.

  16. Azide-based cross-linking of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) for condensable gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Naiying; Dal-Cin, Mauro M D; Pinnau, Ingo; Nicalek, Andrzej; Robertson, Gilles P.; Guiver, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM)s for gas separation membranes, were prepared by a nitrene reaction from a representative PIM in the presence of two different diazide cross-linkers. The reaction temperature was optimized using TGA. The homogenous membranes were cast from THF solutions of different ratios of PIM to azides. The resulting cross-linked structures of the PIMs membranes were formed at 175 °C after 7.5 h and confirmed by TGA, XPS, FT-IR spectroscopy and gel content analysis. These resulting cross-linked polymeric membranes showed excellent gas separation performance and can be used for O 2/N 2 and CO 2/N 2 gas pairs, as well as for condensable gases, such as CO 2/CH 4, propylene/propane separation. Most importantly, and differently from typical gas separation membranes derived from glassy polymers, the crosslinked PIMs showed no obvious CO 2 plasticization up to 20 atm pressure of pure CO 2 and CO 2/CH 4 mixtures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Conditions that Stabilize Membrane Domains Also Antagonize n-Alcohol Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.; Gray, Ellyn; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L. C.; Gray, Erin M.; Miller, Ann L.; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-08-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several n-alcohol anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to further test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to n-alcohol anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological and behavioral measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of butanol at relevant concentrations and pressures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that $\\Delta T_c$ predicts anesthetic potency for n-alcohols better than hydrophobicity in a range of contexts, supporting a mechanistic role for membrane heterogeneity in general anesthesia.

  18. Azide-based cross-linking of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) for condensable gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Naiying

    2011-03-11

    Cross-linked polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM)s for gas separation membranes, were prepared by a nitrene reaction from a representative PIM in the presence of two different diazide cross-linkers. The reaction temperature was optimized using TGA. The homogenous membranes were cast from THF solutions of different ratios of PIM to azides. The resulting cross-linked structures of the PIMs membranes were formed at 175 °C after 7.5 h and confirmed by TGA, XPS, FT-IR spectroscopy and gel content analysis. These resulting cross-linked polymeric membranes showed excellent gas separation performance and can be used for O 2/N 2 and CO 2/N 2 gas pairs, as well as for condensable gases, such as CO 2/CH 4, propylene/propane separation. Most importantly, and differently from typical gas separation membranes derived from glassy polymers, the crosslinked PIMs showed no obvious CO 2 plasticization up to 20 atm pressure of pure CO 2 and CO 2/CH 4 mixtures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Amino Terminal Region of Dengue Virus NS4A Cytosolic Domain Binds to Highly Curved Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fu Hung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an important human pathogen causing millions of disease cases and thousands of deaths worldwide. Non-structural protein 4A (NS4A is a vital component of the viral replication complex (RC and plays a major role in the formation of host cell membrane-derived structures that provide a scaffold for replication. The N-terminal cytoplasmic region of NS4A(1–48 is known to preferentially interact with highly curved membranes. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the stable binding of NS4A(1–48 to small liposomes using a liposome floatation assay and identify the lipid binding sequence by NMR spectroscopy. Mutations L6E;M10E were previously shown to inhibit DENV replication and to interfere with the binding of NS4A(1–48 to small liposomes. Our results provide new details on the interaction of the N-terminal region of NS4A with membranes and will prompt studies of the functional relevance of the curvature sensitive membrane anchor at the N-terminus of NS4A.

  20. Ionic Liquid Confined in Mesoporous Polymer Membrane with Improved Stability for CO2/N2 Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs have a promising prospect of application in flue gas separation, owing to its high permeability and selectivity of CO2. However, existing SILMs have the disadvantage of poor stability due to the loss of ionic liquid from the large pores of the macroporous support. In this study, a novel SILM with high stability was developed by confining ionic liquid in a mesoporous polymer membrane. First, a mesoporous polymer membrane derived from a soluble, low-molecular-weight phenolic resin precursor was deposited on a porous Al2O3 support, and then 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([emim][BF4] was immobilized inside mesopores of phenolic resin, forming the SILM under vacuum. Effects of trans-membrane pressure difference on the SILM separation performance were investigated by measuring the permeances of CO2 and N2. The SILM exhibits a high ideal CO2/N2 selectivity of 40, and an actual selectivity of approximately 25 in a mixed gas (50% CO2 and 50% N2 at a trans-membrane pressure difference of 2.5 bar. Compared to [emim][BF4] supported by polyethersulfone membrane with a pore size of around 0.45 μm, the [emim][BF4] confined in a mesoporous polymer membrane exhibits an improved stability, and its separation performance remained stable for 40 h under a trans-membrane pressure difference of 1.5 bar in a mixed gas before the measurement was intentionally stopped.

  1. A review of recent advances in molecular simulation of graphene-derived membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Seyyed Mahmood; Abbasi, Zeynab; Rajabzadeh, Halimeh; Hashemizadeh, Seyyed Ali; Deldar, Amir Noori

    2017-07-01

    To obtain an ideal membrane for gas separation the following three characteristics should be considered: the membrane should be as thin as possible, be mechanically robust, and have well-defined pore sizes. These features will maximize its solvent flux, preserve it from fracture, and guarantee its selectivity. These attractive properties of graphene-derived membranes introduce them as appropriate candidates for gas separation and gas molecular-sieving processes in nanoscale dimensions. The current effort has focused on two issues, including the review of the most newly progression on drilling holes in single graphene membranes for making ultrathin membranes for gas separation, and studying functionalized nanoporous sheet and graphene-derived membranes, including doped graphene, graphene oxide, fluorographene, and reduced graphene oxide from theoretical perspectives for making functional coatings for nano ultrafiltration for gas separation. We investigated the basic mechanism of separation by membranes derived from graphene and relevant possible applications. Functionalized nanoporous membranes as novel approach are characterized by low energy cost in realizing high throughput molecular-sieving separation.

  2. Heat shock 70 protein interaction with Turnip mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase within virus-induced membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, Philippe J.; Thivierge, Karine; Cotton, Sophie; Beauchemin, Chantal; Ide, Christine; Ubalijoro, Eliane; Laliberte, Jean-Francois; Fortin, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification was used in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify cellular interactors of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The heat shock cognate 70-3 (Hsc70-3) and poly(A)-binding (PABP) host proteins were recovered and shown to interact with the RdRp in vitro. As previously shown for PABP, Hsc70-3 was redistributed to nuclear and membranous fractions in infected plants and both RdRp interactors were co-immunoprecipitated from a membrane-enriched extract using RdRp-specific antibodies. Fluorescently tagged RdRp and Hsc70-3 localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleus when expressed alone or in combination in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, they were redistributed to large perinuclear ER-derived vesicles when co-expressed with the membrane binding 6K-VPg-Pro protein of TuMV. The association of Hsc70-3 with the RdRp could possibly take place in membrane-derived replication complexes. Thus, Hsc70-3 and PABP2 are potentially integral components of the replicase complex and could have important roles to play in the regulation of potyviral RdRp functions

  3. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well.

  4. Subcellular localization and logistics of integral membrane protein biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Aboulwafa, Mohammad; Saier, Milton H

    2013-01-01

    Transporters catalyze entry and exit of molecules into and out of cells and organelles, and protein-lipid interactions influence their activities. The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyzes transport-coupled sugar phosphorylation as well as nonvectorial sugar phosphorylation in the cytoplasm. The vectorial process is much more sensitive to the lipid environment than the nonvectorial process. Moreover, cytoplasmic micellar forms of these enzyme-porters have been identified, and non-PTS permeases have similarly been shown to exist in 'soluble' forms. The latter porters exhibit lipid-dependent activities and can adopt altered topologies by simply changing the lipid composition. Finally, intracellular membranes and vesicles exist in Escherichia coli leading to the following unanswered questions: (1) what determines whether a PTS permease catalyzes vectorial or nonvectorial sugar phosphorylation? (2) How do phospholipids influence relative amounts of the plasma membrane, intracellular membrane, inner membrane-derived vesicles and cytoplasmic micelles? (3) What regulates the route(s) of permease insertion and transfer into and between the different subcellular sites? (4) Do these various membranous forms have distinct physiological functions? (5) What methods should be utilized to study the biogenesis and interconversion of these membranous structures? While research concerning these questions is still in its infancy, answers will greatly enhance our understanding of protein-lipid interactions and how they control the activities, conformations, cellular locations and biogenesis of integral membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [3H]PN200-110 and [3H]ryanodine binding and reconstitution of ion channel activity with skeletal muscle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.L.; Alvarez, R.M.; Fill, M.; Hawkes, M.J.; Brush, K.L.; Schilling, W.P.; Stefani, E.

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal muscle membranes derived either from the tubular (T) network or from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were characterized with respect to the binding of the dihydropyridine, [ 3 H]PN200-110, and the alkaloid, [ 3 H]ryanodine; polypeptide composition; and ion channel activity. Conditions for optimizing the binding of these radioligands are discussed. A bilayer pulsing technique is described and is used to examine the channels present in these membranes. Fusion of T-tubule membranes into bilayers revealed the presence of chloride channels and dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels with three distinct conductances. The dihydropyridine-sensitive channels were further characterized with respect to their voltage dependence. Pulsing experiments indicated that two different populations of dihydropyridine-sensitive channels existed. Fusion of heavy SR vesicles revealed three different ion channels; the putative calcium release channel, a potassium channel, and a chloride channel. Thus, this fractionation procedure provides T-tubules and SR membranes which, with radioligand binding and single channel recording techniques, provide a useful tool to study the characteristics of skeletal muscle ion channels and their possible role in excitation-contraction coupling

  6. Methodology for Isolation, Identification and Characterization of Microvesicles in Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M.; Heit, John A.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Analyses of circulating cell membrane-derived microvesicles (MV) have come under scrutiny as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. However, methods to isolate, label and quantify MV have been neither systematized nor validated. Objective To determine how pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical factors affect plasma MV counts, markers for cell of origin and expression of procoagulant surface phosphatidylserine. Methods and Results Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. Effects of blood sample collection, anticoagulant and sample processing to platelet free plasma (PFP), and MV isolation, staining and storage (freeze-thaw) and cytometer design were evaluated with replicate samples from these populations. The key finding is that use of citrate or EDTA anticoagulants decreases or eliminates microvesicles from plasma by inducing adhesion of the microvesicles to platelets or other formed elements. Protease inhibitor anticoagulants, including heparin, preserve MV counts. A centrifugation protocol was developed in which recovery of isolated MV was high with resolution down to the equivalent light scatter of 0.2 micron latex beads. Each procedure was systematically evaluated for its impact on the MV counts and characteristics. Conclusion This study provides a systematic methodology for MV isolation, identification and quantification, essential for development of MV as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. PMID:22075275

  7. Role of Small RNAs in Trypanosomatid Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites survive and replicate in the host by using mechanisms that aim to establish a successful infection and ensure parasite survival. Evidence points to microRNAs as new players in the host-parasite interplay. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that control proteins levels via post-transcriptional gene down-regulation, either within the cells where they were produced or in other cells via intercellular transfer. These microRNAs can be modulated in host cells during infection and are among the growing group of small regulatory RNAs, for which many classes have been described, including the transfer RNA-derived small RNAs. Parasites can either manipulate microRNAs to evade host-driven damage and/or transfer small RNAs to host cells. In this mini-review, we present evidence for the involvement of small RNAs, such as microRNAs, in trypanosomatid infections which lack RNA interference. We highlight both microRNA profile alterations in host cells during those infections and the horizontal transfer of small RNAs and proteins from parasites to the host by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles in a cell communication mechanism. PMID:27065454

  8. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-01-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and 3 H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of 3 H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis

  9. Carbon molecular sieve membrane from a microporous spirobisindane-based polyimide precursor with enhanced ethylene/ethane mixed-gas selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2017-01-13

    Ethylene is typically produced by steam cracking of various hydrocarbon feedstocks. The gaseous products are then separated in a demethanizer followed by a deethanizer unit and finally sent to a C splitter for the final purification step. Cryogenic distillation of ethylene from ethane is the most energy-intensive unit operation process in the chemical industry. Therefore, the development of more energy-efficient processes for ethylene purification is highly desirable. Membrane-based separation has been proposed as an alternative option for replacement or debottlenecking of C splitters but current polymer membrane materials exhibit insufficient mixed-gas CH/CH selectivity (<7) to be technically and economically attractive. In this work, a highly selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane derived from a novel spirobisindane-based polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-6FDA) was developed and characterized. PIM-6FDA showed a single-stage degradation process under an inert nitrogen atmosphere which commenced at ∼480 °C. The CMS formed by pyrolysis at 800 °C had a diffusion/size-sieving-controlled morphology with a mixed-gas (50% CH/50% CH) ethylene/ethane selectivity of 15.6 at 20 bar feed pressure at 35 °C. The mixed-gas ethylene/ethane selectivity is the highest reported value for CMS-type membranes to date.

  10. Regulation of osteogenesis of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells by sodium butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoting; Li, Lei; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2018-04-01

    Human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) draw great interests for regenerative medicine due to convenient availability and low immunogenicity. However, suboptimal culture conditions limit their application. In recent years, small molecules have proven powerful in regulating stem cell fates and can be applied to stimulate their function. In the present study, the impacts of sodium butyrate (NaBu), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), on hAMSCs were investigated. It was shown that NaBu at a low concentration inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 rather than inducing apoptosis. When NaBu was supplemented at a concentration of generated and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes (ALP, Runx2, Opn, and Ocn) and proteins (Col1a1, OPN, OCN, Runx2, and TAZ) were both significantly enhanced. However, a higher concentration (1.0 mM) and longer exposure time (14 days) of NaBu showed no such effects, which may be partially attributed to both the increased expression of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) and reduced level of H3K9-Ace, thus leading to the transcriptional inhibition during osteogenesis. Further, it was indicated that ERK might be involved in the stimulatory effects of NaBu. These findings may be helpful to develop an efficient culture process for hAMSCs towards bone regeneration. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Carbon molecular sieve gas separation membranes based on an intrinsically microporous polyimide precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xiaohua

    2013-10-01

    We report the physical characteristics and gas transport properties for a series of pyrolyzed membranes derived from an intrinsically microporous polyimide containing spiro-centers (PIM-6FDA-OH) by step-wise heat treatment to 440, 530, 600, 630 and 800 C, respectively. At 440 C, the PIM-6FDA-OH was converted to a polybenzoxazole and exhibited a 3-fold increase in CO2 permeability (from 251 to 683 Barrer) with a 50% reduction in selectivity over CH4 (from 28 to 14). At 530 C, a distinct intermediate amorphous carbon structure with superior gas separation properties was formed. A 56% increase in CO2-probed surface area accompanied a 16-fold increase in CO2 permeability (4110 Barrer) over the pristine polymer. The graphitic carbon membrane, obtained by heat treatment at 600 C, exhibited excellent gas separation properties, including a remarkable CO2 permeability of 5040 Barrer with a high selectivity over CH4 of 38. Above 600 C, the strong emergence of ultramicroporosity (<7 Å) as evidenced by WAXD and CO2 adsorption studies elicits a prominent molecular sieving effect, yielding gas separation performance well above the permeability-selectivity trade-off curves of polymeric membranes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Arachidonate metabolism increases as rat alveolar type II cells differentiate in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipchik, R.J.; Chauncey, J.B.; Paine, R.; Simon, R.H.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1990-01-01

    Rat type II alveolar epithelial cells are known to undergo morphological and functional changes when maintained in culture for several days. Having previously demonstrated that these cells can deacylate free arachidonic acid (AA) and metabolize it to products of the cyclooxygenase pathway, the present study was undertaken to determine whether in vitro differentiation was accompanied by alterations in the availability and metabolism of AA. We assessed the constitutive and ionophore A23187-induced deacylation and metabolism of endogenous AA, as well as the metabolism of exogenously supplied AA, in primary cultures of rat type II cells at days 2, 4, and 7 after isolation. Levels of free endogenous AA were increased at day 4, whereas eicosanoid synthesis, predominantly prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin, increased markedly only at day 7. A similar time course of augmentation of prostanoid release was seen in response to exogenous AA. Type II cells cultured on fibronectin, intended to hasten cell flattening and spreading, demonstrated accelerated increases in available free AA in response to A23187; cells cultured on basement membrane derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma, known to maintain the type II phenotype, exhibited diminished levels of available free AA. From these findings, we conclude that alterations in arachidonate metabolism are linked to alterations in cellular phenotype. The potentiation of eicosanoid synthesis accompanying in vitro differentiation suggests a possible role for the alveolar epithelium in the modulation of inflammation and fibrosis in the distal lung

  13. Role of Ocrl1 and Inpp5E in primary cilia assembly and maintenance: a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase relay system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhivanan K

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kayalvizhi Madhivanan,* Swetha Ramadesikan,* R Claudio Aguilar Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The primary cilium (PC is a plasma membrane-derived structure of great importance for cell and organismal physiology. Indeed, abnormalities in assembly or function of the PC trigger the onset of a group of genetic diseases collectively known as ciliopathies. In recent years, it has become evident that the integrity and function of the PC depends substantially on signaling elements such as phosphoinositides (PI and their regulators. Because phospholipids such as PI(4,5P2 constitute recruitment platforms for cytoskeleton, signaling, and trafficking machinery, control over their levels is critical for PC function. Although information about phosphoinositol phosphate (PIP kinases in the PC is scarce, a growing body of evidence supports a role for PIP phosphatases in cilia assembly/maintenance. Indeed, deficiencies in two 5′ PIP phosphatases, Inpp5E and Ocrl1, are clearly linked to ciliopathies like Joubert/MORM syndromes, or ciliopathy-associated diseases like Lowe syndrome. Here, we review the unique roles of these proteins and their specific site of action for ensuring ciliary integrity. Further, we discuss the possibility that a phosphatase relay system able to pass PI control from a preciliary to an intraciliary compartment is in place to ensure PC integrity/function. Keywords: primary cilia, Ocrl1, Inpp5E, Pip2, Pip3

  14. Subcellular localization of the antidepressant-sensitive norepinephrine transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winder Danny G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reuptake of synaptic norepinephrine (NE via the antidepressant-sensitive NE transporter (NET supports efficient noradrenergic signaling and presynaptic NE homeostasis. Limited, and somewhat contradictory, information currently describes the axonal transport and localization of NET in neurons. Results We elucidate NET localization in brain and superior cervical ganglion (SCG neurons, aided by a new NET monoclonal antibody, subcellular immunoisolation techniques and quantitative immunofluorescence approaches. We present evidence that axonal NET extensively colocalizes with syntaxin 1A, and to a limited degree with SCAMP2 and synaptophysin. Intracellular NET in SCG axons and boutons also quantitatively segregates from the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2, findings corroborated by organelle isolation studies. At the surface of SCG boutons, NET resides in both lipid raft and non-lipid raft subdomains and colocalizes with syntaxin 1A. Conclusion Our findings support the hypothesis that SCG NET is segregated prior to transport from the cell body from proteins comprising large dense core vesicles. Once localized to presynaptic boutons, NET does not recycle via VMAT2-positive, small dense core vesicles. Finally, once NET reaches presynaptic plasma membranes, the transporter localizes to syntaxin 1A-rich plasma membrane domains, with a portion found in cholera toxin-demarcated lipid rafts. Our findings indicate that activity-dependent insertion of NET into the SCG plasma membrane derives from vesicles distinct from those that deliver NE. Moreover, NET is localized in presynaptic membranes in a manner that can take advantage of regulatory processes targeting lipid raft subdomains.

  15. Long-distance delivery of bacterial virulence factors by Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Bomberger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use a variety of secreted virulence factors to manipulate host cells, thereby causing significant morbidity and mortality. We report a mechanism for the long-distance delivery of multiple bacterial virulence factors, simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm, thus obviating the need for direct interaction of the pathogen with the host cell to cause cytotoxicity. We show that outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMV secreted by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa deliver multiple virulence factors, including beta-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, hemolytic phospholipase C, and Cif, directly into the host cytoplasm via fusion of OMV with lipid rafts in the host plasma membrane. These virulence factors enter the cytoplasm of the host cell via N-WASP-mediated actin trafficking, where they rapidly distribute to specific subcellular locations to affect host cell biology. We propose that secreted virulence factors are not released individually as naked proteins into the surrounding milieu where they may randomly contact the surface of the host cell, but instead bacterial derived OMV deliver multiple virulence factors simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm in a coordinated manner.

  16. Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Asthma: Implications for Eosinophilic Inflammation

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    Redwan Moqbel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the treatment and management of asthma have suggested that leukotriene (LT receptor antagonists may be very beneficial as a second generation therapy with steroid-sparing properties and negligible side effects. These agents have shown interesting effects on peripheral blood and sputum eosinophils. A major contributor to the damage in the airway of asthmatic patients is the eosinophil, which, upon activation, releases a battery of granule-associated cytotoxic, cationic proteins, including the major basic protein and eosinophil peroxidase, and membrane-derived de novo-synthesized bioactive lipid mediators, including LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4, as well as platelet activating factor. These products have deleterious effects on the airway tissue including mucosal and smooth muscle layers. Accumulating evidence suggests that these agents may also influence the accumulation and maintenance of eosinophilic responses at the site of inflammation. This article reviews the possible anti-inflammatory mode of action of these therapies. It also discusses where there may be a gap in the knowledge regarding the potential direct and indirect effects of LT modifiers on eosinophil function and recruitment.

  17. Purification and characterization of lutropin receptor from membranes of pig follicular fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarney, T.A.; Sairam, M.R.; Bhargavi, G.N.; Mohapatra, S.K. (Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-04-10

    Membranes derived from free floating granulosa cells in porcine ovarian follicular fluid were used as a starting material for structural characterization of both LH/hCG and FSH receptors. The receptors were highly hormone-specific and showed single classes of high-affinity binding sites. Their molecular weights as determined by affinity cross-linking with their respective {sup 125}I-ligands were similarly 70,000. The membrane-localized receptors could be solubilized with reduced Triton X-100 in the presence of 20% glycerol with good retention of hormone binding activity. The purified receptor exhibited a high specificity for hCG and hLH but not for hFSH bTSH. The purified receptor was iodinated and visualized to be composed of a major protein of M{sub r} 70,000 and other minor proteins of molecular weights ranging from 14,000 to 40,000. Except for the M{sub r} 14,000 protein, all other protein species bound to the concanavalin A-Sepharose column. The data suggest that the ovarian LH/hCG and FSH receptors are structurally similar and consist of a single polypeptide chain, as recently documented for the LH/hCG receptor.

  18. 3D Spatially Resolved Models of the Intracellular Dynamics of the Hepatitis C Genome Replication Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus

    2017-10-02

    Mathematical models of virus dynamics have not previously acknowledged spatial resolution at the intracellular level despite substantial arguments that favor the consideration of intracellular spatial dependence. The replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral RNA (vRNA) occurs within special replication complexes formed from membranes derived from endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). These regions, termed membranous webs, are generated primarily through specific interactions between nonstructural virus-encoded proteins (NSPs) and host cellular factors. The NSPs are responsible for the replication of the vRNA and their movement is restricted to the ER surface. Therefore, in this study we developed fully spatio-temporal resolved models of the vRNA replication cycle of HCV. Our simulations are performed upon realistic reconstructed cell structures-namely the ER surface and the membranous webs-based on data derived from immunostained cells replicating HCV vRNA. We visualized 3D simulations that reproduced dynamics resulting from interplay of the different components of our models (vRNA, NSPs, and a host factor), and we present an evaluation of the concentrations for the components within different regions of the cell. Thus far, our model is restricted to an internal portion of a hepatocyte and is qualitative more than quantitative. For a quantitative adaption to complete cells, various additional parameters will have to be determined through further in vitro cell biology experiments, which can be stimulated by the results deccribed in the present study.

  19. Comprehensive Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Placenta and Fetal Membrane and Their Response to Osteoactivin Stimulation

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    C. M. Raynaud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are the most promising seed cells for cell therapy and can be isolated from various sources of human adult tissues such as bone marrow (BM-MSC and adipose tissue. However, cells from these tissues must be obtained through invasive procedures. We, therefore, characterized MSCs isolated from fresh placenta (Pl-MSC and fetal membrane (Mb-MSC through morphological and fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS. MSC frequency is higher in membrane than placenta (2.14%  ± 0.65 versus 15.67%  ± 0.29%. Pl/Mb-MSCs in vitro expansion potential was significantly higher than BM-MSCs. We demonstrated that one of the MSC-specific marker is sufficient for MSC isolation and that culture in specific media is the optimal way for selecting very homogenous MSC population. These MSCs could be differentiated into mesodermal cells expressing cell markers and cytologic staining consistent with mature osteoblasts and adipocytes. Transcriptomic analysis and cytokine arrays demonstrated broad similarity between placenta- and membrane-derived MSCs and only discrete differences with BM-MSCs with enrichment of networks involved in bone differentiation. Pl/Mb-MSCs displayed higher osteogenic differentiation potential than BM-MSC when their response to osteoactivin was evaluated. Fetal-tissue-derived mesenchymal cells may, therefore, be considered as a major source of MSCs to reach clinical scale banking in particular for bone regeneration.

  20. The role of extracellular vesicles in parasite-host interaction

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    Justyna Gatkowska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, initially considered cell debris, were soon proved to be an essential tool of intercellular communication enabling the exchange of information without direct contact of the cells. At present EVs are the subject of extensive research due to their universal presence in single- and multi-cell organisms, regardless of their systematic position, and their substantial role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs seem to be released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under natural (in vivo and laboratory (in vitro conditions. Even purified fractions of isolated EVs comprise various membrane-derived structures. However, EVs can be classified into general groups based primarily on their size and origin. EVs may carry various materials, and ongoing research investigations give new insight into their potenti participation in critical biological processes, e.g. carcinogenesis. This paper presents current knowledge on the EVs’ involvement in host–parasite interactions including the invasion process, the maintenance of the parasite infection and modulation of the host immune response to parasite antigenic stimulation, as well as perspectives of the potential use of EVs as immunoprophylactic and diagnostic tools for controlling parasite infections. The most numerous literature data concern protozoan parasites, especially those of the greatest medical and social importance worldwide. However, available information about the EVs’ contribution to helminth invasion has also been included.

  1. Membrane-associated proteolytic activity in Escherichia coli that is stimulated by ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemes, Y.; Voellmy, R.W.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation of proteins in bacteria requires metabolism energy. One important enzyme in this process is protease La, a soluble ATP-dependent protease encoded by the lon gene. However, lon mutants that lack a functional protease La still show some ATP-dependent protein breakdown. The authors have reported an ATP-stimulated endoproteolytic activity associated with the inner membrane of E. coli. This ATP-stimulated activity is found in normal levels in membranes derived from lon mutants, including strains carrying insertions in the lon gene. The membrane-bound activity hydrolyzes 14 C-methylglobin at a linear rate for up to 3 hours. These fractions also contain appreciable proteolytic activity that is not affected by ATP. The stimulation by ATP requires the presence of Mg 2+ . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (e.g. AMPPNP or ATP-γ-S) and ADP do not enhance proteolysis. Unlike protease La, the membrane-associated enzyme does not degrade the fluorometric substrate, Glt-Ala-Ala-Phe-MNA, in an ATP-stimulated fashion, and its level is not influenced by high temperature of by the gene which regulates the heat-shock response. The enzyme is inhibited by dichloroisocoumarin and certain peptide chloromethyl ketones. They conclude that E. coli contain at least two ATP-dependent proteases with distinct specificities: one is soluble and the other is membrane-associated

  2. Plasmodium berghei: immunosuppression of the cell-mediated immune response induced by nonviable antigenic preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, A.; Frankenburg, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, plasmodial antigens were examined for their ability to suppress the cellular immune response during lethal Plasmodium berghei infection. Splenic enlargement and the number and function of white spleen cells were assessed after injection of normal mice with irradiated parasitized erythrocytes (IPE) or with parasitized erythrocytes (PE) membranes. Both IPE and PE membranes caused splenomegaly and an increase in the number of splenic white cells with concurrent alteration of the relative proportions of T cells and macrophages. The percentage of T lymphocytes was fractionally diminished, but there was a marked increase in Lyt 2.2 positive (suppressor and cytotoxic) T subsets and in the number of splenic macrophage precursors. The pathological enlargement of the spleen was induced by various plasma membrane-derived antigens containing both proteins and carbohydrates. Splenocytes of mice injected with liposomes containing deoxycholate-treated PE or PE fractions showed both diminished interleukin 2 production and a decreased response to mitogen. It appears that some of the changes in the cellular immune response during P. berghei infection are a consequence of the massive provision of a wide spectrum of antigens, capable of suppressing the immune response. Thus, it may be appropriate to evaluate the possible negative effect of parasite epitopes that are candidates for vaccine

  3. Transplantation with cultured stem cells derived from the human amniotic membrane for corneal alkali burns: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Yanwei; Zeng, Guangwei; Yang, Bo; Zhu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Amniotic membranes (AM) have been used in a wide range of clinical applications. We successfully extracted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human AM, but little is known about the use and efficacy of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAM-dMSCs) for the treatment of alkali burns. We utilized hAM-dMSCs transplantation, AM grafting, and their combined use in the treatment of alkali burns. An experimental model in rabbits was devised to analyze the use of these techniques with immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The survival and migration of hAM-dMSCs labeled by SPION in the host were assessed with Prussian blue staining. Compared with the control group, the treated groups demonstrated faster reconstruction of the corneal epithelium, and lower levels of corneal opacification and neovascularization within corneal alkali burns. Furthermore, dark blue-stained particles were detected in the limbus corneae at day 28. These results demonstrated the ability of hAM-dMSCs to enhance epithelial healing and reduce corneal opacification and neovascularization in corneal alkali wounds.

  4. Phosphatidylkojibiosyl Diglyceride: metabolism and function as an anchor in bacterial cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieringer, R A

    1975-07-01

    The recently discovered phosphoglycolipid, phosphatidylkojibiosyl diglyceride (PKD), was first observed as a biosynthetic by-product of glycosyl diglyceride metabolism in Streptococcus faecalis (faecium) ATCC 9790. Its structure is 1, 2-diacyl-3-O-alpha-Dglucopyranosyl-6'-O-phosphoryl- [1'', 2''-diacyl-3''-O-sn-glycerol]-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol. The biosynthesis of phosphatidyl-kojibiosyl diglyceride occurs by a novel transphosphatidylation reaction in which a phosphatidyl glycerol to the primary alcohol function at the 6 position of the internal glucose of kojibiosyl diglyceride. The reaction is catalyzed by a membrane-derived enzyme. Phosphatidyl-kojibiosyl diglyceride is bound covalently through a phosphodiester bond to the polyglycerol phosphate moiety of membrane lipoteichoic acid from S. faecalis. Phosphatidylkojibiosyl diglyceride has four nonpolar long chain fatty acyl groups and appears to have the necessary physico-chemical properties to anchor the long hydrophilic glycerol phosphate polymer of lipoteichoic acid to the hydrophobic enviroment of the membrane of S. faecalis and probably other gram-positive bacteria as well.

  5. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Menon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species—indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms—but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system.

  6. A comparison of the functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered from different stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinardell, Tatiana; Sheehy, Eamon J; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-06-01

    Joint-derived stem cells are a promising alternative cell source for cartilage repair therapies that may overcome many of the problems associated with the use of primary chondrocytes (CCs). The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) and joint tissue-derived stem cells following encapsulation in agarose hydrogels. Culture-expanded BMSCs, fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs), and synovial membrane-derived stem cells (SDSCs) were encapsulated in agarose and maintained in a chondrogenic medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-β3. After 21 days of culture, constructs were either implanted subcutaneously into the back of nude mice for an additional 28 days or maintained for a similar period in vitro in either chondrogenic or hypertrophic media formulations. After 49 days of in vitro culture in chondrogenic media, SDSC constructs accumulated the highest levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) (∼2.8% w/w) and collagen (∼1.8% w/w) and were mechanically stiffer than constructs engineered using other cell types. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice, sGAG content significantly decreased for all stem cell-seeded constructs, while no significant change was observed in the control constructs engineered using primary CCs, indicating that the in vitro chondrocyte-like phenotype generated in all stem cell-seeded agarose constructs was transient. FPSCs and SDSCs appeared to undergo fibrous dedifferentiation or resorption, as evident from increased collagen type I staining and a dramatic loss in sGAG content. BMSCs followed a more endochondral pathway with increased type X collagen expression and mineralization of the engineered tissue. In conclusion, while joint tissue-derived stem cells possess a strong intrinsic chondrogenic capacity, further studies are needed to identify the factors that will lead to the generation

  7. Differential distribution of proteins and lipids in detergent-resistant and detergent-soluble domains in rod outer segment plasma membranes and disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael H; Nash, Zack A; Takemori, Nobuaki; Fliesler, Steven J; McClellan, Mark E; Naash, Muna I

    2008-01-01

    Membrane heterogeneity plays a significant role in regulating signal transduction and other cellular activities. We examined the protein and lipid components associated with the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fractions from retinal rod outer segment (ROS) disk and plasma membrane-enriched preparations. Proteomics and correlative western blot analysis revealed the presence of alpha and beta subunits of the rod cGMP-gated ion channel and glucose transporter type 1, among other proteins. The glucose transporter was present exclusively in ROS plasma membrane (not disks) and was highly enriched in DRMs, as was the cGMP-gated channel beta-subunit. In contrast, the majority of rod opsin and ATP-binding cassette transporter A4 was localized to detergent-soluble domains in disks. As expected, the cholesterol : fatty acid mole ratio was higher in DRMs than in the corresponding parent membranes (disk and plasma membranes, respectively) and was also higher in disks compared to plasma membranes. Furthermore, the ratio of saturated : polyunsaturated fatty acids was also higher in DRMs compared to their respective parent membranes (disk and plasma membranes). These results confirm that DRMs prepared from both disks and plasma membranes are enriched in cholesterol and in saturated fatty acids compared to their parent membranes. The dominant fatty acids in DRMs were 16 : 0 and 18 : 0; 22 : 6n3 and 18 : 1 levels were threefold higher and twofold lower, respectively, in disk-derived DRMs compared to plasma membrane-derived DRMs. We estimate, based on fatty acid recovery that DRMs account for only approximately 8% of disks and approximately 12% of ROS plasma membrane.

  8. Benefits of mineralized bone cortical allograft for immediate implant placement in extraction sites: an in vivo study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orti, Valérie; Bousquet, Philippe; Tramini, Paul; Gaitan, Cesar; Mertens, Brenda; Cuisinier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mineralized bone cortical allograft (MBCA), with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane derived from bovine pericardium, on alveolar bone remodeling after immediate implant placement in a dog model. Six mongrel dogs were included. The test and control sites were randomly selected. Four biradicular premolars were extracted from the mandible. In control sites, implants without an allograft or membrane were placed immediately in the fresh extraction sockets. In the test sites, an MBCA was placed to fill the gap between the bone socket wall and implant, with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane. Specimens were collected after 1 and 3 months. The amount of residual particles and new bone quality were evaluated by histomorphometry. Few residual graft particles were observed to be closely embedded in the new bone without any contact with the implant surface. The allograft combined with a resorbable collagen membrane limited the resorption of the buccal wall in height and width. The histological quality of the new bone was equivalent to that of the original bone. The MBCA improved the quality of new bone formation, with few residual particles observed at 3 months. The preliminary results of this animal study indicate a real benefit in obtaining new bone as well as in enhancing osseointegration due to the high resorbability of cortical allograft particles, in comparison to the results of xenografts or other biomaterials (mineralized or demineralized cancellous allografts) that have been presented in the literature. Furthermore, the use of an MBCA combined with a collagen membrane in extraction and immediate implant placement limited the extent of post-extraction resorption.

  9. Basal-plane dislocations in bilayer graphene - Peculiarities in a quasi-2D material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Dislocations represent one of the most fascinating and fundamental concepts in materials science. First and foremost, they are the main carriers of plastic deformation in crystalline materials. Furthermore, they can strongly alter the local electronic or optical properties of semiconductors and ionic crystals. In layered crystals like graphite dislocation movement is restricted to the basal plane. Thus, those basal-plane dislocations cannot escape enabling their confinement in between only two atomic layers of the material. So-called bilayer graphene is the thinnest imaginable quasi-2D crystal to explore the nature and behavior of dislocations under such extreme boundary conditions. Robust graphene membranes derived from epitaxial graphene on SiC provide an ideal platform for their investigation. The presentation will give an insight in the direct observation of basal-plane partial dislocations by transmission electron microscopy and their detailed investigation by diffraction contrast analysis and atomistic simulations. The investigation reveals striking size effects. First, the absence of stacking fault energy, a unique property of bilayer graphene, leads to a characteristic dislocation pattern, which corresponds to an alternating AB BA change of the stacking order. Most importantly, our experiments in combination with atomistic simulations reveal a pronounced buckling of the bilayer graphene membrane, which directly results from accommodation of strain. In fact, the buckling completely changes the strain state of the bilayer graphene and is of key importance for its electronic/spin transport properties. Due to the high degree of disorder in our quasi-2D material it is one of the very few examples for a perfect linear magnetoresistance, i.e. the linear dependency of the in-plane electrical resistance on a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the graphene sheet up to field strengths of more than 60 T. This research is financed by the German Research Foundation

  10. Variation among Staphylococcus aureus membrane vesicle proteomes affects cytotoxicity of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyejin; Oh, Man Hwan; Jun, So Hyun; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Chi Won; Kwon, Hyo Il; Na, Seok Hyeon; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Nicholas, Asiimwe; Selasi, Gati Noble; Lee, Je Chul

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which can deliver virulence factors to host cells and induce cytopathology. However, the cytopathology of host cells induced by MVs derived from different S. aureus strains has not yet been characterized. In the present study, the cytotoxic activity of MVs from different S. aureus isolates on host cells was compared and the proteomes of S. aureus MVs were analyzed. The MVs purified from S. aureus M060 isolated from a patient with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome showed higher cytotoxic activity toward host cells than that shown by MVs from three other clinical S. aureus isolates. S. aureus M060 MVs induced HEp-2 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, but the cytotoxic activity of MVs was completely abolished by treatment with proteinase K. In a proteomic analysis, the MVs from three S. aureus isolates not only carry 25 common proteins, but also carry ≥60 strain-specific proteins. All S. aureus MVs contained δ-hemolysin (Hld), γ-hemolysin, leukocidin D, and exfoliative toxin C, but exfoliative toxin A (ETA) was specifically identified in S. aureus M060 MVs. ETA was delivered to HEp-2 cells via S. aureus MVs. Both rETA and rHld induced cytotoxicity in HEp-2 cells. In conclusion, MVs from clinical S. aureus isolates differ with respect to cytotoxic activity in host cells, and these differences may result from differences in the MV proteomes. Further proteogenomic analysis or mutagenesis of specific genes is necessary to identify cytotoxic factors in S. aureus MVs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective pharmacological modulation of renal peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding by treatment with diuretic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukeman, D.S.; Vaughn, D.A.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have assessed the effects of in vivo administration of different classes of diuretic drugs on the expression of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) in crude membranes derived from the cortex and outer medulla of rat kidney by saturation analysis with the PBBS-selective ligands [ 3 H]RO5-4864 and [ 3 H]PH 11195 in cortex and [ 3 H]RO5-4864 in outer medulla. Administration for 14-15 days of furosemide, a drug that blocks NaCl-KCl coupled transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, produced a significant doubling in the PBBS density (B/sub max/) in outer medulla, a region of the kidney rich in thick ascending limbs, and produced a lesser but significant increase in PBBS density in the cortex. Conversely, administration for 14-15 days of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide, which acts predominantly in the proximal tubule, and hydrochlorothiazide, which acts predominantly in the early distal tubule, elicited statistically significant increases in PBBS density in renal cortex but not in renal outer medulla. Furthermore, all drug treatments were without effect on the equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/s) of [ 3 H]RO5-4864 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding to cortical and outer medullary membrane preparations. These findings demonstrate that the PBBS can be selectively up-regulated in different regions of the kidney by diuretic drugs with different modes/sites of action. 50 references, 1 table

  12. Characterization of the methotrexate transport pathway in murine L1210 leukemia cells: Involvement of a membrane receptor and a cytosolic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.M.; Ratnam, M.; Rodeman, K.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, N α -(4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methyl-pteroyl)-N ε -(4-azidosalicylyl)-L-lysine (APA-ASA-Lys), was recently used to identify the plasma membrane derived binding protein involved in the transport of this folate antagonist into murine L1210 cells. The labeled protein has an apparent molecular weight of 46K-48K when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but no such labeling occurs in a methotrexate transport-defective cell line (L1210/R81). Labeling of the total cytosolic protein from disrupted cells, followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography, showed, among other proteins, a 21K band, corresponding to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), in both the parent and R81 cells and a 38K band only in the parent cells. However, when whole cells were UV irradiated at various times at 37 degree C following addition of radiolabeled APA-ASA-Lys, the 38K protein and DHFR were the only cytosolic proteins labeled in the parent cells, while the intact R81 cells showed no labeled cytosolic protein, since the photoprobe is not transported. Further, when the parent cells were treated with a pulse of radiolabeled photoprobe, followed by UV irradiation at different times at 37 degree C, the probe appeared sequentially on the 48K membrane protein and both the 38K cytosolic protein and dihydrofolate reductase. A 48K protein could be detected in both parent L1210 cells and the R81 cells on Western blots using antisera to a membrane folate binding protein from human placenta. These results suggest a vectorial transport of APA-ASA-Lys or methotrexate and reduced folate coenzymes into murine L1210 cells mediated by a 48K integral membrane protein and a 38K cytosolic or peripheral membrane protein. The 38K protein may help in the trafficking of reduced folate coenzymes, shuttling them to various cytosolic targets

  13. Human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles combined with low-dose irradiation: a new approach to enhance drug targeting in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lianru Zhang, Rutian Li, Hong Chen, Jia Wei, Hanqing Qian, Shu Su, Jie Shao, Lifeng Wang, Xiaoping Qian, Baorui Liu The Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University and Clinical Cancer Institute of Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cell membrane-derived nanoparticles are becoming more attractive because of their ability to mimic many features of their source cells. This study reports on a biomimetic delivery platform based on human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte membranes. In this system, the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles was camouflaged using T-lymphocyte membranes, and local low-dose irradiation (LDI was used as a chemoattractant for nanoparticle targeting. The T-lymphocyte membrane coating was verified using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This new platform reduced nanoparticle phagocytosis by macrophages to 23.99% (P=0.002. Systemic administration of paclitaxel-loaded T-lymphocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles inhibited the growth of human gastric cancer by 56.68% in Balb/c nude mice. Application of LDI at the tumor site significantly increased the tumor growth inhibition rate to 88.50%, and two mice achieved complete remission. Furthermore, LDI could upregulate the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor vessels, which is important in the process of leukocyte adhesion and might contribute to the localization of T-lymphocyte membrane-encapsulated nanoparticles in tumors. Therefore, this new drug-delivery platform retained both the long circulation time and tumor site accumulation ability of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while local LDI could significantly enhance tumor localization. Keywords: cell membrane, drug delivery system, gastric cancer, low-dose irradiation, nanoparticles

  14. Biogenesis of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane in vivo: comparison of the pathways taken by apical and basolateral proteins using subcellular fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartles, J.R.; Feracci, H.M.; Stieger, B.; Hubbard, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We have used pulse-chase metabolic radiolabeling with L-[ 35 S]methionine in conjunction with subcellular fractionation and specific protein immunoprecipitation techniques to compare the posttranslational transport pathways taken by endogenous domain-specific integral proteins of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane in vivo. Our results suggest that both apical (HA 4, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, and aminopeptidase N) and basolateral (CE 9 and the asialoglycoprotein receptor [ASGP-R]) proteins reach the hepatocyte plasma membrane with similar kinetics. The mature molecular mass form of each of these proteins reaches its maximum specific radioactivity in a purified hepatocyte plasma membrane fraction after only 45 min of chase. However, at this time, the mature radiolabeled apical proteins are not associated with vesicles derived from the apical domain of the hepatocyte plasma membrane, but instead are associated with vesicles which, by several criteria, appear to be basolateral plasma membrane. These vesicles: (a) fractionate like basolateral plasma membrane in sucrose density gradients and in free-flow electrophoresis; (b) can be separated from the bulk of the likely organellar contaminants, including membranes derived from the late Golgi cisternae, transtubular network, and endosomes; (c) contain the proven basolateral constituents CE 9 and the ASGP-R, as judged by vesicle immunoadsorption using fixed Staphylococcus aureus cells and anti-ASGP-R antibodies; and (d) are oriented with their ectoplasmic surfaces facing outward, based on the results of vesicle immunoadsorption experiments using antibodies specific for the ectoplasmic domain of the ASGP-R. Only at times of chase greater than 45 min do significant amounts of the mature radiolabeled apical proteins arrive at the apical domain, and they do so at different rates

  15. Reconstruction of delayed scleral flap melting with bovine pericardium after trabeculectomy with mitomycin C

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    Coutinho, Inês

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present a challenging case of hypotony after trabeculectomy and its treatment. Case description: A 22-year-old woman with juvenile glaucoma underwent a conventional trabeculectomy with mitomycin C on the right eye (OD. In the immediate postoperative period, we observed a hyperfiltration bleb with hypotony refractory to conservative measures leading to hypotony maculopathy.A surgical revision with scleral flap resuture and conjunctival graft was performed with a satisfactory result and resolution of hypotony maculopathy. After two years, the patient complained of low visual acuity (VA of the OD. During examination, we observed a fine and avascular bleb with Seidel and visualization of the underlying uveal tissue, an intraocular pressure (IOP of 5 mmHg, and chorioretinal folds. A new revision of the trabeculectomy was performed. During the procedure, it was not possible to identify the scleral flap, so the fistula was closed with a patch of collagenous membrane derived from bovine pericardium (Tutopatch graft. A good clinical evolution occurred. After 2 months, IOP was 15 mmHg without Seidel or changes in the fundus and VA was 20/20. After of follow-up, the IOP remains stable without further complaints. Conclusion: This case illustrates the difficulties faced in the management of a common complication of trabeculectomy and highlights some of the options available for its treatment. There are few reports of scleral melting after trabeculectomy. However, trauma and scleral necrosis associated with mitomycin are listed as the main causes.The use of a scleral patch derived from bovine pericardium allows effective suturing and closure of the aqueous leak.

  16. A novel muscarinic receptor ligand which penetrates the blood brain barrier and displays in vivo selectivity for the m2 subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitler, M.S.; Cohen, V.I.; De La Cruz, R.; Boulay, S.F.; Jin, B.; Zeeberg, B.R.; Reba, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in the posterior parietal cortex of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. In our efforts to prepare such a radioligand, the authors have used competition studies against currently existing muscarinic receptor radioligands to infer the in vitro and in vivo properties of a novel muscarinic receptor ligand, 5-[[4-[4-(diisobutylamino)butyl]-1-phenyl]acetyl]-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepin-11-one (DIBD). In vitro competition studies against [ 3 H](R)-3-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([ 3 H]QNB) and [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine ([ 3 H]NMS), using membranes derived from transfected cells expressing only m1, m2, m3, or m4 receptor subtypes, indicate that DIBD is selective for m2/m4 over m1/m3. In vivo competition studies against (R,R)-[ 125 I]IQNB indicate that DIBD crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB). The relationship of the regional percentage decrease in (R,R)-[ 125 I]IQNB versus the percentage of each of the receptor subtypes indicates that DIBD competes more effectively in those brain regions which are known to be enriched in the m2, relative to the m1, m3, and m4, receptor subtype; however, analysis of the data using a mathematical model shows that caution is required when interpreting the in vivo results. The authors conclude that a suitably radiolabeled derivative of DIBD may be of potential use in emission tomographic study of changes in m2 receptors in the central nervous system

  17. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

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    Leilismara Sousa

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1, iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5% than in women and was associated with an increase (446% in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and an increase (327% in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132% in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  18. Predicting carotid artery disease and plaque instability from cell-derived microparticles.

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    Wekesa, A L; Cross, K S; O'Donovan, O; Dowdall, J F; O'Brien, O; Doyle, M; Byrne, L; Phelan, J P; Ross, M D; Landers, R; Harrison, M

    2014-11-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are small plasma membrane-derived vesicles shed from circulating blood cells and may act as novel biomarkers of vascular disease. We investigated the potential of circulating MPs to predict (a) carotid plaque instability and (b) the presence of advanced carotid disease. This pilot study recruited carotid disease patients (aged 69.3 ± 1.2 years [mean ± SD], 69% male, 90% symptomatic) undergoing endarterectomy (n = 42) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 73). Plaques were classified as stable (n = 25) or unstable (n = 16) post surgery using immunohistochemistry. Blood samples were analysed for MP subsets and molecular biomarkers. Odds ratios (OR) are expressed per standard deviation biomarker increase. Endothelial MP (EMP) subsets, but not any vascular, inflammatory, or proteolytic molecular biomarker, were higher (p < .05) in the unstable than the stable plaque patients. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for CD31(+)41(-) EMP in discriminating an unstable plaque was 0.73 (0.56-0.90, p < .05). CD31(+)41(-) EMP predicted plaque instability (OR = 2.19, 1.08-4.46, p < .05) and remained significant in a multivariable model that included transient ischaemic attack symptom status. Annexin V(+) MP, platelet MP (PMP) subsets, and C-reactive protein were higher (p < .05) in cases than controls. Annexin V(+) MP (OR = 3.15, 1.49-6.68), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (OR = 1.64, 1.03-2.59), and previous smoking history (OR = 3.82, 1.38-10.60) independently (p < .05) predicted the presence of carotid disease in a multivariable model. EMP may have utility in predicting plaque instability in carotid patients and annexin V(+) MPs may predict the presence of advanced carotid disease in aging populations, independent of established biomarkers. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phospholipid Binding Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Is Present on Microparticles Generated In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Einfinger, Katrin; Badrnya, Sigrun; Furtmüller, Margareta; Handschuh, Daniela; Lindner, Herbert; Geiger, Margarethe

    2015-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor is a secreted, non-specific serine protease inhibitor with broad protease reactivity. It binds glycosaminoglycans and anionic phospholipids, which can modulate its activity. Anionic phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine are normally localized to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, but are exposed on activated and apoptotic cells and on plasma membrane-derived microparticles. In this report we show by flow cytometry that microparticles derived from cultured cells and activated platelets incorporated protein C inhibitor during membrane blebbing. Moreover, protein C inhibitor is present in/on microparticles circulating in normal human plasma as judged from Western blots, ELISAs, flow cytometry, and mass spectrometry. These plasma microparticles are mainly derived from megakaryocytes. They seem to be saturated with protein C inhibitor, since they do not bind added fluorescence-labeled protein C inhibitor. Heparin partially removed microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor, supporting our assumption that protein C inhibitor is bound via phospholipids. To assess the biological role of microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor we performed protease inhibition assays and co-precipitated putative binding partners on microparticles with anti-protein C inhibitor IgG. As judged from amidolytic assays microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor did not inhibit activated protein C or thrombin, nor did microparticles modulate the activity of exogenous protein C inhibitor. Among the proteins co-precipitating with protein C inhibitor, complement factors, especially complement factor 3, were most striking. Taken together, our data do not support a major role of microparticle-associated protein C inhibitor in coagulation, but rather suggest an interaction with proteins of the complement system present on these phospholipid vesicles. PMID:26580551

  20. Reconstitution of hormone-responsive detergent-solubilized follicle stimulating hormone receptors into liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Dattatreyamurty, B.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An FSH receptor-enriched fraction that responds to exogenous FSH by activation of adenylate cyclase was prepared by ultrafiltration of sucrose density gradient-purified light membranes derived from bovine calf testes homogenates and solubilized with Triton X-100. To further confirm the functional nature of the detergent-solubilized FSH receptor, the extract was incorporated by lipid hydration into large multilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, 2:1 molar ratio. Receptor incorporation was determined by measurement of specific binding of [125I] human FSH ([125I] hFSH). Substitution of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine or increasing the cholesterol concentration of the vesicles reduced specific binding of [125I]hFSH. Under conditions favoring optimal incorporation of the receptor, specific binding of [125I]hFSH was time and temperature dependent and saturable when increasing concentrations of radioligand were added to a constant amount of proteoliposomes. Reconstituted proteoliposomes bound 1600 fmol FSH/mg protein with an affinity of 3.54 x 10(9) M-1. Inhibition of [125I] hFSH binding by hFSH was comparable to that seen with the membrane-bound receptor (ED50 = 10 ng). Equilibrium binding studies with [3H]Gpp(NH)p indicated that a single class of high affinity GTP binding sites with an association constant (Ka) of 3.33 x 10(7) m-1 which bound 2.19 fmol [3H]Gpp(NH)p/mg protein had also been incorporated into the proteoliposomes. Addition of FSH induced a 2-fold stimulation of [3H]Gpp(NH)p binding, supporting our earlier studies suggesting that the detergent-solubilized FSH receptor is complexed to the G protein. Of particular significance in the present study was the observation that both NaF and FSH stimulated cAMP production in the reconstituted system

  1. Hydrostatic pressure acts to stabilise a chondrogenic phenotype in porcine joint tissue derived stem cells

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    T Vinardell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrostatic pressure (HP is a key component of the in vivo joint environment and has been shown to enhance chondrogenesis of stem cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction between HP and TGF-β3 on both the initiation and maintenance of a chondrogenic phenotype for joint tissue derived stem cells. Pellets generated from porcine chondrocytes (CCs, synovial membrane derived stem cells (SDSCs and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells (FPSCs were subjected to 10 MPa of cyclic HP (4 h/day and different concentrations of TGF-β3 (0, 1 and 10 ng/mL for 14 days. CCs and stem cells were observed to respond differentially to both HP and TGF-β3 stimulation. HP in the absence of TGF-β3 did not induce robust chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells. At low concentrations of TGF-β3 (1 ng/mL, HP acted to enhance chondrogenesis of both SDSCs and FPSCs, as evident by a 3-fold increase in Sox9 expression and a significant increase in glycosaminoglycan accumulation. In contrast, HP had no effect on cartilage-specific matrix synthesis at higher concentrations of TGF-β3 (10 ng/mL. Critically, HP appears to play a key role in the maintenance of a chondrogenic phenotype, as evident by a down-regulation of the hypertrophic markers type X collagen and Indian hedgehog in SDSCs irrespective of the cytokine concentration. In the context of stem cell based therapies for cartilage repair, this study demonstrates the importance of considering how joint specific environmental factors interact to regulate not only the initiation of chondrogenesis, but also the development of a stable hyaline-like repair tissue.

  2. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low-oxygen Proterozoic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bryant, Donald A; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the role of biology in planetary evolution remains an outstanding challenge to geobiologists. Progress towards unravelling this puzzle for Earth is hindered by the scarcity of well-preserved rocks from the Archean (4.0 to 2.5 Gyr ago) and Proterozoic (2.5 to 0.5 Gyr ago) Eons. In addition, the microscopic life that dominated Earth's biota for most of its history left a poor fossil record, consisting primarily of lithified microbial mats, rare microbial body fossils and membrane-derived hydrocarbon molecules that are still challenging to interpret. However, it is clear from the sulfur isotope record and other geochemical proxies that the production of oxygen or oxidizing power radically changed Earth's surface and atmosphere during the Proterozoic Eon, pushing it away from the more reducing conditions prevalent during the Archean. In addition to ancient rocks, our reconstruction of Earth's redox evolution is informed by our knowledge of biogeochemical cycles catalysed by extant biota. The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis in ancient cyanobacteria represents one of the most impressive microbial innovations in Earth's history, and oxygenic photosynthesis is the largest source of O2 in the atmosphere today. Thus the study of microbial metabolisms and evolution provides an important link between extant biota and the clues from the geologic record. Here, we consider the physiology of cyanobacteria (the only microorganisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis), their co-occurrence with anoxygenic phototrophs in a variety of environments and their persistence in low-oxygen environments, including in water columns as well as mats, throughout much of Earth's history. We examine insights gained from both the rock record and cyanobacteria presently living in early Earth analogue ecosystems and synthesize current knowledge of these ancient microbial mediators in planetary redox evolution. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that anoxygenic photosynthesis

  3. Avoiding false positive antigen detection by flow cytometry on blood cell derived microparticles: the importance of an appropriate negative control.

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    Emerence Crompot

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs, also called microvesicles (MVs are plasma membrane-derived fragments with sizes ranging from 0.1 to 1μm. Characterization of these MPs is often performed by flow cytometry but there is no consensus on the appropriate negative control to use that can lead to false positive results.We analyzed MPs from platelets, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, monocytes, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL B-cells. Cells were purified by positive magnetic-separation and cultured for 48h. Cells and MPs were characterized using the following monoclonal antibodies (CD19,20 for B-cells, CD3,8,5,27 for T-cells, CD16,56 for NK-cells, CD14,11c for monocytes, CD41,61 for platelets. Isolated MPs were stained with annexin-V-FITC and gated between 300nm and 900nm. The latex bead technique was then performed for easy detection of MPs. Samples were analyzed by Transmission (TEM and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM.Annexin-V positive events within a gate of 300-900nm were detected and defined as MPs. Our results confirmed that the characteristic antigens CD41/CD61 were found on platelet-derived-MPs validating our technique. However, for MPs derived from other cell types, we were unable to detect any antigen, although they were clearly expressed on the MP-producing cells in the contrary of several data published in the literature. Using the latex bead technique, we confirmed detection of CD41,61. However, the apparent expression of other antigens (already deemed positive in several studies was determined to be false positive, indicated by negative controls (same labeling was used on MPs from different origins.We observed that mother cell antigens were not always detected on corresponding MPs by direct flow cytometry or latex bead cytometry. Our data highlighted that false positive results could be generated due to antibody aspecificity and that phenotypic characterization of MPs is a difficult field requiring the use of several negative controls.

  4. Surface interactions between nanoscale iron and organic material: Potential uses in water treatment process units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Max

    Membrane systems are among the primary emergent technologies in water treatment process units due to their ease of use, small physical footprint, and high physical rejection. Membrane fouling, the phenomena by which membranes become clogged or generally soiled, is an inhibitor to optimal efficiency in membrane systems. Novel, composite, and modified surface materials must be investigated to determine their efficacy in improving fouling behavior. Ceramic membranes derived from iron oxide nanoparticles called ferroxanes were coated with a superhydrophillic, zwitterionic polymer called poly (sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) to form a composite ceramic-polymeric membrane. Membrane samples with and without polySBMA coating were subjected to fouling with a bovine serum albumin solution and fouling was observed by measuring permeate flux at 10 mL intervals. Loss of polySBMA was measured using total organic carbon analysis, and membrane samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The coated membrane samples decreased initial fouling rate by 27% and secondary fouling rate by 24%. Similarly, they displayed a 30% decrease in irreversible fouling during the initial fouling stage, and a 27% decrease in irreversible fouling in the secondary fouling stage; however, retention of polySBMA sufficient for improved performance was not conclusive. The addition of chemical disinfectants into drinking water treatment processes results in the formation of compounds called disinfection by-products (DBPs). The formation of DBPs occurs when common chemical disinfectants (i.e. chlorine) react with organic material. The harmful effects of DBP exposure require that they be monitored and controlled for public safety. This work investigated the ability of nanostructured hematite derived from ferroxane nanoparticles to remove organic precursors to DBPs in the form of humic acid via adsorption processes. The results show that p

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

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    Galia Ramírez-Toloza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68, T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP, trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF, C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT. Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs. All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP, alternative (AP or lectin pathways (LP. Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host

  6. The establishment of polarized membrane traffic in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S J; Leaf, D S; Moore, H P; Gerhart, J C

    1992-09-01

    Delineation of apical and basolateral membrane domains is a critical step in the epithelialization of the outer layer of cells in the embryo. We have examined the initiation of polarized membrane traffic in Xenopus and show that membrane traffic is not polarized in oocytes but polarized membrane domains appear at first cleavage. The following proteins encoded by injected RNA transcripts were used as markers to monitor membrane traffic: (a) VSV G, a transmembrane glycoprotein preferentially inserted into the basolateral surface of polarized epithelial cells; (b) GThy-1, a fusion protein of VSV G and Thy-1 that is localized to the apical domains of polarized epithelial cells; and (c) prolactin, a peptide hormone that is not polarly secreted. In immature oocytes, there is no polarity in the expression of VSV G or GThy-1, as shown by the constitutive expression of both proteins at the surface in the animal and vegetal hemispheres. At meiotic maturation, membrane traffic to the surface is blocked; the plasma membrane no longer accepts the vesicles synthesized by the oocyte (Leaf, D. L., S. J. Roberts, J. C. Gerhart, and H.-P. Moore. 1990. Dev. Biol. 141:1-12). When RNA transcripts are injected after fertilization, VSV G is expressed only in the internal cleavage membranes (basolateral orientation) and is excluded from the outer surface (apical orientation, original oocyte membrane). In contrast, GThy-1 and prolactin, when expressed in embryos, are inserted or released at both the outer membrane derived from the oocyte and the inner cleavage membranes. Furthermore, not all of the cleavage membrane comes from an embryonic pool of vesicles--some of the cleavage membrane comes from vesicles synthesized during oogenesis. Using prolactin as a marker, we found that a subset of vesicles synthesized during oogenesis was only released after fertilization. However, while embryonic prolactin was secreted from both apical and basolateral surfaces, the secretion of oogenic prolactin

  7. Identification of Host Cell Factors Associated with Astrovirus Replication in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Andrea; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Méndez, Ernesto; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-10-01

    Astroviruses are small, nonenveloped viruses with a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome causing acute gastroenteritis in children and immunocompromised patients. Since positive-sense RNA viruses have frequently been found to replicate in association with membranous structures, in this work we characterized the replication of the human astrovirus serotype 8 strain Yuc8 in Caco-2 cells, using density gradient centrifugation and free-flow zonal electrophoresis (FFZE) to fractionate cellular membranes. Structural and nonstructural viral proteins, positive- and negative-sense viral RNA, and infectious virus particles were found to be associated with a distinct population of membranes separated by FFZE. The cellular proteins associated with this membrane population in infected and mock-infected cells were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The results indicated that membranes derived from multiple cell organelles were present in the population. Gene ontology and protein-protein interaction network analysis showed that groups of proteins with roles in fatty acid synthesis and ATP biosynthesis were highly enriched in the fractions of this population in infected cells. Based on this information, we investigated by RNA interference the role that some of the identified proteins might have in the replication cycle of the virus. Silencing of the expression of genes involved in cholesterol (DHCR7, CYP51A1) and fatty acid (FASN) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol (PI4KIIIβ) and inositol phosphate (ITPR3) metabolism, and RNA helicase activity (DDX23) significantly decreased the amounts of Yuc8 genomic and antigenomic RNA, synthesis of the structural protein VP90, and virus yield. These results strongly suggest that astrovirus RNA replication and particle assembly take place in association with modified membranes potentially derived from multiple cell organelles. Astroviruses are common etiological agents of acute gastroenteritis in children and immunocompromised patients

  8. Identification of Host Cell Factors Associated with Astrovirus Replication in Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Andrea; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Méndez, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Astroviruses are small, nonenveloped viruses with a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome causing acute gastroenteritis in children and immunocompromised patients. Since positive-sense RNA viruses have frequently been found to replicate in association with membranous structures, in this work we characterized the replication of the human astrovirus serotype 8 strain Yuc8 in Caco-2 cells, using density gradient centrifugation and free-flow zonal electrophoresis (FFZE) to fractionate cellular membranes. Structural and nonstructural viral proteins, positive- and negative-sense viral RNA, and infectious virus particles were found to be associated with a distinct population of membranes separated by FFZE. The cellular proteins associated with this membrane population in infected and mock-infected cells were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The results indicated that membranes derived from multiple cell organelles were present in the population. Gene ontology and protein-protein interaction network analysis showed that groups of proteins with roles in fatty acid synthesis and ATP biosynthesis were highly enriched in the fractions of this population in infected cells. Based on this information, we investigated by RNA interference the role that some of the identified proteins might have in the replication cycle of the virus. Silencing of the expression of genes involved in cholesterol (DHCR7, CYP51A1) and fatty acid (FASN) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol (PI4KIIIβ) and inositol phosphate (ITPR3) metabolism, and RNA helicase activity (DDX23) significantly decreased the amounts of Yuc8 genomic and antigenomic RNA, synthesis of the structural protein VP90, and virus yield. These results strongly suggest that astrovirus RNA replication and particle assembly take place in association with modified membranes potentially derived from multiple cell organelles. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are common etiological agents of acute gastroenteritis in children and

  9. Lifestyle-induced metabolic inflexibility and accelerated ageing syndrome: insulin resistance, friend or foe?

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    Bell Jimmy D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metabolic syndrome may have its origins in thriftiness, insulin resistance and one of the most ancient of all signalling systems, redox. Thriftiness results from an evolutionarily-driven propensity to minimise energy expenditure. This has to be balanced with the need to resist the oxidative stress from cellular signalling and pathogen resistance, giving rise to something we call 'redox-thriftiness'. This is based on the notion that mitochondria may be able to both amplify membrane-derived redox growth signals as well as negatively regulate them, resulting in an increased ATP/ROS ratio. We suggest that 'redox-thriftiness' leads to insulin resistance, which has the effect of both protecting the individual cell from excessive growth/inflammatory stress, while ensuring energy is channelled to the brain, the immune system, and for storage. We also suggest that fine tuning of redox-thriftiness is achieved by hormetic (mild stress signals that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and resistance to oxidative stress, which improves metabolic flexibility. However, in a non-hormetic environment with excessive calories, the protective nature of this system may lead to escalating insulin resistance and rising oxidative stress due to metabolic inflexibility and mitochondrial overload. Thus, the mitochondrially-associated resistance to oxidative stress (and metabolic flexibility may determine insulin resistance. Genetically and environmentally determined mitochondrial function may define a 'tipping point' where protective insulin resistance tips over to inflammatory insulin resistance. Many hormetic factors may induce mild mitochondrial stress and biogenesis, including exercise, fasting, temperature extremes, unsaturated fats, polyphenols, alcohol, and even metformin and statins. Without hormesis, a proposed redox-thriftiness tipping point might lead to a feed forward insulin resistance cycle in the presence of excess calories. We therefore suggest

  10. Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue 2 envelope forms virus-like particles without pre-membrane protein and induces high titer neutralizing antibodies.

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    Shailendra Mani

    Full Text Available Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease with a global prevalence. It is caused by four closely-related dengue viruses (DENVs 1-4. A dengue vaccine that can protect against all four viruses is an unmet public health need. Live attenuated vaccine development efforts have encountered unexpected interactions between the vaccine viruses, raising safety concerns. This has emphasized the need to explore non-replicating dengue vaccine options. Virus-like particles (VLPs which can elicit robust immunity in the absence of infection offer potential promise for the development of non-replicating dengue vaccine alternatives. We have used the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris to develop DENV envelope (E protein-based VLPs. We designed a synthetic codon-optimized gene, encoding the N-terminal 395 amino acid residues of the DENV-2 E protein. It also included 5' pre-membrane-derived signal peptide-encoding sequences to ensure proper translational processing, and 3' 6× His tag-encoding sequences to facilitate purification of the expressed protein. This gene was integrated into the genome of P. pastoris host and expressed under the alcohol oxidase 1 promoter by methanol induction. Recombinant DENV-2 protein, which was present in the insoluble membrane fraction, was extracted and purified using Ni(2+-affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. Amino terminal sequencing and detection of glycosylation indicated that DENV-2 E had undergone proper post-translational processing. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of discrete VLPs in the purified protein preparation after dialysis. The E protein present in these VLPs was recognized by two different conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies. Low doses of DENV-2 E VLPs formulated in alum were immunogenic in inbred and outbred mice eliciting virus neutralizing titers >1,1200 in flow cytometry based assays and protected AG129 mice against lethal challenge (p<0.05. The formation of immunogenic DENV-2 E

  11. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    of plasma membrane-derived vesicles from host cells, which prevent the activity of C3 convertase C4b2a and thereby may hinder complement. In this review, we aim to present an overview on the strategies used by T. cruzi in order to circumvent the activation of complement and, consequently, its biological effects.

  12. Characterization of guinea pig myocardial leukotriene C4 binding sites. Regulation by cations and sulfhydryl-directed reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogaboom, G.K.; Mong, S.; Stadel, J.M.; Crooke, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Using [ 3 H]leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and radioligand-binding techniques, specific leukotriene C4 binding sites have been identified in membranes derived from guinea pig ventricular myocardium. High performance liquid chromatography analyses indicated that, in the presence of the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase inhibitor L-serine-borate (80 mM), less than 2% of membrane-bound [ 3 H]LTC4 was converted at 20 degrees to [ 3 H]leukotriene D4 or [ 3 H]leukotriene E4. The specific binding of 4 nM [ 3 H]LTC4, in the presence of 80 mM L-serine-borate, reached a stable steady state within 15 min at 20 degrees (pH 7.5). A monophasic Scatchard plot of saturation binding data yielded a dissociation constant (Kd) of 27.5 +/- 6.0 nM and a maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 19.9 +/- 5.2 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Competition binding studies of [ 3 H]LTC4 with synthetic leukotriene C4, leukotriene D4, and leukotriene E4 and the putative peptidoleukotriene antagonists FPL 55712, SKF 88046, and 4R-hydroxy-5S-1-cysteinylglycine-6Z-nonadecanoic acid revealed an order of potency of leukotriene C4 much greater than 4R-hydroxy-5S-1-cysteinylglycine-6Z-nonadecanoic acid greater than SKF 88046 greater than LTE4 greater than LTD4 greater than FPL 55712. The specific [ 3 H]LTC4 binding was stimulated by the divalent cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ and to a lesser degree by the monovalent cations Na+, K+, Li+, and NH4+. CaCl2 (3 mM) and NaCl (150 mM) stimulated the LTC4 binding by increasing the Bmax to 42.6 +/- 5.9 and 35.0 +/- 2.0 pmol/mg, respectively, but had minimal effects on Kd

  13. A Promising Tool in Retina Regeneration: Current Perspectives and Challenges When Using Mesenchymal Progenitor Stem Cells in Veterinary and Human Ophthalmological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cislo-Pakuluk, Anna; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Visual impairment is a common ailment of the current world population, with more exposure to CCD screens and fluorescent lighting, approximately 285 billion people suffer from this deficiency and 13% of those are considered clinically blind. More common causes for visual impairment include age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy (Zhu et al. Molecular Medicine Reports, 2015; Kolb et al. 2007; Machalińska et al. Current Eye Research, 34(9),748-760, 2009) among a few. As cases of retinal and optic nerve diseases rise, it is vital to find a treatment, which has led to investigation of the therapeutic potential of various stem cells types (Bull et al. Investigative Opthalmology & Visual Science, 50(9), 4244, 2009; Bull et al. Investigative Opthalmology & Visual Science, 49(8), 3449, 2008; Yu et al. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 344(4), 1071-1079, 2006; Na et al. Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 247(4), 503-514, 2008). In previous studies, some of the stem cell variants used include human Muller SCs and bone marrow derived SCs. Some of the regenerative potential characteristics of mesenchymal progenitor stem cells (MSCs) include their multilineage differentiation potential, their immunomodulatory effects, their high proliferative activity, they can be easily cultured in vitro, and finally their potential to synthesize and secrete membrane derived vesicles rich in growth factors, mRNA and miRNA which possibly aid in regulation of tissue damage regeneration. These facts alone, explain why MSCs are so widely used in clinical trials, 350 up to date (Switonski, Reproductive Biology, 14(1), 44-50, 2014). Animal studies have demonstrated that sub-retinal transplantation of MSCs delays retinal degeneration and preserves retinal function through trophic response (Inoue et al. Experimental Eye Research, 85(2), 234-241, 2007). Umbilical cord derived MSCs (UC/MSCs) have also been shown to contain

  14. Thermal Tuning of Ethylene/Ethane Selective Cavities of Intrinsically Microporous Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2016-06-21

    Ethylene is the most important organic molecule with regard to production volume. Therefore, the energy spent in its separation processes, based on old-fashioned distillation, takes approx. 33% of total operating costs. Membranes do not require significant thermal energy input; therefore, membrane processes may separate hydrocarbons cheaply and just as reliably as distillation columns. Olefin/paraffin separations are the future targets of commercial membrane applications, provided high-performing materials become available at reasonable prices. This thesis addresses the development of advanced carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes derived from intrinsically microporous polymers (PIMs). Chronologically, Chapter 4 of this work reports the evaluation of PIMs as potential ethylene/ethane selective materials, while Chapters 5 to 7 propose PIMs as carbonization precursors. The gravimetric sorption studies conducted in this work regarding both the polymers and their heated-derivatives revealed that this separation is entirely controlled by diffusion differences. The pristine polymers examined in this study presented BET surface areas from 80 to 720 m2g-1. Furthermore, the effect of using bromine-substituted PIM-polyimides elucidated a boost in ethylene permeability, but with a significant drop in selectivity. The hydroxyl functionalization of PIM-polyimides was confirmed as a valuable strategy to increase selectivity. Functionalized PMDA-HSBF is the most selective polyimide of intrinsic microporosity known to date (= 5.1) due to its hydrogen-bonded matrix. In spite of their novelty, pristine PIMs based on the spirobisindane moiety were not tight enough to distinguish between the 0.2 Å difference in diameter of the ethylene/ethane molecules. Therefore, they did not surpass the upper bound limit performance of known polymeric membranes. Nevertheless, the carbons derived from these polymers were excellent ethylene/ethane sieves by virtue of their narrow and tight

  15. Beyond iPS!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2012-01-01

    open acknowledgement that he chose a research career as he was not good in surgical procedures, is something that teaches us to keep going ahead even when we know our limitations. Another important quality we appreciate in him is his team-spirit and perseverance. Not only as a member of the university Judo team, but after starting the iPS research when sourcing research funds was difficult, he plunged into organizing a marathon run, which he completed till the finish line is a marvelous feat to showcase his perseverance. As this issue is published with articles on molecular profiling of human breast cancer initiating cells, allogeneic amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (AMSC transplantation and mononuclear stem cell therapy, we look back, recognize and salute the genius of Alexander Maximov, who coined the term “Stem Cell” in 1908, Joseph Altman & Gopal D.Das who reported the post-natal neurogenesis in the 1960s and James E.Till & Ernest McCulloch, who discovered the presence of self-renewing cells in bone-marrow in 1963 that later led to the bone-marrow transplantation as a treatment. “…But they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.” - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

  16. High-­Performance Carbon Molecular Sieve Gas Separation Membranes Based on a Carbon-­Rich Intrinsically Microporous Polyimide Precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Hazazi, Khalid

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transport properties and the microstructure of CMS membranes derived from a carbon-rich intrinsically microporous polyimide precursor. CMS membranes were prepared by a heat treatment of the polyimide precursor using a well-defined heating protocol in a horizontal tube furnace up to 1000 °C. A nitrogen purge was kept inside the furnace to remove all the evolved by-products as the precursor started to decompose and carbonize. The microstructures of the carbon molecular sieve membranes (CMSMs) were examined using wide-angle x-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, N2 adsorption and CO2 adsorption. The average interlayer spacing (d002) between the graphite plates was estimated using the data obtained by the WXRD. The average d002 decreased as a result of increasing the pyrolysis temperature; average d002 distances for CMS prepared at 700 and 1000 °C were estimated to be 0.40 to 0.38 nm, respectively. Raman spectra confirmed the progressive structural ordering as heat-treatment temperature increased. A substantial decrease in the intensity of the D band was observed as a function of pyrolysis temperature, indicating a decrease in the disordered structure. Graphitic structure and turbostratic carbon coexist in the as-prepared carbon membranes, of which the microcrystal size La and the stacking height Lc were increasing as a function of pyrolysis temperature. N2 adsorption showed a remarkable increase in the BET surface area as a function of pyrolysis temperature. BET surface areas for the pristine and CMSs prepared at 700 to 900 °C were in the range of 650 to 680 m2/g with a remarkable shift in the pore size distribution toward the ultra- microporous region. CO2 adsorption was used to estimate the surface area for pores with sizes of less than 1 nm. Surface areas were observed to increase from 350 m2/g at 500 °C to 857 m2/g at 800 °C, and then started dropping slightly from 857 to 650 m2/g at 800 to 1000 °C, respectively