WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane transport

  1. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  2. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  4. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  6. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  7. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  8. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  10. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  14. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  16. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  17. Transport through track etched polymeric blend membrane

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polysulphone (PSF) having thickness, 27 m, are prepared by solution cast method. The transport properties of pores in a blend membrane are examined. The pores were produced in this membrane by a track etching technique. For this purpose, a thin polymer membrane was ...

  18. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  19. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  20. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  1. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor configured using repeating assemblies of oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalytic reforming reactors.

  2. Mass transport in thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis multi-component mass transport in thin supported amorphous silica membranes is discussed. These membranes are micro-porous, with pore diameters smaller than 4Å and show high fluxes for small molecules (such as hydrogen) combined with high selectivities for these molecules with respect

  3. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  4. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorbed...

  5. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorb...

  6. Biomolecular Transport through Hemofiltration Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subhra; Fissell, William H.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for filtration of large solutes through a pore in the presence of transmembrane pressures, applied/induced electric fields, and dissimilar interactions at the pore entrance and exit is developed to characterize and predict the experimental performance of a hemofiltration membrane with nanometer scale pores designed for a proposed implantable Renal Assist Device (RAD). The model reveals that the sieving characteristics of the membrane can be improved by applying an external electric field, and ensuring a smaller ratio of the pore-feed and pore-permeate equilibrium partitioning coefficients when diffusion is present. The model is then customized to study the sieving characteristics for both charged and uncharged solutes in the slit-shaped nanopores of the hemofiltration device for the RAD. The effect of streaming potential or induced fields are found to be negligible under representative operating conditions. Experimental data on the sieving coefficient of bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase and thyroglobulin are reported and compared with the theoretical predictions. Both steric and electrostatic partitioning are considered and the comparison suggests that in general electrostatic effects are present in the filtration of proteins though some data, particularly those recorded in a strongly hypertonic solution (10×PBS), show better agreement with the steric partitioning theory. PMID:19184436

  7. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C Clarke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosome membrane (SM is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologues of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome.

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Joseph [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Porter, Jason [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Patki, Neil [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Kelley, Madison [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Stanislowski, Josh [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Tolbert, Scott [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Makuch, David [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  9. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  10. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  11. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2017-10-03

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane system for utilizing heat generated in reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes to generate steam, heat process fluid and/or provide energy to carry out endothermic chemical reactions. The system provides for improved thermal coupling of oxygen transport membrane tubes to steam generation tubes or process heater tubes or reactor tubes for efficient and effective radiant heat transfer.

  12. Collective motor dynamics in membrane transport in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaklee, Paige Marie

    2009-01-01

    Key cellular processes such as cell division, internal cellular organization, membrane compartmentalization and intracellular transport rely on motor proteins. Motor proteins, ATP-based mechanoenzymes, actively transport cargo throughout the cell by walking on cytoskeletal filaments. Motors have

  13. Carrier mediated transport through supported liquid membranes; determination of transport parameters from a single transport experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrisstoffels, L.A.J.; Struijk, Wilhelmina; de Jong, Feike; Reinhoudt, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a time-dependent transport model for carrier assisted cation transport through supported liquid membranes. The model describes the flux of salt as a function of time and two parameters viz. the diffusion coefficient of the cation complex (D), and the extraction constant (Kex).

  14. Mixed Gas Transport Study Through Polymeric Membranes: a Novel Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Dhingra, Sukhtej Singh

    1997-01-01

    The gas transport and separation properties of polymers have been successfully exploited in commercial ventures. Industrial applications employing membrane processes range from production of pure gases to barrier coatings for protection against environmental elements. Membrane separations are simple, energy efficient processes, which can be economically competitive with traditional separation technologies. Membrane separation and permeation characteristics for a...

  15. Membrane transport mechanism 3D structure and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a molecular view of membrane transport by means of numerous biochemical and biophysical techniques. The rapidly growing number of atomic structures of transporters in different conformations and the constant progress in bioinformatics have recently added deeper insights.   The unifying mechanism of energized solute transport across membranes is assumed to consist of the conformational cycling of a carrier protein to provide access to substrate binding sites from either side of a cellular membrane. Due to the central role of active membrane transport there is considerable interest in deciphering the principles of one of the most fundamental processes in nature: the alternating access mechanism.   This book brings together particularly significant structure-function studies on a variety of carrier systems from different transporter families: Glutamate symporters, LeuT-like fold transporters, MFS transporters and SMR (RND) exporters, as well as ABC-type importers.   The selected examples im...

  16. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  17. Recent achievements in facilitated transport membranes for separation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Ferraz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane separation processes have been extensively used for some important industrial separations, substituting traditional methods. However, some applications require the development of new membranes. In this work, we discuss recent progress achieved in this field, focusing on gas and liquid separation using facilitated transport membranes. The advantages of using a carrier species either in a liquid membrane or fixed in a polymer matrix to enhance both the flux and the selectivity of the transport are summarized. The most probable transport mechanisms in these membranes are presented and the improvements needed to spread this technology are also discussed. As examples, we discuss our very successful experiences in air fractioning, olefin/paraffin separation and sugar recovery using liquid and fixed carrier membranes.

  18. Transport of Carbon Dioxide through a Biomimetic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Matsaridis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic membranes (BMM based on polymer filters impregnated with lipids or their analogues are widely applied in numerous areas of physics, biology, and medicine. In this paper we report the design and testing of an electrochemical system, which allows the investigation of CO2 transport through natural membranes such as alveoli barrier membrane system and also can be applied for solid-state measurements. The experimental setup comprises a specially designed two-compartment cell with BMM connected with an electrochemical workstation placed in a Faraday cage, two PH meters, and a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer. We prove, experimentally, that the CO2 transport through the natural membranes under different conditions depends on pH and displays a similar behavior as natural membranes. The influence of different drugs on the CO2 transport process through such membranes is discussed.

  19. Ion Transport through Diffusion Layer Controlled by Charge Mosaic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic transport behaviors in near interface of the membranes were studied using commercial anion and cation exchange membrane and charge mosaic membrane. Current-voltage curve gave the limiting current density that indicates the ceiling of conventional flux. From chronopotentiometry above the limiting current density, the transition time was estimated. The thickness of boundary layer was derived with conjunction with the conventional limiting current density and the transition time from steady state flux. On the other hand, the charge mosaic membrane was introduced in order to examine the ion transport on the membrane surface in detail. The concentration profile was discussed by the kinetic transport number with regard to the water dissociation (splitting on the membrane surface.

  20. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Mooij (Miriam); A.T. Nies (Anne T.); C.A.J. Knibbe (Catherijne); E. Schaeffeler (Elke); D. Tibboel (Dick); M. Schwab (Matthias); S.N. de Wildt (Saskia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMembrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown

  1. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, M.G.; Nies, A.T.; Knibbe, C.A.; Schaeffeler, E.; Tibboel, D.; Schwab, M.; Wildt, S.N. de

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug

  2. Effect of nephrotoxicants on renal membrane transport: In vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.A.; Berndt, W.O.

    1990-01-01

    It is possible to study the effects of nephrotoxicants on membrane function free of other cellular influences. By the use of Percoll gradient centrifugation, highly purified preparations of right-side-out basolateral (BL) and brush border (BB) membrane vesicles can be obtained from rat (male, Sprague-Dawley) renal cortex. Membrane function can be monitored by evaluation of sodium driven transport: 14 C-p-aminohippurate (PAH) for BL and 14 C-glucose for BB. Transport was measured by the rapid filtration technique. Each vesicle preparation was preincubated with the nephrotoxicant for five minutes before initiation of transport. Control vesicles showed a prominant overshoot 1 to 2 minutes after start of transport. Mercuric ion (Hg) had no effect on transport by BB at concentrations as high as 10μM. Transport by BL was reduced significantly at Hg concentrations as low as 100 nM. Chromate (Cr) also reduced BL transport at 100 nM and had no effect on BB transport. Citrinin significantly reduced both BB and BL transport, but the sensitivity of the membrane preparations differed. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that some nephrotoxicants may act on either side of the renal tubular cell membrane

  3. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Ciarimboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1, the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2, the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2, and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1. Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters.

  4. Transport through zeolite filled polymeric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, J.P.; Boom, J.P.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Zwijnenberg, Harmen Jan; Bargeman, D.; de Boer, R.; Smolders, C.A.; Bargeman, D.; Strathmann, H.; Smolders, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the effect of zeolite particles incorporated in rubbery polymers on the pervaporation properties of membranes made from these polymers is discussed. Pervaporation of methanol/toluene mixtures was carried out with membranes prepared from the toluene selective polymer EPDM and the

  5. Metallodynameric membranes--toward the constitutional transport of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Macron, Thomas; Gilles, Arnaud; Mouline, Zineb; Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-07-11

    The adequate selection of macromonomers, dialdehyde core connectors and of coordinating metal ions makes possible the generation of metallodynameric materials, allowing the fine modulation of the gas transport through rubbery membranes.

  6. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied

  7. Directed Evolution of Membrane Transport Using Synthetic Selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Anne Pihl; Genee, Hans J.; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding and engineering solute transporters is important for metabolic engineering and the development of therapeutics. However, limited available experimental data on membrane transporters makes sequence-function relationships complex to predict. Here we apply ligand-responsive biosensor s...... as a substrate. Our results provide insight into the molecular determinants of substrate recognition of the PnuC transporter family and demonstrate how synthetic biology can be deployed to engineer the substrate spectrum of small molecule transporters....

  8. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  9. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  10. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane Transporters for Bilirubin and Its Conjugates: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Čvorović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bilirubin is a highly-hydrophobic tetrapyrrole which binds to plasma albumin. It is conjugated in the liver to glucuronic acid, and the water-soluble glucuronides are excreted in urine and bile. The membrane transporters of bilirubin diglucuronide are well-known. Still undefined are however the transporters performing the uptake of bilirubin from the blood into the liver, a process known to be fast and not rate-limited. The biological importance of this process may be appraised by considering that in normal adults 200–300 mg of bilirubin are produced daily, as a result of the physiologic turnover of hemoglobin and cellular cytochromes. Nevertheless, research in this field has yielded controversial and contradicting results. We have undertaken a systematic review of the literature, believing in its utility to improve the existing knowledge and promote further advancements.Methods: We have sourced the PubMed database until 30 June 2017 by applying 5 sequential searches. Screening and eligibility criteria were applied to retain research articles reporting results obtained by using bilirubin molecules in membrane transport assays in vitro or by assessing serum bilirubin levels in in vivo experiments.Results: We have identified 311 articles, retaining 44, reporting data on experimental models having 6 incremental increases of complexity (isolated proteins, membrane vesicles, cells, organ fragments, in vivo rodents, and human studies, demonstrating the function of 19 membrane transporters, encoded by either SLCO or ABC genes. Three other bilirubin transporters have no gene, though one, i.e., bilitranslocase, is annotated in the Transporter Classification Database.Conclusions: This is the first review that has systematically examined the membrane transporters for bilirubin and its conjugates. Paradoxically, the remarkable advancements in the field of membrane transport of bilirubin have pointed to the elusive mechanism(s enabling

  12. Structure and Water Transport in Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric; Page, Kirt

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorinated ionomers, specifically Nafion, are the most widely used ion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications, where an understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and transport of water/ions is critical to battery performance. In this study, the structure of Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes, synthesized using sol-gel chemistry, as well as cast directly from Nafion/SiO2 nanoparticle dispersions, was measured using both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). Through contrast match studies of the SiO2 nanoparticles, direct information on the change in the structure of the Nafion membranes and the ion-transport channels within was obtained, where differences in membrane structure was observed between the solution-cast membranes and the membranes synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. Additionally, water sorption and diffusion in these Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes were measured using in situ time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

  13. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  14. Ion transport across the biological membrane by computational protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Gevorg

    The cellular membrane is impermeable to most of the chemicals the cell needs to take in or discard to survive. Therefore, transporters-a class of transmembrane proteins tasked with shuttling cargo chemicals in and out of the cell-are essential to all cellular life. From existing crystal structures, we know transporters to be complex machines, exquisitely tuned for specificity and controllability. But how could membrane-bound life have evolved if it needed such complex machines to exist first? To shed light onto this question, we considered the task of designing a transporter de novo. As our guiding principle, we took the ``alternating-access model''-a conceptual mechanism stating that transporters work by rocking between two conformations, each exposing the cargo-binding site to either the intra- or the extra-cellular environment. A computational design framework was developed to encode an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that rocked between two alternative states to orchestrate the movement of Zn(II) ions across the membrane. The ensemble nature of both states was accounted for using a free energy-based approach, and sequences were chosen based on predicted formation of the targeted topology in the membrane and bi-stability. A single sequence was prepared experimentally and shown to function as a Zn(II) transporter in lipid vesicles. Further, transport was specific to Zn(II) ions and several control peptides supported the underlying design principles. This included a mutant designed to retain all properties but with reduced rocking, which showed greatly depressed transport ability. These results suggest that early transporters could have evolved in the context of simple topologies, to be later tuned by evolution for improved properties and controllability. Our study also serves as an important advance in computational protein design, showing the feasibility of designing functional membrane proteins and of tuning conformational landscapes for desired function

  15. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  16. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  17. Method of making a hydrogen transport membrane, and article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph M.; Corpus, Joseph M.; Lim, Hankwon

    2015-07-21

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a hydrogen transport membrane and the composite article itself. More specifically, the invention relates to producing a membrane substrate, wherein the ceramic substrate is coated with a metal oxide slurry, thereby eliminating the need for an activation step prior to plating the ceramic membrane through an electroless plating process. The invention also relates to modifying the pore size and porosity of the substrate by oxidation or reduction of the particles deposited by the metal oxide slurry.

  18. Mechanical reliability of geometrically imperfect tubular oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Søgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    operation. This paper investigates numerically the failure risk of tubular oxygen transport membranes under industrial operating conditions using finite element modeling and Weibull strength analysis. The effects of component manufacturing defects on fracture probability are elucidated by explicit modeling...... of imperfections in the tubular membrane geometry. A supported membrane made of dense and porous Zr-doped-BSCF is studied as an illustrative example. It is shown that stresses induced by oxygen stoichiometry gradients relax over time due to creep and external pressure is the dominating source of stress in the long...... quality (in terms of specification of tolerable deviation from perfect tubular shape) that allows fail-safe operation are deduced....

  19. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  20. Dicarbanonaborates in yeast respiration and membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G

    1997-04-01

    Two derivatives of carborates, sodium 5,6-dichloro-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-Cl) and sodium 5-mercapto-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-SH) were found to inhibit endogenous as well as glucose-induced respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both substances slightly increased endogenous acid production, were neutral toward H(+)-ATPase-associated acidification but pronouncedly inhibited the K(+)-stimulated acidification. The same effects were observed also with an ATPase-deficient mutant of the yeast. The ATP-hydrolyzing activity of yeast plasma membranes in vitro was severely reduced. The membrane potential was substantially increased toward more negative values. The H(+)-symporting uptake of glutamic acid was considerably decreased, that of adenine was diminished much less. The effects of the dicarbanonaborates are obviously pleiotropic but their inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and of uptake of H(+)-symported substances, on the one hand, and absolute lack of effect on ATPase-catalyzed acidification, on the other, pose an unresolved problem.

  1. Hypoxanthine transport through human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuozzo, E.; Crifo, C.; Gigante, M.C.; Salerno, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report the kinetics of 14-C hypoxanthine uptake by intact human erythrocytes suspended in a phosphate-free medium, i.e. in conditions which make negligible 14-C hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation. Human erythrocytes were prepared from blood freshly drawn in heparin and washed three times with isotonic glucose-NaCl solution. In the absence of inorganic phosphate in the suspending medium, hypoxanthine receptor appears to be saturated by relatively low purine base concentration. When the cells are suspended in a medium containing inorganic phosphate, and thus, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate becomes available for nucleotide synthesis, hypoxanthine in phosphoribosylted to IMP. It can be suggested that under these conditions the receptor gets rid of hypoxanthine, crosses the cell membrane, and takes up new exogenous purine base

  2. Barriers to Superfast Water Transport in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each...... over the continuum predictions. These rates are far below those reported experimentally. The results suggest that the reported superfast water transport rates cannot be attributed to interactions of water with pristine CNTs alone....

  3. An overview of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B

    1995-12-01

    All eukaryotic cells contain a wide variety of proteins embedded in the plasma and internal membranes, which ensure transmembrane solute transport. It is now established that a large proportion of these transport proteins can be grouped into families apparently conserved throughout organisms. This article presents the data of an in silicio analysis aimed at establishing a preliminary classification of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was conducted at a time when about 65% of all yeast genes were available in public databases. In addition to approximately 60 transport proteins whose function was at least partially known, approximately 100 deduced protein sequences of unknown function display significant sequence similarity to membrane transport proteins characterized in yeast and/or other organisms. While some protein families have been well characterized by classical genetic experimental approaches, others have largely if not totally escaped characterization. The proteins revealed by this in silicio analysis also include a putative K+ channel, proteins similar to aquaporins of plant and animal origin, proteins similar to Na+-solute symporters, a protein very similar to electroneural cation-chloride cotransporters, and a putative Na+-H+ antiporter. A new research area is anticipated: the functional analysis of many transport proteins whose existence was revealed by genome sequencing.

  4. Membrane transport of anandamide through resealed human red blood cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, I.N.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of resealed red blood cell membranes (ghosts) allows the study of the transport of a compound in a nonmetabolizing system with a biological membrane. Transmembrane movements of anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, arachidonoylethanolamide) have been studied by exchange efflux experiments...... at 0°C and pH 7.3 with albumin-free and albumin-filled human red blood cell ghosts. The efflux kinetics is biexponential and is analyzed in terms of compartment models. The distribution of anandamide on the membrane inner to outer leaflet pools is determined to be 0.275 ± 0.023, and the rate constant...... of unidirectional flux from inside to outside is 0.361 ± 0.023 s. The rate constant of unidirectional flux from the membrane to BSA in the medium ([BSA]) increases with the square root of [BSA] in accordance with the theory of an unstirred layer around ghosts. Anandamide passed through the red blood cell membrane...

  5. Membrane transporter engineering in industrial biotechnology and whole cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B; Swainston, Neil; Pir, Pınar; Oliver, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Because they mainly do not involve chemical changes, membrane transporters have been a Cinderella subject in the biotechnology of small molecule production, but this is a serious oversight. Influx transporters contribute significantly to the flux towards product, and efflux transporters ensure the accumulation of product in the much greater extracellular space of fermentors. Programmes for improving biotechnological processes might therefore give greater consideration to transporters than may have been commonplace. Strategies for identifying important transporters include expression profiling, genome-wide knockout studies, stress-based selection, and the use of inhibitors. In addition, modern methods of directed evolution and synthetic biology, especially those effecting changes in energy coupling, offer huge opportunities for increasing the flux towards extracellular product formation by transporter engineering. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental well-being. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be utilized to enhance yields of staple crops, incre...

  7. Water vapor and Gas Transport through Polymeric Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air).

  8. On the mechanism of gas transport in rigid polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensema, E.R.; Hensema, E.R.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional polymers are compared as gas separation membrane materials with tailormade polymers. The increased permeability of the latter are due to their higher free volume available for gas transport. The increased free volume is associated with the rigidity polymer backbone. Free volume is

  9. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA; Waldron, William Emil [Whitehall, PA

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  10. Role of Passive Diffusion, Transporters, and Membrane Trafficking-Mediated Processes in Cellular Drug Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, E; Kim, J Y; Bai, Y; Pabla, N

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular drug accumulation is thought to be dictated by two major processes, passive diffusion through the lipid membrane or membrane transporters. The relative role played by these distinct processes remains actively debated. Moreover, the role of membrane-trafficking in drug transport remains underappreciated and unexplored. Here we discuss the distinct processes involved in cellular drug distribution and propose that better experimental models are required to elucidate the differential contributions of various processes in intracellular drug accumulation. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Membranes on nanopores for multiplexed single-transporter analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Michael; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The study of membrane proteins as prime drug targets has led to intensified efforts to characterize their structure and function. With regards to the structural analysis of membrane proteins, there have been considerable technological innovations in cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography, but advancements in the elucidation of membrane protein function, especially on a single-molecule level, have been struggling to bridge from basic science to high-throughput applications. There is a need for advanced biosensor platforms allowing membrane protein-mediated transport and potential suppressor libraries to be characterized. Membrane proteins facilitating the translocation of non-electrogenic substrates particularly suffer from a lack of such techniques to date. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of membrane protein analysis, with a special focus on micro- and nanostructured platforms for purpose of high-throughput screening using fluorescent read-out systems. Additionally, their use as novel biosensor platforms to elucidate non-electrogenic substrate translocation is described. This overview contains 82 references. (author)

  12. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  13. Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

      Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...... phosphorylation. Due to the low abundance of phosphoprotein, the specific enrichment prior to MS analysis is necessary. Plant proton pump (H+-ATPase) is an enzyme controls the major transport processes in the plant, such as root nutrient uptake. Moreover, this pump has been proposed to be involved in other...... important physiological functions, such as stomata aperture, cell elongation, or cellular pH regulation. It is known that the activity of plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. Therefore, we first investigated the phosphorylation profile of plant H+-ATPase by enriching...

  14. Quantitative visualization of passive transport across bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, John M. A.; Edwards, Martin A.; Rudd, Nicola C.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict and interpret membrane permeation coefficients is of critical importance, particularly because passive transport is crucial for the effective delivery of many pharmaceutical agents to intracellular targets. We present a method for the quantitative measurement of the permeation coefficients of protonophores by using laser confocal scanning microscopy coupled to microelectrochemistry, which is amenable to precise modeling with the finite element method. The technique delivers well defined and high mass transport rates and allows rapid visualization of the entire pH distribution on both the cis and trans side of model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). A homologous series of carboxylic acids was investigated as probe molecules for BLMs composed of soybean phosphatidylcholine. Significantly, the permeation coefficient decreased with acyl tail length contrary to previous work and to Overton's rule. The reasons for this difference are considered, and we suggest that the applicability of Overton's rule requires re-evaluation. PMID:18787114

  15. Development of thin film oxygen transport membranes on metallic supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Ye

    2012-04-25

    interlayer, though it comprised some cracks. The second interlayer had a crack-free and porous structure. The top membrane layer was deposited by physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering) with a thickness of 3.8 {mu}m improving the gastightness considerably but showing still reasonable air-leakage. Summarizing, the successful development of a metal-perovskite-composite could be shown, which acts as a basis for a further development of a gas-tight metal supported oxygen transport asymmetric membrane structure. (orig.)

  16. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Maria Jarzyniak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted.

  17. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julian I; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-05-02

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land.

  18. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  19. Mechanisms and regulation of water transport across the peritoneal membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis represents the major home-based dialysis modality for patients with end-stage renal disease. The capacity of the peritoneal membrane to transport water in response to an osmotic gradient contributes to the efficiency of the technique. Previous studies have demonstrated that aquaporin water channels are expressed in the endothelium lining peritoneal microvessels and mediate ultrafiltration during peritoneal dialysis. The investigations presented in this work provide novel i...

  20. Role of membranes and membrane reactors in the hydrogen supply of fuel cells for transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julbe, A.; Guizard, Ch. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMII, Lab. des Materiaux et des Procedes Membranaires, CNRS UMR 5635, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2000-07-01

    Production, storage and supply of high-purity hydrogen as a clean and efficient fuel is central to fuel cells technology, in particular in vehicle traction. Actually, technologies for handling liquefied or gaseous hydrogen in transports are not available so that a number of alternative fuels are considered with the aim of in-situ generation of hydrogen through catalytic processes. The integrated concept of membrane reactors (MRs) can greatly benefit to these technologies. Particular emphasis is put on inorganic membranes and their role in MRs performance for H{sub 2} production.

  1. Simulation of water transport through a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrink, S.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1994-04-14

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly via computation of the free energy and diffusion rate profiles of a water molecule across the bilayer. We concluded that the permeation of water through a lipid membrane cannot be described adequately by a simple homogeneous solubility-diffusion model. Both the excess free energy and the diffusion rate strongly depend on the position in the membrane, as a result from the inhomogeneous nature of the membrane. The calculated excess free energy profile has a shallow slope and a maximum height of 26 kJ/mol. The diffusion rate is highest in the middle of the membrane where the lipid density is low. In the interfacial region almost all water molecules are bound by the lipid headgroups, and the diffusion turns out to be 1 order of magnitude smaller. The total transport process is essentially determined by the free energy barrier. 78 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  3. Calcium and proton transport in membrane vesicles from barley roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, F.M.; Windle, J.J.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Ca 2+ uptake by membrane fractions from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv CM72) roots was characterized. Uptake of 45 Ca 2+ was measured in membrane vesicles obtained from continuous and discontinuous sucrose gradients. A single, large peak of Ca 2+ uptake coincided with the peak of proton transport by the tonoplast H + -ATPase. Depending on the concentration of Ca 2+ in the assay, Ca 2+ uptake was inhibited 50 to 75% by those combinations of ionophores and solutes that eliminated the pH gradient and membrane potential. However, 25 to 50% of the Ca 2+ uptake in the tonoplast-enriched fraction was not sensitive to ionophores but was inhibited by vanadate. The results suggest that 45 Ca uptake was driven by the low affinity, high capacity tonoplast Ca 2+ /nH + antiporter and also by a high affinity, lower capacity Ca 2+ -ATPase. The Ca 2+ -ATPase may be associated with tonoplast, Golgi or contaminating vesicles of unknown origin. No Ca 2+ transport was specifically associated with the distinct peak of endoplasmic reticulum that was identified by NADH cytochrome c reductase, choline phosphotransferase, and dolichol-P-mannosyl synthase activities. A small shoulder of Ca 2+ uptake in the plasma membrane region of the gradient was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B and may represent the activity of a separate plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase. Vesicle volumes were estimated using electron spin resonance techniques, and intravesicular Ca 2+ concentrations were estimated to be as high as 5 millimolar. ATP-driven uptake of Ca 2+ created 800- to 2,000-fold concentration gradients within minutes. Problems in interpreting the effects of Ca 2+ on ATP-generated pH gradients are discussed and the suggestion is made that Ca 2+ dissipates pH gradients by a different mechanism than is responsible for Ca 2+ uptake into tonoplast vesicles

  4. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2012-07-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity and the associated energy penalty. To utilize this technology more effectively, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fundamental processes of oxygen transport and fuel conversion in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. In this paper, a numerical model that spatially resolves the gas flow, transport and reactions is presented. The model incorporates detailed gas phase chemistry and transport. The model is used to express the oxygen permeation flux in terms of the oxygen concentrations at the membrane surface given data on the bulk concentration, which is necessary for cases when mass transfer limitations on the permeate side are important and for reactive flow modeling. The simulation results show the dependence of oxygen transport and fuel conversion on the geometry and flow parameters including the membrane temperature, feed and sweep gas flow, oxygen concentration in the feed and fuel concentration in the sweep gas. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. TransportTP: A two-phase classification approach for membrane transporter prediction and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udvardi Michael K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane transporters play crucial roles in living cells. Experimental characterization of transporters is costly and time-consuming. Current computational methods for transporter characterization still require extensive curation efforts, especially for eukaryotic organisms. We developed a novel genome-scale transporter prediction and characterization system called TransportTP that combined homology-based and machine learning methods in a two-phase classification approach. First, traditional homology methods were employed to predict novel transporters based on sequence similarity to known classified proteins in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB. Second, machine learning methods were used to integrate a variety of features to refine the initial predictions. A set of rules based on transporter features was developed by machine learning using well-curated proteomes as guides. Results In a cross-validation using the yeast proteome for training and the proteomes of ten other organisms for testing, TransportTP achieved an equivalent recall and precision of 81.8%, based on TransportDB, a manually annotated transporter database. In an independent test using the Arabidopsis proteome for training and four recently sequenced plant proteomes for testing, it achieved a recall of 74.6% and a precision of 73.4%, according to our manual curation. Conclusions TransportTP is the most effective tool for eukaryotic transporter characterization up to date.

  6. Transport of Proteins Dissolved in Organic Solvents Across Biomimetic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Lev E.; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1995-02-01

    Using lipid-impregnated porous cellulose membranes as biomimetic barriers, we tested the hypothesis that to afford effective transmembrane transfer of proteins and nucleic acids, the vehicle solvent should be able to dissolve both the biopolymers and the lipids. While the majority of solvents dissolve one or the other, ethanol and methanol were found to dissolve both, especially if the protein had been lyophilized from an aqueous solution of a pH remote from the protein's isoelectric point. A number of proteins, as well as RNA and DNA, dissolved in these alcohols readily crossed the lipidized membranes, whereas the same biopolymers placed in nondissolving solvents (e.g., hexane and ethyl acetate) or in those unable to dissolve lipids (e.g., water and dimethyl sulfoxide) exhibited little transmembrane transport. The solubility of biopolymers in ethanol and methanol was further enhanced by complexation with detergents and poly(ethylene glycol); significant protein and nucleic acid transport through the lipidized membranes was observed from these solvents but not from water.

  7. Artificial membranes with selective nanochannels for protein transport

    KAUST Repository

    Sutisna, B.

    2016-09-05

    A poly(styrene-b-tert-butoxystyrene-b-styrene) copolymer was synthesized by anionic polymerization and hydrolyzed to poly(styrene-b-4-hydroxystyrene-b-styrene). Lamellar morphology was confirmed in the bulk after annealing. Membranes were fabricated by self-assembly of the hydrolyzed copolymer in solution, followed by water induced phase separation. A high density of pores of 4 to 5 nm diameter led to a water permeance of 40 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 and molecular weight cut-off around 8 kg mol−1. The morphology was controlled by tuning the polymer concentration, evaporation time, and the addition of imidazole and pyridine to stabilize the terpolymer micelles in the casting solution via hydrogen bond complexes. Transmission electron microscopy of the membrane cross-sections confirmed the formation of channels with hydroxyl groups beneficial for hydrogen-bond forming sites. The morphology evolution was investigated by time-resolved grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering experiments. The membrane channels reject polyethylene glycol with a molecular size of 10 kg mol−1, but are permeable to proteins, such as lysozyme (14.3 kg mol−1) and cytochrome c (12.4 kg mol−1), due to the right balance of hydrogen bond interactions along the channels, electrostatic attraction, as well as the right pore sizes. Our results demonstrate that artificial channels can be designed for protein transport via block copolymer self-assembly using classical methods of membrane preparation.

  8. Oxygen transport membranes for biomass gasification and cement industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Shiyang

    Oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) are of particular interest for their potential applications in high purity oxygen separation, biomass gasification and carbon capture and storage in cement production. Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-δ (GCO) is one of the interesting materials of OTMs because of its high ionic...... be an interstitial defect in GCO. Also dual phase membranes were studied. A 1-mm thick dual phase composite oxygen membrane (50vol.% Al0.02Ga0.02Zn0.96O1.02-50 vol.% Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-δ) with catalyst on both sides was observed to sustain an oxygen flux of 0.3 Nml cm-2 min-1 under air/N2 at 900 °C. The material....... In this study various routes for enhancing the electronic conductivity were investigated; either via elemental substitution or via mixing doped-ceria with another material when forming the membrane layers. The increase of electronic conductivity by substitution co-doped Gd and Pr in ceria was investigated...

  9. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Godbout

    Full Text Available A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures.

  10. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm2/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  11. Glia plasma membrane transporters: Key players in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system, elicits its functions through the activation of specific membrane receptors that are expressed in neurons and glial cells. The re-cycling of this amino acid is carried out mostly through a continuous interplay between neurons and glia cells, given the fact that the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft depends mainly on glial glutamate transporters. Therefore, a functional and physical interaction between membrane transporters links glutamate uptake, transformation to glutamine and its release to the extra-synaptic space and its uptake to the pre-synaptic terminal. This sequence of events, best known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle is central to glutamatergic transmission. In this sense, the uptake process triggers a complex series of biochemical cascades that modify the physiology of glial cells in the immediate, short and long term so as to be capable to take up, transform and release these amino acids in a regulated amount and in an appropriate time frame to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission. Among the signaling cascades activated in glial cells by glutamate transporters, a sustained Na(+) and Ca(2+) influx, protein posttranslational modifications and gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels are present. Therefore, it is clear that the pivotal role of glial cells in the context of excitatory transmission has been constantly underestimated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette; Dutertre, Sébastien; Hastrup, Hanne; Jha, Alok; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H; Betz, Heinrich; Eulenburg, Volker

    2008-04-18

    Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization that was retained intracellulary. Based on these results and GlyT structures modeled by using the crystal structure of the bacterial homolog LeuT(Aa), as a template, residues located within the extracellular loop 3 and at the beginning of transmembrane domain 6 are proposed to contribute to the dimerization interface of GlyTs.

  13. Regulation of transport processes across the tonoplast membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eTrentmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the vacuole builds up the cellular turgor and represents an important component in cellular responses to diverse stress stimuli. Rapid volume changes of cells, particularly of motor cells, like guard cells, are caused by variation of osmolytes and consequently of the water contents in the vacuole. Moreover, directed solute uptake into or release out of the large central vacuole allows adaptation of cytosolic metabolite levels according to the current physiological requirements and specific cellular demands. Therefore, solute passage across the vacuolar membrane, the tonoplast, has to be tightly regulated. Important principles in vacuolar transport regulation are changes of tonoplast transport protein abundances by differential expression of genes or changes of their activities, e.g. due to post-translational modification or by interacting proteins. Because vacuolar transport is in most cases driven by an electro-chemical gradient altered activities of tonoplast proton pumps significantly influence vacuolar transport capacities. Intense studies on individual tonoplast proteins but also unbiased system biological approaches have provided important insights into the regulation of vacuolar transport. This short review refers to selected examples of tonoplast proteins and their regulation, with special focus on protein phosphorylation.

  14. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with 50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  15. Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum (protozoa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinac, B.

    1980-06-01

    Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum was studied by measuring calcium uptake and release by means of flow-through-technique, which was developed especially for this purpose. The method allows continuous flow of the cells suspension with radioactive and inactive solution, respectively, combined with simultaneous electrical stimulation of the cells by means of extracellular electrodes. The results obtained were compared to and interpreted according to behavioral patterns of Paramecium, which were registered by the time exposure dark-field macrophotographic technique under the same experimental conditions. (orig.) [de

  16. A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görgülü Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II ion from water or other solution.

  17. Transport Parameters in a Porous Cellulose Acetate Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPolo, R.; Sha'afi, R. I.; Solomon, A. K.

    1970-01-01

    The transport parameters of a cellulose acetate membrane prepared from a mixture of cellulose acetate, formamide, and acetone, 25:25:50 by weight, were studied. The membrane consists of a thin, porous layer, the skin, in series with a thick, highly porous layer, the coarse support. In the skin the diffusional permeability coefficient, ω, of a number of small amides and alcohols depends critically upon the partition coefficient, Ks, the size of the molecule, and the apparent hydrogen-bonding ability, Ns, of the solute. These observations are in general agreement with our earlier conclusions on the properties of nonporous membranes. On the other hand, the corrected reflection coefficient, σ', is not a very sensitive function of either Ns or Ks taken separately. The correlation between σ' and molecular diameter is reasonably good; however, it is much improved when both Ns and Ks are taken into consideration. Isotope interaction was also studied in the present preparation and was found to provide only a small (5–8%) contribution to the diffusional permeability coefficient of ethylene glycol. The contribution of solute-water friction was found to be less than 24% of the total solute friction. PMID:5410490

  18. Towards Co-evolution of Membrane Transport and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Protocellular boundaries were inextricably connected to the metabolism they encapsulated: to be inheritable, early metabolism must have led to an increased rate of growth and division of vesicles and, similarly, transport through vesicle boundaries must have supported the evolution of metabolism. Even though explaining how this coupling emerged and evolved in the absence of the complex machinery of modern cells is one of the key issues in studies on the origin of life, little is known about the biochemical and biophysical processes that might have been involved. This gap in our knowledge is a major impediment in efforts to construct scenarios for the origin of life and laboratory models of protocells. A combination of experimental and computational studies carried out by us and our collaborators is aimed at helping to close this gap. Properties of membranes might have contributed to the selection of RNA as an early biopolymer. A kinetic mechanism was proposed (Sacerdote & Szostak, 2005) in which ribose was supplied more quickly than other aldopentoses to primordial cells for preferential incorporation of ribonucleotides into nucleic acids. This proposal is based on a finding that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose. Our computer simulations, which yield permeation rates in excellent agreement with experiment, and kinetic modeling explain this phenomenon in terms of inter- and intramolecular interactions involving exocyclic hydroxyl groups attached to carbon atoms of the pyranose ring (Wei and Pohorille, 2009). They also constrain scenarios for the formation of the earliest nucleic acids (Wei and Pohorille, 2013). In one scenario, sugars permeate protocellular walls and subsequently are used to synthesize nucleic acids inside protocells. As long as this process proceeds at the rate faster than 6x10(exp -3)/s, ribose derivatives will be available for synthesis easier than their diastereomers. If

  19. Membrane-traversing mechanism of thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protze, Jonas; Braun, Doreen; Hinz, Katrin Manuela; Bayer-Kusch, Dorothea; Schweizer, Ulrich; Krause, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) mediates thyroid hormone (TH) transport across the plasma membrane in many cell types. In order to better understand its mechanism, we have generated three new MCT8 homology models based on sugar transporters XylE in the intracellular opened (PDB ID: 4aj4) and the extracellular partly occluded (PDB ID: 4gby) conformations as well as FucP (PDB ID: 3o7q) and GLUT3 (PDB ID: 4zwc) in the fully extracellular opened conformation. T 3 -docking studies from both sides revealed interactions with His192, His415, Arg445 and Asp498 as previously identified. Selected mutations revealed further transport-sensitive positions mainly at the discontinuous transmembrane helices TMH7 and 10. Lys418 is potentially involved in neutralising the charge of the TH substrate because it can be replaced by charged, but not by uncharged, amino acids. The side chain of Thr503 was hypothesised to stabilise a helix break at TMH10 that undergoes a prominent local shift during the transport cycle. A T503V mutation accordingly affected transport. The aromatic Tyr419, the polar Ser313 and Ser314 as well as the charged Glu422 and Glu423 lining the transport channel have been studied. Based on related sugar transporters, we suggest an alternating access mechanism for MCT8 involving a series of amino acid positions previously and newly identified as critical for transport.

  20. Preparation of Citric Acid Crosslinked Chitosan/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Blend Membranes for Creatinine Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Ariadi Lusiana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of membrane using crosslinking reaction between chitosan and citric acid showed that functional group modification increased the number of active carrier groups which lead to better transport capacity of the membrane. In addition, the substitution of the carboxyl group increased creatinine permeation of chitosan membrane. The transport capacity of citric acid crosslinked chitosan membrane for creatinine was found to be 6.3 mg/L. The presence of cyanocobalamin slightly hindered the transport of creatinine although compounds did not able to pass through citric acid crosslinked chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol blend membrane, as compounds no found in the acceptor phase.

  1. Dual phase oxygen transport membrane for efficient oxyfuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, Madhumidha

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) are attracting great interest for the separation of oxygen from air in an energy efficient way. A variety of solid oxide ceramic materials that possess mixed ionic and electronic conductivity (MIEC) are being investigated for efficient oxygen separation (Betz '10, Skinner '03). Unfortunately these materials do not exhibit high degradation stability under harsh ambient conditions such as flue gas containing CO 2 , SO x , H 2 O and dust, pressure gradients and high temperatures that are typical in fossil fuel power plants. For this reason, dual phase composite membranes are developed to combine the best characteristics of different compounds to achieve high oxygen permeability and sufficient chemical and mechanical stability at elevated temperatures. In this thesis, the dual phase membrane Ce 0.8 Gd 0.2 O 2-δ - FeCo 2 O 4 (CGO-FCO) was developed after systematic investigation of various combinations of ionic and electronic conductors. The phase distribution of the composite was investigated in detail using electron microscopes and this analysis revealed the phase interaction leading to grain boundary rock salt phase and formation of perovskite secondary phase. A systematic study explored the onset of phase interactions to form perovskite phase and the role of this unintended phase as pure electronic conductor was identified. Additionally optimization of conventional sintering process to eliminate spinel phase decomposition into rock salt was identified. An elaborate study on the absolute minimum electronic conductor requirement for efficient percolation network was carried out and its influence on oxygen flux value was measured. Oxygen permeation measurements in the temperature range of 600 C - 1000 C under partial pressure gradient provided by air and argon as feed and sweep gases are used to identify limiting transport processes. The dual phase membranes are much more prone to surface exchange limitations because of the

  2. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  3. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  4. Modeling bidirectional transport of quantum dot nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2011-08-01

    This paper develops a model of transport of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes (MNTs). It is assumed that QDs are transported inside intracellular organelles (called here nanoparticle-loaded vesicles, NLVs) that are propelled by either kinesin or dynein molecular motors while moving on microtubules (MTs). A vesicle may have both types of motors attached to it, but the motors are assumed to work in a cooperative fashion, meaning that at a given time the vesicle is moved by either kinesin or dynein motors. The motors are assumed not to work against each other, when one type of motors is pulling the vesicle, the other type is inactive. From time to time the motors may switch their roles: passive motors can become active motors and vice versa, resulting in the change of the vesicle's direction of motion. It is further assumed that QDs can escape NLVs and become free QDs, which are then transported by diffusion. Free QDs can be internalized by NLVs. The effects of two possible types of MT orientation in MNTs are investigated: when all MTs have a uniform polarity orientation, with their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells connected by an MNT, and when MTs have a mixed polarity orientation, with half of MTs having their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells and the other half having their plus-ends directed toward the other cell. Computational results are presented for three cases. The first case is when organelles are as likely to be transported by kinesin motors as by dynein motors. The second case is when organelles are more likely to be transported by kinesin motors than by dynein motors, and the third case is when NLVs do not associate with dynein motors at all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A continuum and atomistic simulation study of ion transport in multilayered graphene membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, GengPing

    2017-01-01

    Graphene membrane as a staggered multilayer structure was demonstrated to be a promising filter membrane for the gas and liquid separation. The superior property of graphene membrane is owing to the exotic behaviour of fluid confined in the graphene nanochannel (< 10 nm), namely the booming nanofluidics field. Unlike the 1-D nanochannel in lab-on-a-chip devices, the graphene membrane has a unique cascading nano-slit system. Understanding of ion transport in graphene membranes i...

  6. A fluid membrane enhances the velocity of cargo transport by small teams of kinesin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; King, Stephen J.; Qiu, Weihong; Xu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Kinesin-1 (hereafter referred to as kinesin) is a major microtubule-based motor protein for plus-end-directed intracellular transport in live cells. While the single-molecule functions of kinesin are well characterized, the physiologically relevant transport of membranous cargos by small teams of kinesins remains poorly understood. A key experimental challenge remains in the quantitative control of the number of motors driving transport. Here we utilized "motile fraction" to overcome this challenge and experimentally accessed transport by a single kinesin through the physiologically relevant transport by a small team of kinesins. We used a fluid lipid bilayer to model the cellular membrane in vitro and employed optical trapping to quantify the transport of membrane-enclosed cargos versus traditional membrane-free cargos under identical conditions. We found that coupling motors via a fluid membrane significantly enhances the velocity of cargo transport by small teams of kinesins. Importantly, enclosing a cargo in a fluid lipid membrane did not impact single-kinesin transport, indicating that membrane-dependent velocity enhancement for team-based transport arises from altered interactions between kinesins. Our study demonstrates that membrane-based coupling between motors is a key determinant of kinesin-based transport. Enhanced velocity may be critical for fast delivery of cargos in live cells.

  7. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  8. Giant photoeffect in proton transport through graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Hidalgo, Marcelo; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sheng; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Rodriguez, Francisco J.; Berdyugin, Alexey; Grigorenko, Alexander; Geim, Andre K.

    2018-04-01

    Graphene has recently been shown to be permeable to thermal protons1, the nuclei of hydrogen atoms, which sparked interest in its use as a proton-conducting membrane in relevant technologies1-4. However, the influence of light on proton permeation remains unknown. Here we report that proton transport through Pt-nanoparticle-decorated graphene can be enhanced strongly by illuminating it with visible light. Using electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we find a photoresponsivity of ˜104 A W-1, which translates into a gain of ˜104 protons per photon with response times in the microsecond range. These characteristics are competitive with those of state-of-the-art photodetectors that are based on electron transport using silicon and novel two-dimensional materials5-7. The photo-proton effect could be important for graphene's envisaged use in fuel cells and hydrogen isotope separation. Our observations may also be of interest for other applications such as light-induced water splitting, photocatalysis and novel photodetectors.

  9. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  10. Improved Fuel Transport Selectivity in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kyle Tyler

    2014-01-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, fuel crossover through the membrane is a significant problem that contributes to reduction in cell efficiency and accelerated membrane degradation. The need for high water content in the membrane to produce acceptable conductivities leads to excessive fuel crossover while also limiting cell operating temperature to

  11. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen I. Zgurskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of cells. Some transporters together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs and outer membrane channels assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protect bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes.

  12. Highly Parallel Transport Recordings on a Membrane-on-Nanopore Chip at Single Molecule Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, Michael; Kleefen, Alexander; Mukherjee, Nobina; Seelheim, Patrick; Windschiegl, Barbara; Brueggen, Marc Vor Der; Kocer, Armagan; Tampe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are prime drug targets as they control the transit of information, ions, and solutes across membranes. Here, we present a membrane-on-nanopore platform to analyze nonelectrogenic channels and transporters that are typically not accessible by electrophysiological methods in a

  13. Radiative ballistic phonon transport in silicon-nitride membranes at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevers, H.F.C.; Ridder, M.L.; Germeau, A.; Bruijn, M.P.; de Korte, P.A.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the phonon transport in free-standing 1 µm thick silicon-nitride membranes at temperatures around 100 mK. By varying the geometry of the membranes and the dimensions of the heater element, we are able to distinguish between radiative and diffuse phonon transport. The data indicate that

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  15. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  16. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-01-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels

  17. Oxygen Transport Membranes: A Material Science and Process Engineering Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several fundamental aspects on the membrane-integrated oxy-fuel combustion process and can be divided in two parts: 1) The development and characterization of membrane materials; 2) The design, simulation and evaluation of a coal-fired power plant, coupled with a membrane

  18. Evaluation of transport properties of nanofiltration membranes exposed to radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elizabeth E.M.; Barbosa, Celina C.R.; Bastos, Edna T.R., E-mail: eemo@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeira, RJ (Brazil); Afonso, Julio C., E-mail: Julio@iq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2011-07-01

    The application of membrane separation processes (PSM) for treatment of radioactive waste requires the selection of a suitable membrane for the treatment of waste, as the membrane will be directly exposed to the radioactive liquid waste, and also exposed to ionizing radiation. The nanofiltration membrane is most suitable for treatment of radioactive waste, since it has high rejection of multivalent ions. Usually the membranes are made of polymers and depending on the composition of the waste, type and dose of radiation absorbed may be changes in the structure of the membrane, resulting in loss of its transport properties. We tested two commercial nanofiltration membranes: NF and SW Dow/Filmtec. The waste liquid used was obtained in the process of conversion of uranium hexafluoride gas to solid uranium dioxide, known as 'carbonated water'. The membranes were characterized as their transport properties (hydraulic permeability, permeate flux and salt rejection) before and after their immersion in the waste for 24 hours. The surface of the membranes was also evaluated by SEM and FTIR. It was observed that in both the porosity of the membrane selective layer was altered, but not the membrane surface charge, which is responsible for the selectivity of the membrane. The NF membranes and SW showed uranium ion rejection of 64% and 55% respectively. (author)

  19. Separation of some metal ions using coupled transport supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid membrane extraction processes has become very popular due to their superiority in many ways over other separation techniques. In coupled transport membranes the metal ions can be transported across the membrane against their concentration gradient under the influence of chemical potential difference. Liquid membranes consisting of a carrier-cum-diluent, supported in microporous polymeric hydrophobic films have been studied for transport of metal ions like U(VI), Cr(VI), Be(II), V(V), Ti(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hf(IV), W(VI), and Co(II). The present paper presents basic data with respect to flux and permeabilities of these metal ions across membranes based on experimental results and theoretical equations, using different carriers and diluents and provides a brief reference to possibility of such membranes for large scale applications. (author)

  20. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  1. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  2. Transport phenomena in gas-selective silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio

    Upcoming technology platforms for green fuel production require the development of advanced molecular separation processes for recovering dry liquid biofuels [1,2], biomethane [2] and hydrogen [3]. Replacement of extractive distillation, cryodistillation and adsorption processes by membrane units...... may lead to vast energy savings [2,3]. In this context, ultramicroporous silica membranes, that is, silica membranes with pores smaller than 1 nm [4], appear to be able to play a determinant role. Indeed, in reason of their extremely small pore size, these membranes can be used as sieves to recover...... fluxes than zeolite membranes. Ultramicroporous silica membranes typical typically an asymmetric structure, consisting of few millimeters thick macroporous tubes or disks, which confer mechanical strength to the membrane, and one or more mesoporous intermediate layers with subsequently smaller pore sizes...

  3. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaea, David B; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-04-15

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and nonvesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t 1/2 =12-15 min. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP independent and therefore is nonvesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. A soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of nonvesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that nonvesicular sterol transport mechanisms and STARD4 in particular account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC. © 2017 Iaea et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Effect of adenine nucleotides and gamma radiation on the transport of TEMPOL across the erythrocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Z.; Gwozdzinski, K.; Helszer, Z. (Lodz Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-09-01

    External adenine compounds bring about changes in the transport of hydrophilic molecules across control and irradiated bovine erythrocyte membranes. Changes in the transport induced by incubation of erythrocytes with nucleotides depend on the type of nucleotide and its concentration. The range of nucleotide concentrations over which the stimulatory effect on the transport occurs is established.

  5. Solvent-extraction and Langmuir-adsorption-based transport in chemically functionalized nanopore membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Damian J; Baker, Lane A; Martin, Charles R

    2005-11-10

    We have investigated the transport properties of nanopore alumina membranes that were rendered hydrophobic by functionalization with octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS). The pores in these ODS-modified membranes are so hydrophobic that they are not wetted by water. Nevertheless, nonionic molecules can be transported from an aqueous feed solution on one side of the membrane, through the dry nanopores, and into an aqueous receiver solution on the other side. The transport mechanism involves Langmuir-type adsorption of the permeating molecule onto the ODS layers lining the pore walls, followed by solid-state diffusion along these ODS layers; we have measured the diffusion coefficients associated with this transport process. We have also investigated the transport properties of membranes prepared by filling the ODS-modified pores with the water-immiscible (hydrophobic) liquid mineral oil. In this case the transport mechanism involves solvent extraction of the permeating molecule into the mineral oil subphase confined with the pores, followed by solution-based diffusion through this liquid subphase. Because of this different transport mechanism, the supported-liquid membranes show substantially better transport selectivity than the ODS-modified membranes that contain no liquid subphase.

  6. Polyamines as mediators of insulin's action on pyruvate dehydrogenase, 45Ca2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, A.D.; Koenig, H.; Lu, C.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin (IN) induces a rapid stimulation of Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport in mouse kidney cortex which involves rapid polyamine synthesis. 1.3 nM (IN) induced an early ( 45 Ca 2+ influx and efflux peaked at 1-2 min and returned to basal levels by 5-10 min. The ODC inhibitor α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, 5 mM) abolished IN stimulation of PDH, 45 Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport, and putrescine (.5 mM) nullified DFMO inhibition. IN (50 mUnits/kg) in rats induced an early ( 2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

  7. Transport phenomena in gas-selective silica membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Boffa, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Upcoming technology platforms for green fuel production require the development of advanced molecular separation processes for recovering dry liquid biofuels [1,2], biomethane [2] and hydrogen [3]. Replacement of extractive distillation, cryodistillation and adsorption processes by membrane units may lead to vast energy savings [2,3]. In this context, ultramicroporous silica membranes, that is, silica membranes with pores smaller than 1 nm [4], appear to be able to play a determinant role. In...

  8. GLTP Mediated Non-Vesicular GM1 Transport between Native Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  9. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  10. Electrical Resistance and Transport Numbers of Ion-Exchange Membranes Used in Electrodialytic Soil Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    1999-01-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to know if this contact with the soil...... different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new...

  11. On the resistances of membrane, diffusion boundary layer and double layer in ion exchange membrane transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlugolecki, P.E.; Ogonowski, Piotr; Metz, S.J.; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Membrane resistances are often measured under direct current conditions using a standard 0.5 M NaCl characterization solution, although several electro-membrane processes (e.g. reverse electrodialysis, electrodialysis, fuel cells, microbial fuel cells and membrane capacitive deionization) operate in

  12. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  13. Metallodynameric membranes--are metallic ions facilitating the transport of CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Macron, Thomas; Gilles, Arnaud; Charmette, Christophe; Sanchez, Jose; Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-12-07

    The concomitant operation of dynamic covalent frameworks and metallodynamers results in the formation of selective Zn(2+)-based dynameric membranes for restrictive facilitated and selective transport of CO(2).

  14. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  15. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  16. Transport of europium(III) through supported liquid membrane containing diisodecylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shigeto

    1987-01-01

    The transport of europium has been investigated through a supported liquid membrane containing diisodecylphosphoric acid (DIDPA). By the addition of 1-octanol to the membrane phase, europium was quantitatively transported from the feed solution of 0.1 M HNO 3 into the product solution of 5 M HNO 3 . The apparent rate constant (k obs ) increased with increasing carrier concentration and became nearly constant above 0.05 M DIDPA. (author)

  17. Surface and charge transport characterization of polyaniline-cellulose acetate composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Asif A; Hyland, Margaret M; Patterson, Darrell A

    2011-02-24

    This study elucidates the charge transport processes of polyaniline (PANI) composite membranes and correlates them to the PANI deposition site and the extent of PANI surface layering on the base microporous membranes. PANI was deposited either as a surface layer or inside the pores of cellulose acetate microporous membranes using various in situ chemical polymerization techniques. The extent of PANI layering at the surface of the base membrane and its oxidation and doping states were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). PANI deposition on the membranes showed a strong dependence on the polymerization technique and polymerization time within a single technique. In XPS, the deconvolution of C 1s and N 1s core-level spectra of the composite membranes was used to quantify the extent of PANI layering at the surface along with its oxidation and doping states. PANI incompletely covered the surface of the base microporous membranes for all the employed techniques. However, the extent of the layering increased with the polymerization time in a particular technique. The charge transport through the bulk membrane and charge transfer at the membrane/electrode interface were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The data were analyzed using the equivalent circuit modeling technique. The modeling parameters revealed that PANI deposition at the surface enhanced the interfacial charge transfer but the process depended on the extent of the surface coverage of the membrane. In addition, the charge transport in the bulk membrane depended on the PANI intercalation level, which varied depending on the polymerization technique employed. In addition, the EIS of electrolyte-soaked membranes was also conducted to evaluate the effects of PANI deposition site on charge transport in the presence of an electrolyte. PANI layering at the pore walls of the base membrane from diaphragmatic polymerization

  18. Podocyte expression of membrane transporters involved in puromycin aminonucleoside-mediated injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Zennaro

    Full Text Available Several complex mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of the intricate ramified morphology of glomerular podocytes and to interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying basement membrane. Recently, components of small molecule transporter families have been found in the podocyte membrane, but expression and function of membrane transporters in podocytes is largely unexplored. To investigate this complex field of investigation, we used two molecules which are known substrates of membrane transporters, namely Penicillin G and Puromycin Aminonucleoside (PA. We observed that Penicillin G pre-administration prevented both in vitro and in vivo podocyte damage caused by PA, suggesting the engagement of the same membrane transporters by the two molecules. Indeed, we found that podocytes express a series of transporters which are known to be used by Penicillin G, such as members of the Organic Anion Transporter Polypeptides (OATP/Oatp family of influx transporters, and P-glycoprotein, a member of the MultiDrug Resistance (MDR efflux transporter family. Expression of OATP/Oatp transporters was modified by PA treatment. Similarly, in vitro PA treatment increased mRNA and protein expression of P-glycoprotein, as well as its activity, confirming the engagement of the molecule upon PA administration. In summary, we have characterized some of the small molecule transporters present at the podocyte membrane, focusing on those used by PA to enter and exit the cell. Further investigation will be needed to understand precisely the role of these transporter families in maintaining podocyte homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury.

  19. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube City, Yamaguchi (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  20. Molecular mobility and transport in polymer membranes and polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagidullin, Alexandr; Meier-Haack, Jochen; Scheler, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers prepared by the layer-by-layer technique provide an efficient way to generate planar structures of tailored surface charge and hydrophobicity, which are used as membranes for pervaporation. The use of polyelectrolyte multilayers to form the membrane permits tailoring the surface charge of the membrane and, thus, selectivity; at the same time, it reduces fouling of the membrane by adsorption of organic matter. Pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to investigate the diffusion of probe molecules into polymer systems. Evaluation of the apparent diffusion coefficient in porous poly(amide) results in a pore size of 4 microm, as found in electron micrographs. For the pore size obtained for polyelectrolyte multilayers, no equivalent pores could be found in microscopy. Propagators for the diffusion of propanol and propanol-water mixture into multilayers reveal that there might be selective interaction of probe molecules with the polyelectrolyte system.

  1. Water transport through graphene oxide membranes: the roles of driving forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J Y; Wang, B; Li, K

    2018-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have shown excellent selectivities in nanofiltration and pervaporation. However, the water transport mechanisms in the unique membrane laminar structure are still not well understood, especially in pervaporation which involves selective permeation and evaporation. Herein, water transport in GO membranes was tested under two different modes: pressure-driven permeation and pervaporation. The pure water flux was found to be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in pervaporation due to the large capillary pressure induced by evaporation. The water flux in pervaporation was suggested to be limited by evaporation at room temperature but surface diffusion at high temperature.

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  3. Spectrins: a structural platform for stabilization and activation of membrane channels, receptors and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnicka, Beata; Czogalla, Aleksander; Hryniewicz-Jankowska, Anita; Bogusławska, Dżamila M; Grochowalska, Renata; Heger, Elżbieta; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on structure and functions of spectrin as a major component of the membrane skeleton. Recent advances on spectrin function as an interface for signal transduction mediation and a number of data concerning interaction of spectrin with membrane channels, adhesion molecules, receptors and transporters draw a picture of multifaceted protein. Here, we attempted to show the current depiction of multitask role of spectrin in cell physiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  5. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitish K; Chang, Junil; Zhao, Patrick X

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task. Support vector machine (SVM)-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM), were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset. Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM) and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions for the

  6. Uranyl ion transport across tri-n-butyl phosphate/n-dodecane liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.; Misra, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Carrier-facilitated transport of uranium (VI) against its concentration gradient from aqueous nitrate acidic solutions across organic bulk liquid membranes (BLM) and supported liquid membranes (SLM) containing TBP as the mobile carrier and n-dodecane as the membrane solvent was investigated. Extremely dilute uranyl nitrate solutions in about 2.5 M nitric acid generally constituted as the source phase. Uranyl transport appreciably increased with both stirring of the receiving phase and the carrier concentration in the organic membrane, while enhanced acidity of the strip side adversely affected the partioning of the cation into this phase. Among the several reagents tested, diluted ammonium carbonate (∼1M) solutions served efficiently as the stripant. Besides Accurel polypropylene (PP) film as the solid support for SLM, some silicon flat-sheet membranes with different inorganic fillers like silica, calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, chromium oxide, zinc oxide etc. and teflon membranes transported about 70% of uranium in nearly 7-8 hr employing 1 M ammonium carbonate as the strippant. Specifically, 30% TBP supported on Accurel flat-sheet supports transfered better than 70% of uranium from moderate acid feeds (2.5M) under similar conditions. Membranes supporting Aliquat-336, TLA, TOPO etc. yielded somewhat poor uranium recoveries. The feed : strip volume ratio showed an inverse relationship to the fraction of cation transported. (author). 9 refs., 2 tab s

  7. A Glimpse of Membrane Transport through Structures-Advances in the Structural Biology of the GLUT Glucose Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nieng

    2017-08-18

    The cellular uptake of glucose is an essential physiological process, and movement of glucose across biological membranes requires specialized transporters. The major facilitator superfamily glucose transporters GLUTs, encoded by the SLC2A genes, have been a paradigm for functional, mechanistic, and structural understanding of solute transport in the past century. This review starts with a glimpse into the structural biology of membrane proteins and particularly membrane transport proteins, enumerating the landmark structures in the past 25years. The recent breakthrough in the structural elucidation of GLUTs is then elaborated following a brief overview of the research history of these archetypal transporters, their functional specificity, and physiological and pathophysiological significances. Structures of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT5 in distinct transport and/or ligand-binding states reveal detailed mechanisms of the alternating access transport cycle and substrate recognition, and thus illuminate a path by which structure-based drug design may be applied to help discover novel therapeutics against several debilitating human diseases associated with GLUT malfunction and/or misregulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Membrane Anchoring and Ion-Entry Dynamics in P-type ATPase Copper Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Christina; Sitsel, Oleg; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Cu(+)-specific P-type ATPase membrane protein transporters regulate cellular copper levels. The lack of crystal structures in Cu(+)-binding states has limited our understanding of how ion entry and binding are achieved. Here, we characterize the molecular basis of Cu(+) entry using molecular...... and provide a molecular understanding of ion entry in Cu(+)-transporting P-type ATPases....

  9. Proteoliposomes as Tool for Assaying Membrane Transporter Functions and Interactions with Xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Tonazzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteoliposomes represent a suitable and up to date tool for studying membrane transporters which physiologically mediate absorption, excretion, trafficking and reabsorption of nutrients and metabolites. Using recently developed reconstitution strategies, transporters can be inserted in artificial bilayers with the same orientation as in the cell membranes and in the absence of other interfering molecular systems. These methodologies are very suitable for studying kinetic parameters and molecular mechanisms. After the first applications on mitochondrial transporters, in the last decade, proteoliposomes obtained with optimized methodologies have been used for studying plasma membrane transporters and defining their functional and kinetic properties and structure/function relationships. A lot of information has been obtained which has clarified and completed the knowledge on several transporters among which the OCTN sub-family members, transporters for neutral amino acid, B0AT1 and ASCT2, and others. Transporters can mediate absorption of substrate-like derivatives or drugs, improving their bioavailability or can interact with these compounds or other xenobiotics, leading to side/toxic effects. Therefore, proteoliposomes have recently been used for studying the interaction of some plasma membrane and mitochondrial transporters with toxic compounds, such as mercurials, H2O2 and some drugs. Several mechanisms have been defined and in some cases the amino acid residues responsible for the interaction have been identified. The data obtained indicate proteoliposomes as a novel and potentially important tool in drug discovery.

  10. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  11. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications—A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie L. Rangel-Cárdenas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  13. Engineered Transport in Microporous Materials and Membranes for Clean Energy Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changyi; Meckler, Stephen M; Smith, Zachary P; Bachman, Jonathan E; Maserati, Lorenzo; Long, Jeffrey R; Helms, Brett A

    2018-02-01

    Many forward-looking clean-energy technologies hinge on the development of scalable and efficient membrane-based separations. Ongoing investment in the basic research of microporous materials is beginning to pay dividends in membrane technology maturation. Specifically, improvements in membrane selectivity, permeability, and durability are being leveraged for more efficient carbon capture, desalination, and energy storage, and the market adoption of membranes in those areas appears to be on the horizon. Herein, an overview of the microporous materials chemistry driving advanced membrane development, the clean-energy separations employing them, and the theoretical underpinnings tying membrane performance to membrane structure across multiple length scales is provided. The interplay of pore architecture and chemistry for a given set of analytes emerges as a critical design consideration dictating mass transport outcomes. Opportunities and outstanding challenges in the field are also discussed, including high-flux 2D molecular-sieving membranes, phase-change adsorbents as performance-enhancing components in composite membranes, and the need for quantitative metrologies for understanding mass transport in heterophasic materials and in micropores with unusual chemical interactions with analytes of interest. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Analysis of Porphyra membrane transporters demonstrates gene transfer among photosynthetic eukaryotes and numerous sodium-coupled transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R; Prochnik, Simon E; Blouin, Nicolas A; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L; Klein, Anita S; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters.

  15. On water transport in polymer electrolyte membranes during the passage of current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach to model the water transport in the membranes of PEM fuel cells during operation. Starting from a frequently utilized equation the various transport mechanisms are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the commonly used approach to simply balance the electro......-osmotic drag (EOD) with counter diffusion and/or hydraulic permeation is flawed, and that any net transport of water through the membrane is caused by diffusion. Depending on the effective drag the cathode side of the membrane may experience a lower hydration than the anode side. The effect of a water......-uptake layer on the net water transport will also be pictured. Finally, the effect of EOD is visualized using “Newton’s cradle”....

  16. Description of the Gas Transport through Dynamic Liquid Membrane.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Setničková, Kateřina; Tseng, H.-H.; Šíma, Vladimír; Petričkovič, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 184, AUG 31 (2017), s. 152-157 ISSN 1383-5866 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) MOST-16-04 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gas separation * liquid membrane * solurion-diffusion model Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  17. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Applied for Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is investigated. PEMFC may be the most promising technology for fuel cell automotive systems, which is operating at quite low temperatures, (between 60 to 80℃). In this study the fuel cell motive power part of a lift truck has...

  18. Ion transport through biological membranes an integrated theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Michael C

    1975-01-01

    This book illustrates some of the ways physics and mathematics have been, and are being, used to elucidate the underlying mechan­ isms of passive ion movement through biological membranes in general, and the membranes of excltable cells in particular. I have made no effort to be comprehensive in my introduction of biological material and the reader interested in a brief account of single cell electro­ physlology from a physically-oriented biologists viewpoint will find the chapters by Woodbury (1965) an excellent introduction. Part I is introductory in nature, exploring the basic electrical properties of inexcitable and excitable cell plasma membranes. Cable theory is utilized to illustrate the function of the non-decrementing action potential as a signaling mechanism for the long range trans­ mission of information in the nervous system, and to gain some in­ sight into the gross behaviour of neurons. The detailed analysis of Hodgkin and Huxley on the squid giant axon membrane ionic conductance properties...

  19. Transport properties of fullerene-polyphenylene oxide homogeneous membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polotskaya, G.; Biryulin, Yu.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Brožová, Libuše; Bleha, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2004), s. 371-376 ISSN 1536-383X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : fullerene * polyphenylene oxide * homogeneous membranes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.117, year: 2004

  20. Transport dynamics in membranes of photosynthetic purple bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caycedo, Felipe; Rodriguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Fassioli, Francesca; Johnson, Neil

    2007-03-01

    Photo-Syntethic Unit (PSU) of purple bacteria is conformed by three basic constituents: Light Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) antenna complexes, where chromophores are distributed in a ring in close contact with caroteniods with a function of collecting light; LH1s, ring shaped structures of chromophores which harvest and funnel excitations to the Reaction Centre (RC), where phtosynthesis takes place. Studies concerning a single PSU have been capable of reproducing experimental transfer times, but incapable of explaining the fact that architecture LH2-LH1-RC of phototosynthetic membranes changes as light intensity conditions vary. The organization of antenna complexes in the membranes that support PSU seems to have its own functionality. A hopping model where excitations are transferred within a membrane is used, and populations of RC, LH1 and LH2 are investigated. Different statistics concerning arrival times of excitations that excite a single PSU are considered and compared with the global model where coordinates of a great portion of a membrane are included. The model permits in a classical basis to understand which parameters make photosynthesis in purple bateria efficient and reliable.

  1. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in

  2. Simulation of Water Transport through a Lipid Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly

  3. Probing water structure and transport in proton exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.

    2018-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted tremendous attention as alternative energy sources because of their high energy density and practically zero greenhouse gas emission - water is their only direct by-product. Critical to the function of PEMFCs is fast proton and water

  4. Translocation across biological membranes: activity, structure and regulation of transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Alle cellen zijn omsloten door biologische membranen met selectief doorlatende membrane, die het mogelijk maken om omstandigheden "binnen" en "buiten" de cel te handhaven. De gereguleerde beweging van moleculen door deze membranen is nodig voor talrijke essentiële processen, waaronder het verkrijgen

  5. Amplified CPEs enhancement of chorioamnion membrane mass transport by encapsulation in nano-sized PLGA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Appel, Reut; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) have long been used for mass transport enhancement across membranes. Many CPEs are used in a solution or gel and could be a solvent. The use of CPEs is mainly limited due to their toxicity/irritation levels. This study presents the evaluation of encapsulated CPEs in nano-sized polymeric particles on the chorioamnion (CA) membrane mass transport. CPEs' mass encapsulated in nanoparticles was decreased by 10,000-fold. Interestingly, this approach resulted in a 6-fold increase in mass transport across the CA. This approach may also be used with other CPEs' base applications necessitating lower CPE concentration. Applying Ultrasound (US) has shown to increase the release rate of and also the mass transport across the CA membrane. It is proposed that encapsulated CPEs penetrate into the CA membrane thus prolonging their exposure, possibly extending their penetration into the CA membrane, while insonation also deepens their penetration into the CA membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication and Molecular Transport Studies of Highly c-Oriented AFI Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2017-01-10

    The AFI membrane with one-dimensional straight channels is an ideal platform for various applications. In this work, we report the fabrication of a highly c-oriented, compact and stable AFI membrane by epitaxial growth from an almost close-packed and c-oriented monolayer of plate-like seeds that is manually assembled on a porous alumina support. The straight channels in the membrane are not only aligned vertically along the membrane depth, but are also continuous without disruption. The transport resistance is thus minimized and as a result, the membrane shows almost two orders of magnitude greater permeance in pervaporation of hydrocarbons compared to reported values in the literature. The selectivity of p-xylene to 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) is approximately 850. In addition, through gas permeation studies on a number of gas and liquid molecules, different transport mechanisms including activated Knudsen diffusion, surface diffusion and molecular sieving were discovered for different diffusion species. The ratio of kinetic diameter to channel diameter, dm/dc, and the ratio of the Lennard-Jones length constant to channel diameter, σm/dc, are found very useful in explaining the different transport behaviors. These results should be useful not only for potential industrial applications of the AFI membranes but also for the fundamental understanding of transport in nanoporous structures.

  7. Electrochemical characterization and transport phenomena of polystyrene based barium–magnesium phosphate composite membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mujahid Ali Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The polystyrene based barium–magnesium (BMP composite membrane was prepared by sol–gel method. The physico-chemical characterization of the BMP composite membrane was established by XRD, FTIR and simultaneous SEM studies. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with uniform arrangement of particles indicating no sign of visible cracks. Membrane potential is a measurable and important parameter to characterize the charge property of the membrane. Membrane potentials have been measured across the polystyrene based barium–magnesium (BMP composite membrane separating various 1:1 electrolytes at different concentrations and followed the order KCl < NaCl < LiCl. The membrane was found to be cation-selective. Membrane potentials have been used to calculate transport number, mobility ratio, distribution coefficient, charge effectiveness, and also the fixed charge density which is a central parameter governing the membrane phenomena by utilizing Teorell, Meyer, and Sievers method. The order of surface charge density for uni-univalent electrolytes solution was found to be LiCl < NaCl < KCl.

  8. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  9. Transport of Water in Semicrystalline Block Copolymer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Oparaji, Onyekachi

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO) is a semicrystalline block copolymer (BCP) with interesting properties. It is mechanically tough, amphiphilic, and has a polar phase. The mechanical toughness is due to the crystallinity of PEO and the high glass transition temperature of PS, as well as the morphological structure of the BCP. The polymer has high CO2, water, and salt solubility that derive from the polar PEO component. Potential applications include CO2 separation, water purification, and lithium air batteries. In all of the aforementioned applications, water transport is an important parameter. The presence of water can also affect thermal and mechanical properties. Water transport and thermal and mechanical properties of a lamellar PS- b-PEO copolymer have been measured as a function of water activity. Water transport can be affected by the heterogeneous nature of a semicrystalline BCP. Therefore, Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy has been employed, because water transport and polymer swelling can be measured simultaneously. The effect of BCP structure on transport has been investigated by comparing water transport in PS- b-PEO to a PEO homopolymer. The crystalline content of the PEO and the presence of glassy PS lamellae will be used to explain the transport results.

  10. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette

    2008-01-01

    by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization......Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma...

  11. Electrogenic Na+-independent Pi transport in canine renal basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, S.J.; Hammerman, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    To define the mechanism by which Pi exists from the renal proximal tubular cell across the basolateral membrane, we measured 32Pi uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles from dog kidney in the absence of Na+. Preloading of basolateral vesicles with 2 mM Pi transstimulated 32Pi uptake, which is consistent with counterflow. We used measurements of transstimulation to quantitate the transport component of 32Pi uptake. Transstimulation of 32Pi uptake was inhibited less than 30% by concentrations of probenecid as high as 50 mM. In contrast, transstimulation of 35SO4(2-) uptake by intravesicular SO4(2-) was inhibited 92% by 5 mM probenecid. Preloading basolateral vesicles with SO4(2-) did not result in transstimulation of 32Pi uptake. Accumulation of 32Pi in basolateral vesicles above steady state was driven by a membrane potential (intravesicular positive), consistent with Na+-independent Pi transport being accompanied by the net transfer of negative charge across the membrane. We conclude that carrier-mediated, electrogenic Na+-independent 32Pi transport can be demonstrated in basolateral vesicles from dog kidney. This process appears to be mediated, at least in part, via a mechanism different from that by which SO4(2-) is transported. Electrogenic Na+-independent Pi transport may reflect one means by which Pi reabsorbed across the luminal membrane exists from the proximal tubular cell down an electrochemical gradient.

  12. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K(+) transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K(+) required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporte...

  13. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K+ transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K+ required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporters (...

  14. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  15. Role of adaptor proteins in motor regulation and membrane transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Schlager (Max)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Active transport along the cytoskeleton is a process essential for proper cellular function. Although much is known about the motor proteins that generate the necessary force and the cytoskeleton that provides the cellular infrastructure, many questions still

  16. Experimental extrusion of tubular multilayer materials for Oxygen Transport Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan

    membrane based on gadolinia doped ceria oxide, (Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ), (CGO) was developed on a tubular, porous support structure based on cost-efficient magnesium oxide (MgO). The porous support structure was prepared by thermoplastic extrusion using MgO powder, thermoplastic binders and graphite pore former....... The results revealed sufficiently high bending strength values of 60 MPa for the MgO support at an operation temperature of 850 °C, whereas the strength at room temperature was 77 MPa. The oxygen permeation flux on an asymmetric tubular CGO membrane, consisting of an MgO support (porous), catalytic layer...

  17. Plasma membrane-localized transporter for aluminum in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Jixing; Yamaji, Naoki; Kasai, Tomonari; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, but its trivalent ionic form is highly toxic to all organisms at low concentrations. How Al enters cells has not been elucidated in any organisms. Herein, we report a transporter, Nrat1 (Nramp aluminum transporter 1), specific for trivalent Al ion in rice. Nrat1 belongs to the Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) family, but shares a low similarity with other Nramp members. When expressed in yeast, Nrat1 transp...

  18. Description of the Gas Transport through Dynamic Liquid Membrane.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Setničková, Kateřina; Tseng, H.-H.; Šíma, Vladimír; Petričkovič, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 184, AUG 31 (2017), s. 152-157 ISSN 1383-5866 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) MOST-16-04 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gas separation * liquid membrane * solurion-diffusion model Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  19. Membrane Drug Transporters and Chemoresistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, Wolfgang; Faissner, Ralf; Schnolzer, Martina; Lohr, Matthias; Jesnowski, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks among the tumors most resistant to chemotherapy. Such chemoresistance of tumors can be mediated by various cellular mechanisms including dysregulated apoptosis or ineffective drug concentration at the intracellular target sites. In this review, we highlight recent advances in experimental chemotherapy underlining the role of cellular transporters in drug resistance. Such contribution to the chemoresistant phenotype of tumor cells or tissues can be conferred both by uptake and export transporters, as demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro data. Our studies used human pancreatic carcinoma cells, cells stably transfected with human transporter cDNAs, or cells in which a specific transporter was knocked down by RNA interference. We have previously shown that 5-fluorouracil treatment affects the expression profile of relevant cellular transporters including multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and that MRP5 (ABCC5) influences chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Similarly, cell treatment with the nucleoside drug gemcitabine or a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs can variably influence the expression pattern and relative amount of uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells or select for pre-existing subpopulations. In addition, cytotoxicity studies with MRP5-overexpressing or MRP5-silenced cells demonstrate a contribution of MRP5 also to gemcitabine resistance. These data may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine and/or 5-fluorouracil

  20. Multi-component transport in polymers: hydrocarbon / hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membrane; Transport multi-composants dans les polymeres: separation hydrocarbures / hydrogene par membrane a selectivite inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauviel, G.

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membranes is investigated. The first goal is to develop materials showing an increased selectivity. Silicone membranes loaded with inorganic fillers have been prepared, but the expected enhancement is not observed. The second goal is to model the multi- component transport through rubbers. Indeed the permeability model is not able to predict correctly permeation when a vapour is present. Thus many phenomena have to be considered: diffusional inter-dependency, sorption synergy, membrane swelling and drag effect. The dependence of diffusivities with the local composition is modelled according to free-volume theory. The model resolution allows to predict the permeation flow-rates of mixed species from their pure sorption and diffusion data. For the systems under consideration, the diffusional inter-dependency is shown to be preponderant. Besides, sorption synergy importance is pointed out, whereas it is most often neglected. (author)

  1. INHIBITION OF MYCOLIC ACID TRANSPORT ACROSS THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS PLASMA MEMBRANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewicz, Anna E.; Pham, Ha; Gundi, Vijay A. K. B.; Scherman, Michael S.; North, Elton J.; Hess, Tamara; Jones, Victoria; Gruppo, Veronica; Born, Sarah E. M.; Korduláková, Jana; Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Morisseau, Christophe; Lenaerts, Anne J.; Lee, Richard E.; McNeil, Michael R.; Jackson, Mary

    2011-01-01

    New chemotherapeutics active against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) are urgently needed. We report on the identification of an adamantyl urea compound displaying potent bactericidal activity against M. tb and a unique mode of action, namely the abolition of the translocation of mycolic acids from the cytoplasm where they are synthesized to the periplasmic side of the plasma membrane where they are transferred onto cell wall arabinogalactan or used in the formation of virulence-associated outer membrane trehalose-containing glycolipids. Whole genome sequencing of spontaneous resistant mutants of M. tb selected in vitro followed by genetic validation experiments revealed that our prototype inhibitor targets the inner membrane transporter, MmpL3. Conditional gene expression of mmpL3 in mycobacteria and analysis of inhibitor-treated cells validate MmpL3 as essential for mycobacterial growth and support the involvement of this transporter in the translocation of trehalose monomycolate across the plasma membrane. PMID:22344175

  2. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  3. Design and optimization of porous ceramic supports for asymmetric ceria-based oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Pećanac, G.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties and gas permeability of porous supports of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ (CGO) were investigated as a function of sintering temperature and volume fraction of pore former for use in planar asymmetric oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). With increasing the pore former ...... activity of the CGO membrane was reduced by Fe2O3 addition (replacing Co3O4 as sintering additive)....

  4. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  5. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  6. Fluid transportation mechanisms by a coupled system of elastic membranes and magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Sugiura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The basic properties of the fluid transportation mechanism that is produced by the coupled waves propagating along a thin elastic membrane covering a magnetic fluid layer in a shallow and long rectangular vessel are investigated. It is shown that the progressive magnetic field induced by the rectangular pulses generates sinusoidal vibration of the displacement of elastic membrane and makes the system work more efficiently than the magnetic field induced by the pulse-width-modulation method

  7. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we describe techniques to visualize the functioning of membrane transport proteins with fluorescent probes at the single-molecule level. First, we explain how to produce membrane-reconstituted transporters with fluorescent labels. Next, we detail the construction of a microfluidic flow cell to image immobilized proteoliposomes on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We conclude by describing the methods that are needed to analyze fluorescence movies and obtain useful single-molecule data. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of prolonged recombinant human erythropoietin administration on muscle membrane transport systems and metabolic marker enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C; Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L

    2007-01-01

    on the expression of muscle membrane transport proteins. Likewise, improvements in performance may involve upregulation of metabolic enzymes. Since Epo is known to augment performance we tested the effect of rHuEpo on some marker enzymes that are related to aerobic capacity. For these purposes eight subjects...... performance by approximately 54%. Membrane transport systems and carbonic anhydrases involved in pH regulation remained unchanged. Of the Na(+), K(+)-pump isoforms only the density of the alpha2 subunit was decreased (by 22%) after treatment. The marker enzymes cytochrom c and hexokinase remained unchanged......Adaptations to chronic hypoxia involve changes in membrane transport proteins. The underlying mechanism of this response may be related to concomitant occurring changes in erythropoietin (Epo) levels. We therefore tested the direct effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment...

  9. Isolation of Arabidopsis thylakoid membranes and their use for in vitro protein insertion or transport assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Thomas; Schünemann, Danja

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the techniques of chloroplast isolation; their fractionation into envelopes, stroma, and thylakoids; and their further use for in vitro protein transport assays. In addition to the isolation of thylakoids, this chapter also describes the experimental steps of both protein translocation across the thylakoid membrane and protein integration into the membrane. Protein translocation and integration can be analysed by the radioactive labelling of substrate proteins using an in vitro transcription and translation system. The translocated or integrated proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. Our protocol allows the analysis of these transport systems in wild-type Arabidopsis or mutants that lack or overexpress soluble or membrane transport factors that could be of potential interest.

  10. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin

    2017-01-30

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  11. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoungjin An, Alicia; Lee, Eui-Jong; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Jung-Gil; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-01-01

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  12. The enduring legacy of the “constant-field equation” in membrane ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In 1943, David Goldman published a seminal paper in The Journal of General Physiology that reported a concise expression for the membrane current as a function of ion concentrations and voltage. This body of work was, and still is, the theoretical pillar used to interpret the relationship between a cell’s membrane potential and its external and/or internal ionic composition. Here, we describe from an historical perspective the theory underlying the constant-field equation and its application to membrane ion transport. PMID:28931632

  13. Calixarene-mediated liquid membrane transport of choline conjugates 3: The effect of handle variation on neurotransmitter transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James L; Fujii, Ayu; Roshandel, Sahar; To, Cuong-Alexander; Schramm, Michael P

    2017-07-01

    Upper rim phosphonic acid functionalized calix[4]arene affects selective transport of multiple molecular payloads through a liquid membrane. The secret is in the attachment of a receptor-complementary handle to the payload. We find that the trimethylammonium ethylene group present in choline is one of several general handles for the transport of drug and drug-like species. Herein we compare the effect of handle variation against the transport of serotonin and dopamine. We find that several ionizable amine termini handles are sufficient for transport and identify two ideal candidates. Their performance is significantly enhanced in HEPES buffered solutions. This inquiry completes a series of 3 studies aimed at optimization of this strategy. In completion a new approach towards synthetic receptor mediated selective small molecule transport has emerged; future work in vesicular and cellular systems will follow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid, directed transport of DC-SIGN clusters in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Weinreb, Violetta; Ridilla, Marc; Betts, Laurie; Patel, Pratik; de Silva, Aravinda M; Thompson, Nancy L; Jacobson, Ken

    2017-11-01

    C-type lectins, including dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are all-purpose pathogen receptors that exist in nanoclusters in plasma membranes of dendritic cells. A small fraction of these clusters, obvious from the videos, can undergo rapid, directed transport in the plane of the plasma membrane at average speeds of more than 1 μm/s in both dendritic cells and MX DC-SIGN murine fibroblasts ectopically expressing DC-SIGN. Surprisingly, instantaneous speeds can be considerably greater. In MX DC-SIGN cells, many cluster trajectories are colinear with microtubules that reside close to the ventral membrane, and the microtubule-depolymerizing drug, nocodazole, markedly reduced the areal density of directed movement trajectories, suggesting a microtubule motor-driven transport mechanism; by contrast, latrunculin A, which affects the actin network, did not depress this movement. Rapid, retrograde movement of DC-SIGN may be an efficient mechanism for bringing bound pathogen on the leading edge and projections of dendritic cells to the perinuclear region for internalization and processing. Dengue virus bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic projections was rapidly transported toward the cell center. The existence of this movement within the plasma membrane points to an unexpected lateral transport mechanism in mammalian cells and challenges our current concepts of cortex-membrane interactions.

  15. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, G.; Malínský, Jan; Stahlschmidt, W.; Loibl, M.; Weig-Meckl, I.; Frommer, W.B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 6 (2008), s. 1075-1088 ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/0009; GA ČR GA204/07/0133; GA ČR GC204/08/J024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Lithium acetate * Membrane compartment of Can1 * Monomeric red fluorescent protein Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 9.120, year: 2008

  16. Measuring Transport of Water Across the Peritoneal Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asghar, R. B.; Diskin, A. M.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.; Davies, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 64, - (2003), s. 1911-1915 ISSN 0085-2538 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0827 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : deuterium * total body water * solute transport Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.302, year: 2003

  17. Membrane permeability in the gastrointestinal tract: the interplay between microclimate pH and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristl, Albin

    2009-11-01

    Some examples of pH- and transporter-dependent permeability, determined in side-by-side diffusion cells, are summarized. We investigated the polarized transport in the mucosal-to-serosal direction of monocarboxylic acid-type drugs through the excised rat jejunal tissue and an artificial membrane. We established that, in vitro, these substances are most probably not transported by monocarboxylate transporter 1, but by passive pH-dependent transport. We also studied various influences on the permeability of fluorescein, a low permeability marker, through isolated rat intestinal segments, Caco-2 cell monolayers, and an artificial membrane. Polarized transport of fluorescein in the serosal-to-mucosal direction through the rat jejunum by multidrug resistance-associated protein was triggered by the addition of D-glucose to the mucosal side, while the pH-dependent increase of fluorescein influx is presumably the consequence of a monocarboxylate transporter and a member of the organic-anion transporting polypeptide family. With permeability experiments through the excised segments of rat small intestine, we ascertained that ciprofloxacin is a low-permeability drug and has higher and pH-dependent transport in the mucosal-to-serosal direction than in the opposite direction. We also established that neither the permeability of fluoroquinolones nor their solubility in different buffers was influenced by the interactions with metal cations.

  18. 3D Topography Design of Membranes for Enhanced Mass Transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel; Godinho, M.H.; Brogueira, P.; Figueirinhas, J.L.; Crespo, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 2 (2008), s. 337-343 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/08/0600 Grant - others:SFRH(PT) BPD/9470/2002; POCTI(PT) EQU/35437/2000; POCTI(PT) CTM/56382/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : Ionic liquids * mass transport * pervaporation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.247, year: 2008

  19. Identification of the glucose transporter in mammalian cell membranes using an /sup 125/(I)-forskolin photoaffinity label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoho, A.; Wadzinski, B.; Shanahan, M.

    1987-05-01

    The glucose transporter has been identified in a variety of mammlian cell membranes using a carrier-free photoactivatable radioiodinated derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-0-succinyldeacetyl-forskolin, (I-125)IAPS-Fsk, at 1-10 nM. The membranes which have been photolabeled with (I-125)IAPS-Fsk are: rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes, rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes, human placental membranes, and wild type S49 lymphoma cell membranes. The glucose transporter in rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes and rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes was determined to be 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Photolysis of human placental membranes and S49 lymphoma membranes with (I-125)IAPS-Fsk followed by SDS-PAGE indicated specific derivatization of a broad band (45-55 kDa) in placental membranes and a narrower band (45 kDa) in the S49 lymphoma membranes. Digestion of the (I-125)IPAS-Fsk labelled placental and S49 lymphoma membranes with endo-B-galactosidase showed a reduction in the apparent molecular weight of the radiolabelled band to 40 kDa. Trypsinization of labelled placental and lymphoma membranes produced an 18 kDa radiolabelled proteolytic fragment. (I-125)IAPS-Fsk is a highly effective probe for identifying low levels of glucose transporters in mammalian tissues.

  20. Identification of the glucose transporter in mammalian cell membranes using an 125(I)-forskolin photoaffinity label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruoho, A.; Wadzinski, B.; Shanahan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The glucose transporter has been identified in a variety of mammlian cell membranes using a carrier-free photoactivatable radioiodinated derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-0-succinyldeacetyl-forskolin, [I-125]IAPS-Fsk, at 1-10 nM. The membranes which have been photolabeled with [I-125]IAPS-Fsk are: rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes, rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes, human placental membranes, and wild type S49 lymphoma cell membranes. The glucose transporter in rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes and rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes was determined to be 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Photolysis of human placental membranes and S49 lymphoma membranes with [I-125]IAPS-Fsk followed by SDS-PAGE indicated specific derivatization of a broad band (45-55 kDa) in placental membranes and a narrower band (45 kDa) in the S49 lymphoma membranes. Digestion of the [I-125]IPAS-Fsk labelled placental and S49 lymphoma membranes with endo-B-galactosidase showed a reduction in the apparent molecular weight of the radiolabelled band to 40 kDa. Trypsinization of labelled placental and lymphoma membranes produced an 18 kDa radiolabelled proteolytic fragment. [I-125]IAPS-Fsk is a highly effective probe for identifying low levels of glucose transporters in mammalian tissues

  1. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  2. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  3. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  4. Enhancing oxygen transport through Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony S.

    Ceramic membranes based on Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting (MIEC) oxides are capable of separating oxygen from air in the presence of an oxygen partial-pressure gradient. These MIEC membranes show great promise for oxygen consuming industrial processes, such as the production of syngas from steam reforming of natural gas (SRM), as well as for electricity generation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). For both applications, the overall performance is dictated by the rate of oxygen transport across the membrane. Oxygen transport across MIEC membranes is composed of a bulk oxygen-ion diffusion process and surface processes, such as surface reactions and adsorption/desorption of gaseous reactants/products. The main goal of this thesis was to determine which process is rate-limiting in order to significantly enhance the overall rate of oxygen transport in MIEC membrane systems. The rate-limiting step was determined by evaluating the total resistance to oxygen transfer, Rtot. Rtot is the sum of a bulk diffusion resistance in the membrane itself, Rb, and interfacial loss components, Rs. Rb is a function of the membrane's ionic conductivity and thickness, while Rs arises primarily from slow surface-exchange kinetics that cause the P(O2) at the surfaces of the membrane to differ from the P(O 2) in the adjacent gas phases. Rtot can be calculated from the Nernst potential across the membrane and the measured oxygen flux. The rate-limiting process can be determined by evaluating the relative contributions of the various losses, Rs and Rb, to Rtot. Using this method, this thesis demonstrates that for most membrane systems, Rs is the dominating factor. In the development of membrane systems with high oxygen transport rates, thin membranes with high ionic conductivities are required to achieve fast bulk oxygen-ion diffusion. However, as membrane thickness is decreased, surface reaction kinetics become more important in determining the overall transport rate. The two

  5. Self-Assembly of Grafted Nanoparticles for Transport Channels in Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchak, Connor; Buenning, Ellie; Durning, Christopher; Kumar, Sanat

    2015-03-01

    Polymer membranes have seen increased application for vapor separations, particularly for natural gas processing and purification. The addition of nanoparticles to such membranes has led to conflicting findings; conventional (Maxwell) composite theory predicts the addition of inert filler to hinder membrane transport properties. However, our research using silica nanoparticles grafted with Poly (Methacrylate) has shown these grafted systems to possess permeabilities similar to those of a pure polymer system increasing penetrant solubility without compromising diffusivity. This is counterintuitive to Maxwell theory. We propose that the grafted nanoparticles self-assemble into an ordered crystal lattice containing low-density ``channels'' which facilitate penetrant uptake. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering experiments appear to confirm this theory. Varying polymer grafting density and chain length is also predicted to alter transport properties, allowing for the fabrication of membrane with tunable diffusivity and selectivity. These grafted nanocomposite systems therefore represent a means of creating robust membranes with transport properties similar to those of conventional polymeric films that may be easily adapted for various separations processes. Corresponding author.

  6. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size

  7. Synthesis and Transport Properties of Novel MOF/PIM-1/MOF Sandwich Membranes for Gas Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Fuoco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs were supported on polymer membrane substrates for the fabrication of composite polymer membranes based on unmodified and modified polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1. Layers of two different MOFs, zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8 and Copper benzene tricarboxylate ((HKUST-1, were grown onto neat PIM-1, amide surface-modified PIM-1 and hexamethylenediamine (HMDA -modified PIM-1. The surface-grown crystalline MOFs were characterized by a combination of several techniques, including powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the film morphology on the neat and modified PIM-1 membranes. The pure gas permeabilities of He, H2, O2, N2, CH4, CO2 were studied to understand the effect of the surface modification on the basic transport properties and evaluate the potential use of these membranes for industrially relevant gas separations. The pure gas transport was discussed in terms of permeability and selectivity, highlighting the effect of the MOF growth on the diffusion coefficients of the gas in the new composite polymer membranes. The results confirm that the growth of MOFs on polymer membranes can enhance the selectivity of the appropriately functionalized PIM-1, without a dramatic decrease of the permeability.

  8. Synthesis and Transport Properties of Novel MOF/PIM-1/MOF Sandwich Membranes for Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Alessio; Khdhayyer, Muhanned R; Attfield, Martin P; Esposito, Elisa; Jansen, Johannes C; Budd, Peter M

    2017-02-11

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were supported on polymer membrane substrates for the fabrication of composite polymer membranes based on unmodified and modified polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1). Layers of two different MOFs, zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) and Copper benzene tricarboxylate ((HKUST-1), were grown onto neat PIM-1, amide surface-modified PIM-1 and hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) -modified PIM-1. The surface-grown crystalline MOFs were characterized by a combination of several techniques, including powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the film morphology on the neat and modified PIM-1 membranes. The pure gas permeabilities of He, H₂, O₂, N₂, CH₄, CO₂ were studied to understand the effect of the surface modification on the basic transport properties and evaluate the potential use of these membranes for industrially relevant gas separations. The pure gas transport was discussed in terms of permeability and selectivity, highlighting the effect of the MOF growth on the diffusion coefficients of the gas in the new composite polymer membranes. The results confirm that the growth of MOFs on polymer membranes can enhance the selectivity of the appropriately functionalized PIM-1, without a dramatic decrease of the permeability.

  9. Water and Salt Transport Properties of Triptycene-Containing Sulfonated Polysulfone Materials for Desalination Membrane Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongxi; Aboki, Joseph; Ji, Yuanyuan; Guo, Ruilan; Geise, Geoffrey M

    2018-01-31

    A series of triptycene-containing sulfonated polysulfone (TRP-BP) materials was prepared via condensation polymerization, and the desalination membrane-relevant fundamental water and salt transport properties (i.e., sorption, diffusion, and permeability coefficients) of the polymers were characterized. Incorporating triptycene into sulfonated polysulfone increased the water content of the material compared to sulfonated polysulfone materials that do not contain triptycene. No significant difference in salt sorption was observed between TRP-BP membranes and other sulfonated polysulfone membranes, suggesting that the presence of triptycene in the polymer did not dramatically affect thermodynamic interactions between salt and the polymer. Both water and salt diffusion coefficients in the TRP-BP membranes were suppressed relative to other sulfonated polysulfone materials with comparable water content, and these phenomena may result from the influence of triptycene on polymer chain packing and/or free-volume distribution, which could increase the tortuosity of the transport pathways in the polymers. Enhanced water/salt diffusivity selectivity was observed for some of the TRP-BP membranes relative to those materials that did not contain triptycene, and correspondingly, incorporation of triptycene into sulfonated polysulfone resulted in an increase, particularly for acid counterion form TRP-BP materials, in water/salt permeability selectivity, which is favorable for desalination membrane applications.

  10. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Membranes for Flue Gas Treatment - Transport behavior of water and gas in hydrophilic polymer membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Potreck, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Fossil fuel fired power plants produce electricity and in addition to that large volume flows of flue gas, which mainly contain N2, O2, and CO2, but also large quantities of water vapor. To prevent condensation of the water vapor present in this flue gas stream, water needs to be removed before emission to the atmosphere. Commercial dehydration processes such as the use of a condenser or a desiccant system have several disadvantages and membrane technology is an attractive, energy efficient a...

  12. Oriented Morphology and Anisotropic Transport in Uniaxially Stretched Perfluorosulfonate Ionomer Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Park; J Li; G Divoux; L Madsen; R Moore

    2011-12-31

    Relations between morphology and transport sensitively govern proton conductivity in perfluorsulfonate ionomers (PFSIs) and thus determine useful properties of these technologically important materials. In order to understand such relations, we have conducted a broad systematic study of H{sup +}-form PFSI membranes over a range of uniaxial extensions and water uptakes. On the basis of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy, uniaxial deformation induces a strong alignment of ionic domains along the stretching direction. We correlate ionic domain orientation to transport using pulsed-field-gradient {sup 1}H NMR measurements of water diffusion coefficients along the three orthogonal membrane directions. Intriguingly, we observe that uniaxial deformation enhances water transport in one direction (parallel-to-draw direction) while reducing it in the other two directions (two orthogonal directions relative to the stretching direction). We evaluate another important transport parameter, proton conductivity, along two orthogonal in-plane directions. In agreement with water diffusion experiments, orientation of ionic channels increases proton conduction along the stretching direction while decreasing it in the perpendicular direction. These findings provide valuable fodder for optimal application of PFSI membranes as well as for the design of next generation polymer electrolyte membranes.

  13. Use of orthonormal polynomials to fit energy spectrum data for water transported through membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, N.; Todorova, L.

    2001-01-01

    A new application of our approach with orthonormal polynomials to curve fitting is given when both variables have errors. We approximate and describe data of a new effect due to change of water energy spectrum as a result of water transport in a porous membrane

  14. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  15. Design and optimization of porous ceramic supports for asymmetric ceria-based oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Pećanac, G.

    2016-01-01

    =7). The achieved gas permeability of 2.25×10−15 m2 for a 0.4 mm thick support will not limit the gas transport for oxygen production but in partial oxidation of methane to syngas at higher oxygen fluxes. For integration of the CGO support layer into a flat, asymmetric CGO membrane, the sintering...

  16. Molecular-dynamics of water transport through membranes - water from solvent to solute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERENDSEN, HJC; MARRINK, SJ

    1993-01-01

    An application of Molecular Dynamics computer simulation (MD) to the process of transport of water through a lipid bilayer membrane is described. The permeation process is far too slow to be modeled by straightforward MD. In stead the inverse of the permeability coefficient is expressed as an

  17. Increasing Extracellular Free Fatty Acid Production in Escherichia coli by Disrupting Membrane Transport Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang Soo; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2017-12-27

    Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify three mutants of E. coli that exhibited increased free fatty acid (FFA) production, which resulted from the disruption of genes related to membrane transport. Deletion of envR, gusC, and mdlA individually in a recombinant E. coli strain resulted in 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.2-fold increases in total FFA production, respectively. In particular, deletion of envR increased the percentage of extracellular FFA to 46%, compared with 29% for the control strain. Multiple deletion of envR, gusC, mdlA, ompF, and fadL had a synergistic effect on FFA production, resulting in high extracellular FFA production, comprising up to 50% of total FFA production. This study has identified new membrane proteins involved in FFA production and showed that genetic engineering targeting these membrane transporters is important to increase both total FFA and extracellular FFA production.

  18. Modelling the transport of carbonic acid anions through anion-exchange membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonenko, V.; Lebedev, K.; Manzanares, J.A.; Pourcelly, G.

    2003-01-01

    Electrodiffusion of carbonate and bicarbonate anions through anion-exchange membranes (AEM) is described on the basis of the Nernst-Planck equations taking into account coupled hydrolysis reactions in the external diffusion boundary layers (DBLs) and internal pore solution. The model supposes local electroneutrality as well as chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The transport is considered in three layers being an anion exchange membrane and two adjoining diffusion layers. A mechanism of competitive transport of HCO 3 - and CO 3 2- anions through the membrane which takes into account Donnan exclusion of H + ions is proposed. It is predicted that the pH of the depleting solution decreases and that of the concentrating solution increases during electrodialysis (ED). Eventual deviations from local electroneutrality and local chemical equilibrium are discussed

  19. Correlating humidity-dependent ionically conductive surface area with transport phenomena in proton-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-10-13

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using direct-current voltammetry and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion membrane was examined.

  20. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  1. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  2. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choveaux David L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369, containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds.

  3. Development of Dual-Phase Oxygen Transport Membranes for Carbon Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirou, Stéven

    -fuel combustion power plants. For the case of direct integration considered here the permeate side of the OTMs will be swept with recirculated flue gas whereby a driving force for oxygen transport through the membrane, which is fed with air on the other side, is directly established. It further facilitates...... developed and characterized as thick (1 mm) self-standing membranes and thin (8 μm) supported membranes. The stability of these membranes in gas streams containing CO2, SO2 and H2O was found to be excellent. However, the high volatility of the Zn in the AZO phase under mildly reducing atmospheres makes...... in the combustion, which greatly facilitates the down-stream CO2 capture. The main energy penalty for the oxy-fuel process is related to the production of the oxygen, which today commonly is done in cryogenic air separation units (ASUs). An alternative approach, which requires significant less energy is the use...

  4. Energetics and molecular biology of active transport in bacterial membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaback, H R; Ramos, S; Robertson, D E; Stroobant, P; Tokuda, H

    1977-01-01

    Bacterial membrane vesicles retain the same sidedness as the membrane in the intact cell and catalyze active transport of many solutes by a respiration-dependent mechanism that does not involve the generation of utilization of ATP or other high-energy phosphate compounds. In E. coli vesicles, most of these transport systems are coupled to an electrochemical gradient of protons (deltamuH+, interior negative and alkaline) generated primarily by the oxidation of D-lactate or reduced phenazine methosulfate via a membrane-bound respiratory chain. Oxygen or, under appropriate conditions, fumarate or nitrate can function as terminal electron acceptors, and the site at which deltamuH+ is generated is located before cytochrome b1 in the respiratory chain. Certain (N-dansyl)aminoalkyl-beta-D-galactopyranosides (Dns-gal) and N(2-nitro-4-azidophenyl)aminoalkyl 1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranosides (APG) are competitive inhibitors of lactose transport but are not transported themselves. Various fluorescence techniques, direct binding assays, and photoinactivation studies demonstrate that the great bulk of the lac carrier protein (ca. 95%) does not bind ligand in the absence of energy-coupling. Upon generation of a deltamuH+ (interior negative and alkaline), binding of Dns-gal and APG-dependent photoinactivation are observed. The data indicate that energy is coupled to the initial step in the transport process, and suggest that the lac carrier protein may be negatively charged.

  5. Identification of membrane proteins associated with phenylpropanoid tolerance and transport in Escherichia coli BL21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingwen; Wang, Kui; Xu, Sha; Wu, Junjun; Liu, Peiran; Du, Guocheng; Li, Jianghua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-15

    Phenylpropanoids are phytochemicals produced by some plants and possess a wide variety of biological activities. These compounds exist in plants in low amounts. Production of them in genetically engineered microorganisms has many advantages. A majority of functional phenylpropanoids are toxic to microbial hosts. Export of these compounds may relieve the cellular toxicity and increase the yield. However, proteins and mechanisms involved in phenylpropanoids transport and tolerance remain poorly understood. In this study, 16 membrane proteins that were differentially expressed in Escherichia coli in response to three typical phenylpropanoids (resveratrol, naringenin and rutin) were identified using a membrane proteomics approach. These proteins included outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpF, OmpW, FadL, TolC, LamB, and YaeT, peripheral membrane proteins AtpD, AtpH, YgaU, OppA, MalK, and MalE, and cytoplasmic membrane proteins OppD, PotG, and ManX. Functions of these proteins were determined by using gene overexpression and silencing. The results suggest that OmpA and FadL may play important roles in the transmembrane export of phenylpropanoids in E. coli. LamB, MalE, MalK and ManX may participate in phenylpropanoid uptake. The role of YgaU in enhancing the tolerance to phenylpropanoids remains to be determined. These results may assist the engineering of microorganisms with enhanced phenylpropanoid producing capabilities. Phenylpropanoids are phytochemicals produced by some plants and possess a wide variety of biological activities. Both the tolerance and the transport of phenylpropanoids play important roles in systematic metabolic engineering of microorganisms to produce these phytochemicals. Both specific and non-specific transporters are essential for these functions but remain poorly understood. This research utilized membrane proteomics to identify E. coli BL21 (DE3) membrane proteins that may be involved in phenylpropanoid transport and tolerance. These results

  6. When is a carrier not a membrane carrier? The cytoplasmic transport of amphipathic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisiger, R A

    1996-11-01

    After entering the cell, small molecules must penetrate the cytoplasm before they are metabolized, excreted, or can convey information to the cell nucleus. Without efficient cytoplasmic transport, most such molecules would efflux back out of the cell before they could reach their targets. Cytoplasmic movement of amphipathic molecules (e.g., long-chain fatty acids, bilirubin, bile acids) is greatly slowed by their tendency to bind intracellular structures. Soluble cytoplasmic binding proteins reduce this binding by increasing the aqueous solubility of their ligands. These soluble carriers catalyze the transport of hydrophobic molecules across hydrophilic water layers, just as membrane carriers catalyze the transport of hydrophilic molecules across the hydrophobic membrane core. They even display the kinetic features of carrier-mediated transport, including saturation, mutual competition between similar molecules, and countertransport. Recent data suggest that amphipathic molecules cross the cytoplasm very slowly, with apparent diffusion constants 10(2) to 10(4) times smaller than in water. By modulating the rate of cytoplasmic transport, cytosolic binding proteins may regulate transport and metabolism of amphipathic molecules. Storage diseases may cause hepatocellular dysfunction by disrupting normal cytoplasmic transport.

  7. Na+-independent D-glucose transport in rabbit renal basolateral membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, P.T.; Hammerman, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    To define the mechanism by which glucose is transported across the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell, we measured D-[14C]glucose uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles from rabbit kidney. Na+-dependent D-glucose transport, demonstrable in brush-border vesicles, could not be demonstrated in basolateral membrane vesicles. In the absence of Na+, the uptake of D-[14C]glucose in basolateral vesicles was more rapid than that of L-[3H]glucose over a concentration range of 1-50 mM. Subtraction of the latter from the former uptakes revealed a saturable process with apparent Km of 9.9 mM and Vmax of 0.80 nmol.mg protein-1.s-1. To characterize the transport component of D-glucose uptake in basolateral vesicles, we measured trans stimulation of 2 mM D-[14C]glucose entry in the absence of Na+. Trans stimulation could be effected by preloading basolateral vesicles with D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, or 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, but not with L-glucose or alpha-methyl-D-glucoside. Trans-stimulated D-[14C]glucose uptake was inhibited by 0.1 mM phloretin or cytochalasin B but not phlorizin. In contrast, Na+-dependent D-[14C]glucose transport in brush-border vesicles was inhibited by phlorizin but not phloretin or cytochalasin B. Our findings are consistent with the presence of a Na+-independent D-glucose transporter in the proximal tubular basolateral membrane with characteristics similar to those of transporters present in nonepithelial cells

  8. Transport of organic anions through the erythrocyte membrane as K+-valinomycin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Skarin, A; Whitman, P

    1978-04-26

    K+, Rb+, or Cs+ complexes of valinomycin form ion pair complexes with picric acid and trinitrobenzenesulfonate (TNBS). The formation of a picrate-K+-valinomycin complex is supported by spectral evidence. These complexes have zero net charge and readily permeate the intact erythrocyte membrane. The K+-valinomycin complex has been used to convert the nonpenetrating TNBS into a penetrating covalent probe, making it as useful vectorial probe to measure accessible amino groups of proteins and phospholipids on both sites of the erythrocyte membrane. The enhanced transport of TNBS into the cell by valinomycin is dependent on external K+ in the medium. The entry of TNBS into the cell is manifested by an increased labeling of hemoglobin and membrane phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Stilbeneisothiocyanatedisulfonate (SITS) and anilinonaphthalenesulfonate (ANS) inhibit both the basal and K+-valinomycin stimulated labeling of PE and hemoglobin by TNBS. The data suggest two independent effects of ANS and SITS, one mediated by an inhibition of the anion transport protein and another by the incorporation of these hydrobic anions into the cell membrane with an increase in negative charge on the membrane which leads to an inhibition of TNBS permeation into the cell by electrostatic repulsion.

  9. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M; Desai, Tejal A; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy. PMID:27009429

  10. Molecular mechanism of α-tocopheryl-phosphate transport across the cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negis, Yesim; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    α-Tocopheryl-phosphate (α-TP) is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues where it modulates several functions. α-TP is more potent than α-T in inhibiting cell proliferation, down-regulating CD36 transcription, inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation. Administration of α-TP to cells or animals requires its transfer through membranes, via a transporter. We show here that α-TP is passing the plasma membrane via a system that is inhibited by glibenclamide and probenecid, inhibitors of a number of transporters. Glibenclamide and probenecid prevent dose-dependently α-TP inhibition of cell proliferation. The two inhibitors act on ATP binding cassette (ABC) and organic anion transporters (OAT). Since ABC transporters function to export solutes and α-TP is transported into cells, it may be concluded that α-TP transport may occur via an OAT family member. Due to the protection by glibenclamide and probenecid on the α-TP induced cell growth inhibition it appears that α-TP acts after its uptake inside cells

  11. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  12. Transport of acidic amino acids by human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, V.M.; Harig, J.M.; Adams, M.B.; Ramaswamy, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the transport of radiolabeled acidic amino acids into brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from human jejunum. The uptakes of L-glutamic, L-aspartic, and D-aspartic acids were stimulated by a Na + gradient. Concentrative uptake (resulting in an overshoot phenomenon) of these dicarboxylic amino acids occurred when there was an outward K + gradient. In addition, increasing K + gradients resulted in enhanced uptake of L-glutamic acid. This K + requirement is somewhat specific as Rb + and Cs + could enhance uptake to a limited extent, whereas Li + and choline + showed no enhancement. The presence of a K + gradient did not affect the affinity of the carrier system for L-glutamic acid but it did increase the V/sub max/. The presence of extravesicular anions having differing membrane permeabilities did not altar L-glutamic acid uptake indicating an absence of an effect of membrane potential on the transport process. Finally, the human transport system for L-glutamic acid appears to be specific for acidic amino acids as demonstrated by inhibition studies. The studies demonstrate a transport system in human jejunum specific for acidic amino acids that is energized by an inward Na + gradient and an outward K + gradient

  13. Effect of Porosity and Concentration Polarization on Electrolyte Diffusive Transport Parameters through Ceramic Membranes with Similar Nanopore Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Romero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusive transport through nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs produced by the two-step anodization method, with similar pore size but different porosity, is studied by analyzing membrane potential measured with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Donnan exclusion of co-ions at the solution/membrane interface seem to exert a certain control on the diffusive transport of ions through NPAMs with low porosity, which might be reduced by coating the membrane surface with appropriated materials, as it is the case of SiO2. Our results also show the effect of concentration polarization at the membrane surface on ionic transport numbers (or diffusion coefficients for low-porosity and high electrolyte affinity membranes, which could mask values of those characteristic electrochemical parameters.

  14. Membrane depolarization regulates intracellular RANKL transport in non-excitable osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notomi, Takuya; Kuno, Miyuki; Hiyama, Akiko; Ezura, Yoichi; Honma, Masashi; Ishizuka, Toru; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Yawo, Hiromu; Noda, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3) are important factors in Ca(2+) homeostasis, and promote osteoclastogenesis by modulating receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression. However, their contribution to RANKL intracellular transport (RANKLiT), including the trigger for RANKL lysosomal vesicle (RANKL-lv) fusion to the cell membrane, is unclear. In neurons, depolarization of membrane potential increases the intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)]i) and promotes neurotransmitter release via fusion of the synaptic vesicles to the cell membrane. To determine whether membrane depolarization also regulates cellular processes such as RANKLiT in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts (OBs), we generated a light-sensitive OB cell line and developed a system for altering their membrane potential via delivery of a blue light stimulus. In the membrane fraction of RANKL-overexpressing OBs, PTH and VD3 increased the membrane-bound RANKL (mbRANKL) level at 10 min after application without affecting the mRNA expression level, and depolarized the cell membrane while transiently increasing [Ca(2+)]i. In our novel OB line stably expressing the channelrhodopsin-wide receiver, blue light-induced depolarization increased the mbRANKL level, which was reversed by treatment of blockers for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. In co-cultures of osteoclast precursor-like RAW264.7 cells and light-sensitive OBs overexpressing RANKL, light stimulation induced an increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and promoted osteoclast differentiation. These results indicate that depolarization of the cell membrane is a trigger for RANKL-lv fusion to the membrane and that membrane potential contributes to the function of OBs. In addition, the non-genomic action of VD3-induced RANKL-lv fusion included the membrane-bound VD3 receptor (1,25D3-MARRS receptor). Elucidating the mechanism of RANKLiT regulation

  15. Disassembly of the actin network inhibits insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and prevents recruitment of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1994-11-25

    In muscle and fat tissues, insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporter proteins from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation is unknown. We have examined the possible role of the actin microfilament network in the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin and on the distribution of glucose transporters, in differentiated L6 rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M for 30 min) caused a major reorganization of the actin network of differentiated L6 myotubes. Cytochalasin D, a widely used inhibitor of actin filament formation, caused a dose- and time-dependent disassembly of the actin network, which was associated with an 80% inhibition of the insulin stimulation of glucose transport, without affecting the basal rate of glucose uptake. L6 myotubes express three glucose transporter isoforms, named GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Disassembly of the actin network by cytochalasin D did not affect the number of basal glucose transporters in the plasma membrane but reduced the content of all three glucose transporters in intracellular membranes and prevented their appearance at the plasma membrane response to insulin. The inhibitory effect of cytochalasin D treatment on the insulin stimulation of glucose transport occurred downstream of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and of binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1. Using immunoprecipitation of intact membranes, we detected specific association of the actin-binding protein spectrin with GLUT4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles. We conclude that an intact actin network is required for the correct intracellular localization of glucose transporters, as well as for their incorporation into the plasma membrane in response to insulin. A direct interaction may exist between the actin network and the glucose transporter vesicles which may be mediated through a spectrin

  16. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  17. Enzymatic membranes for the selective transport of neutral molecules by electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Bernard; Couturier, Roger; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine; Maïsterrena, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The active and selective transport of glucose and glycerol was carried out using electrophoresis and artificial enzymatic membranes. These positively charged composite membranes carry, on the face adjacent to the donor compartment of an electrophoresis module, a specific kinase (hexokinase or glycerokinase) and, on the opposite face, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Phosphorylation of the neutral substrate (glucose or glycerol) on the donor side by the kinase generates a negatively charged phosphorylated substrate, whose transmembrane migration is promoted by an electric field and by the membrane's positive charge. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated substrate by ALP on the opposite face regenerates the neutral substrate, which accumulates in the receiver compartment of the electrophoresis module. Using an electrophoresis module specifically designed for this study, our experiments were carried out enabling glucose and glycerol to be concentrated approximately eight- and twelve-fold, respectively, in 8 h.

  18. Facilitated transport in hydroxide-exchange membranes for post-combustion CO2 separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Laj; Gu, Shuang; Jensen, Kurt O; Yan, Yushan S

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxide-exchange membranes are developed for facilitated transport CO2 in post-combustion flue-gas feed. First, a correlation between the basicity of fixed-site functional groups and CO2 -separation performance is discovered. This relationship is used to identify phosphonium as a promising candidate to achieve high CO2 -separation performance. Consequently, quaternary phosphonium-based hydroxide-exchange membranes are demonstrated to have a separation performance that is above the Robeson upper bound. Specifically, a CO2 permeability as high as 1090 Barrer and a CO2 /N2 selectivity as high as 275 is achieved. The high performance observed in the membranes can be attributed to the quaternary phosphonium moiety. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs

  20. Application of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia

    2018-02-23

    The rising demand for clean and safe water has increased the interest in advanced wastewater treatment and reuse. Reverse osmosis (RO) can provide reliable and high-quality water from treated wastewater. Biofouling inevitably occurs, certainly with wastewater effluents, resulting in RO performance decline and operational problems. Chlorination of feed water has been commonly applied to limit biological growth. However, chlorine use may lead to a loss of membrane integrity of RO systems. In this study the potential of monochloramine as an alternative for chlorine was studied by (i) evaluating the biological stability of a full-scale wastewater membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent during transport over 13 km to a full-scale RO plant and (ii) assessing the biofouling control potential in membrane fouling simulator (MFS) and pilot-scale RO installation. Microbial water analysis was performed on samples taken at several locations in the full-scale water reuse system (MBR effluent, during transport, and at the RO inlet and outlet) using a suite of tools including heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), flow cytometry (FCM), and 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Growth potential tests were used to evaluate the effect of monochloramine presence and absence on bacterial growth. Results showed limited changes in the microbial water quality in the presence of monochloramine. MFS studies showed that membrane biofouling could be effectively repressed by monochloramine over prolonged time periods. The normalized salt passage in a pilot RO system with monochloramine dosage was constant over a one year period (data of last 130 days presented), demonstrating that no membrane damage occurred. From this study, it can be concluded that monochloramine dosage in wastewater applications is effective in controlling biofouling in RO systems and maintaining a monochloramine residual during water transport provides biologically stable water.

  1. The molecular mechanism of Zinc acquisition by the neisserial outer-membrane transporter ZnuD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Ing, Christopher; Buckwalter, Carolyn M.; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chieh-Lin Lai, Christine; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Gray-Owen, Scott D.; Pomès, Régis; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2015-08-01

    Invading bacteria from the Neisseriaceae, Acinetobacteriaceae, Bordetellaceae and Moraxellaceae families express the conserved outer-membrane zinc transporter zinc-uptake component D (ZnuD) to overcome nutritional restriction imposed by the host organism during infection. Here we demonstrate that ZnuD is required for efficient systemic infections by the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, Neisseria meningitidis, in a mouse model. We also combine X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechanism of zinc recognition and transport across the bacterial outer-membrane by ZnuD. Because ZnuD is also considered a promising vaccine candidate against N. meningitidis, we use several ZnuD structural intermediates to map potential antigenic epitopes, and propose a mechanism by which ZnuD can maintain high sequence conservation yet avoid immune recognition by altering the conformation of surface-exposed loops.

  2. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Fischermeier, E. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Pospisil, P. [A.S.C. R., Prague (Czech Republic). J. Heyrovsky Inst. Physical Chemistry; Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-07-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P{sub 1B}-type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  3. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone)/KF electrolyte membranes for facilitated CO(2) transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Je Hyun; Kang, Yong Soo; Kang, Sang Wook

    2013-10-03

    In this study, we show for the first time that potassium fluoride (KF) can be utilized as a carrier for facilitated CO2 transport. A polymer electrolyte membrane was prepared by incorporating KF through coordinate covalent bonding with the amide groups of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The resulting PVP/KF electrolyte membrane showed enhanced CO2 separation performance compared with neat PVP. The selectivity ratio CO2/N2 increased to 4.1 with a CO2 permeance of 28 GPU. This enhanced separation performance was attributable to the reversible interaction of KF with CO2 molecules, resulting in the increase of CO2 transport. The interaction between KF and the amide groups of PVP was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The coordination of potassium ions with the amide groups caused the free ions in KF to be increased, resulting in the favorable interaction with CO2 molecules.

  4. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, Karim; Pospisil, P.; Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-01-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P 1B -type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  5. CFTR in cystic fibrosis and cholera: from membrane transport to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E; Percy, William H

    2005-06-01

    We have used a brief analysis of transport via cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulators (CFTRs) in various organ systems to highlight the importance of basic membrane transport processes across epithelial cells for first-year medical students in physiology. Because CFTRs are involved in transport both physiologically and pathologically in various systems, we have used this clinical correlation to analyze how a defective gene leading to defective transport proteins can be directly involved in the symptoms of cholera and CF. This article is a "Staying Current" approach to transport via CFTRs including numerous helpful references with further information for a teaching faculty member. The article follows our normal presentation which begins with a discussion of the involvement of CFTR transport in the intestine and how cholera affects intestinal transport, extends to CFTR transport in various organ systems in CF, and concludes with the logic behind many of the treatments that improve CF. Student learning objectives are included to assist in assessment of student understanding of the basic concepts.

  6. FINAL REPORT:Observation and Simulations of Transport of Molecules and Ions Across Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MURAD, SOHAIL [University of Illinois at Chicago; JAMESON, CYNTHIA J [University of Illinois at Chicago

    2013-10-22

    During the this new grant we developed a robust methodology for investigating a wide range of properties of phospho-lipid bilayers. The approach developed is unique because despite using periodic boundary conditions, we can simulate an entire experiment or process in detail. For example, we can follow the entire permeation process in a lipid-membrane. This includes transport from the bulk aqueous phase to the lipid surface; permeation into the lipid; transport inside the lipid; and transport out of the lipid to the bulk aqueous phase again. We studied the transport of small gases in both the lipid itself and in model protein channels. In addition, we have examined the transport of nanocrystals through the lipid membrane, with the main goal of understanding the mechanical behavior of lipids under stress including water and ion leakage and lipid flip flop. Finally we have also examined in detail the deformation of lipids when under the influence of external fields, both mechanical and electrostatic (currently in progress). The important observations and conclusions from our studies are described in the main text of the report

  7. Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

  8. Modeling of water transport through the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.

    In this work, a one-dimensional, isothermal two-phase mass transport model is developed to investigate the water transport through the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The liquid (methanol-water solution) and gas (carbon dioxide gas, methanol vapor and water vapor) two-phase mass transport in the porous anode and cathode is formulated based on classical multiphase flow theory in porous media. In the anode and cathode catalyst layers, the simultaneous three-phase (liquid and vapor in pores as well as dissolved phase in the electrolyte) water transport is considered and the phase exchange of water is modeled with finite-rate interfacial exchanges between different phases. This model enables quantification of the water flux corresponding to each of the three water transport mechanisms through the membrane for DMFCs, such as diffusion, electro-osmotic drag, and convection. Hence, with this model, the effects of MEA design parameters on water crossover and cell performance under various operating conditions can be numerically investigated.

  9. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  10. Gas Phase Transport, Adsorption and Surface Diffusion in Porous Glass Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, J.; Čermáková, Jiřina; Uchytil, Petr; Hamel, Ch.; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 104, 2-4 (2005), s. 344-351 ISSN 0920-5861. [International Conference on Catalysis in Membrane Reactors /6./. Lahnstein, 06.07.2004-09.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas phase transport * vycor glass * adsorption Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.365, year: 2005

  11. Relationships between membrane lipids and ion transport in red blood cells of Dahl rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokurková, Martina; Nováková, O.; Dobešová, Zdenka; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 13 (2005), s. 1452-1464 ISSN 0024-3205 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/03/0769; GA MZd(CZ) NR7786; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ion transport * membrane lipids * red blood cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.512, year: 2005

  12. Characterization of cadmium plasma membrane transport in gills of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, P.; Custódio, M.R. [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Zanotto, F.P., E-mail: fzanotto@usp.br [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Três de Maio 100, São Paulo 04044-020 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd{sup 2+} gill cell transport, a non-essential toxic metal, was characterized in a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. • Cd{sup 2+} enter gill cells through Ca{sup 2+} channels and is dependent of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. • Route of entry in gill cells also involves a Cd{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} (2Na) exchanger. • Cd transport depends on Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and gill cell electrochemical gradient. • Vanadate inhibits gill Cd{sup 2+} transport and ouabain increase gill Cd{sup 2+} transport. - Abstract: Membrane pathway for intracellular cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) accumulation is not fully elucidated in many organisms and has not been studied in crab gill cells. To characterize membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport of anterior and posterior gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a hypo-hyper-regulating crab, a change in intracellular Cd{sup 2+} concentration under various experimental conditions was examined by using FluoZin, a fluorescent probe. The membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport was estimated by the augmentation of FluoZin fluorescence induced by extracellular application of CdCl{sub 2} and different inhibitors. Addition of extracellular calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) to the cells affected little the fluorescence of FluoZin, confirming that Cd{sup 2+} was the main ion increasing intracellular fluorescence. Ca{sup 2+} channels blockers (nimodipine and verapamil) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx as well as vanadate, a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase blocker. Chelating intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (BAPTA) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx in gill cells, while increasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (caffeine) augmented Cd influx. Cd{sup 2+} and ATP added at different temporal conditions were not effective at increasing intracellular Cd{sup 2+} accumulation. Ouabain (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor) increased Cd{sup 2+} influx probably through a change in intracellular Na and/or a change in cell membrane potential. Routes of Cd{sup 2+} influx, a non-essential metal, through the

  13. Enquiry into the Topology of Plasma Membrane-Localized PIN Auxin Transport Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodzyński, Tomasz; Vanneste, Steffen; Zwiewka, Marta; Pernisová, Markéta; Hejátko, Jan; Friml, Jiří

    2016-11-07

    Auxin directs plant ontogenesis via differential accumulation within tissues depending largely on the activity of PIN proteins that mediate auxin efflux from cells and its directional cell-to-cell transport. Regardless of the developmental importance of PINs, the structure of these transporters is poorly characterized. Here, we present experimental data concerning protein topology of plasma membrane-localized PINs. Utilizing approaches based on pH-dependent quenching of fluorescent reporters combined with immunolocalization techniques, we mapped the membrane topology of PINs and further cross-validated our results using available topology modeling software. We delineated the topology of PIN1 with two transmembrane (TM) bundles of five α-helices linked by a large intracellular loop and a C-terminus positioned outside the cytoplasm. Using constraints derived from our experimental data, we also provide an updated position of helical regions generating a verisimilitude model of PIN1. Since the canonical long PINs show a high degree of conservation in TM domains and auxin transport capacity has been demonstrated for Arabidopsis representatives of this group, this empirically enhanced topological model of PIN1 will be an important starting point for further studies on PIN structure-function relationships. In addition, we have established protocols that can be used to probe the topology of other plasma membrane proteins in plants. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of Western blotting analysis for the isolation and detection of membrane xenobiotic transporter ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygieł, Małgorzata; Markiewicz, Marcin; Szafraniec, Milena; Zuziak, Roxana; Urbańska, Krystyna; Fiedor, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    All organisms are exposed to numerous stress factors, which include harmful xenobiotics. The diversity of these compounds is enormous, thus in the course of evolution diverse biological defense mechanisms at various levels of organization have developed. One of them engages an evolutionarily conserved family of transporters from the ABC superfamily, found in most species - from bacteria to humans. An important example of such a transporter is the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), a typical integral membrane protein. It plays a key role in the absorption, distribution and elimination of a wide variety of xenobiotics, including drugs used in chemotherapy, and is involved in multidrug resistance. It also protects against phototoxic chlorophyll derivatives of dietary origin. BCRP is a hemitransporter which consists of one transmembrane domain, made of six alpha-helices forming a characteristic pore structure, and one ATP-binding domain, which provides the energy from ATP hydrolysis, required for active transport of the substrates. The isolation of BCRP is still not an easy task, because its insolubility in water and the presence of membrane rafts pose serious methodological and technical challenges during the purification. The aim of this study was to optimize the methods for detection and isolation of BCRP-enriched fractions obtained from animal tissue samples. In this report we describe an optimization of isolation of a BCRP-enriched membrane fraction, which is suitable for further protein quantitative and qualitative analysis using the molecular biology tools.

  15. Computational Approaches for Revealing the Structure of Membrane Transporters: Case Study on Bilitranslocase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Venko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional details of transmembrane proteins are vastly underexplored, mostly due to experimental difficulties regarding their solubility and stability. Currently, the majority of transmembrane protein structures are still unknown and this present a huge experimental and computational challenge. Nowadays, thanks to X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy over 3000 structures of membrane proteins have been solved, among them only a few hundred unique ones. Due to the vast biological and pharmaceutical interest in the elucidation of the structure and the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins, several computational methods have been developed to overcome the experimental gap. If combined with experimental data the computational information enables rapid, low cost and successful predictions of the molecular structure of unsolved proteins. The reliability of the predictions depends on the availability and accuracy of experimental data associated with structural information. In this review, the following methods are proposed for in silico structure elucidation: sequence-dependent predictions of transmembrane regions, predictions of transmembrane helix–helix interactions, helix arrangements in membrane models, and testing their stability with molecular dynamics simulations. We also demonstrate the usage of the computational methods listed above by proposing a model for the molecular structure of the transmembrane protein bilitranslocase. Bilitranslocase is bilirubin membrane transporter, which shares similar tissue distribution and functional properties with some of the members of the Organic Anion Transporter family and is the only member classified in the Bilirubin Transporter Family. Regarding its unique properties, bilitranslocase is a potentially interesting drug target.

  16. Steric exclusion and protein conformation determine the localization of plasma membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Frans; Syga, Łukasz; Moiset, Gemma; Spakman, Dian; Schavemaker, Paul E; Punter, Christiaan M; Seinen, Anne-Bart; van Oijen, Antoine M; Robinson, Andrew; Poolman, Bert

    2018-02-05

    The plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains membrane compartments, MCC/eisosomes and MCPs, named after the protein residents Can1 and Pma1, respectively. Using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques we show that Can1 and the homologous transporter Lyp1 are able to diffuse into the MCC/eisosomes, where a limited number of proteins are conditionally trapped at the (outer) edge of the compartment. Upon addition of substrate, the immobilized proteins diffuse away from the MCC/eisosomes, presumably after taking a different conformation in the substrate-bound state. Our data indicate that the mobile fraction of all integral plasma membrane proteins tested shows extremely slow Brownian diffusion through most of the PM. We also show that proteins with large cytoplasmic domains, such as Pma1 and synthetic chimera of Can1 and Lyp1, are excluded from the MCC/eisosomes. We hypothesize that the distinct localization patterns found for these integral membrane proteins in S. cerevisiae arises from a combination of slow lateral diffusion, steric exclusion, and conditional trapping in membrane compartments.

  17. Theory of Ion and Water Transport in Reverse-Osmosis Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Y. S.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a theory for ion and water transport through reverse-osmosis (RO) membranes based on a Maxwell-Stefan framework combined with hydrodynamic theory for the reduced motion of particles in thin pores. We take into account all driving forces and frictions both on the fluid (water) and on the ions including ion-fluid friction and ion-wall friction. By including the acid-base characteristic of the carbonic acid system, the boric acid system, H3O+/OH- , and the membrane charge, we locally determine p H , the effective charge of the membrane, and the dissociation degree of carbonic acid and boric acid. We present calculation results for an experiment with fixed feed concentration, where effluent composition is a self-consistent function of fluxes through the membrane. A comparison with experimental results from literature for fluid flow vs pressure, and for salt and boron rejection, shows that our theory agrees very well with the available data. Our model is based on realistic assumptions for the effective size of the ions and makes use of a typical pore size of a commercial RO membrane.

  18. Exploiting nanotechnologies and TRPV1 channels to investigate the putative anandamide membrane transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Ligresti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable efforts have been made to characterize the pathways regulating the extracellular levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide. However, none of such pathways has been so argued as the existence of a carrier-mediated transport of anandamide across the membrane. Apart from the lack of molecular evidence for such a carrier, the main reasons of this controversy lie in the methodologies currently used to study anandamide cellular uptake. Furthermore, the main evidence in favor of the existence of an "anandamide transporter" relies on synthetic inhibitors of this process, the selectivity of which has been questioned.We used the cytosolic binding site for anandamide on TRPV1 channels as a biosensor to detect anandamide entry into cells, and exploited nanotechnologies to study anandamide membrane transport into intact TRPV1-overexpressing HEK-293 cells. Both fluorescence and digital holographic (DH quantitative phase microscopy were used to study TRPV1 activation. Poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanoparticles (PCL-NPs were used to incorporate anandamide, which could thus enter the cell and activate TRPV1 channels bypassing any possible specific protein(s involved in the uptake process. We reasoned that in the absence of such protein(s, pharmacological tools previously shown to inhibit the "anandamide transporter" would affect in the same way the uptake of anandamide and PCL-NP-anandamide, and hence the activation of TRPV1. However, when masked into PCL-NPs, anandamide cellular uptake became much less sensitive to these agents, although it maintained the same pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics as that of "free" anandamide.We found here that several agents previously reported to inhibit anandamide cellular uptake lose their efficacy when anandamide is prevented from interacting directly with plasma membrane proteins, thus arguing in favor of the specificity of such agents for the putative "anandamide transporter", and of the existence of such

  19. Acid-extrusion from tissue: the interplay between membrane transporters and pH buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Harris, Adrian L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Swietach, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    The acid-base balance of cells is related to the concentration of free H⁺ ions. These are highly reactive, and their intracellular concentration must be regulated to avoid detrimental effects to the cell. H⁺ ion dynamics are influenced by binding to chelator substances ('buffering'), and by the production, diffusion and membrane-transport of free H⁺ ions or of the H⁺-bound chelators. Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation aims to balance this system of diffusion-reaction-transport processes at a favourable steady-state pHi. The ability of cells to regulate pHi may set a limit to tissue growth and can be subject to selection pressures. Cancer cells have been postulated to respond favourably to such selection pressures by evolving a better means of pHi regulation. A particularly important feature of tumour pHi regulation is acid-extrusion, which involves H⁺-extrusion and HCO₃⁻-uptake by membrane-bound transporter-proteins. Extracellular CO₂/HCO₃⁻ buffer facilitates these membrane-transport processes. As a mobile pH-buffer, CO₂/HCO₃⁻ protects the extracellular space from excessive acidification that could otherwise inhibit further acid-extrusion. CO₂/HCO₃⁻ also provides substrate for HCO₃⁻-transporters. However, the inherently slow reaction kinetics of CO₂/HCO₃⁻ can be rate-limiting for acid-extrusion. To circumvent this, cells can express extracellular-facing carbonic anhydrase enzymes to accelerate the attainment of equilibrium between CO₂, HCO₃⁻ and H⁺. The acid-extrusion apparatus has been proposed as a target for anti-cancer therapy. The major targets include H⁺ pumps, Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers and carbonic anhydrases. The effectiveness of such therapy will depend on the correct identification of rate-limiting steps in pHi regulation in a specific type of cancer.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes with controlled ion transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui

    2011-12-01

    Ion-containing block copolymers hold promise as next-generation polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) materials due to their capability to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures facilitating proton transport over a wide range of conditions. Ion-containing block copolymers, sulfonated poly(styrene- b-vinylidene fluoride-b-styrene), with varied degrees of sulfonation were synthesized. The synthetic strategy involved a new approach to chain-end functionalized poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a macro-initiator followed by atom transfer polymerization of styrene and sulfonation. Characterization of the polymers were extensively carried out by 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance and Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry analysis. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to study the phase separation and self-assembled morphology. Strong dependence of ion exchange capacity, water absorption, morphology and proton conductivity on the degree of sulfonation has been found. It has been observed that the conductivities of the block copolymers are considerably higher than the random copolymers of polystyrene and sulfonated polystyrene possessing similar ion exchange capacities. Copolymers of vinylidene fluoride and perfluoro(4-methyl-3,6-dioxane-7-ene) sulfonyl fluoride containing amino end-groups were synthesized for the first time. The prepared aminoterminated polymers underwent cross-linking reactions with 1,3,5-benzene triisocyanate to form proton conductive networks. The chain-end crosslinked fluoropolymer membranes exhibited excellent thermal, hydrolytic and oxidative stabilities. The ion exchange capacity, water uptake, the state of absorbed water, and transport properties of the membranes were found to be highly dependent upon the chemical composition of the copolymers. The cross-linked membranes showed extremely low methanol permeability, while maintaining high proton

  1. Characterization of transport phenomena in small polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanen, O.P.

    2008-07-01

    In small fuel cell systems, energy consumption and size of auxiliary devices should be minimized. One option is to use passive controlling methods that rely on material and structural solutions. Therefore it is important to understand transport phenomena occurring in the cells. In this thesis, charge, mass, and heat transport phenomena related to small PEMFCs were studied experimentally and by modeling. A new method was developed for the characterization of water transport properties of polymer electrolyte membrane under realistic operating conditions. The method was used to evaluate the diffusion coefficient of water in the membrane. Due to channelrib structure, cell components are inhomogeneously compressed. Charge and mass transport parameters were experimentally evaluated as a function of compression. The effect of inhomogeneous compression on cell operation was studied by modeling. Inhomogeneous compression does not significantly affect the polarization behavior of the cell, but it creates uneven current and temperature distributions inside the cell. This affects both cell performance and lifetime and should not be ignored in cell design and modeling. The operation of a freebreathing PEMFC was studied at subzero temperatures. To be able to operate at low temperatures, current density must be high enough to avoid freezing of reactant product water inside the cell. Startup at cold temperatures requires active heating. To maximize fuel efficiency, the operation of a freebreathing PEMFC in dead end mode was investigated. Dead ended operation with periodic purging enables high fuel utilization rate and the test cell operated without significant water management problems or performance loss. (orig.)

  2. Study of saturated hydrocarbons transport through MFI zeolitic membranes; Etude du transport d`hydrocarbures satures dans des membranes zeolithiques de structure MFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millot, B.

    1998-12-22

    The main goal of this work was to characterize and model alkanes transport through (MFI) zeolitic membranes. This work was divided in two steps. First, a characterization of alkanes sorption equilibria in MFI type zeolite was necessary. The measurements of sorption isotherms and Temperature Programmed Desorption allowed us to deduce: capacity of absorption, variations of the sorption isosteric enthalpy and entropy. A model using two different types of sorption sites in the zeolite was used to explain the presence of several interaction types between molecules and zeolite. The model showed the importance of entropy on the localization of the molecules in the zeolitic channels. Moreover, we studied the permeation of alkanes in zeolitic membranes. The results showed promising properties for the separation of linear and branched alkanes. Even if the behavior is very intricate, the use of the Generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations gave an access to the diffusivities of the linear and mono-branched alkanes. The preliminary modeling of the permeation mixtures results was also obtained. (author) 280 refs.

  3. Enhanced Transport of U(Vi) and Th(IV) Through Cation Exchange Membrane Using Electric Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, E.E.; Aly, H.F.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of ionic species through ion exchange membrane found several applications for water effluents purification and metal ion separation. To enhance the transport performance, the effect of electric field was introduced in this work. The transport of U (Vi) and Th(IV) species in nitric acid solutions across cation exchange membrane was investigated. In this concern, different parameters affecting the transport were studied. These parameters include; nitric acid concentration in the feed solution, stripping solution concentration and applied electric field. From the results obtained the permeability coefficient of U(Vi) and Th(IV) were calculated. Based on these information, a process for separation of thorium from uranium is developed

  4. Effect of Probenecid on Tetraethyl Ammonium (TEA) Transport Across Basolateral Membrane of Rabbit Proximal Tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae Lyong; Kim, Yong Keun

    1992-01-01

    The effect of probenecid on the transport of tetraethylammonium (TEA) was investigated in rabbit reanal cortical slices in an attempt to ascertain the interaction of organic anion with the organic cation transport system in proximal tubule. Probenecid reversibly inhibited TEA uptake by cortical slices in a dose-dependent manner over the concentration range of 1 and 5 mM. The efflux of TEA was not affected by the presence of 3 mM probenecid. Kinetic analysis indicated that probenecid decreased Vmax without a significant change in Km. Probenecid inhibited significantly tissue oxgen consumption at concentrations of 3 and 5 mM. However, probenecid did not significantly reduce TEA uptake in brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles prepared from renal cortex even at higher concentration of 10 mM. These results indicate that probenecid reduces TEA uptake in cortical slices by inhibiting the tissue metabolism rather than by the interaction with the organic cation transporter. PMID:1306074

  5. Lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and transport at the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandeo, Paola; Martorana, Alessandra M; Polissi, Alessandra

    2017-11-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer containing a unique glycolipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in its outer leaflet. LPS molecules confer to the OM peculiar permeability barrier properties enabling Gram-negative bacteria to exclude many toxic compounds, including clinically useful antibiotics, and to survive harsh environments. Transport of LPS poses several problems to the cells due to the amphipatic nature of this molecule. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the LPS transport machinery, discuss the challenges associated with this process and present the solutions that bacterial cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS transport and assembly at the cell surface. Finally, we discuss how knowledge on LPS biogenesis can be translated for the development of novel antimicrobial therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Transport of uranium (VI) through a supported liquid membrane containing LIX 63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, K.; Kanno, T.

    1983-01-01

    The carrier transport of U(VI) has been studied by means of the liquid membrane of LIX 63 (HR) held on a porous support. U was effectively transported from the dilute feed solution (pH = 4-5) to the product solution of 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 . Its concentration in the feed decreased according to [U]/sub f,t/ = [U]/sub f,0/ exp (-k/sub obs/t). The apparent rate constant (k/sub obs/) increased with an increase in carrier concentration up to 0.05 M, but it became nearly constant in the range of [HR] = 0.05-0.2 M. The rate of transport was inversely proportional to the feed volume. More than 99% of U was recovered and the final concentration ratio in the product to the feed ([U]/sub p//[U]/sub f/) exceeded 10 3 . 7 figures, 2 tables

  7. Interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous-phase fuel conversion on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-02-01

    The interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous fuel oxidation reactions on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane (ITM) are examined using a comprehensive model, which couples the dependency of the oxygen permeation rate on the membrane surface conditions and detailed chemistry and transport in the vicinity of the membrane. We assume that the membrane surface is not catalytic to hydrocarbon or syngas oxidation. Results show that increasing the sweep gas inlet temperature and fuel concentration enhances oxygen permeation substantially. This is accomplished through promoting oxidation reactions (oxygen consumption) and the transport of the products and reaction heat towards the membrane, which lowers the oxygen concentration and increases the gas temperature near the membrane. Faster reactions at higher fuel concentration and higher inlet gas temperature support substantial fuel conversion and lead to a higher oxygen permeation flux without the contribution of surface catalytic activity. Beyond a certain maximum in the fuel concentration, extensive heat loss to the membrane (and feed side) reduces the oxidation kinetic rates and limits oxygen permeation as the reaction front reaches the membrane. The sweep gas flow rate and channel height have moderate impacts on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion due to the residence time requirements for the chemical reactions and the location of the reaction zone relative to the membrane surface. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Voltage-Gated Transport of Nanoparticles across Free-Standing All-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Hollow-Fiber Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gaoliang; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Fan, Xinfei; Yu, Hongtao; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the mechanism underlying controllable transmembrane transport observed in biological membranes benefits the development of next-generation separation membranes for a variety of important applications. In this work, on the basis of common structural features of cell membranes, a very simple biomimetic membrane system exhibiting gated transmembrane performance has been constructed using all-carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based hollow-fiber membranes. The conductive CNT membranes with hydrophobic pore channels can be positively or negatively charged and are consequently capable of regulating the transport of nanoparticles across their pore channels by their "opening" or "closing". The switch between penetration and rejection of nanoparticles through/by CNT membranes is of high efficiency and especially allows dynamic control. The underlying mechanism is that CNT pore channels with different polarities can prompt or prevent the formation of their noncovalent interactions with charged nanoparticles, resulting in their rejection or penetration by/through the CNT membranes. The theory about noncovalent interactions and charged pore channels may provide new insight into understanding the complicated ionically and bimolecularly gated transport across cell membranes and can contribute to many other important applications beyond the water purification and resource recovery demonstrated in this study.

  9. New separation process of the propane/propylene stream using facilitated transport membranes; Novo processo de separacao da corrente propano/propeno usando membranas de transporte facilitado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, Liliane Damaris; Habert, Alberto Claudio; Borges, Cristiano Piacsek [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica. Centro de Tecnologia], e-mails: lpollo@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, habert@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, cristiano@peq.coppe.ufrj.br

    2010-04-15

    Propylene separation from the propane/propylene mixture is of great interest to the petrochemical industry. This arises from the high value of this product, which is used to manufacture several polymers and composites, especially polypropylene. Currently, the most frequently used separation process is distillation, which consumes large amounts of energy, mainly due to the similar properties of these gases. Therefore, the separation processes by facilitated transport membranes (FTM) seems to be an efficient alternative, as the gas separation occurs without a phase change, significantly reducing energy consumption. The FTM contain carriers that promote the specific transport of olefins through the membrane. Since this is a new technology, the use of suitable carrier agents presents a wide research field. The aim of this study is to synthesize and characterize polymeric membranes containing different carrier agents to separate the propane/propylene mixture. Polymeric membranes based on polyurethane containing silver salts (AgCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} and AgSbF{sub 6}) and copper salts (CuCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}) as carriers were synthesized. The membranes were characterized by different techniques and the results showed that the membranes containing silver salts exhibited the best efficiency to separate the propane/propylene mixture. The ideal selectivity of the membrane containing 20% w/w AgCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}, was five times higher than the selectivity of the membrane without the carrier agent, confirming the facilitated transport behavior. (author)

  10. Stress regulated members of the plant organic cation transporter family are localized to the vacuolar membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis six genes group into the gene family of the organic cation transporters (OCTs. In animals the members of the OCT-family are mostly characterized as polyspecific transporters involved in the homeostasis of solutes, the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters and the transport of choline and carnitine. In plants little is known about function, localisation and regulation of this gene family. Only one protein has been characterized as a carnitine transporter at the plasma membrane so far. Findings We localized the five uncharacterized members of the Arabidopsis OCT family, designated OCT2-OCT6, via GFP fusions and protoplast transformation to the tonoplast. Expression analysis with RNA Gel Blots showed a distinct, organ-specific expression pattern of the individual genes. With reporter gene fusion of four members we analyzed the tissue specific distribution of OCT2, 3, 4, and 6. In experiments with salt, drought and cold stress, we could show that AtOCT4, 5 and 6 are up-regulated during drought stress, AtOCT3 and 5 during cold stress and AtOCT 5 and 6 during salt stress treatments. Conclusion Localisation of the proteins at the tonoplast and regulation of the gene expression under stress conditions suggests a specific role for the transporters in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  11. Transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells via voltage loss breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Sarah; Dhanushkodi, Shankar R.; Mérida, Walter

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a voltage loss breakdown method based on in-situ experimental data to systematically analyze the different overpotentials of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. This study includes a systematic breakdown of the anodic overpotentials via the use of a reference electrode system. This work demonstrates the de-convolution of the individual overpotentials for both anode and cathode side, including the distinction between mass-transport overpotentials in cathode porous transport layer (PTL) and electrode, based on in-situ polarization tests under different operating conditions. This method is used to study the relationship between mass-transport losses inside the cathode catalyst layer (CL) and the PTL for both a single layer and two-layer PTL configuration. We conclude that the micro-porous layer (MPL) significantly improves the water removal within the cell, especially inside the cathode electrode, and therefore the mass transport within the cathode CL. This study supports the theory that the MPL on the cathode leads to an increase in water permeation from cathode to anode due to its function as a capillary barrier. This is reflected in increased anodic mass-transport overpotential, decreased ohmic losses and decreased cathode mass-transport losses, especially in the cathode electrode.

  12. Issues to resolve with the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during interfacility transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgueño, P; González, C; Sarralde, A; Gordo, F

    2018-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support is indicated in patients who are refractory to treatment, those with cardiogenic shock or respiratory failure and those with exacerbations eligible for heart and lung transplantation. Physician experience and quantity of necessary resources are reasons why regionalization could benefit patients of this kind, establishing ECMO reference centers and integrating a transportation network specialized in ECMO. This type of transportation is a challenge for healthcare systems and physicians, given its greater complexity, requiring a multidisciplinary and inter-territorial approach. ECMO transportation is safer than without mechanical support, though there are currently no criteria for starting such therapy in patients being transferred. Criteria of lesser severity might be necessary for these patients. The training and specialization of the team in extracorporeal support therapies, interfacility transport and the systemization of transfer can improve the outcomes. There are no studies on the conditions that must be met by the transportation media, although space and stability are important characteristics. Air transfer with ECMO is an increasingly frequent option. Although there are data on its safety, there are none on the physiology of patients undergoing ECMO at high altitudes. Such information could be of help in the indication and management of this type of transportation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Coarse-grained model of nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton transport in Nafion membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Mao, Runfang; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model of the acid form of Nafion membrane that explicitly includes proton transport. This model is based on a soft-core bead representation of the polymer implemented into the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation framework. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with water beads. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss hopping mechanism of proton transport. The proposed DPD model is parameterized to account for the specifics of the conformations and flexibility of the Nafion backbone and sidechains; it treats electrostatic interactions in the smeared charge approximation. The simulation results qualitatively, and in many respects quantitatively, predict the specifics of nanoscale segregation in the hydrated Nafion membrane into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from a collection of isolated water clusters to a 3D network of pores filled with water embedded in the hydrophobic matrix. The segregated morphology is characterized in terms of the pore size distribution with the average size growing with hydration from ˜1 to ˜4 nm. Comparison of the predicted water diffusivity with the experimental data taken from different sources shows good agreement at high and moderate hydration and substantial deviation at low hydration, around and below the percolation threshold. This discrepancy is attributed to the dynamic percolation effects of formation and rupture of merging bridges between the water clusters, which become progressively important at low hydration, when the coarse-grained model is unable to mimic the fine structure of water network that includes singe molecule bridges. Selected simulations of water diffusion are performed for the alkali metal substituted membrane which demonstrate the effects of the counter-ions on

  14. Determination of membrane behaviour during transport of pollutants n clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, M.; Pejon, O.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in clay barriers had a extensive development in environmental geotechnics. The most studied transport processes are solutes by advection - dispersion and diffusion generated by hydraulic and chemical gradients respectively. Greater attention should be given to the chemical - osmotic flow and behavior membrane clay barriers, since in one case the water molecules move through the existence of a chemical gradient and on the other the means totally or partially inhibits the passage of solutes. The team developed to measure these processes was constructed based on items international literature and performance was verified using two types of materials KCl solution . One material is a bentonite geocomposite (Geosynthetic Clay Liner GCL ) similar to that used by other researchers. The other material is a soil barrier compacted clay (Compacted Clay Liner CCL) Fm. Corumbataí (Permian), belonging to the Paraná basin in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil . The results show the proper performance of the equipment built . Osmotic pressure generation and membrane performance was verified for both samples. Further corroborated influence of the type of clay mineral in the osmotic pressure generated value and membrane behavior

  15. Role of Membrane Lipids in the Regulation of Erythrocytic Oxygen-Transport Function in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revin, Victor V; Gromova, Natalia V; Revina, Elvira S; Martynova, Maria I; Seikina, Angelina I; Revina, Nadezhda V; Imarova, Oksana G; Solomadin, Ilia N; Tychkov, Alexander Yu; Zhelev, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The composition and condition of membrane lipids, the morphology of erythrocytes, and hemoglobin distribution were explored with the help of laser interference microscopy (LIM) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have significant changes in the composition of their phospholipids and the fatty acids of membrane lipids. Furthermore, the microviscosity of the membranes and morphology of the erythrocytes are altered causing disordered oxygen transport by hemoglobin. Basic therapy carried out with the use of antiaggregants, statins, antianginals, beta-blockers, and calcium antagonists does not help to recover the morphofunctional properties of erythrocytes. Based on the results the authors assume that, for the relief of the ischemic crisis and further therapeutic treatment, it is necessary to include, in addition to cardiovascular disease medicines, medication that increases the ability of erythrocytes' hemoglobin to transport oxygen to the tissues. We assume that the use of LIM and Raman spectroscopy is advisable for early diagnosis of changes in the structure and functional state of erythrocytes when cardiovascular diseases develop.

  16. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  17. Time-correlated transport of potassium ions through a thin poly-p-xylylene membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeck, Konstanze; Schulze, Susanne; Schlemmer, Andreas; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2010-01-01

    The transport of potassium ions through a 1 μm thick free-standing membrane of poly-para-xylylene (PPX) has been investigated under high vacuum conditions as a function of the impact energy of the potassium ions impinging onto the membrane. The experiment employs a c.w. potassium ion beam generated by thermionic emission from heated synthetic Leucite. Ions transmitted through the membrane are detected by a pair of microchannel plates detecting single particles. The analysis of the pulse-pair correlation function of successive ion detection events reveals a sharp drop in the width of the probability distribution between impact energies of 1300 and 1400 V. The maximum probability of the smallest waiting times exhibits a complementary increase. These variations are interpreted as an indication of a change in the underlying transport mechanism, most likely connected to a local electrical breakdown induced by pronounced space charge zones as a consequence of the ion bombardment. An upper limit for the relevant surface potential is discussed.

  18. Role of Membrane Lipids in the Regulation of Erythrocytic Oxygen-Transport Function in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor V. Revin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition and condition of membrane lipids, the morphology of erythrocytes, and hemoglobin distribution were explored with the help of laser interference microscopy (LIM and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD have significant changes in the composition of their phospholipids and the fatty acids of membrane lipids. Furthermore, the microviscosity of the membranes and morphology of the erythrocytes are altered causing disordered oxygen transport by hemoglobin. Basic therapy carried out with the use of antiaggregants, statins, antianginals, beta-blockers, and calcium antagonists does not help to recover the morphofunctional properties of erythrocytes. Based on the results the authors assume that, for the relief of the ischemic crisis and further therapeutic treatment, it is necessary to include, in addition to cardiovascular disease medicines, medication that increases the ability of erythrocytes’ hemoglobin to transport oxygen to the tissues. We assume that the use of LIM and Raman spectroscopy is advisable for early diagnosis of changes in the structure and functional state of erythrocytes when cardiovascular diseases develop.

  19. The product of the ABC half-transporter gene ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) is expressed in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocchi, E; Khodjakov, A; Volk, E L

    2000-01-01

    The products of the ABC gene family can be generally classified as either full-transporters of half-transporters. Full-transporters are expressed in the plasma membrane, whereas half-transporters are usually found in intracellular membranes. Recently, an ABC half-transporter, the ABCG2 gene product...... by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. This protein is highly overexpressed in several drug-resistant cell lines and localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane, instead of to intracellular membranes as seen with all other known half-transporters. Therefore, BCRP/MXR is unique among the ABC half...

  20. Molecular structure and transport dynamics in Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.Y.; Chiu, C.P.; Hong, C.W. [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kwang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013 (China)

    2009-12-01

    An atomistic simulation technique is performed to investigate the molecular structure and transport dynamics inside a hydrated Nafion membrane and a hydrated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) (SPEEKK) membrane. The simulation system consists of the representative fragments of the polymer electrolytes, hydronium ions and solvent molecules, such as water plus methanol molecules. Simulation results show that the hydrated SPEEKK has less phase separation among hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in comparison with the Nafion. Those water channels formed in the SPEEKK are much narrower compared to those in the Nafion. These characteristics lead to a lower mobility of hydronium ions and water molecules and hence relatively lower diffusion coefficient of methanol in the SPEEKK. It results in the reduction of the methanol permeation problem in direct methanol fuel cells. (author)

  1. Trafficking Ion Transporters to the Apical Membrane of Polarized Intestinal Enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engevik, Amy Christine; Goldenring, James R

    2018-01-02

    Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract require distinct apical and basolateral domains to function properly. Trafficking and insertion of enzymes and transporters into the apical brush border of intestinal epithelial cells is essential for effective digestion and absorption of nutrients. Specific critical ion transporters are delivered to the apical brush border to facilitate fluid and electrolyte uptake. Maintenance of these apical transporters requires both targeted delivery and regulated membrane recycling. Examination of altered apical trafficking in patients with Microvillus Inclusion disease caused by inactivating mutations in MYO5B has led to insights into the regulation of apical trafficking by elements of the apical recycling system. Modeling of MYO5B loss in cell culture and animal models has led to recognition of Rab11a and Rab8a as critical regulators of apical brush border function. All of these studies show the importance of apical membrane trafficking dynamics in maintenance of polarized epithelial cell function. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. MRP transporters as membrane machinery in the bradykinin-inducible export of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sun, Jing; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays the role of an autocrine/paracrine signal molecule in a variety of cells. So far, however, the membrane machinery in the export of intracellular ATP remains poorly understood. Activation of B2-receptor with bradykinin-induced massive release of ATP from cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. The evoked release of ATP was unaffected by gap junction hemichannel blockers, such as 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and Gap 26. Furthermore, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) coupled Cl(-) channel blockers, CFTR(inh)172, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, Gd3(+) and glibenclamide, failed to suppress the export of ATP by bradykinin. On the other, the evoked release of ATP was greatly reduced by multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter inhibitors, MK-571, indomethacin, and benzbromarone. From western blotting analysis, blots of MRP 1 protein only, but not MRP 2 and MRP 3 protein, appeared at 190 kD. However, the MRP 1 protein expression was not enhanced after loading with 1 muM bradykinin for 5 min. Likewise, niflumic acid and fulfenamic acid, Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel blockers, largely abated the evoked release of ATP. The possibility that the MRP transporter system couples with Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel activities is discussed here. These findings suggest that MRP transporters, probably MRP 1, unlike CFTR-Cl(-) channels and gap junction hemichannels, may contribute as membrane machinery to the export of ATP induced by G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  3. Transport phenomena within the porous cathode for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juanfang; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Kurihara, Eru; Saha, Litan Kumar

    A two-phase, one-dimensional steady model is developed to analyze the coupled phenomena of cathode flooding and mass-transport limiting for the porous cathode electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. In the model, the catalyst layer is treated not as an interface between the membrane and gas diffusion layer, but as a separate computational domain with finite thickness and pseudo-homogenous structure. Furthermore, the liquid water transport across the porous electrode is driven by the capillary force based on Darcy's law. And the gas transport is driven by the concentration gradient based on Fick's law. Additionally, through Tafel kinetics, the transport processes of gas and liquid water are coupled. From the numerical results, it is found that although the catalyst layer is thin, it is very crucial to better understand and more correctly predict the concurrent phenomena inside the electrode, particularly, the flooding phenomena. More importantly, the saturation jump at the interface of the gas diffusion layer and catalyst layers is captured, when the continuity of the capillary pressure is imposed on the interface. Elsewise, the results show further that the flooding phenomenon in the CL is much more serious than that in the GDL, which has a significant influence on the mass transport of the reactants. Moreover, the saturation level inside the cathode is determined, to a great extent, by the surface overpotential, the absolute permeability of the porous electrode, and the boundary value of saturation at the gas diffusion layer-gas channel interface. In order to prevent effectively flooding, it should remove firstly the liquid water accumulating inside the CL and keep the boundary value of liquid saturation as low as possible.

  4. Transport phenomena within the porous cathode for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juanfang; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Kurihara, Eru; Saha, Litan Kumar [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    A two-phase, one-dimensional steady model is developed to analyze the coupled phenomena of cathode flooding and mass-transport limiting for the porous cathode electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. In the model, the catalyst layer is treated not as an interface between the membrane and gas diffusion layer, but as a separate computational domain with finite thickness and pseudo-homogenous structure. Furthermore, the liquid water transport across the porous electrode is driven by the capillary force based on Darcy's law. And the gas transport is driven by the concentration gradient based on Fick's law. Additionally, through Tafel kinetics, the transport processes of gas and liquid water are coupled. From the numerical results, it is found that although the catalyst layer is thin, it is very crucial to better understand and more correctly predict the concurrent phenomena inside the electrode, particularly, the flooding phenomena. More importantly, the saturation jump at the interface of the gas diffusion layer and catalyst layers is captured, when the continuity of the capillary pressure is imposed on the interface. Elsewise, the results show further that the flooding phenomenon in the CL is much more serious than that in the GDL, which has a significant influence on the mass transport of the reactants. Moreover, the saturation level inside the cathode is determined, to a great extent, by the surface overpotential, the absolute permeability of the porous electrode, and the boundary value of saturation at the gas diffusion layer-gas channel interface. In order to prevent effectively flooding, it should remove firstly the liquid water accumulating inside the CL and keep the boundary value of liquid saturation as low as possible. (author)

  5. Bicarbonate-dependent transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of sheep rumen epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, F; Rackwitz, R; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Gäbel, G

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of HCO₃⁻ in the transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of rumen epithelium and to identify transport proteins involved. The effects of basolateral variation in HCO₃⁻ concentrations on acetate and butyrate efflux out of the epithelium and the transepithelial flux of these short-chain fatty acids were tested in Ussing chamber experiments using (14)C-labelled substrates. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport mechanisms were characterized by adding specific inhibitors of candidate proteins to the serosal side. Effluxes of acetate and butyrate out of the epithelium were higher to the serosal side than to the mucosal side. Acetate and butyrate effluxes to both sides of rumen epithelium consisted of HCO₃⁻-independent and -dependent parts. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport across the basolateral membrane was confirmed in studies of transepithelial fluxes. Mucosal to serosal fluxes of acetate and butyrate decreased with lowering serosal HCO₃⁻ concentrations. In the presence of 25 mm HCO₃⁻, transepithelial flux of acetate was inhibited effectively by p-hydroxymercuribenzoic acid or α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, while butyrate flux was unaffected by the blockers. Fluxes of both acetate and butyrate from the serosal to the mucosal side were diminished largely by the addition of NO₃⁻ to the serosal side, with this effect being more pronounced for acetate. Our results indicate the existence of a basolateral short-chain fatty acid/HCO₃⁻ exchanger, with monocarboxylate transporter 1 as a primary candidate for acetate transfer. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  7. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  8. Solanaceae XIPs are plasma membrane aquaporins that facilitate the transport of many uncharged substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Jahn, Thomas Paul; Boutry, Marc; Chaumont, François

    2011-04-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) transport water and uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an uncharacterized MIP subfamily was identified in the genomes of plants and fungi and named X Intrinsic Proteins (XIPs). Here, we describe the genetic features, localization, expression, and functions of a group of Solanaceae XIPs. XIP cDNA and gDNA were cloned from tobacco, potato, tomato, and morning glory. A conserved sequence motif in the first intron of Solanaceae XIPs initiates an RNA-processing mechanism that results in two splice variants (α and β). When transiently or stably expressed in tobacco plants, yellow fluorescent protein-tagged NtXIP1;1α and NtXIP1;1β were both localized in the plasma membrane. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing NtXIP1;1-promoter-GUS constructs and RT-PCR studies showed that NtXIP1;1 was expressed in all organs. The NtXIP1;1 promoter was mainly active in cell layers facing the environment in all above-ground tissues. Heterologous expression of Solanaceae XIPs in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants demonstrated that these isoforms facilitate the transport of bulky solutes, such as glycerol, urea, and boric acid. In contrast, permeability for water was undetectable. These data suggest that XIPs function in the transport of uncharged solutes across the cell plasma membrane in specific plant tissues, including at the interface between the environment and external cell layers. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Small Molecule Membrane Transporters in the Mammalian Podocyte: A Pathogenic and Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Zennaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The intriguingly complex glomerular podocyte has been a recent object of intense study. Researchers have sought to understand its role in the pathogenesis of common proteinuric diseases such as minimal change disease and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis. In particular, considerable effort has been directed towards the anatomic and functional barrier to macromolecular filtration provided by the secondary foot processes, but little attention has been paid to the potential of podocytes to handle plasma proteins beyond the specialization of the slit diaphragm. Renal membrane transporters in the proximal tubule have been extensively studied for decades, particularly in relation to drug metabolism and elimination. Recently, uptake and efflux transporters for small organic molecules have also been found in the glomerular podocyte, and we and others have found that these transporters can engage not only common pharmaceuticals but also injurious endogenous and exogenous agents. We have also found that the activity of podocyte transporters can be manipulated to inhibit pathogen uptake and efflux. It is conceivable that podocyte transporters may play a role in disease pathogenesis and may be a target for future drug development.

  10. Cimetidine transport in rabbit renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, T.D.; Kunnemann, M.E.

    1987-03-01

    Cimetidine is an organic cation and commonly prescribed drug that is eliminated primarily by proximal renal tubular secretion. The present studies evaluated cimetidine transport in rabbit renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). (/sup 3/H)Cimetidine uptake varied inversely with media osmolarity and was stimulated with uphill transport above equilibrium values (overshoot) produced by an initial proton gradient directed from the vesicle interior outwardly. Uphill transport occurred earlier and was of greater magnitude at 25/sup 0/C than at 5/sup 0/C. pH-stimulated (/sup 3/H)cimetidine uptake was inhibited by excess nonradiolabeled cimetidine, quinidine, and procainamide but was affected little by probenecid. Tetraethylammonium inhibited cimetidine uptake in the presence and absence of an initial proton gradient, indicating that nonionic diffusion and simple diffusion cannot totally account for cimetidine transport in BBMV. Preloading BBMV with an excess of procainamide enhanced cimetidine uptake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cimetidine is transported across BBMV by organic cation-proton exchange.

  11. Electrolyte Composition of Mink (Mustela vison Erythrocytes and Active Cation Transporters of the Cell Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clausen TN

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells from mink (Mustela vison were characterized with respect to their electrolyte content and their cell membranes with respect to enzymatic activity for cation transport. The intra- and extracellular concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were determined in erythrocytes and plasma, respectively. Plasma and red cell water content was determined, and molal electrolyte concentrations were calculated. Red cells from male adult mink appeared to be of the low-K+, high-Na+ type as seen in other carnivorous species. The intracellular K+ concentration is slightly higher than the extracellular one and the plasma-to-cell chemical gradient for Na+ is weak, though even the molal concentrations may differ significantly. Consistent with the high intracellular Na+ and low K+ concentrations, a very low or no ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase activity and no K+-activated pNPPase activity were found in the plasma membrane fraction from red cells. The Cl- and Mg2+ concentrations expressed per liter cell water were significantly higher in red cells than in plasma whereas the opposite was the case with Ca2+. The distribution of Cl- thus does not seem compatible with an inside-negative membrane potential in mink erythrocytes. In spite of a steep calcium gradient across the red cell membrane, neither a calmodulin-activated Ca2+-ATPase activity nor an ATP-activated Ca2+-pNPPase activity were detectable in the plasma membrane fraction. The origin of a supposed primary Ca2+ gradient for sustaining of osmotic balance thus seems uncertain.

  12. Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2013-09-17

    Many salinity gradient energy technologies such as reverse electrodialysis (RED) rely on highly selective anion transport through polymeric anion exchange membranes. While there is considerable interest in using thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) in RED processes for closed-loop conversion of heat energy to electricity, little is known about membrane performance in this electrolyte. The resistances of two commercially available cation exchange membranes in AmB were lower than their resistances in NaCl. However, the resistances of commercially available anion exchange membranes (AEMs) were much larger in AmB than in NaCl, which would adversely affect energy recovery. The properties of a series of quaternary ammonium-functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) and Radel-based AEMs were therefore examined to understand the reasons for increased resistance in AmB to overcome this performance penalty due to the lower mobility of bicarbonate, 4.59 × 10-4 cm2/(V s), compared to chloride, 7.90 × 10-4 cm2/(V s) (the dilute aqueous solution mobility ratio of HCO3 - to Cl- is 0.58). Most membrane resistances were generally consistent with the dilute solution mobilities of the anions. For a few key samples, however, increased water uptake in AmB solution reduced the ionic resistance of the polymer compared to its resistance in NaCl solution. This increased water uptake was attributed to the greater hydration of the bicarbonate ion compared to the chloride ion. The increased resistance due to the use of bicarbonate as opposed to chloride ions in AEMs can therefore be mitigated by designing polymers that swell more in AmB compared to NaCl solutions, enabling more efficient energy recovery using AmB thermolytic solutions in RED. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Mathematical modeling of a carrier-mediated transport process in a liquid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Subramanian; Anitha, Shanmugarajan; Subbiah, Alwarappan; Rajendran, Lakshmanan

    2013-06-01

    An analysis of the reaction diffusion in a carrier-mediated transport process through a membrane is presented. A simple approximate analytical expression of concentration profiles is derived in terms of all dimensionless parameters. Furthermore, in this work we employ the homotopy perturbation method to solve the nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations. Moreover, the analytical results have been compared to the numerical simulation using the Matlab program. The simulated results are comparable with the appropriate theories. The results obtained in this work are valid for the entire solution domain.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na+/Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters in a membrane-aqueous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology model of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in a membrane environment and in complex with either the natural substrate S-HT or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitaloprom. We have also included a transporter homologue...

  15. CHX14 is a plasma membrane K-efflux transporter that regulates K+ redistribution in "Arabidopsis thaliana"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K(+)) is essential for plant growth and development, yet the molecular identity of many K(+) transporters remains elusive. Here we characterized cation/H(+) exchanger (CHX) 14 as a plasma membrane K(+) transporter. "CHX14" expression was induced by elevated K(+) and histochemical analysis...

  16. Carrier-mediated ¿-aminobutyric acid transport across the basolateral membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Carstensen, Mette; Brodin, Birger

    2012-01-01

    and the anticancer prodrug d-aminolevulinic acid across the apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. Little is however known about the basolateral transport of these substances. We investigated basolateral transport of GABA in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers using isotope studies. Here we report that, at least...

  17. Plasma Membrane Na+-Coupled Citrate Transporter (SLC13A5 and Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangzom D. Bhutia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available SLC13A5 is a Na+-coupled transporter for citrate that is expressed in the plasma membrane of specific cell types in the liver, testis, and brain. It is an electrogenic transporter with a Na+:citrate3− stoichiometry of 4:1. In humans, the Michaelis constant for SLC13A5 to transport citrate is ~600 μM, which is physiologically relevant given that the normal concentration of citrate in plasma is in the range of 150–200 μM. Li+ stimulates the transport function of human SLC13A5 at concentrations that are in the therapeutic range in patients on lithium therapy. Human SLC13A5 differs from rodent Slc13a5 in two important aspects: the affinity of the human transporter for citrate is ~30-fold less than that of the rodent transporter, thus making human SLC13A5 a low-affinity/high-capacity transporter and the rodent Slc13a5 a high-affinity/low-capacity transporter. In the liver, SLC13A5 is expressed exclusively in the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes, where it plays a role in the uptake of circulating citrate from the sinusoidal blood for metabolic use. In the testis, the transporter is expressed only in spermatozoa, which is also only in the mid piece where mitochondria are located; the likely function of the transporter in spermatozoa is to mediate the uptake of citrate present at high levels in the seminal fluid for subsequent metabolism in the sperm mitochondria to generate biological energy, thereby supporting sperm motility. In the brain, the transporter is expressed mostly in neurons. As astrocytes secrete citrate into extracellular medium, the potential function of SLC13A5 in neurons is to mediate the uptake of circulating citrate and astrocyte-released citrate for subsequent metabolism. Slc13a5-knockout mice have been generated; these mice do not have any overt phenotype but are resistant to experimentally induced metabolic syndrome. Recently however, loss-of-function mutations in human SLC13A5 have been found to cause severe epilepsy

  18. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  19. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, Baltazar; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP4- (out) for ADP3- (in) + 0.5 phosphate2- (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated. PMID:283393

  20. Diamines interfere with the transport of L-ornithine in Ehrlich-cell plasma-membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M A; Urdiales, J L; Mates, J M; Núñez de Castro, I; Sánchez-Jiménez, F

    1991-12-15

    1. L-Ornithine transport by plasma-membrane vesicles isolated from Ehrlich cells is Na(+)-independent and shows a saturable and a diffusional component. 2. Putrescine, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and 2,3-diaminopropane at 55 microM concentration significantly inhibit 0.5 mM-L-ornithine transport at least for the first 10 min of incubation. 3. There is a trans-stimulatory effect of putrescine on L-ornithine transport.

  1. Mixed matrix membranes with fast and selective transport pathways for efficient CO2 separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jinpeng; Li, Xueqin; Guo, Ruili; Zhang, Jianshu; Wang, Zhongming

    2018-03-01

    To improve CO2 separation performance, porous carbon nanosheets (PCNs) were used as a filler into a Pebax MH 1657 (Pebax) matrix, fabricating mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). The PCNs exhibited a preferential horizontal orientation within the Pebax matrix because of the extremely large 2D plane and nanoscale thickness of the matrix. Therefore, the micropores of the PCNs provided fast CO2 transport pathways, which led to increased CO2 permeability. The reduced pore size of the PCNs was a consequence of the overlapping of PCNs and the polymer chains penetrating into the pores of the PCNs. The reduction in the pore size of the PCNs improved the CO2/gas selectivity. As a result, the CO2 permeability and CO2/CH4 selectivity of the Pebax membrane with 10 wt% PCNs-loading (Pebax-PCNs-10) were 520 barrer and 51, respectively, for CO2/CH4 mixed-gas. The CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 selectivity of the Pebax-PCNs-10 membrane were 614 barrer and 61, respectively, for CO2/N2 mixed-gas.

  2. Laminar oxy-fuel diffusion flame supported by an oxygen-permeable-ion-transport membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-03-01

    A numerical model with detailed gas-phase chemistry and transport was used to predict homogeneous fuel conversion processes and to capture the important features (e.g., the location, temperature, thickness and structure of a flame) of laminar oxy-fuel diffusion flames stabilized on the sweep side of an oxygen permeable ion transport membrane (ITM). We assume that the membrane surface is not catalytic to hydrocarbon or syngas oxidation. It has been demonstrated that an ITM can be used for hydrocarbon conversion with enhanced reaction selectivity such as oxy-fuel combustion for carbon capture technologies and syngas production. Within an ITM unit, the oxidizer flow rate, i.e., the oxygen permeation flux, is not a pre-determined quantity, since it depends on the oxygen partial pressures on the feed and sweep sides and the membrane temperature. Instead, it is influenced by the oxidation reactions that are also dependent on the oxygen permeation rate, the initial conditions of the sweep gas, i.e., the fuel concentration, flow rate and temperature, and the diluent. In oxy-fuel combustion applications, the sweep side is fuel-diluted with CO2, and the entire unit is preheated to achieve a high oxygen permeation flux. This study focuses on the flame structure under these conditions and specifically on the chemical effect of CO2 dilution. Results show that, when the fuel diluent is CO2, a diffusion flame with a lower temperature and a larger thickness is established in the vicinity of the membrane, in comparison with the case in which N2 is used as a diluent. Enhanced OH-driven reactions and suppressed H radical chemistry result in the formation of products with larger CO and H2O and smaller H2 concentrations. Moreover, radical concentrations are reduced due to the high CO2 fraction in the sweep gas. CO2 dilution reduces CH3 formation and slows down the formation of soot precursors, C2H2 and C2H4. The flame location impacts the species diffusion and heat transfer from the

  3. Energy Landscape of the Substrate Translocation Equilibrium of Plasma-Membrane Glutamate Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Albers, Thomas; Grewer, Christof

    2018-01-11

    Glutamate transporters maintain a large glutamate concentration gradient across synaptic membranes and are, thus, critical for functioning of the excitatory synapse. Mammalian glutamate transporters concentrate glutamate inside cells through energetic coupling of glutamate flux to the transmembrane concentration gradient of Na + . Structural models based on an archeal homologue, GltPh, suggest an elevator-like carrier mechanism. However, the energetic determinants of this carrier-based movement are not well understood. Although electrostatics play an important role in governing these energetics, their implication on transport dynamics has not been studied. Here, we combine a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the translocation equilibrium with electrostatic computations to gain insight into the energetics of the translocation process. Our results show the biphasic nature of translocation, consistent with the existence of an intermediate on the translocation pathway. In the absence of voltage, the equilibrium is shifted to the outward-facing configuration. Electrostatic computations confirm the intermediate state and show that the elevator-like movement is energetically feasible in the presence of bound Na + ions, whereas a substrate-hopping model is energetically prohibitive. Our results highlight the critical contribution of charge compensation to transport and add to results from previous molecular dynamics simulations for improved understanding of the glutamate translocation process.

  4. Membrane transport systems and the biodegradation potential and pathogenicity of genus Rhodococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.; Costa, Sofia S.; Fernandes, Pedro; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodococcus genus contains species with remarkable ability to tolerate toxic compounds and to degrade a myriad of substrates. These substrates have to cross a distinctive cell envelope dominated by mycolic acids anchored in a scaffold of arabinogalactan covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan, and a cellular membrane with phospholipids, whose composition in fatty acids can be rapidly altered in response to environmental conditions. The hydrophobic nature of the cell envelope facilitates the entrance of hydrophobic molecules but some substrates require active transport systems. Additionally, toxic compounds may also be extruded by energy spending efflux systems. In this review, physiological evidences of the use of transport systems by Rhodococcus strains and genomic studies that corroborate their existence are presented and discussed. The recently released complete genomes of several Rhodococcus strains will be the basis for an in silico correlation analysis between the efflux pumps present in the genome and their role on active transport of substrates. These transport systems will be placed on an integrative perspective of the impact of this important genus on biotechnology and health, ranging from bioremediation to antibiotic and biocide resistance. PMID:24772091

  5. Mechanism of the Antimicrobial Action of Pyrithione: Effects on Membrane Transport, ATP Levels, and Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Carol J.; Segel, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    Pyrithione is a general inhibitor of membrane transport processes in fungi. A brief preincubation of Penicillium mycelia with pyrithione resulted in a marked decrease in the activities of a variety of independently regulated transport systems, including those for inorganic sulfate, inorganic phosphate, methylamine (actually, the NH4+ permease), choline-O-sulfate, glucose, l-methionine (a specific system), and several hydrophobic l-α-amino acids (the general amino acid permease). The degree of inhibition at any fixed pyrithione concentration and exposure time increased as the pH of the incubation medium was decreased. This result strongly suggests that the active species is the un-ionized molecule and that pyrithione acts by collapsing a transmembrane ΔpH driving force. The degree of transport inhibition caused by a given concentration of pyrithione increased with increasing time of exposure to the inhibitor. However, exposure time and pyrithione concentration were not reciprocally related. At “low” pyrithione concentrations, transport inhibition plateaued at some finite value. This observation suggests that the fungi can detoxify low levels of the inhibitor. The concentration of pyrithione required for a given degree of growth inhibition increased as the experimental mycelial density increased. This phenomenon was consistent with the suggestion that the fungi are capable of inactivating pyrithione. PMID:28693

  6. Potassium transport at the plasma membrane of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidchik, Vadim; Macpherson, Neil; Davies, Julia M

    2005-01-15

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a commercially important spoilage yeast capable of growth at low pH in the presence of weak organic acid preservatives, such as benzoic acid. A patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of plasma membrane K+ transport revealed a high conductance pathway for low-affinity K+ uptake. In contrast to the equivalent K+ transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this system remained operative at low extracellular pH and may therefore facilitate K+ uptake in K(+)-rich and acidic beverages. Benzoate inhibited growth, increased intracellular K+ content, yet decreased the magnitude of the K+ uptake conductance; specifically, the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying component was reduced. It is proposed that this adaptation helps maintain a hyperpolarized membrane voltage to effect continued ATPase-mediated H+ extrusion and so combat preservative-induced cytosolic acidosis. Again in contrast to S. cerevisiae, the K+ conductance was relatively insensitive to increased extracellular Ca2+. Paradoxically (and unlike S. cerevisiae) increasing extracellular Ca2+ inhibited growth, suggesting a simple expedient to limit spoilage by Z. bailii.

  7. Gastrointestinal Hormone Cholecystokinin Increases P-Glycoprotein Membrane Localization and Transport Activity in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kentaro; Shimizu, Saori; Tomono, Takumi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2017-09-01

    It was reported that stimulation of taste receptor type 2 member 38 by a bitter substance, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mRNA level and transport activity via release of the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at 9 h. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCK-8 and PTC might also regulate P-gp activity more rapidly via a different mechanism. As a result, we found that the pretreatment of human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells with 10-mM PTC significantly decreased the intracellular accumulation of P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) compared with the control after 90-min incubation. Moreover, CCK-8 treatments significantly reduced the accumulation of Rho123 within 30 min, compared with the control. On the other hand, when Caco-2 cells were pretreated with PTC, the efflux ratio of Rho123 was significantly increased compared with control. The efflux ratio of Rho123 in CCK-8 treatment cells was also significantly increased compared with control. Furthermore, CCK-8 increased the phosphorylation of the scaffold proteins ezrin, radixin, and moesin, which regulate translocation of P-gp to the plasma membrane. Therefore, our results indicate that PTC induced release of CCK-8, which in turn induced the phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins, leading to upregulation of P-gp transport activity via increased membrane localization of P-gp. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen transport membrane reactor based method and system for generating electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Chakravarti, Shrikar; Li, Juan

    2017-02-07

    A carbon capture enabled system and method for generating electric power and/or fuel from methane containing sources using oxygen transport membranes by first converting the methane containing feed gas into a high pressure synthesis gas. Then, in one configuration the synthesis gas is combusted in oxy-combustion mode in oxygen transport membranes based boiler reactor operating at a pressure at least twice that of ambient pressure and the heat generated heats steam in thermally coupled steam generation tubes within the boiler reactor; the steam is expanded in steam turbine to generate power; and the carbon dioxide rich effluent leaving the boiler reactor is processed to isolate carbon. In another configuration the synthesis gas is further treated in a gas conditioning system configured for carbon capture in a pre-combustion mode using water gas shift reactors and acid gas removal units to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas that fuels an integrated gas turbine and steam turbine system to generate power. The disclosed method and system can also be adapted to integrate with coal gasification systems to produce power from both coal and methane containing sources with greater than 90% carbon isolation.

  9. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  11. Reduced levels of folate transporters (PCFT and RFC) in membrane lipid rafts result in colonic folate malabsorption in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Nissar Ahmad; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on folate transport across the colonic apical membranes (CAM) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed 1 g/kg body weight/day ethanol (20%) solution orally for 3 months and folate transport was studied in the isolated colon apical membrane vesicles. The folate transport was found to be carrier mediated, saturable, with pH optima at 5.0. Chronic ethanol ingestion reduced the folate transport across the CAM by decreasing the affinity of transporters (high Km) for the substrate and by decreasing the number of transporter molecules (low Vmax) on the colon luminal surface. The decreased transport activity at the CAM was associated with down-regulation of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) and the reduced folate carrier (RFC) which resulted in decreased PCFT and RFC protein levels in the colon of rats fed alcohol chronically. Moreover, the PCFT and the RFC were found to be distributed in detergent insoluble fraction of the CAM in rats. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of the PCFT and the RFC protein with lipid rafts (LR). Chronic alcoholism decreased the PCFT and the RFC protein levels in the CAM LR in accordance with the decreased synthesis. Hence, we propose that downregulation in the expression of the PCFT and the RFC in colon results in reduced levels of these transporters in colon apical membrane LR as a mechanism of folate malabsorption during chronic alcoholism. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Coupled transport of p-aminohippurate by rat kidney basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchard, J.B. (National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-10-01

    p-Aminohippuric acid (PAH) transport by basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles isolated from rat renal cortex was stimulated very little by a Na{sup +} gradient (out > in). However, when micromolar concentrations of glutaric acid or {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid were added in the presence of a out > in Na{sup +} gradient, PAH uptake was accelerated >20-fold and an overshoot of greater than fivefold was produced. Other anions, e.g., fumarate, stimulated PAH uptake very modestly under these conditions, and that stimulation was totally prevented by short circuiting, i.e., with K{sup +} (in = out) and valinomycin. Glutarate-stimulated uptake was inhibited by 4-acetamide-4{prime}-({sup 14}C)-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid (SITS) and probenecid and was slightly stimulated by the imposition of an inside-negative membrane potential. Furthermore, even in the absence of a Na{sup +} gradient, glutarate-loaded vesicles exhibited a marked acceleration of ({sup 3}H)-PAH uptake (5-fold) and a modest overshoot (2.5-fold). These results suggest an indirect coupling of BLM PAH uptake to the Na{sup +} gradient by a cyclic accumulation (Na{sup +}-dependent) of glutarate followed by its efflux from the vesicle in exchange for PAH. This coupled system was absent in apical membranes. Thus net secretory transport of PAH may entail Na{sup +}-dependent, glutarate-driven PAH uptake at the BLM, followed by the exit of PAH into the lumen down its electrochemical gradient, probably in exchange for other anions, e.g., {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}}, HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or OH{sup {minus}}.

  13. Proteomics of plasma membranes from poplar trees reveals tissue distribution of transporters, receptors, and proteins in cell wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Robert; Bernfur, Katja; Gustavsson, Niklas; Bygdell, Joakim; Wingsle, Gunnar; Larsson, Christer

    2010-02-01

    By exploiting the abundant tissues available from Populus trees, 3-4 m high, we have been able to isolate plasma membranes of high purity from leaves, xylem, and cambium/phloem at a time (4 weeks after bud break) when photosynthesis in the leaves and wood formation in the xylem should have reached a steady state. More than 40% of the 956 proteins identified were found in the plasma membranes of all three tissues and may be classified as "housekeeping" proteins, a typical example being P-type H(+)-ATPases. Among the 213 proteins predicted to be integral membrane proteins, transporters constitute the largest class (41%) followed by receptors (14%) and proteins involved in cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism (8%) and membrane trafficking (8%). ATP-binding cassette transporters (all members of subfamilies B, C, and G) and receptor-like kinases (four subfamilies) were two of the largest protein families found, and the members of these two families showed pronounced tissue distribution. Leaf plasma membranes were characterized by a very high proportion of transporters, constituting almost half of the integral proteins. Proteins involved in cell wall synthesis (such as cellulose and sucrose synthases) and membrane trafficking were most abundant in xylem plasma membranes in agreement with the role of the xylem in wood formation. Twenty-five integral proteins and 83 soluble proteins were exclusively found in xylem plasma membranes, which identifies new candidates associated with cell wall synthesis and wood formation. Among the proteins uniquely found in xylem plasma membranes were most of the enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis, which suggests that they may exist as a complex linked to the plasma membrane.

  14. Quasi-equilibrium analysis of the ion-pair mediated membrane transport of low-permeability drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan M; Dahan, Arik; Gupta, Deepak; Varghese, Sheeba; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research was to gain a mechanistic understanding of ion-pair mediated membrane transport of low-permeability drugs. Quasi-equilibrium mass transport analyses were developed to describe the ion-pair mediated octanol-buffer partitioning and hydrophobic membrane permeation of the model basic drug phenformin. Three lipophilic counterions were employed: p-toluenesulfonic acid, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (HNAP). Association constants and intrinsic octanol-buffer partition coefficients (Log P(AB)) of the ion-pairs were obtained by fitting a transport model to double reciprocal plots of apparent octanol-buffer distribution coefficients versus counterion concentration. All three counterions enhanced the lipophilicity of phenformin, with HNAP providing the greatest increase in Log P(AB), 3.7 units over phenformin alone. HNAP also enhanced the apparent membrane permeability of phenformin, 27-fold in the PAMPA model, and 4.9-fold across Caco-2 cell monolayers. As predicted from a quasi-equilibrium analysis of ion-pair mediated membrane transport, an order of magnitude increase in phenformin flux was observed per log increase in counterion concentration, such that log-log plots of phenformin flux versus HNAP concentration gave linear relationships. These results provide increased understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ion-pair mediated membrane transport, emphasizing the potential of this approach to enable oral delivery of low-permeability drugs.

  15. Impact of Solubilizing Additives on Supersaturation and Membrane Transport of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-10-01

    Many enabling formulations give rise to supersaturated solutions wherein the solute possesses higher thermodynamic activity gradients than the solute in a saturated solution. Since flux across a membrane is driven by solute activity rather than concentration, understanding how solute thermodynamic activity varies with solution composition, particularly in the presence of solubilizing additives, is important in the context of passive absorption. In this study, a side-by-side diffusion cell was used to evaluate solute flux for solutions of nifedipine and felodipine in the absence and presence of different solubilizing additives at various solute concentrations. At a given solute concentration above the equilibrium solubility, it was observed that the solubilizing additives could reduce the membrane flux, indicating that the extent of supersaturation can be reduced. However, the flux could be increased back to the same maximum value (which was determined by the concentration where liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred) by increasing the total solute concentration. Qualitatively, the shape of the curves of solute flux through membrane as a function of total solute concentration is the same in the absence and presence of solubilizing additives. Quantitatively, however, LLPS occurs at higher solute concentrations in the presence of solubilizing additives. Moreover, the ratios of the LLPS onset concentration and equilibrium solubility vary significantly in the absence and presence of additives. These findings clearly point out the flaws in using solute concentration in estimating solute activity or supersaturation, and reaffirm the use of flux measurements to understand supersaturated systems. Clear differentiation between solubilization and supersaturation, as well as thorough understanding of their respective impacts on membrane transport kinetics is important for the rational design of enabling formulations for poorly soluble compounds.

  16. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pikyee; Varela, Filipa; Magoch, Malgorzata; Silva, Ana Rita; Rosário, Ana Lúcia; Brito, José; Oliveira, Tânia Filipa; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Pessanha, Miguel; Stelter, Meike; Kletzin, Arnulf; Henderson, Peter J F; Archer, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential. Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT). These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+)-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf) and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3)). Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials. Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL) produced sufficient

  17. A biochemo-mechano coupled, computational model combining membrane transport and pericellular proteolysis in tissue mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, A-T; Rauch, A D; Wall, W A

    2017-03-01

    We present a computational model for the interaction of surface- and volume-bound scalar transport and reaction processes with a deformable porous medium. The application in mind is pericellular proteolysis, i.e. the dissolution of the solid phase of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a response to the activation of certain chemical species at the cell membrane and in the vicinity of the cell. A poroelastic medium model represents the extra cellular scaffold and the interstitial fluid flow, while a surface-bound transport model accounts for the diffusion and reaction of membrane-bound chemical species. By further modelling the volume-bound transport, we consider the advection, diffusion and reaction of sequestered chemical species within the extracellular scaffold. The chemo-mechanical coupling is established by introducing a continuum formulation for the interplay of reaction rates and the mechanical state of the ECM. It is based on known experimental insights and theoretical work on the thermodynamics of porous media and degradation kinetics of collagen fibres on the one hand and a damage-like effect of the fibre dissolution on the mechanical integrity of the ECM on the other hand. The resulting system of partial differential equations is solved via the finite-element method. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first computational model including contemporaneously the coupling between (i) advection-diffusion-reaction processes, (ii) interstitial flow and deformation of a porous medium, and (iii) the chemo-mechanical interaction impelled by the dissolution of the ECM. Our numerical examples show good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, we outline the capability of the methodology to extend existing numerical approaches towards a more comprehensive model for cellular biochemo-mechanics.

  18. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding 14 C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30 0 C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of [ 14 C]IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant

  19. The importance of OH − transport through anion exchange membrane in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli

    2018-01-11

    In two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) with anion exchange membranes (AEMs), a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) is typically used to avoid increases in catholyte pH as Nernst equation calculations indicate that high pHs adversely impact electrochemical performance. However, ion transport between the chambers will also impact performance, which is a factor not included in those calculations. To separate the impacts of pH and ion transport on MEC performance, a high molecular weight polymer buffer (PoB), which was retained in the catholyte due to its low AEM transport and cationic charge, was compared to PBS in MECs and abiotic electrochemical half cells (EHCs). In MECs, catholyte pH control was less important than ion transport. MEC tests using the PoB catholyte, which had a higher buffer capacity and thus maintained a lower catholye pH (<8), resulted in a 50% lower hydrogen production rate (HPR) than that obtained using PBS (HPR = 0.7 m3-H2 m−3 d−1) where the catholyte rapidly increased to pH = 12. The main reason for the decreased performance using PoB was a lack of hydroxide ion transfer into the anolyte to balance pH. The anolyte pH in MECs rapidly decreased to 5.8 due to a lack of hydroxide ion transport, which inhibited current generation by the anode, whereas the pH was maintained at 6.8 using PBS. In abiotic tests in ECHs, where the cathode potential was set at −1.2 V, the HPR was 133% higher using PoB than PBS due to catholyte pH control, as the anolyte pH was not a factor in the performance. These results show that maintaining charge transfer to control anolyte pH is more important than obtaining a more neutral pH catholyte.

  20. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Kurabi

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM and into the middle ear (ME. Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE; and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy

  1. Effect of gamma radiation on the transport of non-electrolyte spin labels across the fish erythrocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwozdzinski, K.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on two non-electrolytes' (TEMPO /2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl/ and TEMPOL /4-hydroxy-2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl/) permeability on the erythrocyte membrane was studied by ESR technique. Irradiation of fish erythrocytes resulted in an increased permeability of TEMPO and decreased permeability of TEMPOL. Different patterns observed for TEMPO and TEMPOL support the view that these molecules are transported by different channels in erythrocyte membrane. 5 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  2. Effect of gamma radiation on the transport of non-electrolyte spin labels across the fish erythrocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwozdzinski, K. (Lodz Univ. (Poland))

    1983-11-22

    The effect of gamma radiation on two non-electrolytes: TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) permeability of the erythrocyte membrane was studied by ESR technique. Irradiation of fish erythrocytes resulted in an increased permeability of TEMPO and decreased permeability of TEMPOL. Different patterns observed for TEMPO and TEMPOL support the view that these molecules are transported by different channels in erythrocyte membrane.

  3. Alternating current (AC) iontophoretic transport across human epidermal membrane: effects of AC frequency and amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guang; Xu, Qingfang; Anissimov, Yuri G; Hao, Jinsong; Higuchi, William I; Li, S Kevin

    2008-03-01

    As a continuing effort to understand the mechanisms of alternating current (AC) transdermal iontophoresis and the iontophoretic transport pathways in the stratum corneum (SC), the objectives of the present study were to determine the interplay of AC frequency, AC voltage, and iontophoretic transport of ionic and neutral permeants across human epidermal membrane (HEM) and use AC as a means to characterize the transport pathways. Constant AC voltage iontophoresis experiments were conducted with HEM in 0.10 M tetraethyl ammonium pivalate (TEAP). AC frequencies ranging from 0.0001 to 25 Hz and AC applied voltages of 0.5 and 2.5 V were investigated. Tetraethyl ammonium (TEA) and arabinose (ARA) were the ionic and neutral model permeants, respectively. In data analysis, the logarithm of the permeability coefficients of HEM for the model permeants was plotted against the logarithm of the HEM electrical resistance for each AC condition. As expected, linear correlations between the logarithms of permeability coefficients and the logarithms of resistances of HEM were observed, and the permeability data were first normalized and then compared at the same HEM electrical resistance using these correlations. Transport enhancement of the ionic permeant was significantly larger than that of the neutral permeant during AC iontophoresis. The fluxes of the ionic permeant during AC iontophoresis of 2.5 V in the frequency range from 5 to 1,000 Hz were relatively constant and were approximately 4 times over those of passive transport. When the AC frequency decreased from 5 to 0.001 Hz at 2.5 V, flux enhancement increased to around 50 times over passive transport. While the AC frequency for achieving the full effect of iontophoretic enhancement at low AC frequency was lower than anticipated, the frequency for approaching passive diffusion transport at high frequency was higher than expected from the HEM morphology. These observations are consistent with a transport model of multiple

  4. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  5. Analysis of Porphyra Membrane Transporters Demonstrates Gene Transfer among Photosynthetic Eukaryotes and Numerous Sodium-Coupled Transport Systems1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Blouin, Nicolas A.; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L.; Klein, Anita S.; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters. PMID:22337920

  6. The membrane transporter PotE is required for virulence in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Priscila Regina; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth; Ahmed, Shahana; Wang, Dan; Thøfner, Ida; Antenucci, Fabio; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2018-03-01

    Over the last few years, polyamines have been described as key-signal of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. In the current study, we investigated whether the knockout of genes related to polyamine biosynthesis and putrescine transport affected the virulence of an avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strain. One-week-old White Leghorn chickens were infected intratracheally with mutants in polyamine biosynthesis (ΔspeB/C and ΔspeD/E) and transport genes (ΔpotE) of a well-characterized APEC strain of ST117 (O83: H4). All polyamine mutants and the wild-type strain were able to infect chicken; however, we observed significantly fewer lesions in the lungs of the chickens infected with the polyamine mutants in comparison with chicken infected with the wild-type. Results derived from histology of infected lungs detected significantly fewer lesions in the lung of birds infected within particular the putrescine transport mutant (ΔpotE). A decrease in colonization levels was observed in the liver and spleen of birds infected with the putrescine biosynthesis mutant ΔspeB/C, and likewise, a decrease of the colonization levels of all organs from birds infected with the ΔpotE was detected. Together, our data demonstrate that the deletion of polyamine genes, and in particular the PotE membrane protein, attenuates the virulence of APEC during infection of chickens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Proton transport in additives to the polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Pia

    2011-03-21

    The enhancement of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes is an important issue for the development of fuel cell technology. The objective is a material providing proton transport at a temperature range of 350 K to 450 K independent from a purely water based mechanism. To enhance the PEM properties of standard polymer materials, a class of additives is studied by means of atomistic simulations consisting of functionalised mesoporous silicon dioxide particles. The functional molecules are imidazole or sulphonic acid, covalently bound to the surface via a carbon chain with a surface density of about 1.0 nm{sup -2} groups. At first, the proton transport mechanism is explored in a system of functional molecules in vacuum. The molecules are constrained by the terminal carbon groups according to the geometric arrangement in the porous silicon dioxide. The proton transport mechanism is characterised by structural properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations and consists of the aggregation of two or more functional groups, a barrier free proton transport between these groups followed by the separation of the groups and formation of new aggregates due to fluctuations in the hydrogen bond network and movement of the carbon chain. For the different proton conducting groups, i.e. methyl imidazole, methyl sulphonic acid and water, the barrier free proton transport and the formation of protonated bimolecular complexes were addressed by potential energy calculations of the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB). For sulphonic acid even at a temperature of 450 K, relatively stable aggregates are formed, while most imidazole groups are isolated and the hydrogen bond fluctuations are high. However, high density of groups and elevated temperatures enhance the proton transport in both systems. Besides the anchorage and the density of the groups, the influence of the chemical environment on the proton transport was studied. Therefore, the

  8. Effect of passive transport of water through plasma membrane in production of extracellular enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, M; Najafpour, G D; Mohammadi, M

    2017-02-01

    In this article, availability and control of water in solid-state fermentation (SSF) were investigated. Based on passive transport of water through plasma membranes, a new model was proposed for calculation and control of water activities in the mixture of solids. The validity of theoretical model and accuracy of the proposed model were proved by experimental data. This model was used for production of pectinases via mixed-SSF with the aid of a rotary drum bioreactor. It was found that in case of extracellular enzyme production, the new model is in good agreement with experimental data for the control of water activities in the mixed-SSF. Exact control of water activity in SFF, the production of endo- and exo-pectinases was relatively enhanced. Based on theoretical view point, the prominence of this new model in control of water activity was also proved.

  9. Sorbate Transport in Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes and FAU/EMT Intergrowth by Diffusion NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Low

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present and discuss selected results of our recent studies of sorbate self-diffusion in microporous materials. The main focus is given to transport properties of carbon molecular sieve (CMS membranes as well as of the intergrowth of FAU-type and EMT-type zeolites. CMS membranes show promise for applications in separations of mixtures of small gas molecules, while FAU/EMT intergrowth can be used as an active and selective cracking catalyst. For both types of applications diffusion of guest molecules in the micropore networks of these materials is expected to play an important role. Diffusion studies were performed by a pulsed field gradient (PFG NMR technique that combines advantages of high field (17.6 T NMR and high magnetic field gradients (up to 30 T/m. This technique has been recently introduced at the University of Florida in collaboration with the National Magnet Lab. In addition to a more conventional proton PFG NMR, also carbon-13 PFG NMR was used.

  10. Refolding, purification and crystallization of the FrpB outer membrane iron transporter from Neisseria meningitidis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Prince, Stephen M.; Patel, Hema; Chan, Hannah; Feavers, Ian M.; Derrick, Jeremy P.

    2012-01-01

    The refolding, purification and crystallization of FrpB from the meningitis pathogen Neisseria meningitidis is described. FrpB is an integral outer membrane protein from the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis. It is a member of the TonB-dependent transporter family and promotes the uptake of iron across the outer membrane. There is also evidence that FrpB is an antigen and hence a potential component of a vaccine against meningococcal meningitis. FrpB incorporating a polyhistidine tag was overexpressed in Escherichia coli into inclusion bodies. The protein was then solubilized in urea, refolded and purified to homogeneity. Two separate antigenic variants of FrpB were crystallized by sitting-drop vapour diffusion. Crystals of the F5-1 variant diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 176.5, b = 79.4, c = 75.9 Å, β = 98.3°. Crystal-packing calculations suggested the presence of a monomer in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the F3-3 variant also diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 85.3, b = 104.6, c = 269.1 Å. Preliminary analysis suggested the presence of an FrpB trimer in the asymmetric unit

  11. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector M Vazquez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data.

  12. Bioenergetic coupling between membrane transport systems and biosynthetic pathways essential for cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leister, K.J.; Cutry, A.F.; Wenner, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that there exists a point in the cell cycle (approximately 2 h prior to S phase entry) when (Na + /K + )ATPase pump activity is no longer needed for progression through the cycle. These data suggests that pump activity is critical in the biosynthetic processes which enables the cell to proceed through the G 1 phase. A scheme is proposed which is currently being tested that (Na + /K + )ATPase pump activity serves as the driving force in the regulation of other membrane transport processes critical for cell proliferation. For example, in post-confluent quiescent C3H-10T1/2 fibroblasts, when [K + ]/sub o/ is lowered just below the K/sub m/ of the pump for K + there is a 10-fold increase in 3 H-uridine uptake into both acid soluble and insoluble cell fractions. By modulation of the pump in this manner, glucose utilization is enhanced whereas inhibition of the pump by ouabain suppresses glucose utilization. In both methods of affecting the pump, 3 H-leucine incorporation is inhibited. Electron acceptors that influence the redox state of the cell have been shown to both stimulate or inhibit cell cycle progression. Under conditions where [K + ]/sub o/ is lowered, the nucleoside uptake responses observed were modified by electron acceptors depending on the ability to oxidize NAD(P)H directly or to interact with a cytochrome-like component, (e.g. phenazine methosulfate) reversed the enhanced uridine uptake and p-phenylene diamine further enhanced the uridine uptake response. These findings suggest that a plasma membrane redox system (presumably cyt-c like) is linked to nucleoside transport which is subject to (Na + /K + )ATPase activity

  13. Alteration of membrane complement regulators is associated with transporter status in patients on peritoneal dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegger, Dagmar; Segerer, Stephan; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M. Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A growing body of evidence from animal models and cell culture studies indicate an important role of a local regulatory complement system (CS) in peritoneal injury during peritoneal dialysis (PD). We investigated the expression of the local regulatory CS (reflected by CD46,CD55,CD59) in the peritoneal tissue of patients with different membrane function characteristics. Patients and methods Biopsies from the parietal peritoneum were taken from 24 patients on PD, 22 uremic patients prior to PD. PD patients were grouped according to the dialysate-to-plasma ratio of creatinine (D/P Cre) and ratio of dialysate glucose at 4 hours versus dialysate glucose at time zero (D/D0 glucose) into low or low-average peritoneal transport status (L/LA) and high-average or high-transport status (HA/H) groups. CD46, CD55, and CD59 RNA expression were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Further localization of membrane complement regulators (CRegs) and semiquantitatively analysis was done by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results CD46 and CD59 expression were similar in all groups. CD55 expression was significantly decreased in the HA/H group compared to the L/LA group and to uremic controls (p peritonitis. There was no statistically significant correlation between PD duration and the expressions of CD46, CD55, and CD59. IHC revealed strong CD46, CD55, and CD59 expression in mesothelial cells. CD55 and CD59 were additionally detected in the vasculature. Using IHC, CD46 was lower in PD patients compared to uremic controls (p>0.05), but there was no difference between the L/LA compared to the H/HA group. Moreover IHC confirmed decreased expression of CD55 in the HA/H group compared to the L/LA group and uremic controls (pperitonitis and PD duration do not appear to alter CReg expression. PMID:28542228

  14. Characteristics of glutamine transport in dog jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulus, N M; Abumrad, N N; Ghishan, F K

    1989-07-01

    The present study characterizes glutamine transport across brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from dog jejunum. The purity of these vesicles was demonstrated by a 20-fold enrichment of leucine aminopeptidase, a marker for BBM. Glutamine uptake was found to occur into an osmotically active space with no membrane binding and to exhibit temperature and pH dependence (optimal uptake at pH 7-7.5). Glutamine uptake was driven by an inwardly directed Na+ gradient with a distinct overshoot not observed under K+ gradient. Lithium could not substitute for Na+ as a stimulator of glutamine uptake. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was not inhibited by methylaminoisobutyric acid, a typical substrate for system A, and was found to be electrogenic and saturable with a Km of 0.97 +/- 0.58 mM and a Vmax of 3.93 +/- 0.99 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. A Na+-glutamine coupling ratio of 1:1 could be demonstrated by a plot of Hill transformation. Na+-independent glutamine uptake was found to be electroneutral and saturable with a Km of 3.70 +/- 0.66 mM and a Vmax of 2.70 +/- 1.55 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. Inhibition studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-dependent as well as a Na+-independent carrier for glutamine uptake. We conclude that glutamine uptake across dog BBMV occurs via two transport systems: a Na+-dependent high-affinity system similar to the neutral brush-border system and a Na+-independent lower-affinity system similar to system L.

  15. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  16. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    diffusion layer, microporous layer, and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation, and mass transfer between phases by a nonequilibrium phase change model...... variations affect gas and liquid water transport, and hence liquid water distribution and the risk of blocking active sites. Hence, water transport is studied under GDL compression in order to investigate the qualitative effects. Two simulation cases are compared; one with and one without compression.......A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas...

  17. A model for the biosynthesis and transport of plasma membrane-associated signaling receptors to the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Claudia Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein transport is emerging as critical in determining the outcome of receptor-activated signal transduction pathways. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating receptor synthesis and transport to the cell surface. Recent advances in this field indicate that signaling pathways and intracellular transport machinery converge and coordinate to render receptors competent for signaling at their plasma membrane activity sites. The biogenesis and transport to the cell surface of signaling receptors appears to require both general trafficking and receptor-specific factors. Several molecular determinants, residing or associated with compartments of the secretory pathway and known to influence aspects in receptor biogenesis, are discussed and integrated into a predictive cooperative model for the functional expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane.

  18. Mechanical characterization and durability of sintered porous transport layers for polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgardt, Elena; Panchenko, Olha; Hackemüller, Franz Josef; Giffin, Jürgen; Bram, Martin; Müller, Martin; Lehnert, Werner; Stolten, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Differential pressure electrolysis offers the potential for more efficient hydrogen compression. Due to the differential pressures acting within the electrolytic cell, the porous transport layer (PTL) is subjected to high stress. For safety reasons, the PTL's mechanical stability must be ensured. However, the requirements for high porosity and low thickness stand in contrast to that for mechanical stability. Porous transport layers for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolysis are typically prepared by means of the thermal sintering of titanium powder. Thus far, the factors that influence the mechanical strength of the sintered bodies and how all requirements can be simultaneously fulfilled have not been investigated. Here, the static and dynamic mechanical properties of thin sintered titanium sheets are investigated ex-situ via tensile tests and periodic loading in a test cell, respectively. In order for a sintered PTL with a thickness of 500 μm and porosities above 25% to be able to withstand 50 bar differential pressure in the cell, the maximum flow field width should be limited to 3 mm. Thus, a method was developed to test the suitability of PTL materials for use in electrolysis for various differential pressures and flow field widths.

  19. Synthesis and Gas Transport Properties of Hyperbranched Polyimide–Silica Hybrid/Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Miki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbranched polyimide–silica hybrids (HBPI–silica HBDs and hyperbranched polyimide–silica composites (HBPI–silica CPTs were prepared, and their general and gas transport properties were investigated to clarify the effect of silica sources and preparation methods. HBPI–silica HBDs and HBPI–silica CPTs were synthesized by two-step polymerization of A2 + B3 monomer system via polyamic acid as precursor, followed by hybridizing or blending silica sources. Silica components were incorporated by the sol-gel reaction with tetramethoxysilane (TMOS or the addition of colloidal silica. In HBPI-silica HBDs, the aggregation of silica components is controlled because of the high affinity of HBPI and silica caused by the formation of covalent bonds between HBPI and silica. Consequently, HBPI-silica HBDs had good film formability, transparency, and mechanical properties compared with HBPI-silica CPTs. HBPI-silica HBD and CPT membranes prepared via the sol-gel reaction with TMOS showed specific gas permeabilities and permselectivities for CO2/CH4 separation, that is, both CO2 permeability and CO2/CH4 selectivity increased with increasing silica content. This result suggests that gas transport can occur through a molecular sieving effect of the porous silica network derived from the sol-gel reaction and/or through the narrow interfacial region between the silica networks and the organic matrix.

  20. Effect of hydrophobic additive on oxygen transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunzhong; Li, Xiaohui; Wan, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanan; Tan, Jinting; Pan, Mu

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance (OTR) is a critical factor influencing the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this paper, an effective method to reduce the OTR of catalyst layers (CLs) by introducing a hydrophobic additive into traditional CLs is proposed. A low-molecular-weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is selected for its feasibility to prepare an emulsion, which is mixed with a traditional catalyst ink to successfully fabricate the CL with PTFE of 10 wt%. The PTFE film exists in the mesopores between the carbon particles. The limiting current of the hydrophobic CL was almost 4000 mA/cm2, which is 500 mA/cm2 higher than that of the traditional CL. PTFE reduces the OTR of the CL in the dry region by as much as 24 s/m compared to the traditional CL and expands the dry region from 2000 mA/cm2 in the traditional CL to 2500 mA/cm2. Furthermore, the CL with the hydrophobic agent can improve the oxygen transport in the wet region (>2000 mA/cm2) more effectively than that in the dry region. All these results indicate that the CL with the hydrophobic agent shows a superior performance in terms of optimizing water management and effectively reduces the OTR in PEMFCs.

  1. Effects of Cholesterol on the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Passive Transport of Water through Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2015-07-23

    While it has long been known that cholesterol reduces the permeability of biological membranes to water, the exact mechanism by which cholesterol influences transmembrane permeation is still unclear. The thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to the transport of water across mixed DPPC/cholesterol bilayers of different composition are thus examined by molecular dynamics simulations. Our analyses show that cholesterol decreases transmembrane permeability to water mainly by altering the thermodynamics of water transport. In particular, the free-energy barrier to permeation is magnified in the dense bilayer interior and the partitioning of water is significantly lowered. The changes are observed to correlate quantitatively well with the cholesterol-dependent density and thickness of the bilayers. In contrast, diffusion coefficients are relatively insensitive to cholesterol concentration, except in the sparsely populated center of the bilayer. Diffusion of water in cholesterol-containing bilayers appears to be related to changes in the free area in the middle of the bilayer and to the solute cross-sectional area in the denser hydrophobic regions. Overall, cholesterol is found to have an inhibitory effect on the permeation of water at all concentrations investigated, although bilayers containing cholesterol concentrations up to 20 mol % display a more dramatic dependence on cholesterol content than at higher concentrations. Our results show that it is possible to quantitatively reproduce the relative effects of cholesterol on lipid bilayer permeability from molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Identification of a transport mechanism for NH4+ in the symbiosome membrane of pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, P.; Rosendahl, L.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiosome membrane vesicles, facing bacteroid-side-out, were purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules and used to study NH4+ transport across the membrane by recording vesicle uptake of the NH4+ analog [C-14]methylamine (MA). Membrane potentials (Delta psi) were imposed on the vesicles ...

  3. Specific and efficient targeting of cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eUehara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Installation of cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the inner envelope membrane (IEM of chloroplasts in C3 plants has been thought to improve photosynthetic performance. However, the method to deliver cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the chloroplast IEM remains to be established. In this study, we provide evidence that the cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters, BicA and SbtA, can be specifically installed into the chloroplast IEM using the chloroplast IEM targeting signal in conjunction with the transit peptide. We fused the transit peptide and the mature portion of Cor413im1, whose targeting mechanism to the IEM has been characterized in detail, to either BicA or SbtA isolated from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Among the seven chimeric constructs tested, we confirmed that four chimeric bicarbonate transporters, designated as BicAI, BicAII, SbtAII, and SbtAIII, were expressed in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, these chimeric transporters were specifically targeted to the chloroplast IEM. They were also resistant to alkaline extraction but can be solubilized by Triton X-100, indicating that they are integral membrane proteins in the chloroplast IEM. One of the transporters, BicA, could reside in the chloroplast IEM even after removal of the IEM targeting signal. Taken together, our results indicate that the addition of IEM targeting signal, as well as the transit peptide, to bicarbonate transporters allows us to efficiently target nuclear-encoded chimeric bicarbonate transporters to the chloroplast IEM.

  4. H+ V-ATPase-Energized Transporters in Brush Border Membrane Vesicles from Whole Larvae of Aedes Aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush Border Membrane vesicles (BBMVs) from Whole larvae of Aedes aegypti (AeBBMVWs ) contain an H+ V-ATPase (V), a Na+/H+ antiporter, NHA1 (A) and a Na+-coupled, nutrient amino acid transporter, NAT8 (N), VAN for short. All V-ATPase subunits are present in the Ae. aegypti genome and in the vesicles...

  5. Role of Individual Positive Charges in the Membrane Orientation and Activity of Transporters of the Small Multidrug Resistance Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbusz, Magdalena A.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of individual positively charged residues on the orientation in the membrane was analyzed in three dual-topology transporters of the small. multidrug resistance (SMR) family: AAVE4701aave of Acidovorax avenae, EMREecol of Escherichia coli, and RRUA0272rrub of Rhodospirillum rubrum. It is

  6. MEMBRANE MOBILITY AND MICRODOMAIN LOCALIZATION OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER STUDIED BY CONFOCAL FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (FCS) AND FRAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erica; (Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; van Deurs, Bo

    FCS measurements in transiently transfected N2A neuroblastoma cells were impaired by photobleachning suggesting immobilization of the transporter in the membrane. This was confirmed by the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which showed clear recovery of YFP-DAT fluorescence...

  7. Ca2+releases E-Syt1 autoinhibition to couple ER-plasma membrane tethering with lipid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xin; Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2018-01-17

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins that bind the plasma membrane (PM) via C2 domains and transport lipids between them via SMP domains. E-Syt1 tethers and transports lipids in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner, but the role of Ca 2+ in this regulation is unclear. Of the five C2 domains of E-Syt1, only C2A and C2C contain Ca 2+ -binding sites. Using liposome-based assays, we show that Ca 2+ binding to C2C promotes E-Syt1-mediated membrane tethering by releasing an inhibition that prevents C2E from interacting with PI(4,5)P 2 -rich membranes, as previously suggested by studies in semi-permeabilized cells. Importantly, Ca 2+ binding to C2A enables lipid transport by releasing a charge-based autoinhibitory interaction between this domain and the SMP domain. Supporting these results, E-Syt1 constructs defective in Ca 2+ binding in either C2A or C2C failed to rescue two defects in PM lipid homeostasis observed in E-Syts KO cells, delayed diacylglycerol clearance from the PM and impaired Ca 2+ -triggered phosphatidylserine scrambling. Thus, a main effect of Ca 2+ on E-Syt1 is to reverse an autoinhibited state and to couple membrane tethering with lipid transport. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Facilitated Transport of Zn2+, Ni2+ and Co2+ by Liquid Membrane Using a Tertio Amine as Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassaine-Sadi F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of the emissions of heavy metals (Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+ present in the industrial effluents become extensive more and more. The discharge of toxic metals into environment is a serious problem facing numerous industries. So the search for extraction techniques to remove those heavy metals are increasing interest. Liquid membranes have shown great potentiel in this way especially in cases where metal concentrations are relatively low and other techniques cannot be applied efficiently.The fundamental parameters influencing the transport of the zinc (II, nickel (II and cobalt (II through the liquid membrane have been examined (the acidity, the time of transport. The coupling that makes itself thanks to the membrane (extractant + diluent permits to define the different phases of transfer and to determine the mechanisms of transportation membranaires. In thi study of th facilitated transport of zinc, nickel, cobalt ions by liquid membranes containing Tri-n-octyl amine as carrier. The chemical variable exam permitted to determine the parameters giving the extraction efficiency and reextraction optimum. Some performances have been gotten so much to the level of the extraction that of the reextraction. A chemical modelization has allowed to identify the extraction mechanism and transport. The coupling required a real optimization of the set of the parameters. The symmetrical behavior of the two compartments showed that the extraction – reextraction association permits to achieve a transportation, one counter - transportation and a positive coupling. This lets predict an applications as well in the field of metalliferous processing liquid waste not very in charge as in that of the industrial wastes. This also allows an effective protection of the environment while being profitable.

  9. Measurement of Membrane Characteristics Using the Phenomenological Equation and the Overall Mass Transport Equation in Ion-Exchange Membrane Electrodialysis of Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall membrane pair characteristics included in the overall mass transport equation are understandable using the phenomenological equations expressed in the irreversible thermodynamics. In this investigation, the overall membrane pair characteristics (overall transport number , overall solute permeability , overall electro-osmotic permeability and overall hydraulic permeability were measured by seawater electrodialysis changing current density, temperature and salt concentration, and it was found that occasionally takes minus value. For understanding the above phenomenon, new concept of the overall concentration reflection coefficient ∗ is introduced from the phenomenological equation. This is the aim of this investigation. ∗ is defined for describing the permselectivity between solutes and water molecules in the electrodialysis system just after an electric current interruption. ∗ is expressed by the function of and . ∗ is generally larger than 1 and is positive, but occasionally ∗ becomes less than 1 and becomes negative. Negative means that ions are transferred with water molecules (solvent from desalting cells toward concentrating cells just after an electric current interruption, indicating up-hill transport or coupled transport between water molecules and solutes.

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Membrane-Spanning DNA Channels: Conductance Mechanism, Electro-Osmotic Transport, and Mechanical Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-12-03

    DNA self-assembly has emerged as a new paradigm for design of biomimetic membrane channels. Several experimental groups have already demonstrated assembly and insertion of DNA channels into lipid bilayer membranes; however, the structure of the channels and their conductance mechanism have remained undetermined. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the biophysical properties of the DNA membrane channels with atomic precision. We show that, while overall remaining stable, the local structure of the channels undergoes considerable fluctuations, departing from the idealized design. The transmembrane ionic current flows both through the central pore of the channel as well as along the DNA walls and through the gaps in the DNA structure. Surprisingly, we find that the conductance of DNA channels depend on the membrane tension, making them potentially suitable for force-sensing applications. Finally, we show that electro-osmosis governs the transport of druglike molecules through the DNA channels.

  11. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential (...

  12. Preparation of a Facilitated Transport Membrane Composed of Carboxymethyl Chitosan and Polyethylenimine for CO2/N2 Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Nan Shen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The miscibility of carboxymethyl chitosan/polyethylenimine (CMCS/PEI blends was analyzed by FT-IR, TGA and SEM. Defect-free CMCS/PEI blend membranes were prepared with polysulfone (PSf ultrafiltration membranes as support layer for the separation of CO2/N2 mixtures. The results demonstrate that the CMCS/PEI blend is miscible, due to the hydrogen bonding interaction between the two targeted polymers. For the blended membrane without water, the permeability of CO2 gas is 3.6 × 10−7 cm3 cm−2 s−1 cmHg−1 and the corresponding separation factor for CO2 and N2 gas is about 33 at the pressure of 15.2 cmHg. Meanwhile, the blended membrane with water has the better permselectivity. The blended membrane containing water with PEI content of 30 wt% has the permeance of 6.3 × 10−4 cm3 cm−2 s−1 cmHg−1 for CO2 gas and a separation factor of 325 for CO2/N2 mixtures at the same feed pressure. This indicates that the CO2 separation performance of the CMCS/PEI blend membrane is higher than that of other facilitated transport membranes reported for CO2/N2 mixture separation.

  13. Restoration of active transport of solutes and oxidative phosphorylation by naphthoquinones in irradiated membrane vesicles from Mycobacterium phlei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Ho; Sutherland, Thomas O.; Deves, Rosa; Brodie, Arnold F.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of the inverted membrane vesicles of Mycobacterium phlei with light at 360 nm inactivated the natural menaquinone [MK9(II-H)] and resulted in a loss of substrate oxidation, pH gradient, membrane potential, active transport of proline or calcium ions, and oxidative phosphorylation. Restoration of the protonmotive force and active transport occurred on addition of naphthoquinones such as vitamin K1, menadione, or lapachol to the irradiated membrane vesicles. However, coupled phosphorylation was restored only by vitamin K1. Menadione and lapachol did not act as uncoupling agents. The magnitude of the pH gradient and membrane potential in the quinone-restored system was a reflection of the rate of oxidation and was correlated with the rate of uptake of proline or Ca2+. These results are consistent with the chemosmotic hypothesis proposed for the energy transducing mechanism for active transport and further demonstrate that the complete respiratory chain is not required to drive active transport. In contrast, the data suggest that in addition to the driving force (protonmotive force) necessary to establish oxidative phosphorylation, a specific spatial orientation of the respiratory components, such as the naphthaquinones, is essential for the utilization of the proton gradient or membrane potential or both. Bypass of electrons from the respiratory chain with menadione may explain the inability of this quinone to restore oxidative phosphorylation; however, lapachol restores oxidation by the same electron transport pathway as the natural menaquinone but fails to restore phosphorylation. Because all three quinones restore the protonmotive force, other factors that are discussed must be considered in understanding the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:6928606

  14. Carrier-mediated transport of trace quantity of plutonium across dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 / toluene liquid membrane from low alpha waste solutions (Preprint no. SST-09)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, R.K.; Nair, M.K.T.; Shukla, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Macrocycle-facilitated transport of Pu(IV) from plutonium nitrate solutions of extremely low concentration levels across bulk liquid membrane (BLM) and supported liquid membrane (SLM) was investigated. Most of the plutonium could be transported by employing 0.2M DC18C6/ toluene as carrier and sodium carbonate as strippant. Enka Accurel flat sheet polypropylene membrane was used for SLM. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  15. Hepatic taurine transport: a Na+-dependent carrier on the basolateral plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucuvalas, J.C.; Goodrich, A.L.; Suchy, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Highly purified rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were used examine the mechanism and the driving forces for hepatic uptake of the β-amino acid, taurine. An inwardly directed 100 mM NaCl gradient stimulated the initial rate of taurine uptake and energized a transient twofold accumulation of taurine above equilibrium (overshoot). In contrast, uptake was slower and no overshoot was detected in the presence of a KCl gradient. A negative intravesicular electrical potential generated by the presence of permeant anions or an outwardly directed K + gradient with valinomycin increased Na + -stimulated taurine uptake. External Cl - stimulated Na + -dependent taurine uptake independent of effects on the transmembrane electrical potential difference. Na + -dependent taurine uptake showed a sigmoidal dependence on extravesicular Na + concentration, suggesting multiple Na + ions are involved in the translocation of each taurine molecule. Na + -dependent taurine uptake demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximum velocity of 0.537 nmol x mg protein -1 x min -1 and an apparent K/sub m/ of 174 μM. [ 3 H]taurine uptake was inhibited by the presence of excess unlabeled taurine, β-alanine, or hypotaurine but not by L-glutamine or L-alanine. In summary, using basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles, the authors have shown that hepatic uptake of taurine occurs by a carrier-mediated, secondary active transport process specific for β-amino acids. Uptake is electrogenic, stimulated by external Cl - , and requires multiple Na + ions for the translocation of each taurine molecule

  16. Metallic substrate materials for thin film oxygen transport membranes for application in a fossil power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Y.; Baumann, S.; Sebold, D.; Meulenberg, W.A.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF) - IEF-1 Materials Synthesis and Processing

    2010-07-01

    La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}CO{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF58428) and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CO{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF5582) exhibit high oxygen permeability due to their high ionic and electronic conductivity. For this reason they are under discussion for application in oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) in zero-emission power plants using oxyfuel technology. A thin film membrane which can increase the oxygen flux is beneficial and a structural substrate is required. Two types of Ni-base alloys were studied as substrate material candidates with a number of advantages, such as high strength, high temperature stability, easy joining and similar thermal expansion coefficient to the selected perovskite materials. Chemical compositions and thermal expansion coefficients of Ni-base alloys were measured in this study. LSCF58428 and BSCF5582 layers were screen printed on Ni-based alloys and co-fired at high temperature in air. The microstructure and element analysis of samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX). A Ni-base alloy, MCrAlY, with a high Al content was the most suitable substrate material, and showed better chemical compatibility with perovskite materials at high temperature than Hastelloy X, which is a chromia-forming Ni-base alloy. A reaction occurred between Sr in the perovskite and the alumina surface layers on MCr-AlY. However, the reaction zone did not increase in thickness during medium-term annealing at 800 C in air. Hence, it is expected that this reaction will not prevent the application of MCr-AlY as a substrate material. (orig.)

  17. Earliest Results in the Use of Activated Composite Membranes for the Transport of Silver Ions from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucundo Mendoza-Tolentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results concerning the first use of activated composite membranes (ACMs for the facilitated transport of silver ions containing di-(2-ethylhexyl-dithiophosphoric acid (DTPA as the carrier. DTPA was immobilized by interfacial polymerization in a dense layer that was deposited in a porous layer, which was prepared on a nonwoven fabric support by phase inversion. The influence of fundamental parameters affecting the transport of silver ion as the carrier concentration in the membrane phase and stripping agent variation of the stripping solution have been studied. In the optimal conditions, the amount of silver transported across the ACMs was greater than 50%, whereas if the content of the carrier is modified, more than the 90% of the initial silver is removed from the feed phase.

  18. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  19. Transport of a lipophilic ionizable permeant (capric acid) across a lipophilic membrane (silicone polymer membrane) from aqueous buffered solutions in the presence of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymas, Richard V; Ho, Norman F H; Higuchi, William I

    2012-07-01

    The present study describes a physical model approach applicable to understanding the transport of highly lipophilic, ionizable drugs across a lipophilic membrane between two aqueous compartments in the presence of a cyclodextrin in the aqueous phase. Model predictions were compared with experimental results of capric acid (HA) transport across a silicone polymer membrane in the presence and in the absence of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPB) in the aqueous phase over wide ranges of conditions. Key parameters entering into the physical model calculations were the HA-HPB and the A(-)-HPB binding constants, the unionized and ionized free and the complexed HA species diffusion coefficients, the HA pKa, the HA intrinsic silicone polymer membrane permeability coefficient, and the aqueous boundary layer thickness. All of these key parameters were determined from independent or essentially independent experiments. The agreement between the model predictions and the experiments were generally quite good over the entire ranges of the studied independent variables. The results of this study provide an approach that is useful in the mechanistic understanding of how cyclodextrins may enhance the passive absorption of highly lipophilic, low solubility drug molecules in the intestinal tract. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Smart membranes for nitrate removal, water purification, and selective ion transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William D [Pleasanton, CA; Schaldach, Charlene M [Pleasanton, CA; Bourcier, William L [Livermore, CA; Paul, Phillip H [Livermore, CA

    2009-12-15

    A computer designed nanoengineered membrane for separation of dissolved species. One embodiment provides an apparatus for treatment of a fluid that includes ions comprising a microengineered porous membrane, a system for producing an electrical charge across the membrane, and a series of nanopores extending through the membrane. The nanopores have a pore size such that when the fluid contacts the membrane, the nanopores will be in a condition of double layer overlap and allow passage only of ions opposite to the electrical charge across the membrane.

  1. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikyee Ma

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential.Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT. These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3. Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials.Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL produced

  2. [Transport of monovalent thallium across the membrane of oocyte of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherstobitov, A O; Lapin, A V; Glazunov, V V; Nikiforov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms of transport of monovalent thallium across the membrane of oocyte of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis were studied by using 204Tl. Transport of Tl+ in lamprey oocytes has been shown to be realized by at least two pathways: through Na/K-pump and by the mechanism of Na,K,Cl-cotransport. In the standard Ringer solution (mM): 4 KCl, 140 NaCl, 0.5 CaCl2, 5 glucose, 10 Tris-HCl--in the presence of oubain, the coefficient of the 204Tl stationary distribution (cell/medium) was within the range of 2.3-2.5, while the time necessary to reach its 50 % value amounted to 40-5 min at 20 degrees C. In potassium-free media, transport of 204Tl via Na/K-pump was described by simple kinetis with saturation and was characterized by the value V(max) = 520 pmol/(cell x h) and K(M) = 0.3 mM. In the presence of 4 mM K+ and 0.1 mM/l Tl+, the oubain-sensitive Tl+ flow decreased to 75 pmol/(cell x h). At activation of the mechanism of Na,K,Cl-cotransport by the outer Na+ (in Na-NMDG media of different composition) the total inflow of Tl+ reached 193 +/- 20 pmol/(cell x h), while the butamenide-sensitive component--119 +/- 12 pmol/(cell x h) with K(M) for Na+ about 20 mM. In the incubation media with variable concentration of chloride ions (replacement of Cl- by NO3(-)) the total Tl+ flow reached 220 +/- 21, while via the mechanisms of Na,K,Cl-cotransport--87 +/- 8 pmol/(cell x h). Under our experimental conditions, mechanisms of active transport and Na,K,Cl-cotransport accounted for 94% of the Tl+ inflow. The potassium channels that usually are also permeable to monovalent thallium ions were not revealed.

  3. Continuous transport of a small fraction of plasma membrane cholesterol to endoplasmic reticulum regulates total cellular cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Rodney Elwood; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2017-04-17

    Cells employ regulated transport mechanisms to ensure that their plasma membranes (PMs) are optimally supplied with cholesterol derived from uptake of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and synthesis. To date, all inhibitors of cholesterol transport block steps in lysosomes, limiting our understanding of post-lysosomal transport steps. Here, we establish the cholesterol-binding domain 4 of anthrolysin O (ALOD4) as a reversible inhibitor of cholesterol transport from PM to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using ALOD4, we: (1) deplete ER cholesterol without altering PM or overall cellular cholesterol levels; (2) demonstrate that LDL-derived cholesterol travels from lysosomes first to PM to meet cholesterol needs, and subsequently from PM to regulatory domains of ER to suppress activation of SREBPs, halting cholesterol uptake and synthesis; and (3) determine that continuous PM-to-ER cholesterol transport allows ER to constantly monitor PM cholesterol levels, and respond rapidly to small declines in cellular cholesterol by activating SREBPs, increasing cholesterol uptake and synthesis.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  5. Poly(vinyl-alcohol)/poly(ethylene-glycol)/poly(ethylene-imine) blend membranes - structure and CO{sub 2} facilitated transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Hamouda, S. [Laboratoire de traitement des eaux naturelles, CERTE 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Quang, Trong Nguyen; Langevin, D. [FRE 3103, CNRS, laboratoire -Polymeres, Biopolymeres, Surfaces, universite de Rouen, 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France); Sadok, Roudeslic [Laboratoire polymeres, biopolymeres, materiaux organiques, universite de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2010-03-15

    Poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA)/poly(ethylene-imine) (PEI)/poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) blend membranes were prepared by solution casting followed by solvent evaporation. The effects of the blend polymer composition on the membrane structure and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} permeation characteristics were investigated. IR spectroscopy evidenced strong hydrogen bonding interactions between amorphous PVA and PEI, and weaker interactions between PVA and PEG. DSC studies showed that PVA crystallization was partially inhibited by the interactions between amorphous PVA and PEI blend, in which PEG separated into nodules. The CO{sub 2} permeability decreased with an increase in CO{sub 2} partial pressure in feed gas, while the N{sub 2} permeability remained constant. This result indicated that only CO{sub 2} was transported by the facilitated transport mechanism. The CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} permeabilities increased monotonically with the PEI content in the blend membranes, whereas the ideal selectivity of CO{sub 2} to N{sub 2} transport showed a maximum. When CO{sub 2} is humidified, its permeability through the blend membranes is much higher than that of dry CO{sub 2}, but the change in permeability due to the presence of humidity is reversible. (authors)

  6. Poly(vinyl-alcohol)/poly(ethylene-glycol)/poly(ethylene-imine) blend membranes - structure and CO2 facilitated transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Hamouda, S.; Quang, Trong Nguyen; Langevin, D.; Sadok, Roudeslic

    2010-01-01

    Poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA)/poly(ethylene-imine) (PEI)/poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) blend membranes were prepared by solution casting followed by solvent evaporation. The effects of the blend polymer composition on the membrane structure and CO 2 /N 2 permeation characteristics were investigated. IR spectroscopy evidenced strong hydrogen bonding interactions between amorphous PVA and PEI, and weaker interactions between PVA and PEG. DSC studies showed that PVA crystallization was partially inhibited by the interactions between amorphous PVA and PEI blend, in which PEG separated into nodules. The CO 2 permeability decreased with an increase in CO 2 partial pressure in feed gas, while the N 2 permeability remained constant. This result indicated that only CO 2 was transported by the facilitated transport mechanism. The CO 2 and N 2 permeabilities increased monotonically with the PEI content in the blend membranes, whereas the ideal selectivity of CO 2 to N 2 transport showed a maximum. When CO 2 is humidified, its permeability through the blend membranes is much higher than that of dry CO 2 , but the change in permeability due to the presence of humidity is reversible. (authors)

  7. Aldosterone induction of electrogenic sodium transport in the apical membrane vesicles of rat distal colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, V.M.; Kashgarian, M.; Binder, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Na-H exchange is present in apical membrane vesicles (AMV) isolated from distal colon of normal rats. Because in intact tissue aldosterone both induces amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium transport and inhibits electroneutral sodium absorption, these studies with AMV were designed to establish the effect of aldosterone on sodium transport. An outward-directed proton gradient stimulated 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from distal colon of normal and dietary sodium depleted (with elevated aldosterone levels) experimental rats. Unlike normal AMV, proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in experimental AMV was inhibited when uptake was measured under voltage-clamped conditions. 10 microM amiloride inhibited the initial rate of proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in AMV of normal and experimental rats by 30 and 75%, respectively. In contrast, 1 mM amiloride produced comparable inhibition (90 and 80%) of 22Na uptake in normal and experimental AMV. Intravesicular-negative potential stimulated 22Na uptake in experimental but not in normal AMV. This increase was inhibited by 90% by 10 microM amiloride. An analogue of amiloride, 5-(N-ethylisopropyl) amiloride (1 microM), a potent inhibitor of electroneutral Na-H exchange in AMV of normal rat distal colon, did not alter potassium diffusion potential-dependent 22Na uptake. Increasing sodium concentration saturated proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in normal AMV. However, in experimental AMV, 22Na uptake stimulated by both proton gradient and potassium diffusion potential did not saturate as a function of increasing sodium concentration. We conclude from these results that an electrically sensitive conductive channel, not electroneutral Na-H exchange, mediates 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from the distal colon of aldosterone rats

  8. Trans-Plasma Membrane Electron Transport and Ascorbate Efflux by Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Eccardt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trans-plasma membrane electron transport (tPMET and the antioxidant roles of ascorbate reportedly play a role in protection of cells from damage by reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in causing metabolic dysfunction such as insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle comprises the largest whole-body organ fraction suggesting a potential role of tPMET and ascorbate export as a major source of extracellular antioxidant. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle is capable of tPMET and ascorbate efflux. To measure these processes, we assayed the ability of cultured muscle cells, satellite cells, and isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus (SOL to reduce two extracellular electron acceptors, water soluble tetrazolium salt 1 (WST-1, and dichlorophenolindophenol (DPIP. Ascorbate oxidase (AO was utilized to determine which portion of WST-1 reduction was dependent on ascorbate efflux. We found that muscle cells can reduce extracellular electron acceptors. In C2C12 myotubes and satellite cells, a substantial portion of this reduction was dependent on ascorbate. In myotubes, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 inhibitors along with a pan-GLUT inhibitor suppressed tPMET and ascorbate efflux, while a GLUT4 inhibitor had no effect. The adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP-activated protein kinase activator 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR suppressed both tPMET and ascorbate efflux by myotubes, while insulin had no effect. Taken together, our data suggest that muscle cells are capable of tPMET and ascorbate efflux supported by GLUT1, thus illustrating a model in which resting muscle exports electrons and antioxidant to the extracellular environment.

  9. Plasma membrane-located purine nucleotide transport proteins are key components for host exploitation by microsporidian intracellular parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes, consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

  10. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J.; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO3-) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  11. Novel Protic Ionic Liquid Composite Membranes with Fast and Selective Gas Transport Nanochannels for Ethylene/Ethane Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Haozhen; Jiang, Bin; Xiao, Xiaoming; Xu, Mi; Tantai, Xiaowei; Wang, Baoyu; Sun, Yongli; Zhang, Luhong

    2018-04-25

    Protic ionic liquids (PILs) were utilized for the fabrication of composite membranes containing silver salt as the C 2 H 4 transport carrier to perform C 2 H 4 /C 2 H 6 separation for the first time. The intrinsic nanostructures of PILs were adopted to construct fast and selective C 2 H 4 transport nanochannels. The investigation of structure-performance relationships of composite membranes suggested that transport nanochannels (polar domains of PILs) could be tuned by the sizes of cations, which greatly manipulated activity of the carrier and determined the separation performances of membranes. The role of different carriers in the facilitated transport was studied, which revealed that the PILs were good solvents for dissolution and activation of the carrier due to their hydrogen bond networks and waterlike properties. The operating conditions of separation process were investigated systemically and optimized, confirming C 2 H 4 /C 2 H 6 selectivity was enhanced with the increase of silver salt concentration, the flow rate of sweep gas, and the feed ratio of C 2 H 4 to C 2 H 6 , as well as the decrease of the transmembrane pressure and operating temperature. Furthermore, the composite membranes exhibited long-term stability and obtained very competitive separation performances compared with other results. In summary, PIL composite membranes, which possess good long-term stability, high C 2 H 4 /C 2 H 6 selectivity, and excellent C 2 H 4 permeability, may have a good perspective in industrial C 2 H 4 /C 2 H 6 separation.

  12. Grafted functional groups on expanded tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) support for fuel cell and water transport membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Timothy J.; Jiang, Ruichun

    2017-01-24

    A method for forming a modified solid polymer includes a step of contacting a solid fluorinated polymer with a sodium sodium-naphthalenide solution to form a treated fluorinated solid polymer. The treated fluorinated solid polymer is contacted with carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or sulfur trioxide to form a solid grafted fluorinated polymer. Characteristically, the grafted fluorinated polymer includes appended CO.sub.2H or SO.sub.2H or SO.sub.3H groups. The solid grafted fluorinated polymer is advantageously incorporated into a fuel cell as part of the ion-conducting membrane or a water transport membrane in a humidifier.

  13. Determination of technical and economic parameters of an ionic transport membrane air separation unit working in a supercritical power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Kotowicz Janusz; Michalski Sebastian; Balicki Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper an air separation unit was analyzed. The unit consisted of: an ionic transport membrane contained in a four-end type module, an air compressor, an expander fed by gas that remains after oxygen separation and heat exchangers which heat the air and recirculated flue gas to the membrane operating temperature (850 °C). The air separation unit works in a power plant with electrical power equal to 600 MW. This power plant additionally consists of: an oxy-type pulverized-fuel boiler, a...

  14. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum-Ho Bin

    Full Text Available The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP. Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4. However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH.

  15. A Finite-Difference Solution of Solute Transport through a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a theoretical analysis of the transport of solutes through a fixed-film membrane bioreactor (MBR, immobilised with an active biocatalyst. The dimensionless convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients was solved analytically and numerically for concentration profiles of the solutes through the MBR. The analytical solution makes use of regular perturbation and accounts for radial convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate species. The Michaelis-Menten (or Monod rate equation was assumed for the sink term, and the perturbation was extended up to second-order. In the analytical solution only the first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation was considered; hence the linearized equation was solved. In the numerical solution, however, this restriction was lifted. The solution of the nonlinear, elliptic, partial differential equation was based on an implicit finite-difference method (FDM. An upwind scheme was employed for numerical stability. The resulting algebraic equations were solved simultaneously using the multivariate Newton-Raphson iteration method. The solution allows for the evaluation of the effect on the concentration profiles of (i the radial and axial convective velocity, (ii the convective mass transfer rates, (iii the reaction rates, (iv the fraction retentate, and (v the aspect ratio.

  16. Electrochemical System for the Study of Trans-Plasma Membrane Electron Transport in Whole Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Harry G; Jovanovic, Carolyn; Stolnik, Snow; Rawson, Frankie J

    2018-02-20

    The study of trans-plasma membrane electron transport (tPMET) in oncogenic systems is paramount to the further understanding of cancer biology. The current literature provides methodology to study these systems that hinges upon mitochondrial knockout genotypes in conjunction with cell surface oxygen consumption, or the detection of an electron acceptor using colorimetric methods. However, when using an iron redox based system to probe tPMET, there is yet to be a method that allows for the simultaneous quantification of iron redox states while providing an exceptional level of sensitivity. Developing a method to simultaneously analyze the redox state of a reporter molecule would give advantages in probing the underlying biology. Herein, we present an electrochemical based method that allows for the quantification of both ferricyanide and ferrocyanide redox states to a highly sensitive degree. We have applied this system to a novel application of assessing oncogenic cell-driven iron reduction and have shown that it can effectively quantitate and identify differences in iron reduction capability of three lung epithelial cell lines.

  17. Pharmacogenomics of Methotrexate Membrane Transport Pathway: Can Clinical Response to Methotrexate in Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aurea; Bernardes, Miguel; Azevedo, Rita; Medeiros, Rui; Seabra, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used as predictors of patients’ therapeutic outcome variability. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the influence of SNPs in genes encoding for MTX membrane transport proteins in order to predict clinical response to MTX. Methods: Clinicopathological data from 233 RA patients treated with MTX were collected, clinical response defined, and patients genotyped for 23 SNPs. Genotype and haplotype analyses were performed using multivariate methods and a genetic risk index (GRI) for non-response was created. Results: Increased risk for non-response was associated to SLC22A11 rs11231809 T carriers; ABCC1 rs246240 G carriers; ABCC1 rs3784864 G carriers; CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs2074087 and rs3784864; and CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs246240 and rs3784864. GRI demonstrated that patients with Index 3 were 16-fold more likely to be non-responders than those with Index 1. Conclusions: This study revealed that SLC22A11 and ABCC1 may be important to identify those patients who will not benefit from MTX treatment, highlighting the relevance in translating these results to clinical practice. However, further validation by independent studies is needed to develop the field of personalized medicine to predict clinical response to MTX treatment. PMID:26086825

  18. CORRELATION BETWEEN POLYMER PACKING AND GAS TRANSPORT PROPERTIES FOR CO2/N2 SEPARATION IN GLASSY FLUORINATED POLYIMIDE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. TAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas separation performance of a membrane highly hinges on its physical properties. In this study, the interplay between polymer packing of a membrane and its gas transport behaviours (permeability and selectivity was investigated through a series of 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2 polyimide membranes with different polymer compactness. The chemical structure and the polymer packing of the resulting membrane were characterized using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and packing density measurement, respectively. CO2/N2 separation efficiency of the membrane was evaluated at 25oC with feed pressure up to 6 bar. N2 permeability was found to rely on the membrane’s packing density, which signified its greater dependence on molecular sieving. In contrast, sorption showed a more vital role in determining the CO2 permeability. In this work, the membrane with a final thickness of 97±2 µm had successfully surpassed the Robeson’s 2008 upper bound plot with a CO2 permeability of 83 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity of 97 at 3 bar permeation.

  19. Development of facilitated transport membranes for the separation of olefins from gas streams; Entwicklung von Carriermembranen zur Olefinabtrennung aus Gasstroemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    2001-07-01

    The current work is concerned with the development of highly selective facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separation. Adsorption measurements with 7 silver salts showed that silver-perchlorate was the most promising carrier material. This carrier was embedded into two different commercial available polyetherblockamides - Pebax trademark 4011 and Pebax trademark 2533 with up to 41 wt.-% of silver ions. The solubility of the carrier in polymer and the influence of humidity on the separation characteristics of the membranes were studied in detail. The aging of the membrane samples was investigated as well. A composite membrane with a top layer of Pebax trademark 2533/silver-perchlorate showed the best performance. Ethylene permeabilities in the range of 0.1 to 0.4 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} h bar and gas mixture selectivities of 110 to 400 were measured with an humidified equimolar gas mixture of ethylene and ethane. Best results were obtained with membranes manufactured from proposely aging coating solutions and a sub-surface-structure. These membranes showed a permeability coefficient up to 1000 Barrer for ethylene with a gas mixture selectivity of 400. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target

  1. Temperature and concentration effects on electrolyte transport across porous thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes: Pore transport mechanisms and energetics of permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh R; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2006-06-01

    The influence of temperature and concentration on nanofilter charge density and electrolyte pore transport mechanisms is reported. Crossflow filtration experiments were performed to measure transport of several electrolytes (NaCl, NaNO3, NaClO4, CaCl2, MgCl2, and MgSO4) across two commercially available thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes in the range 5-41 degrees C. Experiments were also performed with selected salts in the range 1-50 meq/L to quantify concentration effects. Three different approaches, irreversible thermodynamics, extended Nernst-Planck formulation, and theory of rate processes, were employed to interpret retentions of these symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes at varying temperature and concentration. Increasing feed water temperature slightly increased electrolyte reflection coefficients and only weakly increased permeability compared with neutral solutes. Electromigration and convection tended to counteract each other at high fluxes explaining the weak temperature dependence of the reflection coefficient. Changes in membrane surface charge density with temperature were attributed to increased adsorption of electrolytes on the polymer constituting the active layer. Activation energy of permeation for charged solutes was primarily determined by the Donnan potential at the membrane-feed water interface. Electrolyte permeation was shown to be an enthalpy-driven process that resulted in small entropy changes. Increasing sorption capacity with temperature and low sorption energies indicated that co-ion sorption on polymeric membranes was an endothermic physicosorption process, which appears to determine temperature dependence of electrolyte permeation at increased feed concentrations.

  2. Tonoplast- and plasma membrane-localized aquaporin-family transporters in blue hydrangea sepals of aluminum hyperaccumulating plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Negishi

    Full Text Available Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla is tolerant of acidic soils in which toxicity generally arises from the presence of the soluble aluminum (Al ion. When hydrangea is cultivated in acidic soil, its resulting blue sepal color is caused by the Al complex formation of anthocyanin. The concentration of vacuolar Al in blue sepal cells can reach levels in excess of approximately 15 mM, suggesting the existence of an Al-transport and/or storage system. However, until now, no Al transporter has been identified in Al hyperaccumulating plants, animals or microorganisms. To identify the transporter being responsible for Al hyperaccumulation, we prepared a cDNA library from blue sepals according to the sepal maturation stage, and then selected candidate genes using a microarray analysis and an in silico study. Here, we identified the vacuolar and plasma membrane-localized Al transporters genes vacuolar Al transporter (VALT and plasma membrane Al transporter 1 (PALT1, respectively, which are both members of the aquaporin family. The localization of each protein was confirmed by the transient co-expression of the genes. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting results indicated that VALT and PALT1 are highly expressed in sepal tissue. The overexpression of VALT and PALT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred Al-tolerance and Al-sensitivity, respectively.

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on the transport of spin-labelled compounds across the porcine erythrocyte membrane. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Z. (Instytut Wlokiennictwa, Lodz (Poland))

    1983-02-01

    Using the transport of nitroxide spin labels as a method of estimating the permeability of erythrocyte membranes (Ross and McConnell 1975), an investigation was made of the effect of /sup 60/Co radiation (10 kGy/hour) on the transport of non-electrolytes TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), cation TEMPO-choline and anion 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl across the porcine erythrocyte membrane. The sequence of transport rates was TEMPO, TEMPOL, the anion, and TEMPO-choline. An increase in the reduction of TEMPO was noted after a dose of 1 kGy. Changes in the reduction of TEMPOL were observed only after a dose of 2 kGy. An acceleration of TEMPO-choline reduction was brought about by a dose of 0.5 kGy, while enhanced reduction of anion was found at doses of 1-2 kGy. It was concluded that the spin-label method applied to studies of the effect of radiation on the transport of different compounds allows not only for determination of the rate of permeation of the molecules into the cells but also enables elucidation of species differences in the properties of cell membranes and in their sensitivity to the action of external factors.

  4. Development of Novel active transport membrane devices. Phase I. Final report, 31 October 1988--31 January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laciak, D.V.; Quinn, R.; Choe, G.S.; Cook, P.J.; Tsai, Fu-Jya

    1994-08-01

    The main objective of this program was to identify and develop a technique for fabricating Active Transport Materials (ATM) into lab-scale membrane devices. Air Products met this objective by applying thin film, multilayer fabrication techniques to support the AT material on a substrate membrane. In Phase IA, spiral-wound hollow fiber membrane modules were fabricated and evaluated. These nonoptimized devices were used to demonstrate the AT-based separation of carbon dioxide from methane, hydrogen sulfide from methane, and ammonia from hydrogen. It was determined that a need exists for a more cost efficient and less energy intensive process for upgrading subquality natural gas. Air Products estimated the effectiveness of ATM for this application and concluded that an optimized ATM system could compete effectively with both conventional acid gas scrubbing technology and current membrane technology. In addition, the optimized ATM system would have lower methane loss and consume less energy than current alternative processes. Air Products made significant progress toward the ultimate goal of commercializing an advanced membrane for upgrading subquality natural gas. The laboratory program focused on developing a high performance hollow fiber substrate and fabricating and evaluating ATM-coated lab-scale hollow fiber membrane modules. Selection criteria for hollow fiber composite membrane supports were developed and used to evaluate candidate polymer compositions. A poly(amide-imide), PAI, was identified for further study. Conditions were identified which produced microporous PAI support membrane with tunable surface porosity in the range 100-1000{Angstrom}. The support fibers exhibited good hydrocarbon resistance and acceptable tensile strength though a higher elongation may ultimately be desirable. ATM materials were coated onto commercial and PAI substrate fiber. Modules containing 1-50 fibers were evaluated for permselectivity, pressure stability, and lifetime.

  5. How is glucose transported through cell membrane? ¿Cómo se transporta la glucosa a través de la membrana celular?

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Carlos Burgos Herrera; Diana Patricia Díaz Hernández

    2002-01-01

    Glucose is the main energy supply for the cell and requires a transport protein to enter through cell membranes. Two monosacharid transport systems have been described: SGLT (sodium-glucose transporters) and GLUT (glucose transporters). In this article we review the main molecular, biochemical and functional characteristics of these monosacharid transporters. La glucosa es el principal sustrato energético de la célula y para su ingreso requiere una proteína transportadora en la membrana celul...

  6. The impact of membrane surface charges on the ion transport in MoS2 nanopore power generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhuo; Zhang, Yan; Hayashida, Tomoki; Ji, Ziwei; He, Yuhui; Tsutsui, Makusu; Miao, Xiang Shui; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-12-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated giant osmotic effects induced in a single-atomic-layer MoS2 nanopore by imposing a KCl concentration bias, thereby highlighting the prospect of ultrathin nanopores as power generators. In this work, we report on an electrokinetic analysis of the ionic transport in the MoS2 nanopore system. By taking membrane surface chemistry into account, we found profound roles of surface charges in and out of the nanopore on the cross-pore ion transport, which shed light on the intriguing experimental observations of a high pore conductance with a large open-circuit voltage in the MoS2 system. The present work establishes a theoretical model capable of dealing with ultrathin membrane surface charges for evaluating the energy conversion performance of nanopore power generators constructed with two-dimensional materials.

  7. An examination of the proposition to use membrane transport in an aqueous solution absorption heat pump cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. S.; Haskin, W. L.; Chang, W. S.

    1990-06-01

    A thermal transfer cycle utilizing membrane osmotic transport of water against a pressure rise is investigated from the viewpoint of the operation of a conventional absorption heat pump using an aqueous solution as the working fluid. Physical sorption, similar or equivalent to condensation, of water vapor in the membrane material is considered to be an essential step in the overall process of water transport. The thermal nature of this step during which the heat of sorption similar in amount to the heat of condensation for water vapor must evolve at the evaporator temperature or lower disqualifies the system in performance as a heat pump. Simple flow relations for the aqueous sugar solution are derived under simplifying assumptions. A set of numerical calculations is given as an illustration to show that the inferred steps are well within the limits of thermodynamics.

  8. Transport of Th(IV) and U(VI) through barium silico-phosphate composite membrane using electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, E.E.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation of a novel barium silico-phosphate filter paper supported membrane. It is based on precipitation reaction of barium silico-phosphate on the outer surface and in the interstices of a filter paper by means of electrodialysis. The main physical and electrical properties of the membrane are given and its electrodialysis behaviour is assessed for Th(IV) and U(VI). The transport of Th(IV) in presence of U(VI) was studied. The cationic fluxes of Th(IV) and U(VI) were found to be 1.2 x 10 -8 and 6.5 x 10 -9 g eq cm -2 s -1 , respectively. Transport of Th(IV) and U(VI) in presence of EDTA was investigated. The cationic flux of U(VI) is found to be 9.8 x 10 -9 g eq cm -2 s -1 at a current density of 25 mA/cm 2 . A comparative study on the electro osmotic effect was carried out using the developed membrane and commercially available Nafion membranes. In this context, different parameters like current density, electrolyte concentration, etc. were investigated. The electro-osmotic permeability coefficient, D e , of Th(IV) through barium silico-phosphate and Nafion membranes were 6.9 x 10 -2 and 1.0 x 10 -2 cm 3 /As, respectively. It can be concluded that inorganic membranes have very marked electro-osmotic properties unlike their organic counterparts. (orig.)

  9. Intact plant MRI for the study of cell water relations, membrane permeability, cell-to-cell and long distance water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    2007-01-01

    Water content and hydraulic conductivity, including transport within cells, over membranes, cell-to-cell, and long-distance xylem and phloem transport, are strongly affected by plant water stress. By being able to measure these transport processes non-invasely in the intact plant situation in

  10. Exercise-induced increase in glucose transport, GLUT-4, and VAMP-2 in plasma membrane from human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Hargreaves, Mark; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    contractions may induce trafficking of GLUT-4-containing vesicles via a mechanism similar to neurotransmitter release. Our results demonstrate for the first time exercise-induced translocation of GLUT-4 and VAMP-2 to the plasma membrane of human muscle and increased sarcolemmal glucose transport.......A major effect of muscle contractions is an increase in sarcolemmal glucose transport. We have used a recently developed technique to produce sarcolemmal giant vesicles from human muscle biopsy samples obtained before and after exercise. Six men exercised for 10 min at 50% maximal O2 uptake (Vo2max...

  11. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  12. Transport phenomena in chitosan synthetic membranes with emphasis on the effect of variations in the ratio of matrix/solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyoman Rupiasih, N.; Eka Puspita, Yayuk; Sumadiyasa, Made

    2015-06-01

    The object of this research was investigating the transport phenomena of chitosan synthetic membranes with emphasis on the effect of variations in the ratio of matrix/solvent. The study was focused on the effect of amount of chitosan as matrix and electrolytes solutions on the characteristics of current density of chitosan membranes. A series of chitosan membranes with various ratios of components was used such as 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%. The electrolytes solutions, NaCl and CaCl2, with various concentrations, 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM, 100 mM and 1000 mM, were used. Ion transport processes were carried out in a cell membrane model which composed of two compartments named compartment 1 and 2, and the potential difference was measured using a pair of Activon AEP jnct Single 12 x 120 mm calomel electrodes. All the measurements were conducted at room temperature, 28.8 oC. The result showed that the current density increased with some parameters e.g. increased in the ratio of concentration of solution, C1:C2; increased in the amount of chitosan, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%; and increased in the size of Stokes radii of the selected cations, Na+ and Ca+2.

  13. Facilitated transport of uranium(VI) across supported liquid membranes containing T2EHDGA as the carrier extractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, S; Mohapatra, P K; Tripathi, S C; Manchanda, V K

    2011-04-15

    Facilitated transport of uranyl ion from nitric acid feed solutions was investigated across PTFE supported liquid membranes using N,N,N',N'-tetra-2-ethylhexyl-3-pentane-diamide (T2EHDGA) in n-dodecane as the carrier extractant containing 30% iso-decanol as the phase modifier. Solvent extraction studies indicated extraction of species of the type, UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·T2EHDGA. The distribution coefficients increased in the presence of NaNO(3) as compared to equivalent concentration of HNO(3) which was exactly the opposite of what was reported for Am(III)-TODGA extraction system. Supported liquid membrane studies indicated about 11h were required for quantitative transport of U(VI) from a feed of 3M HNO(3) using 0.2M T2EHDGA in n-dodecane containing 30% iso-decanol as the carrier extractant. Effect of various parameters such as feed acidity, T2EHDGA concentration, and nature of the strippant on the transport rate was investigated. The transport was found to be diffusion controlled in the membrane phase and the permeability coefficient was calculated to be (3.20 ± 0.13)× 10(-4)cm/s for the feed composition of 3M HNO(3), receiver phase composition of 0.01 M HNO(3) and membrane carrier phase of 0.2M T2EHDGA in n-dodecane containing 30% iso-decanol. The present results may be useful for the separation of U from lean solutions or radioactive wastes considered hazardous due to the presence of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of temperature on oxygen permeation through ion transport membrane to feed a biomass gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, T.; Foscolo, P. U.; Gallucci, K.; Stendardo, S.

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen-permeable perovskite membranes with mixed ionic-electronic conducting properties can play an important role in the high temperature separation of oxygen from air. A detailed design of a membrane test module is presented, useful to test mechanical resistance and structural stability of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) capillary membrane in the reactor environment. Preliminary experimental results of membrane permeation tests highlight the positive effect of temperature on perovskite materials. This behaviour is also confirmed by a computational model of char combustion with oxygen permeated through the membrane module, when it is placed inside a gasifier reactor to provide the necessary input of heat to the gasification endothermic process. The results show that the temperature affects the oxygen permeation of the BSCF membrane remarkably.

  15. Water Transport in Bicontinuous, Phase-Separated Membranes Made from Reactive Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Membranes Made from Reactive Block Copolymers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORISE 1120-1120-99 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...semipermeable membrane that allows sweat to escape a chemical protection garment , while rejecting chemical agents, would provide a potential solution... garment in chemical agent protection. 15. SUBJECT TERMS ionomer, membrane, water vapor, cocontinuous, bicontinuous 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  16. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  17. Surface oxygen vacancy and oxygen permeation flux limits of perovskite ion transport membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Anton

    2015-09-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The mechanisms and quantitative models for how oxygen is separated from air using ion transport membranes (ITMs) are not well understood, largely due to the experimental complexity for determining surface exchange reactions at extreme temperatures (>800°C). This is especially true when fuels are present at the permeate surface. For both inert and reactive (fuels) operations, solid-state oxygen surface vacancies (δ) are ultimately responsible for driving the oxygen flux, JO2. In the inert case, the value of δ at either surface is a function of the local PO2 and temperature, whilst the magnitude of δ dictates both the JO2 and the inherent stability of the material. In this study values of δ are presented based on experimental measurements under inert (CO2) sweep: using a permeation flux model and local PO2 measurements, collected by means of a local gas-sampling probe in our large-scale reactor, we can determine δ directly. The ITM assessed was La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF); the relative resistances to JO2 were quantified using the pre-defined permeation flux model and local PO2 values. Across a temperature range from 825°C to 1056°C, δ was found to vary from 0.007 to 0.029 (<1%), safely within material stability limits, whilst the permeate surface exchange resistance dominates. An inert JO2 limit was identified owing to a maximum sweep surface δ, δmaxinert. The physical presence of δmaxinert is attributed to a rate limiting step shift from desorption to associative electron transfer steps on the sweep surface as PO2 is reduced. Permeate surface exchange limitations under non-reactive conditions suggest that reactive (fuel) operation is necessary to accelerate surface chemistry for future work, to reduce flux resistance and push δpast δmaxinert in a stable manner.

  18. Red and green algal origin of diatom membrane transporters: insights into environmental adaptation and cell evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Xin Chan

    Full Text Available Membrane transporters (MTs facilitate the movement of molecules between cellular compartments. The evolutionary history of these key components of eukaryote genomes remains unclear. Many photosynthetic microbial eukaryotes (e.g., diatoms, haptophytes, and dinoflagellates appear to have undergone serial endosymbiosis and thereby recruited foreign genes through endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT. Here we used the diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum as models to examine the evolutionary origin of MTs in this important group of marine primary producers. Using phylogenomics, we used 1,014 diatom MTs as query against a broadly sampled protein sequence database that includes novel genome data from the mesophilic red algae Porphyridium cruentum and Calliarthron tuberculosum, and the stramenopile Ectocarpus siliculosus. Our conservative approach resulted in 879 maximum likelihood trees of which 399 genes show a non-lineal history between diatoms and other eukaryotes and prokaryotes (at the bootstrap value ≥70%. Of the eukaryote-derived MTs, 172 (ca. 25% of 697 examined phylogenies have members of both red/green algae as sister groups, with 103 putatively arising from green algae, 19 from red algae, and 50 have an unresolved affiliation to red and/or green algae. We used topology tests to analyze the most convincing cases of non-lineal gene history in which red and/or green algae were nested within stramenopiles. This analysis showed that ca. 6% of all trees (our most conservative estimate support an algal origin of MTs in stramenopiles with the majority derived from green algae. Our findings demonstrate the complex evolutionary history of photosynthetic eukaryotes and indicate a reticulate origin of MT genes in diatoms. We postulate that the algal-derived MTs acquired via E/HGT provided diatoms and other related microbial eukaryotes the ability to persist under conditions of fluctuating ocean chemistry, likely

  19. Membrane potential independent transport of NH3in the absence of ammonium permeases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Rojas, Hugo F; Milne, Nicholas; van Helmond, Ward; Pieterse, Mervin M; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2017-04-17

    Microbial production of nitrogen containing compounds requires a high uptake flux and assimilation of the N-source (commonly ammonium), which is generally coupled with ATP consumption and negatively influences the product yield. In the industrial workhorse Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ammonium (NH 4 + ) uptake is facilitated by ammonium permeases (Mep1, Mep2 and Mep3), which transport the NH 4 + ion, resulting in ATP expenditure to maintain the intracellular charge balance and pH by proton export using the plasma membrane-bound H + -ATPase. To decrease the ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the Mep genes were removed, resulting in a strain unable to uptake the NH 4 + ion. Subsequent analysis revealed that growth of this ∆mep strain was dependent on the extracellular NH 3 concentrations. Metabolomic analysis revealed a significantly higher intracellular NH X concentration (3.3-fold) in the ∆mep strain than in the reference strain. Further proteomic analysis revealed significant up-regulation of vacuolar proteases and genes involved in various stress responses. Our results suggest that the uncharged species, NH 3 , is able to diffuse into the cell. The measured intracellular/extracellular NH X ratios under aerobic nitrogen-limiting conditions were consistent with this hypothesis when NH x compartmentalization was considered. On the other hand, proteomic analysis indicated a more pronounced N-starvation stress response in the ∆mep strain than in the reference strain, which suggests that the lower biomass yield of the ∆mep strain was related to higher turnover rates of biomass components.

  20. Structure and Transport Properties of Mixed-Matrix Membranes Based on Polyimides with ZrO2 Nanostars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Sokolova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-matrix membranes based on amorphous and semi-crystalline polyimides with zirconium dioxide (ZrO2 nanostars were synthesized. Amorphous poly(4,4′-oxydiphenylenepyromellitimide and semi-crystalline polyimide prepared from 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxybenzene and 4,4’-oxydiphthalic anhydride were used. The effect of ZrO2 nanostars on the structure and morphology of nanocomposite membranes was studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle measurements. Thermal properties and stability were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Transport properties of hybrid membranes containing 5 wt % ZrO2 were tested for pervaporation of a mixture of butanol–water with 10 wt % H2O content. It was found that a significant amount of the ZrO2 added to the semi-crystalline polyimide is encapsulated inside spherulites. Therefore, the beneficial influence of inorganic filler on the selectivity of mixed-matrix membrane with respect to water was hampered. Mixed-matrix membranes based on amorphous polymer demonstrated the best performance, because water molecules had higher access to inorganic particles.

  1. PIN6 auxin transporter at endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane mediates auxin homeostasis and organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sibu; Skůpa, Petr; Viaene, Tom; Zwiewka, Marta; Tejos, Ricardo; Klíma, Petr; Čarná, Mária; Rolčík, Jakub; De Rycke, Riet; Moreno, Ignacio; Dobrev, Petre I; Orellana, Ariel; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Plant development mediated by the phytohormone auxin depends on tightly controlled cellular auxin levels at its target tissue that are largely established by intercellular and intracellular auxin transport mediated by PIN auxin transporters. Among the eight members of the Arabidopsis PIN family, PIN6 is the least characterized candidate. In this study we generated functional, fluorescent protein-tagged PIN6 proteins and performed comprehensive analysis of their subcellular localization and also performed a detailed functional characterization of PIN6 and its developmental roles. The localization study of PIN6 revealed a dual localization at the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transport and metabolic profiling assays in cultured cells and Arabidopsis strongly suggest that PIN6 mediates both auxin transport across the PM and intracellular auxin homeostasis, including the regulation of free auxin and auxin conjugates levels. As evidenced by the loss- and gain-of-function analysis, the complex function of PIN6 in auxin transport and homeostasis is required for auxin distribution during lateral and adventitious root organogenesis and for progression of these developmental processes. These results illustrate a unique position of PIN6 within the family of PIN auxin transporters and further add complexity to the developmentally crucial process of auxin transport. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    the apoprotein. Escherichia coli lipid and DOPG (and to a smaller extent DOPC) increase Ffh's α-helical content, possibly related to Ffh's role in guiding membrane proteins to the membrane. Binding is largely mediated by electrostatic interactions but does not protect Ffh against trypsinolysis. We conclude...

  3. Ion transport resistance in Microbial Electrolysis Cells with anion and cation exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Rozendal, R.A.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) perform better when an anion exchange membrane (AEM) than when a cation exchange membrane (CEM) separates the electrode chambers. Here, we have further studied this phenomenon by comparing two analysis methods for

  4. Dense inorganic membranes - studies on transport properties, defect chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen separation with dense oxide membranes may be an attractive method for the production of oxygen from air. Another possible application is the direct supply of oxygen in membrane reactors for the (partial) oxidation of hydrocarbons. The driving force for oxygen permeation through dense mixed

  5. Membrane potential plays a dual role for chloride transport across toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Rasmussen, B E

    1983-01-01

    The Cl- -current through toad skin epithelium depends on the potential in a way consistent with a potential-controlled Cl- permeability. Computer analysis of the Koefoed-Johnsen Ussing two-membrane model provided with constant membrane permeabilities indicates that the voltage- and time-dependent......The Cl- -current through toad skin epithelium depends on the potential in a way consistent with a potential-controlled Cl- permeability. Computer analysis of the Koefoed-Johnsen Ussing two-membrane model provided with constant membrane permeabilities indicates that the voltage- and time...... resemble experimental observations. This extension of the classic frog skin model implies that the Cl- permeability is activated by a voltage change caused by the inward Na+ current through the apical membrane....

  6. Uncovering Arabidopsis membrane protein interactome enriched in transporters using mating-based split ubiquitin assays and classification models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin eChen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput data are a double-edged sword; for the benefit of large amount of data, there is an associated cost of noise. To increase reliability and scalability of high-throughput protein interaction data generation, we tested the efficacy of classification to enrich potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs. We applied this method to identify interactions among Arabidopsis membrane proteins enriched in transporters. We validated our method with multiple retests. Classification improved the quality of the ensuing interaction network and was effective in reducing the search space and increasing true positive rate. The final network of 541 interactions among 239 proteins (of which 179 are transporters is the first protein interaction network enriched in membrane transporters reported for any organism. This network has similar topological attributes to other published protein interaction networks. It also extends and fills gaps in currently available biological networks in plants and allows building a number of hypotheses about processes and mechanisms involving signal-transduction and transport systems.

  7. Carrier-facilitated transport of Cd(II) through a supported liquid membrane containing thiacalix[4]arene derivatives as ionophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghbani, Asma; Tayeb, Rafik; Dhahbi, Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of a facilitated transport process of cadmium ions through a SLM system incorporating new extractant agents, thiacalix[4]arenes, was studied. These molecules have sulfur atoms instead of usual methylene bridges. The chemical modification of the upper or the lower rim provides a great variety of supra molecules having different complexation ability and different conformational behaviour. The efficiency of the transport across the inner membrane organic liquid phase is shown to depend on the chemical (affinity) and structural (conformational states possible) parameters of these complexing molecules. In this work, two different thiacalix[4]arenes were selected as effective ionophore for the treatment of liquid media loaded in Cd(II). The results show that these thiacalix[4]arenes derivative ensure facilitated transport of cadmium cations through supported liquid membranes. Especially, the non-substituted thiacalix[4]arene can be considered as an effective extractant agent. The incidence of several parameters on transport efficiency such as pH of both aqueous solutions and carrier concentration was studied. The permeation of the species is due to a proton potential gradient (the driving force of the process) existing between the two opposite sides of the SLM. The initial flux, J, is found to be equal to 6.7.10 -7 mol.m -2 .s -1 , under optimal experimental conditions.

  8. Effects of heat and water transport on the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under high current density operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Shiomi, Takeshi; Aoki, Osamu; Kubo, Norio; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Key challenges to the acceptance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for automobiles are the cost reduction and improvement in its power density for compactness. In order to get the solution, the further improvement in a fuel cell performance is required. In particular, under higher current density operation, water and heat transport in PEMFCs has considerable effects on the cell performance. In this study, the impact of heat and water transport on the cell performance under high current density was investigated by experimental evaluation of liquid water distribution and numerical validation. Liquid water distribution in MEA between rib and channel area is evaluated by neutron radiography. In order to neglect the effect of liquid water in gas channels and reactant species concentration distribution in the flow direction, the differential cell was used in this study. Experimental results suggested that liquid water under the channel was dramatically changed with rib/channel width. From the numerical study, it is found that the change of liquid water distribution was significantly affected by temperature distribution in MEA between rib and channel area. In addition, not only heat transport but also water transport through the membrane also significantly affected the cell performance under high current density operation.

  9. The core components of organelle biogenesis and membrane transport in the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Rada

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protist of the Excavata group. It contains an anaerobic form of mitochondria called hydrogenosomes, which produce hydrogen and ATP; the majority of mitochondrial pathways and the organellar genome were lost during the mitochondrion-to-hydrogenosome transition. Consequently, all hydrogenosomal proteins are encoded in the nucleus and imported into the organelles. However, little is known about the membrane machineries required for biogenesis of the organelle and metabolite exchange. Using a combination of mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, in vitro import assays and reverse genetics, we characterized the membrane proteins of the hydrogenosome. We identified components of the outer membrane (TOM and inner membrane (TIM protein translocases include multiple paralogs of the core Tom40-type porins and Tim17/22/23 channel proteins, respectively, and uniquely modified small Tim chaperones. The inner membrane proteins TvTim17/22/23-1 and Pam18 were shown to possess conserved information for targeting to mitochondrial inner membranes, but too divergent in sequence to support the growth of yeast strains lacking Tim17, Tim22, Tim23 or Pam18. Full complementation was seen only when the J-domain of hydrogenosomal Pam18 was fused with N-terminal region and transmembrane segment of the yeast homolog. Candidates for metabolite exchange across the outer membrane were identified including multiple isoforms of the β-barrel proteins, Hmp35 and Hmp36; inner membrane MCF-type metabolite carriers were limited to five homologs of the ATP/ADP carrier, Hmp31. Lastly, hydrogenosomes possess a pathway for the assembly of C-tail-anchored proteins into their outer membrane with several new tail-anchored proteins being identified. These results show that hydrogenosomes and mitochondria share common core membrane components required for protein import and metabolite exchange; however, they also reveal remarkable differences

  10. Transmembrane segment (TMS) VIII of the Na+/citrate transporter CitS requires downstream TMS IX for insertion in the Escherichia coli membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the sodium ion-dependent citrate transporter CitS of IL pneumoniae contains 12 hydrophobic stretches that could form membrane-spanning segments. A previous analysis of the membrane topology in Escherichia coli using the PhoA gene fusion technique indicated that only nine

  11. Structural and functional properties of SrTi1-xFexO3-δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) for the use as oxygen transport membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze-Küppers, F.; Ten Donkelaar, S. F.P.; Baumann, S.; Prigorodov, P.; Sohn, Y. J.; Bouwmeester, H. J.M.; Meulenberg, W. A.; Guillon, O.

    2015-01-01

    Perovskitic oxides are widely investigated as oxygen transport membrane materials for the efficient generation of pure oxygen or the use in membrane reactors. However, most of high performance perovskites suffer from low stability in operation conditions. Therefore, solid solutions of SrTi1-xFexO3-δ

  12. Electrodriven selective transport of Cs+ using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in polymer inclusion membrane: a novel approach for cesium removal from simulated nuclear waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Goswami, Asok

    2014-11-04

    The work describes a novel and cleaner approach of electrodriven selective transport of Cs from simulated nuclear waste solutions through cellulose tri acetate (CTA)/poly vinyl chloride (PVC) based polymer inclusion membrane. The electrodriven cation transport together with the use of highly Cs+ selective hexachlorinated derivative of cobalt bis dicarbollide, allows to achieve selective separation of Cs+ from high concentration of Na+ and other fission products in nuclear waste solutions. The transport selectivity has been studied using radiotracer technique as well as atomic emission spectroscopic technique. Transport studies using CTA based membrane have been carried out from neutral solution as well as 0.4 M HNO3, while that with PVC based membrane has been carried out from 3 M HNO3. High decontamination factor for Cs+ over Na+ has been obtained in all the cases. Experiment with simulated high level waste solution shows selective transport of Cs+ from most of other fission products also. Significantly fast Cs+ transport rate along with high selectivity is an interesting feature observed in this membrane. The current efficiency for Cs+ transport has been found to be ∼100%. The promising results show the possibility of using this kind of electrodriven membrane transport methods for nuclear waste treatment.

  13. Polymer-immobilized liquid membrane transport of palladium (II) from nitric acid media using some thia extractants as novel receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Carrier-facilitated co-transport of Pd (II) from dilute acidic nitrate solutions was examined across a polymer-immobilized liquid membrane (PILM) deploying S 6 -pentano-36 (S 6 -P-36), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfoxide (BESO) and bis (2, 4, 4 trimethyl pentyl) monothio phosphinic acid (Cyanex 302) as the novel receptors. The study carried out to distinguish the driving force between H + and NO 3 - ion for the cation transport across PILM, indicated that NO 3 - ion not the H + ion seems to be the driving force for Pd (II) transport under the present conditions for both BESO-PILM and S 6 -P-36-PILM systems. Recovery of palladium from acidic process effluents generated in Purex reprocessing of spent fuels was successfully achieved. 39 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  14. High-resolution NMR reveals secondary structure and folding of amino acid transporter from outer chloroplast membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Zook

    Full Text Available Solving high-resolution structures for membrane proteins continues to be a daunting challenge in the structural biology community. In this study we report our high-resolution NMR results for a transmembrane protein, outer envelope protein of molar mass 16 kDa (OEP16, an amino acid transporter from the outer membrane of chloroplasts. Three-dimensional, high-resolution NMR experiments on the (13C, (15N, (2H-triply-labeled protein were used to assign protein backbone resonances and to obtain secondary structure information. The results yield over 95% assignment of N, HN, CO, Cα, and Cβ chemical shifts, which is essential for obtaining a high resolution structure from NMR data. Chemical shift analysis from the assignment data reveals experimental evidence for the first time on the location of the secondary structure elements on a per residue basis. In addition T 1Z and T2 relaxation experiments were performed in order to better understand the protein dynamics. Arginine titration experiments yield an insight into the amino acid residues responsible for protein transporter function. The results provide the necessary basis for high-resolution structural determination of this important plant membrane protein.

  15. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating costs, as well higher product selectivities than traditional technologies. The oxygen permeation rate through a given ITM is defined by the membrane temperature and oxygen chemical potential difference across it. Both of these parameters can be strongly influenced by thermochemical reactions occurring in the vicinity of the membrane, though in the literature they are often characterized in terms of the well mixed product stream at the reactor exit. This work presents the development of a novel ITM reactor for the fundamental investigation of the coupling between fuel conversion and oxygen permeation under well defined fluid dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, including provisions for spatially resolved, in-situ investigations. A planar, finite gap stagnation flow reactor with optical and probe access to the reaction zone is used to facilitate in-situ measurements and cross-validation with detailed numerical simulations. Using this novel reactor, baseline measurements are presented to elucidate the impact of the sweep gas fuel (CH4) fraction on the oxygen permeation and fuel conversion. In addition, the difference between well-mixed gas compositions measured at the reactor outlet and those measured in the vicinity of the membrane surface are discussed, demonstrating the unique utility of the reactor. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Employment of Voltammetry in Studies of Transport Processes across Artificial Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, Ivana; Navrátil, Tomáš; Josypčuk, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 11 (2016), s. 2754-2759 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : phospholipid membrane * cadmium * calcium ionophore (calcimycin) Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.851, year: 2016

  17. The influence of erythrocyte maturity on ion transport and membrane lipid composition in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokurková, Martina; Rauchová, Hana; Dobešová, Zdenka; Loukotová, Jana; Nováková, O.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2016), s. 91-99 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25396A; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : reticulocytes * immature erythrocytes * mean cellular hemoglobin content * membrane phospholipids * membrane cholesterol Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  18. Membrane permeable C-terminal dopamine transporter peptides attenuate amphetamine-evoked dopamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Owens, WA; Winkler, Marie-Therese

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for sequestration of extracellular dopamine (DA). The psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) is a DAT substrate, which is actively transported into the nerve terminal, eliciting vesicular depletion and reversal of DA transport via DAT. Here, we investigate...

  19. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  20. Experimental and analytical analysis of polarization and water transport behaviors of hydrogen alkaline membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Sen; Zhou, Jiaxun; Wang, Tianyou; Chen, Rui; Jiao, Kui

    2018-04-01

    Experimental test and analytical modeling are conducted to investigate the operating behavior of an alkaline electrolyte membrane (AEM) fuel cell fed by H2/air (or O2) and explore the effect of various operating pressures on the water transfer mechanism. According to the experimental test, the cell performance is greatly improved through increasing the operating pressure gradient from anode to cathode which leads to significant liquid water permeation through the membrane. The high frequency resistance of the A901 alkaline membrane is observed to be relatively stable as the operating pressure varies based on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. Correspondingly, based on the modeling prediction, the averaged water content in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) does not change too much which leads to the weak variation of membrane ohmic resistance. This reveals that the performance enhancement should give the credit to better electro-chemical reaction kinetics for both the anode and cathode, also prone by the EIS results. The reversion of water back diffusion direction across the membrane is also observed through analytical solution.

  1. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C.; Dalzell, Danielle R.; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2 nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  2. Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater

    KAUST Repository

    Valentino, Lauren

    2015-02-17

    This study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage.

  3. Lipoprotein Transport: Greasing the Machines of Outer Membrane Biogenesis: Re-Examining Lipoprotein Transport Mechanisms Among Diverse Gram-Negative Bacteria While Exploring New Discoveries and Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowicz, Marcin

    2018-04-01

    The Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) is a potent permeability barrier against antibiotics, limiting clinical options amid mounting rates of resistance. The Lol transport pathway delivers lipoproteins to the OM. All the OM assembly machines require one or more OM lipoprotein to function, making the Lol pathway central for all aspects of OM biogenesis. The Lol pathways of many medically important species clearly deviate from the Escherichia coli paradigm, perhaps with implications for efforts to develop novel antibiotics. Moreover, recent work reveals the existence of an undiscovered alternate route for bringing lipoproteins to the OM. Here, lipoprotein transport mechanisms, and the quality control systems that underpin them, is re-examined in context of their diversity. © 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular basis for interaction of Na+/K+-ATPase with other transporters in membrane microdomains of vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Kirstine; Matchkov, Vladimir; Bouzinova, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K+-pump, has previously been shown to interfere with intercellular communication. We have recently demonstrated a mechanism of this action of ouabain (1). We have showed that gap junctions between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are regulated through...... an interaction between the Na+/K+-pump and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger leading to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. This regulation suggests a close association of the proteins in microdomains. We have also suggested that this Na......+/K+-pump-containing microdomain is functionally linked to KATP channels via the local ion homeostasis and that this interaction can be bidirectional (1;2). Using PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry we aimed to identify the isoforms of membrane transporters involved in the suggested interaction in SMCs from mesenteric...

  5. Mapping the membrane proteome of anaerobic gut fungi identifies a wealth of carbohydrate binding proteins and transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Susanna; Solomon, Kevin V; Gilmore, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered cell factories that convert biomass into value-added compounds are emerging as a timely alternative to petroleum-based industries. Although often overlooked, integral membrane proteins such as solute transporters are pivotal for engineering efficient microbial chassis. Anaerobic gut....... Unexpectedly, we found a number of putative sugar binding proteins that are associated with prokaryotic uptake systems; and approximately 100 class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) with non-canonical putative sugar binding domains. We report the first comprehensive characterization of the membrane protein...... a plethora of carbohydrate binding domains at their surface, perhaps as a means to sense and sequester some of the sugars that their biomass degrading, extracellular enzymes produce....

  6. The periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA acts as a switch in stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by MacB transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Modali, Sita D.; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC is a tri-partite macrolide efflux transporter driven by hydrolysis of ATP. In this complex, MacA is the periplasmic membrane fusion protein that stimulates the activity of MacB transporter and establishes the link with the outer membrane channel TolC. The molecular mechanism by which MacA stimulates MacB remains unknown. Here, we report that the periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA plays a critical role in functional MacA-MacB interactions and stimulation o...

  7. Inhibition of beta-amino acid transport by diamide does not involve the brush border membrane surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesney, R.W.; Gusowski, N.; Albright, P.

    1985-01-01

    Diamide (dicarboxylic acid bis-(N,N-dimethylamide) has been shown in previous studies to block the uptake of the beta-amino acid taurine at its high affinity transport site in rat renal cortex slices. Diamide may act by increasing the efflux of taurine from the slice. Studies performed in rat slices again indicate enhanced efflux over 8-12 minutes. The time course of reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion from renal cortex is similar, indicating a potential interaction between GSH depletion and inhibition of taurine accumulation. The effect of 9 mM diamide on the Na+ -dependent accumulation of taurine (10 and 250 microM) by brush border membrane vesicles was examined, and the taurine uptake value both initially and at equilibrium was the same in the presence and absence of diamide. Isolation of the brush border surface and subsequent transport studies of taurine are not influenced by diamide. Thus, diamide inhibition of taurine uptake does not involve physiochemical alteration of the membrane surface where active amino acid transport occurs, despite the thiol-oxidizing properties of this agent. Further, these studies suggest that diamide either acts at the basolateral surface, rather than the brush border surface of rat renal cortex or requires the presence of an intact tubule, capable of metabolism, prior to its inhibitory action

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  9. The transport of phenylacetic acid across the peroxisomal membrane is mediated by the PaaT protein in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aguado, Marta; Ullán, Ricardo V; Teijeira, Fernando; Rodríguez-Castro, Raquel; Martín, Juan F

    2013-04-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum, an industrial microorganism used worldwide for penicillin production, is an excellent model to study the biochemistry and the cell biology of enzymes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites. The well-known peroxisomal location of the last two steps of penicillin biosynthesis (phenylacetyl-CoA ligase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase) requires the import into the peroxisomes of the intermediate isopenicillin N and the precursors phenylacetic acid and coenzyme A. The mechanisms for the molecular transport of these precursors are still poorly understood. In this work, a search was made, in the genome of P. chrysogenum, in order to find a Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) membrane protein homologous to CefT of Acremonium chrysogenum, which is known to confer resistance to phenylacetic acid. The paaT gene was found to encode a MFS membrane protein containing 12 transmembrane spanners and one Pex19p-binding domain for Pex19-mediated targeting to peroxisomal membranes. RNA interference-mediated silencing of the paaT gene caused a clear reduction of benzylpenicillin secretion and increased the sensitivity of P. chrysogenum to the penicillin precursor phenylacetic acid. The opposite behavior was found when paaT was overexpressed from the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter that increases phenylacetic acid resistance and penicillin production. Localization studies by fluorescent laser scanning microscopy using PaaT-DsRed and EGFP-SKL fluorescent fusion proteins clearly showed that the protein was located in the peroxisomal membrane. The results suggested that PaaT is involved in penicillin production, most likely through the translocation of side-chain precursors (phenylacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid) from the cytosol to the peroxisomal lumen across the peroxisomal membrane of P. chrysogenum.

  10. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

  11. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopamine transporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika M; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Fog, Jacob U

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...... protein) a diffusion coefficient (D) of approximately 3.6 x 10(-9) cm2/s, consistent with a relatively freely diffusible protein. In neuronally derived cells (N2a), we were unable to perform FCS measurements on plasma membrane-associated protein due to photobleaching, suggesting partial immobilization...

  12. Transport phenomena and fouling in vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation: Experimental and modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-08-27

    The application of vacuum to direct contact membrane distillation (vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation, V-DCMD) removed condensable gasses and reduced partial pressure in the membrane pores, achieving 37.6% higher flux than DCMD at the same feed temperature. Transfer mechanism and temperature distribution profile in V-DCMD were studied. The empirical flux decline (EFD) model represented fouling profiles of V-DCMD. In a continuous V-DCMD operation with moderate temperature (55 degrees C) and permeate pressure (300 mbar) for treating wastewater ROC, a flux of 16.0 +/- 0.3 L/m(2) h and high quality distillate were achieved with water flushing, showing the suitability of V-DCMD for ROC treatment. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Super Boiler: Packed Media/Transport Membrane Boiler Development and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, William E; Cygan, David F

    2013-04-17

    up to 50% smaller in footprint, has a smaller diameter, and is up to 50% lower in weight, resulting in very compact design with reduced material cost and labor costs, while requiring less boiler room floor space. For enhanced energy efficiency, the heat recovery system uses a transport membrane condenser (TMC), a humidifying air heater (HAH), and a split-stage economizer to extract maximum energy from the flue gas. The TMC is a new innovation that pulls a major portion of water vapor produced by the combustion process from the flue gases along with its sensible and latent heat. This results in nearly 100% transfer of heat to the boiler feed water. The HAH improves the effectiveness of the TMC, particularly in steam systems that do not have a large amount of cold makeup water. In addition, the HAH humidifies the combustion air to reduce NOx formation. The split-stage economizer preheats boiler feed water in the same way as a conventional economizer, but extracts more heat by working in tandem with the TMC and HAH to reduce flue gas temperature. These components are designed to work synergistically to achieve energy efficiencies of 92-94% which is 10-15% higher than today's typical firetube boilers.

  14. Final Report - High Performance, Durable, Low Cost Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Andrew [3M Company, Maplewood, MN (United States)

    2017-05-31

    The primary project objective was development of improved polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) which address the key DOE barriers of performance, durability and cost. Additional project objectives were to address commercialization barriers specific to MEAs comprising 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF) electrodes, including a larger-than-acceptable sensitivity to operating conditions, an unexplained loss of rated power capability with operating time, and slow break-in conditioning. Significant progress was made against each of these barriers, and most DOE 2020 targets were met or substantially approached.

  15. Gas transport behavior of mixed-matrix membranes composed of silica nanoparticles in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1)

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Juhyeon

    2010-01-01

    Recently, high-free volume, glassy ladder-type polymers, referred to as polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM), have been developed and their reported gas transport performance exceeded the Robeson upper bound trade-off for O2/N2 and CO2/CH4. The present work reports the gas transport behavior of PIM-1/silica nanocomposite membranes. The changes in free volume, as well as the presence and volume of the void cavities, were investigated by analyzing the density, thermal stability, and nano-structural morphology. The enhancement in gas permeability (e.g., He, H2, O2, N2, and CO2) with increasing filler content shows that the trend is related to the true silica volume and void volume fraction. Crown Copyright © 2009.

  16. Transport Asymmetry of Novel Bi-Layer Hybrid Perfluorinated Membranes on the Base of MF-4SC Modified by Halloysite Nanotubes with Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Filippov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three types of bi-layer hybrid nanocomposites on the base of perfluorinated cation-exchange membrane MF-4SC (Russian analogue of Nafion®-117 were synthesized and characterized. It was found that two membranes possess the noticeable asymmetry of the current–voltage curve (CVC under changing their orientation towards the applied electric field, despite the absence of asymmetry of diffusion permeability. These phenomena were explained in the frame of the “fine-porous model” expanded for bi-layer membranes. A special procedure to calculate the real values of the diffusion layers thickness and the limiting current density was proposed. Due to asymmetry effects of the current voltage curves of bi-layer hybrid membranes on the base of MF-4SC, halloysite nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles, it is prospective to assemble membrane switches (membrane relays or diodes with predictable transport properties, founded upon the theory developed here.

  17. Transport of Zn (II by TDDA-Polypropylene Supported Liquid Membranes and Recovery from Waste Discharge Liquor of Galvanizing Plant of Zn (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Ur Rehman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The facilitated passage of Zn (II across flat sheet supported liquid membrane saturated with TDDA (tri-n-dodecylamine in xylene membrane phase has been investigated. The effect of acid and metal ion concentration in the feed solution, the carrier concentration in membrane phase, stripping agent concentration in stripping phase, and coions on the extraction of Zn (II was investigated. The stoichiometry of the extracted species, that is, complex, was investigated on slope analysis method and it was found that the complex (LH2·Zn(Cl2 is responsible for transport of Zn (II. A mathematical model was developed for transport of Zn (II, and the predicted results strongly agree with experimental ones. The mechanism of transport was determined by coupled coion transport mechanism with H+ and Cl− coupled ions. The optimized SLM was effectively used for elimination of Zn (II from waste discharge liquor of galvanizing plant of Zn (II.

  18. Lysosomal membrane transport : physiological and pathological events / Grazia Maria Simonetta Mancini

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with the identification of a lysosomal transport mechanism for sialic acid. A primary genetic defect of this transport mechanism is demonstrated in patients affected by lysosomal storage of free sialic acid and excessive sialuria (sialic acid storage diseases, SASD). A

  19. Proton transport in a membrane protein channel: two-dimensional infrared spectrum modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Knoester, J.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.

    2012-01-01

    We model the two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectrum of a proton channel to investigate its applicability as a spectroscopy tool to study the proton transport process in biological systems. Proton transport processes in proton channels are involved in numerous fundamental biochemical reactions.

  20. Gene expression of membrane transporters: Importance for prognosis and progression of ovarian carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elsnerová, K.; Mohelniková; Duchonová, B.; Čeřovská, E.; Ehrlichová, M.; Gut, I.; Rob, L.; Skapa, P.; Hruda, M.; Bartáková, A.; Bouda, J.; Vodička, Pavel; Souček, P.; Václavíková, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2016), s. 2159-2170 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14056; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14050 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : epithelial ovarian cancer * ABC transporters * SLC transporters * gene expression * prognosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.662, year: 2016

  1. Selective Transport of Silver(I) Cation Across a Bulk Liquid Membrane Containing Bis-β-enamino Ester as Ion Carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Tarahomi,Somayeh; Rounaghi,Gholam Hossein; Eshghi,Hossein; Daneshvar,Leili; Chamsaz,Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Facilitated transport of silver(I) cation across a bulk liquid membrane by two synthesized ligands, bis-β-enamino ester (BBEE) and bis(benzoic acid) trioxaheptane (BBAT), as carriers dissolved in dichloromethane has been investigated. BBEE was used as a specific ion carrier for the transport of silver(I) ion. The influence of experimental parameters affecting the transport efficiency of silver(I) ion have been studied. In the presence of thiosulfate as a suitable metal ion acceptor in th...

  2. Transport of Basic Amino Acids by Membrane Vesicles of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Leeuwen, Cornelis van; Konings, Wilhelmus

    The uptake of the basic amino acids arginine, ornithine, and lysine was studied in membrane vesicles derived from cells of Lactococcus lactis which were fused with liposomes in which beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was incorporated as a proton motive force (PMF)-generating system. In

  3. The Influence of Water on Butanol Isomers Pervaporation Transport through Polyethylene Membrane..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petričkovič, Roman; Setničková, Kateřina; Uchytil, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 107, APR 2 (2013), s. 85-90 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1165 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pervaporation * binary mixtures butanol isomers-water * polyethylene membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2013

  4. Polymer Inclusion Membrane Containing a Tripodal Diglycolamide Ligand: Actinide Ion Uptake and Transport Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahanty, B.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Raut, D.R.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, M.; Verboom, Willem

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA)-based polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing a C-pivot tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) as the carrier extractant and 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer shows potential for the uptake of actinides from acidic feed solutions. The uptake of actinides

  5. Transport of small molecules through polyphenylene oxide membranes modified by fullerene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polotskaya, G.; Penkova, A. V.; Toikka, A. M.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Brožová, Libuše; Bleha, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2007), s. 333-347 ISSN 0149-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : gas separation * pervaporation * homogeneous membranes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.048, year: 2007

  6. Solute Transport from Aqueous Mixture through Supported Ionic Liquid Membrane by Pervaporation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel; Koekerling, M.; Kragl, U.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 199, 1-3 (2006) , s. 96–98 ISSN 0011-9164. [Euromembrane 2006. Giardini, Naxos, 24.09.2006-28.09.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : supported ionic liquid membrane * pervaporation * 1,3-propanediol Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2006

  7. Oligomeric state of membrane transport proteins analyzed with blue native electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuberger, E.H M L; Veenhoff, L.M.; Duurkens, R.H.T.; Friesen, R.H.E.; Poolman, B.

    2002-01-01

    Blue native electrophoresis is used widely for the analysis of non-dissociated protein complexes with respect to composition, oligomeric state and molecular mass. However, the effects of detergent or dye binding on the mass and stability of the integral membrane proteins have not been studied. By

  8. Determination of technical and economic parameters of an ionic transport membrane air separation unit working in a supercritical power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotowicz Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an air separation unit was analyzed. The unit consisted of: an ionic transport membrane contained in a four-end type module, an air compressor, an expander fed by gas that remains after oxygen separation and heat exchangers which heat the air and recirculated flue gas to the membrane operating temperature (850 °C. The air separation unit works in a power plant with electrical power equal to 600 MW. This power plant additionally consists of: an oxy-type pulverized-fuel boiler, a steam turbine unit and a carbon dioxide capture unit. Life steam parameters are 30 MPa/650 °C and reheated steam parameters are 6 MPa/670 °C. The listed units were analyzed. For constant electrical power of the power plant technical parameters of the air separation unit for two oxygen recovery rate (65% and 95% were determined. One of such parameters is ionic membrane surface area. In this paper the formulated equation is presented. The remaining technical parameters of the air separation unit are, among others: heat exchange surface area, power of the air compressor, power of the expander and auxiliary power. Using the listed quantities, the economic parameters, such as costs of air separation unit and of individual components were determined. These quantities allowed to determine investment costs of construction of the air separation unit. In addition, they were compared with investment costs for the entire oxy-type power plant.

  9. Low rate of membrane lithium transport during treatment correlates with outcome of maintenance pharmacotherapy in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinger, A G; Frank, E; Thase, M E; Dippold, C S; Kupfer, D J

    1997-05-01

    Lithium is transported across cell membranes by an exchange diffusion process (Na(+)-Li+ countertransport) that is inhibited during lithium treatment. We hypothesized that low rates of lithium efflux (a potential manifestation of strong transport inhibition) would be associated with better clinical outcome of maintenance pharmacotherapy. We measured the erythrocyte (RBC) apparent rate constant for lithium efflux (kexch) in 22 patients with bipolar disorder who had been euthymic on lithium for 1 month. Subsequently, clinical mood ratings and in vivo RBC: plasma lithium ratios (LiR) were determined monthly. Outcome was categorized according to whether subjects completed 1 year of successful maintenance treatment (n = 10), experienced a recurrent affective episode (n = 8), or dropped out (n = 4). The kexch at the outset of the study was significantly lower (potentially because of greater transport inhibition) in 1-year completers than in patients with recurrences or those who dropped out (median kexch = 0.09, 0.24, and 0.27 h-1, respectively; P lower were successfully maintained on lithium for 1 year, whereas only 23% of those with a kexch greater than or equal to 0.12 h-1 had a successful treatment outcome. LiR measured during the course of maintenance treatment was significantly higher (suggesting greater transport inhibition) in 1-year completers than in noncompleters (recurrences and dropouts). Measurement of kexch at an early point in treatment may provide a means for prospectively identifying those bipolar patients at greater risk for failure of maintenance lithium therapy.

  10. Functional Characterization of AbeD, an RND-Type Membrane Transporter in Antimicrobial Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is becoming an increasing menace in health care settings especially in the intensive care units due to its ability to withstand adverse environmental conditions and exhibit innate resistance to different classes of antibiotics. Here we describe the biological contributions of abeD, a novel membrane transporter in bacterial stress response and antimicrobial resistance in A. baumannii.The abeD mutant displayed ~ 3.37 fold decreased survival and >5-fold reduced growth in hostile osmotic (0.25 M; NaCl and oxidative (2.631 μM-6.574 μM; H2O2 stress conditions respectively. The abeD inactivated cells displayed increased susceptibility to ceftriaxone, gentamicin, rifampicin and tobramycin (~ 4.0 fold. The mutant displayed increased sensitivity to the hospital-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (~3.18-fold. In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the abeD mutant exhibited (P<0.01 lower virulence capability. Binding of SoxR on the regulatory fragments of abeD provide strong evidence for the involvement of SoxR system in regulating the expression of abeD in A. baumannii.This study demonstrates the contributions of membrane transporter AbeD in bacterial physiology, stress response and antimicrobial resistance in A. baumannii for the first time.

  11. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  12. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-03-03

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  13. N-linked glycans do not affect plasma membrane localization of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) but selectively alter its prostaglandin E2 transport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Fahad; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C

    2016-01-22

    Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) is a member of subfamily C of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of membrane transport proteins. MRP4 mediates the ATP-dependent efflux of many endogenous and exogenous solutes across the plasma membrane, and in polarized cells, it localizes to the apical or basolateral plasma membrane depending on the tissue type. MRP4 is a 170 kDa glycoprotein and here we show that MRP4 is simultaneously N-glycosylated at Asn746 and Asn754. Furthermore, confocal immunofluorescence studies showed that N-glycans do not affect MRP4's apical membrane localization in polarized LLC-PK1 cells or basolateral membrane localization in polarized MDCKI cells. However, vesicular transport assays showed that N-glycans differentially affect MRP4's ability to transport prostaglandin E2, but not estradiol glucuronide. Together these data indicate that N-glycosylation at Asn746 and Asn754 is not essential for plasma membrane localization of MRP4 but cause substrate-selective effects on its transport activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of various heavy metal nanoparticles on Enterococcus hirae and Escherichia coli growth and proton-coupled membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanyan, Zaruhi; Gevorkyan, Vladimir; Ananyan, Michail; Vardapetyan, Hrachik; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-10-16

    Due to bacterial resistance to antibiotics there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. In this respect nanoparticles can be used as they have expressed antibacterial activity simultaneously being more reactive compared to their bulk material. The action of zinc (II), titanium (IV), copper (II) and (I) oxides thin films with nanostructured surface and silver nanoscale particles on Enterococcus hirae and Escherichia coli growth and membrane activity was studied by using microbiological, potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods. It was revealed that sapphire base plates with deposited ZnO, TiO2, CuO and Cu2O nanoparticles had no effects neither on E. hirae nor E. coli growth both on agar plates and in liquid medium. Concentrated Ag nanoparticles colloid solution markedly affected bacterial growth which was expressed by changing growth properties. E. hirae was able to grow only at <1:200 dilutions of Ag nanoparticles while E. coli grew even at 1:10 dilution. At the same time Ag nanoparticles directly affected membranes, as the FOF1-ATPase activity and H(+)-coupled transport was changed either (E. coli were less susceptible to nanoparticles compared to E. hirae). Ag nanoparticles increased H(+) and K(+) transport even in the presence of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), inhibitor of FOF1. The stoichiometry of DCCD-inhibited ion fluxes was disturbed. These results point out to distinguishing antibacterial effects of Ag nanoparticles on different bacteria; the difference between effects can be explained by peculiarities in bacterial membrane structure and properties. H(+)-K(+)-exchange disturbance by Ag nanoparticles might be involved in antibacterial effects on E. hirae. The role of FOF1 in antibacterial action of Ag nanoparticles was shown using atpD mutant lacked β subunit in F1.

  15. Gas transport properties of novel mixed matrix membranes made of titanate nanotubes and PBI or PPO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giel, Verena; Galajdová, Barbora; Popelková, Daniela; Kredatusová, Jana; Trchová, Miroslava; Pavlova, Ewa; Beneš, Hynek; Válek, R.; Peter, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 12 (2015), s. 3285-3293 ISSN 1944-3994. [International Conference on Membrane and Electromembrane Processes - MELPRO 2014. Prague, 18.05.2014-21.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP106/12/P643 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polybenzimidazole * poly(phenylene oxide) * titanate nanotubes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.272, year: 2015

  16. Transport across the cell-membrane dictates nanoparticle fate and toxicity: a new paradigm in nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Sabella, Stefania; Muscetti, Ornella; Belli, Valentina; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Fusco, Sabato; de Luca, Elisa; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2014-08-01

    The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions.The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  17. Alterations in adhesion, transport, and membrane characteristics in an adhesion-deficient pseudomonad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFlaun, M.F.; Streger, S.; Condee, C.W. [Envirogen, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States). Princeton Research Center; Oppenheimer, S.R.; Fletcher, M. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology

    1999-02-01

    A stable adhesion-deficient mutant of Burkholderia cepacia G4, a soil pseudomonad, was selected in a sand column assay. This mutant (ENV435) was compared to the wild-type strain by examining the adhesion of the organisms to silica sand and their transport through two aquifer sediments that differed in their sand, silt, and clay contents. The authors compared the longitudinal transport of the wild type and the adhesion mutant to the transport of a conservative chloride tracer in 25-cm-long glass columns. The transport of the wild-type strain was severely retarded compared to the transport of the conservative tracer in a variety of aquifer sediments, while the adhesion mutant and the conservative tracer traveled at similar rates. An intact sediment core study produced similar results; ENV435 was transported at a faster rate and in much greater numbers than G4. The results of hydrophobic interaction chromatography revealed that G4 was significantly more hydrophobic than ENV435, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed significant differences in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigens of the adhesion mutant and the wild type. Differences in this cell surface polymer may explain the decreased adhesion of strain ENV435.

  18. The ABCs of membrane transporters in health and disease (SLC series): introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, Matthias A; Clémençon, Benjamin; Burrier, Robert E; Bruford, Elspeth A

    2013-01-01

    The field of transport biology has steadily grown over the past decade and is now recognized as playing an important role in manifestation and treatment of disease. The SLC (solute carrier) gene series has grown to now include 52 families and 395 transporter genes in the human genome. A list of these genes can be found at the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) website (see www.genenames.org/genefamilies/SLC). This special issue features mini-reviews for each of these SLC families written by the experts in each field. The existing online resource for solute carriers, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables (www.bioparadigms.org), has been updated and significantly extended with additional information and cross-links to other relevant databases, and the nomenclature used in this database has been validated and approved by the HGNC. In addition, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables functionality has been improved to allow easier access by the scientific community. This introduction includes: an overview of all known SLC and "non-SLC" transporter genes; a list of transporters of water soluble vitamins; a summary of recent progress in the structure determination of transporters (including GLUT1/SLC2A1); roles of transporters in human diseases and roles in drug approval and pharmaceutical perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of a mixed ionic/electronic conducting oxygen transport membrane pilot module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaff, E.M.; Kaletsch, A.; Broeckmann, C. [RWTH Aachen University, IWM, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    In the last years, a lot of ceramic materials were developed that, at higher temperatures, have a high electrical conductivity and a high conductivity of oxygen ions. Such mixed ionic/electronic conductors can be used to produce high-purity oxygen. This work focuses on the realization of a pilot membrane module, with BSCF (Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}}) perovskite selected as the membrane material. An amount of 500 kg of powder was industrially fabricated, spray-granulized and pressed into tubes. The best operation conditions concerning energy consumption were calculated, and a module reactor was designed operating at 850 C, with an air pressure of 15-20 bar on the feed site and a low vacuum of about 0.8 bar on the permeate site. Special emphasis was placed on joining alternatives for ceramic tubes in metallic bottoms. A first laboratory module was tested with a membrane area of 1 m{sup 2} and then advanced to a pilot module with 570 tubes and a capability of more than 300 000 L of pure oxygen per day. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Facilitated olefin transport by reversible olefin coordination to silver ions in a dry cellulose acetate membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J H; Lee, H; Kim, Y J; Kang, Y S; Kim, H S

    2001-04-01

    The highly selective dry complex membrane AgBF4-cellulose acetate (CA) was prepared and tested for the separation of ethylene/ethane and propylene/propane mixtures. The maximum selectivity for olefin over paraffin was found to be 280 for the ethylene/ethane mixture and 200 for the propylene/propane mixture. Solid-state interactions of AgBF4 with cellulose acetate (CA) and/or olefins have been investigated by using FT-IR, UV, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FT-IR and XPS studies clearly show that the silver ions are coordinated by carbonyl oxygen atoms among three different types of oxygen atoms present in CA-two in the acetate group and one in the ether linkage. Upon incorporation of AgBF4 into CA, the carbonyl stretching frequency of the free cellulose acetate at 1750 cm(-1) shifts to a lower frequency by about 41 cm(-1). The binding energy corresponding to a carbonyl oxygen atom in the O 1s XPS spectrum shifts to a more positive binding energy by the incorporation of AgBF4. Reversible olefin coordination to silver ions has been observed by FT-IR and UV studies. Treatment of the AgBF4-CA membrane placed in a gas cell with propylene produces a propylene-coordinated membrane in which coordinated propylene is easily replaced by other olefins such as 1,3-butadiene.

  1. The development of electro-membrane filtration for the isolation of bioactive peptides: the effect of membrane selection and operating parameters on the transport rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bargeman, Gerrald; Koops, G.H.; Houwing, J.; Breebaart, I.; van der Horst, H.C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    The ability to produce functional food ingredients from natural sources becomes increasingly attractive to the food industry. Antimicrobial (bioactive) ingredients, like peptides and proteins, can be isolated from hydrolysates with membrane filtration and/or chromatography. Electro-membrane

  2. Pathways of root uptake and membrane transport of Cd2+in the zinc/cadmium hyperaccumulating plant Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Zhen; Tu, Chen; Wu, Long-Hua; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Ebbs, Stephen; Luo, Yong-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Uptake and membrane transport of cadmium (Cd) in roots of the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola X.H. Guo et S.B. Zhou ex L.H. Wu was characterized by assessing the impact of various inhibitors and ion channel blockers on Cd accumulation as well as the real-time net Cd 2+ flux at the roots with application of the scanning ion-selective electrode technique. The uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol and P-type adenosine triphosphatase inhibitor Na 3 VO 4 significantly limited Cd 2+ uptake and transport kinetics in the root of S. plumbizincicola. These findings indicate that Cd is actively taken up into the roots. The Cd content in plant was significantly decreased with pretreatments of the Ca 2+ channel blocker La 3+ or Gd 3+ and the K + channel blocker tetraethylammonium, as well as in the presence of higher concentration of Ca 2+ and K + . These findings indicated that uptake of Cd 2+ into the root of S. plumbizincicola proceeds through ion channels that are permeable to both Ca 2+ and K + as confirmed by the direct evidence of real-time net Cd 2+ fluxes at the root surface in the treatments with ion channel inhibitors, as well as in the presence of elevated concentrations of Ca 2+ and K + . In addition, the results suggested a role for phytochelatin and protein synthesis in mediating Cd 2+ uptake by S. plumbizincicola. These findings increase the understanding of Cd 2+ uptake and membrane transport pathways in roots of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator S. plumbizincicola. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1038-1046. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Tuning PIM-PI-Based Membranes for Highly Selective Transport of Propylene/Propane

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Ramy J.

    2016-12-06

    To date there exists a great deal of energetic and economic inefficiency in the separation of olefins from paraffins because the principal means of achieving industrial purity requirements is accomplished with very energy intensive cryogenic distillation. Mitigation of the severe energy intensity of the propylene/propane separation has been identified as one of seven chemical separations which can change the landscape of global energy use, and membranes have been targeted as an emerging technology because they offer scalability and lower capital and operating costs. The focus of this work was to evaluate a new direction of material development for the very industrially relevant propylene/propane separation using membranes. The objective was to develop a rational design approach for generating highly selective membranes using a relatively new platform of materials known as polyimides of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-PIs), the prospects of which have never been examined for the propylene/propane separation. Structurally, PIMs comprise relatively inflexible macromolecular architectures integrating contortion sites that help disrupt packing and trap microporous free volume elements (< 20 Å). To date most of the work reported in the literature on this separation is based on conventional low free volume 6FDA-based polyimides which in the best case show moderate C3H6/C3H8 selectivities (<20) with C3H6 permeabilities too low to garner industrial interest. Due to propylene and propane’s relatively large molecular size, we hypothesized that the use of more open structures can provide greater accessibility to the pores necessary to enhance membrane sieving and flux. It has been shown for numerous key gas separations that introduction of microporosity into a polymer structure can defy the notorious permeability/selectivity tradeoff curve and induce simultaneous boosts in both permeability and selectivity. The cornerstone approach to designing state of the art high

  4. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the expression of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) at the blood-brain barrier and its implications to the transport of neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Lu, Ya-Hsuan; Peng, Yi-Hsuan; Hsu, Lih-Ching; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2015-12-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a polyspecific organic cation transporter that is highly expressed in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide on PMAT expression at the blood-brain barrier and the interaction between PMAT and neurotoxins. As a result, PMAT mRNA was identified in brain microvessels (BMVs), brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), astrocytes, and pericytes isolated from C57BL/6 mice and/or Wistar rats using RT-qPCR. The immunofluorescence staining confirmed the expression of PMAT protein in BMVs and striatum of C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting demonstrated its localization at the luminal and abluminal sides of BMECs. In C57BL/6 mice, PMAT protein was significantly increased in BMVs 24 h after an intraperitoneal injection of 3 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide treatment also significantly increased PMAT expression in cerebral cortex and the striatum in a time-dependent manner, as well as the brain-to-plasma ratio of 1-benzyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1-benzyl-TIQ). In isolated cells, lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly increased PMAT mRNA in brain astrocytes and the BMECs co-cultured with astrocytes. In addition to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, the kinetic study indicated that both 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 1-benzyl-TIQ are substrates of human PMAT. These findings suggest that inflammation can change PMAT expression at the blood-brain barrier, which may affect PMAT-mediated transport of neurotoxins. We demonstrated the expression of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT; mRNA or protein) at several subunits of the blood-brain barrier. Lipopolysaccharide treatment can significantly increase the expression of PMAT in vivo (in brain microvessels, cerebral cortex, and the striatum of C57BL/6 mice) and in vitro (in brain astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with astrocytes). Lipopolysaccharide treatment

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of transmembrane transport of chemical components in Chinese herbs and the function of platycodin D in a biological membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufang Yang

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The Martini force field was successfully applied to the study of the interaction between herbal compounds and a biological membrane. By combining the dynamics equilibrium morphology, the distribution of drugs inside and outside the biomembrane, and the interaction sites of drugs on the DPPC bilayer, factors influencing transmembrane transport of drugs were elucidated and the function of platycodin D in a biological membrane was reproduced.

  6. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  7. [Space-time organization of systems of membrane hydrolysis and transport in rat small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, G I

    1977-05-01

    Glucose transport by the concentration gradient with the incubation for 90 min in 0.2% glucose and soluble starch solutions was studied in Wistar rats in 5 segments of the small intestine by the "sac turned inside out" method. Serous fluid was completely replaced by a new portion of Ringer's solution every 15 or 30 min. Substrate load synchronized the enterocyte population and stabilized the transport systems. The changes of glucose absorption during the period of about an hour proved to differ in the 5 segments against the background of continuous and interrupted substrate load. These differences were due to the properties of the transported systems autocontrol and the reactivity level of the given enterocyte population. Areas with different reactivity were found to alternate along the intestine. Between the 8th and 16th hour (rats were sacrificed every 2 hours) starch glucose transport fell sharply in the proximal, and, to a lesser extent, in the middle segments. On the contrary, absorption between the 8th and the 12th hour was considerably intensified in the distal segments. The changes of the strach glucose transport during the period of about an hour along the intestine differed. The data obtained are discussed with consideration to the possible role of the undulating processes in the individual enterocyte population and in the small intestine as an integral system.

  8. Transport of polyamines in Drosophila S2 cells: kinetics, pharmacology and dependence on the plasma membrane proton gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Krantz, David E

    2006-01-15

    Polyamine transport activities have been described in diverse multicellular systems, but their bioenergetic mechanisms and molecular identity remain unclear. In the present paper, we describe a high-affinity spermine/spermidine transport activity expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. Ion-replacement experiments indicate that polyamine uptake across the cell membrane is Na+-, K+-, Cl-- and Ca2+-independent, but pH-sensitive. Additional experiments using ionophores suggest that polyamine uptake may be H+-coupled. Pharmacological experiments show that polyamine uptake in S2 cells is selectively blocked by MGBG {methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) or 1,1'-[(methylethanediylidine)-dinitrilo]diguanidine} and paraquat (N,N-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium), two known inhibitors of polyamine uptake in mammalian cells. In addition, inhibitors known to block the Slc22 (solute carrier 22) family of organic anion/cation transporters inhibit spermine uptake in S2 cells. These data and the genetic tools available in Drosophila will facilitate the molecular identification and further characterization of this activity.

  9. Dietary α-linolenic acid supplementation alters skeletal muscle plasma membrane lipid composition, sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 abundance, and palmitate transport rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorner, Zane; Barbeau, Pierre-Andre; Castellani, Laura; Wright, David C; Chabowski, Adrian; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-12-01

    The cellular processes influenced by consuming polyunsaturated fatty acids remains poorly defined. Within skeletal muscle, a rate-limiting step in fatty acid oxidation is the movement of lipids across the sarcolemmal membrane, and therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of consuming flaxseed oil high in α-linolenic acid (ALA), on plasma membrane lipid composition and the capacity to transport palmitate. Rats fed a diet supplemented with ALA (10%) displayed marked increases in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) within whole muscle and sarcolemmal membranes (approximately five-fold), at the apparent expense of arachidonic acid (-50%). These changes coincided with increased sarcolemmal palmitate transport rates (+20%), plasma membrane fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36; +20%) abundance, skeletal muscle triacylglycerol content (approximately twofold), and rates of whole body fat oxidation (~50%). The redistribution of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane could not be explained by increased phosphorylation of signaling pathways implicated in regulating FAT/CD36 trafficking events (i.e., phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CaMKII, AMPK, and Akt), suggesting the increased n-3 PUFA composition of the plasma membrane influenced FAT/CD36 accumulation. Altogether, the present data provide evidence that a diet supplemented with ALA increases the transport of lipids into resting skeletal muscle in conjunction with increased sarcolemmal n-3 PUFA and FAT/CD36 contents. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Excess white noise to probe transport mechanisms in a membrane channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queralt-Martín, María; López, M. Lidón; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Current fluctuation analysis has been successfully used over the years to investigate the physical properties of different systems. Here, we perform single-channel time-resolved current experiments in a protein channel to evaluate the different transport mechanisms governing the channel function. Using different salts of monovalent and divalent cations in a wide range of concentrations and applied potentials, we analyze current fluctuations focusing on the voltage dependence of the additional white noise that appears in the low-frequency range of the spectra. We demonstrate that the channel displays two characteristic transport regimes: at low salt concentrations (10 mM to 1 M) ion permeation is controlled by the protein fixed charges that induce accumulation or exclusion of ions to preserve local electroneutrality. At high salt concentrations (>1 M ) adsorption processes associated to the binding of cations to the channel charges regulate the transport properties.

  11. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  12. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  13. Na+/K+-pump modulates intercellular communication viainteraction with other membrane transporters in vascularsmooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Hansen, Anne Kirstine; Nilsson, Holger

    Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+-pump, has previously been shown to disturb intercellular communication. Here we test the hypothesis that the communication between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regulated through an interaction between the Na+/K+-pump and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger...... in restricted spaces near the plasma membrane. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in individual SMCs was imaged simultaneously with isometric force in rat mesenteric small arteries. Paired cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) were used as a model for electrical coupling of SMC by measuring...

  14. Effect of antibiotics influencing membrane function on the potassium transport of E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoegyi, M.; Tarjan, I.; Tamas, Gy.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of polymixin, nigericin, gramicidin on the 42 K-efflux of E. coli cells was studied. The 42 K-efflux of the bacteria decreases in time according to an exponential function. The slopes of the linearized functions characterizing the efflux increase with increasing concentration of antibiotics. The frequency of events of the 42 K-release as a parameter of antibiotics membrane interaction was determined on the basis of a theoretical model developed for the evaluation of the authors' experimental data. In this way a quantitative comparison of the effectiveness of antibiotics was possible. The most effective antibiotic was polymixin, followed by nigericin and gramicidin. (author)

  15. Lipid Raft-Based Membrane Compartmentation of a Plant Transport Protein Expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, Q.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Nováková, L.; Stolz, J.; Tanner, W.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2006), s. 945-953 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae * plant transport protein * hup1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.707, year: 2006

  16. Transport of water vapor and inert gas mixtures through highly selective and highly permeable polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.; van de Ven, W.J.C.; Potreck, Jens; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies in detail the measurement of the permeation properties of highly permeable and highly selective polymers for water vapor/nitrogen gas mixtures. The analysis of the mass transport of a highly permeable polymer is complicated by the presence of stagnant boundary layers at feed and

  17. The membrane transporter PotE is required for virulence in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Priscila Regina; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Over the last few years, polyamines have been described as key-signal of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. In the current study, we investigated whether the knockout of genes related to polyamine biosynthesis and putrescine transport affected the virulence of an avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC...

  18. Integrating membrane transport with male gametophyte development and function through transcriptomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bock, K.W.; Honys, David; Ward, J.M.; Padmanaban, S.; Nawrocki, E.P.; Hirschi, K.D.; Twell, D.; Sze, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 4 (2006), s. 1151-1168 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6038409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : POLLEN-TUBE GROWTH * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA * MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTER Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.125, year: 2006

  19. Influence of Capillary Condensation Effects on Mass Transport through Porous Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Petričkovič, Roman; Thomas, S.; Siedel-Morgenstern, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2003), s. 273-281 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : capillary condensation * mass transport * gas separation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.355, year: 2003

  20. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on erythrocyte membrane ion transport in offspring of hypertensive parents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánková, G.; Vlasáková, Z.; Zicha, Josef; Vokurková, Martina; Dobešová, Zdenka; Pelikánová, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2003), s. 1325-1330 ISSN 0263-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1638; GA MZd NB6682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : ion transport * hypertension * insulin resistance Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.572, year: 2003

  1. Dye Transport across the Retinal Basement Membrane of the Blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weyrauther, E.; Roebroek, J.G.H.; Stavenga, D.G.

    In the blowfly, Calliphora erythrocephala, transport of dye into or out of the retina, following injection into the eye or thorax, was investigated, mainly by microspectrophotometry and fluorimetry. After injection into the eye, Phenol Red, Trypan Blue, Lucifer Yellow and 9-amino-acridine were

  2. Effect of articaine on calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from medial pterygoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Di Croce, Daniel E; Richard, Susana B; Takara, Delia

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics used in dentistry have myotoxic effects. Articaine, also known as carticaine, is one of the local anesthetics most widely used in clinical dentistry. The aim of this work was to describe its effect on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle. Ca-ATPase enzymatic activity was determined by a colorimetric method and ATP-dependent calcium uptake with a radioisotopic technique. Articaine inhibited both Ca-ATPase activity and calcium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Both inhibitory effects became evident at articaine concentrations lower than those employed in clinical dentistry. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (K) were 15.1 +/- 1.8 mM (n = 6) and 25.2 +/- 1.6 mM (n = 6) for enzymatic activity and calcium uptake, respectively. Preincubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes with articaine enhanced Ca-ATPase activity in the absence of calcium ionophore, suggesting an ionophoric-like effect of the local anesthetic. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of articaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle is due to a direct interaction of the anesthetic with the enzyme and to the increased membrane permeability to calcium induced by this drug.

  3. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batuman, V.; Chadha, I.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of 14 C-D-glucose and 14 C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 x 10 -8 M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC 50 , of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 x 10 -8 M, and 5.4 x 10 -9 M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, K i , 1.5 x 10 -8 M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 x 10 -9 M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC 50 s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins

  4. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D.

    1990-01-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ([Ca 2+ ] c ) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca 2+ - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of [Ca 2+ ] c is 92 ± 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca 2+ across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about -60 kJmol -1 - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca 2+ - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H + /Ca 2+ exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of + /Ca 2+ . The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca 2+ efflux is ATP-driven H + /Ca 2+ exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H + /Ca 2+ . The increase in [Ca 2+ ] c in the presence of CN - at pH 8.4 is compared with 45 Ca 2+ influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca 2+ remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 x 10 -5 , and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca 2+ binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 μM, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca 2+ homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca 2+ homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca 2+ uptake into fungal vacuoles

  5. Quantitative Modeling of Membrane Transport and Anisogamy by Small Groups Within a Large-Enrollment Organismal Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Haag

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative modeling is not a standard part of undergraduate biology education, yet is routine in the physical sciences. Because of the obvious biophysical aspects, classes in anatomy and physiology offer an opportunity to introduce modeling approaches to the introductory curriculum. Here, we describe two in-class exercises for small groups working within a large-enrollment introductory course in organismal biology. Both build and derive biological insights from quantitative models, implemented using spreadsheets. One exercise models the evolution of anisogamy (i.e., small sperm and large eggs from an initial state of isogamy. Groups of four students work on Excel spreadsheets (from one to four laptops per group. The other exercise uses an online simulator to generate data related to membrane transport of a solute, and a cloud-based spreadsheet to analyze them. We provide tips for implementing these exercises gleaned from two years of experience.

  6. Graphite and PMMA as pore formers for thermoplastic extrusion of porous 3Y-TZP oxygen transport membrane supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnetun Haugen, Astri; Gurauskis, Jonas; Kaiser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A gas permeable porous support is a crucial part of an asymmetric oxygen transport membrane (OTM). Here, we develop feedstocks for thermoplastic extrusion of tubular, porous 3Y-TZP (partially stabilized zirconia polycrystals, (Y2O3)0.03(ZrO2)0.97)) ceramics, using graphite and/or polymethyl...... with gas permeability exceeding the target of 10−14m2 are obtained. In the temperature range 1250–1400°C the support gas permeability is insensitive to the sintering temperature, and the feedstocks shrink more than 15% during sintering, making them ideal for co-sintering with functional OTM layers....... This demonstrates the suitability of thermoplastic extrusion for fabrication of porous 3Y-TZP OTM supports, or for other technologies requiring porous ceramics....

  7. Properties of the luminal membrane of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts. Effect of cyclic AMP and blockers of chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by what transport mechanism does HCO-3 cross the luminal membrane of pancreatic duct cells, and how do the cells respond to stimulation with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). For this purpose a newly developed preparation of isolated and perfused intra......) hyperpolarized PDbl by 10.3 +/- 1.7 mV (n = 10); and SITS hyperpolarized PDbl by 7.8 +/- 0.9 mV (n = 4). Stimulation of the ducts with db-cAMP in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2 resulted in depolarization of PDbl, the ductal lumen became more negative and the fractional resistance of the luminal membrane...... decreased. Together with forskolin (10(-6) M), db-cAMP (10(-4) M) caused a fast depolarization of PDbl by 33.8 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 6). When db-cAMP (5 x 10(-4) M) was given alone in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2, PDbl depolarized by 25.3 +/- 4.2 mV (n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  8. Huntingtin is required for ER-to-Golgi transport and for secretory vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemma Brandstaetter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Huntingtin is a large membrane-associated scaffolding protein that associates with endocytic and exocytic vesicles and modulates their trafficking along cytoskeletal tracks. Although the progression of Huntington’s disease is linked to toxic accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, loss of wild-type huntingtin function might also contribute to neuronal cell death, but its precise function is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the molecular role of huntingtin in exocytosis and observed that huntingtin knockdown in HeLa cells causes a delay in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi transport and a reduction in the number of cargo vesicles leaving the trans-Golgi network. In addition, we found that huntingtin is required for secretory vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane. Similar defects in the early exocytic pathway were observed in primary fibroblasts from homozygous Htt140Q/140Q knock-in mice, which have the expansion inserted into the mouse huntingtin gene so lack wild-type huntingtin expression. Interestingly, heterozygous fibroblasts from a Huntington’s disease patient with a 180Q expansion displayed no obvious defects in the early secretory pathway. Thus, our results highlight the requirement for wild-type huntingtin at distinct steps along the secretory pathway.

  9. Electrophysiological study of transport systems in isolated perfused pancreatic ducts: properties of the basolateral membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    short circuit current (Isc) under similar conditions was 26 and 50 microA . cm-2. The specific transepithelial resistance (Rte) was 88 omega cm2. In control solutions the PD across the basolateral membrane (PDbl) was -63 +/- 1 mV (n = 314). Ouabain (3 mmol/l) depolarized PDbl by 4.8 +/- 1.1 mV (n = 6.......4 +/- 1.4 mV (n = 19), while another K+ channel blocker TEA+ (50 mmol/l) depolarized PDbl only by 7.7 +/- 2.0 mV (n = 9). Addition of amiloride (1 mmol/l) to the bath caused 3-4 mV depolarization of PDbl. Furosemide (0.1 mmol/l) and SITS (0.1 mmol/l) had no effect on PDbl. An increase in the bath HCO3...

  10. Inhibition of plant cell membrane transport phenomena induced by zearalenone (F-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, A; Macri, F

    1978-01-01

    Zearalenone (F-2), an estrogenic factor produced by a number of Fusarium spp., stimulates a leakage of electrolytes, β-cyanin and aminoacids from three plant tissues. F-2 inhibits rubidium uptake in roots of Zea mays L. and Beta vulgaris L. var. rubra. However the effect in the latter tissue is evident after long-term treatments with the toxin. Rubidium uptake is not affected in Solanum tuberosum L. var. Bintje. The toxin also causes inhibition of H(+) extrusion, of root elongation, of ATPase activity of plasmalemma-enriched fractions and depolarization of transmembrane potentials of corn roots. The evidence presented supports the hypothesis that F-2 affects plasma membranes of several plant species.

  11. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  12. Magnetic Modulation of the Transport of Organophilic Solutes through Supported Magnetic Ionic Liquid Membranes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, C.L.; Rubio, A.M.; Sebastião, P.J.; Afonso, C.A.M.; Storch, Jan; Izák, Pavel; Portugal, C.A.M.; Crespo, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 505, MAY 1 (2016), s. 36-43 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0569 Grant - others:ERANET(PT) ERA-CHEM/0001/2008; EUI(ES) 2008- 03857; FCT-MCTES(PT) SFRH/BD/81552/2011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) * solute transport modulation * magnetic field Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 6.035, year: 2016

  13. Transport-associated pathway responses in ovine fetal membranes to changes in amniotic fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Current evidence suggests that amniotic fluid volume (AFV) is actively regulated by vesicular transport of amniotic fluid outward across the amnion and into the underlying fetal vasculature in the placenta. Our objective was to determine whether gene expression profiles of potential stimulators, inhibitors, and mediators of vesicular transport are altered in response to changes in intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate. Samples of ovine amnion and chorion were obtained from fetal sheep with normal, experimentally reduced or increased AFVs and IMA rates. Amnion and chorion levels of target mRNAs were determined by RT-qPCR In the amnion, caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 mRNA levels were unchanged during alterations in IMA rate. However, levels of both were significantly higher in amnion than in chorion. Tubulin- α mRNA levels in the amnion but not in chorion were reduced when IMA rate decreased, and amnion levels correlated positively with IMA rate ( P  fluid and thus modulate IMA rate. Further, our results are consistent with the concept that the amnion is the rate-limiting layer for amniotic fluid transport. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. The yeast ABC transporter Pdr18 (ORF YNR070w) controls plasma membrane sterol composition, playing a role in multidrug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrito, Tânia R.; Teixeira, Miguel C.; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The action of multidrug efflux pumps in MDR (multidrug resistance) acquisition has been proposed to partially depend on the transport of physiological substrates which may indirectly affect drug partition and transport across cell membranes. In the present study, the PDR18 gene [ORF (open reading frame) YNR070w], encoding a putative PDR (pleiotropic drug resistance) transporter of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, was found to mediate plasma membrane sterol incorporation in yeast. The physiological role of Pdr18 is demonstrated to affect plasma membrane potential and is proposed to underlie its action as a MDR determinant, conferring resistance to the herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). The action of Pdr18 in yeast tolerance to 2,4-D, which was found to contribute to reduce [14C]2,4-D intracellular accumulation, may be indirect, given the observation that 2,4-D exposure deeply affects the sterol plasma membrane composition, this effect being much stronger in a Δpdr18 background. PDR18 activation under 2,4-D stress is regulated by the transcription factors Nrg1, controlling carbon source availability and the stress response, and, less significantly, Yap1, involved in oxidative stress and MDR, and Pdr3, a key regulator of the yeast PDR network, consistent with a broad role in stress defence. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that Pdr18 plays a role in plasma membrane sterol incorporation, this physiological trait contributing to an MDR phenotype. PMID:21831043

  15. {sup 13}C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States); Liu, Corey W. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (United States); Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K. [University of Virginia, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics (United States); Maduke, Merritt, E-mail: maduke@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl{sup −} for H{sup +} across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl{sup −} and H{sup +} binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state {sup 13}C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H{sup +}) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H{sup +}-dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl{sup −}-permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H{sup +}-dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H{sup +} binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl{sup −}.

  16. Rotavirus NSP4114-135 peptide has no direct, specific effect on chloride transport in rabbit brush-border membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Monique

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The direct effect of the rotavirus NSP4114-135 and Norovirus NV464-483 peptides on 36Cl uptake was studied by using villus cell brush border membrane (BBM isolated from young rabbits. Both peptides inhibited the Cl-/H+ symport activity about equally and partially. The interaction involved one peptide-binding site per carrier unit. Whereas in vitro NSP4114-135 caused nonspecific inhibition of the Cl-/H+ symporter, the situation in vivo is different. Because rotavirus infection in young rabbits accelerated both Cl- influx and Cl- efflux rates across villi BBM without stimulating Cl- transport in crypt BBM, we conclude that the NSP4114-135 peptide, which causes diarrhea in young rodents, did not have any direct, specific effect on either intestinal absorption or secretion of chloride. The lack of direct effect of NSP4 on chloride transport strengthens the hypothesis that NSP4 would trigger signal transduction pathways to enhance net chloride secretion at the onset of rotavirus diarrhea.

  17. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA stimulates vesicular transport of α7 ACh receptors towards surface membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We have earlier found that the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA could ameliorate learning and memory impairment by targeting α7 ACh receptor. The present study aimed at understanding DCP-LA-regulated α7 ACh receptor trafficking. We monitored currents through α7 ACh receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and assayed the receptor mobilizations using fractions with a sucrose density gradient centrifugation, synaptosome preparation, and acutely dissociated neurons from rat hippocampal slices. DCP-LA persistently potentiated α7 ACh receptor currents, and the effect was inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or vesicular transport inhibitors. DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of α7 ACh receptors. DCP-LA stimulated translocation of α7 ACh receptors from the cytosol toward the plasma membrane or from extra-synaptosomes into synaptosomes and accumulated the receptors at the presynaptic site in hippocampal neurons. The results of the present study demonstrate that DCP-LA increases surface localization of α7 ACh receptors in hippocampal neurons, specifically at presynaptic terminals, by stimulating vesicular transport of the receptors, resulting in potentiation of α7 ACh receptor responses, regardless of PKC phosphorylation of the receptors. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Enhanced V. cholerae Growth in Hypersaline Conditions by Transporting Carnitine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Fu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic marine bacteria are found in environments and food sources with high salt concentrations, which the bacteria must effectively manage for their survival. Several mechanisms, such as the transport of ions and compatible solutes as well as changes in aerobic and anaerobic respiration, confer salt tolerance to bacteria. In this study, we found that the outer membrane protein OmpW was related to salt stress in Vibrio cholerae and that ompW gene transcription and expression were up-regulated in cultures containing high NaCl concentrations. Deletion of ompW resulted in reduced V. cholerae growth in hypersaline culture conditions. Supplements of the compatible solutes betaine, L-carnitine, or L-lysine enhanced the growth of V. cholerae in hypersaline media. Supplements of betaine or L-lysine had the same growth enhancement effect on the ompW-deletion mutant cultured in hypersaline media, whereas L-carnitine supplementation did not restore mutant growth. In addition, the uptake of L-carnitine was decreased in the ompW-deletion mutant. Our study showed that among the multiplex factors that enhance the hypersaline tolerance of V. cholerae, OmpW also plays a role by transporting L-carnitine.

  19. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  20. 13C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M.; Liu, Corey W.; Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K.; Maduke, Merritt

    2015-01-01

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl − for H + across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl − and H + binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state 13 C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H + ) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H + -dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl − -permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H + -dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H + binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl −