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Sample records for membrane curvature controls

  1. A Theoretical Characterization of Curvature Controlled Adhesive Properties of Bio-Inspired Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afferante, Luciano; Heepe, Lars; Casdorff, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    Some biological systems, such as the tree frog, Litoria caerulea, and the bush-cricket, Tettigonia viridissima, have developed the ability to control adhesion by changing the curvature of their pads. Active control systems of adhesion inspired by these biological models can be very attractive...

  2. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodelling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe a new approach to study curvature sensing, by simulating the direction-dependent interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyse three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated m...

  3. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-05

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe an approach to study curvature sensing by simulating the interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. Our findings provide evidence for direction-dependent curvature sensing mechanisms in amphipathic peptides and challenge existing theories of hydrophobic insertion. The buckling approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature-sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David J; Houser, Justin R; Hayden, Carl C; Sherman, Michael B; Lafer, Eileen M; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2015-07-24

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  5. Membrane Curvature Affects the Formation of α-Hemolysin Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-17

    Membrane proteins perform their functions within or on the lipid membrane, and lipid compositions are known to affect membrane protein integration and activity. Recently, the geometric aspect of membrane curvature was shown to play an important role in membrane protein behavior. Certain membrane proteins are known to sense the curvature of the membrane and to preferentially bind to highly curved membranes. However, although numerous membrane proteins assemble to form homo- or heterocomplexes and perform their biological functions, the dependence of membrane protein assembly on membrane curvature remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the membrane curvature on the nanopore formation of α-hemolysin (AH), which is a toxic membrane protein derived from Staphylococcus aureus. The AH protein binds to the membrane as a monomer, assembles to form a heptamer, and forms a nanopore. By simultaneously measuring the molecules bound to the membrane and the activities of the nanopore on the membrane, we determined the nanopore formation ratio of AH. We used various sizes of liposomes and analyzed the dependence on the membrane curvature by using flow cytometry. Combining the results for positive and negative curvature, we found that the nanopore formation ratio of AH was curvature sensitive and was higher in a flat membrane than in a curved membrane. Furthermore, the nanopore formation ratio was almost identical or relatively higher in membranes with negative curvature than those with positive curvature.

  6. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2016-09-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (-3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles.

  7. Curvature-Controlled Topological Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Mesarec

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effectively, two-dimensional (2D closed films exhibiting in-plane orientational ordering (ordered shells might be instrumental for the realization of scaled crystals. In them, ordered shells are expected to play the role of atoms. Furthermore, topological defects (TDs within them would determine their valence. Namely, bonding among shells within an isotropic liquid matrix could be established via appropriate nano-binders (i.e., linkers which tend to be attached to the cores of TDs exploiting the defect core replacement mechanism. Consequently, by varying configurations of TDs one could nucleate growth of scaled crystals displaying different symmetries. For this purpose, it is of interest to develop a simple and robust mechanism via which one could control the position and number of TDs in such atoms. In this paper, we use a minimal mesoscopic model, where variational parameters are the 2D curvature tensor and the 2D orientational tensor order parameter. We demonstrate numerically the efficiency of the effective topological defect cancellation mechanism to predict positional assembling of TDs in ordered films characterized by spatially nonhomogeneous Gaussian curvature. Furthermore, we show how one could efficiently switch among qualitatively different structures by using a relative volume v of ordered shells, which represents a relatively simple naturally accessible control parameter.

  8. CURVATURE-DRIVEN MOLECULAR FLOW ON MEMBRANE SURFACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, Michael; Zhou, Y C

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical model for the localization of multiple species of diffusion molecules on membrane surfaces. Morphological change of bilayer membrane in vivo is generally modulated by proteins. Most of these modulations are associated with the localization of related proteins in the crowded lipid environments. We start with the energetic description of the distributions of molecules on curved membrane surface, and define the spontaneous curvature of bilayer membrane as a function of the molecule concentrations on membrane surfaces. A drift-diffusion equation governs the gradient flow of the surface molecule concentrations. We recast the energetic formulation and the related governing equations by using an Eulerian phase field description to define membrane morphology. Computational simulations with the proposed mathematical model and related numerical techniques predict (i) the molecular localization on static membrane surfaces at locations with preferred mean curvatures, and (ii) the generation of preferred mean curvature which in turn drives the molecular localization.

  9. Novel tilt-curvature coupling in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, M. Mert; Deserno, Markus

    2017-08-01

    On mesoscopic scales, lipid membranes are well described by continuum theories whose main ingredients are the curvature of a membrane's reference surface and the tilt of its lipid constituents. In particular, Hamm and Kozlov [Eur. Phys. J. E 3, 323 (2000)] have shown how to systematically derive such a tilt-curvature Hamiltonian based on the elementary assumption of a thin fluid elastic sheet experiencing internal lateral pre-stress. Performing a dimensional reduction, they not only derive the basic form of the effective surface Hamiltonian but also express its emergent elastic couplings as trans-membrane moments of lower-level material parameters. In the present paper, we argue, though, that their derivation unfortunately missed a coupling term between curvature and tilt. This term arises because, as one moves along the membrane, the curvature-induced change of transverse distances contributes to the area strain—an effect that was believed to be small but nevertheless ends up contributing at the same (quadratic) order as all other terms in their Hamiltonian. We illustrate the consequences of this amendment by deriving the monolayer and bilayer Euler-Lagrange equations for the tilt, as well as the power spectra of shape, tilt, and director fluctuations. A particularly curious aspect of our new term is that its associated coupling constant is the second moment of the lipid monolayer's lateral stress profile—which within this framework is equal to the monolayer Gaussian curvature modulus, κ¯ m. On the one hand, this implies that many theoretical predictions now contain a parameter that is poorly known (because the Gauss-Bonnet theorem limits access to the integrated Gaussian curvature); on the other hand, the appearance of κ¯ m outside of its Gaussian curvature provenance opens opportunities for measuring it by more conventional means, for instance by monitoring a membrane's undulation spectrum at short scales.

  10. A cost-benefit analysis of the physical mechanisms of membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Brodsky, Frances M; Miller, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Many cellular membrane-bound structures exhibit distinct curvature that is driven by the physical properties of their lipid and protein constituents. Here we review how cells manipulate and control this curvature in the context of dynamic events such as vesicle-mediated membrane traffic. Lipids and cargo proteins each contribute energy barriers that must be overcome during vesicle formation. In contrast, protein coats and their associated accessory proteins drive membrane bending using a variety of interdependent physical mechanisms. We survey the energy costs and drivers involved in membrane curvature, and draw a contrast between the stochastic contributions of molecular crowding and the deterministic assembly of protein coats. These basic principles also apply to other cellular examples of membrane bending events, including important disease-related problems such as viral egress.

  11. Pattern formation by curvature-inducing proteins on spherical membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Golestanian, Ramin

    2017-12-01

    Spatial organisation is a hallmark of all living cells, and recreating it in model systems is a necessary step in the creation of synthetic cells. It is therefore of both fundamental and practical interest to better understand the basic mechanisms underlying spatial organisation in cells. In this work, we use a continuum model of membrane and protein dynamics to study the behaviour of curvature-inducing proteins on membranes of spherical shape, such as living cells or lipid vesicles. We show that the interplay between curvature energy, entropic forces, and the geometric constraints on the membrane can result in the formation of patterns of highly-curved/protein-rich and weakly-curved/protein-poor domains on the membrane. The spontaneous formation of such patterns can be triggered either by an increase in the average density of curvature-inducing proteins, or by a relaxation of the geometric constraints on the membrane imposed by the membrane tension or by the tethering of the membrane to a rigid cell wall or cortex. These parameters can also be tuned to select the size and number of the protein-rich domains that arise upon pattern formation. The very general mechanism presented here could be related to protein self-organisation in many biological processes, ranging from (proto)cell division to the formation of membrane rafts.

  12. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane curva...... curvature was essential for enrichment in raft-like liquid-ordered phases; enrichment was driven by relief of lateral pressure upon anchor insertion and most likely affects the localization of lipidated proteins in general....

  13. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  14. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  15. Annexin A4 and A6 induce membrane curvature and constriction during cell membrane repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Theresa Louise; Maeda, Kenji; Pezeshkian, Weria

    2017-01-01

    that annexin A4 binds to artificial membranes and generates curvature force initiated from free edges, whereas annexin A6 induces constriction force. In cells, plasma membrane injury and Ca2+ influx recruit annexin A4 to the vicinity of membrane wound edges where its homo-trimerization leads to membrane......Efficient cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential for maintaining membrane integrity and thus for cell life. Here we show that the Ca2+- and phospholipid-binding proteins annexin A4 and A6 are involved in plasma membrane repair and needed for rapid closure of micron-size holes. We demonstrate...... curvature near the edges. We propose that curvature force is utilized together with annexin A6-mediated constriction force to pull the wound edges together for eventual fusion. We show that annexin A4 can counteract various plasma membrane disruptions including holes of several micrometers indicating...

  16. Steric confinement of proteins on lipid membranes can drive curvature and tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2010-04-27

    Deformation of lipid membranes into curved structures such as buds and tubules is essential to many cellular structures including endocytic pits and filopodia. Binding of specific proteins to lipid membranes has been shown to promote membrane bending during endocytosis and transport vesicle formation. Additionally, specific lipid species are found to colocalize with many curved membrane structures, inspiring ongoing exploration of a variety of roles for lipid domains in membrane bending. However, the specific mechanisms by which lipids and proteins collaborate to induce curvature remain unknown. Here we demonstrate a new mechanism for induction and amplification of lipid membrane curvature that relies on steric confinement of protein binding on membrane surfaces. Using giant lipid vesicles that contain domains with high affinity for his-tagged proteins, we show that protein crowding on lipid domain surfaces creates a protein layer that buckles outward, spontaneously bending the domain into stable buds and tubules. In contrast to previously described bending mechanisms relying on local steric interactions between proteins and lipids (i.e. helix insertion into membranes), this mechanism produces tubules whose dimensions are defined by global parameters: domain size and membrane tension. Our results suggest the intriguing possibility that confining structures, such as lipid domains and protein lattices, can amplify membrane bending by concentrating the steric interactions between bound proteins. This observation highlights a fundamental physical mechanism for initiation and control of membrane bending that may help explain how lipids and proteins collaborate to create the highly curved structures observed in vivo.

  17. Curvature-driven effective attraction in multicomponent membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Matthew F; Sknepnek, Rastko; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2012-08-01

    We study closed liquid membranes that segregate into three phases due to differences in the chemical and physical properties of its components. The shape and in-plane membrane arrangement of the phases are coupled through phase-specific bending energies and line tensions. We use simulated annealing Monte Carlo simulations to find low-energy structures, allowing both phase arrangement and membrane shape to relax. The three-phase system is the simplest one in which there are multiple interface pairs, allowing us to analyze interfacial preferences and pairwise distinct line tensions. We observe the system's preference for interface pairs that maximize differences in spontaneous curvature. From a pattern selection perspective, this acts as an effective attraction between phases of most disparate spontaneous curvature. We show that this effective attraction is robust enough to persist even when the interface between these phases is the most penalized by line tension. This effect is driven by geometry and not by any explicit component-component interaction.

  18. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  19. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology....

  20. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs) domains and amphipathic alpha-helices (AHs) are believed to be sensors of membrane curvature thus facilitating the assembly of protein complexes on curved membranes. Here, we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to compare the binding of both motifs on single...... nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...

  1. A curvature-dependent membrane binding by tyrosine kinase Fer involves an intrinsically disordered region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru; Kondo, Akihiro; Itoh, Toshiki

    2018-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are important enzymes that mediate signal transduction at the plasma membrane. While the significance of membrane localization of tyrosine kinases has been well evaluated, the role of membrane curvature in their regulation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that an intrinsically disordered region in the tyrosine kinase Fer acts as a membrane curvature sensor that preferentially binds to highly curved membranes in vitro. This region forms an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with curved membranes, aligning hydrophobic residues on one side of the helical structure. Further, the tyrosine kinase activity of Fer is significantly enhanced by the membrane in a manner dependent on curvature. We propose a model for the regulation of Fer based on an intramolecular interaction and the curvature-dependent membrane binding mediated by its intrinsically disordered region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Curvature of double-membrane organelles generated by changes in membrane size and composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland L Knorr

    Full Text Available Transient double-membrane organelles are key players in cellular processes such as autophagy, reproduction, and viral infection. These organelles are formed by the bending and closure of flat, double-membrane sheets. Proteins are believed to be important in these morphological transitions but the underlying mechanism of curvature generation is poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for this curvature generation which depends primarily on three membrane properties: the lateral size of the double-membrane sheets, the molecular composition of their highly curved rims, and a possible asymmetry between the two flat faces of the sheets. This mechanism is evolutionary advantageous since it does not require active processes and is readily available even when resources within the cell are restricted as during starvation, which can induce autophagy and sporulation. We identify pathways for protein-assisted regulation of curvature generation, organelle size, direction of bending, and morphology. Our theory also provides a mechanism for the stabilization of large double-membrane sheet-like structures found in the endoplasmic reticulum and in the Golgi cisternae.

  3. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U

    2010-01-01

    The internal membranes of eukaryotic cells are all twists and bends characterized by high curvature. During recent years it has become clear that specific proteins sustain these curvatures while others simply recognize membrane shape and use it as "molecular information" to organize cellular proc...... on curved membranes instead of higher affinity as assumed so far. Finally, we integrate these new insights into the debate about which motifs are involved in sensing versus induction of membrane curvature and what role MCS proteins may play in biology....

  4. Nontopological Saddle-Splay and Curvature Instabilities from Anisotropic Membrane Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J. B.

    1996-06-01

    Anisotropic inclusions are shown to induce spontaneous deviatoric bendings in lipidic membranes, by orienting at right angles across the bilayer. In the limit of strong membrane curvatures, a nonanalytical bending energy term is generated that favors saddlelike and cylindrical shapes, without penalizing spherical ones. An ``egg-carton'' instability results in flat membranes as well as a wormlike shape instability for vesicles.

  5. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  6. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    . As the radius of the substrate r0→∞, the leading effect of the curvature is adding the Laplace pressure ΠL∝r0-1 to the pressure balance in the film. At temperatures and pressures under which the wetting is complete in planar geometry, Laplace pressure suppresses divergence of the mean thickness of the wetting...

  7. Curvature-electric effects in artificial and natural membranes studied using patch-clamp techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A G; Ramsey, R L; Usherwood, P N

    1989-01-01

    Methods for applying sound pressure to membrane patches formed at the tips of patch-clamp pipettes have been developed. Artificial membrane patches were formed from diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine using a pipette dipping technique. Natural membrane patches were excised (inside-out mode) from collagenase-treated locust muscle membrane. Curvature-electric signals were registered under both voltage clamp and current clamp conditions. The phenomenon of flexoelectricity in membranes has previously been attributed to curvature-induced polarization originating from the liquid crystalline properties of membranes. The estimated magnitude (2 x 10(-18) C) of the flexoelectric coefficient of the artificial lipid bilayers is consistent with previous findings while that of the muscle membrane was in certain cases several times larger. The present study is the first to report on flexoelectricity in a natural membrane and raises the question of the biological significance of this phenomenon.

  8. Membrane heterogeneity : from lipid domains to curvature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semrau, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Membrane heterogeneity on the micro- and nanometer scale plays an important role for a large number of biological processes. In parallel to the conception of refined membrane models, new experimental techniques to determine membrane microstructure were developed in recent years. Single molecule

  9. Fluid lipid membranes: from differential geometry to curvature stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A fluid lipid membrane transmits stresses and torques that are fully determined by its geometry. They can be described by a stress- and torque-tensor, respectively, which yield the force or torque per length through any curve drawn on the membrane's surface. In the absence of external forces or torques the surface divergence of these tensors vanishes, revealing them as conserved quantities of the underlying Euler-Lagrange equation for the membrane's shape. This review provides a comprehensive introduction into these concepts without assuming the reader's familiarity with differential geometry, which instead will be developed as needed, relying on little more than vector calculus. The Helfrich Hamiltonian is then introduced and discussed in some depth. By expressing the quest for the energy-minimizing shape as a functional variation problem subject to geometric constraints, as proposed by Guven (2004), stress- and torque-tensors naturally emerge, and their connection to the shape equation becomes evident. How to reason with both tensors is then illustrated with a number of simple examples, after which this review concludes with four more sophisticated applications: boundary conditions for adhering membranes, corrections to the classical micropipette aspiration equation, membrane buckling, and membrane mediated interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Membrane Curvature in Nanoscale Topography-Induced Intracellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hsin-Ya; Zhao, Wenting; Zeng, Yongpeng; Cui, Bianxiao

    2018-04-12

    Over the past decade, there has been growing interest in developing biosensors and devices with nanoscale and vertical topography. Vertical nanostructures induce spontaneous cell engulfment, which enhances the cell-probe coupling efficiency and the sensitivity of biosensors. Although local membranes in contact with the nanostructures are found to be fully fluidic for lipid and membrane protein diffusions, cells appear to actively sense and respond to the surface topography presented by vertical nanostructures. For future development of biodevices, it is important to understand how cells interact with these nanostructures and how their presence modulates cellular function and activities. How cells recognize nanoscale surface topography has been an area of active research for two decades before the recent biosensor works. Extensive studies show that surface topographies in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers can significantly affect cell functions, behaviors, and ultimately the cell fate. For example, titanium implants having rough surfaces are better for osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration than those with smooth surfaces. At the cellular level, nanoscale surface topography has been shown by a large number of studies to modulate cell attachment, activity, and differentiation. However, a mechanistic understanding of how cells interact and respond to nanoscale topographic features is still lacking. In this Account, we focus on some recent studies that support a new mechanism that local membrane curvature induced by nanoscale topography directly acts as a biochemical signal to induce intracellular signaling, which we refer to as the curvature hypothesis. The curvature hypothesis proposes that some intracellular proteins can recognize membrane curvatures of a certain range at the cell-to-material interface. These proteins then recruit and activate downstream components to modulate cell signaling and behavior. We discuss current technologies

  11. Influence of Global and Local Membrane Curvature on Mechanosensitive Ion Channels: A Finite Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Bavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanosensitive (MS channels are ubiquitous molecular force sensors that respond to a number of different mechanical stimuli including tensile, compressive and shear stress. MS channels are also proposed to be molecular curvature sensors gating in response to bending in their local environment. One of the main mechanisms to functionally study these channels is the patch clamp technique. However, the patch of membrane surveyed using this methodology is far from physiological. Here we use continuum mechanics to probe the question of how curvature, in a standard patch clamp experiment, at different length scales (global and local affects a model MS channel. Firstly, to increase the accuracy of the Laplace’s equation in tension estimation in a patch membrane and to be able to more precisely describe the transient phenomena happening during patch clamping, we propose a modified Laplace’s equation. Most importantly, we unambiguously show that the global curvature of a patch, which is visible under the microscope during patch clamp experiments, is of negligible energetic consequence for activation of an MS channel in a model membrane. However, the local curvature (RL < 50 and the direction of bending are able to cause considerable changes in the stress distribution through the thickness of the membrane. Not only does local bending, in the order of physiologically relevant curvatures, cause a substantial change in the pressure profile but it also significantly modifies the stress distribution in response to force application. Understanding these stress variations in regions of high local bending is essential for a complete understanding of the effects of curvature on MS channels.

  12. Electrostatic field in terms of geometric curvature in membrane MEMS devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Barba Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present, in a framework of 1D-membrane Micro-Electro-Mechanical- Systems (MEMS theory, a formalization of the problem of existence and uniqueness of a solution related to the membrane deformation u for electrostatic actuation in the steady- state case. In particular, we propose a new model in which the electric field magnitude E is proportional to the curvature of the membrane and, for it, we obtain results of existence by Schauder-Tychono's fixed point application and subsequently we establish conditions of uniqueness. Finally, some numerical tests have been carried out to further support the analytical results.

  13. Curvature generation and pressure profile modulation in membrane by lysolipids: insights from coarse-grained simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Cui, Qiang

    2009-10-21

    Although many membrane additives are known to modulate the activities of membrane proteins via perturbing the properties of lipid membrane, the underlying mechanism is often not precisely understood. In this study, we investigate the impact of asymmetrically incorporating single-tailed lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into a membrane bilayer using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Using a simple computational protocol designed to approximately mimic a micropipette setting, we show that asymmetric incorporation of LPC can lead to significant curvature in a bilayer. Detailed analysis of geometrical and mechanical properties (pressure profile) of the resulting mound structure indicates that the degree of pressure profile perturbation is determined not by the local curvature per se but by the packing of lipid headgroups (i.e., area-per-lipid). The findings help provide a concrete basis for understanding the activation mechanism of mechanosensitive channels by asymmetric incorporation of LPC into membrane patches in patch-clamp experiments. The calculated local pressure profiles are valuable to the construction of realistic membrane models for the analysis of mechanosensation in a continuum mechanics framework.

  14. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  15. The effect of curvature on the undulation spectrum of Red Blood Cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Levine, Alex J.

    2009-03-01

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane has a composite structure of a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network. The study of the mechanical properties of RBCs is crucial to our understanding of their ability withstand large amplitude deformations during their passage through the microvasculature. The linear mechanical response of this composite membrane can be measured by observing its undulatory dynamics in thermal equilibrium, i.e. microrheology. Previous models of these dynamics postulated an effective surface tension. In this talk, we show that surface tension is not necessary. Rather, the coupling of membrane bending to spectrin network compression by curvature can account for the observed dynamics. We use a simplified theoretical model to describe the undulatory dynamics of RBCs, measured experimentally by the Popescu group.ootnotetextG. Popescu et al. ``Imaging red blood cell dynamics by quantitative phase microscopy, Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases, (2008), in print'' Analyzing their data using our model, we observe dramatic changes in RBC membrane elasticity associated with cells' morphological transition from discocytes to echinocyte to spherocyte.

  16. Modeling the Mechanics of Cell Division: Influence of Spontaneous Membrane Curvature, Surface Tension, and Osmotic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beltrán-Heredia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many cell division processes have been conserved throughout evolution and are being revealed by studies on model organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa. Cellular membrane constriction is one of these processes, observed almost universally during cell division. It happens similarly in all organisms through a mechanical pathway synchronized with the sequence of cytokinetic events in the cell interior. Arguably, such a mechanical process is mastered by the coordinated action of a constriction machinery fueled by biochemical energy in conjunction with the passive mechanics of the cellular membrane. Independently of the details of the constriction engine, the membrane component responds against deformation by minimizing the elastic energy at every constriction state following a pathway still unknown. In this paper, we address a theoretical study of the mechanics of membrane constriction in a simplified model that describes a homogeneous membrane vesicle in the regime where mechanical work due to osmotic pressure, surface tension, and bending energy are comparable. We develop a general method to find approximate analytical expressions for the main descriptors of a symmetrically constricted vesicle. Analytical solutions are obtained by combining a perturbative expansion for small deformations with a variational approach that was previously demonstrated valid at the reference state of an initially spherical vesicle at isotonic conditions. The analytic approximate results are compared with the exact solution obtained from numerical computations, getting a good agreement for all the computed quantities (energy, area, volume, constriction force. We analyze the effects of the spontaneous curvature, the surface tension and the osmotic pressure in these quantities, focusing especially on the constriction force. The more favorable conditions for vesicle constriction are determined, obtaining that smaller constriction forces are required for positive

  17. Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Kaichen; Lou, Shuai; Choe, Hwan Sung; Yao, Jie; Wu, Junqiao; Liu, Kai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Due to its thermally driven structural phase transition, vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) has emerged as a promising material for micro/nano-actuators with superior volumetric work density, actuation amplitude, and repetition frequency. However, the high initial curvature of VO 2 actuators severely obstructs the actuation performance and application. Here, we introduce a “seesaw” method of fabricating tri-layer cantilevers to compensate for the residual stress and realize nearly arbitrary curvature control of VO 2 actuators. By simply adjusting the thicknesses of the individual layers, cantilevers with positive, zero, or negative curvatures can be engineered. The actuation amplitude can be decoupled from the curvature and controlled independently as well. Based on the experimentally measured residual stresses, we demonstrate sub-micron thick VO 2 actuators with nearly zero final curvature and a high actuation amplitude simultaneously. This “seesaw” method can be further extended to the curvature engineering of other microelectromechanical system multi-layer structures where large stress-mismatch between layers are inevitable.

  18. Supported lipid bilayers with controlled curvature via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Maria; Manandhar, Michal; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    monitoring (QCM-D) was used to confirm vesicle rupture onto such structured surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy was used to show fluidity of the supported membranes. The formation of confluent SLBs is demonstrated at the nanostructured surfaces from vesicles composed of POPC lipids. However, at surfaces...

  19. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  20. Molecular View of the Role of Fusion Peptides in Promoting Positive Membrane Curvature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion peptides are moderately hydrophobic segments of viral and nonviral membrane fusion proteins that enable these proteins to fuse two closely apposed biological membranes. In vitro assays furthermore show that even isolated fusion peptides alone can support membrane fusion in model systems. In

  1. Salt Bridge Formation between the I-BAR Domain and Lipids Increases Lipid Density and Membrane Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Kitao, Akio

    2017-07-28

    The BAR domain superfamily proteins sense or induce curvature in membranes. The inverse-BAR domain (I-BAR) is a BAR domain that forms a straight "zeppelin-shaped" dimer. The mechanisms by which IRSp53 I-BAR binds to and deforms a lipid membrane are investigated here by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation (MD), binding energy analysis, and the effects of mutation experiments on filopodia on HeLa cells. I-BAR adopts a curved structure when crystallized, but adopts a flatter shape in MD. The binding of I-BAR to membrane was stabilized by ~30 salt bridges, consistent with experiments showing that point mutations of the interface residues have little effect on the binding affinity whereas multiple mutations have considerable effect. Salt bridge formation increases the local density of lipids and deforms the membrane into a concave shape. In addition, the point mutations that break key intra-molecular salt bridges within I-BAR reduce the binding affinity; this was confirmed by expressing these mutants in HeLa cells and observing their effects. The results indicate that the stiffness of I-BAR is important for membrane deformation, although I-BAR does not act as a completely rigid template.

  2. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  3. Control of defect localization in crystalline wrinkling by curvature and topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Jimenez, Francisco

    We investigate the influence of curvature and topology on crystalline wrinkling patterns in generic elastic bilayers. Our numerical analysis predicts that the total number of defects created by adiabatic compression exhibits universal quadratic scaling for spherical, ellipsoidal and toroidal surfaces over a wide range of system sizes. However, both the localization of individual defects and the orientation of defect chains depend strongly on the local Gaussian curvature and its gradients across a surface. Our results imply that curvature and topology can be utilized to pattern defects in elastic materials, thus promising improved control over hierarchical bending, buckling or folding processes. Generally, this study suggests that bilayer systems provide an inexpensive yet valuable experimental test-bed for exploring the effects of geometrically induced forces on assemblies of topological charges. Joint work with Norbert Stoop, Romain Lagrange, Jorn Dunkel and Pedro M. Reis.

  4. Controllable soliton propagation based on phase-front curvature in asymmetrical nonlocal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Lü, Hua; Luo, Jianghua; Sun, Lihui

    2016-08-01

    The influence of phase-front curvature on the dynamical behavior of the fundamental mode soliton during its transmission in asymmetrical nonlocal media is studied in detail and the phase-front curvature can be imposed on the fundamental mode soliton by reshaping or phase imprinting technologies. By changing the phase-front curvature or its imposed position, controllable soliton propagation in asymmetrical nonlocal media can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11547007 and 11304024), the Innovation Personnel Training Plan for Excellent Youth of Guangdong University Project (Grant No. 2013LYM_0023), and the Yangtze Fund for Youth Teams of Science and Technology Innovation (Grant No. 2015cqt03).

  5. Curved Amphipathic Oligothiophenes : Curvature directed S.A. with applications in energy transfer systems and membrane curvature detection in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijn, P.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and synthesised a new class of molecules which self-assemble based on hydrophobic interactions with an additional driving force for influencing the overall aggregate morphology, namely, molecular curvature. The structure is build from subunits which are substituted with either

  6. Membrane curvature induction and tubulation are common features of synucleins and apolipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varkey, Jobin; Isas, Jose Mario; Mizuno, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    Synucleins and apolipoproteins have been implicated in a number of membrane and lipid trafficking events. Lipid interaction for both types of proteins is mediated by 11 amino acid repeats that form amphipathic helices. This similarity suggests that synucleins and apolipoproteins might have compar...... density of tubulating proteins may be important. How cellular safeguarding mechanisms prevent such potentially toxic events and whether they go awry in disease remains to be determined....

  7. The meaning of curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (geodesic) triangles and negative curvatures slim triangles. Some basic ideas from metric (length-)space geometry and from the geometric analysis of the Laplacian will be surveyed and applied. Via the Laplacian the curvature tensor is in control of a variety of very natural phenomena ranging from heat......This talk is essentially concerned with the shape molding forces of curvature and with the old question of how to detect the presence of curvature in manifolds and length spaces at various scales ranging from global to local to microlocal. As the old saying goes: Positive curvatures produce fat...... diffusion to volume growth. We are e.g. interested in obtaining precise bounds for mean exit times for Brownian motions and for isoperimetric inequalities. One way to obtain such bounds are via curvature controlled comparison with corresponding values in constant curvature spaces and in other tailor-made so...

  8. Effects of membrane curvature and pH on proton pumping activity of single cytochrome bo3 enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mengqiu; Khan, Sanobar; Rong, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli, cytochrome bo3, for hundreds of seconds on the single enzyme level (Li et al. J Am Chem Soc 137 (2015) 16055–16063). Here, we have extended these studies by additional experiments and analyses of the proton transfer rate as a function of proteoliposome size and pH at the N- and P...... that the pH optimum is related to proton release from the proton exit site. Our previous single-enzyme experiments identified rare, long-lived conformation states of cytochrome bo3 where protons leak back under turn-over conditions. Here, we analyzed and found that ~ 23% of cytochrome bo3 proteoliposomes......-side of single HCOs. Proton transport activity of cytochrome bo3 was found to decrease with increased curvature of the membrane. Furthermore, proton uptake at the N-side (proton entrance) was insensitive to pH between pH 6.4–8.4, while proton release at the P-side had an optimum pH of ~ 7.4, suggesting...

  9. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  10. Effects of membrane curvature and pH on proton pumping activity of single cytochrome bo3enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengqiu; Khan, Sanobar; Rong, Honglin; Tuma, Roman; Hatzakis, Nikos S; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2017-09-01

    The molecular mechanism of proton pumping by heme-copper oxidases (HCO) has intrigued the scientific community since it was first proposed. We have recently reported a novel technology that enables the continuous characterisation of proton transport activity of a HCO and ubiquinol oxidase from Escherichia coli, cytochrome bo 3 , for hundreds of seconds on the single enzyme level (Li et al. J Am Chem Soc 137 (2015) 16055-16063). Here, we have extended these studies by additional experiments and analyses of the proton transfer rate as a function of proteoliposome size and pH at the N- and P-side of single HCOs. Proton transport activity of cytochrome bo 3 was found to decrease with increased curvature of the membrane. Furthermore, proton uptake at the N-side (proton entrance) was insensitive to pH between pH6.4-8.4, while proton release at the P-side had an optimum pH of ~7.4, suggesting that the pH optimum is related to proton release from the proton exit site. Our previous single-enzyme experiments identified rare, long-lived conformation states of cytochrome bo 3 where protons leak back under turn-over conditions. Here, we analyzed and found that ~23% of cytochrome bo 3 proteoliposomes show ΔpH half-lives below 50s after stopping turnover, while only ~5% of the proteoliposomes containing a non-pumping mutant, E286C cytochrome bo 3 exhibit such fast decays. These single-enzyme results confirm our model in which HCO exhibit heterogeneous pumping rates and can adopt rare leak states in which protons are able to rapidly flow back. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of miniature elastomer lenses with programmable liquid mold for smartphone microscopy: curing polydimethylsiloxane with in situ curvature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Bhuvaneshwari; Tharion, Joseph; Dhawangale, Arvind Ramrao; Paul, Debjani; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2018-02-01

    Miniature lenses can transform commercial imaging systems, e.g., smartphones and webcams, into powerful, low-cost, handheld microscopes. To date, the reproducible fabrication of polymer lenses is still a challenge as they require controlled dispensing of viscous liquid. This paper reports a reproducible lens fabrication technique using liquid mold with programmable curvature and off-the-shelf materials. The lens curvature is controlled during fabrication by tuning the curvature of an interface of two immiscible liquids [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glycerol]. The curvature control is implemented using a visual feedback system, which includes a software-based guiding system to produce lenses of desired curvature. The technique allows PDMS lens fabrication of a wide range of sizes and focal lengths, within 20 min. The fabrication of two lens diameters: 1 and 5 mm with focal lengths ranging between 1.2 and 11 mm are demonstrated. The lens surface and bulk quality check performed using X-ray microtomography and atomic force microscopy reveal that the lenses are suitable for optical imaging. Furthermore, a smartphone microscope with ˜1.4-μm resolution is developed using a self-assembly of a single high power fabricated lens and microaperture. The lenses have various potential applications, e.g., optofluidics, diagnostics, forensics, and surveillance.

  12. Effects of pyrenebutyrate on the translocation of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides through artificial membranes: recruiting peptides to the membranes, dissipating liquid-ordered phases, and inducing curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Sayaka; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Yano, Yoshiaki; Murayama, Tomo; Nakata, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Futaki, Shiroh

    2013-09-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, including octaarginine (R8) and HIV-1 TAT peptides, have the ability to translocate through cell membranes and transport exogenous bioactive molecules into cells. Hydrophobic counteranions such as pyrenebutyrate (PyB) have been reported to markedly promote the membrane translocation of these peptides. In this study, using model membranes having liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, we explored the effects of PyB on the promotion of R8 translocation. Confocal microscopic observations of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) showed that PyB significantly accelerated the accumulation of R8 on membranes containing negatively charged lipids, leading to the internalization of R8 without collapse of the GUV structures. PyB displayed an alternative activity, increasing the fluidity of the negatively charged membranes, which diminished the distinct Lo/Ld phase separation on GUVs. This was supported by the decrease in fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Additionally, PyB induced membrane curvature, which has been suggested as a possible mechanism of membrane translocation for R8. Taken together, our results indicate that PyB may have multiple effects that promote R8 translocation through cell membranes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of a kneeling chair on lumbar curvature in patients with low back pain and healthy controls: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucher, Matthieu; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Demattei, Christophe; Alonso, Sandrine; Hérisson, Christian; Kouyoumdjian, Pascal; van Dieën, Jaap H; Dupeyron, Arnaud

    2015-06-01

    The concept of an ideal sitting posture is often used in practice but lacks a basis in evidence. We designed a cross-sectional, comparative, matched study to determine the effects of chair and posture on lumbar curvature in 10 patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CLBP; mean pain duration 24 ± 18 months) and 10 healthy matched controls. Pelvic incidence, sacral slope and lumbar curvature were measured on computed radiographs by 2 blinded clinicians for subjects in 2 postures (upright vs slumped sitting) and on 2 chairs (usual flat chair vs kneeling chair). The reliability of measures was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient>0.9). As hypothesized, the expected sacral slope and lumbar lordosis changed between standing and sitting on a kneeling chair as compared with a usual chair (Pchairs and postures for lumbar lordosis (P=0.02) indicated more pronounced effects of the chair in slumped sitting. Therefore, lumbar lordosis was reduced less when sitting on a kneeling chair as compared with a usual chair. Although healthy subjects showed more reduction in lordosis between standing and sitting, the chair effect was found in both CLBP patients and healthy subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Curvature Entropy for Curved Profile Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Ujiie, Yoshiki; Kato, Takeo; Sato, Koichiro; Matsuoka, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    In a curved surface design, the overall shape features that emerge from combinations of shape elements are important. However, controlling the features of the overall shape in curved profiles is difficult using conventional microscopic shape information such as dimension. Herein two types of macroscopic shape information, curvature entropy and quadrature curvature entropy, quantitatively represent the features of the overall shape. The curvature entropy is calculated by the curvature distribu...

  15. Chemically triggered ejection of membrane tubules controlled by intermonolayer friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J-B; Khalifat, N; Puff, N; Angelova, M I

    2009-01-09

    We report a chemically driven membrane shape instability that triggers the ejection of a tubule growing exponentially toward a chemical source. The instability is initiated by a dilation of the exposed monolayer, which is coupled to the membrane spontaneous curvature and slowed down by intermonolayer friction. Our experiments are performed by local delivery of a basic pH solution to a giant vesicle. Quantitative fits of the data give an intermonolayer friction coefficient b approximately 2x10;{9} J s/m;{4}. The exponential growth of the tubule may be explained by a Marangoni stress yielding a pulling force proportional to its length.

  16. Curvature Entropy for Curved Profile Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Sato

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a curved surface design, the overall shape features that emerge from combinations of shape elements are important. However, controlling the features of the overall shape in curved profiles is difficult using conventional microscopic shape information such as dimension. Herein two types of macroscopic shape information, curvature entropy and quadrature curvature entropy, quantitatively represent the features of the overall shape. The curvature entropy is calculated by the curvature distribution, and represents the complexity of a shape (one of the overall shape features. The quadrature curvature entropy is an improvement of the curvature entropy by introducing a Markov process to evaluate the continuity of a curvature and to approximate human cognition of the shape. Additionally, a shape generation method using a genetic algorithm as a calculator and the entropy as a shape generation index is presented. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated using the side view of an automobile as a design example.

  17. Cholera toxin B subunit induces local curvature on lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Nåbo, Lina J.; Ipsen, John H.

    2017-01-01

    B induces a local membrane curvature that is essential for its clathrin-independent uptake. Using all-atom molecular dynamics, we show that CTxB induces local curvature, with the radius of curvature around 36 nm. The main feature of the CTxB molecular structure that causes membrane bending is the protruding...... alpha helices in the middle of the protein. Our study points to a generic protein design principle for generating local membrane curvature through specific binding to their lipid anchors....

  18. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  19. [Case control study on the association between abnormality curvature of cervical spine and pathogenesy of cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Cai; Shi, Yin-Yu; Wang, Xiang; Huang, Shi-Rong; Zhan, Hong-Sheng

    2010-10-01

    To explore the relationship between the abnormality curvature of cervical spine and pathogenesy of cervical spondylosis, in order to provide a new way in diagnosis of cervical spondylosis. There were two groups in the study, which were non-cervical spondylosis group (with heath adults) and cervical spondylosis group. From March 2006 to December 2008, 333 patients (out-patients in department of orthopaedics of Shuguang hospital) in cervical spondylosis group, which were 119 males, 214 females with an average age of (48.11 +/- 12.21) years. There were 73 subjects in non-cervical spondylosis group, which was 18 males, 55 females with an average age of (45.99 +/- 11.47) years. Based on the lateral view X-ray pictures of cervical spine, the abnormality curvature and character of cervical spine were studied in two groups. The incidence rate in abnormality curvature of cervical spine in cervical spondylosis group (achieved to 95.50%) was more than that of non-cervical spondylosis group, there was significant difference between two groups (P = 0.000 spondylosis group was complicated and variegated, of which physiological curvature diminished had 23.12% (77 cases), turn straight had 40.84% (136 cases), increased had 0.60% (2 cases), recurved had 12.01% (40 cases), S shape had 4.20%(14 cases), contra-S shape had 2.70% (9 cases), upper flex and lower straight had 4.50% (15 cases), upper straight and lower flex had 7.51% (25 cases). The abnormality curvature of cervical spine may be an X-ray diagnostic indication to the cervical spondylosis, which is complicated and variegated. It will provide the guidance for the diagnosis and treatment of cervical spondylosis.

  20. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  1. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-05

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to control a water production rate of the MD process based at least in part upon a distributed heat transfer across the membrane boundary layer. In another example, a method includes determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating a feed side and a permeate side of a membrane distillation (MD) process; and adjusting inlet flow rate or inlet temperature of at least one of the feed side or the permeate side to maintain a difference temperature along the membrane boundary layer about a defined reference temperature based at least in part upon the plurality of estimated temperature states.

  2. Curvature-Induced Instabilities of Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Stoop, Norbert; Steranka, Mark P.; Bade, Abdikhalaq J.; Holmes, Douglas P.

    2018-01-01

    Induced by proteins within the cell membrane or by differential growth, heating, or swelling, spontaneous curvatures can drastically affect the morphology of thin bodies and induce mechanical instabilities. Yet, the interaction of spontaneous curvature and geometric frustration in curved shells remains poorly understood. Via a combination of precision experiments on elastomeric spherical shells, simulations, and theory, we show how a spontaneous curvature induces a rotational symmetry-breaking buckling as well as a snapping instability reminiscent of the Venus fly trap closure mechanism. The instabilities, and their dependence on geometry, are rationalized by reducing the spontaneous curvature to an effective mechanical load. This formulation reveals a combined pressurelike term in the bulk and a torquelike term in the boundary, allowing scaling predictions for the instabilities that are in excellent agreement with experiments and simulations. Moreover, the effective pressure analogy suggests a curvature-induced subcritical buckling in closed shells. We determine the critical buckling curvature via a linear stability analysis that accounts for the combination of residual membrane and bending stresses. The prominent role of geometry in our findings suggests the applicability of the results over a wide range of scales.

  3. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  4. Rapid, bilateral changes in growth rate and curvature during gravitropism of cucumber hypocotyls: implications for mechanism of growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The growth response of etiolated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyls to gravitropic stimulation was examined by means of time-lapse photography and high-resolution analysis of surface expansion and curvature. In comparison with video analysis, the technique described here has five- to 20-fold better resolution; moreover, the mathematical fitting method (cubic splines) allows direct estimation of local and integrated curvature. After switching seedlings from a vertical to horizontal position, both upper and lower surfaces of the stem reacted after a lag of about 11 min with a two- to three-fold increase in surface expansion rate on the lower side and a cessation of expansion, or slight compression, on the upper surface. This growth asymmetry was initiated simultaneously along the length of the hypocotyl, on both upper and lower surfaces, and did not migrate basipetally from the apex. Later stages in the gravitropic response involved a complex reversal of the growth asymmetry, with the net result being a basipetal migration of the curved region. This secondary growth reversal may reflect oscillatory and/or self-regulatory behaviour of growing cells. With some qualifications, the kinetics and pattern of growth response are consistent with a mechanism involving hormone redistribution, although they do not prove such a mechanism. The growth kinetics require a growth mechanism which can be stimulated by two- to three-fold or completely inhibited within a few minutes.

  5. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  7. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; FERRER, J.

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON® , Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the follo...

  8. Introducing quantum Ricci curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitgaard, N.; Loll, R.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the search for geometric observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we define a notion of coarse-grained Ricci curvature. It is based on a particular way of extracting the local Ricci curvature of a smooth Riemannian manifold by comparing the distance between pairs of spheres with that of their centers. The quantum Ricci curvature is designed for use on non-smooth and discrete metric spaces, and to satisfy the key criteria of scalability and computability. We test the prescription on a variety of regular and random piecewise flat spaces, mostly in two dimensions. This enables us to quantify its behavior for short lattices distances and compare its large-scale behavior with that of constantly curved model spaces. On the triangulated spaces considered, the quantum Ricci curvature has good averaging properties and reproduces classical characteristics on scales large compared to the discretization scale.

  9. Importance of plan curvature in watershed modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, J.; Ribail, J.; Zhao, M.

    2016-12-01

    A hillslope's hydrologic response to precipitation events is largely controlled by the topographic features of a given hillslope, specifically the profile and plan curvature. Many models simplify hillslope topography and ignore the curvature properties, and some use alternate measures such as a topographic index or the hillslope width function. Models that ignore curvature properties may be calibrated to produce the statistically acceptable integrated response of runoff at a watershed outlet, but incorporating these properties is necessary to model accurately hydrologic processes such as surface flow, erosion, subsurface lateral flow, location of runoff generation and drainage response. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of rainfall-runoff modelling to profile and plan curvature in two models. In the first model, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, hillslope uses a representative width to the hillslope by dividing the drainage area by the average surface channel length. Profile curvature is preserved with a limited spatial resolution due to the number of overland flow elements. In the second model, the distributed Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model, the geographic information system uses the D8 algorithm to capture profile and plan curvature. Sensitivity to topographic features was tested for three profile curvatures (convex, concave, straight) combined with three plan curvatures (diverging, converging, uniform) resulting in a total of nine hillslopes. Each hillslope was subjected to different rainfall events to detect threshold behavior for when topographic features cannot be ignored. Our findings indicate that concave and convex plan curvature need to be included when subsurface flow processes are the dominant flow process for surface flow runoff generation. We present thresholds for acceptable cases when profile and plan curvature can be simplified in larger spatial hydrologic units.

  10. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell control with feed-forward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feed-forward and feedback control is developed in this work for Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks. The feed-forward control is achieved using different methods, including look-up table, fuzzy logic and neural network, to improve the fuel cell stack breathing control and prevent the problem of oxygen ...

  11. Equi-Gaussian curvature folding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    curvature kf (p) i.e., kp = kf (p). In this case f will map curves to curves with equal equi-. Gaussian curvature at corresponding points. It will also map area with sectional curvature k(σ, p) into areas with the same sectional curvature, and so on. The set of all equi-Gaussian curvature foldings of M into N will be denoted by.

  12. Amino-Functionalized Ceramic Capillary Membranes for Controlled Virus Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Julia; Souza, Marina N; Schaper, Amelie; Árki, Pál; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-02-16

    A straightforward chemical functionalization strategy using aminosilanes for high-flux yttria-stabilized zirconia capillary membranes is presented (macroporous, d50 = 144 nm, open porosity =49%, membrane flux ∼150 L/(m(2)hbar)). Three different aminosilanes with one, two or three amino groups per silane molecule, namely 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AE-APTES) and N-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine (TPDA), are used to generate the amino-functionalized membranes. With a higher number of amino groups per silane molecule increased loading capacities between 0.44 and 1.01 accessible amino groups/nm(2) membrane are achieved. Streaming potential measurements confirm that the zeta-potential of the membrane surface is converted from negative (non-functionalized) to positive (amino-functionalized). By operation in dead-end filtration mode using the model virus MS2 (diameter = 25 nm, IEP = 3.9) the virus retention capacity of the amino-functionalized membranes is significantly increased and log reduction values (LRVs) of up to 9.6 ± 0.3 (TPDA) are obtained whereas a LRV functionalized membranes. Long-term dead-end filtration experiments for 1 week reveal a high stability of immobilized aminosilanes (TPDA), being robust against leaching. By iterative backflushing with desorption buffer MS2-loaded membranes are successfully regenerated being reusable for a new filtration cycle. The presented functionalization platform is highly promising for controlled virus retention.

  13. Nanomaterials for membrane fouling control: accomplishments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-11-01

    We report a review of recent research efforts on incorporating nanomaterials-including metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanomaterials, and polymeric nanomaterials-into/onto membranes to improve membrane antifouling properties in biomedical or potentially medical-related applications. In general, nanomaterials can be incorporated into/onto a membrane by blending them into membrane fabricating materials or by attaching them to membrane surfaces via physical or chemical approaches. Overall, the fascinating, multifaceted properties (eg, high hydrophilicity, superparamagnetic properties, antibacterial properties, amenable functionality, strong hydration capability) of nanomaterials provide numerous novel strategies and unprecedented opportunities to fully mitigate membrane fouling. However, there are still challenges in achieving a broader adoption of nanomaterials in the membrane processes used for biomedical applications. Most of these challenges arise from the concerns over their long-term antifouling performance, hemocompatibility, and toxicity toward humans. Therefore, rigorous investigation is still needed before the adoption of some of these nanomaterials in biomedical applications, especially for those nanomaterials proposed to be used in the human body or in contact with living tissue/body fluids for a long period of time. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to predict that the service lifetime of membrane-based biomedical devices and implants will be prolonged significantly with the adoption of appropriate fouling control strategies. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatiotemporal Control of Lipid Conversion, Actin-Based Mechanical Forces, and Curvature Sensors during Clathrin/AP-1-Coated Vesicle Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Anitei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clathrin/adaptor protein-1-coated carriers connect the secretory and the endocytic pathways. Carrier biogenesis relies on distinct protein networks changing membrane shape at the trans-Golgi network, each regulating coat assembly, F-actin-based mechanical forces, or the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers. How these different hubs are spatiotemporally coordinated remains largely unknown. Using in vitro reconstitution systems, quantitative proteomics, and lipidomics, as well as in vivo cell-based assays, we characterize the protein networks controlling membrane lipid composition, membrane shape, and carrier scission. These include PIP5K1A and phospholipase C-beta 3 controlling the conversion of PI[4]P into diacylglycerol. PIP5K1A binding to RAC1 provides a link to F-actin-based mechanical forces needed to tubulate membranes. Tubular membranes then recruit the BAR-domain-containing arfaptin-1/2 guiding carrier scission. These findings provide a framework for synchronizing the chemical/biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, F-actin-based mechanical forces, and the activity of proteins sensing membrane shape during clathrin/adaptor protein-1-coated carrier biogenesis.

  15. Modulation of Tenoxicam release from hydrophilic matrix: modulator membrane versus rate-controlling membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabarawi, Mohamed Ahmed

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation of two layered device comprising of tenoxicam containing layer and a drug free membrane layer based on Geomatrix Technology. Our device based on bilaminated films which produced by a casting/solvent evaporation technique. The drug-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) layer was covered by drug free membrane layer composed of a mixture of different ratios of HPMC and ethyl cellulose (EC). The prepared devices were evaluated for thickness, weight, drug content uniformity, water absorption capacity and in-vitro drug release. The films were also evaluated for appearance, smoothness and transparency. The influence of drug free membrane layer composition and thickness on the drug release pattern was studied on 12 devices (D1 to D12). The results indicate that, the release of drug from HPMC matrixes without the drug free membrane layer was fast and follows diffusion controlled mechanism. The release of drug from the devices D1, D4, D9 and D12 follow the same mechanism, while the release of drug from other devices become linear with time (zero order) and extended for long time especially when thickness and the ratio of EC was increased in the drug free membrane layer. From this study it is concluded that, changing the geometry of drug layer by addition of drug free membrane layer and changing its composition and thickness plays an important role in determining whether the drug free membrane layer is rate-controlling or modulator membrane. Hence it can facilitate the development of different pharmaceutical products with different release pattern.

  16. Hydrogen concentration control utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keating, S.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen in a fluid mixture is controlled to a desired concentration by flowing the fluid through one chamber of a diffusion cell separated into two chambers by a hydrogen permeable membrane. A gradient of hydrogen partial pressure is maintained across the membrane to cause diffusion of hydrogen through the membrane to maintain the concentration of hydrogen in the fluid mixture at the predetermined level. The invention has particular utility for the purpose of injecting into and/or separating hydrogen from the reactor coolant of a nuclear reactor system

  17. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  18. Ripple structures of mixed homopolymer brushes grafted on cylindrical surfaces: controlling the orientation of the pattern by attuning the substrate curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Chen, Cangyi; Yang, Yingzi; Qiu, Feng

    2014-08-28

    We employed the strong segregation theory (SST) to study the phase structures of mixed homopolymer brushes grafted on cylindrical surfaces. We considered a simplified case in which two incompatible homopolymers have the same chain length and grafting density. Under these conditions, micro-phase separation in the brush may result in either ripple or helix structures. By comparing the free energy of the possible candidate structures, we found that the helix structure is never the most stable one, while the stability of the perpendicular and parallel ripple structures are sensitive to the curvature of the grafting substrate. It was found that the morphology orientation of the mixed homopolymer brushes can be controlled by attuning the geometry of the substrates.

  19. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    hyperbolas. This means that when a plane orthogonal system of curves for which the vertices in a mesh always lie on a circle is mapped on a surface with positive Gaussian curvature using inverse mapping, and the mapped vertices are connected by straight lines, this network will form a faceted surface...

  20. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  1. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  2. Optimal adaptive scheduling and control of beer membrane filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigenburg, van L.G.; Vollebregt, H.M.; Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive optimal scheduling and controller design is presented that attempts to improve the performance of beer membrane filtration over the ones currently obtained by operators. The research was performed as part of a large European research project called EU Cafe with the aim to investigate the

  3. Brane cosmology with curvature corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofinas, Georgios; Maartens, Roy; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2003-01-01

    We study the cosmology of the Randall-Sundrum brane-world where the Einstein-Hilbert action is modified by curvature correction terms: a four-dimensional scalar curvature from induced gravity on the brane, and a five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet curvature term. The combined effect of these curvature corrections to the action removes the infinite-density big bang singularity, although the curvature can still diverge for some parameter values. A radiation brane undergoes accelerated expansion near the minimal scale factor, for a range of parameters. This acceleration is driven by the geometric effects, without an inflation field or negative pressures. At late times, conventional cosmology is recovered. (author)

  4. Model predictive control for ethanol steam reformers with membrane separation

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria; Ocampo-Martínez, Carlos; Li, Mingming; Llorca Piqué, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ This paper focuses on the dynamic modelling and the predictive control of an ethanol steam reformer (ESR) with Pdsingle bondAg membrane separation stage for the generation of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen purity necessary to feed a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is required. A non-linear dynamic model of the ESR is developed together with a procedure f...

  5. Quantifying the Relationship between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Dennis S; Lomholt, Michael A; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-06-02

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that headgroup dipole moments, the lateral pressure profile across the bilayer, and spontaneous curvature all systematically change with increasing membrane potentials. In particular, there is a linear dependence between the bending moment (the product of bending rigidity and spontaneous curvature) and the applied membrane potentials. We show that biologically relevant membrane potentials can induce biologically relevant curvatures corresponding to radii of around 500 nm. The implications of flexoelectricity in lipid bilayers are thus likely to be of considerable consequence both in biology and in model lipid bilayer systems.

  6. The effect of increasing membrane curvature on the phase transition and mixing behavior of a dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipid mixture as studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brumm, T.; Jørgensen, Kent; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    The phase transition behavior of a lipid bilayer of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphalidylcholine/distearoyl-sn- glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC-d54/DSPC) (1:1) on a solid support with varying curvatures was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and model...... of the liquidus point can be understood as a reduction of the lateral pressure in the bilayer with increasing curvature. The shift of the solidus line is interpreted as a result of the increased demixing of the two components in the two-phase region with increasing curvature due to lowering of the lateral...

  7. Combined Estimation and Optimal Control of Batch Membrane Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jelemenský

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with the model-based time-optimal operation of a batch diafiltration process in the presence of membrane fouling. Membrane fouling poses one of the major problems in the field of membrane processes. We model the fouling behavior and estimate its parameters using various methods. Least-squares, least-squares with a moving horizon, recursive least-squares methods and the extended Kalman filter are applied and discussed for the estimation of the fouling behavior on-line during the process run. Model-based optimal non-linear control coupled with parameter estimation is applied in a simulation case study to show the benefits of the proposed approach.

  8. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  9. Quantifying the Relationship Between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dennis Skjøth; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecular...... and spontaneous curvature) and the applied membrane potentials. We show that biologically relevant membrane potentials can induce biologically relevant curva- tures corresponding to radii of around 500nm. The implications of flexoelectricity in lipid bilayers are thus likely to be of considerable consequence both...

  10. PH-triggered micellar membrane for controlled release microchips

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoqiang

    2011-01-01

    A pH-responsive membrane based on polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer was developed on a model glass microchip as a promising controlled polymer delivery system. The PS-b-P4VP copolymer assembles into spherical and/or worm-like micelles with styrene block cores and pyridine coronas in selective solvents. The self-assembled worm-like morphology exhibited pH-responsive behaviour due to the protonation of the P4VP block at low pH and it\\'s deprotonation at high pH and thus constituting a switchable "off/on" system. Doxorubicin (Dox) was used as cargo to test the PS-b-P4VP membrane. Luminescence experiments indicated that the membrane was able to store Dox molecules within its micellar structure at neutral pH and then release them as soon as the pH was raised to 8.0. The performance of the cast membrane was predictable and most importantly reproducible. The physiochemical and biological properties were also investigated carefully in terms of morphology, cell viability and cell uptake. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. On Gauss-Bonnet Curvatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Larbi Labbi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The $(2k$-th Gauss-Bonnet curvature is a generalization to higher dimensions of the $(2k$-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet integrand, it coincides with the usual scalar curvature for $k = 1$. The Gauss-Bonnet curvatures are used in theoretical physics to describe gravity in higher dimensional space times where they are known as the Lagrangian of Lovelock gravity, Gauss-Bonnet Gravity and Lanczos gravity. In this paper we present various aspects of these curvature invariants and review their variational properties. In particular, we discuss natural generalizations of the Yamabe problem, Einstein metrics and minimal submanifolds.

  12. Introduction of Curvature in Amphipathic Oligothiophenes for Defined Aggregate Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Janeliunas, Dainius; Brizard, Aurelie M. A.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the possibility to control the size and shape of self-assembled structures through the local curvature of their molecular building blocks has been investigated. To this end a series of amphipathic conjugated oligothiophenes with a well-defined curvature of their backbone has been

  13. A Curvature Flow Unifying Symplectic Curvature Flow And Pluriclosed Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Song

    2013-01-01

    Streets and Tian introduced pluriclosed flow and symplectic curvature flow in recent years. Here we construct a curvature flow to unify these two flows. We show the short time existence of our flow and exhibit an obstruction to long time existence.

  14. Attosecond control of electron beams at dielectric and absorbing membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Ultrashort electron pulses are crucial for time-resolved electron diffraction and microscopy of the fundamental light-matter interaction. In this work, we study experimentally and theoretically the generation and characterization of attosecond electron pulses by optical-field-driven compression and streaking at dielectric or absorbing interaction elements. The achievable acceleration and deflection gradient depends on the laser-electron angle, the laser's electric and magnetic field directions, and the foil orientation. Electric and magnetic fields have similar contributions to the final effect and both need to be considered. Experiments and theory agree well and reveal the optimum conditions for highly efficient, velocity-matched electron-field interactions in the longitudinal or transverse direction. We find that metallic membranes are optimum for light-electron control at mid-infrared or terahertz wavelengths, but dielectric membranes are excellent in the visible and near-infrared regimes and are therefore ideal for the formation of attosecond electron pulses.

  15. Filtration behavior of casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) in an enzymatic membrane reactor: fouling control by membrane selection and threshold flux operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    to be the most suitable membrane for this application. Low pH increased CGMP retention but produced more fouling. Higher agitation and lower CGMP concentration induced larger permeate flux and higher CGMP retention. Adsorption fouling and pore blocking by CGMP in/on membranes could be controlled by selecting...... a highly hydrophilic membrane with appropriate pore size. Operating under threshold flux could minimize the concentration polarization and cake/gel/scaling layers, but might not avoid irreversible fouling caused by adsorption and pore blocking. The effects of membrane properties, pH, agitation and CGMP...

  16. Fouling Issues in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs for Wastewater Treatment: Major Mechanisms, Prevention and Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros K. Gkotsis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane fouling is one of the most important considerations in the design and operation of membrane systems as it affects pretreatment needs, cleaning requirements, operating conditions, cost and performance. Given that membrane fouling represents the main limitation to membrane process operation, it is unsurprising that the majority of membrane material and process research and development conducted is dedicated to its characterization and amelioration. This work presents the fundamentals of fouling issues in membrane separations, with specific regard to membrane fouling in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs and the most frequently applied preventive-control strategies. Feed pretreatment, physical and chemical cleaning protocols, optimal operation of MBR process and membrane surface modification are presented and discussed in detail. Membrane fouling is the major obstacle to the widespread application of the MBR technology and, therefore, fouling preventive-control strategies is a hot issue that strongly concerns not only the scientific community, but industry as well.

  17. Microbial Relevant Fouling in Membrane Bioreactors: Influencing Factors, Characterization, and Fouling Control

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony G. Fane; Bing Wu

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) play important roles on degradation of organic/inorganic substances in wastewaters, while microbial deposition/growth and microbial product accumulation on membranes potentially induce membrane fouling. Generally, there is a need to characterize membrane foulants and to determine their relations to the evolution of membrane fouling in order to identify a suitable fouling control approach in MBRs. This review summarized the factors in MBRs that inf...

  18. Lectures on mean curvature flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xi-Ping

    2002-01-01

    "Mean curvature flow" is a term that is used to describe the evolution of a hypersurface whose normal velocity is given by the mean curvature. In the simplest case of a convex closed curve on the plane, the properties of the mean curvature flow are described by Gage-Hamilton's theorem. This theorem states that under the mean curvature flow, the curve collapses to a point, and if the flow is diluted so that the enclosed area equals \\pi, the curve tends to the unit circle. In this book, the author gives a comprehensive account of fundamental results on singularities and the asymptotic behavior of mean curvature flows in higher dimensions. Among other topics, he considers in detail Huisken's theorem (a generalization of Gage-Hamilton's theorem to higher dimension), evolution of non-convex curves and hypersurfaces, and the classification of singularities of the mean curvature flow. Because of the importance of the mean curvature flow and its numerous applications in differential geometry and partial differential ...

  19. Pedal claw curvature in birds, lizards and mesozoic dinosaurs--complicated categories and compensating for mass-specific and phylogenetic control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra V Birn-Jeffery

    Full Text Available Pedal claw geometry can be used to predict behaviour in extant tetrapods and has frequently been used as an indicator of lifestyle and ecology in Mesozoic birds and other fossil reptiles, sometimes without acknowledgement of the caveat that data from other aspects of morphology and proportions also need to be considered. Variation in styles of measurement (both inner and outer claw curvature angles has made it difficult to compare results across studies, as have over-simplified ecological categories. We sought to increase sample size in a new analysis devised to test claw geometry against ecological niche. We found that taxa from different behavioural categories overlapped extensively in claw geometry. Whilst most taxa plotted as predicted, some fossil taxa were recovered in unexpected positions. Inner and outer claw curvatures were statistically correlated, and both correlated with relative claw robusticity (mid-point claw height. We corrected for mass and phylogeny, as both likely influence claw morphology. We conclude that there is no strong mass-specific effect on claw curvature; furthermore, correlations between claw geometry and behaviour are consistent across disparate clades. By using independent contrasts to correct for phylogeny, we found little significant relationship between claw geometry and behaviour. 'Ground-dweller' claws are less curved and relatively dorsoventrally deep relative to those of other behavioural categories; beyond this it is difficult to assign an explicit category to a claw based purely on geometry.

  20. Pedal claw curvature in birds, lizards and mesozoic dinosaurs--complicated categories and compensating for mass-specific and phylogenetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Miller, Charlotte E; Naish, Darren; Rayfield, Emily J; Hone, David W E

    2012-01-01

    Pedal claw geometry can be used to predict behaviour in extant tetrapods and has frequently been used as an indicator of lifestyle and ecology in Mesozoic birds and other fossil reptiles, sometimes without acknowledgement of the caveat that data from other aspects of morphology and proportions also need to be considered. Variation in styles of measurement (both inner and outer claw curvature angles) has made it difficult to compare results across studies, as have over-simplified ecological categories. We sought to increase sample size in a new analysis devised to test claw geometry against ecological niche. We found that taxa from different behavioural categories overlapped extensively in claw geometry. Whilst most taxa plotted as predicted, some fossil taxa were recovered in unexpected positions. Inner and outer claw curvatures were statistically correlated, and both correlated with relative claw robusticity (mid-point claw height). We corrected for mass and phylogeny, as both likely influence claw morphology. We conclude that there is no strong mass-specific effect on claw curvature; furthermore, correlations between claw geometry and behaviour are consistent across disparate clades. By using independent contrasts to correct for phylogeny, we found little significant relationship between claw geometry and behaviour. 'Ground-dweller' claws are less curved and relatively dorsoventrally deep relative to those of other behavioural categories; beyond this it is difficult to assign an explicit category to a claw based purely on geometry.

  1. Haptic perception of object curvature in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Konczak

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The haptic perception of the curvature of an object is essential for adequate object manipulation and critical for our guidance of actions. This study investigated how the ability to perceive the curvature of an object is altered by Parkinson's disease (PD.Eight healthy subjects and 11 patients with mild to moderate PD had to judge, without vision, the curvature of a virtual "box" created by a robotic manipulandum. Their hands were either moved passively along a defined curved path or they actively explored the curved curvature of a virtual wall. The curvature was either concave or convex (bulging to the left or right and was judged in two locations of the hand workspace--a left workspace location, where the curved hand path was associated with curved shoulder and elbow joint paths, and a right workspace location in which these joint paths were nearly linear. After exploring the curvature of the virtual object, subjects had to judge whether the curvature was concave or convex. Based on these data, thresholds for curvature sensitivity were established. The main findings of the study are: First, 9 out 11 PD patients (82% showed elevated thresholds for detecting convex curvatures in at least one test condition. The respective median threshold for the PD group was increased by 343% when compared to the control group. Second, when distal hand paths became less associated with proximal joint paths (right workspace, haptic acuity was reduced substantially in both groups. Third, sensitivity to hand trajectory curvature was not improved during active exploration in either group.Our data demonstrate that PD is associated with a decreased acuity of the haptic sense, which may occur already at an early stage of the disease.

  2. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  3. Discrete Curvature Theories and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2016-08-25

    Discrete Di erential Geometry (DDG) concerns discrete counterparts of notions and methods in di erential geometry. This thesis deals with a core subject in DDG, discrete curvature theories on various types of polyhedral surfaces that are practically important for free-form architecture, sunlight-redirecting shading systems, and face recognition. Modeled as polyhedral surfaces, the shapes of free-form structures may have to satisfy di erent geometric or physical constraints. We study a combination of geometry and physics { the discrete surfaces that can stand on their own, as well as having proper shapes for the manufacture. These proper shapes, known as circular and conical meshes, are closely related to discrete principal curvatures. We study curvature theories that make such surfaces possible. Shading systems of freeform building skins are new types of energy-saving structures that can re-direct the sunlight. From these systems, discrete line congruences across polyhedral surfaces can be abstracted. We develop a new curvature theory for polyhedral surfaces equipped with normal congruences { a particular type of congruences de ned by linear interpolation of vertex normals. The main results are a discussion of various de nitions of normality, a detailed study of the geometry of such congruences, and a concept of curvatures and shape operators associated with the faces of a triangle mesh. These curvatures are compatible with both normal congruences and the Steiner formula. In addition to architecture, we consider the role of discrete curvatures in face recognition. We use geometric measure theory to introduce the notion of asymptotic cones associated with a singular subspace of a Riemannian manifold, which is an extension of the classical notion of asymptotic directions. We get a simple expression of these cones for polyhedral surfaces, as well as convergence and approximation theorems. We use the asymptotic cones as facial descriptors and demonstrate the

  4. Ion Transport through Diffusion Layer Controlled by Charge Mosaic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic transport behaviors in near interface of the membranes were studied using commercial anion and cation exchange membrane and charge mosaic membrane. Current-voltage curve gave the limiting current density that indicates the ceiling of conventional flux. From chronopotentiometry above the limiting current density, the transition time was estimated. The thickness of boundary layer was derived with conjunction with the conventional limiting current density and the transition time from steady state flux. On the other hand, the charge mosaic membrane was introduced in order to examine the ion transport on the membrane surface in detail. The concentration profile was discussed by the kinetic transport number with regard to the water dissociation (splitting on the membrane surface.

  5. Mixed lipid bilayers with locally varying spontaneous curvature and bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Guillaume; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2014-08-01

    A model of lipid bilayers made of a mixture of two lipids with different average compositions on both leaflets, is developed. A Landau Hamiltonian describing the lipid-lipid interactions on each leaflet, with two lipidic fields ψ 1 and ψ 2, is coupled to a Helfrich one, accounting for the membrane elasticity, via both a local spontaneous curvature, which varies as C 0 + C 1(ψ 1 - ψ 2/2), and a bending modulus equal to κ 0 + κ 1(ψ 1 + ψ 2)/2. This model allows us to define curved patches as membrane domains where the asymmetry in composition, ψ 1 - ψ 2, is large, and thick and stiff patches where ψ 1 + ψ 2 is large. These thick patches are good candidates for being lipidic rafts, as observed in cell membranes, which are composed primarily of saturated lipids forming a liquid-ordered domain and are known to be thick and flat nano-domains. The lipid-lipid structure factors and correlation functions are computed for globally spherical membranes and planar ones and for a whole set of parameters including the surface tension and the coupling in the two leaflet compositions. Phase diagrams are established, within a Gaussian approximation, showing the occurrence of two types of Structure Disordered phases, with correlations between either curved or thick patches, and an Ordered phase, corresponding to the divergence of the structure factor at a finite wave vector. The varying bending modulus plays a central role for curved membranes, where the driving force κ 1 C 0 (2) is balanced by the line tension, to form raft domains of size ranging from 10 to 100 nm. For planar membranes, raft domains emerge via the cross-correlation with curved domains. A global picture emerges from curvature-induced mechanisms, described in the literature for planar membranes, to coupled curvature- and bending-induced mechanisms in curved membranes forming a closed vesicle.

  6. Clinical Assessment of Lamina Cribrosa Curvature in Eyes with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Woo Kim

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of lamina cribrosa (LC posterior bowing in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography.Patients with POAG (n = 123 eyes and healthy individuals of a similar age (n = 92 eyes were prospectively recruited. Anterior laminar insertion depth (ALID was defined as the vertical distance between the anterior laminar insertion and a reference plane connecting the Bruch's membrane openings (BMO. The mean LC depth (mLCD was approximated by dividing the area enclosed by the anterior LC, the BMO reference plane, and the two vertical lines for ALID measurement by the length between those two vertical lines. The LC curvature index was defined as the difference between the mLCD and the ALID. The factors influencing the LC curvature index were evaluated.The ALID and mLCD were significantly larger in POAG eyes than in healthy controls (P -6 dB and moderate-to-advanced glaucoma (MD < -6 dB, P = 0.95.LC posterior bowing was increased in POAG eyes, and was significantly associated with structural optic nerve head (ONH changes but not with functional glaucoma severity. Quantitative evaluation of LC curvature can facilitate assessment of glaucomatous ONH change.

  7. The role of curvature in silica mesoporous crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Miyasaka, Keiichi

    2012-02-08

    Silica mesoporous crystals (SMCs) offer a unique opportunity to study micellar mesophases. Replication of non-equilibrium mesophases into porous silica structures allows the characterization of surfactant phases under a variety of chemical and physical perturbations, through methods not typically accessible to liquid crystal chemists. A poignant example is the use of electron microscopy and crystallography, as discussed herein, for the purpose of determining the fundamental role of amphiphile curvature, namely mean curvature and Gaussian curvature, which have been extensively studied in various fields such as polymer, liquid crystal, biological membrane, etc. The present work aims to highlight some current studies devoted to the interface curvature on SMCs, in which electron microscopy and electron crystallography (EC) are used to understand the geometry of silica wall surface in bicontinuous and cage-type mesostructures through the investigation of electrostatic potential maps. Additionally, we show that by altering the synthesis conditions during the preparation of SMCs, it is possible to isolate particles during micellar mesophase transformations in the cubic bicontinuous system, allowing us to view and study epitaxial relations under the specific synthesis conditions. By studying the relationship between mesoporous structure, interface curvature and micellar mesophases using electron microscopy and EC, we hope to bring new insights into the formation mechanism of these unique materials but also contribute a new way of understanding periodic liquid crystal systems. © 2012 The Royal Society.

  8. Surface meshing with curvature convergence

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2014-06-01

    Surface meshing plays a fundamental role in graphics and visualization. Many geometric processing tasks involve solving geometric PDEs on meshes. The numerical stability, convergence rates and approximation errors are largely determined by the mesh qualities. In practice, Delaunay refinement algorithms offer satisfactory solutions to high quality mesh generations. The theoretical proofs for volume based and surface based Delaunay refinement algorithms have been established, but those for conformal parameterization based ones remain wide open. This work focuses on the curvature measure convergence for the conformal parameterization based Delaunay refinement algorithms. Given a metric surface, the proposed approach triangulates its conformal uniformization domain by the planar Delaunay refinement algorithms, and produces a high quality mesh. We give explicit estimates for the Hausdorff distance, the normal deviation, and the differences in curvature measures between the surface and the mesh. In contrast to the conventional results based on volumetric Delaunay refinement, our stronger estimates are independent of the mesh structure and directly guarantee the convergence of curvature measures. Meanwhile, our result on Gaussian curvature measure is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric and independent of the embedding. In practice, our meshing algorithm is much easier to implement and much more efficient. The experimental results verified our theoretical results and demonstrated the efficiency of the meshing algorithm. © 2014 IEEE.

  9. Coating of reverse osmosis membranes with amphiphilic copolymers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2017-05-30

    Surface coating of membranes may be a promising option to control biofilm development and biofouling impact on membrane performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of an amphiphilic copolymer coating on biofilm formation and biofouling control. The coating was composed of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFA), respectively. Commercial RO membranes were coated with HEMA-PFA copolymer film. Long and short term biofouling studies with coated and uncoated membranes and feed spacer were performed using membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) operated in parallel, fed with water containing nutrients. For the long-term studies pressure drop development in time was monitored and after eight days the MFSs were opened and the accumulated biofilm on the membrane and spacer sheets was quantified and characterized. The presence of the membrane coating was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results showed that the amphiphilic coating (i) delayed biofouling (a lower pressure drop increase by a factor of 3 and a lower accumulated active biomass amount by a factor of 6), (ii) influenced the biofilm composition (23% lower polysaccharides and 132% higher protein content) and (iii) was still completely present on the membrane at the end of the biofouling study, showing that the coating was strongly attached to the membrane surface. Using coated membranes and feed spacers in combination with advanced cleaning strategies may be a suitable way to control biofouling.

  10. Design and simulation of the surface shape control system for membrane mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gengsheng; Tang, Minxue

    2009-11-01

    The surface shape control is one of the key technologies for the manufacture of membrane mirror. This paper presents a design of membrane mirror's surface shape control system on the basis of fuzzy logic control. The system contains such function modules as surface shape design, surface shape control, surface shape analysis, and etc. The system functions are realized by using hybrid programming technology of Visual C# and MATLAB. The finite element method is adopted to simulate the surface shape control of membrane mirror. The finite element analysis model is established through ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). ANSYS software kernel is called by the system in background running mode when doing the simulation. The controller is designed by means of controlling the sag of the mirror's central crosssection. The surface shape of the membrane mirror and its optical aberration are obtained by applying Zernike polynomial fitting. The analysis of surface shape control and the simulation of disturbance response are performed for a membrane mirror with 300mm aperture and F/2.7. The result of the simulation shows that by using the designed control system, the RMS wavefront error of the mirror can reach to 142λ (λ=632.8nm), which is consistent to the surface accuracy of the membrane mirror obtained by the large deformation theory of membrane under the same condition.

  11. Biofouling Control in Spiral-Wound Membrane Systems: Impact of Feed Spacer Modification and Biocides

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber

    2016-12-01

    High-quality drinking water can be produced with membrane-based filtration processes like reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. One of the major problems in these membrane systems is biofouling that reduces the membrane performance, increasing operational costs. Current biofouling control strategies such as pre-treatment, membrane modification, and chemical cleaning are not sufficient in all cases. Feed spacers are thin (0.8 mm), complex geometry meshes that separate membranes in a module. The main objective of this research was to evaluate whether feed spacer modification is a suitable strategy to control biofouling. Membrane fouling simulator studies with six feed spacers showed differences in biofouled spacer performance, concluding that (i) spacer geometry influences biofouling impact and (ii) biofouling studies are essential for evaluation of spacer biofouling impact. Computed tomography (CT) was found as a suitable technique to obtain three-dimensional (3D) measurements of spacers, enabling more representative mathematical modeling of hydraulic behavior of spacers in membrane systems. A strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of spacers by numerical modeling, 3D printing of spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator studies was developed. The combination of modeling and experimental testing of 3D printed spacers is a promising strategy to develop advanced spacers aiming to reduce the impact of biofilm formation on membrane performance and to improve the cleanability of spiral-wound membrane systems.

  12. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  13. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  14. Optimal control of physical backwash strategy - towards the enhancement of membrane filtration process performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kalboussi, Nesrine; Harmand, Jérôme; Rapaport, Alain; Bayen, Térence; Ellouze, Fatma; Benamar, Nihel

    2018-01-01

    International audience; In this work, we show how optimal control theory can be used to optimize membrane filtration processes. The objective is to determine the optimal switching between filtration and backwash sequences in order to maximize the net water production per membrane area of microfiltration or ultrafiltration systems over a given period of time. The optimal solutions, whether the backwash flux is constant or variable, have been derived for a membrane filtration process operating ...

  15. Cosmic curvature tested directly from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenya, Mikhail; Linder, Eric V.; Shafieloo, Arman

    2018-03-01

    Cosmic spatial curvature is a fundamental geometric quantity of the Universe. We investigate a model independent, geometric approach to measure spatial curvature directly from observations, without any derivatives of data. This employs strong lensing time delays and supernova distance measurements to measure the curvature itself, rather than just testing consistency with flatness. We define two curvature estimators, with differing error propagation characteristics, that can crosscheck each other, and also show how they can be used to map the curvature in redshift slices, to test constancy of curvature as required by the Robertson-Walker metric. Simulating realizations of redshift distributions and distance measurements of lenses and sources, we estimate uncertainties on the curvature enabled by next generation measurements. The results indicate that the model independent methods, using only geometry without assuming forms for the energy density constituents, can determine the curvature at the ~6×10‑3 level.

  16. Fine-Tuning of Photosynthesis Requires CURVATURE THYLAKOID1-Mediated Thylakoid Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pribil, Mathias; Sandoval Ibáñez, Omar Alejandro; Xu, Wenteng

    2018-01-01

    The thylakoid membrane system of higher plant chloroplasts consists of interconnected subdomains of appressed and nonappressed membrane bilayers, known as grana and stroma lamellae, respectively. CURVATURE THYLAKOID1 (CURT1) protein complexes mediate the shape of grana stacks in a dosage-dependen...... plays an important role in fine-tuning photosynthesis and plant fitness during challenging growth conditions....

  17. The dark side of curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Martínez, Enrique Fernández; Mena, Olga; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    Geometrical tests such as the combination of the Hubble parameter H(z) and the angular diameter distance d A (z) can, in principle, break the degeneracy between the dark energy equation of state parameter w(z), and the spatial curvature Ω k in a direct, model-independent way. In practice, constraints on these quantities achievable from realistic experiments, such as those to be provided by Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) galaxy surveys in combination with CMB data, can resolve the cosmic confusion between the dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature only statistically and within a parameterized model for w(z). Combining measurements of both H(z) and d A (z) up to sufficiently high redshifts z ∼ 2 and employing a parameterization of the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state are the keys to resolve the w(z)−Ω k degeneracy

  18. Modern approaches to discrete curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Romon, Pascal

    2017-01-01

     This book provides a valuable glimpse into discrete curvature, a rich new field of research which blends discrete mathematics, differential geometry, probability and computer graphics. It includes a vast collection of ideas and tools which will offer something new to all interested readers. Discrete geometry has arisen as much as a theoretical development as in response to unforeseen challenges coming from applications. Discrete and continuous geometries have turned out to be intimately connected. Discrete curvature is the key concept connecting them through many bridges in numerous fields: metric spaces, Riemannian and Euclidean geometries, geometric measure theory, topology, partial differential equations, calculus of variations, gradient flows, asymptotic analysis, probability, harmonic analysis, graph theory, etc. In spite of its crucial importance both in theoretical mathematics and in applications, up to now, almost no books have provided a coherent outlook on this emerging field.

  19. Controlled membrane translocation provides a mechanism for signal transduction and amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J.; Keymeulen, Flore; Ciaccia, Maria; Williams, Nicholas H.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission and amplification of chemical signals across lipid bilayer membranes is of profound significance in many biological processes, from the development of multicellular organisms to information processing in the nervous system. In biology, membrane-spanning proteins are responsible for the transmission of chemical signals across membranes, and signal transduction is often associated with an amplified signalling cascade. The ability to reproduce such processes in artificial systems has potential applications in sensing, controlled drug delivery and communication between compartments in tissue-like constructs of synthetic vesicles. Here we describe a mechanism for transmitting a chemical signal across a membrane based on the controlled translocation of a synthetic molecular transducer from one side of a lipid bilayer membrane to the other. The controlled molecular motion has been coupled to the activation of a catalyst on the inside of a vesicle, which leads to a signal-amplification process analogous to the biological counterpart.

  20. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA; Waldron, William Emil [Whitehall, PA

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  1. Equi-Gaussian curvature folding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have the same equi-Gaussian curvature 1/a2, where a is the radius of the sphere. Now let f : S2 → Pn be a cellular folding. Then we have the following possibilities: Firstly, there are no cellular foldings f : S2 → Pn, for any n > 3 [2]. Secondly, any cellular folding f : S2 → P3 for which Gf forms a regular graph is equivalent to ...

  2. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  3. Effect of Pre-Ozonation and UF Membrane Modification with CNT on Fouling Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kailun; Guan, Yuqi; Zhu, Xuedong; Dong, Dan; Guo, Jin

    2018-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanotubes (CNT) modification on ultrafiltration membrane fouling control was explored. Three kinds of base membrane were chosen in the study: 20 kDa polysulfone (PS) membrane, 20 kDa and 100 kDa polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. Besides, the effect of pre-ozonation on the three CNT modified membranes for fouling alleviation was further studied. CNT modification presented antifouling properties at the beginning of filtration, while the recoverability of the CNT modified membranes are relatively lower as for the blocking of CNT layer by foulants. Pre-ozonation with a lower ozone concentration (0.25 mgO3/mgDOC) did not efficiently alleviate the fouling of CNT modified membranes. With the ozone concentration increased to 0.81 mgO3/mgDOC, the CNT modified membranes exhibited their higher antifouling properties. Water quality analysis results showed that CNT modification presented a higher capture ability for the humic-like and protein-like substances. After pre-ozonation, more organic materials could be retained in the interior of CNT layer, which decreased the fouling of base membranes and increased the permeate quality as well. Base membrane with large molecular size cut-off is more helpful for the synergistic effect of pre-ozonation and CNT modification.

  4. Introduction of curvature in amphipathic oligothiophenes for defined aggregate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Janeliunas, Dainius; Brizard, Aurélie M A; Stuart, Marc C A; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H

    2010-12-03

    In this study the possibility to control the size and shape of self-assembled structures through the local curvature of their molecular building blocks has been investigated. To this end a series of amphipathic conjugated oligothiophenes with a well-defined curvature of their backbone has been designed and synthesized. The molecular (local) curvature of these oligothiophenes resulted from a preference for cis instead of trans conformations at specific positions along the oligothiophene backbone, which can be controlled by the sequence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, while their ratio was kept constant. The self-assembly of ter-, sexi-, and dodecathiophenes appeared to be a low-cooperative process, involving the formation of premicellar aggregates at sub-millimolar concentrations, which at concentrations in the millimolar regime transformed into micelles and cylindrical micelles. The aggregates display fine structures with dimensions reminiscent of the thiophene molecules. The structure-morphology relationship of the ter- and sexithiophenes could be described by conventional packing theory. However, with the dodecathiophene, the backbone curvature governed the formation of cylindrical aggregates with a well-defined diameter. These results demonstrate that it is possible to control the aggregation morphology of simple amphipathic oligothiophenes by implementation of an additional structural motif namely, the curvature.

  5. Current research and development of controlling membrane fouling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fouling is a major problem influencing the operational performance, stability and cost of a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The composition of wastewater and biomass grown in the MBR are directly related to fouling. Many factors including operational parameters can affect the fouling process. The extent of fouling can be ...

  6. Spinal curvature and characteristics of postural change in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanishi, Natsuko; Kito, Nobuhiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Yamamoto, Masako

    2012-07-01

    Pregnant women often report complaints due to physiological and postural changes. Postural changes during pregnancy may cause low back pain and pelvic girdle pain. This study aimed to compare the characteristics of postural changes in pregnant compared with non-pregnant women. Prospective case-control study. Pregnancy care center. Fifteen women at 17-34 weeks pregnancy comprised the study group, while 10 non-pregnant female volunteers comprised the control group. Standing posture was evaluated in the sagittal plane with static digital pictures. Two angles were measured by image analysis software: (1) between the trunk and pelvis; and (2) between the trunk and lower extremity. Spinal curvature was measured with Spinal Mouse® to calculate the means of sacral inclination, thoracic and lumbar curvature and inclination. The principal components were calculated until eigenvalues surpassed 1. Three distinct factors with eigenvalues of 1.00-2.49 were identified, consistent with lumbosacral spinal curvature and inclination, thoracic spine curvature, and inclination of the body. These factors accounted for 77.2% of the total variance in posture variables. Eleven pregnant women showed postural characteristics of lumbar kyphosis and sacral posterior inclination. Body inclination showed a variety of patterns compared with those in healthy women. Spinal curvature demonstrated a tendency for lumbar kyphosis in pregnant women. Pregnancy may cause changes in spinal curvature and posture, which may in turn lead to relevant symptoms. Our data provide a basis for investigating the effects of spinal curvature and postural changes on symptoms during pregnancy. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Curvature-tuned InAs-based shells containing two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutilin, S V; Vorobyova, Ju S; Vorob' ev, A B; Putyato, M A; Prinz, V Ya, E-mail: s.mutilin@gmail.com [AV Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090, acad. Lavrentyev ave., 13, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-14

    Conducting InAs/AlSb/GaSb shells of curvature radius {approx}10 {mu}m are fabricated on GaSb (1 0 0) substrates. In the InAs quantum well, the shells are shown to contain a two-dimensional electron gas. Controlled tuning of the curvature of the formed shells in excess of three times is demonstrated. The sequence of fabrication steps for forming curvature-tuned InAs-based shells with quantum well is described.

  8. Application of electrochemical processes to membrane bioreactors for improving nutrient removal and fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borea, Laura; Naddeo, Vincenzo; Belgiorno, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is becoming increasingly popular as wastewater treatment due to the unique advantages it offers. However, membrane fouling is being given a great deal of attention so as to improve the performance of this type of technology. Recent studies have proven that the application of electrochemical processes to MBR represents a promising technological approach for membrane fouling control. In this work, two intermittent voltage gradients of 1 and 3 V/cm were applied between two cylindrical perforated electrodes, immersed around a membrane module, at laboratory scale with the aim of investigating the treatment performance and membrane fouling formation. For comparison purposes, the reactor also operated as a conventional MBR. Mechanisms of nutrient removal were studied and membrane fouling formation evaluated in terms of transmembrane pressure variation over time and sludge relative hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the impact of electrochemical processes on transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP), proposed as a new membrane fouling precursor, was investigated in addition to conventional fouling precursors such as bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP). All the results indicate that the integration of electrochemical processes into a MBR has the advantage of improving the treatment performance especially in terms of nutrient removal, with an enhancement of orthophosphate (PO 4 -P) and ammonia nitrogen (NH 4 -N) removal efficiencies up to 96.06 and 69.34 %, respectively. A reduction of membrane fouling was also observed with an increase of floc hydrophobicity to 71.72 %, a decrease of membrane fouling precursor concentrations, and, thus, of membrane fouling rates up to 54.33 %. The relationship found between TEP concentration and membrane fouling rate after the application of electrochemical processes confirms the applicability of this parameter as a new membrane fouling indicator.

  9. Constant Power Control of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell through Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Minxiu Yan; Liping Fan

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cell is a device that converts the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity through a chemical reaction with oxygen or another oxidizing agent. The paper describes a mathematical model of proton exchange membrane fuel cells by analyzing the working mechanism of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Furthermore, an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed for the constant power output of PEMFC system. Simulation results prove that adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control has be...

  10. Dynamic Double Curvature Mould System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Christian Raun; Kristensen, Mathias Kræmmergaard; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes a concept for a reconfigurable mould surface which is designed to fit the needs of contemporary architecture. The core of the concept presented is a dynamic surface manipulated into a given shape using a digital signal created directly from the CAD drawing of the design....... This happens fast, automatic and without production of waste, and the manipulated surface is fair and robust, eliminating the need for additional, manual treatment. Limitations to the possibilities of the flexible form are limited curvature and limited level of detail, making it especially suited for larger...

  11. Edges, curvature, and primal sketches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Marr described two versions of the primal sketch: the basic image-processing level in human vision. In line with his broader view of how one should construct explanatory theories in vision, he provided some details of the computational theory for this stage, the algorithms used, and how they might be implemented in neural systems. In this paper I consider how Marr ideas have continued over the past 30 years. In this regard, I pay particular attention to three stages: locating edges; describing edge curvature; linking local edge segments into elongated contours.

  12. Recursive Alterations of the Relationship between Simple Membrane Geometry and Insertion of Amphiphilic Motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Herlo, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The shape and composition of a membrane directly regulate the localization, activity, and signaling properties of membrane associated proteins. Proteins that both sense and generate membrane curvature, e.g., through amphiphilic insertion motifs, potentially engage in recursive binding dynamics......, where the recruitment of the protein itself changes the properties of the membrane substrate. Simple geometric models of membrane curvature interactions already provide prediction tools for experimental observations, however these models are treating curvature sensing and generation as separated...

  13. Coiled-coil oligomerization controls localization of the plasma membrane REMORINs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Denis; Legrand, Anthony; Gronnier, Julien; Decossas, Marion; Gouguet, Paul; Lambert, Olivier; Berbon, Mélanie; Verron, Loris; Grélard, Axelle; Germain, Veronique; Loquet, Antoine; Mongrand, Sébastien; Habenstein, Birgit

    2018-02-23

    REMORINs are nanodomain-organized proteins located in the plasma membrane and involved in cellular responses in plants. The dynamic assembly of the membrane nanodomains represents an essential tool of the versatile membrane barriers to control and modulate cellular functions. Nevertheless, the assembly mechanisms and protein organization strategies of nanodomains are poorly understood and many structural aspects are difficult to visualize. Using an ensemble of biophysical approaches, including solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, cryo-electron microscopy and in vivo confocal imaging, we provide first insights on the role and the structural mechanisms of REMORIN trimerization. Our results suggest that the formation of REMORIN coiled-coil trimers is essential for membrane recruitment and promotes REMORIN assembly in vitro into long filaments by trimer-trimer interactions that might participate in nanoclustering into membrane domains in vivo. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Membrane tension controls adhesion positioning at the leading edge of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Gole, Laurent; Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Tam, Zhi Yang; Luo, Weiwei; Kan, Sophie; Viasnoff, Virgile; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is dependent on adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the leading edge. These events may be physically constrained by the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the mechanical signal produced by an increase in plasma membrane tension triggers the positioning of new rows of adhesions at the leading edge. During protrusion, as membrane tension increases, velocity slows, and the lamellipodium buckles upward in a myosin II–independent manner. The buckling occurs between the front of the lamellipodium, where nascent adhesions are positioned in rows, and the base of the lamellipodium, where a vinculin-dependent clutch couples actin to previously positioned adhesions. As membrane tension decreases, protrusion resumes and buckling disappears, until the next cycle. We propose that the mechanical signal of membrane tension exerts upstream control in mechanotransduction by periodically compressing and relaxing the lamellipodium, leading to the positioning of adhesions at the leading edge of cells. PMID:28687667

  15. Air dehumidification by membrane with cold water for manned spacecraft environmental control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yonghong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional condensation dehumidification method requires additional gas-liquid separation and water recovery process in the manned spacecraft humidity control system, which would increase weight and complexity of systems. A new membrane dehumidification with cold water is proposed, which uses water vapor partial pressure difference to promote water vapor transmembrane mass transfer for dehumidification. The permeability of the membrane was measured and the experimental results agree well with the theoretical calculations. Based on the simulation of dehumidification process of cold water-membrane, the influence of module structure and working condition on dehumidification performance was analyzed, which provided reference for the design of membrane module construct. It can be seen from the simulation and experiments that the cold water-membrane dehumidification can effectively reduce the thermal load of the manned spacecraft.

  16. Improving membrane fouling control by maximizing the impact of air bubbles shear in a submerged plate-and-frame membrane module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseus, A.; Bilad, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    Harvesting microalgae is challenging due to the nature of microalgae having very small size, about similar density to water, and high membrane fouling propensity. Numerous techniques have been implemented for membrane fouling control including periodical cleanings, optimizing operational conditions and imposing shear-rates, such as using air bubbles. Nevertheless, air bubbles effectiveness can still be further improved by maximizing the shear-rates impact to scour foulant on membrane surface. In this paper, a new method to enhance membrane cleaning effect of air bubbles is presented. It was done by tilting the module to maximize contacts of air bubbles on the membrane surface. First of all, we investigate the effect of tilting angle, followed by the effect of switching period, and lastly the effect of aeration rate. The tests were conducted in a lab-scale submerged filtration treating microalgae broth solution. The filtration performance was judged based on steady state permeability. The results showed that increasing tilting lead to further improvement the cleaning efficiency by offering higher permeability. It was also identified that operating at one-sided membrane under optimum tilting angle matches permeability of a two-sided membrane at the same tilting angle, in which the later involved switching mode. Higher aeration rates lead to higher permeability and tilting membrane at 15° can reduce up to 30% of specific aeration demand, and thus improves energy saving. This tilted membrane module can lead to significant cost reduction as well as offers energy saving for membrane fouling control.

  17. Cell volume and membrane stretch independently control K+ channel activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholtz, Sofia Hammami; Willumsen, Niels J; Olsen, Hervør L

    2009-01-01

    A number of potassium channels including members of the KCNQ family and the Ca(2+) activated IK and SK, but not BK, are strongly and reversibly regulated by small changes in cell volume. It has been argued that this general regulation is mediated through sensitivity to changes in membrane stretch....... To test this hypothesis we have studied the regulation of KCNQ1 and BK channels after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Results from cell-attached patch clamp studies (approximately 50 microm(2) macropatches) in oocytes expressing BK channels demonstrate that the macroscopic volume-insensitive BK current...... that stretch and volume sensitivity can be considered two independent regulatory mechanisms....

  18. Exact boundary controllability for a series of membranes elastically connected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar D. Bastos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the exact controllability with Neumann boundary controls for a system of linear wave equations coupled in parallel by lower order terms on piecewise smooth domains of the plane. We obtain square integrable controls for initial state with finite energy and time of controllability near the optimal value.

  19. Membrane morphology and topology for fouling control in Reverse Osmosis filtration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Battiato, Ilenia

    2017-11-01

    Reverse Osmosis Membrane (ROM) filtration systems are widely utilized in waste-water recovery, seawater desalination, landfill water treatment, etc. During filtration, the system performance is dramatically affected by membrane fouling which causes a significant decrease in permeate flux as well as an increase in the energy input required to operate the system. Design and optimization of ROM filtration systems aim at reducing membrane fouling by studying the coupling between membrane structure, local flow field and foulant adsorption patterns. Yet, current studies focus exclusively on oversimplified steady-state models that ignore any dynamic coupling between fluid flow and transport through the membrane. In this work, we develop a customized solver (SUMembraneFoam) under OpenFOAM to solve the transient equations. The simulation results not only predict macroscopic quantities (e.g. permeate flux, pressure drop, etc.) but also show an excellent agreement with the fouling patterns observed in experiments. It is observed that foulant deposition is strongly controlled by the local shear stress on the membrane, and channel morphology or membrane topology can be modified to control the shear stress distribution and reduce fouling. Finally, we identify optimal regimes for design.

  20. Impact of feed spacer and membrane modification by hydrophilic, bactericidal and biocidal coating on biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Araújo, Paula A.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of polydopamine- and polydopamine-. graft-poly(ethylene glycol)-coated feed spacers and membranes, copper-coated feed spacers, and commercially-available biostatic feed spacers on biofouling has been studied in membrane fouling simulators. Feed spacers and membranes applied in practical membrane filtration systems were used; biofouling development was monitored by feed channel pressure drop increase and biomass accumulation. Polydopamine and polydopamine-. g-PEG are hydrophilic surface modification agents expected to resist protein and bacterial adhesion, while copper feed spacer coatings and biocides infused in feed spacers are expected to restrict biological growth. Our studies showed that polydopamine and polydopamine-. g-PEG coatings on feed spacers and membranes, copper coatings on feed spacers, and a commercial biostatic feed spacer did not have a significant impact on feed channel pressure drop increase and biofilm accumulation as measured by ATP and TOC content. The studied spacer and membrane modifications were not effective for biofouling control; it is doubtful that feed spacer and membrane modification, in general, may be effective for biofouling control regardless of the type of applied coating. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. LOCALIZATION OF POINT VORTICES UNDER CURVATURE PERTURBATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto, Garra

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We discuss the effect of curvature on the dynamics of a two-dimensional inviscid incompressible fluid with initial vorticity concentrated in N small disjoint regions, that is, the classical point vortex system. We recall some results about point vortex dynamics on simply connected surfaces with constant curvature K, that is, plane, spherical, and hyperbolic surfaces. We show that the effect of curvature can be treated as a smooth perturbation to the Green's function of...

  2. Nanoporous gold membranes: From morphological control to fuel cell catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi

    Porous noble metals are particularly attractive for scientific research and industrial applications such as catalysis, sensing, and filtration. In this thesis, I will discuss the fabrication, characterization, and application of a new class of porous metals, called nanoporous metals (NPM). NPM is made during selective dissolution (also called dealloying) of reactive components (e.g., silver) from multi-component alloys (e.g., Ag/Au alloy). Commercially available white gold leaf (Ag65Au35) can, for example, be etched into nanoporous gold (NPG) membrane by simply floating the leaf on concentrated nitric acid for periods of a few minutes. NPG leaf adopts a single crystal porous structure within individual grains. The microstructure of NPG, such as the pore size, is tunable between a few nanometers to sub-micron length scale by either thermal annealing or post-treatment in nitric acid for extended period of time. A new gas-liquid-solid interface electroless plating technique is developed to uniformly cover the NPG surface with other metals, such as silver and platinum. This technique allows new opportunities of making functionalized nanostructures. We show that a combination of silver plating and dealloying can be used to make multimodal porous metals, which are expected to have application in sensing field. Electroless platinum plating onto NPG shows very usual growth mode. TEM observation indicates that the platinum layer on NPG surface takes a novel form of layer-islanding growth (Stranski-Krastanov growth). Annealing the Pt/NPG composite smoothens the Pt islands and forms a 1 nm coherent Pt layer on the NPG backbone, possibly with dislocation formation at the Pt/Au interface. Furthermore, it was found that we could dissolve the gold away in aqueous gold etchant, leaving behind the 1 nm-thick Pt shell, a structure we call nanotubular mesoporous platinum (NMP). Pt plated NPG has a series of unique structural properties, such as high active surface area, thermally

  3. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  4. Graphene oxide enrichment of collagen membranes improves DPSCs differentiation and controls inflammation occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunovic, Milena; De Colli, Marianna; De Marco, Patrizia; Di Nisio, Chiara; Fontana, Antonella; Piattelli, Adriano; Cataldi, Amelia; Zara, Susi

    2017-08-01

    Collagen membranes are used in oral surgery for bone defects treatment acting as a barrier that does not allow the invasion of soft tissue into the growing bone. To improve biocompatibility collagen membranes were coated with graphene oxide (GO), a graphene derivative. The aim of this study was to investigate the biocompatibility of GO coated collagen membranes on human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) focusing on biomaterial cytotoxicity, ability to promote DPSCs differentiation process and to control inflammation event induction. DPSCs were cultured on uncoated membranes and on both 2 and 10 μg mL -1 GO coated membranes up to 28 days. Alamar blue and LDH cytotocicity assay, PGE2 ELISA assay, real time RT-PCR for RUNX2, BMP2, SP7, TNFα and COX2 genes expression were performed. Proliferation is higher on GO coated membranes at days 14 and 28. LDH assay evidences no cytotoxicity. BMP2 and RUNX2 expression is higher on coated membranes, BMP2 at early and RUNX2 and SP7 at late experimental times. PGE2 levels are lower on GO coated membranes at days 14 and 28, both TNFα and COX2 expression is significantly decreased when GO is applied. GO coated membranes are not toxic for DPSCs, induce a faster DPSCs differentiation into odontoblasts/osteoblasts and may represent good alternative to conventional membranes thus ensuring more efficient bone formation and improving the clinical performance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2312-2320, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ion sieving in graphene oxide membranes via cationic control of interlayer spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Jie; Peng, Bingquan; Zhang, Bowu; Wang, Yuzhu; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Deyuan; Qian, Zhe; Xu, Gang; Liu, Gongping; Zeng, Jianrong; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Yizhou; Zhou, Guoquan; Wu, Minghong; Jin, Wanqin; Li, Jingye; Fang, Haiping

    2017-10-19

    Graphene oxide membranes-partially oxidized, stacked sheets of graphene-can provide ultrathin, high-flux and energy-efficient membranes for precise ionic and molecular sieving in aqueous solution. These materials have shown potential in a variety of applications, including water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, proton conductors, lithium-based batteries and super-capacitors. Unlike the pores of carbon nanotube membranes, which have fixed sizes, the pores of graphene oxide membranes-that is, the interlayer spacing between graphene oxide sheets (a sheet is a single flake inside the membrane)-are of variable size. Furthermore, it is difficult to reduce the interlayer spacing sufficiently to exclude small ions and to maintain this spacing against the tendency of graphene oxide membranes to swell when immersed in aqueous solution. These challenges hinder the potential ion filtration applications of graphene oxide membranes. Here we demonstrate cationic control of the interlayer spacing of graphene oxide membranes with ångström precision using K + , Na + , Ca 2+ , Li + or Mg 2+ ions. Moreover, membrane spacings controlled by one type of cation can efficiently and selectively exclude other cations that have larger hydrated volumes. First-principles calculations and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy reveal that the location of the most stable cation adsorption is where oxide groups and aromatic rings coexist. Previous density functional theory computations show that other cations (Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cr 2+ and Pb 2+ ) should have a much stronger cation-π interaction with the graphene sheet than Na + has, suggesting that other ions could be used to produce a wider range of interlayer spacings.

  6. Curvature Continuous and Bounded Path Planning for Fixed-Wing UAVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Peng; Li, Deshi; Sun, Tao

    2017-09-19

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) play an important role in applications such as data collection and target reconnaissance. An accurate and optimal path can effectively increase the mission success rate in the case of small UAVs. Although path planning for UAVs is similar to that for traditional mobile robots, the special kinematic characteristics of UAVs (such as their minimum turning radius) have not been taken into account in previous studies. In this paper, we propose a locally-adjustable, continuous-curvature, bounded path-planning algorithm for fixed-wing UAVs. To deal with the curvature discontinuity problem, an optimal interpolation algorithm and a key-point shift algorithm are proposed based on the derivation of a curvature continuity condition. To meet the upper bound for curvature and to render the curvature extrema controllable, a local replanning scheme is designed by combining arcs and Bezier curves with monotonic curvature. In particular, a path transition mechanism is built for the replanning phase using minimum curvature circles for a planning philosophy. Numerical results demonstrate that the analytical planning algorithm can effectively generate continuous-curvature paths, while satisfying the curvature upper bound constraint and allowing UAVs to pass through all predefined waypoints in the desired mission region.

  7. Curvature Continuous and Bounded Path Planning for Fixed-Wing UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Li, Deshi; Sun, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) play an important role in applications such as data collection and target reconnaissance. An accurate and optimal path can effectively increase the mission success rate in the case of small UAVs. Although path planning for UAVs is similar to that for traditional mobile robots, the special kinematic characteristics of UAVs (such as their minimum turning radius) have not been taken into account in previous studies. In this paper, we propose a locally-adjustable, continuous-curvature, bounded path-planning algorithm for fixed-wing UAVs. To deal with the curvature discontinuity problem, an optimal interpolation algorithm and a key-point shift algorithm are proposed based on the derivation of a curvature continuity condition. To meet the upper bound for curvature and to render the curvature extrema controllable, a local replanning scheme is designed by combining arcs and Bezier curves with monotonic curvature. In particular, a path transition mechanism is built for the replanning phase using minimum curvature circles for a planning philosophy. Numerical results demonstrate that the analytical planning algorithm can effectively generate continuous-curvature paths, while satisfying the curvature upper bound constraint and allowing UAVs to pass through all predefined waypoints in the desired mission region. PMID:28925960

  8. SLED phenomenology: curvature vs. volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermann, Florian; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We assess the question whether the SLED (Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions) model admits phenomenologically viable solutions with 4D maximal symmetry. We take into account a finite brane width and a scale invariance (SI) breaking dilaton-brane coupling, both of which should be included in a realistic setup. Provided that the brane tension and the microscopic size of the brane take generic values set by the fundamental bulk Planck scale, we find that either the 4D curvature or the size of the extra dimensions is unacceptably large. Since this result is independent of the dilaton-brane couplings, it provides the biggest challenge to the SLED program. In addition, to quantify its potential with respect to the cosmological constant problem, we infer the amount of tuning on model parameters required to obtain a sufficiently small 4D curvature. A first answer was recently given in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2016)025, showing that 4D flat solutions are only ensured in the SI case by imposing a tuning relation, even if a brane-localized flux is included. In this companion paper, we find that the tuning can in fact be avoided for certain SI breaking brane-dilaton couplings, but only at the price of worsening the phenomenological problem. Our results are obtained by solving the full coupled Einstein-dilaton system in a completely consistent way. The brane width is implemented using a well-known ring regularization. In passing, we note that for the couplings considered here the results of http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2016)025 (which only treated infinitely thin branes) are all consistently recovered in the thin brane limit, and how this can be reconciled with the concerns about their correctness, recently brought up in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP01(2016)017.

  9. Biofouling of Water Treatment Membranes: A Review of the Underlying Causes, Monitoring Techniques and Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity A. Roddick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is a critical issue in membrane water and wastewater treatment as it greatly compromises the efficiency of the treatment processes. It is difficult to control, and significant economic resources have been dedicated to the development of effective biofouling monitoring and control strategies. This paper highlights the underlying causes of membrane biofouling and provides a review on recent developments of potential monitoring and control methods in water and wastewater treatment with the aim of identifying the remaining issues and challenges in this area.

  10. Hollow fiber membrane decorated with Ag/MWNTs: toward effective water disinfection and biofouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Poernomo; Guan, Cong; Song, Xianghua; Zhang, Quanyuan; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Tang, Chuyang; Chen, Yuan; Chan-Park, Mary B; Chang, Matthew Wook; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-12-27

    The currently applied disinfection methods during water treatment provide effective solutions to kill pathogens, but also generate harmful byproducts, which are required to be treated with additional efforts. In this work, an alternative and safer water disinfection system consisting of silver nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ag/MWNTs) coated on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membrane, Ag/MWNTs/PAN, has been developed. Silver nanoparticles of controlled sizes were coated on polyethylene glycol-grafted MWNTs. Ag/MWNTs were then covalently coated on the external surface of a chemically modified PAN hollow fiber membrane to act as a disinfection barrier. A continuous filtration test using E. coli containing feedwater was conducted for the pristine PAN and Ag/MWNTs/PAN composite membranes. The Ag/MWNT coating significantly enhanced the antimicrobial activities and antifouling properties of the membrane against E. coli. Under the continuous filtration mode using E. coli feedwater, the relative flux drop over Ag/MWNTs/PAN was 6%, which was significantly lower than that over the pristine PAN (55%) at 20 h of filtration. The presence of the Ag/MWNT disinfection layer effectively inhibited the growth of bacteria in the filtration module and prevented the formation of biofilm on the surface of the membrane. Such distinctive antimicrobial properties of the composite membrane is attributed to the proper dispersion of silver nanoparticles on the external surface of the membrane, leading to direct contact with bacterium cells.

  11. Fouling mitigation of anion exchange membrane by zeta potential control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Soo; Lee, Hong-Joo; Choi, Seok-Ju; Geckeler, Kurt E; Cho, Jaeweon; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2003-03-15

    The feasibility of fouling mitigation of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in the presence of humate was studied by adding three different types of water-soluble polymers, i.e., poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), during electrodialysis (ED) desalination. Measurement of zeta potential of the humate used in this study showed highly negative potential (about -30 mV), implying that the humate had a strong fouling potential on the AEMs in ED. Of the three water-soluble polymers, PEI showed a positive zeta potential (about +14 mV) and is able to form an interpolymer complex with the humate. PAA and PVA hardly formed interpolymer complexes with humate due to electrostatic repulsion. The PEI-humate mixture with a volume ratio of 1:20 (PEI:humate) showed zero zeta potential, and a complexed humate with zero surface charge was formed, resulting in no fouling effects on the AEMs. Accordingly, the desalting ED experiments with PEI showed improved ED performance. Further, black colloids formed in the mixture did not cause the cell resistance to increase.

  12. Combination of electrochemical processes with membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and fouling control: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Marie B. Ensano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a critical review about the integration of electrochemical processes into membrane bioreactors (MBR in order to understand the influence of these processes on wastewater treatment performance and membrane fouling control. The integration can be realized either in an internal or an external configuration. Electrically enhanced membrane bioreactors or electro membrane bioreactors (eMBRs combine biodegradation, electrochemical and membrane filtration processes into one system providing higher effluent quality as compared to conventional MBRs and activated sludge plants. Furthermore, electrochemical processes, such as electrocoagulation, electrophoresis and electroosmosis, help to mitigate deposition of foulants into the membrane and enhance sludge dewaterability by controlling the morphological properties and mobility of the colloidal particles and bulk liquid. Intermittent application of minute electric field has proven to reduce energy consumption and operational cost as well as minimize the negative effect of direct current field on microbial activity which are some of the main concerns in eMBR technology. The present review discusses important design considerations of eMBR, its advantages as well as its applications to different types of wastewater. It also presents several challenges that need to be addressed for future development of this hybrid technology which include treatment of high strength industrial wastewater and removal of emerging contaminants, optimization study, cost benefit analysis and the possible combination with microbial electrolysis cell for biohydrogen production.

  13. Curvature recognition and force generation in phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassler Jana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of particles by actin-powered invagination of the plasma membrane is common to protozoa and to phagocytes involved in the immune response of higher organisms. The question addressed here is how a phagocyte may use geometric cues to optimize force generation for the uptake of a particle. We survey mechanisms that enable a phagocyte to remodel actin organization in response to particles of complex shape. Results Using particles that consist of two lobes separated by a neck, we found that Dictyostelium cells transmit signals concerning the curvature of a surface to the actin system underlying the plasma membrane. Force applied to a concave region can divide a particle in two, allowing engulfment of the portion first encountered. The phagosome membrane that is bent around the concave region is marked by a protein containing an inverse Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (I-BAR domain in combination with an Src homology (SH3 domain, similar to mammalian insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate p53. Regulatory proteins enable the phagocyte to switch activities within seconds in response to particle shape. Ras, an inducer of actin polymerization, is activated along the cup surface. Coronin, which limits the lifetime of actin structures, is reversibly recruited to the cup, reflecting a program of actin depolymerization. The various forms of myosin-I are candidate motor proteins for force generation in particle uptake, whereas myosin-II is engaged only in retracting a phagocytic cup after a switch to particle release. Thus, the constriction of a phagocytic cup differs from the contraction of a cleavage furrow in mitosis. Conclusions Phagocytes scan a particle surface for convex and concave regions. By modulating the spatiotemporal pattern of actin organization, they are capable of switching between different modes of interaction with a particle, either arresting at a concave region and applying force in an attempt to sever the particle

  14. Optimal Transportation and Curvature of Metric Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Eskin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we study the notion of non-negative Ricci curvature for compact metric measure spaces introduced by Lott and Villani in their article (2009): Ricci curvature for metric measure spaces via optimal transport. We also define and prove the required prerequisites concerning length spaces, convex analysis, measure theory, and optimal transportation.

  15. Weyl tensors for asymmetric complex curvatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.G.

    Considering a second rank Hermitian field tensor and a general Hermitian connection the associated complex curvature tensor is constructed. The Weyl tensor that corresponds to this complex curvature is determined. The formalism is applied to the Weyl unitary field theory and to the Moffat gravitational theory. (Author) [pt

  16. Fermion localization in higher curvature spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Mitra, Joydip; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2018-01-01

    Fermion localization in a braneworld model in presence of dilaton coupled higher curvature Gauss–Bonnet bulk gravity is discussed. It is shown that the lowest mode of left handed fermions can be naturally localized on the visible brane due to the dilaton coupled higher curvature term without the necessity of any external localizing bulk field.

  17. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results.

  18. Controlled fabrication of patterned lateral porous alumina membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowtham, M; Eude, L; Cojocaru, C S; Marquardt, B; Jeong, H J; Legagneux, P; Song, K K; Pribat, D

    2008-01-01

    Confined lateral alumina templates are fabricated with different pore sizes by changing the acid electrolyte and the anodization voltage. The control of the number of pore rows down to one dimension is also achieved, by controlling the thickness of the starting aluminum film as well as the anodization voltage. We observe that the mechanism of pore formation in the lateral regime is very similar to that in the classical vertical situation

  19. Canards and curvature: nonsmooth approximation by pinching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desroches, M; Jeffrey, M R

    2011-01-01

    In multiple time-scale (singularly perturbed) dynamical systems, canards are counterintuitive solutions that evolve along both attracting and repelling invariant manifolds. In two dimensions, canards result in periodic oscillations whose amplitude and period grow in a highly nonlinear way: they are slowly varying with respect to a control parameter, except for an exponentially small range of values where they grow extremely rapidly. This sudden growth, called a canard explosion, has been encountered in many applications ranging from chemistry to neuronal dynamics, aerospace engineering and ecology. Canards were initially studied using nonstandard analysis, and later the same results were proved by standard techniques such as matched asymptotics, invariant manifold theory and parameter blow-up. More recently, canard-like behaviour has been linked to surfaces of discontinuity in piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. This paper provides a new perspective on the canard phenomenon by showing that the nonstandard analysis of canard explosions can be recast into the framework of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. An exponential coordinate scaling is applied to a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations. The scaling acts as a lens that resolves dynamics across all time-scales. The changes of local curvature that are responsible for canard explosions are then analysed. Regions where different time-scales dominate are separated by hypersurfaces, and these are pinched together to obtain a piecewise-smooth system, in which curvature changes manifest as discontinuity-induced bifurcations. The method is used to classify canards in arbitrary dimensions, and to derive the parameter values over which canards form either small cycles (canards without head) or large cycles (canards with head)

  20. The role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine the role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of seedling roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit), the cortex on the two opposite flanks was removed from the meristem through the growing zone; gravitropic curvature was measured with the roots oriented horizontally with the cut flanks either on the upper and lower side, or on the lateral sides as a wound control. Curvature was slower in both these treatments (53 degrees in 5 h) than in intact roots (82 degrees), but there was no difference between the two orientations in extent and rate of curvature, nor in the latent time, showing that epidermis and cortex were not the site of action of the growth-regulating signal. The amount of cortex removed made no difference in the extent of curvature. Curvature was eliminated when the endodermis was damaged, raising the possibility that the endodermis or the stele-cortex interface controls gravitropic curvature in roots. The elongation rate of roots from which just the epidermis had been peeled was reduced by 0.01 mM auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) from 0.42 to 0.27 mm h-1, contradicting the hypothesis that only the epidermis responds to changes in auxin activity during gravistimulation. These observations indicate that gravitropic curvature in maize roots is not driven by differential cortical cell enlargement, and that movement of growth regulator(s) from the tip to the elongating zone is unlikely to occur in the cortex.

  1. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  2. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model is semi-descretized in space, and a nonlinear state-space representation is provided. The control is designed to force the temperature difference along the membrane sides to track a desired reference asymptotically, and hence a desired flux would be generated. Certain constraints are put on the control law inputs to be within an economic range of energy supplies. The effect of the controller gain is discussed. Simulations with real process parameters for the model, and the controller are provided. © 2015 American Automatic Control Council.

  3. Natural material-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticle container for multifunctional membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Hu,1 Lei Ke,2 Hao Chen,1 Ma Zhuo,1 Xinzhou Yang,1 Dan Zhao,1 Suying Zeng,1 Xincai Xiao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To avoid the side effects caused by nonspecific targeting, premature release, weak selectivity, and poor therapeutic efficacy of current nanoparticle-based systems used for drug delivery, we fabricated natural material-decorated nanoparticles as a multifunctional, membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery system. The nanocomposite material coated with a membrane was biocompatible and integrated both specific tumor targeting and responsiveness to stimulation, which improved transmission efficacy and controlled drug release. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, which are known for their biocompatibility and high drug-loading capacity, were selected as a model drug container and carrier. The membrane was established by the polyelectrolyte composite method from chitosan (CS which was sensitive to the acidic tumor microenvironment, folic acid-modified CS which recognizes the folate receptor expressed on the tumor cell surface, and a CD44 receptor-targeted polysaccharide hyaluronic acid. We characterized the structure of the nanocomposite as well as the drug release behavior under the control of the pH-sensitive membrane switch and evaluated the antitumor efficacy of the system in vitro. Our results provide a basis for the design and fabrication of novel membrane-controlled nanoparticles with improved tumor-targeting therapy. Keywords: multifunctional, membrane-controlled, natural materials, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, targeted drug delivery

  4. Curvature function and coarse graining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Marin, Homero; Zapata, Jose A.

    2010-01-01

    A classic theorem in the theory of connections on principal fiber bundles states that the evaluation of all holonomy functions gives enough information to characterize the bundle structure (among those sharing the same structure group and base manifold) and the connection up to a bundle equivalence map. This result and other important properties of holonomy functions have encouraged their use as the primary ingredient for the construction of families of quantum gauge theories. However, in these applications often the set of holonomy functions used is a discrete proper subset of the set of holonomy functions needed for the characterization theorem to hold. We show that the evaluation of a discrete set of holonomy functions does not characterize the bundle and does not constrain the connection modulo gauge appropriately. We exhibit a discrete set of functions of the connection and prove that in the abelian case their evaluation characterizes the bundle structure (up to equivalence), and constrains the connection modulo gauge up to ''local details'' ignored when working at a given scale. The main ingredient is the Lie algebra valued curvature function F S (A) defined below. It covers the holonomy function in the sense that expF S (A)=Hol(l=∂S,A).

  5. Control of biofouling on reverse osmosis polyamide membranes modified with biocidal nanoparticles and antifouling polymer brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Rahaman, Md. Saifur

    2014-01-01

    Thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are prone to biofouling due to their inherent physicochemical surface properties. In order to address the biofouling problem, we have developed novel surface coatings functionalized with biocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and antifouling polymer brushes via polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly. The novel surface coating was prepared with polyelectrolyte LBL films containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), with the latter being either pure PEI or silver nanoparticles coated with PEI (Ag-PEI). The coatings were further functionalized by grafting of polymer brushes, using either hydrophilic poly(sulfobetaine) or low surface energy poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The presence of both LBL films and sulfobetaine polymer brushes at the interface significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the membrane surface, while PDMS brushes lowered the membrane surface energy. Overall, all surface modifications resulted in significant reduction of irreversible bacterial cell adhesion. In microbial adhesion tests with E. coli bacteria, a normalized cell adhesion in the range of only 4 to 16% on the modified membrane surfaces was observed. Modified surfaces containing silver nanoparticles also exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. Membranes coated with LBL films of PAA/Ag-PEI achieved over 95% inactivation of bacteria attached to the surface within 1 hour of contact time. Both the antifouling and antimicrobial results suggest the potential of using these novel surface coatings in controlling the fouling of RO membranes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  6. Receptor concentration and diffusivity control multivalent binding of Sv40 to membrane bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliwia M Szklarczyk

    Full Text Available Incoming Simian Virus 40 particles bind to their cellular receptor, the glycolipid GM1, in the plasma membrane and thereby induce membrane deformation beneath the virion leading to endocytosis and infection. Efficient membrane deformation depends on receptor lipid structure and the organization of binding sites on the internalizing particle. To determine the role of receptor diffusion, concentration and the number of receptors required for stable binding in this interaction, we analyze the binding of SV40 to GM1 in supported membrane bilayers by computational modeling based on experimental data. We measure the diffusion rates of SV40 virions in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and of the receptor in bilayers by single molecule tracking. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D is used to measure binding of SV40 virus-like particles to bilayers containing the viral receptor GM1. We develop a phenomenological stochastic dynamics model calibrated against this data, and use it to investigate the early events of virus attachment to lipid membranes. Our results indicate that SV40 requires at least 4 attached receptors to achieve stable binding. We moreover find that receptor diffusion is essential for the establishment of stable binding over the physiological range of receptor concentrations and that receptor concentration controls the mode of viral motion on the target membrane. Our results provide quantitative insight into the initial events of virus-host interaction at the nanoscopic level.

  7. Dimensional and Structural Control of Silica Aerogel Membranes for Miniaturized Motionless Gas Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanyu; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Muralt, Paul; Kim, Nayoung; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Jeong, Eunho; Han, Yen-Lin; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-08-26

    With growing public interest in portable electronics such as micro fuel cells, micro gas total analysis systems, and portable medical devices, the need for miniaturized air pumps with minimal electrical power consumption is on the rise. Thus, the development and downsizing of next-generation thermal transpiration gas pumps has been investigated intensively during the last decades. Such a system relies on a mesoporous membrane that generates a thermomolecular pressure gradient under the action of an applied temperature bias. However, the development of highly miniaturized active membrane materials with tailored porosity and optimized pumping performance remains a major challenge. Here we report a systematic study on the manufacturing of aerogel membranes using an optimized, minimal-shrinkage sol-gel process, leading to low thermal conductivity and high air conductance. This combination of properties results in superior performance for miniaturized thermomolecular air pump applications. The engineering of such aerogel membranes, which implies pore structure control and chemical surface modification, requires both chemical processing know-how and a detailed understanding of the influence of the material properties on the spatial flow rate density. Optimal pumping performance was found for devices with integrated membranes with a density of 0.062 g cm(-3) and an average pore size of 142.0 nm. Benchmarking of such low-density hydrophobic active aerogel membranes gave an air flow rate density of 3.85 sccm·cm(-2) at an operating temperature of 400 °C. Such a silica aerogel membrane based system has shown more than 50% higher pumping performance when compared to conventional transpiration pump membrane materials as well as the ability to withstand higher operating temperatures (up to 440 °C). This study highlights new perspectives for the development of miniaturized thermal transpiration air pumps while offering insights into the fundamentals of molecular pumping in

  8. Electrospun Gelatin/poly(Glycerol Sebacate Membrane with Controlled Release of Antibiotics for Wound Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shirazaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important risk that threatens the skin wounds is infections. Therefore, fabrication of a membrane as a wound dressing with the ability of antibiotic delivery in a proper delivery rate is especially important. Materials and Methods: Poly(glycerol sebacate (PGS was prepared from sebacic acid and glycerol with 1:1 ratio; then, it was added to gelatin in the 1:3 ratio and was dissolved in 80% (v/v acetic acid, and finally, ciprofloxacin was added in 10% (w/v of polymer solution. The gelatin/PGS membrane was fabricated using an electrospinning method. The membrane was cross-linked using ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiim (EDC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS in different time periods to achieve a proper drug release rate. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy was being used to manifest the peaks of polymers and drug in the membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to evaluate the morphology, fibers diameter, pore size, and porosity before and after crosslinking process. Ultraviolet (UV-visible spectrophotometry was used to show the ciprofloxacin release from the cross-linked membrane. Results: FTIR analysis showed the characteristic peaks of gelatin, PGS, and ciprofloxacin without any added peaks after the crosslinking process. SEM images revealed that nanofibers' size increased during the crosslinking process and porosity was higher than 80% before and after crosslinking process. UV-visible spectrophotometry showed the proper rate of ciprofloxacin release occurred from cross-linked membrane that remaining in EDC/NHS ethanol solution for 120 min. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that this recently developed gelatin/PGS membrane with controlled release of ciprofloxacin could be a promising biodegradable membrane for wound dressing.

  9. The influence of curvature on film cooling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S. G.; Goldstein, R. J.; Eckert, E. R. G.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of injection rate and strength of curvature on film cooling performance of gas injected through a row of holes on a convex surface is studied. Comparisons are made to film cooling of concave and flat surfaces. Three different relative strengths of curvature (ratio of radius of curvature to radius of injection hole), two density ratios (0.95 and 2.0), and a wide range of blowing rates (0.3 to 2.7) are considered. A foreign gas injection technique (mass transfer analogy) is used. The strength of curvature was controlled by varying the injection hole diameter. At low blowing rates, film cooling is more effective on the convex surface than on a flat or a concave surface. The cross stream pressure gradient present in curved flows tends to push the jet into the convex wall. As the injection rate is increased, normal and tangential jet momentum promote lift-off from the convex surface, thereby lowering performance. In contrast, previous studies show that a concave surface, tangential jet momentum, flow instabilities, and blockage improve performance on a concave surface as blowing rate is increased.

  10. Nitric oxide treatment for the control of reverse osmosis membrane biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert J; Low, Jiun Hui; Bandi, Ratnaharika R; Tay, Martin; Chua, Felicia; Aung, Theingi; Fane, Anthony G; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling remains a key challenge for membrane-based water treatment systems. This study investigated the dispersal potential of the nitric oxide (NO) donor compound, PROLI NONOate, on single- and mixed-species biofilms formed by bacteria isolated from industrial membrane bioreactor and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The potential of PROLI NONOate to control RO membrane biofouling was also examined. Confocal microscopy revealed that PROLI NONOate exposure induced biofilm dispersal in all but two of the bacteria tested and successfully dispersed mixed-species biofilms. The addition of 40 μM PROLI NONOate at 24-h intervals to a laboratory-scale RO system led to a 92% reduction in the rate of biofouling (pressure rise over a given period) by a bacterial community cultured from an industrial RO membrane. Confocal microscopy and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction revealed that PROLI NONOate treatment led to a 48% reduction in polysaccharides, a 66% reduction in proteins, and a 29% reduction in microbial cells compared to the untreated control. A reduction in biofilm surface coverage (59% compared to 98%, treated compared to control) and average thickness (20 μm compared to 26 μm, treated compared to control) was also observed. The addition of PROLI NONOate led to a 22% increase in the time required for the RO module to reach its maximum transmembrane pressure (TMP), further indicating that NO treatment delayed fouling. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the NO treatment did not significantly alter the microbial community composition of the membrane biofilm. These results present strong evidence for the application of PROLI NONOate for prevention of RO biofouling. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Ion sieving in graphene oxide membranes via cationic control of interlayer spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Jie; Peng, Bingquan; Zhang, Bowu; Wang, Yuzhu; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Deyuan; Qian, Zhe; Xu, Gang; Liu, Gongping; Zeng, Jianrong; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Yizhou; Zhou, Guoquan; Wu, Minghong; Jin, Wanqin; Li, Jingye; Fang, Haiping

    2017-10-01

    Graphene oxide membranes—partially oxidized, stacked sheets of graphene—can provide ultrathin, high-flux and energy-efficient membranes for precise ionic and molecular sieving in aqueous solution. These materials have shown potential in a variety of applications, including water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, proton conductors, lithium-based batteries and super-capacitors. Unlike the pores of carbon nanotube membranes, which have fixed sizes, the pores of graphene oxide membranes—that is, the interlayer spacing between graphene oxide sheets (a sheet is a single flake inside the membrane)—are of variable size. Furthermore, it is difficult to reduce the interlayer spacing sufficiently to exclude small ions and to maintain this spacing against the tendency of graphene oxide membranes to swell when immersed in aqueous solution. These challenges hinder the potential ion filtration applications of graphene oxide membranes. Here we demonstrate cationic control of the interlayer spacing of graphene oxide membranes with ångström precision using K+, Na+, Ca2+, Li+ or Mg2+ ions. Moreover, membrane spacings controlled by one type of cation can efficiently and selectively exclude other cations that have larger hydrated volumes. First-principles calculations and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy reveal that the location of the most stable cation adsorption is where oxide groups and aromatic rings coexist. Previous density functional theory computations show that other cations (Fe2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Cr2+ and Pb2+) should have a much stronger cation-π interaction with the graphene sheet than Na+ has, suggesting that other ions could be used to produce a wider range of interlayer spacings.

  12. The Drosophila inner-membrane protein PMI controls crista biogenesis and mitochondrial diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Marc; El Fissi, Najla; Tufi, Roberta; Bentobji, Mélanie; Liévens, Jean-Charles; Martins, L Miguel; Royet, Julien; Rival, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Cristae are mitochondrial inner-membrane structures that concentrate respiratory chain complexes and hence regulate ATP production. Mechanisms controlling crista morphogenesis are poorly understood and few crista determinants have been identified. Among them are the Mitofilins that are required to establish crista junctions and ATP-synthase subunits that bend the membrane at the tips of the cristae. We report here the phenotypic consequences associated with the in vivo inactivation of the inner-membrane protein Pantagruelian Mitochondrion I (PMI) both at the scale of the whole organism, and at the level of mitochondrial ultrastructure and function. We show that flies in which PMI is genetically inactivated experience synaptic defects and have a reduced life span. Electron microscopy analysis of the inner-membrane morphology demonstrates that loss of PMI function increases the average length of mitochondrial cristae in embryonic cells. This phenotype is exacerbated in adult neurons in which cristae form a dense tangle of elongated membranes. Conversely, we show that PMI overexpression is sufficient to reduce crista length in vivo. Finally, these crista defects are associated with impaired respiratory chain activity and increases in the level of reactive oxygen species. Since PMI and its human orthologue TMEM11 are regulators of mitochondrial morphology, our data suggest that, by controlling crista length, PMI influences mitochondrial diameter and tubular shape.

  13. Effects of ethylene on the kinetics of curvature and auxin redistribution in gravistimulated roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. S.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the involvement of ethylene in maize (Zea mays L.) root gravitropism by measuring the kinetics of curvature and lateral auxin movement in roots treated with ethylene, inhibitors of ethylene synthesis, or inhibitors of ethylene action. In the presence of ethylene the latent period of gravitropic curvature appeared to be increased somewhat. However, ethylene-treated roots continued to curve after control roots had reached their final angle of curvature. Consequently, maximum curvature in the presence of ethylene was much greater in ethylene-treated roots than in controls. Inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action had effects on the kinetics of curvature opposite to that of ethylene, i.e. the latent period appeared to be shortened somewhat while total curvature was reduced relative to that of controls. Label from applied 3H-indole-3-acetic acid was preferentially transported toward the lower side of stimulated roots. In parallel with effects on curvature, ethylene treatment delayed the development of gravity-induced asymmetric auxin movement across the root but extended its duration once initiated. The auxin transport inhibitor, 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid reduced both gravitropic curvature and the effect of ethylene on curvature. Since neither ethylene nor inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action prevented curvature, we conclude that ethylene does not mediate the primary differential growth response causing curvature. Because ethylene affects curvature and auxin transport in parallel, we suggest that ethylene modifies curvature by affecting gravity-induced lateral transport of auxin, perhaps by interfering with adaptation of the auxin transport system to the gravistimulus.

  14. Anteroposterior curvatures of the spine in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabara, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    To assess the shape of anteroposterior vertebral curvatures in adolescents who practice team sports. 57 females and 104 males aged 14-17 years, playing volleyball, basketball or handball, and 63 females and 99 males as a control group. A Rippstein plurimeter was used to measure the angles of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. The study has revealed significant differences in lumbar lordosis in male athletes compared to the control (p=0.01). Male volleyball players had greater thoracic kyphosis (p=0.002) than basketball players. Female athletes had lower thoracic kyphosis than the control group (p < 0.01). Normal values of thoracic kyphosis were more frequent in female athletes and male handball players whereas normal lumbar lordosis was more frequently seen in female volleyball players and male control group. Our investigations revealed significant (p < 0.05) correlations between the anteroposterior curvature of the spine and somatic parameters. Differences in thoracic kyphosis or lumbar lordosis among the athletes and the control group might be due to postural muscles strengthening as a result of regular engagement in intensive exercise. The variability of anteroposterior spine curvatures may not only be associated with directional physical activity; some contribution of the somatic structure is also possible.

  15. The application of nitric oxide to control biofouling of membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinxue; Zhang, Jinsong; Barnes, Robert J; Tan, Xiaohui; McDougald, Diane; Fane, Anthony G; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Cohen, Yehuda; Rice, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    A novel strategy to control membrane bioreactor (MBR) biofouling using the nitric oxide (NO) donor compound PROLI NONOate was examined. When the biofilm was pre-established on membranes at transmembrane pressure (TMP) of 88-90 kPa, backwashing of the membrane module with 80 μM PROLI NONOate for 45 min once daily for 37 days reduced the fouling resistance (Rf ) by 56%. Similarly, a daily, 1 h exposure of the membrane to 80 μM PROLI NONOate from the commencement of MBR operation for 85 days resulted in reduction of the TMP and Rf by 32.3% and 28.2%. The microbial community in the control MBR was observed to change from days 71 to 85, which correlates with the rapid TMP increase. Interestingly, NO-treated biofilms at 85 days had a higher similarity with the control biofilms at 71 days relative to the control biofilms at 85 days, indicating that the NO treatment delayed the development of biofilm bacterial community. Despite this difference, sequence analysis indicated that NO treatment did not result in a significant shift in the dominant fouling species. Confocal microscopy revealed that the biomass of biopolymers and microorganisms in biofilms were all reduced on the PROLI NONOate-treated membranes, where there were reductions of 37.7% for proteins and 66.7% for microbial cells, which correlates with the reduction in TMP. These results suggest that NO treatment could be a promising strategy to control biofouling in MBRs. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Polymeric barrier membranes for device packaging, diffusive control and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasikiewicz, J.M.; Roohpour, N.; Paul, D. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Grahn, M. [Centre for Academic Surgery, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Ateh, D. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Barts and the London Queen Mary' s school of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Rehman, I. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Vadgama, P. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.vadgama@qmul.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    Current state-of-the-art implantable micron feature electronic devices are capable of monitoring and stimulating functions in vivo. Within an EU Framework VI project a further step was taken in developing key microsystem technologies and communication methods that could bring intelligence directly to the human interface, in the form of reactive medical implants and ambulatory measurement systems. Information from these devices is planned to be transmitted out into the wider environment for remote processing. However, the packaging of such state-of-the-art devices to enhance tissue biocompatibility, and to protect conducting elements from in vivo corrosion during extended use, along with protecting the body from toxins leaching from implant components, remains a concern. Candidate polymeric barriers as hydration resistant and solute impermeable interfaces to mitigate such major problems of chronic implantation were investigated. Materials studied included silicone rubber, PVC, polyurethane, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). Polymer permeability to water solutes was marginally improved through incorporation of lipid into these structures. Surface biocompatibility was assessed on the basis of protein film deposition in vitro and by cell viability studies in tissue culture. Short-term toxicity was not observed for any of the tested materials, though there were substantial differences in hydration. Additionally, polypyrrole over active electrodes shows feasibility for controlled tissue interfacing whilst retaining electrical conductivity.

  17. Polymeric barrier membranes for device packaging, diffusive control and biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasikiewicz, J. M.; Roohpour, N.; Paul, D.; Grahn, M.; Ateh, D.; Rehman, I.; Vadgama, P.

    2008-11-01

    Current state-of-the-art implantable micron feature electronic devices are capable of monitoring and stimulating functions in vivo. Within an EU Framework VI project a further step was taken in developing key microsystem technologies and communication methods that could bring intelligence directly to the human interface, in the form of reactive medical implants and ambulatory measurement systems. Information from these devices is planned to be transmitted out into the wider environment for remote processing. However, the packaging of such state-of-the-art devices to enhance tissue biocompatibility, and to protect conducting elements from in vivo corrosion during extended use, along with protecting the body from toxins leaching from implant components, remains a concern. Candidate polymeric barriers as hydration resistant and solute impermeable interfaces to mitigate such major problems of chronic implantation were investigated. Materials studied included silicone rubber, PVC, polyurethane, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). Polymer permeability to water solutes was marginally improved through incorporation of lipid into these structures. Surface biocompatibility was assessed on the basis of protein film deposition in vitro and by cell viability studies in tissue culture. Short-term toxicity was not observed for any of the tested materials, though there were substantial differences in hydration. Additionally, polypyrrole over active electrodes shows feasibility for controlled tissue interfacing whilst retaining electrical conductivity.

  18. Ultra-thin and strong formvar-based membranes with controlled porosity for micro- and nano-scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchter, Eric; Marquez, Justin; Stevens, Garrison; Silva, Rebecca; Mcculloch, Quinn; Guengerich, Quintessa; Blair, Andrew; Litchfield, Sebastian; Li, Nan; Sheehan, Chris; Chamberlin, Rebecca; Yarbro, Stephen L.; Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2018-05-01

    We present a methodology for developing ultra-thin and strong formvar-based membranes with controlled morphologies. Formvar is a thin hydrophilic and oleophilic polymer inert to most chemicals and resistant to radiation. The formvar-based membranes are viable materials as support structures in micro- and macro-scale systems depending on thinness and porosity control. Tunable sub-micron thick porous membranes with 20%–65% porosity were synthesized by controlling the ratios of formvar, glycerol, and chloroform. This synthesis process does not require complex separation or handling methods and allows for the production of strong, thin, and porous formvar-based membranes. An expansive array of these membrane characterizations including chemical compatibility, mechanical responses, wettability, as well as the mathematical simulations as a function of porosity has been presented. The wide range of chemical compatibility allows for membrane applications in various environments, where other polymers would not be suitable. Our formvar-based membranes were found to have an elastic modulus of 7.8 GPa, a surface free energy of 50 mN m‑1 and an average thickness of 125 nm. Stochastic model simulations indicate that formvar with the porosity of ∼50% is the optimal membrane formulation, allowing the most material transfer across the membrane while also withstanding the highest simulated pressure loadings before tearing. Development of novel, resilient and versatile membranes with controlled porosity offers a wide range of exciting applications in the fields of nanoscience, microfluidics, and MEMS.

  19. Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Cabin Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David T.; Gleason, Kevin J.; Engel, Jeffrey R.; Chullen, Cinda

    2016-01-01

    The development of new, robust, life support systems is critical to NASA's continued progress in space exploration. One vital function is maintaining the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the cabin at levels that do not impair the health or performance of the crew. The carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA) is the current CO2 control technology on-board the International Space Station (ISS). Although the CDRA has met the needs of the ISS to date, the repeated cycling of the molecular sieve sorbent causes it to break down into small particles that clog filters or generate dust in the cabin. This reduces reliability and increases maintenance requirements. Another approach that has potential advantages over the current system is a membrane that separates CO2 from air. In this approach, cabin air contacts one side of the membrane while other side of the membrane is maintained at low pressure to create a driving force for CO2 transport across the membrane. In this application, the primary power requirement is for the pump that creates the low pressure and then pumps the CO2 to the oxygen recovery system. For such a membrane to be practical, it must have high CO2 permeation rate and excellent selectivity for CO2 over air. Unfortunately, conventional gas separation membranes do not have adequate CO2 permeability and selectivity to meet the needs of this application. However, the required performance could be obtained with a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which consists of a microporous material filled with a liquid that selectively reacts with CO2 over air. In a recently completed Phase II SBIR project, Reaction Systems, Inc. fabricated an SLM that is very close to meeting permeability and selectivity objectives for use in the Portable Life Support System (PLSS). This paper describes work carried out to evaluate its potential for use in the cabin.

  20. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian

  1. Curvature of Indoor Sensor Network: Clustering Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the geometric properties of the communication graph in realistic low-power wireless networks. In particular, we explore the concept of the curvature of a wireless network via the clustering coefficient. Clustering coefficient analysis is a computationally simplified, semilocal approach, which nevertheless captures such a large-scale feature as congestion in the underlying network. The clustering coefficient concept is applied to three cases of indoor sensor networks, under varying thresholds on the link packet reception rate (PRR. A transition from positive curvature (“meshed” network to negative curvature (“core concentric” network is observed by increasing the threshold. Even though this paper deals with network curvature per se, we nevertheless expand on the underlying congestion motivation, propose several new concepts (network inertia and centroid, and finally we argue that greedy routing on a virtual positively curved network achieves load balancing on the physical network.

  2. Higher Curvature Supergravity, Supersymmetry Breaking and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In these lectures, after a short introduction to cosmology, we discuss the supergravity embedding of higher curvature models of inflation. The supergravity description of such models is presented for the two different formulations of minimal supergravity.

  3. Control of directed cell migration in vivo by membrane-to-cortex attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Diz-Muñoz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell shape and motility are primarily controlled by cellular mechanics. The attachment of the plasma membrane to the underlying actomyosin cortex has been proposed to be important for cellular processes involving membrane deformation. However, little is known about the actual function of membrane-to-cortex attachment (MCA in cell protrusion formation and migration, in particular in the context of the developing embryo. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach to study MCA in zebrafish mesoderm and endoderm (mesendoderm germ layer progenitor cells, which migrate using a combination of different protrusion types, namely, lamellipodia, filopodia, and blebs, during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with the activity of molecules linking the cortex to the membrane and measuring resulting changes in MCA by atomic force microscopy, we show that reducing MCA in mesendoderm progenitors increases the proportion of cellular blebs and reduces the directionality of cell migration. We propose that MCA is a key parameter controlling the relative proportions of different cell protrusion types in mesendoderm progenitors, and thus is key in controlling directed migration during gastrulation.

  4. Dynamic water management of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using intermittent RH control

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    A novel method of water management of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells using intermittent humidification is presented in this study. The goal is to maintain the membrane close to full humidification, while eliminating channel flooding. The entire cycle is divided into four stages: saturation and de-saturation of the gas diffusion layer followed by de-hydration and hydration of membrane. By controlling the duration of dry and humid flows, it is shown that the cell voltage can be maintained within a narrow band. The technique is applied on experimental test cells using both plain and hydrophobic materials for the gas diffusion layer and an improvement in performance as compared to steady humidification is demonstrated. Duration of dry and humid flows is determined experimentally for several operating conditions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  6. Detection and quantification through a lipid membrane using the molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavli, Danny; Tkachev, Maria; Piwonski, Hubert; Capua, Eyal; de Albuquerque, Ian; Bensimon, David; Haran, Gilad; Naaman, Ron

    2012-01-10

    The detection of covalent and noncovalent binding events between molecules and biomembranes is a fundamental goal of contemporary biochemistry and analytical chemistry. Currently, such studies are performed routinely using fluorescence methods, surface-plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. However, there is still a need for novel sensitive miniaturizable detection methods where the sample does not have to be transferred to the sensor, but the sensor can be brought into contact with the sample studied. We present a novel approach for detection and quantification of processes occurring on the surface of a lipid bilayer membrane, by monitoring the current change through the n-type GaAs-based molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor (MOCSER), on which the membrane is adsorbed. Since GaAs is susceptible to etching in an aqueous environment, a protective thin film of methoxysilane was deposited on the device. The system was found to be sensitive enough to allow monitoring changes in pH and in the concentration of amino acids in aqueous solution on top of the membrane. When biotinylated lipids were incorporated into the membrane, it was possible to monitor the binding of streptavidin or avidin. The device modified with biotin-streptavidin complex was capable of detecting the binding of streptavidin antibodies to immobilized streptavidin with high sensitivity and selectivity. The response depends on the charge on the analyte. These results open the way to facile electrical detection of protein-membrane interactions.

  7. [Oxidation of mercury by CuBr2 decomposition under controlled-release membrane catalysis condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Gang; Qu, Zan; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Guo, Yong-Fu; Xie, Jiang-Kun; Jia, Jin-Ping

    2014-02-01

    CuBr2 in the multi-porous ceramic membrane can release Br2 at high temperature, which was employed as the oxidant for Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation efficiency was studied by a membrane catalysis device. Meanwhile, a reaction and in situ monitoring device was designed to avoid the impact of Br2 on the downstream pipe. The result showed that the MnO(x)/alpha-Al2O3 catalysis membrane had a considerable "controlled-release" effect on Br2 produced by CuBr2 decomposition. The adsorption and reaction of Hg0 and Br2 on the surface of catalysis membrane obeyed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with the rising of Br2 concentration. However, when Br2 reached a certain concentration, the removal efficiency was limited by adsorption rate and reaction rate of Hg0 and Br2 on the catalysis membrane. From 473 K to 573 K, the variation of Hg0 oxidation efficiency was relatively stable. SO2 in flue gas inhibited the oxidation of Hg0 while NO displayed no obvious effect.

  8. Fluorescent in situ folding control for rapid optimization of cell-free membrane protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Müller-Lucks

    Full Text Available Cell-free synthesis is an open and powerful tool for high-yield protein production in small reaction volumes predestined for high-throughput structural and functional analysis. Membrane proteins require addition of detergents for solubilization, liposomes, or nanodiscs. Hence, the number of parameters to be tested is significantly higher than with soluble proteins. Optimization is commonly done with respect to protein yield, yet without knowledge of the protein folding status. This approach contains a large inherent risk of ending up with non-functional protein. We show that fluorophore formation in C-terminal fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP indicates the folding state of a membrane protein in situ, i.e. within the cell-free reaction mixture, as confirmed by circular dichroism (CD, proteoliposome reconstitution and functional assays. Quantification of protein yield and in-gel fluorescence intensity imply suitability of the method for membrane proteins of bacterial, protozoan, plant, and mammalian origin, representing vacuolar and plasma membrane localization, as well as intra- and extracellular positioning of the C-terminus. We conclude that GFP-fusions provide an extension to cell-free protein synthesis systems eliminating the need for experimental folding control and, thus, enabling rapid optimization towards membrane protein quality.

  9. GDP growth and the yield curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stig Vinther

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the forecastability of GDP growth using information from the term structure of yields. In contrast to previous studies, the paper shows that the curvature of the yield curve contributes with much more forecasting power than the slope of yield curve. The yield curvature also...... predicts bond returns, implying a common element to time-variation in expected bond returns and expected GDP growth....

  10. Nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms for membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2016-09-19

    This paper presents a nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov control for a membrane distillation (MD) process. The control considers the inlet temperatures of the feed and the permeate solutions as inputs, transforming it to boundary control process, and seeks to maintain the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries around a sufficient level to promote water production. MD process is modeled with advection diffusion equation model in two dimensions, where the diffusion and convection heat transfer mechanisms are best described. Model analysis, effective order reduction and parameters physical interpretation, are provided. Moreover, a nonlinear observer has been designed to provide the control with estimates of the temperature evolution at each time instant. In addition, physical constraints are imposed on the control to have an acceptable range of feasible inputs, and consequently, better energy consumption. Numerical simulations for the complete process with real membrane parameter values are provided, in addition to detailed explanations for the role of the controller and the observer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal design and control of solar driven air gap membrane distillation desalination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yih-Hang; Li, Yu-Wei; Chang, Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Air gap membrane distillation unit was used in the desalination plants. ► Aspen Custom Molder was used to simulate each unit of desalination plants. ► Design parameters were investigated to obtain the minimum total annual cost. ► The control structure was proposed to operate desalination plants all day long. -- Abstract: A solar heated membrane distillation desalination system is constructed of solar collectors and membrane distillation devices for increasing pure water productivity. This technically and economically feasible system is designed to use indirect solar heat to drive membrane distillation processes to overcome the unstable supply of solar radiation from sunrise to sunset. The solar heated membrane distillation desalination system in the present study consisted of hot water storage devices, heat exchangers, air gap membrane distillation units, and solar collectors. Aspen Custom Molder (ACM) software was used to model and simulate each unit and establish the cost function of a desalination plant. From Design degree of freedom (DOF) analysis, ten design parameters were investigated to obtain the minimum total annual cost (TAC) with fixed pure water production rate. For a given solar energy density profile of typical summer weather, the minimal TAC per 1 m 3 pure water production can be found at 500 W/m 2 by varying the solar energy intensity. Therefore, we proposed two modes for controlling the optimal design condition of the desalination plant; day and night. In order to widen the operability range of the plant, the sensitivity analysis was used to retrofit the original design point to lower the effluent temperature from the solar collector by increasing the hot water recycled stream. The simulation results show that the pure water production can be maintained at a very stable level whether in sunny or cloudy weather.

  12. Cosmological attractor models and higher curvature supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecotti, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata

    2014-01-01

    We study cosmological α-attractors in superconformal/supergravity models, where α is related to the geometry of the moduli space. For α=1 attractors http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2013/07/002 we present a generalization of the previously known manifestly superconformal higher curvature supergravity model http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(87)90844-6. The relevant standard 2-derivative supergravity with a minimum of two chiral multiplets is shown to be dual to a 4-derivative higher curvature supergravity, where in general one of the chiral superfields is traded for a curvature superfield. There is a degenerate case when both matter superfields become non-dynamical and there is only a chiral curvature superfield, pure higher derivative supergravity. Generic α-models http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2013)198 interpolate between the attractor point at α=0 and generic chaotic inflation models at large α, in the limit when the inflaton moduli space becomes flat. They have higher derivative duals with the same number of matter fields as the original theory or less, but at least one matter multiplet remains. In the context of these models, the detection of primordial gravity waves will provide information on the curvature of the inflaton submanifold of the Kähler manifold, and we will learn if the inflaton is a fundamental matter multiplet, or can be replaced by a higher derivative curvature excitation

  13. Cosmological attractor models and higher curvature supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata

    2014-05-01

    We study cosmological α-attractors in superconformal/supergravity models, where α is related to the geometry of the moduli space. For α = 1 attractors [1] we present a generalization of the previously known manifestly superconformal higher curvature supergravity model [2]. The relevant standard 2-derivative supergravity with a minimum of two chiral multiplets is shown to be dual to a 4-derivative higher curvature supergravity, where in general one of the chiral superfields is traded for a curvature superfield. There is a degenerate case when both matter superfields become non-dynamical and there is only a chiral curvature superfield, pure higher derivative supergravity. Generic α-models [3] interpolate between the attractor point at α = 0 and generic chaotic inflation models at large α, in the limit when the inflaton moduli space becomes flat. They have higher derivative duals with the same number of matter fields as the original theory or less, but at least one matter multiplet remains. In the context of these models, the detection of primordial gravity waves will provide information on the curvature of the inflaton submanifold of the Kähler manifold, and we will learn if the inflaton is a fundamental matter multiplet, or can be replaced by a higher derivative curvature excitation.

  14. Ion-Exchanged SAPO-34 Membranes for Krypton-Xenon Separation: Control of Permeation Properties and Fabrication of Hollow Fiber Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yeon Hye; Min, Byunghyun; Yang, Shaowei; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Bhave, Ramesh R; Nair, Sankar

    2018-02-21

    Separation of radioisotope 85 Kr from 136 Xe is of importance in used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Membrane separation based on zeolite molecular sieves such as chabazite SAPO-34 is an attractive alternative to energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. We report the synthesis of SAPO-34 membranes with considerably enhanced performance via thickness reduction based upon control of a steam-assisted vapor-solid conversion technique followed by ion exchange with alkali metal cations. The reduction of membrane thickness leads to a large increase in Kr permeance from 7.5 to 26.3 gas permeation units (GPU) with ideal Kr/Xe selectivities >20 at 298 K. Cation-exchanged membranes show large (>50%) increases in selectivity at ambient or slight subambient conditions. The adsorption, diffusion, and permeation characteristics of ion-exchanged SAPO-34 materials and membranes are investigated in detail, with potassium-exchanged SAPO-34 membranes showing particularly attractive performance. We then demonstrate the fabrication of selective SAPO-34 membranes on α-alumina hollow fibers.

  15. Effect of Graphene and Fullerene Nanofillers on Controlling the Pore Size and Physicochemical Properties of Chitosan Nanocomposite Mesoporous Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene S. Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS nanocomposite mesoporous membranes were fabricated by mixing CS with graphene (G and fullerene (F nanofillers, and the diffusion properties through CS membranes were studied. In addition, in order to enhance the binding between the internal CS chains, physical cross-linking of CS by sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP was carried out. F and G with different weight percentages (0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt.% were added on physically cross-linked chitosan (CLCS and non-cross-linked chitosan (NCLCS membranes by wet mixing. Permeability and diffusion time of CLCS and NCLCS membranes at different temperatures were investigated. The results revealed that the pore size of all fabricated CS membranes is in the mesoporous range (i.e., 2–50 nm. Moreover, the addition of G and F nanofillers to CLCS and NCLCS solutions aided in controlling the CS membranes’ pore size and was found to enhance the barrier effect of the CS membranes either by blocking the internal pores or decreasing the pore size. These results illustrate the significant possibility of controlling the pore size of CS membranes by cross-linking and more importantly the careful selection of nanofillers and their percentage within the CS membranes. Controlling the pore size of CS membranes is a fundamental factor in packaging applications and membrane technology.

  16. Membrane-bound organelles versus membrane-less compartments and their control of anabolic pathways in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Classically, we think of cell compartmentalization as being achieved by membrane-bound organelles. It has nevertheless emerged that membrane-less assemblies also largely contribute to this compartmentalization. Here, we compare the characteristics of both types of compartmentalization in term of

  17. BSM-MBR: a benchmark simulation model to compare control and operational strategies for membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maere, Thomas; Verrecht, Bart; Moerenhout, Stefanie; Judd, Simon; Nopens, Ingmar

    2011-03-01

    A benchmark simulation model for membrane bioreactors (BSM-MBR) was developed to evaluate operational and control strategies in terms of effluent quality and operational costs. The configuration of the existing BSM1 for conventional wastewater treatment plants was adapted using reactor volumes, pumped sludge flows and membrane filtration for the water-sludge separation. The BSM1 performance criteria were extended for an MBR taking into account additional pumping requirements for permeate production and aeration requirements for membrane fouling prevention. To incorporate the effects of elevated sludge concentrations on aeration efficiency and costs a dedicated aeration model was adopted. Steady-state and dynamic simulations revealed BSM-MBR, as expected, to out-perform BSM1 for effluent quality, mainly due to complete retention of solids and improved ammonium removal from extensive aeration combined with higher biomass levels. However, this was at the expense of significantly higher operational costs. A comparison with three large-scale MBRs showed BSM-MBR energy costs to be realistic. The membrane aeration costs for the open loop simulations were rather high, attributed to non-optimization of BSM-MBR. As proof of concept two closed loop simulations were run to demonstrate the usefulness of BSM-MBR for identifying control strategies to lower operational costs without compromising effluent quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Zeta potential control in decontamination with inorganic membranes and inorganic adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, E.; Vega, R.; Correa, M.; Araya, R.; Loyola, P.

    1997-01-01

    The application of some advanced separation processes such as microfiltration and ultrafiltration, electroosmosis and electrodialysis for treating nuclear waste from different aqueous streams is under examination at the Chilean Commission for Nuclear Energy. The application of these techniques can be extended to regular industrial wastes when economically advisable. This report deals mainly with electrodialysis, electroosmosis and adsorption with inorganic materials. Special attention is paid to zeta potential control as a driving factor to electroosmosis. For radioactive contaminants that are present in the form of cations, anions, non-ionic solutions, colloids and suspended matter, appropriate combination of the processes may considerably increase the efficiency of processes used. As an example, colloids and suspended particles may be retained in porous ceramic membranes by nanofiltration, ultrafiltration or microfiltration depending on the particle size of the particles. The control of zeta potential by acting in the solid phase or else on the liquid phase has been studied; a mathematical model to predict electrodialysis data has been developed, and finally, the use of a home-made inorganic adsorbent illustrated. The effect of gamma irradiation on the membranes has also been studied. Properties such as salt retention, water flux and pore size diameter determined on both organic and inorganic membranes before and after irradiation indicate deterioration of the organic membrane. (author). 13 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-11

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat.

  20. The membrane as a target for controlling hypervirulent Clostridium difficile infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqian; Cherian, Philip T.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The stationary phase of Clostridium difficile, which is primarily responsible for diarrhoeal symptoms, is refractory to antibiotic killing. We investigated whether disrupting the functions of the clostridial membrane is an approach to control C. difficile infections by promptly removing growing and non-growing cells. Methods The bactericidal activities of various membrane-active agents were determined against C. difficile logarithmic-phase and stationary-phase cultures and compared with known antibiotics. Their effects on the synthesis of ATP, toxins A/B and sporulation were also determined. The effect of rodent caecal contents on anti-difficile activities was examined using two reutericyclin lead compounds, clofazimine, daptomycin and other comparator antibiotics. Results Most membrane-active agents and partially daptomycin showed concentration-dependent killing of both logarithmic-phase and stationary-phase cultures. The exposure of cells to compounds at their MBC resulted in a rapid loss of viability with concomitant reductions in cellular ATP, toxins A/B and spore numbers. With the exception of nisin, these effects were not due to membrane pore formation. Interestingly, the activity of the proton ionophore nigericin significantly increased as the growth of C. difficile decreased, suggesting the importance of the proton gradient to the survival of non-growing cells. The activities of the lipophilic antimicrobials reutericyclins and clofazimine were reduced by caecal contents. Conclusions These findings indicate that C. difficile is uniquely susceptible to killing by molecules affecting its membrane function and bioenergetics, indicating that the clostridial membrane is a novel antimicrobial target for agents to alleviate the burden of C. difficile infections. PMID:23264511

  1. Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, A.

    2015-09-29

    Implantable drug delivery systems can provide long-term reliability, controllability, and biocompatibility, and have been used in many applications, including cancer pain and non-malignant pain treatment. However, many of the available systems are limited to zero-order, inconsistent, or single burst event drug release. To address these limitations, we demonstrate prototypes of a remotely operated drug delivery device that offers controllability of drug release profiles, using osmotic pumping as a pressure source and magnetically triggered membranes as switchable on-demand valves. The membranes are made of either ethyl cellulose, or the proposed stronger cellulose acetate polymer, mixed with thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel and superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. The prototype devices\\' drug diffusion rates are on the order of 0.5–2 μg/h for higher release rate designs, and 12–40 ng/h for lower release rates, with maximum release ratios of 4.2 and 3.2, respectively. The devices exhibit increased drug delivery rates with higher osmotic pumping rates or with magnetically increased membrane porosity. Furthermore, by vapor deposition of a cyanoacrylate layer, a drastic reduction of the drug delivery rate from micrograms down to tens of nanograms per hour is achieved. By utilizing magnetic membranes as the valve-control mechanism, triggered remotely by means of induction heating, the demonstrated drug delivery devices benefit from having the power source external to the system, eliminating the need for a battery. These designs multiply the potential approaches towards increasing the on-demand controllability and customizability of drug delivery profiles in the expanding field of implantable drug delivery systems, with the future possibility of remotely controlling the pressure source.

  2. Superhydrophilic Thin-Film Composite Forward Osmosis Membranes for Organic Fouling Control: Fouling Behavior and Antifouling Mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes for organic fouling control: fouling behavior and antifouling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes.

  4. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  5. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schrödinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  6. Coagulation and oxidation for controlling ultrafiltration membrane fouling in drinking water treatment: Application of ozone at low dose in submerged membrane tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenzheng; Graham, Nigel J D; Fowler, Geoffrey D

    2016-05-15

    Coagulation prior to ultrafiltration (UF) is widely applied for treating contaminated surface water sources for potable supply. While beneficial, coagulation alone is unable to control membrane fouling effectively in many cases, and there is continuing interest in the use of additional, complementary methods such as oxidation in the pre-treatment of raw water prior to UF. In this study, the application of ozone at low dose in the membrane tank immediately following coagulation has been evaluated at laboratory-scale employing model raw water. In parallel tests with and without the application of ozone, the impact of applied ozone doses of 0.5 mg L(-1) and 1.5 mg L(-1) (approximately 0.18 mg L(-1) and 0.54 mg L(-1) consumed ozone, respectively) on the increase of trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was evaluated and correlated with the quantity and nature of membrane deposits, both as a cake layer and within membrane pores. The results showed that a dose of 0.5 mgO3 L(-1) gave a membrane fouling rate that was substantially lower than without ozone addition, while a dose of 1.5 mgO3 L(-1) was able to prevent fouling effects significantly (no increase in TMP). Ozone was found to decrease the concentration of bacteria (especially the concentration of bacteria per suspended solid) in the membrane tank, and to alter the nature of dissolved organic matter by increasing the proportion of hydrophilic substances. Ozone decreased the concentration of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), such as polysaccharides and proteins, in the membrane cake layer; the reduced EPS and bacterial concentrations resulted in a much thinner cake layer, although the suspended solids concentration was much higher in the ozone added membrane tank. Ozone also decreased the accumulation and hydrophobicity of organic matter within the membrane pores, leading to minimal irreversible fouling. Therefore, the application of low-dose ozone within the UF membrane tank is a potentially important

  7. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  8. pH control structure design for a periodically operated membrane separation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2012-01-01

    A bioreactor integrated with an electrically driven membrane separation process (Reverse Electro-Enhanced Dialysis – REED) is under investigation as potential technology for intensifying lactic acid bioproduction. In this contribution the pH regulation issue in the periodically operated REED module...... is studied. A methodology for control structure design is proposed to handle the dynamic system. A sensitivity analysis is used for the conceptual design of the control structure. Dynamic simulations are employed to evaluate the sensitivity index. From the analysis a periodic input-resetting control...

  9. Performance of diagonal control structures at different operating conditions for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Husar, Attila; Feroldi, Diego; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-08-25

    This work is focused on the selection of operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. It analyses efficiency and controllability aspects, which change from one operating point to another. Specifically, several operating points that deliver the same amount of net power are compared, and the comparison is done at different net power levels. The study is based on a complex non-linear model, which has been linearised at the selected operating points. Different linear analysis tools are applied to the linear models and results show important controllability differences between operating points. The performance of diagonal control structures with PI controllers at different operating points is also studied. A method for the tuning of the controllers is proposed and applied. The behaviour of the controlled system is simulated with the non-linear model. Conclusions indicate a possible trade-off between controllability and optimisation of hydrogen consumption. (author)

  10. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  11. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  12. Flow restrictor silicon membrane microvalve actuated by optically controlled paraffin phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolari, K; Havia, T; Stuns, I; Hjort, K

    2014-01-01

    Restrictor valves allow proportional control of fluid flow but are rarely integrated in microfluidic systems. In this study, an optically actuated silicon membrane restrictor microvalve is demonstrated. Its actuation is based on the phase transition of paraffin, using a paraffin wax mixed with a suitable concentration of optically absorbing nanographite particles. Backing up the membrane with oil (the melted paraffin) allows for a compliant yet strong contact to the valve seat, which enables handling of high pressures. At flow rates up to 30 µL min −1 and at a pressure of 2 bars, the valve can successfully be closed and control the flow level by restriction. The use of this paraffin composite as an adhesive layer sandwiched between the silicon valve and glass eases fabrication. This type of restrictor valve is best suited for high pressure, low volume flow silicon-based nanofluidic systems. (paper)

  13. [Characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus removal and control of membrane fouling in MBR and SMBR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Ma; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Kai-Yan; Zhao Yang-Guo

    2015-03-01

    To improve the efficiency and running stability of wastewater advanced treatment, a sequencing membrane bioreactor (SMBR) and a traditional membrane bioreactor (MBR) were used to investigate the characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus removal, and the effect of anoxic time on treatment systems and membrane fouling. Simultaneously, molecular biology techniques were applied to analyze the composition of microbial community and the structure of suspended sludge. The results showed that SMBR had higher efficiency in removing TN than MBR, which indicated that intermittent aeration could enhance the ability of nitrogen removal. SMBR and MBR had a similar removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N, TP, COD, and turbidity with the removal rates of 94%, 78%, 80%, and 97%, respectively. Extension of SMBR anoxic time had no effect on COD, NH4(+) -N removal but decreased TN and TP removal rate, dropping from 61% and 74% to 46% and 52%, respectively. Intermittent aeration and powder activated carbon (PAC) could both mitigate membrane fouling. The analysis on microbial community indicated that there was no difference in the composition and structure of microbial community between SMBR and MBR. Nitrospira and Dechloromonas were both highly abundant functional groups, which provided the basis for highly efficient control of bioreactors.

  14. Integrated Wireless Monitoring and Control System in Reverse Osmosis Membrane Desalination Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Haji Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The operational processes of the Reverse Osmosis (RO membrane desalination plants require continuous monitoring through the constant attendance of operators to ensure proper productivity and minimize downtime and prevent membrane failure. Therefore, the plant must be equipped with a control system that monitors and controls the operational variables. Monitoring and controlling the affecting parameters are critical to the evaluation of the performance of the desalination plant, which will help the operator find and resolve problems immediately. Therefore, this paper was aimed at developing an RO unit by utilizing a wireless sensor network (WSN system. Hence, an RO pilot plant with a feed capacity of 1.2 m3/h was utilized, commissioned, and tested in Kuwait to assess and verify the performance of the integrated WSN in RO membrane desalination system. The investigated system allowed the operators to remotely monitor the operational process of the RO system. The operational data were smoothly recorded and monitored. Furthermore, the technical problems were immediately determined, which reduced the time and effort in rectifying the technical problems relevant to the RO performance. The manpower requirements of such treatment system were dramatically reduced by about 50%. Based on a comparison between manual and wireless monitoring operational processes, the availability of the integrated RO unit with a wireless monitoring was increased by 10%

  15. Fabrication of a membrane filter with controlled pore shape and its application to cell separation and strong single cell trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Gun-Wook; Yoon, Jun-Bo; Park, Jeong Won; Lee, Dae-Sik; Ihm, Chunhwa

    2015-01-01

    A porous membrane filter is one of the key components for sample preparation in lab-on-a-chip applications. However, most of the membranes reported to date have only been used for size-based separation since it is difficult to provide functionality to the membrane or improve the performance of the membrane. In this work, as a method to functionalize the membrane filter, controlling the shape of the membrane pores is suggested, and a convenient and mass-producible fabrication method is provided. With the proposed method, membrane filters with round, conical and funnel shape pores were successfully fabricated, and we demonstrated that the sidewall slope of the conical shape pores could be precisely controlled. To verify that the membrane filter can be functionalized by controlled pore shape, we investigated filtration and trapping performance of the membrane filter with conical shape pores. In a filtration test of 1000 cancer cells (MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line) spiked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, 77% of the total cancer cells were retained on the membrane, and each cell from among 99.3% of the retained cells was automatically isolated in a single conical pore during the filtration process. Thanks to its engineered pore shape, trapping ability of the membrane with conical pores is dramatically improved. Microparticles trapped in the conical pores maintain their locations without any losses even at a more than 30 times faster external flow rate com-pared with those mounted on conventional cylindrical pores. Also, 78% of the cells trapped in the conical pores withstand an external flow of over 300 μl min −1 whereas only 18% of the cells trapped in the cylindrical pores remain on the membrane after 120 μl min −1 of an external flow is applied. (paper)

  16. Orthonormal curvature polynomials over a unit circle: basis set derived from curvatures of Zernike polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyu; Burge, James H

    2013-12-16

    Zernike polynomials are an orthonormal set of scalar functions over a circular domain, and are commonly used to represent wavefront phase or surface irregularity. In optical testing, slope or curvature of a surface or wavefront is sometimes measured instead, from which the surface or wavefront map is obtained. Previously we derived an orthonormal set of vector polynomials that fit to slope measurement data and yield the surface or wavefront map represented by Zernike polynomials. Here we define a 3-element curvature vector used to represent the second derivatives of a continuous surface, and derive a set of orthonormal curvature basis functions that are written in terms of Zernike polynomials. We call the new curvature functions the C polynomials. Closed form relations for the complete basis set are provided, and we show how to determine Zernike surface coefficients from the curvature data as represented by the C polynomials.

  17. Endoplasmatic reticulum shaping by generic mechanisms and protein-induced spontaneous curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2014-06-01

    The endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) comprises flattened vesicles (cisternae) with worm holes dubbed with ribosomes coexisting with a network of interconnected tubes which can extend to the cell periphery or even penetrate nerve axons. The coexisting topologies enclose a continuous luminal space. The complex ER topology is specifically controlled by a group of ER-shaping proteins often called reticulons (discovered by the group of Tom Rapoport). They include atlastin, reticulon, REEP and the MT severing protein spastin. A generic ER shape controlling factor is the necessity to maximize the area-to-volume ratio of ER membranes in the highly crowded cytoplasmic space. I present a model of the ER-shaping function of the reticulons based on the Helfrich bending elasticity concept of soft shell shape changes. Common structural motifs of the reticulons are hydrophobic sequences forming wedge shaped hairpins which penetrate the lipid bilayer of the cell membranes. The wedge-like hydrophobic anchors can both induce the high curvature of the tubular ER fraction and ensure the preferred distribution of the reticulons along the tubules. Tubular junctions may be stabilized by the reticulons forming two forceps twisted by 90°. The ER extensions to the cell periphery and the axons are mediated by coupling of the tubes to the microtubules which is mediated by REEP and spastin. At the end I present a model of the tension driven homotype fusion of ER-membranes by atlastin, based on analogies to the SNARE-complexin-SNARE driven heterotype fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Therapeutic ultrasound to stimulate osteoconduction - A placebo controlled single blind study using e-PTFE membranes in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Ruben, JL; Raghoebar, GM; Stegenga, B

    To decrease heating time of bone defects covered with osteoconductive membranes, an attempt was made to stimulate the osteoconductive process with therapeutic ultrasound. In 72 rats, a circular mandibular defect was created and covered on both sides with an e-PTFE membrane. A control group, an

  19. Tailor-made pore controlled poly (arylene ether ketone) membranes as a lithium-ion battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mong, Anh; Kim, Dukjoon

    2016-02-01

    Porous poly(arylene ether ketone) (PAEK) membranes are prepared by selective removal of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) molecules from self-assembled PAEK-PLA block copolymers. The pore size and porosity of the membranes are precisely controlled by adjusting PLA concentration. The synthesis of the PAEK-PLA copolymer is confirmed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies and the morphology of the membrane is examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several important properties such as liquid electrolyte uptake, contact angle, thermal and mechanical stability, and lithium ion conductivity are measured and compared with those of commercial poly(propylene) (PP) membranes to investigate their application feasibility as a separator. The porous PAEK membrane shows improved thermal and dimensional stability compared to the PP membrane. The EC/DEC/EMC (1:1:1, v/v/v) soaked PAEK membrane with a pore diameter of 50 nm shows the highest lithium ion conductivity, higher than that of PP membrane. More importantly, the porous PAEK membranes show superior liquid electrolyte holding capacity to the PP membrane.

  20. Cosmic curvature from de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    I show that the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology generically predicts observable levels of curvature in the Universe today. The predicted value of the curvature, Ω(k), depends only on the ratio of the density of nonrelativistic matter to cosmological constant density ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and the value of the curvature from the initial bubble that starts the inflation, Ω(k)(B). The result is independent of the scale of inflation, the shape of the potential during inflation, and many other details of the cosmology. Future cosmological measurements of ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and Ω(k) will open up a window on the very beginning of our Universe and offer an opportunity to support or falsify the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

  1. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces.

  2. Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for CO2 Control in Extravehicular Activity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David T.; Gleason, Kevin J.; Engel, Jeffrey R.; Cowley, Scott W.; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Developing a new, robust, portable life support system (PLSS) is currently a high priority for NASA in order to support longer and safer extravehicular activity (EVA) missions. One of the critical PLSS functions is maintaining the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the suit at acceptable levels. Although the Metal Oxide (MetOx) canister has worked well, it has a finite CO2 adsorption capacity. Consequently, the unit would have to be larger and heavier to extend EVA times. Therefore, new CO2 control technologies must be developed to meet mission objectives without increasing the size of the PLSS. Although recent work has centered on sorbents that can be regenerated during the EVA, this strategy increases the system complexity and power consumption. A simpler approach is to use a membrane that selectively vents CO2 to space. A membrane has many advantages over current technology: it is a continuous system with no theoretical capacity limit, it requires no consumables, and it requires no hardware for switching beds between absorption and regeneration. Unfortunately, conventional gas separation membranes do not have adequate selectivity for use in the PLSS. However, the required performance could be obtained with a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which consists of a micro porous material filled with a liquid that selectively reacts with CO2 over oxygen (O2). In a current Phase II SBIR project, Reaction Systems has developed a new reactive liquid, which has effectively zero vapor pressure making it an ideal candidate for use in an SLM. The SLM function has been demonstrated with representative pressures of CO2, O2, and water (H2O). In addition to being effective for CO2 control, the SLM also vents moisture to space. Therefore, this project has demonstrated the feasibility of using an SLM to control CO2 in an EVA application.

  3. Longitudinal surface curvature effect in magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodas, N.G.

    1975-01-01

    The two-dimensional motion of an incompressible and electrically conducting fluid past an electrically insulated body surface (having curvature) is studied for a given O(1) basic flow and magnetic field, when (i) the applied magnetic field is aligned with the velocity in the basic flow, and (ii) the applied magnetic field is within the body surface. 01 and 0(Re sup(1/2)) mean the first and second order approximations respectively in an exansion scheme in powers of Resup(-1/2), Re being the Reynolds number). The technique of matched asymptotic expansions is used to solve the problem. The governing partial differential equations to 0(Resup(-1/2)) boundary layer approximation are found to give similarity solutions for a family of surface curvature and pressure gradient distributions in case (i), and for uniform basic flow with analytic surface curvature distributions in case (ii). The equations are solved numerically. In case (i) it is seen that the effect of the magnetic field on the skin-friction- correction due to the curvature is very small. Also the magnetic field at the wall is reduced by the curvature on the convex side. In case (ii) the magnetic field significantly increases the skin-friction-correction due to the curvature. The effect of the magnetic field on the O(1) and O(Resup(-1/2)) skin friction coefficients increases with the increase of the electrical conductivity of the fluid. Also, at higher values of the magnetic pressure, moderate changes in the electrical conductivity do not influence the correction to the skin-friction significantly. (Auth.)

  4. Feedback control for distributed heat transfer mechanisms in direct-contact membrane distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, the problem of stabilization and production rate reference tracking for a Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) system is addressed. Sufficient conditions for the asymptotic and exponential stabilization for DCMD system are presented using the Gronwall-Bellman lemma and Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) approaches, respectively. A nonlinear observer is then proposed to estimate the temperature distribution among the DCMD domain. This contributes to propose a reference production rate control design for the DCMD process via observer-based output control approach. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  5. Generic Properties of Curvature Sensing through Vision and Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Dresp-Langley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generic properties of curvature representations formed on the basis of vision and touch were examined as a function of mathematical properties of curved objects. Virtual representations of the curves were shown on a computer screen for visual scaling by sighted observers (experiment 1. Their physical counterparts were placed in the two hands of blindfolded and congenitally blind observers for tactile scaling. The psychophysical data show that curvature representations in congenitally blind individuals, who never had any visual experience, and in sighted observers, who rely on vision most of the time, are statistically linked to the same mathematical properties of the curves. The perceived magnitude of object curvature, sensed through either vision or touch, is related by a mathematical power law, with similar exponents for the two sensory modalities, to the aspect ratio of the curves, a scale invariant geometric property. This finding supports biologically motivated models of sensory integration suggesting a universal power law for the adaptive brain control and balance of motor responses to environmental stimuli from any sensory modality.

  6. Development and Optimization of Osmotically Controlled Asymmetric Membrane Capsules for Delivery of Solid Dispersion of Lycopene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to develop and statistically optimize the osmotically controlled asymmetric membrane capsules of solid dispersion of lycopene. Solid dispersions of lycopene with β-cyclodextrin in different ratios were prepared using solvent evaporation method. Solubility studies showed that the solid dispersion with 1 : 5 (lycopene : β-cyclodextrin exhibited optimum solubility (56.25 mg/mL for osmotic controlled delivery. Asymmetric membrane capsules (AMCs were prepared on glass mold pins via dip coating method. Membrane characterization by scanning electron microscopy showed inner porous region and outer dense region. Central composite design response surface methodology was applied for the optimization of AMCs. The independent variables were ethyl cellulose (X1, glycerol (X2, and NaCl (X3 which were varied at different levels to analyze the effect on dependent variables (percentage of cumulative drug release (Y1 and correlation coefficient of drug release (Y2. The effect of independent variables on the response was significantly influential. The F18 was selected as optimized formulation based on percentage of CDR (cumulative drug release of 85.63% and correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The optimized formulation was subjected to analyze the effect of osmotic pressure and agitational intensity on percentage of CDR. The drug release was independent of agitational intensity but was dependent on osmotic pressure of dissolution medium.

  7. Effects of manipulating tetanic calcium on the curvature of the force-velocity relationship in isolated rat soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, A M; Nielsen, O B; Overgaard, K

    2018-03-01

    In dynamically contracting muscles, increased curvature of the force-velocity relationship contributes to the loss of power during fatigue. It has been proposed that fatigue-induced reduction in [Ca ++ ] i causes this increased curvature. However, earlier studies on single fibres have been conducted at low temperatures. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that curvature is increased by reductions in tetanic [Ca ++ ] i in isolated skeletal muscle at near-physiological temperatures. Rat soleus muscles were stimulated at 60 Hz in standard Krebs-Ringer buffer, and contraction force and velocity were measured. Tetanic [Ca ++ ] i was in some experiments either lowered by addition of 10 μmol/L dantrolene or use of submaximal stimulation (30 Hz) or increased by addition of 2 mmol/L caffeine. Force-velocity curves were constructed by fitting shortening velocity at different loading forces to the Hill equation. Curvature was determined as the ratio a/F 0 with increased curvature reflecting decreased a/F 0 . Compared to control levels, lowering tetanic [Ca ++ ] i with dantrolene or reduced stimulation frequency decreased the curvature slightly as judged from increase in a/F 0 of 13 ± 1% (P = reduced tetanic [Ca ++ ] i caused a decrease in curvature, while increasing tetanic [Ca ++ ] i increased the curvature. These results reject a simple causal relation between [Ca ++ ] i and curvature of the force-velocity relation during fatigue. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  9. Membrane bending by protein-protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Schmid, Eva M; Ryan, Christopher J; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Sherman, Michael B; Geissler, Phillip L; Fletcher, Daniel A; Hayden, Carl C

    2012-09-01

    Curved membranes are an essential feature of dynamic cellular structures, including endocytic pits, filopodia protrusions and most organelles. It has been proposed that specialized proteins induce curvature by binding to membranes through two primary mechanisms: membrane scaffolding by curved proteins or complexes; and insertion of wedge-like amphipathic helices into the membrane. Recent computational studies have raised questions about the efficiency of the helix-insertion mechanism, predicting that proteins must cover nearly 100% of the membrane surface to generate high curvature, an improbable physiological situation. Thus, at present, we lack a sufficient physical explanation of how protein attachment bends membranes efficiently. On the basis of studies of epsin1 and AP180, proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, we propose a third general mechanism for bending fluid cellular membranes: protein-protein crowding. By correlating membrane tubulation with measurements of protein densities on membrane surfaces, we demonstrate that lateral pressure generated by collisions between bound proteins drives bending. Whether proteins attach by inserting a helix or by binding lipid heads with an engineered tag, protein coverage above ~20% is sufficient to bend membranes. Consistent with this crowding mechanism, we find that even proteins unrelated to membrane curvature, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), can bend membranes when sufficiently concentrated. These findings demonstrate a highly efficient mechanism by which the crowded protein environment on the surface of cellular membranes can contribute to membrane shape change.

  10. Curvature effects on the electronic and transport properties of semiconductor films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, F. F.; Chaves, Andrey; da Costa, D. R.; Farias, G. A.

    2018-05-01

    Within the effective mass approximation, we study the curvature effects on the electronic and transport properties of semiconductor films. We investigate how the geometry-induced potential resulting exclusively from periodic ripples in the film induces electronic confinement and a superlattice band structure. For fixed curvature parameters, such a confinement can be easily tuned by an external electric field, hence features of the superlattice band structure such as its energy gaps and band curvature can be controlled by an external parameter. We also show that, for some values of curvature and electric field, it is possible to obtain massless Dirac bands for a smooth curved structure. Moreover, we use a wave packet propagation method to demonstrate that the ripples are responsible for a significant inter-sub-band transition, specially for moderate values of the ripple height.

  11. Positive scalar curvature and the Euler class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianqing; Zhang, Weiping

    2018-03-01

    We prove the following generalization of the classical Lichnerowicz vanishing theorem: if F is an oriented flat vector bundle over a closed spin manifold M such that TM carries a metric of positive scalar curvature, then 〈 A ̂ (TM) e(F) , [ M ] 〉 = 0, where e(F) is the Euler class of F.

  12. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz–Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behavior of the surfaces...

  13. Norm of the Riemannian Curvature Tensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider the Riemannian functional R p ( g ) = ∫ M | R ( g ) | p d v g defined on the space of Riemannian metrics with unit volume on a closed smooth manifold where R ( g ) and d v g denote the corresponding Riemannian curvature tensor and volume form and p ∈ ( 0 , ∞ ) . First we prove that the Riemannian metrics ...

  14. Zero curvature conditions and conformal covariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemann, G.; Grimm, R.

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional zero curvature conditions were investigated in detail, with special emphasis on conformal properties, and the appearance of covariant higher order differential operators constructed in terms of a projective connection was elucidated. The analysis is based on the Kostant decomposition of simple Lie algebras in terms of representations with respect to their 'principal' SL(2) subalgebra. (author) 27 refs

  15. On Mass, Spacetime Curvature, and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Allen I.

    2018-01-01

    The frequently used analogy of a massive ball distorting an elastic sheet, which is used to illustrate why mass causes spacetime curvature and gravitational attraction, is criticized in this article. A different analogy that draws on the students' previous knowledge of spacetime diagrams in special relativity is suggested.

  16. Resolving curvature singularities in holomorphic gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantz, C.L.M.; Prokopec, T.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a holomorphic theory of gravity and study how the holomorphy symmetry alters the two most important singular solutions of general relativity: black holes and cosmology. We show that typical observers (freely) falling into a holomorphic black hole do not encounter a curvature

  17. Gaussian curvature on hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 124, No. 2, May 2014, pp. 155–167. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Gaussian curvature on hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces. ABEL CASTORENA. Centro de Ciencias Matemáticas (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,. Campus Morelia) Apdo. Postal 61-3 Xangari, C.P. 58089 Morelia,.

  18. Curvature driven instabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.

    1986-11-01

    The electromagnetic ballooning mode, the curvature driven trapped electron mode and the toroidally induced ion temperature gradient mode have been studies. Eigenvalue equations have been derived and solved both numerically and analytically. For electromagnetic ballooning modes the effects of convective damping, finite Larmor radius, higher order curvature terms, and temperature gradients have been investigated. A fully toroidal fluid ion model has been developed. It is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for an instability below the MHD limit is the presence of an ion temperature gradient. Analytical dispersion relations giving results in good agreement with numerical solutions are also presented. The curvature driven trapped electron modes are found to be unstable for virtually all parameters with growth rates of the order of the diamagnetic drift frequency. Studies have been made, using both a gyrokinetic ion description and the fully toroidal ion model. Both analytical and numerical results are presented and are found to be in good agreement. The toroidally induced ion temperature gradients modes are found to have a behavior similar to that of the curvature driven trapped electron modes and can in the electrostatic limit be described by a simple quadratic dispersion equation. (author)

  19. Modulation of saccade curvature by ocular counterroll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konrad P; Bockisch, Christopher J; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Straumann, Dominik

    2009-03-01

    On close inspection, it can be seen that most saccadic trajectories are not straight but curve slightly; in other words, they are not single-axis ocular rotations. The authors asked whether saccade curvatures are systematically influenced by static ocular counterroll (OCR). OCR was elicited by static whole-body roll position. Eight healthy human subjects performed horizontal and vertical saccades (10 degrees amplitude; 0 degrees and 10 degrees eccentricity; head-fixed coordinate system) in upright and ear-down whole-body roll positions (45 degrees right, 45 degrees left). Three-dimensional eye movements were recorded with modified dual-search coils at 1000 Hz. Saccade curvature was systematically modulated by OCR depending on saccade direction. In the horizontal-vertical plane, primarily vertical saccades were modulated with downward saccades curving toward the upper ear and upward saccades curving toward the lower ear. Modulation of saccade curvature in the torsional direction correlated significantly with OCR only in abducting saccades. No universal mechanism, such as visual-motor coordinate transformation or kinematic characteristics of the saccadic burst generator, alone could explain the complex modulation pattern of saccade curvature. OCR-induced changes of the ocular motor plant, including transient force imbalances between agonist eye muscles (vertical rectus and oblique muscles) and shifting eye muscle pulleys, are suitable to explain the found direction-dependent modulation pattern.

  20. Constraining inverse curvature gravity with supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab; Weller, Jochen; /University Coll., London /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    We show that the current accelerated expansion of the Universe can be explained without resorting to dark energy. Models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature can have late time accelerating attractors without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedman equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe. This allows us to perform a detailed analysis of Supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. Hence, inverse curvature gravity models represent an example of phenomenologically viable models in which the current acceleration of the Universe is driven by curvature instead of dark energy. If we further include constraints on the current expansion rate of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope and on the age of the Universe from globular clusters, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07 {le} {omega}{sub m} {le} 0.21 (95% Confidence). Hence the inverse curvature gravity models considered can not explain the dynamics of the Universe just with a baryonic matter component.

  1. Garbage on, garbage off: new insights into plasma membrane protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGurn, Jason A

    2014-08-01

    Maintenance of cellular protein quality - by restoring misfolded proteins to their native state and by targeting terminally misfolded or damaged proteins for degradation - is a critical function of all cells. To ensure protein quality, cells have evolved various organelle-specific quality control mechanisms responsible for recognizing and responding to misfolded proteins at different subcellular locations of the cell. Recently, several publications have begun to elucidate mechanisms of quality control that operate at the plasma membrane (PM), recognizing misfolded PM proteins and targeting their endocytic trafficking and lysosomal degradation. Here, I discuss these recent developments in our understanding of PM quality control mechanisms and how they relate to global protein quality control strategies in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A strain-controlled C2N monolayer membrane for gas separation in PEMFC application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengwei; Hu, Hui; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo

    2018-05-01

    Ultrathin membranes with controllable pore sizes have great potential to realize high-selectivity gas separation at low energy cost, especially for those mixtures with narrow size distributions. Using a combination of van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we examine the separation ability of biaxial stretched monolayer C2N nanosheets which is applied to the O2 separation from CO/CO2/O2 mixtures in the cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The DFT calculations show that the diffusion energy barrier for molecules passing through the membrane followed by CO, CO2 and O2 in descending order, and an overall decrease of energy barriers due to the widen the pore size is observed with the increase of applied strains. Furthermore, MD results show that the nanosheet can effectively purify O2 from CO2 and CO with a strain from 8% to 10%. It confirms that the selectivity is determined by the electronic structure related interaction in addition to the kinetic diameter of individual molecules. The O2 permeability is improved progressively with further increase of strain, and small amount of CO2 begins to permeate through the nanosheet at relatively large strain, while the excellent CO isolation is not compromised until the theoretical maximum strain.

  3. Controlled ionic condensation at the surface of a native extremophile membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contera, Sonia Antoranz; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Ryan, John F.

    2010-02-01

    At the nanoscale level biological membranes present a complex interface with the solvent. The functional dynamics and relative flexibility of membrane components together with the presence of specific ionic effects can combine to create exciting new phenomena that challenge traditional theories such as the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory or models interpreting the role of ions in terms of their ability to structure water (structure making/breaking). Here we investigate ionic effects at the surface of a highly charged extremophile membrane composed of a proton pump (bacteriorhodopsin) and archaeal lipids naturally assembled into a 2D crystal. Using amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) in solution, we obtained sub-molecular resolution images of ion-induced surface restructuring of the membrane. We demonstrate the presence of a stiff cationic layer condensed at its extracellular surface. This layer cannot be explained by traditional continuum theories. Dynamic force spectroscopy experiments suggest that it is produced by electrostatic correlation mediated by a Manning-type condensation of ions. In contrast, the cytoplasmic surface is dominated by short-range repulsive hydration forces. These findings are relevant to archaeal bioenergetics and halophilic adaptation. Importantly, they present experimental evidence of a natural system that locally controls its interactions with the surrounding medium and challenges our current understanding of biological interfaces.At the nanoscale level biological membranes present a complex interface with the solvent. The functional dynamics and relative flexibility of membrane components together with the presence of specific ionic effects can combine to create exciting new phenomena that challenge traditional theories such as the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory or models interpreting the role of ions in terms of their ability to structure water (structure making/breaking). Here we

  4. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  5. Controlled Modulation of Lipid Bilayer State by a Photosensitive Membrane Effector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Jørgensen, Lars; Zargarani, Dordaneh

    by a combination of spectroscopic (UV-vis, NMR, mass spectroscopy), thermodynamic (Langmuir compression, calorimetry) and structural studies (X-ray/neutron reflectometry, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction). The conformational change of the guest upon illumination is coupled into the host system, inducing...... or even globally modify the initial state of the host per se, most probably the state of the matrix in turn serves as a control tool for regulating the work of functional units (e.g. proteins). Results are presented on a membrane model system that was inoculated with a photosensitive and thus active...

  6. Electrically-controlled permeation of vapors through carbon nanotube network-based membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2018), s. 332-337 ISSN 1536-125X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/19.0409 Grant - others:Ministerstvo školství, mládeže a tělovýchovy (MŠMT)(CZ) LO1504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * electrically controlled membranes * permeation of chemical vapors Impact factor: 2.485, year: 2016

  7. Sound shielding by a piezoelectric membrane and a negative capacitor with feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Tomás; Kodama, Hidekazu; Fukada, Eiichi; Mokrý, Pavel

    2008-08-01

    The design and realization of an adaptive sound-shielding system based on a method to control the effective elastic stiffness of piezoelectric materials are presented in this paper. In this system, the sound-shielding effect is achieved by a sound reflection from the piezoelectric curved membrane fixed in rigid frame and connected to an active analog circuit that behaves as a negative capacitor. The acoustic transmission loss through the curved membrane was measured for the incident sound of frequency 1.6 kHz and of acoustic pressure level 80 dB. When the negative capacitor in the system was properly adjusted, the acoustic pressure level of the transmitted sound was reduced from the initial 60 dB to 15 dB by the action of the negative capacitor. Then the system was exposed to naturally changing operational conditions, and their effect on sound-shielding efficiency was studied. It is shown that the acoustic transmission loss of the system dropped by 35 dB within 30 min from the moment of negative capacitor adjustment. Therefore, a self-adjustment of the system has been implemented by appending an additional digital control circuit to the negative capacitor. It is shown that the aforementioned deteriorating effect has been eliminated by the adjusting action of the control circuit. The long-time sustainable value of 60 dB in the acoustic transmission loss of the adaptive sound shielding system has been achieved.

  8. New type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane for gallic acid encapsulation and controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Gabriela; Neagu, Elena; Tache, Andreia; Radu, G L

    2014-01-01

    A new type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane have been developed for the encapsulation and controlled release of gallic acid. The morphology of the composite membrane was investigated by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), whereas swelling gallic acid and release properties were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. The release behavior with pH changes was also explored. The composite membrane based on chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin with gallic acid included showed improved antioxidant capacities compared to plain chitosan membrane. The information obtained in this study will facilitate the design and preparation of composite membrane based on chitosan and could open a wide range of applications, particularly its use as an antioxidant in food, food packaging, biomedical (biodegradable soft porous scaffolds for enhance the surrounding tissue regeneration), pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries.

  9. On controllability of an integrated bioreactor and periodically operated membrane separation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    Investigation of integrated processes involves challenges at both design and control levels, these can mainly be associated with different dynamic behaviors of the individual units plus their interaction. Therefore, the design and operation of the integrated system constitutes a key issue. In order...... to understand the controlled operation of the integrated process, it is convenient to use a model based approach supported by experimental evidence. Recently, an integrated bioreactor and electrically driven membrane separation process (Reverse Electro- Enhanced Dialysis - REED) has been proposed as a method...... on the innovative REED technology, where lactate ions are exchanged by hydroxide ions. This allows the lactate removal and simultaneously facilitates the pH control in the fermenter. Long operation time is achieved by reversing periodically the polarity of the imposed electrical field to significantly reduce...

  10. Sensitive zone parameters and curvature radius evaluation for polymer optical fiber curvature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; José Pontes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are suitable for applications such as curvature sensors, strain, temperature, liquid level, among others. However, for enhancing sensitivity, many polymer optical fiber curvature sensors based on intensity variation require a lateral section. Lateral section length, depth, and surface roughness have great influence on the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis, and linearity. Moreover, the sensor curvature radius increase the stress on the fiber, which leads on variation of the sensor behavior. This paper presents the analysis relating the curvature radius and lateral section length, depth and surface roughness with the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis and linearity for a POF curvature sensor. Results show a strong correlation between the decision parameters behavior and the performance for sensor applications based on intensity variation. Furthermore, there is a trade-off among the sensitive zone length, depth, surface roughness, and curvature radius with the sensor desired performance parameters, which are minimum hysteresis, maximum sensitivity, and maximum linearity. The optimization of these parameters is applied to obtain a sensor with sensitivity of 20.9 mV/°, linearity of 0.9992 and hysteresis below 1%, which represent a better performance of the sensor when compared with the sensor without the optimization.

  11. Study of Hydrogen Consumption by Control System in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros Emilia Rosli; Edy Herianto Majlan; Siti Afiqah Abd Hamid; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Ramizi Mohamed; Dedi Rohendi

    2016-01-01

    Efficient operation results from a proper control strategy. In the operation and performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), the hydrogen gas flow rate is one of the most essential control parameter in addition to operating pressure, water management, temperature and humidity. This is because of the high cost and amount of energy are required to produce the purity hydrogen gas. In this paper, a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) feedback control system is used to control the hydrogen flow rate. A strategy is adapted to balance the hydrogen use based on the loading requirements, especially during start-ups and sudden power demands. This system is implemented using National Instrument (NI) devices powered by the LabVIEW program. This is due to its simplicity and customization flexibility for measuring, processing and recording data. Designed structure allows the real-time implementation of a robust control law that is able to address the related nonlinearities and uncertainties without incurring a heavy computational load for the controller algorithm. While it facilitating a fast sampling rate according to the needs of the power system. Test results from the controller show that the new fuel control system provides good performance by reducing the amount of wasted hydrogen gas compared with that of the previous open loop system by 30 % to over 80 % saved by the varied load. This improvement is beneficial for any PEMFC that experiences fluctuating power demand, especially for vehicle applications. (author)

  12. Aortic Curvature Is a Predictor of Late Type Ia Endoleak and Migration After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmann, Richte C L; van Noort, Kim; Overeem, Simon P; Ouriel, Kenneth; Jordan, William D; Muhs, Bart E; 't Mannetje, Yannick; Reijnen, Michel; Fioole, Bram; Ünlü, Çağdaş; Brummel, Peter; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the association between aortic curvature and other preoperative anatomical characteristics and late (>1 year) type Ia endoleak and endograft migration in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) patients. Eight high-volume EVAR centers contributed 116 EVAR patients (mean age 81±7 years; 103 men) to the study: 36 patients (mean age 82±7 years; 31 men) with endograft migration and/or type Ia endoleak diagnosed >1 year after the initial EVAR and 80 controls without early or late complications. Aortic curvature was calculated from the preoperative computed tomography scan as the maximum and average curvature over 5 predefined aortic segments: the entire infrarenal aortic neck, aneurysm sac, and the suprarenal, juxtarenal, and infrarenal aorta. Other morphological characteristics included neck length, neck diameter, mural neck calcification and thrombus, suprarenal and infrarenal angulation, and largest aneurysm sac diameter. Independent risk factors were identified using backward stepwise logistic regression. Relevant cutoff values for each of the variables in the final regression model were determined with the receiver operator characteristic curve. Logistic regression identified maximum curvature over the length of the aneurysm sac (>47 m -1 ; p=0.023), largest aneurysm sac diameter (>56 mm; p=0.028), and mural neck thrombus (>11° circumference; pIa endoleak. Aortic curvature is a predictor for late type Ia endoleak and endograft migration after EVAR. These findings suggest that aortic curvature is a better parameter than angulation to predict post-EVAR failure and should be included as a hostile neck parameter.

  13. Stress-controlled Poisson ratio of a crystalline membrane: Application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrov, I. Â. S.; Gornyi, I. Â. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Â. Yu.; Katsnelson, M. Â. I.; Los, J. Â. H.; Mirlin, A. Â. D.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that a key elastic parameter of a suspended crystalline membrane—the Poisson ratio (PR) ν —is a nontrivial function of the applied stress σ and of the system size L , i.e., ν =νL(σ ) . We consider a generic two-dimensional membrane embedded into space of dimensionality 2 +dc . (The physical situation corresponds to dc=1 .) A particularly important application of our results is to freestanding graphene. We find that at a very low stress, when the membrane exhibits linear response, the PR νL(0 ) decreases with increasing system size L and saturates for L →∞ at a value which depends on the boundary conditions and is essentially different from the value ν =-1 /3 previously predicted by the membrane theory within a self-consistent scaling analysis. By increasing σ , one drives a sufficiently large membrane (with the length L much larger than the Ginzburg length) into a nonlinear regime characterized by a universal value of PR that depends solely on dc, in close connection with the critical index η controlling the renormalization of bending rigidity. This universal nonlinear PR acquires its minimum value νmin=-1 in the limit dc→∞ , when η →0 . With the further increase of σ , the PR changes sign and finally saturates at a positive nonuniversal value prescribed by the conventional elasticity theory. We also show that one should distinguish between the absolute and differential PR (ν and νdiff, respectively). While coinciding in the limits of very low and very high stress, they differ in general: ν ≠νdiff . In particular, in the nonlinear universal regime, νdiff takes a universal value which, similarly to the absolute PR, is a function solely of dc (or, equivalently, of η ) but is different from the universal value of ν . In the limit of infinite dimensionality of the embedding space, dc→∞ (i.e., η →0 ), the universal value of νdiff tends to -1 /3 , at variance with the limiting value -1 of ν . Finally, we briefly

  14. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant

  15. Integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed-membrane hybrid process for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtban Kenari, Seyedeh Laleh; Barbeau, Benoit

    2017-04-15

    Newly developed ceramic membrane technologies offer numerous advantages over the conventional polymeric membranes. This work proposes a new configuration, an integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed (PFB)-ceramic MF/UF hybrid process, for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water. A pilot-scale study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this process with respect to iron and manganese control as well as membrane fouling. In addition, the fouling of commercially available ceramic membranes in conventional preoxidation-MF/UF process was compared with the hybrid process configuration. In this regard, a series of experiments were conducted under different influent water quality and operating conditions. Fouling mechanisms and reversibility were analyzed using blocking law and resistance-in-series models. The results evidenced that the flux rate and the concentration of calcium and humic acids in the feed water have a substantial impact on the filtration behavior of both membranes. The model for constant flux compressible cake formation well described the rise in transmembrane pressure. The compressibility of the filter cake substantially increased in the presence of 2 mg/L humic acids. The presence of calcium ions caused significant aggregation of manganese dioxide and humic acid which severely impacted the extent of membrane fouling. The PFB pretreatment properly alleviated membrane fouling by removing more than 75% and 95% of iron and manganese, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. How curved membranes recruit amphipathic helices and protein anchoring motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S; Bhatia, Vikram K; Larsen, Jannik; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves; Kunding, Andreas H; Castillo, John; Gether, Ulrik; Hedegård, Per; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    Lipids and several specialized proteins are thought to be able to sense the curvature of membranes (MC). Here we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure curvature-selective binding of amphipathic motifs on single liposomes 50-700 nm in diameter. Our results revealed that sensing is predominantly mediated by a higher density of binding sites on curved membranes instead of higher affinity. We proposed a model based on curvature-induced defects in lipid packing that related these findings to lipid sorting and accurately predicted the existence of a new ubiquitous class of curvature sensors: membrane-anchored proteins. The fact that unrelated structural motifs such as alpha-helices and alkyl chains sense MC led us to propose that MC sensing is a generic property of curved membranes rather than a property of the anchoring molecules. We therefore anticipate that MC will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through other types of hydrophobic moieties.

  17. Cosmological signatures of anisotropic spatial curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Thiago S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86057-970, Londrina – PR (Brazil); Marugán, Guillermo A. Mena [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Carneiro, Saulo, E-mail: tspereira@uel.br, E-mail: mena@iem.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador – BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    If one is willing to give up the cherished hypothesis of spatial isotropy, many interesting cosmological models can be developed beyond the simple anisotropically expanding scenarios. One interesting possibility is presented by shear-free models in which the anisotropy emerges at the level of the curvature of the homogeneous spatial sections, whereas the expansion is dictated by a single scale factor. We show that such models represent viable alternatives to describe the large-scale structure of the inflationary universe, leading to a kinematically equivalent Sachs-Wolfe effect. Through the definition of a complete set of spatial eigenfunctions we compute the two-point correlation function of scalar perturbations in these models. In addition, we show how such scenarios would modify the spectrum of the CMB assuming that the observations take place in a small patch of a universe with anisotropic curvature.

  18. Weyl curvature tensor in static spherical sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the Weyl curvature tensor in static sources of the Schwarzschild field is studied. It is shown that in general the contribution from the Weyl curvature tensor (the ''purely gravitational field energy'') to the mass-energy inside the body may be positive, negative, or zero. It is proved that a positive (negative) contribution from the Weyl tensor tends to increase (decrease) the effective gravitational mass, the red-shift (from a point in the sphere to infinity), as well as the gravitational force which acts on a constituent matter element of a body. It is also proved that the contribution from the Weyl tensor always is negative in sources with surface gravitational potential larger than (4/9. It is pointed out that large negative contributions from the Weyl tensor could give rise to the phenomenon of gravitational repulsion. A simple example which illustrates the results is discussed

  19. On a curvature-statistics theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain); Aldaya, V [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: Manuel.Calixto@upct.es

    2008-08-15

    The spin-statistics theorem in quantum field theory relates the spin of a particle to the statistics obeyed by that particle. Here we investigate an interesting correspondence or connection between curvature ({kappa} = {+-}1) and quantum statistics (Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein, respectively). The interrelation between both concepts is established through vacuum coherent configurations of zero modes in quantum field theory on the compact O(3) and noncompact O(2; 1) (spatial) isometry subgroups of de Sitter and Anti de Sitter spaces, respectively. The high frequency limit, is retrieved as a (zero curvature) group contraction to the Newton-Hooke (harmonic oscillator) group. We also make some comments on the physical significance of the vacuum energy density and the cosmological constant problem.

  20. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schro¨dinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz...... equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important...... to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear...

  1. Scaling up the curvature of mammalian metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A curvilinear relationship between mammalian metabolic rate and body size on a log-log scale has been adopted in lieu of thelongstanding concept of a 3/4 allometric relationship (Kolokotrones et al. 2010. The central tenet of Metabolic Ecology (ME states that metabolism at the individual level scales-up to drive the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems. If this tenet is correct, the curvature of metabolism should be perceived in other ecological traits. By analyzing the size scaling allometry of eight different mammalian traits including basal and field metabolic rate, offspring biomass production, ingestion rate, costs of locomotion, life span, population growth rate and population density we show that the curvature affects most ecological rates and

  2. Discrete Curvatures and Discrete Minimal Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2012-06-01

    This thesis presents an overview of some approaches to compute Gaussian and mean curvature on discrete surfaces and discusses discrete minimal surfaces. The variety of applications of differential geometry in visualization and shape design leads to great interest in studying discrete surfaces. With the rich smooth surface theory in hand, one would hope that this elegant theory can still be applied to the discrete counter part. Such a generalization, however, is not always successful. While discrete surfaces have the advantage of being finite dimensional, thus easier to treat, their geometric properties such as curvatures are not well defined in the classical sense. Furthermore, the powerful calculus tool can hardly be applied. The methods in this thesis, including angular defect formula, cotangent formula, parallel meshes, relative geometry etc. are approaches based on offset meshes or generalized offset meshes. As an important application, we discuss discrete minimal surfaces and discrete Koenigs meshes.

  3. Harmonic curvatures and generalized helices in En

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camci, Cetin; Ilarslan, Kazim; Kula, Levent; Hacisalihoglu, H. Hilmi

    2009-01-01

    In n-dimensional Euclidean space E n , harmonic curvatures of a non-degenerate curve defined by Ozdamar and Hacisalihoglu [Ozdamar E, Hacisalihoglu HH. A characterization of Inclined curves in Euclidean n-space. Comm Fac Sci Univ Ankara, Ser A1 1975;24:15-23]. In this paper, we give some characterizations for a non-degenerate curve α to be a generalized helix by using its harmonic curvatures. Also we define the generalized Darboux vector D of a non-degenerate curve α in n-dimensional Euclidean space E n and we show that the generalized Darboux vector D lies in the kernel of Frenet matrix M(s) if and only if the curve α is a generalized helix in the sense of Hayden.

  4. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Curvature collineations for the curvature tensor, constructed from a fundamental Bianchi Type-V metric, are studied. We are concerned with a symmetry property of space-time which is called curvature collineation, and we briefly discuss the physical and kinematical properties of the models.

  5. On hypersurfaces with two distinct principal curvatures in space forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the immersed hypersurfaces in space forms Nn+1(c), n ≥4 with two distinct non-simple principal curvatures without the assumption that the (high order) mean curvature is constant. We prove that any immersed hypersurface in space forms with two distinct non-simple principal curvatures is locally ...

  6. Correlations between gravitropic curvature and auxin movement across gravistimulated roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.; Hertel, R.

    1990-01-01

    We compared the kinetics of auxin redistribution across the caps of primary roots of 2-day-old maize (Zea mays, cv Merit) seedlings with the time course of gravitropic curvature. [3H] indoleacetic acid was applied to one side of the cap in an agar donor and radioactivity moving across the cap was collected in an agar receiver applied to the opposite side. Upon gravistimulation the roots first curved upward slightly, then returned to the horizontal and began curving downward, reaching a final angle of about 67 degrees. Movement of label across the caps of gravistimulated roots was asymmetric with preferential downward movement (ratio downward/upward = ca. 1.6, radioactivity collected during the 90 min following beginning of gravistimulation). There was a close correlation between the development of asymmetric auxin movement across the root cap and the rate of curvature, with both values increasing to a maximum and then declining as the roots approached the final angle of curvature. In roots preadapted to gravity (alternate brief stimulation on opposite flanks over a period of 1 hour) the initial phase of upward curvature was eliminated and downward bending began earlier than for controls. The correlation between asymmetric auxin movement and the kinetics of curvature also held in comparisons between control and preadapted roots. Both downward auxin transport asymmetry and downward curvature occurred earlier in preadapted roots than in controls. These findings are consistent with suggestions that the root cap is not only the site of perception but also the location of the initial redistribution of effectors that ultimately leads to curvature.

  7. FBAR syndapin 1 recognizes and stabilizes highly curved tubular membranes in a concentration dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Pradeep; Baroji, Younes F.; Seyyed Reihani, Seyyed Nader

    2013-01-01

    brain lipid vesicles and show that it senses membrane curvature at low density whereas it induces and reinforces tube stiffness at higher density. FBAR strongly up-concentrates on the high curvature tubes pulled out of Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs), this sorting behavior is strongly amplified...... at low protein densities. Interestingly, FBAR from syndapin 1 has a large affinity for tubular membranes with curvatures larger than its own intrinsic concave curvature. Finally, we studied the effect of FBAR on membrane relaxation kinetics with high temporal resolution and found that the protein...... increases relaxation time of the tube holding force in a density-dependent fashion....

  8. Generating the primordial curvature perturbation from inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Lyth, David H.

    2002-01-01

    The scale--independence of the primordial curvature perturbation suggests that it comes from the vacuum fluctuation during inflation of a light scalar field. This field may be the inflaton, or a different `curvaton' field. The observation of primordial non--gaussianity would be a smoking gun for the curvaton model, while the observation of gravitational waves originating during slow--roll inflation would rule out the model.

  9. Gravitational curvature an introduction to Einstein's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Frankel, Theodore Thomas

    1979-01-01

    This classic text and reference monograph applies modern differential geometry to general relativity. A brief mathematical introduction to gravitational curvature, it emphasizes the subject's geometric essence, replacing the often-tedious analytical computations with geometric arguments. Clearly presented and physically motivated derivations express the deflection of light, Schwarzchild's exterior and interior solutions, and the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. A perfect choice for advanced students of mathematics, this volume will also appeal to mathematicians interested in physics. It stresses

  10. Mixed 3-Sasakian structures and curvature

    OpenAIRE

    Caldarella, Angelo V.; Pastore, Anna Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we deal with two classes of mixed metric 3-structures, namely the mixed 3-Sasakian structures and the mixed metric 3-contact structures. Firstly we study some properties of the curvature of mixed 3-Sasakian structures, proving that any manifold endowed with such a structure is Einstein. Then we prove the identity between the class of mixed 3-Sasakian structures and the class of mixed metric 3-contact structures.

  11. Preparation of uniform starch microcapsules by premix membrane emulsion for controlled release of avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Liu, Baoxia; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xing; Shen, Hong; Wu, Decheng

    2016-01-20

    In recent years, starch microparticles have gained interest in many fields. However, low production, uncontrollable size, and varying size distribution hinder their practical application. Here, we adopt a premix membrane emulsification (PME) method to prepare starch microcapsules at high production rates. The process conditions were optimized to fabricate uniform microcapsules with controllable sizes and narrow size distribution (PDImicrocapsules in situ during the process, we developed a pesticide delivery system that enabled a controlled and consistent release of Av over a period of 2 weeks. Kinetic analysis indicated that the mechanisms of Av release involved non-Fickian and Case-II transport. The diameters (0.70-4.8 μm) of the microcapsules and Av contents (16-47%) were adjusted to achieve suitable release profiles. The results will lay the foundation for further field experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  13. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo,, E-mail: wibowo-uns@yahoo.com; Zakaria,, E-mail: zakaaria27@gmail.com; Lambang, Lullus, E-mail: lulus-l@yahoo.com; Triyono,, E-mail: tyon-bila@yahoo.co.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57128 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  14. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo,; Zakaria,; Lambang, Lullus; Triyono,; Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  15. Inflationary scenario from higher curvature warped spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Narayan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Department of Physical Sciences, Nadia, West Bengal (India); Paul, Tanmoy [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-10-15

    We consider a five dimensional warped spacetime, in presence of the higher curvature term like F(R) = R + αR{sup 2} in the bulk, in the context of the two-brane model. Our universe is identified with the TeV scale brane and emerges as a four dimensional effective theory. From the perspective of this effective theory, we examine the possibility of ''inflationary scenario'' by considering the on-brane metric ansatz as an FRW one. Our results reveal that the higher curvature term in the five dimensional bulk spacetime generates a potential term for the radion field. Due to the presence of radion potential, the very early universe undergoes a stage of accelerated expansion and, moreover, the accelerating period of the universe terminates in a finite time. We also find the spectral index of curvature perturbation (n{sub s}) and the tensor to scalar ratio (r) in the present context, which match with the observational results based on the observations of Planck (Astron. Astrophys. 594, A20, 2016). (orig.)

  16. A curvature theory for discrete surfaces based on mesh parallelity

    KAUST Repository

    Bobenko, Alexander Ivanovich

    2009-12-18

    We consider a general theory of curvatures of discrete surfaces equipped with edgewise parallel Gauss images, and where mean and Gaussian curvatures of faces are derived from the faces\\' areas and mixed areas. Remarkably these notions are capable of unifying notable previously defined classes of surfaces, such as discrete isothermic minimal surfaces and surfaces of constant mean curvature. We discuss various types of natural Gauss images, the existence of principal curvatures, constant curvature surfaces, Christoffel duality, Koenigs nets, contact element nets, s-isothermic nets, and interesting special cases such as discrete Delaunay surfaces derived from elliptic billiards. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Distributed mean curvature on a discrete manifold for Regge calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conboye, Rory; Miller, Warner A; Ray, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The integrated mean curvature of a simplicial manifold is well understood in both Regge Calculus and Discrete Differential Geometry. However, a well motivated pointwise definition of curvature requires a careful choice of the volume over which to uniformly distribute the local integrated curvature. We show that hybrid cells formed using both the simplicial lattice and its circumcentric dual emerge as a remarkably natural structure for the distribution of this local integrated curvature. These hybrid cells form a complete tessellation of the simplicial manifold, contain a geometric orthonormal basis, and are also shown to give a pointwise mean curvature with a natural interpretation as the fractional rate of change of the normal vector. (paper)

  18. Free-streaming radiation in cosmological models with spatial curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of spatial curvature on radiation anisotropy are examined for the standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model universes. The effect of curvature is found to be very important when considering fluctuations with wavelengths comparable to the horizon. It is concluded that the behavior of radiation fluctuations in models with spatial curvature is quite different from that in spatially flat models, and that models with negative curvature are most strikingly different. It is therefore necessary to take the curvature into account in careful studies of the anisotropy of the microwave background.

  19. System identification and robust control of a portable proton exchange membrane full-cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Yang, Yee-Pien; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Tsung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Hsin-Ping [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), Armaments Bureau, M.N.D (Taiwan)

    2007-02-10

    This paper will discuss the application of system identification techniques and robust control strategies to a proton exchange membrane fuel-cell system. The fuel-cell system's dynamic behaviour is influenced by many factors, such as the reaction mechanism, pressure, flow-rate, composition and temperature change, and is inherently non-linear and time varying. From a system point of view, however, the system can be modelled as a two-input, two-output linear time-invariant system whose inputs are hydrogen and air flow rates, and whose outputs are cell voltage and current. On the other hand, the system's non-linearities and time-varying characteristics can be regarded as system uncertainties and disturbances that are treated by the designed robust controllers. This paper is comprised of three parts. First, system identification techniques were adopted to model the system's transfer functions. Second, the H{sub {infinity}} robust control strategies were applied to stabilise the system. Finally, the system's stability and performance were compromised by introducing weighting functions to the controller's design. From the experimental results, the designed H{sub {infinity}} robust controllers were deemed effective. (author)

  20. Application of DBNPA dosage for biofouling control in spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber

    2017-05-30

    Biocides may be used to control biofouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biocide 2,2-dibromo-3-ni-trilopropionamide (DBNPA) dosage on biofouling control. Preventive biofouling control was studied applying a continuous dosage of substrate (0.5 mg/L) and DBNPA (1 mg/L). Curative biofouling control was studied on pre-grown biofilms, once again applying a continuous dosage of substrate (0.5 mg acetate C/L) and DBNPA (1 and 20 mg/L). Biofouling studies were performed in membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) supplied with biodegradable substrate and DBNPA. The pressure drop was monitored in time and at the end of the study, the accumulated biomass in MFS was quantified by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Continuous dosage of DBNPA (1 mg/L) prevented pressure drop increase and biofilm accumulation in the MFSs during a run time of 7 d, showing that biofouling can be managed by preventive DBNPA dosage. For biofouled systems, continuous dosage of DBNPA (1 and 20 mg/L) inactivated the accumulated biomass but did not restore the original pressure drop and did not remove the accumulated inactive cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), indicating DBNPA dosage is not suitable for curative biofouling control.

  1. Src- and Fyn-dependent apical membrane trafficking events control endothelial lumen formation during vascular tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Joong; Norden, Pieter R; Salvador, Jocelynda; Barry, David M; Bowers, Stephanie L K; Cleaver, Ondine; Davis, George E

    2017-01-01

    Here we examine the question of how endothelial cells (ECs) develop their apical membrane surface domain during lumen and tube formation. We demonstrate marked apical membrane targeting of activated Src kinases to this apical domain during early and late stages of this process. Immunostaining for phosphotyrosine or phospho-Src reveals apical membrane staining in intracellular vacuoles initially. This is then followed by vacuole to vacuole fusion events to generate an apical luminal membrane, which is similarly decorated with activated phospho-Src kinases. Functional blockade of Src kinases completely blocks EC lumen and tube formation, whether this occurs during vasculogenic tube assembly or angiogenic sprouting events. Multiple Src kinases participate in this apical membrane formation process and siRNA suppression of Src, Fyn and Yes, but not Lyn, blocks EC lumen formation. We also demonstrate strong apical targeting of Src-GFP and Fyn-GFP fusion proteins and increasing their expression enhances lumen formation. Finally, we show that Src- and Fyn-associated vacuoles track and fuse along a subapically polarized microtubule cytoskeleton, which is highly acetylated. These vacuoles generate the apical luminal membrane in a stereotypically polarized, perinuclear position. Overall, our study identifies a critical role for Src kinases in creating and decorating the EC apical membrane surface during early and late stages of lumen and tube formation, a central event in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis.

  2. Src- and Fyn-dependent apical membrane trafficking events control endothelial lumen formation during vascular tube morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Joong Kim

    Full Text Available Here we examine the question of how endothelial cells (ECs develop their apical membrane surface domain during lumen and tube formation. We demonstrate marked apical membrane targeting of activated Src kinases to this apical domain during early and late stages of this process. Immunostaining for phosphotyrosine or phospho-Src reveals apical membrane staining in intracellular vacuoles initially. This is then followed by vacuole to vacuole fusion events to generate an apical luminal membrane, which is similarly decorated with activated phospho-Src kinases. Functional blockade of Src kinases completely blocks EC lumen and tube formation, whether this occurs during vasculogenic tube assembly or angiogenic sprouting events. Multiple Src kinases participate in this apical membrane formation process and siRNA suppression of Src, Fyn and Yes, but not Lyn, blocks EC lumen formation. We also demonstrate strong apical targeting of Src-GFP and Fyn-GFP fusion proteins and increasing their expression enhances lumen formation. Finally, we show that Src- and Fyn-associated vacuoles track and fuse along a subapically polarized microtubule cytoskeleton, which is highly acetylated. These vacuoles generate the apical luminal membrane in a stereotypically polarized, perinuclear position. Overall, our study identifies a critical role for Src kinases in creating and decorating the EC apical membrane surface during early and late stages of lumen and tube formation, a central event in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis.

  3. Surfactant-controlled etching of ion track nanopores and its practical applications in membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Mamonova, T.I.; Orelovitch, O.L.; Sartowska, B.; Yamauchi, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion tracks in polymers has been studied. It has been shown that surface-active agents added to an alkaline etching solution adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entrances. This reduces the etch rate, which leads to the formation of pores tapered toward the surface. Self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the pore entrance creates a barrier for their penetration into the etched-out nanopores, whereas hydroxide ions diffuse freely. Due to this, the internal pore volume grows faster than the pore surface diameter. The ability to control pore shape is demonstrated with the fabrication of profiled nano- and micropores in polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate. Some earlier published data on small track-etched pores in polycarbonate (in particular, the pore diameter vs. etching time curves measured conductometrically) have been revised in light of the above findings. Adding surfactants to chemical etchants makes it possible to optimize the structure of track membranes, thus improving their retention and permeation properties. Asymmetric membranes with thin skin retention layers have been produced and their performance studied

  4. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1981-04-06

    In this paper, the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from bovine brain is shown to be controlled by electrostatic alterations of the charged lipids surrounding the enzyme. The properties under investigation are the enzymatic activity, activation energy and the response of the enzymatic system to temperature. Arrhenius plots of the ATPase activity are biphasic with a break at temperature Ti. The temperature Ti, the activation energies at temperatures above and below Ti, and the enzymatic activity at any constant temperature have been shown to depend upon the concentrations of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in the solution. These electrolyte dependencies are ascribed to changes of electrostatic conditions at the lipids surrounding the ATPase. If the higher electrostatic screening ability of divalent ions is taken into account, the results in the presence of mono- and divalent ions become virtually the same. As a result of this work, it is concluded that electrostatic alterations are transmitted to the ATPase from the lipids of the membrane in which the enzyme is embedded. Inhibition and activation of the enzyme by mono-and divalent metal ions may thus be explained without any auxiliary hypothesis, particularly without postulating specific binding sites for the different ionic species at the protein. In addition, the specific lipid requirement of the ATPase may be understood better in the light of this interpretation.

  5. Protein kinase Gin4 negatively regulates flippase function and controls plasma membrane asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Françoise M.; Su, Brooke M.; von Wulffen, Joachim; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Sartorel, Elodie; Trott, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane function requires distinct leaflet lipid compositions. Two of the P-type ATPases (flippases) in yeast, Dnf1 and Dnf2, translocate aminoglycerophospholipids from the outer to the inner leaflet, stimulated via phosphorylation by cortically localized protein kinase Fpk1. By monitoring Fpk1 activity in vivo, we found that Fpk1 was hyperactive in cells lacking Gin4, a protein kinase previously implicated in septin collar assembly. Gin4 colocalized with Fpk1 at the cortical site of future bud emergence and phosphorylated Fpk1 at multiple sites, which we mapped. As judged by biochemical and phenotypic criteria, a mutant (Fpk111A), in which 11 sites were mutated to Ala, was hyperactive, causing increased inward transport of phosphatidylethanolamine. Thus, Gin4 is a negative regulator of Fpk1 and therefore an indirect negative regulator of flippase function. Moreover, we found that decreasing flippase function rescued the growth deficiency of four different cytokinesis mutants, which suggests that the primary function of Gin4 is highly localized control of membrane lipid asymmetry and is necessary for optimal cytokinesis. PMID:25646086

  6. Surfactant-controlled etching of ion track nanopores and its practical applications in membrane technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, P.Yu. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: apel@nrmail.jinr.ru; Blonskaya, I.V.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Mamonova, T.I.; Orelovitch, O.L. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sartowska, B. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna Street 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Yamauchi, Yu. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2008-08-15

    The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion tracks in polymers has been studied. It has been shown that surface-active agents added to an alkaline etching solution adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entrances. This reduces the etch rate, which leads to the formation of pores tapered toward the surface. Self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the pore entrance creates a barrier for their penetration into the etched-out nanopores, whereas hydroxide ions diffuse freely. Due to this, the internal pore volume grows faster than the pore surface diameter. The ability to control pore shape is demonstrated with the fabrication of profiled nano- and micropores in polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate. Some earlier published data on small track-etched pores in polycarbonate (in particular, the pore diameter vs. etching time curves measured conductometrically) have been revised in light of the above findings. Adding surfactants to chemical etchants makes it possible to optimize the structure of track membranes, thus improving their retention and permeation properties. Asymmetric membranes with thin skin retention layers have been produced and their performance studied.

  7. Continued Advancement of Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Extravehicular Activity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David T.; Gleason, Kevin J.; Engel, Jeffrey R.; Cowley, Scott W.; Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    The Development of a new, robust, portable life support system (PLSS) is currently a high NASA priority in order to support longer and safer extravehicular activity (EVA) missions that will be necessary as space travel extends to near-Earth asteroids and eventually Mars. One of the critical PLSS functions is maintaining the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the suit at acceptable levels. The Metal Oxide (MetOx) canister has a finite CO2 adsorption capacity and therefore in order to extend mission times, the unit would have to be larger and heavier, which is undesirable; therefore new CO2 control technologies must be developed. While recent work has centered on the use of alternating sorbent beds that can be regenerated during the EVA, this strategy increases the system complexity and power consumption. A simpler approach is to use a membrane that vents CO2 to space but retains oxygen(O2). A membrane has many advantages over current technology: it is a continuous system with no theoretical capacity limit, it requires no consumables, and it requires no hardware for switching beds between absorption and regeneration. Conventional gas separation membranes do not have adequate selectivity for use in the PLSS, but the required performance could be obtained with a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which consists of a microporous film filled with a liquid that selectively reacts with CO2 over oxygen (O2). In a recently completed Phase II Small Business Innovative Research project, Reaction Systems developed a new reactive liquid that has effectively zero vapor pressure, making it an ideal candidate for use in an SLM. Results obtained with the SLM in a flat sheet configuration with representative pressures of CO2, O2, and water (H2O) have shown that the CO2 permeation rate and CO2/O2 selectivity requirements have been met. In addition, the SLM vents moisture to space very effectively. The SLM has also been prepared and tested in a hollow fiber form, which will be

  8. Controlling the porosity of a polyethersulfone membrane surface with an XeCl laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazokian, Hedieh; Mehrabadi, Adeleh H P; Mollabashi, Mahmoud; Barzin, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Pure and polyvinyl pyrrolidone blend polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were irradiated by an XeCl laser with various numbers of pulses at different fluences to investigate the changes in the surface morphology and the porosity. The results show that the membrane pore size and distribution on the surface can be modified following irradiation dependent on the laser fluence, the number of pulses and the membrane composition. These changes are very attractive for improving the membrane surface in filtration processes and biological applications. (paper)

  9. How curved membranes recruit amphipathic helices and protein anchoring motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Larsen, Jannik

    2009-01-01

    Lipids and several specialized proteins are thought to be able to sense the curvature of membranes (MC). Here we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure curvature-selective binding of amphipathic motifs on single liposomes 50-700 nm in diameter. Our results revealed that sensing...

  10. Analysis of interfacial curvature during drainage and imbibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Porter, M. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent synchrotron-based tomographic data sets of oil-water drainage and imbibition scenarios have been analyzed to quantify phase saturations, interfacial curvature, and separate connected from disconnected fluid phases. This allows us to follow the drainage and imbibition processes in great detail, assess equilibrium states, and understand the effects of fluid phase disconnection and re-connection on the resulting capillary pressures and interfacial curvatures. This analysis also allows for estimating capillary pressure (Pc) based on calculated curvatures and comparison to Pc measured externally with a transducer. Results indicate good agreement between curvature-based and transducer-based measurements when the connected phase interfaces are considered. Curvature measurements show a strong dependence on whether an interface is formed by connected or disconnected phases. Assuming that at equilibrium curvature is constant, curvature differences between the connected and disconnected phase interfaces can be used as a metric to asses equilibrium. Over longer equilibration, the average curvature value, for all interfaces, approaches the average curvature value predicted by the pressure transducer. Overall, the results indicate good agreement between curvature -based and transducer-based Pc measurements and allow for a detailed assessment of interfacial curvature during drainage and imbibition.

  11. Regulated membrane remodeling by Mic60 controls formation of mitochondrial crista junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessenberger, Manuel; Zerbes, Ralf M; Rampelt, Heike; Kunz, Séverine; Xavier, Audrey H; Purfürst, Bettina; Lilie, Hauke; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Daumke, Oliver

    2017-05-31

    The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is crucial for the formation of crista junctions and mitochondrial inner membrane architecture. MICOS contains two core components. Mic10 shows membrane-bending activity, whereas Mic60 (mitofilin) forms contact sites between inner and outer membranes. Here we report that Mic60 deforms liposomes into thin membrane tubules and thus displays membrane-shaping activity. We identify a membrane-binding site in the soluble intermembrane space-exposed part of Mic60. This membrane-binding site is formed by a predicted amphipathic helix between the conserved coiled-coil and mitofilin domains. The mitofilin domain negatively regulates the membrane-shaping activity of Mic60. Binding of Mic19 to the mitofilin domain modulates this activity. Membrane binding and shaping by the conserved Mic60-Mic19 complex is crucial for crista junction formation, mitochondrial membrane architecture and efficient respiratory activity. Mic60 thus plays a dual role by shaping inner membrane crista junctions and forming contact sites with the outer membrane.

  12. A Coincidence Detection Mechanism Controls PX-BAR Domain-Mediated Endocytic Membrane Remodeling via an Allosteric Structural Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wen-Ting; Vujičić Žagar, Andreja; Gerth, Fabian; Lehmann, Martin; Puchkov, Dymtro; Krylova, Oxana; Freund, Christian; Scapozza, Leonardo; Vadas, Oscar; Haucke, Volker

    2017-11-20

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis occurs by bending and remodeling of the membrane underneath the coat. Bin-amphiphysin-rvs (BAR) domain proteins are crucial for endocytic membrane remodeling, but how their activity is spatiotemporally controlled is largely unknown. We demonstrate that the membrane remodeling activity of sorting nexin 9 (SNX9), a late-acting endocytic PX-BAR domain protein required for constriction of U-shaped endocytic intermediates, is controlled by an allosteric structural switch involving coincident detection of the clathrin adaptor AP2 and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P 2 ) at endocytic sites. Structural, biochemical, and cell biological data show that SNX9 is autoinhibited in solution. Binding to PI(3,4)P 2 via its PX-BAR domain, and concomitant association with AP2 via sequences in the linker region, releases SNX9 autoinhibitory contacts to enable membrane constriction. Our results reveal a mechanism for restricting the latent membrane remodeling activity of BAR domain proteins to allow spatiotemporal coupling of membrane constriction to the progression of the endocytic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of fault tolerant control strategies applied to proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijoux, Etienne; Steiner, Nadia Yousfi; Benne, Michel; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Pérez, Brigitte Grondin

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cells are powerful systems for power generation. They have a good efficiency and do not generate greenhouse gases. This technology involves a lot of scientific fields, which leads to the appearance of strongly inter-dependent parameters. This makes the system particularly hard to control and increases fault's occurrence frequency. These two issues call for the necessity to maintain the system performance at the expected level, even in faulty operating conditions. It is called "fault tolerant control" (FTC). The present paper aims to give the state of the art of FTC applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The FTC approach is composed of two parts. First, a diagnosis part allows the identification and the isolation of a fault; it requires a good a priori knowledge of all the possible faults. Then, a control part allows an optimal control strategy to find the best operating point to recover/mitigate the fault; it requires the knowledge of the degradation phenomena and their mitigation strategies.

  14. Ocular dimensions, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature in quarter horses with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badial, Peres R; Cisneros-Àlvarez, Luis Emiliano; Brandão, Cláudia Valéria S; Ranzani, José Joaquim T; Tomaz, Mayana A R V; Machado, Vania M; Borges, Alexandre S

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ocular dimensions, corneal curvature, and corneal thickness between horses affected with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) and unaffected horses. Five HERDA-affected quarter horses and five healthy control quarter horses were used. Schirmer's tear test, tonometry, and corneal diameter measurements were performed in both eyes of all horses prior to ophthalmologic examinations. Ultrasonic pachymetry was performed to measure the central, temporal, nasal, dorsal, and ventral corneal thicknesses in all horses. B-mode ultrasound scanning was performed on both eyes of each horse to determine the dimensions of the ocular structures and to calculate the corneal curvature. Each corneal region examined in this study was thinner in the affected group compared with the healthy control group. However, significant differences in corneal thickness were only observed for the central and dorsal regions. HERDA-affected horses exhibited significant increases in corneal curvature and corneal diameter compared with unaffected animals. The ophthalmologic examinations revealed mild corneal opacity in one eye of one affected horse and in both eyes of three affected horses. No significant between-group differences were observed for Schirmer's tear test, intraocular pressure, or ocular dimensions. Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia-affected horses exhibit decreased corneal thickness in several regions of the cornea, increased corneal curvature, increased corneal diameter, and mild corneal opacity. Additional research is required to determine whether the increased corneal curvature significantly impacts the visual accuracy of horses with HERDA. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  15. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350 W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a control strategy for controlling the methanol reformer temperature of a 350 W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system, by using a cascade control structure for reliable system operation. The primary states affecting the methanol catalyst bed temperature...... is the water and methanol mixture fuel flow and the burner fuel/air ratio and combined flow. An experimental setup is presented capable of testing the methanol reformer used in the Serenergy H3 350 Mobile Battery Charger; a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell system....... The experimental system consists of a fuel evaporator utilizing the high temperature waste gas from the cathode air cooled 45 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack. The fuel cells used are BASF P1000 MEAs which use phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. The resulting reformate gas output of the reformer system...

  16. Evaluation of Miniaturized Infrared Sensors for Process Control of the Palladium Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascola, R. J.; Howard, D. W.

    2005-07-31

    We have tested the suitability of a miniaturized infrared sensor for measurements of CO and H{sub 2}O in the inlet stream to the Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR). We demonstrated that both analytes can be measured with absolute accuracies of 2-4% at the process inlet conditions of 120-140 C and approximately 1 atm of each gas. This accuracy must be improved to 1-1.5% for effective PMR process control. The use of a reference detector and independent temperature and pressure measurements to correct the raw signals will improve the accuracy to a level that will approach, if not meet, this goal. With appropriate bandpass filters, the infrared sensors may be used for other gas analysis applications.

  17. Constraining inverse-curvature gravity with supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, José; Weller, Jochen

    2006-02-03

    We show that models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature, can explain the current accelerated expansion of the Universe without resorting to dark energy and without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedmann equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe and performed a detailed analysis of supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. If we further include constraints on the current expansion of the Universe and on its age, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07baryonic matter component.

  18. Curvature, zero modes and quantum statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y EstadIstica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain); Aldaya, V [Instituto de AstrofIsica de AndalucIa, Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)

    2006-08-18

    We explore an intriguing connection between the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and the thermal baths obtained from a vacuum radiation of coherent states of zero modes in a second quantized (many-particle) theory on the compact O(3) and noncompact O(2, 1) isometry subgroups of the de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spaces, respectively. The high frequency limit is retrieved as a (zero-curvature) group contraction to the Newton-Hooke (harmonic oscillator) group. We also make some comments on the vacuum energy density and the cosmological constant problem. (letter to the editor)

  19. Lecture Notes on Mean Curvature Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mantegazza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the subject of mean curvature flow of hypersurfaces with special emphasis on the analysis of singularities. This flow occurs in the description of the evolution of numerous physical models where the energy is given by the area of the interfaces. These notes provide a detailed discussion of the classical parametric approach (mainly developed by R. Hamilton and G. Huisken). They are well suited for a course at PhD/PostDoc level and can be useful for any researcher interested in a solid introduction to the technical issues of the field. All the proofs are carefully

  20. Spacetime Curvature and Higgs Stability after Inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranen, M; Markkanen, T; Nurmi, S; Rajantie, A

    2015-12-11

    We investigate the dynamics of the Higgs field at the end of inflation in the minimal scenario consisting of an inflaton field coupled to the standard model only through the nonminimal gravitational coupling ξ of the Higgs field. Such a coupling is required by renormalization of the standard model in curved space, and in the current scenario also by vacuum stability during high-scale inflation. We find that for ξ≳1, rapidly changing spacetime curvature at the end of inflation leads to significant production of Higgs particles, potentially triggering a transition to a negative-energy Planck scale vacuum state and causing an immediate collapse of the Universe.

  1. Hemocompatible control of sulfobetaine-grafted polypropylene fibrous membranes in human whole blood via plasma-induced surface zwitterionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Han; Chang, Yung; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Wei, Ta-Chin; Higuchi, Akon; Ho, Feng-Ming; Tsou, Chia-Chun; Ho, Hsin-Tsung; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2012-12-21

    In this work, the hemocompatibility of zwitterionic polypropylene (PP) fibrous membranes with varying grafting coverage of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) via plasma-induced surface polymerization was studied. Charge neutrality of PSBMA-grafted layers on PP membrane surfaces was controlled by the low-pressure and atmospheric plasma treatment in this study. The effects of grafting composition, surface hydrophilicity, and hydration capability on blood compatibility of the membranes were determined. Protein adsorption onto the different PSBMA-grafted PP membranes from human fibrinogen solutions was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibodies. Blood platelet adhesion and plasma clotting time measurements from a recalcified platelet-rich plasma solution were used to determine if platelet activation depends on the charge bias of the grafted PSBMA layer. The charge bias of PSBMA layer deviated from the electrical balance of positively and negatively charged moieties can be well-controlled via atmospheric plasma-induced interfacial zwitterionization and was further tested with human whole blood. The optimized PSBMA surface graft layer in overall charge neutrality has a high hydration capability and keeps its original blood-inert property of antifouling, anticoagulant, and antithrmbogenic activities when it comes into contact with human blood. This work suggests that the hemocompatible nature of grafted PSBMA polymers by controlling grafting quality via atmospheric plasma treatment gives a great potential in the surface zwitterionization of hydrophobic membranes for use in human whole blood.

  2. Low power proton exchange membrane fuel cell system identification and adaptive control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yee-Pien; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Ma, Ying-Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Hsin-Ping; Weng, Biing-Jyh [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), Armaments Bureau, M.N.D. (Taiwan)

    2007-02-10

    This paper proposes a systematic method of system identification and control of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. This fuel cell can be used for low-power communication devices involving complex electrochemical reactions of nonlinear and time-varying dynamic properties. From a system point of view, the dynamic model of PEM fuel cell is reduced to a configuration of two inputs, hydrogen and air flow rates, and two outputs, cell voltage and current. The corresponding transfer functions describe linearized subsystem dynamics with finite orders and time-varying parameters, which are expressed as discrete-time auto-regression moving-average with auxiliary input models for system identification by the recursive least square algorithm. In the experiments, a pseudo-random binary sequence of hydrogen or air flow rate is fed to a single fuel cell device to excite its dynamics. By measuring the corresponding output signals, each subsystem transfer function of reduced order is identified, while the unmodeled, higher-order dynamics and disturbances are described by the auxiliary input term. This provides a basis of adaptive control strategy to improve the fuel cell performance in terms of efficiency, as well as transient and steady state specifications. Simulation shows that adaptive controller is robust to the variation of fuel cell system dynamics, and it has proved promising from the experimental results. (author)

  3. Tendon-Sheath Mechanisms in Flexible Membrane Wing Mini-UAVs: Control and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegoeh Tjahjowidodo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible membrane wings (FMWs are known for two inherent advantages, that is, adaptability to gusty airflow as the wings can flex according to the gust load to reduce the effective angle of attack and the ability to be folded for compact storage purposes. However, the maneuverability of UAV with FMWs is rather limited as it is impossible to install conventional ailerons. The maneuver relies only on the rudders. Some applications utilize torque rods to warp the wings, but this approach makes the FMW become unfoldable. In this research, we proposed the application of a tendon-sheath mechanism to manipulate the wing shape of UAV. Tendon-sheath mechanism is relatively flexible; thus, it can also be folded together with the wings. However, its severe nonlinearity in its dynamics makes the wing warping difficult to control. To compensate for the nonlinearity, a dedicated adaptive controller is designed and implemented. The proposed approach is validated experimentally in a wind tunnel facility with imitated gusty condition and subsequently tested in a real flight condition. The results demonstrate a stable and robust wing warping actuation, while the adaptive washout capability is also validated. Accurate wing warping is achieved and the UAV is easily controlled in a real flight test.

  4. Removal versus retention of cerclage in preterm premature rupture of membranes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyean, Anna; Garite, Thomas J; Maurel, Kimberly; Abril, Diana; Adair, Charles D; Browne, Paul; Combs, C Andrew; How, Helen; Iriye, Brian K; Kominiarek, Michelle; Lu, George; Luthy, David; Miller, Hugh; Nageotte, Michael; Ozcan, Tulin; Porto, Manuel; Ramirez, Mildred; Sawai, Shirley; Sorokin, Yoram

    2014-10-01

    The decision of whether to retain or remove a previously placed cervical cerclage in women who subsequently rupture fetal membranes in a premature gestation is controversial and all studies to date are retrospective. We performed a multicenter randomized controlled trial of removal vs retention of cerclage in these patients to determine whether leaving the cerclage in place prolonged gestation and/or increased the risk of maternal or fetal infection. A prospective randomized multicenter trial of 27 hospitals was performed. Patients included were those with cerclage placement at ≤23 weeks 6 days in singleton or twin pregnancies, with subsequent spontaneous rupture of membranes between 22 weeks 0 days and 32 weeks 6 days. Patients were randomized to retention or removal of cerclage. Patients were then expectantly managed and delivered only for evidence of labor, chorioamnionitis, fetal distress, or other medical or obstetrical indications. Management after 34 weeks was at the clinician's discretion. The initial sample size calculation determined that a total of 142 patients should be included but after a second interim analysis, futility calculations determined that the conditional power for showing statistical significance after randomizing 142 patients for the primary outcome of prolonging pregnancy was 22.8%. Thus the study was terminated after a total of 56 subjects were randomized with complete data available for analysis, 32 to removal and 24 to retention of cerclage. There was no statistical significance in primary outcome of prolonging pregnancy by 1 week comparing the 2 groups (removal 18/32, 56.3%; retention 11/24, 45.8%) P = .59; or chorioamnionitis (removal 8/32, 25.0%; retention 10/24, 41.7%) P = .25, respectively. There was no statistical difference in composite neonatal outcomes (removal 16/33, 50%; retention 17/30, 56%), fetal/neonatal death (removal 4/33, 12%; retention 5/30, 16%); or gestational age at delivery (removal mean 200 days; retention

  5. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: Flexoelectricity in living membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Alexander G.

    2006-01-01

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications

  6. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: Flexoelectricity in living membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Alexander G. [Biomolecular Layers Department, Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: director@issp.bas.bg

    2006-05-24

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications.

  7. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: flexoelectricity in living membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexander G

    2006-05-24

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications.

  8. Thermal control and performance assessment of a proton exchanger membrane fuel cell generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal control unit along with a smart algorithm is able to limit the fuel cell temperature in a desired range. • Thermal control unit comprises a thermostat, a radiator/fan assembly, a coolant heater, and a convection fan. • The system efficiency is increased with increasing the external load, reaching 46% at 80% load-duty. • The stack coolant inlet temperature is optimized in the range 58–63 °C. - Abstract: An original-designed thermal control scheme that manages the thermal behaviors in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell generator has been proposed. It not only keeps the stack from overheating under extreme high external loads, but also prevents the stack from staying too cold in the cold-start conditions. A thermal control unit (TCU) together with a smart control algorithm is able to limit the fuel cell operation temperature in a desired range. The TCU comprises mainly a thermostat, a radiator, and a heater. It divides the stack coolant into a cooling stream and a heating stream that maintains a pre-set coolant temperature before entering the stack. Parametric studies include the external loads (0 L < 4 kW) and the stack coolant inlet temperature (SCIT = 53, 58, and 63 °C). The dynamics of SCIT under different loads are measured to verify the thermal reliability of the fuel cell generator. Then, examining the effect of SCIT on the system efficiency assesses the performance the fuel cell generator. Finally, an empirical correlation for the system efficiency of the PEM fuel cell generator under different SCITs is presented as a function of the external loads

  9. Curvature-driven stability of defects in nematic textures over spherical disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiuqing; Yao, Zhenwei

    2017-06-01

    Stabilizing defects in liquid-crystal systems is crucial for many physical processes and applications ranging from functionalizing liquid-crystal textures to recently reported command of chaotic behaviors of active matters. In this work, we perform analytical calculations to study the curvature-driven stability mechanism of defects based on the isotropic nematic disk model that is free of any topological constraint. We show that in a growing spherical disk covering a sphere the accumulation of curvature effect can prevent typical +1 and +1/2 defects from forming boojum textures where the defects are repelled to the boundary of the disk. Our calculations reveal that the movement of the equilibrium position of the +1 defect from the boundary to the center of the spherical disk occurs in a very narrow window of the disk area, exhibiting the first-order phase-transition-like behavior. For the pair of +1/2 defects by splitting a +1 defect, we find the curvature-driven alternating repulsive and attractive interactions between the two defects. With the growth of the spherical disk these two defects tend to approach and finally recombine towards a +1 defect texture. The sensitive response of defects to curvature and the curvature-driven stability mechanism demonstrated in this work in nematic disk systems may have implications towards versatile control and engineering of liquid-crystal textures in various applications.

  10. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Miami,1320 Campo Sano Ave, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2017-03-07

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  11. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  12. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B.; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na+, and T-type Ca2+ channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  13. Treatment of Spacecraft Wastewater Using a Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Redox Control Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate design concepts for biological treatment reactors for the purification of spacecraft wastewater prior to reverse osmosis treatment. The motivating factor is that wastewater recovery represents the greatest single potential reduction in the resupply requirements for crewed space missions. Spacecraft wastewater composition was estimated from the characteristics of the three major component streams: urine/flush water, hygiene water, and atmospheric condensate. The key characteristics of composite spacecraft wastewater are a theoretical oxygen demand of 4519 mg/L, of which 65% is nitrogenous oxygen demand, in a volume of 11.5 liter/crew-day. The organic carbon to nitrogen ratio of composite wastewater is 0.86. Urine represents 93% of nitrogen and 49% of the organic carbon in the composite wastestream. Various bioreaction scenarios were evaluated to project stoichiometric oxygen demands and the ability of wastewater carbon to support denitrification. Ammonia nitrification to the nitrite oxidation state reduced the oxygen requirement and enabled wastewater carbon to provide nearly complete denitrification. A conceptual bioreactor design was established using hollow fiber membranes for bubbleless oxygen transfer in a gravity-free environment, in close spatial juxtaposition to a second interspaced hollow fiber array for supplying molecular hydrogen. Highly versatile redox control and an enhanced ability to engineer syntrophic associations are stated advantages. A prototype reactor was constructed using a microporous hollow fiber membrane module for aeration. Maintaining inlet gas pressure within 0.25 psi of the external water pressure resulted in bubble free operation with no water ingress into hollow fiber lumens. Recommendations include the design and operational testing of hollow fiber bioreactors using: 1) Partial nitrification/nitrite predenitrification; 2) Limited aeration for simultaneous nitrification

  14. A novel membrane sensor controls the localization and ArfGEF activity of bacterial RalF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Folly-Klan

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp evades destruction in macrophages by camouflaging in a specialized organelle, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV, where it replicates. The LCV maturates by incorporating ER vesicles, which are diverted by effectors that Lp injects to take control of host cell membrane transport processes. One of these effectors, RalF, recruits the trafficking small GTPase Arf1 to the LCV. LpRalF has a Sec7 domain related to host ArfGEFs, followed by a capping domain that intimately associates with the Sec7 domain to inhibit GEF activity. How RalF is activated to function as a LCV-specific ArfGEF is unknown. We combined the reconstitution of Arf activation on artificial membranes with cellular expression and Lp infection assays, to analyze how auto-inhibition is relieved for LpRalF to function in vivo. We find that membranes activate LpRalF by about 1000 fold, and identify the membrane-binding region as the region that inhibits the Sec7 active site. It is enriched in aromatic and positively charged residues, which establish a membrane sensor to control the GEF activity in accordance with specific lipid environments. A similar mechanism of activation is found in RalF from Rickettsia prowazekii (Rp, with a different aromatic/charged residues ratio that results in divergent membrane preferences. The membrane sensor is the primary determinant of the localization of LpRalF on the LCV, and drives the timing of Arf activation during infection. Finally, we identify a conserved motif in the capping domain, remote from the membrane sensor, which is critical for RalF activity presumably by organizing its active conformation. These data demonstrate that RalF proteins are regulated by a membrane sensor that functions as a binary switch to derepress ArfGEF activity when RalF encounters a favorable lipid environment, thus establishing a regulatory paradigm to ensure that Arf GTPases are efficiently activated at

  15. Membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins studied by EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Jobin; Langen, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    The advancement in site-directed spin labeling of proteins has enabled EPR studies to expand into newer research areas within the umbrella of protein-membrane interactions. Recently, membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins has gained a substantial interest in relation to driving and controlling vital cellular processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, shaping of organelles like endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and mitochondria, intracellular vesicular trafficking, formation of filopedia and multivesicular bodies, mitochondrial fusion and fission, and synaptic vesicle fusion and recycling in neurotransmission. Misregulation in any of these processes due to an aberrant protein (mutation or misfolding) or alteration of lipid metabolism can be detrimental to the cell and cause disease. Dissection of the structural basis of membrane remodeling by proteins is thus quite necessary for an understanding of the underlying mechanisms, but it remains a formidable task due to the difficulties of various common biophysical tools in monitoring the dynamic process of membrane binding and bending by proteins. This is largely since membranes generally complicate protein structure analysis and this problem is amplified for structural analysis in the presence of different types of membrane curvatures. Recent EPR studies on membrane remodeling by proteins show that a significant structural information can be generated to delineate the role of different protein modules, domains and individual amino acids in the generation of membrane curvature. These studies also show how EPR can complement the data obtained by high resolution techniques such as X-ray and NMR. This perspective covers the application of EPR in recent studies for understanding membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins that is useful for researchers interested in using or complimenting EPR to gain better understanding of membrane remodeling. We also discuss how a single

  16. Control of recoil losses in nanomechanical SiN membrane resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrielli, A.; Marconi, L.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Pandraud, G.; Pontin, A.; Prodi, G. A.; Sarro, P. M.; Serra, E.; Bonaldi, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of a recoil damping analysis, we have designed and produced a membrane resonator equipped with a specific on-chip structure working as a "loss shield" for a circular membrane. In this device the vibrations of the membrane, with a quality factor of 107, reach the limit set by the intrinsic dissipation in silicon nitride, for all the modes and regardless of the modal shape, also at low frequency. Guided by our theoretical model of the loss shield, we describe the design rationale of the device, which can be used as effective replacement of commercial membrane resonators in advanced optomechanical setups, also at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Using nanocomposite materials technology to understand and control reverse osmosis membrane compaction

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, Mary Theresa M.

    2010-10-01

    Composite reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were formed by interfacial polymerization of polyamide thin films over pure polysulfone and nanocomposite-polysulfone support membranes. Nanocomposite support membranes were formed from amorphous non-porous silica and crystalline microporous zeolite nanoparticles. For each hand-cast membrane, water flux and NaCl rejection were monitored over time at two different applied pressures. Nanocomposite-polysulfone supported RO membranes generally had higher initial permeability and experienced less flux decline due to compaction than pure polysulfone supported membranes. In addition, observed salt rejection tended to increase as flux declined from compaction. Crosssectional SEM images verified significant reduction in thickness of pure polysulfone supports, whereas nanocomposites better resisted compaction due to enhanced mechanical stability imparted by the nanoparticles. A conceptual model was proposed to explain the mechanistic relationship between support membrane compaction and observed changes in water flux and salt rejection. As the support membrane compacts, skin layer pore constriction increased the effective path length for diffusion through the composite membranes, which reduced both water and salt permeability identically. However, experimental salt permeability tended to decline to a greater extent than water permeability; hence, the observed changes in flux and rejection might also be related to structural changes in the polyamide thin film. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proton conductivity enhancement by nanostructural control of sulphonated poly (ether ether ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Ge, Junjie; Cui, Zhiming; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022, Jilin (China); Zhang, Jiujun [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council of Canada. 4250 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lin, Haidan; Na, Hui [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A series of sulphonated poly (ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) membranes for direct methanol fuel cells are successfully prepared under different humidity degree conditions. These membranes exhibit enhanced proton conductivity at high humidity degree. It is proved that the different proton conductivity is ascribed to the orientation arrangement of sulphonic acid groups, which is caused by environmental water in the preparing process of membranes. A model is established by analyzing the dynamics of membrane formation and proved by Field emission scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). (author)

  19. Cycle-time determination and process control of sequencing batch membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a method to determine the cycle time for sequencing batch membrane bioreactors (SBMBRs) is introduced. One of the advantages of SBMBRs is the simplicity of adapting them to varying wastewater composition. The benefit of this flexibility can only be fully utilised if the cycle times are optimised for the specific inlet load conditions. This requires either proactive and ongoing operator adjustment or active predictive instrument-based control. Determination of the cycle times for conventional sequencing batch reactor (SBR) plants is usually based on experience. Due to the higher mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations in SBMBRs and the limited experience with their application, a new approach to calculate the cycle time had to be developed. Based on results from a semi-technical pilot plant, the paper presents an approach for calculating the cycle time in relation to the influent concentration according to the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 and the German HSG (Hochschulgruppe) Approach. The approach presented in this paper considers the increased solid contents in the reactor and the resultant shortened reaction times. This allows for an exact calculation of the nitrification and denitrification cycles with a tolerance of only a few minutes. Ultimately the same approach can be used for a predictive control strategy and for conventional SBR plants.

  20. Integrated Microfluidic Membrane Transistor Utilizing Chemical Information for On-Chip Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Schreiter, Joerg; Haefner, Sebastian; Paschew, Georgi; Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics is a great enabling technology for biology, biotechnology, chemistry and general life sciences. Despite many promising predictions of its progress, microfluidics has not reached its full potential yet. To unleash this potential, we propose the use of intrinsically active hydrogels, which work as sensors and actuators at the same time, in microfluidic channel networks. These materials transfer a chemical input signal such as a substance concentration into a mechanical output. This way chemical information is processed and analyzed on the spot without the need for an external control unit. Inspired by the development electronics, our approach focuses on the development of single transistor-like components, which have the potential to be used in an integrated circuit technology. Here, we present membrane isolated chemical volume phase transition transistor (MIS-CVPT). The device is characterized in terms of the flow rate from source to drain, depending on the chemical concentration in the control channel, the source-drain pressure drop and the operating temperature. PMID:27571209

  1. FapR: From Control of Membrane Lipid Homeostasis to a Biotechnological Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Albanesi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipids and fatty acids are not only one of the major components of cell membranes but also important metabolic intermediates in bacteria. Since the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway is essential and energetically expensive, organisms have developed a diversity of homeostatic mechanisms to fine-tune the concentration of lipids at particular levels. FapR is the first global regulator of lipid synthesis discovered in bacteria and is largely conserved in Gram-positive organisms including important human pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes. FapR is a transcription factor that negatively controls the expression of several genes of the fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis and was first identified in Bacillus subtilis. This review focuses on the genetic, biochemical and structural advances that led to a detailed understanding of lipid homeostasis control by FapR providing unique opportunities to learn how Gram-positive bacteria monitor the status of fatty acid biosynthesis and adjust the lipid synthesis accordingly. Furthermore, we also cover the potential of the FapR system as a target for new drugs against Gram-positive bacteria as well as its recent biotechnological applications in diverse organisms.

  2. Fuzzy control of the removal of estrogen in a membrane bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio Jose de Sucre (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of))" data-affiliation=" (Universidad Politecnica Salesiana Ecuador (Ecuador), E-mail: lsanchezb@ups.edu.ec); Torres Cruz, Ennodio (Universidad Experimental Politecnica Antonio Jose de Sucre (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of))" >Sanchez Barboza, Leadina

    2017-01-01

    The Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) has recently emerged as an important technology product for the treatment of wastewater containing estrogens and contaminants and is capable of transforming a residual water in a high quality effluent. Because of the recalcitrant nature of both natural and synthetic estrogens, one of the parameters that has been determined as influential to the removal of these substances is the Solids Retention Time (SRT), as this allows more time spent in the biomass in the reactor. The influence of the SRT in estrogen removal was simulated in the MATLAB Fuzzy Logic Toolbox using fuzzy control. For this purpose, the values measured or obtained by experts in laboratory scale experiments were fuzzified, and the fuzzy inference process was made on the basis of the previously designed inference rules. Finally the output is again desfuzzified for crisp value. The designed fuzzy control system produced very good results, with very small percentages of error for most cases, except for the removal of ethinylestradiol (EE2) in the reactor with long SRT. The performance of the simulation allows us to conclude that the Fuzzy Logic Toolbox is a good tool to get close to the results obtained by an actual experimental system. (author) [es

  3. Periodontal status in oral mucous membrane pemphigoid: initial results of a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, P G; Farci, V; D'Aiuto, F; Carcieri, P; Carbone, M; Tanteri, C; Gardino, N; Gandolfo, S; Carrozzo, M; Broccoletti, R

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the periodontal status of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) patients and compare it with that of healthy controls. A prospective study was undertaken to examine the impact of gingival MMP lesions on the human periodontium of 29 patients. Parameters evaluated included full mouth plaque score (FMPS), full mouth bleeding upon probing scores, probing depths (PD), gingival recession, clinical attachment level (CAL), mobility score, furcation involvement, number of missing teeth and Machtei criteria. All periodontal parameters recorded were increased in cases when compared to controls in univariate statistics. The mean differences between groups in PD (0.8±0.2mm, 95% CI 0.3-1.3), CAL (1.3±0.4mm, 95% CI 0.4-2.2), FMPS (41.0±6.2%, 95% CI 28.7-53.4), FMBS (16.2±6.6%, 95% CI 3.0-29.4) and tooth loss (2±1 teeth, 95% CI 1-3) were all statistically significant (Pcontrols due to a substantial difference in oral hygiene. Oral health should be promoted in MMP. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Ricci Curvature on Polyhedral Surfaces via Optimal Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Loisel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correctly defining geometric objects, such as the curvature, is a hard one in discrete geometry. In 2009, Ollivier defined a notion of curvature applicable to a wide category of measured metric spaces, in particular to graphs. He named it coarse Ricci curvature because it coincides, up to some given factor, with the classical Ricci curvature, when the space is a smooth manifold. Lin, Lu and Yau and Jost and Liu have used and extended this notion for graphs, giving estimates for the curvature and, hence, the diameter, in terms of the combinatorics. In this paper, we describe a method for computing the coarse Ricci curvature and give sharper results, in the specific, but crucial case of polyhedral surfaces.

  5. The curvature calculation mechanism based on simple cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyang; Fan, Xingyu; Song, Aiqi

    2017-07-20

    A conclusion has not yet been reached on how exactly the human visual system detects curvature. This paper demonstrates how orientation-selective simple cells can be used to construct curvature-detecting neural units. Through fixed arrangements, multiple plurality cells were constructed to simulate curvature cells with a proportional output to their curvature. In addition, this paper offers a solution to the problem of narrow detection range under fixed resolution by selecting an output value under multiple resolution. Curvature cells can be treated as concrete models of an end-stopped mechanism, and they can be used to further understand "curvature-selective" characteristics and to explain basic psychophysical findings and perceptual phenomena in current studies.

  6. Lecture notes on mean curvature flow, barriers and singular perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Bellettini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the book is to study some aspects of geometric evolutions, such as mean curvature flow and anisotropic mean curvature flow of hypersurfaces. We analyze the origin of such flows and their geometric and variational nature. Some of the most important aspects of mean curvature flow are described, such as the comparison principle and its use in the definition of suitable weak solutions. The anisotropic evolutions, which can be considered as a generalization of mean curvature flow, are studied from the view point of Finsler geometry. Concerning singular perturbations, we discuss the convergence of the Allen–Cahn (or Ginsburg–Landau) type equations to (possibly anisotropic) mean curvature flow before the onset of singularities in the limit problem. We study such kinds of asymptotic problems also in the static case, showing convergence to prescribed curvature-type problems.

  7. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications.

  8. Model-Based Control of a Continuous Coating Line for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Electrode Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Devaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most expensive component of a fuel cell is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA, which consists of an ionomer membrane coated with catalyst material. Best-performing MEAs are currently fabricated by depositing and drying liquid catalyst ink on the membrane; however, this process is limited to individual preparation by hand due to the membrane’s rapid water absorption that leads to shape deformation and coating defects. A continuous coating line can reduce the cost and time needed to fabricate the MEA, incentivizing the commercialization and widespread adoption of fuel cells. A pilot-scale membrane coating line was designed for such a task and is described in this paper. Accurate process control is necessary to prevent manufacturing defects from occurring in the coating line. A linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG controller was developed based on a physics-based model of the coating process to optimally control the temperature and humidity of the drying zones. The process controller was implemented in the pilot-scale coating line proving effective in preventing defects.

  9. Dominant factors controlling the efficiency of two-phase flow cleaning in spiral-wound membrane elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wibisono, Y.; Ahmad, F.; Cornelissen, Emile; Cornelissen, E.R.; Kemperman, Antonius J.B.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    2015-01-01

    Two-phase flow cleaning has been successfully applied to control fouling in spiral wound membrane elements. This study focuses on its experimental optimization using a Taguchi Design of Experiment method (L-25 orthogonal arrays) to elucidate the influence of different factors and to reveal the

  10. Estimates and nonexistence of solutions of the scalar curvature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Introduction. Let M be an n-dimensional complete Riemannian manifold with metric g0 and scalar curvature k(x). The problem of the conformal deformation of scalar curvature is to find conditions on the function K(x) so that K(x) is the scalar curvature of a conformally related metric g = ρ(x)g0, here ρ(x) is some positive ...

  11. Statistical mechanics of paths with curvature dependent action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Durhuus, B.; Jonsson, T.

    1987-01-01

    We analyze the scaling limit of discretized random paths with curvature dependent action. For finite values of the curvature coupling constant the theory belongs to the universality class of simple random walk. It is possible to define a non-trivial scaling limit if the curvature coupling tends to infinity. We compute exactly the two point function in this limit and discuss the relevance of our results for random surfaces and string theories. (orig.)

  12. On Riemannian manifolds (Mn, g) of quasi-constant curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    A Riemannian manifold (M n , g) of quasi-constant curvature is defined. It is shown that an (M n , g) in association with other class of manifolds gives rise, under certain conditions, to a manifold of quasi-constant curvature. Some observations on how a manifold of quasi-constant curvature accounts for a pseudo Ricci-symmetric manifold and quasi-umbilical hypersurface are made. (author). 10 refs

  13. Enhanced ferro-actuator with a porosity-controlled membrane using the sol-gel process and the HF etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, KiSu; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ferro-actuator using a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. In detail, we fabricated the silica-embedded PVDF membrane using a sol-gel process with PVDF solution and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solution, where the size of the silica was determined by the ratio of the PVDF and TEOS solutions. Using hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, the silica were removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane, and porous PVDF membranes with different porosities were obtained. Finally, through absorption of a ferrofluid on the porous PVDF membrane, the proposed ferro-actuator using porous PVDF membranes with different porosities was fabricated. We executed the characterization and actuation test as follows. First, the silica size of the silica-embedded PVDF membrane and the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. Second, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that the silica had clearly been removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane by HF etching. Third, through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) of the ferro-actuators, we found that more ferrofluids were absorbed by the porous PVDF membrane when the pore of the membrane was smaller and uniformly distributed. Finally, we executed tip displacement and a blocking force test of the proposed ferro-actuator using the porous PVDF membrane. Similar to the VSM result, the ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane with smaller pores exhibited better actuation performance. The ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane displayed a tip displacement that was about 7.2-fold better and a blocking force that was about 6.5-fold better than the ferro-actuator that used a pure PVDF membrane. Thus, we controlled the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane and enhanced the actuation performance of the ferro-actuator using a porous PVDF membrane. (technical note)

  14. Hair curvature: a natural dialectic and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Joseph N; Das Chaudhuri, Asit Baran

    2014-08-01

    Although hair forms (straight, curly, wavy, etc.) are present in apparently infinite variations, each fibre can be reduced to a finite sequence of tandem segments of just three types: straight, bent/curly, or twisted. Hair forms can thus be regarded as resulting from genetic pathways that induce, reverse or modulate these basic curvature modes. However, physical interconversions between twists and curls demonstrate that strict one-to-one correspondences between them and their genetic causes do not exist. Current hair-curvature theories do not distinguish between bending and twisting mechanisms. We here introduce a multiple papillary centres (MPC) model which is particularly suitable to explain twisting. The model combines previously known features of hair cross-sectional morphology with partially/completely separated dermal papillae within single follicles, and requires such papillae to induce differential growth rates of hair cortical material in their immediate neighbourhoods. The MPC model can further help to explain other, poorly understood, aspects of hair growth and morphology. Separate bending and twisting mechanisms would be preferentially affected at the major or minor ellipsoidal sides of fibres, respectively, and together they exhaust the possibilities for influencing hair-form phenotypes. As such they suggest dialectic for hair-curvature development. We define a natural-dialectic (ND) which could take advantage of speculative aspects of dialectic, but would verify its input data and results by experimental methods. We use this as a top-down approach to first define routes by which hair bending or twisting may be brought about and then review evidence in support of such routes. In particular we consider the wingless (Wnt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways as paradigm pathways for molecular hair bending and twisting mechanisms, respectively. In addition to the Wnt canonical pathway, the Wnt/Ca(2+) and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways

  15. 3D face recognition with asymptotic cones based principal curvatures

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Yinhang

    2015-05-01

    The classical curvatures of smooth surfaces (Gaussian, mean and principal curvatures) have been widely used in 3D face recognition (FR). However, facial surfaces resulting from 3D sensors are discrete meshes. In this paper, we present a general framework and define three principal curvatures on discrete surfaces for the purpose of 3D FR. These principal curvatures are derived from the construction of asymptotic cones associated to any Borel subset of the discrete surface. They describe the local geometry of the underlying mesh. First two of them correspond to the classical principal curvatures in the smooth case. We isolate the third principal curvature that carries out meaningful geometric shape information. The three principal curvatures in different Borel subsets scales give multi-scale local facial surface descriptors. We combine the proposed principal curvatures with the LNP-based facial descriptor and SRC for recognition. The identification and verification experiments demonstrate the practicability and accuracy of the third principal curvature and the fusion of multi-scale Borel subset descriptors on 3D face from FRGC v2.0.

  16. Distributed microscopic actuation analysis of paraboloidal membrane shells of different geometric parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Honghao; Lu, Yifan; Deng, Zongquan; Tzou, Hornsen

    2018-03-01

    Paraboloidal membrane shells of revolution are commonly used as key components for advanced aerospace structures and aviation mechanical systems. Due to their high flexibility and low damping property, active vibration control is of significant importance for these in-orbit membrane structures. To explore the dynamic control behavior of space flexible paraboloidal membrane shells, precision distributed actuation and control effectiveness of free-floating paraboloidal membrane shells with piezoelectric actuators are investigated. Governing equations of the shell structronic system are presented first. Then, distributed control forces and control actions are formulated. A transverse mode shape function of the paraboloidal shell based on the membrane approximation theory and specified boundary condition is assumed in the modal control force analysis. The actuator induced modal control forces on the paraboloidal shell are derived. The expressions of microscopic local modal control forces are obtained by shrinking the actuator area into infinitesimal and the four control components are investigated respectively to predict the spatial microscopic actuation behavior. Geometric parameter (height-radius ratio and shell thickness) effects on the modal actuation behavior are explored when evaluating the micro-control efficiency. Four different cases are discussed and the results reveal the fact that shallow (e.g., antennas/reflectors) and deep (e.g., rocket/missile fairing) paraboloidal shells exhibit totally different modal actuation behaviors due to their curvature differences. Analytical results in this paper can serve as guidelines for optimal actuator placement for vibration control of different paraboloidal structures.

  17. Improved performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells through control of membrane deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2010-03-01

    Cation (CEMs) and anion exchange membrane (AEMs) are commonly used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to enhance Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) by reducing thefluxof oxygen through the cathode to bacteriaonthe anode. AEMs typically work better than CEMs, but in initial experiments we observed the opposite using a membrane electrode assembly MFC. The reason was identified to be membrane deformation, which resulted in water and gas trapped between the membrane and cathode. To correct this, stainless steel mesh was used to press the membrane flat against the cathode. With the steel mesh, AEM performance increased to 46±4W/m3 in a single cathode MFC, and 98±14W/m3 in a double-cathode MFC. These power densities were higher than those using a CEM of 32±2W/m3 (single cathode) and 63±6W/m3 (double cathode). Higher pH gradients across the membrane and salt precipitation on the cathode were responsible for the reduced performance of the CEM compared to the AEM. CEs reached over 90% for both membranes at >2A/m2. These results demonstrate the importance of avoiding water accumulation in thin films between membranes and electrodes, and explain additional reasons for poorer performance of CEMs compared to AEMs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Seguimiento multidisciplinario en el control del penfigoide de membranas mucosas Multidisciplinary follow-up in mucous membranes pemphigoid control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Jeremias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El término penfigoide de membranas mucosas designa un grupo de enfermedades vesículo-bulosas autoinmunes crónicas, que afectan predominantemente mucosas. El presente artículo describe dos casos clínicos de penfigoide de membranas mucosas con compromiso gingival y tuvo como objetivo resaltar la importancia de un correcto diagnóstico de la lesión y discutir la conducta terapéutica. Fueron realizados diversos exámenes complementares como, examen de Nikolsky, biopsia incisional, investigación de células LE y de anticuerpos antinucleares, además de la evaluación de médicos especializados en dermatología y oftalmología. Fue fundamental la substitución de dentífricos, la orientación nutricional y psicológica, el cuidado con la higiene, además del uso de corticoides tópicos. Hubo periodos de remisión y exacerbación del cuadro clínico durante el seguimiento, fue necesario el ajuste en la terapéutica y refuerzo en los cuidados con la higiene bucal. Es muy importante la interacción multidisciplinaria en la atención de estos casos para el control del tratamiento y seguimiento, además de reforzar todas las orientaciones y cuidados en lo que se refiere a la salud bucal y cautela en el uso de corticoides.The term Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid includes a group of chronic and autoimmune vesiculobullous diseases involving mainly the mucosa. The aim of present paper is to describe two clinical cases of Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid with gingival involvement to arrive to a proper diagnosis of the lesion and also to discuss the therapeutic behavior. Different complementary examinations were conducted including Nikolsky test, incisional biopsy, the LE cells study and of antinuclear antibodies, as well as the evaluation of dermatologists and ophthalmologists. It was necessary the replacement of toothpastes, the nutritional and psychological guiding, the hygiene care and the use of topic corticoids. There were periods of remission and

  19. Membrane fission by protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Wilton T; Hayden, Carl C; Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Lafer, Eileen M; Rangamani, Padmini; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-04-18

    Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that is independent of protein structure-steric pressure among membrane-bound proteins. In particular, random collisions among crowded proteins generate substantial pressure, which if unbalanced on the opposite membrane surface can dramatically increase membrane curvature, leading to fission. Using the endocytic protein epsin1 N-terminal homology domain (ENTH), previously thought to drive fission by hydrophobic insertion, our results show that membrane coverage correlates equally with fission regardless of the hydrophobicity of insertions. Specifically, combining FRET-based measurements of membrane coverage with multiple, independent measurements of membrane vesiculation revealed that fission became spontaneous as steric pressure increased. Further, fission efficiency remained equally potent when helices were replaced by synthetic membrane-binding motifs. These data challenge the view that hydrophobic insertions drive membrane fission, suggesting instead that the role of insertions is to anchor proteins strongly to membrane surfaces, amplifying steric pressure. In line with these conclusions, even green fluorescent protein (GFP) was able to drive fission efficiently when bound to the membrane at high coverage. Our conclusions are further strengthened by the finding that intrinsically disordered proteins, which have large hydrodynamic radii yet lack a defined structure, drove fission with substantially greater potency than smaller, structured proteins.

  20. EPA and DHA in blood cell membranes from acute coronary syndrome patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Harris, William S; Reid, Kimberly J; Sands, Scott A; Spertus, John A

    2008-04-01

    Increased blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids (FA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been inversely associated with risk for sudden cardiac death, but their relationship with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is unclear. We hypothesized that the EPA+DHA content of blood cell membranes, as a percent of total FAs, is reduced in ACS patients relative to matched controls. We measured the content of EPA+DHA in 768 ACS patients and 768 age-, sex- and race-matched controls. The association with ACS case status of blood cell EPA+DHA [both by a 1 unit change and by category (low, or =8%)] was assessed using multivariate conditional logistic regression models adjusting for matching variables and smoking status, alcohol use, diabetes, body mass index, serum lipids, education, family history of coronary artery disease, personal histories of myocardial infarction and hypertension, and statin, aspirin, and other antiplatelet drug use. The combined groups had a mean age of 61+/-12 years, 66% were male, and 92% were Caucasian. The EPA+DHA content was 20% lower in cases than controls (3.4+/-1.6 vs. 4.25+/-2.0%, pACS event was 0.58 (95% CI 0.42-0.80), in the intermediate EPA+DHA group and was 0.31 (95% CI 0.14-0.67; p for trend ACS case status increased incrementally as the EPA+DHA content decreased suggesting that low EPA+DHA may be associated with increased risk for ACS.

  1. A Field Theory with Curvature and Anticurvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Wanas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is an attempt to construct a unified field theory in a space with curvature and anticurvature, the PAP-space. The theory is derived from an action principle and a Lagrangian density using a symmetric linear parameterized connection. Three different methods are used to explore physical contents of the theory obtained. Poisson’s equations for both material and charge distributions are obtained, as special cases, from the field equations of the theory. The theory is a pure geometric one in the sense that material distribution, charge distribution, gravitational and electromagnetic potentials, and other physical quantities are defined in terms of pure geometric objects of the structure used. In the case of pure gravity in free space, the spherical symmetric solution of the field equations gives the Schwarzschild exterior field. The weak equivalence principle is respected only in the case of pure gravity in free space; otherwise it is violated.

  2. Differential geometry connections, curvature, and characteristic classes

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Loring W

    2017-01-01

    This text presents a graduate-level introduction to differential geometry for mathematics and physics students. The exposition follows the historical development of the concepts of connection and curvature with the goal of explaining the Chern–Weil theory of characteristic classes on a principal bundle. Along the way we encounter some of the high points in the history of differential geometry, for example, Gauss' Theorema Egregium and the Gauss–Bonnet theorem. Exercises throughout the book test the reader’s understanding of the material and sometimes illustrate extensions of the theory. Initially, the prerequisites for the reader include a passing familiarity with manifolds. After the first chapter, it becomes necessary to understand and manipulate differential forms. A knowledge of de Rham cohomology is required for the last third of the text. Prerequisite material is contained in author's text An Introduction to Manifolds, and can be learned in one semester. For the benefit of the reader and to establ...

  3. Nonminimal coupling of perfect fluids to curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Paramos, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we consider different forms of relativistic perfect fluid Lagrangian densities that yield the same gravitational field equations in general relativity (GR). A particularly intriguing example is the case with couplings of the form [1+f 2 (R)]L m , where R is the scalar curvature, which induces an extra force that depends on the form of the Lagrangian density. It has been found that, considering the Lagrangian density L m =p, where p is the pressure, the extra-force vanishes. We argue that this is not the unique choice for the matter Lagrangian density, and that more natural forms for L m do not imply the vanishing of the extra force. Particular attention is paid to the impact on the classical equivalence between different Lagrangian descriptions of a perfect fluid.

  4. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-01-01

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M D-1 xS 1 , where D is the spacetime dimension and M D-1 stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  5. Slope and curvature of microbreaking wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulliez, G.

    2009-04-01

    Microscale breaking is commonly observed at sea for steep waves less than 30 cm in wavelength. This phenomenon generates high surface slope and curvature roughness at the water surface, which has numerous implications for air-sea exchange and remote-sensing studies. In particular, microbreaking affects momentum transfer from wind to waves, leads to formation of vortices in water, and plays a key role in scattering of electromagnetic and acoustic waves by the air-sea interface. The geometric properties of the parasitic capillaries generated upon steep steady gravity-capillary waves have been well studied over the last decades, both experimentally and numerically. However, owing to their variability, the basic features of naturally occurring wind wave breakers as observed at sea or even in laboratory are far from being identified up to now. To this end, an experimental investigation of microbreaking wind waves was made in a large wind wave tank which combined visualizations of wave breaker profiles with single-point wave elevation and slope measurements. We show that microscale breakers exhibit a characteristic signature in slope and curvature suggesting formation of a bulge on the forward face of the wave crest. Parasitic ripples however are not necessarily generated ahead the bulge. Such breakers are observed for a wide range of wave steepness and wave slope skewness, their structure being only weakly dependent on wavelength and wind forcing. The geometric properties of microbreakers are analysed statistically and compared with the results of the recent numerical simulations by Hung and Tsai (J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2009).

  6. Fouling on ion-exchange membranes: Classification, characterization and strategies of prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylin, Sergey; Bazinet, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The environmentally friendly ion-exchange membrane (IEM) processes find more and more applications in the modern industries in order to demineralize, concentrate and modify products. Moreover, these processes may be applied for the energy conversion and storage. However, the main drawback of the IEM processes is a formation of fouling, which significantly decreases the process efficiency and increases the process cost. The present review is dedicated to the problematic of IEM fouling phenomena. Firstly, the major types of IEM fouling such as colloidal fouling, organic fouling, scaling and biofouling are discussed along with consideration of the main factors affecting fouling formation and development. Secondly, the review of the possible methods of IEM fouling characterization is provided. This section includes the methods of fouling visualization and characterization as well as methods allowing investigations of characteristics of the fouled IEMs. Eventually, the reader will find the conventional and modern strategies of prevention and control of different fouling types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of phospholipid composition and its control in the plasma membrane of developing soybean root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of plasma membrane enriched fractions from developing soybean root and several mechanisms which may regulate it have been examined. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from meristematic and mature sections of four-day-old dark grown soybean roots (Glycine max [L.] Merr. Cult. Wells II). Analysis of lipid extracts revealed two major phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Minor phospholipid classes were phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylgylcerol and diphosphatidylgylcerol. Phospholipid composition was similar at each developmental stage. Fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were 16:0, 18:0, 18:2, and 18:3. Fatty acid composition varied with both phospholipid class and the developmental stage of the root. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine by endogenous phospholipase D during membrane isolation indicated that this enzyme might be involved in phospholipid turnover within the membrane. Phospholipase D activity was heat labile and increasing the pH of the enzyme assay from 5.3 to 7.8 resulted in 90% inhibition of activity. The turnover of fatty acids within the phospholipids of the plasma membrane was studied. Mature root sections were incubated with [1- 14 C] acetate, 1 mM Na acetate and 50 μg/ml chloramphenicol. Membrane lipid extracts analyzed for phospholipid class and acyl chain composition revealed that the long incubation times did not alter the phospholipid composition of the plasma membrane enriched fraction

  8. A novel reverse osmosis membrane by ferrous sulfate assisted controlled oxidation of polyamide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Hiren D.; Raviya, Mayur R.; Gauswami, Maulik V.

    2017-11-01

    With growing desalination capacity, it is very important to evaluate the performance of thin film composite reverse osmosis (TFC RO) membrane in terms of energy consumption for desalination. There is a trade-off between salt rejection and water-flux of TFC RO membrane. This article presents a novel approach of analyzing the effect of mixture of an oxidizing agent sodium hypochlorite and a reducing agent ferrous sulfate on virgin TFC RO membrane. Experiments were carried out by varying the concentrations of both sodium hypochlorite and ferrous sulfate. The negative charge was induced on the membrane due to the treatment of combination of sodium hypochlorite and ferrous sulfate, thereby resulting in higher rejection of negative ions due to repulsive force. Membrane treated with 1000 mg l-1 sodium hypochlorite and 2000 mg l-1 ferrous sulfate showed the best salt rejection i.e. 96.23%. The characterization was carried out to understand the charge on the membrane surface by Zeta potential, morphology of membrane surface by scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface roughness features by atomic force microscope (AFM) and chemical structural changes by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis.

  9. Electromechanics of a membrane with spatially distributed fixed charges: flexoelectricity and elastic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Bastien; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the electrostatic contribution to the lipid membrane mechanical parameters: tension, bending rigidity, spontaneous curvature, and flexocoefficient, using an approach where stress in the membrane is explicitly balanced. Our model includes an applied electrostatic potential as well as a charge distribution in the membrane. We apply our theory to membranes having surface charges and electric dipoles at the surface.

  10. Liquid crystal model of membrane flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D

    2006-07-01

    An interfacial liquid crystal model is formulated and used to derive a membrane shape equation that takes into account pressure, tension, bending, torsion, and flexoelectric forces. Flexoelectricity introduces electric field-induced curvature and is of relevance to the study and characterization of biological membranes. It is shown that flexoelectricity renormalizes the membrane mechanical tension, shear, and bending effects, and hence it offers diverse pathways to manipulate the membrane's shape. The derived electroelastic shape equation provides systematic guidance on how to use electric fields in membrane studies.

  11. A review on the use of membrane technology and fouling control for olive mill wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Javier Miguel Ochando

    2016-09-01

    Olive mill effluents (OME) by-produced have significantly increased in the last decades as a result of the boost of the olive oil agro-industrial sector and due to the conversion into continuous operation centrifugation technologies. In these effluents, the presence of phytotoxic recalcitrant pollutants makes them resistant to biological degradation and thus inhibits the efficiency of biological and conventional processes. Many reclamation treatments as well as integrated processes for OME have already been proposed and developed but not led to completely satisfactory and cost-effective results. Olive oil industries in its current status, typically small mills dispersed, cannot afford such high treatment costs. Furthermore, conventional treatments are not able to abate the significant dissolved monovalent and divalent ions concentration present in OME. Within this framework, membrane technology offers high efficiency and moderate investment and maintenance expenses. Wastewater treatment by membrane technologies is growing in the recent years. This trend is owed to the fact of the availability of new membrane materials, membrane designs, membrane module concepts and general know-how, which have promoted credibility among investors. However, fouling reduces the membrane performances in time and leads to premature substitution of the membrane modules, and this is a problem of cost efficiency since wastewater treatment must imply low operating costs. Appropriate fouling inhibition methods should assure this result, thus making membrane processes for wastewater stream treatment both technically and economically feasible. In this paper, the treatment of the effluents by-produced in olive mills, generally called olive mill wastewaters, will be addressed. Within this context, the state of the art of the different pretreatments and integral membrane processes proposed up to today will be gathered and discussed, with an insight in the problem of fouling. Copyright © 2015

  12. Receptor kinase-mediated control of primary active proton pumping at the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Kristensen, Astrid; Cuin, Tracey A.

    2014-01-01

    Acidification of the cell wall space outside the plasma membrane is required for plant growth and is the result of proton extrusion by the plasma membrane-localized H+-ATPases. Here we show that the major plasma membrane proton pumps in Arabidopsis, AHA1 and AHA2, interact directly in vitro...... heterologous expression system, the introduction of a negative charge at this position caused pump activation. Application of PSY1 to plant seedlings induced rapid in planta phosphorylation at Thr-881, concomitant with an instantaneous increase in proton efflux from roots. The direct interaction between AHA2...

  13. Control and Experimental Characterization of a Methanol Reformer for a 350 W High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker

    This work involves the an experimental characterisation and the development of control strategies for the methanol reformer system used in the Serenergy Serenus H3 E-350 high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell system. The system consists of a fuel evaporator utilizing...... the high temperature waste gas from a cathode air cooled 45 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack. The MEAs used are BASF P2100 which use phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole type membranes; an MEA with high CO tolerance and no complex humidity requirements. The methanol reformer used is integrated into a compact......, i.e. cathode and anode gas flows and temperature by using mass flow controllers and controlled heaters. Using this system the methanol reformer is characterized in its different operating points, both steady-state but also dynamically. Methanol steam reforming is a well known process, and provides...

  14. More Efficient Media Design for Enhanced Biofouling Control in a Membrane Bioreactor: Quorum Quenching Bacteria Entrapping Hollow Cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang H; Lee, Seonki; Lee, Kibaek; Nahm, Chang H; Kwon, Hyeokpil; Oh, Hyun-Suk; Won, Young-June; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak; Park, Pyung-Kyu

    2016-08-16

    Recently, membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with quorum quenching (QQ) bacteria entrapping beads have been reported as a new paradigm in biofouling control because, unlike conventional post-biofilm control methods, bacterial QQ can inhibit biofilm formation through its combined effects of physical scouring of the membrane and inhibition of quorum sensing (QS). In this study, using a special reporter strain (Escherichia coli JB525), the interaction between QS signal molecules and quorum quenching bacteria entrapping beads (QQ-beads) was elucidated through visualization of the QS signal molecules within a QQ-bead using a fluorescence microscope. As a result, under the conditions considered in this study, the surface area of QQ-media was likely to be a dominant parameter in enhancing QQ activity over total mass of entrapped QQ bacteria because QQ bacteria located near the core of a QQ-bead were unable to display their QQ activities. On the basis of this information, a more efficient QQ-medium, a QQ hollow cylinder (QQ-HC), was designed and prepared. In batch experiments, QQ-HCs showed greater QQ activity than QQ-beads as a result of their higher surface area and enhanced physical washing effect because of their larger impact area against the membrane surface. Furthermore, it was shown that such advantages of QQ-HCs resulted in more effective mitigation of membrane fouling than from QQ-beads in lab-scale continuous MBRs.

  15. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 43–48. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity. RISHI KUMAR TIWARI. Department of Mathematics and Computer Application, ... and kinematical properties of the models. Keywords. Collineation; Killing vectors; Ricci tensor; Riemannian curvature tensor. PACS No. 98.80. 1. Introduction.

  16. Estimates and nonexistence of solutions of the scalar curvature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    We derive some estimates and properties of supersolutions of the scalar curvature equation, and obtain some nonex- ... The problem of the conformal deformation of scalar curvature is to find conditions on the function ..... that the condition (b) of Theorem 3.4 is satisfied since r = (n−1)c coth(cr), and hence for any C2 positive ...

  17. Finsler metrics with constant (or scalar) flag curvature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The very special relativity is an interesting theory of investigating the violation of Lorentz invariance which is developed by Cohen and Glashow [5]. In [9], the authors showed that the Killing navi- gation representation has the flag curvature preserving property. In particular, it preserves scalar (or constant) flag curvature.

  18. Determination of Radius of Curvature for Teeth With Cycloid Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Shatalov, E. V.; Efremenkov (Ephremenkov), Egor Alekseevich; Shibinskiy, Konstantin Grigorievich

    2016-01-01

    In the article the geometric determination of curvature radius is considered for teeth with cycloid profile. The equations are obtained for the determination of a radius of curvature with point coordinates of a cycloid profile. The conditions of convexo-concavity of a teeth profile are defined for transmission with intermediate rollers.

  19. Determination of Radius of Curvature for Teeth With Cycloid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, E. V.; Efremenkov, E. A.; Shibinskiy, K. G.

    2016-04-01

    In the article the geometric determination of curvature radius is considered for teeth with cycloid profile. The equations are obtained for the determination of a radius of curvature with point coordinates of a cycloid profile. The conditions of convexo-concavity of a teeth profile are defined for transmission with intermediate rollers.

  20. Automatic quantification of local and global articular cartilage surface curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the surface curvature of the articular cartilage from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and to investigate its role in populations with varying radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA), cross-sectionally and longitudinally. ...... curvature estimates from low-field MRI at different scales could potentially become biomarkers targeted at different stages of OA....

  1. Curvature collineations for the field of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Singh, Gulab

    1981-01-01

    It has been shown that the space-times formed from a plane-fronted gravity wave and from a plane sandwich wave with constant polarisation admit proper curvature collineation in general. The curvature collineation vectors have been determined explicitly. (author)

  2. Chitosan Membranes Exhibiting Shape Memory Capability by the Action of Controlled Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina O. Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan membranes can undergo a glass transition at room temperature triggered by hydration. The mechanical properties of the membranes were followed by a tension test and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, with the sample in wet conditions after being immersed in varying compositions of water/ethanol mixtures. Results show that with the increasing of water content, the Young’s and storage modulus decrease systematically. For water contents of ca. 35 vol%, chitosan (CHT exhibits a glass transition, showing an elastomeric plateau in the elastic modulus above this hydration level and the occurrence of a peak in the loss factor. Due to the semi-crystalline nature of CHT, membranes of this biomaterial present a shape memory capability induced by water uptake. By fixation of the permanent shape by further covalent cross-linking, the membranes can have different permanent shapes appropriate for different applications, including in the biomedical area.

  3. Highly Reflecting, Broadband Deformable Membrane Mirror for Wavefront Control Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I STTR project will develop a highly reflecting, broadband, radiation resistant, low-stress and lightweight, membrane integrated into an electrostatically...

  4. Stress-Matched RF and Thermal Control Coatings for Membrane Antennas, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of multi-meter diameter radiofrequency (RF) antennas for NASA and DoD will have a significant impact of future space programs. Polymer membrane...

  5. Stress-Matched RF and Thermal Control Coatings for Membrane Antennas, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of multi-meter diameter radiofrequency (RF) antennas is an area of intense research for NASA and DoD organizations. Polymer membrane technologies offer...

  6. Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Extravehicular Activity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David T. (Inventor); Gleason, Kevin J. (Inventor); Cowley, Scott W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    There is disclosed a portable life support system with a component for removal of at least one selected gas. In an embodiment, the system includes a supported liquid membrane having a first side and a second side in opposition to one another, the first side configured for disposition toward an astronaut and the second side configured for disposition toward a vacuum atmosphere. The system further includes an ionic liquid disposed between the first side and the second side of the supported liquid membrane, the ionic liquid configured for removal of at least one selected gas from a region housing the astronaut adjacent the first side of the supported liquid membrane to the vacuum atmosphere adjacent the second side of the supported liquid membrane. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  7. Stress-Matched RF and Thermal Control Coatings for Membrane Antennas Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of multi-meter diameter radiofrequency (RF) antennas for NASA and DoD will have a significant impact of future space programs. Polymer membrane...

  8. ANALISIS PENGENDALIAN KUALITAS MEMBRAN DALAM PERVAPORASI ETANOL-AIR DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miftahul Djana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervaporation is an alternative separation process using membrane which allows separations of organic mixtures and dehydrates organic solvents with low energy consumption. The purpose of this experiment is to analyze the influence of operating parameters such as feed temperature, times, variation of feed ethanol water mixtures, variation of membranes on pervaporation performance shown by the flux and selectivity by using ceramic membranes with variation of diatomaceous earth and clay as separation. Pervaporation process performance is determined from permeate selectivity and flux. Increase of permeate selectivity and flux means also increasing performace of pervaporation. However, increasing product flux may contribute on decreasing selectivity. The research consists of membrane preparation, pervaporation process, and optimization. Feed of this research are ethanol-water mixture with temperature varying between 40-60oC and downstream pressure 0.5 mbar. Ceramic membrane is used and modification with 30,60,90% of diatomaceous earth. From the results, the membranes have successfully improved the flux of this research..The results showed that the operating conditions of 0,5mbar pressure of permeate, the variation in temperatures of 40ºC, 50ºC and º, th variation of membranes and times produces the flux increases and selectivity decreases.In these conditions the maximum temperature, 60ºC gives the flux of 0,1945 l/m2.hr and the selectivity of 1,7198. In these conditions produce fuel grade ethanol with purity levels reached 98% from 95% ethanol feed.The test results indicated the mean value of t = 31.400> t table = 2.00 and sig. =0,000 <α = 0.05, thus the average (mean of 1.806 issignificant. Thus the hypothesis that the level of damage membrane of the product significantly affect the processproduction is not proven.

  9. Robust modal curvature features for identifying multiple damage in beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostachowicz, Wiesław; Xu, Wei; Bai, Runbo; Radzieński, Maciej; Cao, Maosen

    2014-03-01

    Curvature mode shape is an effective feature for damage detection in beams. However, it is susceptible to measurement noise, easily impairing its advantage of sensitivity to damage. To deal with this deficiency, this study formulates an improved curvature mode shape for multiple damage detection in beams based on integrating a wavelet transform (WT) and a Teager energy operator (TEO). The improved curvature mode shape, termed the WT - TEO curvature mode shape, has inherent capabilities of immunity to noise and sensitivity to damage. The proposed method is experimentally validated by identifying multiple cracks in cantilever steel beams with the mode shapes acquired using a scanning laser vibrometer. The results demonstrate that the improved curvature mode shape can identify multiple damage accurately and reliably, and it is fairly robust to measurement noise.

  10. Nastic curvatures of wheat coleoptiles that develop in true microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, D G; Chapman, D K; Brown, A H

    1995-07-01

    Dark-grown wheat coleoptiles developed strong curvatures within 5 h of being transferred in orbit from a 1 g centrifuge to microgravity during an experiment flown on the IML-1 shuttle mission. The curving tendency was strongest in seedlings that were immature, with coleoptiles shorter than 10 mm at the time of transfer. The curvature direction was non-random, and directed away from the caryopsis (the coleptile face adjacent to the caryopsis becoming convex). The curvatures were most marked in the basal third of the coleoptiles, contrasting with phototropic responses, which occur in the apical third. We interpret these curvatures as being nastic, and related to the curvatures commonly reported to occur during clinostat rotation treatments.

  11. Dual curvature acoustically damped concentrating collector. Semiannual technical progress report, June 1-December 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    The project's first objective is to establish, analytically, the cost and performance of design choices within the boundaries of the basic proposed concept. With these cost and performance measures as a guide, the second project objective is to design a cost-effective Dual Curvature collector module and collector field array. The third objective is to establish technical and economic concept feasibility through prototype fabrication and test. The final objective is to define the Dual Curvature collector commercialization requirements. The Dual Curvature collector uses a unique reflector module consisting of a reflective film that is tensioned on a reflector support frame. The tensioned membrane (film) surface approximates a hyperbolic paraboloid that is capable of linear focusing when the surface tracks the sun's apparent motion in one axis. The reflective film can be backed by polystyrene foam with an air space between the film and the foam surfaces. This provides damping of the reflector surface to minimize the effect of wind gusts and physical impacts. The baseline collector is intended to operate at a concentration of ten (10) or greater with a nominal absorber temperature of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F). The Component Research and Analysis tasks which lead to the selection of a baseline collector configuration are discussed. Also, some preliminary results of the Collector Module Design task are presented.

  12. Use of autologous grafts in the treatment of acquired penile curvature: An experience of 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Abdul Rouf; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Zahur, Suhael; Tariq, Sheikh; Hamid, Arf; Wani, M S; Wazir, B S; Iqbal, Arsheed

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare the use of autologous dermal and temporalis fascia grafts in the treatment of acquired penile curvatures. It was a prospective observational study of 33 cases, conducted in Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar from March 2007 to September 2013. All the patients had stable Peyronies disease (PD). Dorsal, dorsolateral and vental curvatures with good preoperative erections were included. PD index with visual analog scales for curvature was used preoperatively. An informed written consent was taken from all the patients with main emphasis on erectile dysfunction. After an average follow up of 2 years, complete straightening of penis was observed in all patients with satisfactory sexual intercourse in 30 patients (90%). Three patients (10%) required frequent use of type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors for adequate erections. Overall 91% of patients and partners were satisfied with the procedure and cosmetically donor site was better in temporalis fascia graft site. No rejection of any graft was noted and glans hypoesthesia was noticed in 4 patients (12%). None of the patients required penile prosthesis. Total operative time for harvesting and application of the graft was more in dermal grafts (>3 hrs) than for temporalis fascia graft (2 hrs). Tunical lengthening procedures by autologous free grafts represents a safe and reproducible technique. A good preoperative erectile function is required for tunical lengthening procedure. Temporalis fascia graft is thin, tough membrane and effective graft for PD with good cosmetic and functional results.

  13. Effect of lipid molecule headgroup mismatch on non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induced membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal Roy, Sutapa; Sarkar, Munna

    2011-12-20

    Membrane fusion is an essential process guiding many important biological events, which most commonly requires the aid of proteins and peptides as fusogenic agents. Small drug induced fusion at low drug concentration is a rare event. Only three drugs, namely, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx), belonging to the oxicam group of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown by us to induce membrane fusion successfully at low drug concentration. A better elucidation of the mechanism and the effect of different parameters in modulating the fusion process will allow the use of these common drugs to induce and control membrane fusion in various biochemical processes. In this study, we monitor the effect of lipid headgroup size mismatch in the bilayer on oxicam NSAIDs induced membrane fusion, by introducing dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs). Such headgroup mismatch affects various lipid parameters which includes inhibition of trans-bilayer motion, domain formation, decrease in curvature, etc. Changes in various lipidic parameters introduce defects in the membrane bilayer and thereby modulate membrane fusion. SUVs formed by DMPC with increasing DMPE content (10, 20, and 30 mol %) were used as simple model membranes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the DMPC-DMPE mixed vesicles. Fluorescence assays were used to probe the time dependence of lipid mixing, content mixing, and leakage and also used to determine the partitioning of the drugs in the membrane bilayer. How the inhibition of trans-bilayer motion, heterogeneous distribution of lipids, decrease in vesicle curvature, etc., arising due to headgroup mismatch affect the fusion process has been isolated and identified here. Mx amplifies these effects maximally followed by Px and Tx. This has been correlated to the enhanced

  14. Membrane pore architecture of the CslF6 protein controls (1-3,1-4)-β-glucan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    The cereal cell wall polysaccharide (1-3,1-4)-β-glucan is a linear polymer of glucose containing both β1-3 and β1-4 bonds. The structure of (1-3,1-4)-β-glucan varies between different cereals and during plant growth and development, but little is known about how this is controlled. The cellulose synthase-like CslF6 protein is an integral membrane protein and a major component of the (1-3,1-4)-β-glucan synthase. I show that a single amino acid within the predicted transmembrane pore domain of CslF6 controls (1-3,1-4)-β-glucan structure. A new mechanism for the control of the polysaccharide structure is proposed where membrane pore architecture and the translocation of the growing polysaccharide across the membrane control how the acceptor glucan is coordinated at the active site and thus the proportion of β1-3 and β1-4 bonds within the polysaccharide.

  15. Characterizing repulsive gravity with curvature eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Orlando; Quevedo, Hernando

    2014-10-01

    Repulsive gravity has been investigated in several scenarios near compact objects by using different intuitive approaches. Here, we propose an invariant method to characterize regions of repulsive gravity, associated to black holes and naked singularities. Our method is based upon the behavior of the curvature tensor eigenvalues, and leads to an invariant definition of a repulsion radius. The repulsion radius determines a physical region, which can be interpreted as a repulsion sphere, where the effects due to repulsive gravity naturally arise. Further, we show that the use of effective masses to characterize repulsion regions can lead to coordinate-dependent results whereas, in our approach, repulsion emerges as a consequence of the spacetime geometry in a completely invariant way. Our definition is tested in the spacetime of an electrically charged Kerr naked singularity and in all its limiting cases. We show that a positive mass can generate repulsive gravity if it is equipped with an electric charge or an angular momentum. We obtain reasonable results for the spacetime regions contained inside the repulsion sphere whose size and shape depend on the value of the mass, charge and angular momentum. Consequently, we define repulsive gravity as a classical relativistic effect by using the geometry of spacetime only.

  16. Cosmic acceleration from matter-curvature coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaregonbadi, Raziyeh; Farhoudi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    We consider f( {R,T} ) modified theory of gravity in which, in general, the gravitational Lagrangian is given by an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar and the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We indicate that in this type of the theory, the coupling energy-momentum tensor is not conserved. However, we mainly focus on a particular model that matter is minimally coupled to the geometry in the metric formalism and wherein, its coupling energy-momentum tensor is also conserved. We obtain the corresponding Raychaudhuri dynamical equation that presents the evolution of the kinematic quantities. Then for the chosen model, we derive the behavior of the deceleration parameter, and show that the coupling term can lead to an acceleration phase after the matter dominated phase. On the other hand, the curvature of the universe corresponds with the deviation from parallelism in the geodesic motion. Thus, we also scrutinize the motion of the free test particles on their geodesics, and derive the geodesic deviation equation in this modified theory to study the accelerating universe within the spatially flat FLRW background. Actually, this equation gives the relative accelerations of adjacent particles as a measurable physical quantity, and provides an elegant tool to investigate the timelike and the null structures of spacetime geometries. Then, through the null deviation vector, we find the observer area-distance as a function of the redshift for the chosen model, and compare the results with the corresponding results obtained in the literature.

  17. Reduced-Order Dynamic Modeling, Fouling Detection, and Optimal Control of Solar-Powered Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-12-01

    Membrane Distillation (MD) is an emerging sustainable desalination technique. While MD has many advantages and can be powered by solar thermal energy, its main drawback is the low water production rate. However, the MD process has not been fully optimized in terms of its manipulated and controlled variables. This is largely due to the lack of adequate dynamic models to study and simulate the process. In addition, MD is prone to membrane fouling, which is a fault that degrades the performance of the MD process. This work has three contributions to address these challenges. First, we derive a mathematical model of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD), which is the building block for the next parts. Then, the proposed model is extended to account for membrane fouling and an observer-based fouling detection method is developed. Finally, various control strategies are implemented to optimize the performance of the DCMD solar-powered process. In part one, a reduced-order dynamic model of DCMD is developed based on lumped capacitance method and electrical analogy to thermal systems. The result is an electrical equivalent thermal network to the DCMD process, which is modeled by a system of nonlinear differential algebraic equations (DAEs). This model predicts the water-vapor flux and the temperature distribution along the module length. Experimental data is collected to validate the steady-state and dynamic responses of the proposed model, with great agreement demonstrated in both. The second part proposes an extension of the model to account for membrane fouling. An adaptive observer for DAE systems is developed and convergence proof is presented. A method for membrane fouling detection is then proposed based on adaptive observers. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the membrane fouling detection method. Finally, an optimization problem is formulated to maximize the process efficiency of a solar-powered DCMD. The adapted method is known as Extremum

  18. Controlled drug release from cross-linked κ-carrageenan/hyaluronic acid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aassar, M R; El Fawal, G F; Kamoun, Elbadawy A; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, hydrogel membrane composed of; kappa carrageenan (κC) and hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinked with epichlorohydrine is produced. The optimum condition has been established based on their water absorption properties. Tensile strength (TS) and elongation (E%) for the formed films are evaluated. The obtained films were characterized by FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis. All membranes were loaded with l-carnosine as a drug model. The swelling properties and kinetics of the release of the model drug from the crosslinked hydrogel membrane were monitored in buffer medium at 37°C. The equilibrium swelling of films showed fair dependency on the high presence of HA in the hydrogel. Moreover, the cumulative release profile increased significantly and ranged from 28% to 93%, as HA increases. SEM explored that, the porosity increased by increasing HA content; consequently, drug release into the pores and channels of the membranes is facilitated. In addition, water uptake % increased as well. A slight change in TS occurred by increasing the HA% to κC, while the highest value of strain for κC membrane was 498.38% by using 3% HA. The thermal stability of the κC/HA was higher than that of HA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Curvature-Continuous 3D Path-Planning Using QPMI Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ryong Chang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is impossible to achieve vertex movement and rapid velocity control in aerial robots and aerial vehicles because of momentum from the air. A continuous-curvature path ensures such robots and vehicles can fly with stable and continuous movements. General continuous path-planning methods use spline interpolation, for example B-spline and Bézier curves. However, these methods cannot be directly applied to continuous path planning in a 3D space. These methods use a subset of the waypoints to decide curvature and some waypoints are not included in the planned path. This paper proposes a method for constructing a curvature-continuous path in 3D space that includes every waypoint. The movements in each axis, x, y and z, are separated by the parameter u. Waypoint groups are formed, each with its own continuous path derived using quadratic polynomial interpolation. The membership function then combines each continuous path into one continuous path. The continuity of the path is verified and the curvature-continuous path is produced using the proposed method.

  20. Holographic curvature perturbations in a cosmology with a space-like singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Elisa G.M. [Department of Physics, McGill University,3600 University St., Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Brandenberger, Robert [Department of Physics, McGill University,3600 University St., Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Institute for Theoretical Studies, ETH Zürich,Clausiusstr. 47, Zürich, CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2016-07-19

    We study the evolution of cosmological perturbations in an anti-de-Sitter (AdS) bulk through a cosmological singularity by mapping the dynamics onto the boundary conformal fields theory by means of the AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider a deformed AdS space-time obtained by considering a time-dependent dilaton which induces a curvature singularity in the bulk at a time which we call t=0, and which asymptotically approaches AdS both for large positive and negative times. The boundary field theory becomes free when the bulk curvature goes to infinity. Hence, the evolution of the fluctuations is under better controle on the boundary than in the bulk. To avoid unbounded particle production across the bounce it is necessary to smooth out the curvature singularity at very high curvatures. We show how the bulk cosmological perturbations can be mapped onto boundary gauge field fluctuations. We evolve the latter and compare the spectrum of fluctuations on the infrared scales relevant for cosmological observations before and after the bounce point. We find that the index of the power spectrum of fluctuations is the same before and after the bounce.

  1. Scaling up the extrinsic curvature in asymptotically flat gravitational initial data: generating trapped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Shan; Murchadha, Niall Ó

    2013-01-01

    The existence of the initial value constraints means that specifying initial data for the Einstein equations is non-trivial. The standard method of constructing initial data in the asymptotically flat case is to choose an asymptotically flat 3-metric and a transverse-tracefree (TT) tensor on it. One can find a conformal transformation that maps these data into solutions of the constraints. In particular, the TT tensor becomes the extrinsic curvature of the 3-slice. We wish to understand how the physical solution changes as the free data is changed. In this paper we investigate an especially simple change: we multiply the TT tensor by a large constant. One might assume that this corresponds to pumping up the extrinsic curvature in the physical initial data. Unexpectedly, we show that, while the conformal factor monotonically increases, the physical extrinsic curvature decreases. The increase in the conformal factor however means that the physical volume increases in such a way that the ADM mass become unboundedly large. In turn, the blow-up of the mass combined with the control we have on the extrinsic curvature allows us to show that trapped surfaces, i.e. surfaces that are simultaneously future and past trapped, appear in the physical initial data. (paper)

  2. High Performance Platinum Group Metal Free Membrane Electrode Assemblies through Control of Interfacial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Capuano, Christopher [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Atanassov, Plamen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mukerjee, Sanjeev [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Hickner, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    The quantitative goal of this project was to produce a high-performance anion exchange membrane water electrolyzer (AEM-WE) completely free of platinum group metals (PGMs), which could operate for at least 500 hours with less than 50 microV/hour degradation, at 500 mA/cm2. To achieve this goal, work focused on the optimization of electrocatalyst conductivity, with dispersion and utilization in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) improved through refinement of deposition techniques. Critical factors were also explored with significant work undertaken by Northeastern University to further understand catalyst-membrane-ionomer interfaces and how they differ from liquid electrolyte. Water management and optimal cell operational parameters were established through the design, fabrication, and test of a new test station at Proton specific for AEM evaluation. Additionally, AEM material stability and robustness at high potentials and gas evolution conditions were advanced at Penn State.

  3. Face recognition based on depth maps and surface curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Gaile G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper explores the representation of the human face by features based on the curvature of the face surface. Curature captures many features necessary to accurately describe the face, such as the shape of the forehead, jawline, and cheeks, which are not easily detected from standard intensity images. Moreover, the value of curvature at a point on the surface is also viewpoint invariant. Until recently range data of high enough resolution and accuracy to perform useful curvature calculations on the scale of the human face had been unavailable. Although several researchers have worked on the problem of interpreting range data from curved (although usually highly geometrically structured) surfaces, the main approaches have centered on segmentation by signs of mean and Gaussian curvature which have not proved sufficient in themselves for the case of the human face. This paper details the calculation of principal curvature for a particular data set, the calculation of general surface descriptors based on curvature, and the calculation of face specific descriptors based both on curvature features and a priori knowledge about the structure of the face. These face specific descriptors can be incorporated into many different recognition strategies. A system that implements one such strategy, depth template comparison, giving recognition rates between 80% and 90% is described.

  4. Compensation of Gaussian curvature in developable cones is local

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin W.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2009-10-01

    We use the angular deficit scheme [V. Borrelli, F. Cazals, and J.-M. Morvan, Comput. Aided Geom. Des. 20, 319 (2003)] to determine the distribution of Gaussian curvature in developable cones (d-cones) [E. Cerda, S. Chaieb, F. Melo, and L. Mahadevan, Nature (London) 401, 46 (1999)] numerically. These d-cones are formed by pushing a thin elastic sheet into a circular container. Negative Gaussian curvatures are identified at the rim where the sheet touches the container. Around the rim there are two narrow bands with positive Gaussian curvatures. The integral of the (negative) Gaussian curvature near the rim is almost completely compensated by that of the two adjacent bands. This suggests that the Gauss-Bonnet theorem which constrains the integral of Gaussian curvature globally does not explain the spontaneous curvature cancellation phenomenon [T. Liang and T. A. Witten, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046604 (2006)]. The locality of the compensation seems to increase for decreasing d-cone thickness. The angular deficit scheme also provides a way to confirm the curvature cancellation phenomenon.

  5. Planck-Scale Dual-Curvature Lensing and Spacetime Noncommutativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently realized that Planck-scale momentum-space curvature, which is expected in some approaches to the quantum-gravity problem, can produce dual-curvature lensing, a feature which mainly affects the direction of observation of particles emitted by very distant sources. Several gray areas remain in our understanding of dual-curvature lensing, including the possibility that it might be just a coordinate artifact and the possibility that it might be in some sense a by-product of the better studied dual-curvature redshift. We stress that data reported by the IceCube neutrino telescope should motivate a more vigorous effort of investigation of dual-curvature lensing, and we observe that studies of the recently proposed “ρ-Minkowski noncommutative spacetime” could be valuable from this perspective. Through a dedicated ρ-Minkowski analysis, we show that dual-curvature lensing is not merely a coordinate artifact and that it can be present even in theories without dual-curvature redshift.

  6. Curvature Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Curvature was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using the ArcGIS 3D Analyst "Curvature" Tool. Curvature describes the rate of change of...

  7. Profile Curvature Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profile curvature was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using the ArcGIS 3D Analyst "Curvature" Tool. Profile curvature describes the rate...

  8. Membrane Shape Instability Induced by Protein Crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiming; Atefi, Ehsan; Baumgart, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Peripheral proteins can bend membranes through several different mechanisms, including scaffolding, wedging, oligomerization, and crowding. The crowding effect in particular has received considerable attention recently, in part because it is a colligative mechanism-implying that it could, in principle, be explored by any peripheral protein. Here we sought to clarify to what extent this mechanism is exploited by endocytic accessory proteins. We quantitatively investigate membrane curvature generation by means of a GUV shape stability assay. We found that the amount of crowding required to induce membrane curvature is correlated with membrane tension. Importantly, we also revealed that at the same membrane tension, the crowding mechanism requires far higher protein coverage to induce curvature changes compared to those observed for the endophilin BAR domain, serving here as an example of an endocytic accessory protein. Our results are important for the design of membrane-targeted biosensors as well as the understanding of mechanisms of biological membrane shaping. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes with controlled ion transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui

    2011-12-01

    Ion-containing block copolymers hold promise as next-generation polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) materials due to their capability to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures facilitating proton transport over a wide range of conditions. Ion-containing block copolymers, sulfonated poly(styrene- b-vinylidene fluoride-b-styrene), with varied degrees of sulfonation were synthesized. The synthetic strategy involved a new approach to chain-end functionalized poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a macro-initiator followed by atom transfer polymerization of styrene and sulfonation. Characterization of the polymers were extensively carried out by 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance and Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry analysis. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to study the phase separation and self-assembled morphology. Strong dependence of ion exchange capacity, water absorption, morphology and proton conductivity on the degree of sulfonation has been found. It has been observed that the conductivities of the block copolymers are considerably higher than the random copolymers of polystyrene and sulfonated polystyrene possessing similar ion exchange capacities. Copolymers of vinylidene fluoride and perfluoro(4-methyl-3,6-dioxane-7-ene) sulfonyl fluoride containing amino end-groups were synthesized for the first time. The prepared aminoterminated polymers underwent cross-linking reactions with 1,3,5-benzene triisocyanate to form proton conductive networks. The chain-end crosslinked fluoropolymer membranes exhibited excellent thermal, hydrolytic and oxidative stabilities. The ion exchange capacity, water uptake, the state of absorbed water, and transport properties of the membranes were found to be highly dependent upon the chemical composition of the copolymers. The cross-linked membranes showed extremely low methanol permeability, while maintaining high proton

  10. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman NNAA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab Rahman,1 Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh,1 Raymond Lee2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation age of 66.63 (5.16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66° and 14.10° (10.58°, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r=-0.23, P<0.05; forced vital capacity: r=-0.32, P<0.05, quiet expiration intercostal thickness (r=-0.22, P<0.05 and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness (r=-0.21, P<0.05. The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength (r=-0.29, P<0.05 and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration (r=-0.22, P<0.05. However, respiratory rate

  11. On the transverse Scalar Curvature of a Compact Sasaki Manifold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiyong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We show that the standard picture regarding the notion of stability of constant scalar curvature metrics in Kähler geometry described by S.K. Donaldson [10, 11], which involves the geometry of infinitedimensional groups and spaces, can be applied to the constant scalar curvature metrics in Sasaki geometry with only few modification. We prove that the space of Sasaki metrics is an infinite dimensional symmetric space and that the transverse scalar curvature of a Sasaki metric is a moment map of the strict contactomophism group

  12. Public and private space curvature in Robertson-Walker universes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, W.

    1981-05-01

    The question is asked: what space curvature would a fundamental observer in an ideal Robertson-Walker universe obtain by direct local spatial measurements, i.e., without reference to the motion pattern of the other galaxies? The answer is that he obtains the curvatureK of his “private” space generated by all the geodesics orthogonal to his world line at the moment in question, and that ˜K is related to the usual curvatureK=k/R 2 of the “public” space of galaxies byK=K+H 2/c2, whereH is Hubble's parameter.

  13. On controllability and system constraints of the linear models of proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, Verica

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we first show that the linear models of proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane, PEM) and solid oxide (SO) fuel cells, commonly used in power and energy literature, are not controllable. The source of uncontrollability is the equation for pressure of the water vapor that is only affected by the fuel cell current, which in fact is a disturbance in this system and cannot be controlled by the given model inputs: inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen. Being uncontrollable these models are not good candidates for studying control of dynamic processes in PEM and SO fuel cells. However, due to their simplicity, they can be used in hybrid configurations with other energy producing devices such as photovoltaic (solar) cells, wind turbine, micro gas turbine, battery (ultra capacitor) to demonstrate some other phenomena, but not for control purposes unless the hybrid models formed in such hybrid configurations are controllable. Testing controllability of such hybrid models is mandatory. Secondly, we introduce some algebraic constraints that follow from the model dynamics and the Nernst open-loop fuel cell voltage formula. These constraints must be satisfied in simulation of considered fuel cell modes, for example, via MATLAB/Simulink or any other computer software package.

  14. Magnetic field on fouling control of ultrafiltration membranes applied in treatment of a synthetic textile effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Franciele; Zin, Guilherme; de Souza, Selene M A G U; Luccio, Marco Di; de Souza, Antonio A U; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Membrane performance is decreased by fouling, reducing permeate flux and membrane lifespan. This paper assesses ultrafiltration of a model textile effluent assisted by permanent magnetic field as an alternative to improve the water permeability recovery. Ultrafiltration was performed in a tangential module and model solutions, composed of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and sodium sulphate (Na2SO4). The feed was permeated through 30 kDa polysulphone membrane with and without the presence of a permanent magnetic field of 0.41 T, perpendicular to the membrane surface. Magnetic induction (MI) of feed solution was also investigated by recirculation of the feed stream through the magnetic field for 3 h. The increase in feed concentration did not affect permeate flux, while the presence of salt resulted in a severe flux decline. Effective water permeability recovery was obtained when the magnetic field was applied in the ultrafiltration process, although the MI of the CMC and Na2SO4 solutions also caused some enhancement in permeability recovery. Scanning electron microscopy images showed differences between the assays done with and without the presence of magnetic field. The magnetic field application in ultrafiltration of CMC and Na2SO4 solutions has proved to be an attractive alternative for improving the permeability recovery.

  15. PAN composite membrane with different solvent affinities controlled by surface modification methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dragan, E. S.; Mihai, M.; Schauer, Jan; Ghimici, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 18 (2005), s. 4161-4171 ISSN 0887-624X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : composite membrane * functionalization of polymers * polyelectrolytes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.027, year: 2005

  16. Membrane contactors in the beverage industry for controlling the water gas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuoli, Alessandra; Drioli, Enrico; Moretti, Ugo

    2003-03-01

    In the work described here, membrane contactors are used for coupling the removal of species (oxygen and hydrogen sulfide) present in the water with the water carbonation process. We include both experiments and a theoretical study devoted to the analysis of the transport phenomena that occur in the membrane contactor. The main resistance to mass transport was located at the liquid side. Correlations between Sherwood and Reynolds numbers on the shell side that are suitable for the membrane contactor used to carry out our experiments have been determined. In particular, for Re > 1.6, the expression proposed by Yang and Cussler in 1986: Sh = 0.90 Re(0.40) Sc(0.33) describes the behavior of the system; whereas, for Re between 0.03 and 0.3, a new expression is proposed: Sh = 0.435 Re(1.2)Sc(0.33). A comparison with traditional equipment is also furnished. Membrane contactors offer reduced size, CO(2) consumption, and capital costs.

  17. Efficacy of bacterial cellulose membrane for the treatment of lower limbs chronic varicose ulcers: a randomized and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCIANA MARINS CAVALCANTI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of Bacterial Cellulose (BC membrane dressings in the treatment of lower limb venous ulcers. Methods: we carried out a prospective, randomized, controlled study of 25 patients with chronic venous ulcer disease in the lower limbs from the Angiology and Vascular Surgery Service of the Federal University of Pernambuco Hospital and from the Salgado Polyclinic of the County Health Department, Caruaru, Pernambuco. We randomly assigned patients to two groups: control group, receiving dressings with triglyceride oil (11 patients and experimental group, treated with BC membrane (14 patients. We followed the patients for a period of 120 days. Results: There was a reduction in the wound area in both groups. There were no infections or reactions to the product in any of the groups. Patients in the BC group showed decreased pain and earlier discontinuation of analgesic use. Conclusion: BC membrane can be used as a dressing for the treatment of varicose ulcers of the lower limbs.

  18. Large Deformation Mechanics of Plasma Membrane Chained Vesicles in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosawada, Tadashi; Sanada, Kouichi; Takano, Tetsuo

    The clathrin-coated pits, vesicles and chained vesicles on the inner surface of the plasma membrane facilitate the cell to transport specific extracellular macromolecules. This cellular process is strongly involved with large mechanical deformations of the plasma membrane accompanied by changes in membrane curvature. The assembly of the clathrin coat is thought to provide curvature into the membrane. Hence, effects of in-plane shear elasticity due to these coat structure may be significant on the vesicular mechanics. In this study, large deformation mechanics of plasma membrane chained vesicles in cells have been formulated based on minimization of bending and in-plane shear strain energy of the membrane. Effects of outer surrounding cytoplasmic flat membrane upon mechanically stable shapes of the vesicles were revealed, while effects of in-plane shear elasticity were partly discussed.

  19. Membrane Buckling Induced by Curved Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Martin; Crow, Daniel J. G.; Joanny, Jean-François

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel buckling instability relevant to membrane budding in eukaryotic cells. In this mechanism, curved filaments bind to a lipid bilayer without changing its intrinsic curvature. As more and more filaments adsorb, newly added ones are more and more strained, which destabilizes the flat membrane. We perform a linear stability analysis of filament-dressed membranes and find that the buckling threshold is within reasonable in vivo parameter values. We account for the formation of long tubes previously observed in cells and in purified systems. We study strongly deformed dressed membranes and their bifurcation diagram numerically. Our mechanism could be validated by a simple experiment.

  20. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  1. On hypersurfaces with two distinct principal curvatures in space forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    simple principal curvatures is locally conformal to the. Riemannian product of two constant curved manifolds. We also obtain some charac- terizations for the Clifford hypersurfaces in terms of the trace free part of the second fundamental form.

  2. Abnormalities of Penile Curvature: Chordee and Penile Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Montag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital chordee and penile torsion are commonly observed in the presence of hypospadias, but can also be seen in boys with the meatus in its orthotopic position. Varying degrees of penile curvature are observed in 4–10% of males in the absence of hypospadias. Penile torsion can be observed at birth or in older boys who were circumcised at birth. Surgical management of congenital curvature without hypospadias can present a challenge to the pediatric urologist. The most widely used surgical techniques include penile degloving and dorsal plication. This paper will review the current theories for the etiology of penile curvature, discuss the spectrum of severity of congenital chordee and penile torsion, and present varying surgical techniques for the correction of penile curvature in the absence of hypospadias.

  3. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Young, Erin C.; Robertson, Christian A.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Romanov, Alexey E. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Beltz, Glenn E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  4. Stability of the cylindrical shell of variable curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerre, Karl

    1951-01-01

    This report is a first attempt to devise a calculation method for representing the buckling behavior of cylindrical shells of variable curvature. The problem occurs, for instance, in dimensioning wing noses, the stability of which is decisively influenced by the variability of curvature. The calculation is made possible by simplifying the stability equations (permissible for the shell of small curvature) and by assuming that the curvature 1/R as a function of the arc lengths can be represented by a very few Fourier terms. The formulas for the special case of an ellipse-like half oval with an axis ratio 1/3 ?= e ?= 1 under compression in longitudinal direction,shear, and a combination of shear and compression were evaluated. However, the results can also be applied approximately to an unsymmetrical oval-shell segment under compression, shear, and bending so that the numerical values contained in the diagrams 10 to 12 represent directly dimensioning data for the wing nose.

  5. On the projective curvature tensor of generalized Sasakian-space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    space-forms under some conditions regarding projective curvature tensor. All the results obtained in this paper are in the form of necessary and sufficient conditions. Keywords: Generalized Sasakian-space-forms; projectively flat; ...

  6. Flow derivatives and curvatures for a normal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, G.

    2018-03-01

    A detached bow shock wave is strongest where it is normal to the upstream velocity. While the jump conditions across the shock are straightforward, many properties, such as the shock's curvatures and derivatives of the pressure, along and normal to a normal shock, are indeterminate. A novel procedure is introduced for resolving the indeterminacy when the unsteady flow is three-dimensional and the upstream velocity may be nonuniform. Utilizing this procedure, normal shock relations are provided for the nonunique orientation of the flow plane and the corresponding shock's curvatures and, e.g., the downstream normal derivatives of the pressure and the velocity components. These algebraic relations explicitly show the dependence of these parameters on the shock's shape and the upstream velocity gradient. A simple relation, valid only for a normal shock, is obtained for the average curvatures. Results are also obtained when the shock is an elliptic paraboloid shock. These derivatives are both simple and proportional to the average curvature.

  7. Translating Solitons of Mean Curvature Flow of Noncompact Submanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guanghan; Tian Daping; Wu Chuanxi

    2011-01-01

    We prove the existence and asymptotic behavior of rotationally symmetric solitons of mean curvature flow for noncompact submanifolds in Euclidean and Minkowski spaces, which generalizes part of the corresponding results for hypersurfaces of Jian.

  8. Gauge and non-gauge curvature tensor copies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1982-10-01

    A procedure for constructing curvature tensor copies is discussed using the anholonomic geometrical framework. The corresponding geometries are compared and the notion of gauge copy is elucidated. An explicit calculation is also made. (author)

  9. Higher-order curvature terms and extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun

    1990-01-01

    We consider higher-order curvature terms in context of the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity, and investigate the effects of these terms on extended inflationary theories. We find that the higher-order curvature terms tend to speed up inflation, although the original extended-inflation solutions are stable when these terms are small. Analytical solutions are found for two extreme cases: when the higher-order curvature terms are small, and when they dominate. A conformal transformation is employed in solving the latter case, and some of the subtleties in this technique are discussed. We note that percolation is less likely to occur when the higher-order curvature terms are present. An upper bound on α is expected if we are to avoid excessive and inadequate percolation of true-vacuum bubbles

  10. Constant scalar curvature hypersurfaces in extended Schwarzschild space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, M. J.; Frauendiener, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a class of spherically symmetric hypersurfaces in the Kruskal extension of the Schwarzschild space-time. The hypersurfaces have constant negative scalar curvature, so they are hyperboloidal in the regions of space-time which are asymptotically flat

  11. Inverse curvature flows in asymptotically Robertson Walker spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Heiko

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we consider inverse curvature flows in a Lorentzian manifold N which is the topological product of the real numbers with a closed Riemannian manifold and equipped with a Lorentzian metric having a future singularity so that N is asymptotically Robertson Walker. The flow speeds are future directed and given by 1 / F where F is a homogeneous degree one curvature function of class (K*) of the principal curvatures, i.e. the n-th root of the Gauss curvature. We prove longtime existence of these flows and that the flow hypersurfaces converge to smooth functions when they are rescaled with a proper factor which results from the asymptotics of the metric.

  12. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Lee, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar) were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal) were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation) age of 66.63 (5.16) years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation) thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66°) and 14.10° (10.58°), respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r =-0.23, P <0.05; forced vital capacity: r =-0.32, P <0.05), quiet expiration intercostal thickness ( r =-0.22, P <0.05) and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness ( r =-0.21, P <0.05). The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength ( r =-0.29, P <0.05) and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration ( r =-0.22, P <0.05). However, respiratory rate was correlated neither with thoracic nor with lumbar curvatures. The findings of this study suggest that increase in both thoracic and lumbar curvatures is correlated with decrease in respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle thickness and some parameters of lung function. Clinically, both thoracic and

  13. Novel Dual-Functional Membrane for Controlling Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Brinker; George Xomeritakis; C.-Y. Tsai; Ying-Bing Jiang

    2009-04-30

    CO{sub 2} captured from coal-fired power plants represents three-quarters of the total cost of an entire carbon sequestration process. Conventional amine absorption or cryogenic separation requires high capital investment and is very energy intensive. Our novel membrane process is energy efficient with great potential for economical CO{sub 2} capture. Three classes of microporous sol-gel derived silica-based membranes were developed for selective CO{sub 2} removal under simulated flue gas conditions (SFG), e.g. feed of 10% vol. CO{sub 22} in N{sub 2}, 1 atm total pressure, T = 50-60 C, RH>50%, SO2>10 ppm. A novel class of amine-functional microporous silica membranes was prepared using an amine-derivatized alkoxysilane precursor, exhibiting enhanced (>70) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity in the presence of H{sub 2}O vapor, but its CO{sub 2} permeance was lagging (<1 MPU). Pure siliceous membranes showed higher CO{sub 2} permeance (1.5-2 MPU) but subsequent densification occurred under prolonged SFG conditions. We incorporated NiO in the microporous network up to a loading of Ni:Si = 0.2 to retard densification and achieved CO2 permeance of 0.5 MPU and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity of 50 after 163 h exposure to SFG conditions. However, CO{sub 2} permeance should reach greater than 2.0 MPU in order to achieve the cost of electricity (COE) goal set by DOE. We introduced the atomic layer deposition (ALD), a molecular deposition technique that substantially reduces membrane thickness with intent to improve permeance and selectivity. The deposition technique also allows the incorporation of Ni or Ag cations by proper selection of metallorganic precursors. In addition, preliminary economic analysis provides a sensitivity study on the performance and cost of the proposed membranes for CO{sub 2} capture. Significant progress has been made toward the practical applications for CO{sub 2} capture. (1 MPU = 1.0 cm{sup 3}(STP){center_dot}cm-2{center_dot}min-1{center_dot}atm-1)

  14. Curvature-driven acceleration: a utopia or a reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sudipta; Banerjee, Narayan; Dadhich, Naresh

    2006-01-01

    The present work shows that a combination of nonlinear contributions from the Ricci curvature in Einstein field equations can drive a late time acceleration of expansion of the universe. The transit from the decelerated to the accelerated phase of expansion takes place smoothly without having to resort to a study of asymptotic behaviour. This result emphasizes the need for thorough and critical examination of models with nonlinear contribution from the curvature

  15. Curvature-driven acceleration: a utopia or a reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sudipta [Relativity and Cosmology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta-700 032 (India); Banerjee, Narayan [Relativity and Cosmology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta-700 032 (India); Dadhich, Naresh [Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2006-06-21

    The present work shows that a combination of nonlinear contributions from the Ricci curvature in Einstein field equations can drive a late time acceleration of expansion of the universe. The transit from the decelerated to the accelerated phase of expansion takes place smoothly without having to resort to a study of asymptotic behaviour. This result emphasizes the need for thorough and critical examination of models with nonlinear contribution from the curvature.

  16. Inflation in a shear-or curvature-dominated universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    We show that new inflation occurs even if the universe is shear-or (negative) curvature-dominated when the phase transition begins. In such situations the size of a causally coherent region, after inflation, is only slightly smaller (by powers, but not by exponential factors) than the usual result. The creation and evolution of density perturbations is unaffected. This result is marked contrast to 'old' inflation, where shear- or curvature-domination could quench inflation. (orig.)

  17. New energy definition for higher-curvature gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deser, S.; Tekin, Bayram

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel but natural definition of conserved quantities for gravity models of quadratic and higher order in curvature. Based on the spatial asymptotics of curvature rather than of metric, it avoids the more egregious problems - such as zero-energy 'theorems' and failure in flat backgrounds--in this fourth-derivative realm. In D>4, the present expression indeed correctly discriminates between second-derivative Gauss-Bonnet and generic, fourth-derivative actions

  18. [The preparation and evaluation of the quality control materials for detection of platelet membrane glycoproteins by flow cytometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y Q; Gong, Y; Qu, C X; You, R; Li, L P; Xing, L S; Wang, J Z

    2017-04-11

    Objective: To prepare the quality control material for detection of platelet membrane glycoproteins by flowcytometry and evaluate the appearance traits, homogeneity and stability of it. Methods: Fresh platelets from the blood group O donors were fixed by the certain concentration of aldehyde solution and then washed by the imidazole buffer. After that, adding certain concentration of lyophilized protection solution into the preparations. The preparations were dispensed to be lyophilized and then were kept refrigerated in 2-8 ℃.According to the protocol of control of lyophilized biological products, the quality indicator for monitoring the prepared process, containing the appearance traits, the residual water, the platelet recovery and the rehydration quality were evaluated. The homogeneity and stability of these preparations were evaluated according to the CNAS-GL03 Guidance on evaluating the homogeneity and stability of samples used for proficiency testing and the ISO Guide 35 Reference material - general and statistical principles for certification . Results: The appearance traits and the rehydration quality of the quality control materials meeted the requirements, with the residual water distributed between 3.96% to 4.04% and the platelet recovery rate ranged from 68% to 72%.The homogeneity evaluation showed that there was no significant difference among the groups( P >0.05). The stability test indicated that the positive rate of platelet membrane glycoproteins CD42b, CD41 and CD62P of the quality control material was -0.14%, -0.14% and 0.74%, respectively, at 16 weeks after storage. There was no linear trend between the percentage of positive platelets with membrane glycoproteins and time( P >0.05). Conclusions: The quality control material for detection of platelet membrane glycoproteins by flow cytometry prepared by us meets the needs of the appearance traits, the residual water, the rehydration quality, the homogeneity and the longtime stability.It is

  19. Synthesis of Silicalite Membrane with an Aluminum-Containing Surface for Controlled Modification of Zeolitic Pore Entries for Enhanced Gas Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The separation of small molecule gases by membrane technologies can help performance enhancement and process intensification for emerging advanced fossil energy systems with CO2 capture capacity. This paper reports the demonstration of controlled modification of zeolitic channel size for the MFI-type zeolite membranes to enhance the separation of small molecule gases such as O2 and N2. Pure-silica MFI-type zeolite membranes were synthesized on porous α-alumina disc substrates with and without an aluminum-containing thin skin on the outer surface of zeolite membrane. The membranes were subsequently modified by on-stream catalytic cracking deposition (CCD of molecular silica to reduce the effective openings of the zeolitic channels. Such a pore modification caused the transition of gas permeation from the N2-selective gaseous diffusion mechanism in the pristine membrane to the O2-selective activated diffusion mechanism in the modified membrane. The experimental results indicated that the pore modification could be effectively limited within the aluminum-containing surface of the MFI zeolite membrane to minimize the mass transport resistance for O2 permeation while maintaining its selectivity. The implications of pore modification on the size-exclusion-enabled gas selectivity were discussed based on the kinetic molecular theory. In light of the theoretical analysis, experimental investigation was performed to further enhance the membrane separation selectivity by chemical liquid deposition of silica into the undesirable intercrystalline spaces.

  20. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle McCabe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading.

  1. Design of a curvature sensor using a flexoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X.; Huang, W. B.; Kwon, S. R.; Yang, S. R.; Jiang, X. N.; Yuan, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    A curvature sensor based on flexoelectricity using Ba0.64Sr0.36TiO3 (BST) material is proposed and developed in this paper. The working principle of the sensor is based on the flexoelectricity, exhibiting coupling between mechanical strain gradient and electric polarization. A BST curvature sensor is lab prepared using a conventional solid state processing method. The curvature sensing is demonstrated in four point bending tests of the beam under harmonic loads. BST sensors are attached on both side surfaces of an aluminum beam, located symmetrically with respect to its neutral axis. Analyses have shown that the epoxy bonding layer plays a critical role for curvature transfer. Consequently a shear lag effect is taken into account for extracting actual curvature from the sensor measurement. Experimental results demonstrated good linearity from the charge outputs under the frequencies tests and showed a sensor sensitivity of 30.78pC•m in comparison with 32.48pC•m from theoretical prediction. The BST sensor provides a direct curvature measure instead of using traditional strain gage through interpolation and may offer an optional avenue for on-line and in-situ structural health monitoring.

  2. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Fischermeier, E. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Pospisil, P. [A.S.C. R., Prague (Czech Republic). J. Heyrovsky Inst. Physical Chemistry; Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-07-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P{sub 1B}-type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  3. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, Karim; Pospisil, P.; Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-01-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P 1B -type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  4. Rab33B Controls Hepatitis B Virus Assembly by Regulating Core Membrane Association and Nucleocapsid Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusch, Christina; Döring, Tatjana; Prange, Reinhild

    2017-06-21

    Many viruses take advantage of cellular trafficking machineries to assemble and release new infectious particles. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that the Golgi/autophagosome-associated Rab33B is required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) propagation in hepatoma cell lines. While Rab33B is dispensable for the secretion of HBV subviral envelope particles, its knockdown reduced the virus yield to 20% and inhibited nucleocapsid (NC) formation and/or NC trafficking. The overexpression of a GDP-restricted Rab33B mutant phenocopied the effect of deficit Rab33B, indicating that Rab33B-specific effector proteins may be involved. Moreover, we found that HBV replication enhanced Rab33B expression. By analyzing HBV infection cycle steps, we identified a hitherto unknown membrane targeting module in the highly basic C-terminal domain of the NC-forming core protein. Rab33B inactivation reduced core membrane association, suggesting that membrane platforms participate in HBV assembly reactions. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses provided further hints that the viral core, rather than the envelope, is the main target for Rab33B intervention. Rab33B-deficiency reduced core protein levels without affecting viral transcription and hampered core/NC sorting to envelope-positive, intracellular compartments. Together, these results indicate that Rab33B is an important player in intracellular HBV trafficking events, guiding core transport to NC assembly sites and/or NC transport to budding sites.

  5. Enzymatic treatment for controlling irreversible membrane fouling in cross-flow humic acid-fed ultrafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chien-Hwa [Department of Civil and Environment Engineering, Nanya Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Fang, Lung-Chen; Lateef, Shaik Khaja [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chung-Hsin, E-mail: chunghsinwu@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien Kung Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Fang [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Exploring reasonable ways to remove foulant is of great importance in order to allow sustainable operation of ultrafiltration (UF) membranes in water/wastewater treatment technology. Compounds of organic and inorganic origin largely contribute to irreversible fouling. This study attempted to remove problem of UF membrane fouling by using four different enzymes including {alpha}-amylase, lipase, cellulase and protease. This investigation showed that none of the above mentioned enzymes was found to be effective for the removal of foulant when used alone. However, when these enzymes were used in combination with NaOH and citric acid, about 90% cleaning was achieved. The addition of non-ionic surfactant to the enzymatic solution appears to increase the efficiency of flux recovery by reducing the adhesion of foulant species to the membrane surface through the decrease of contact angle. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were employed to qualitatively illustrate the foulant characteristics. The surface roughness through AFM was used to explain the potential mechanism for the enzymatic cleaning.

  6. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Diby

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors. PMID:25147787

  7. Composite membrane of bacterially-derived cellulose and molecularly imprinted polymer for use as a transdermal enantioselective controlled-release system of racemic propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodhibukkana, Chatchada; Srichana, Teerapol; Kaewnopparat, Sanae; Tangthong, Naruedom; Bouking, Pisit; Martin, Gary P; Suedee, Roongnapa

    2006-06-12

    A composite membrane for transdermal delivery of S-propranolol enantiomer was developed based on the controlled pore functionalization of bacterial cellulose membranes using a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer synthesis. The reactive pore-filling of an asymmetric porous cellulose membrane with a MIP thin-layer was effected using a silanized coupler as an additional anchor for the MIP. MIP thin-layers with specific binding sites for S-propranolol were synthesized by copolymerization of methacrylic acid with a cross-linker, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of S-propranolol as the template molecule and the latter was subsequently extracted. Selective transport of S-propranolol through the MIP composite membrane was obtained, although this was determined mostly by the parent cellulose membrane with some ancillary contributory effect from the MIP layer. In addition, an enantioselectivity in the transport of propranolol prodrug enantiomers was found, suggesting that the shape and functional groups orientation, which are similar to that of the print molecule were essential for enantiomeric recognition of the MIP composite membrane. The enantioselectivity of S-MIP membranes was also shown when the release of propranolol enantiomers was studied in vitro using rat skin, with racemic propranolol contained in the donor compartment. The composite membrane of bacterially-derived cellulose and molecularly imprinted polymer may have great potential for use as a transdermal enantioselective controlled-release system for racemic propranolol.

  8. Reconstitutions of mitochondrial inner membrane remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Mariam; Meinecke, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Biological membranes exhibit function-related shapes, leading to a plethora of complex and beautiful cell and cell organellar morphologies. Most if not all of these structures have evolved for a particular physiological reason. The shapes of these structures are formed by physical forces that operate on membranes. To create particular shaped cells and cell organelles, membranes must undergo deformations which are determined by the structure and elasticity of the membrane and this process is most probable driven by proteins, lipids and/or interplay of both Zimmerberg and Kozlov (2006). Therefore, an important question of current cell biology in conjunction with physics and mathematics is to elucidate the functional cause for these different membrane morphologies as well as how they are formed. One of the most peculiar membrane shapes is observed in mitochondria. These organelles are surrounded by two membranes and especially the convoluted inner membrane displays a complex ultra-structure. A molecular understanding of how this membrane is shaped is missing to a large extent. Unlike membrane remodeling in classical curvature-dependent processes like clathrin-mediated endocytosis, mitochondria are most likely shaped by integral membrane proteins. Following, we will review the current knowledge of inner mitochondrial membrane architecture and discuss recent findings and advances in understanding the factors that shape this membrane. We will address pending questions especially with regard to the experimentally challenging nature of investigating membrane bending by hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of epithelial and fibroblastic cell behavior on nano/micro-topographic PCL membranes produced by crystallinity control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Kaya, F Betül; Beşkardeş, Işıl Gerçek

    2011-06-15

    In this study, the relationship between the cellular morphology and the material surface topography was investigated. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) membranes were prepared in a wide range of surface wettabilities by means of crystallinity-controlled solvent casting process. Membrane surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and static/dynamic water contact angle measurements. It was found that solvent evaporation and non-solvent (methanol) addition to the solvent (THF) are the most decisive parameters to change the surface topography. The non-solvent addition and the decrease in solvent evaporation temperature from room temperature to -20 °C caused increased polymeric chain mobility and crystallization time. Such changes in crystallization parameters led to the formation of micro/nano-sized features on the membrane. Cell culture studies indicated that in contrast to Madin Darby kidney (MDBK) epithelial cells, L929 mouse fibroblast preferred rough and porous surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Controlled sulfonation of poly(ether sulfone using phthalic anhydride as catalyst and its membrane performance for fuel cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seikh Jiyaur Rahaman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells are one of the most emerging alternative energy technologies under development. A novel proton exchange membrane sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES was developed by homogeneous method using phthalic anhydride as catalyst and chlorosulfonic acid as sulfonating agent to control the sulfonation reaction. The method of sulfonation was optimized by varying the reaction time and concentration of the catalyst. The structure of the SPES was studied by 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extent of sulfonation was determined by ion exchange capacity studies. The thermal and mechanical stabilities were studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA respectively. DMA results show that the storage modulus increased with increase in degree of sulfonation (DS and water uptake of SPES increased with DS. The proton conductivity of SPES (34% DS measured by impedance spectroscopy was found to be 0.03S/cm at 80%RH and 100°C. Also, current-voltage polarization characteristics of SPES membranes offer a favourable alternative PEM due to the thermal stability and cost effective than perfluorinated ionomers.

  11. Is the fluid mosaic (and the accompanying raft hypothesis a suitable model to describe fundamental features of biological membranes? What may be missing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Bagatolli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The structure, dynamics, and stability of lipid bilayers are controlled by thermodynamic forces, leading to overall tensionless membranes with a distinct lateral organization and a conspicuous lateral pressure profile. Bilayers are also subject to built-in curvature-stress instabilities that may be released locally or globally in terms of morphological changes leading to the formation of non-lamellar and curved structures. A key controller of the bilayer’s propensity to form curved structures is the average molecular shape of the different lipid molecules. Via the curvature stress, molecular shape mediates a coupling to membrane-protein function and provides a set of physical mechanisms for formation of lipid domains and laterally differentiated regions in the plane of the membrane. Unfortunately, these relevant physical features of membranes are often ignored in the most popular models for biological membranes. Results from a number of experimental and theoretical studies emphasize the significance of these fundamental physical properties and call for a refinement of the fluid mosaic model (and the accompanying raft hypothesis.

  12. Reflectors Made from Membranes Stretched Between Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Tolomeo, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight cylindrical reflectors of a proposed type would be made from reflective membranes stretched between pairs of identically curved and identically oriented end rails. In each such reflector, the curvature of the two beams would define the reflector shape required for the intended application. For example, the beams could be curved to define a reflector of parabolic cross section, so that light incident along the axis of symmetry perpendicular to the cylindrical axis would be focused to a line. In addition, by applying suitable forces to the ends of the beams, one could bend the beams to adjust the reflector surface figure to within a precision of the order of the wavelength of the radiation to be reflected. The figure depicts an example of beams shaped so that in the absence of applied forces, each would be flat on one side and would have a radius of curvature R on the opposite side. Alternatively, the curvature of the reflector-membrane side could be other than circular. In general, the initial curvature would be chosen to optimize the final reflector shape. Then by applying forces F between the beam ends in the positions and orientations shown in the figure, one could bend beams to adjust their shape to a closer approximation of the desired precise circular or noncircular curvature.

  13. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  14. The Egg Carton: Theory of a Periodic Superstructure of Some Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Rüdiger; Helfrich, Wolfgang

    1996-02-01

    A model calculation of the square membrane superstructure of some mixed lipid bilayers is presented. It involves bending elasticity of higher than quadratic order in the principal curvatures and employs Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Dual curvature acoustically damped concentrating collector. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.A.; Rausch, R.A.

    1980-05-01

    A development program was conducted to investigate the design and performance parameters of a novel, dual curvature, concentrating solar collector. The reflector of the solar collector is achieved with a stretched-film reflective surface that approximates a hyperbolic paraboloid and is capable of line-focusing at concentration ratios ranging from 10 to 20X. A prototype collector was designed based on analytical and experimental component trade-off activities as well as economic analyses of solar thermal heating and cooling systems incorporating this type of collector. A prototype collector incorporating six 0.66 x 1.22 m (2 x 4 ft) was fabricated and subjected to a limited thermal efficiency test program. A peak efficiency of 36% at 121/sup 0/C (250/sup 0/F) was achieved based upon the gross aperture area. Commercialization activities were conducted, including estimated production costs of $134.44/m/sup 2/ ($12.49/ft/sup 2/) for the collector assembly (including a local suntracker and controls) and $24.33/m/sup 2/ ($2.26/ft/sup 2/) for the reflector subassembly.

  16. Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Miller, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase controls the expression of CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase for membrane phospholipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2017-08-11

    The PAH1 -encoded phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP), which catalyzes the committed step for the synthesis of triacylglycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae , exerts a negative regulatory effect on the level of phosphatidate used for the de novo synthesis of membrane phospholipids. This raises the question whether PAP thereby affects the expression and activity of enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis. Here, we examined the PAP-mediated regulation of CHO1 -encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (PSS), which catalyzes the committed step for the synthesis of major phospholipids via the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway. The lack of PAP in the pah1 Δ mutant highly elevated PSS activity, exhibiting a growth-dependent up-regulation from the exponential to the stationary phase of growth. Immunoblot analysis showed that the elevation of PSS activity results from an increase in the level of the enzyme encoded by CHO1 Truncation analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the CHO1 promoter indicated that Cho1 expression in the pah1 Δ mutant is induced through the inositol-sensitive upstream activation sequence (UAS INO ), a cis -acting element for the phosphatidate-controlled Henry (Ino2-Ino4/Opi1) regulatory circuit. The abrogation of Cho1 induction and PSS activity by a CHO1 UAS INO mutation suppressed pah1 Δ effects on lipid synthesis, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane morphology, and lipid droplet formation, but not on growth at elevated temperature. Loss of the DGK1 -encoded diacylglycerol kinase, which converts diacylglycerol to phosphatidate, partially suppressed the pah1 Δ-mediated induction of Cho1 and PSS activity. Collectively, these data showed that PAP activity controls the expression of PSS for membrane phospholipid synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Controlling the morphology and performance of FO membrane via adjusting the atmosphere humidity during casting procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hao-Ran; Cao, Gui-Ping; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Song, Chen-Chen; Fang, Xu; Wang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received great interest for its considerable potential in a wide range of fields. In this work, the morphology and performance of FO membrane were regulated by adjusting the atmosphere humidity (HC) of casting procedure. The polysulfone support layer was casted under various atmosphere humidity levels ranging from 40% to 80%. By multi-techniques such as SEM, AFM, and XPS, it was proved that the atmosphere humidity had modified the surface morphology and thickness of the skin layer in support layer, which contributed up to 90% of the structure parameter, resulting in distinct morphology, thickness, and cross-linking degree of active layer. The active layer with sparse bead-like wrinkles on the smooth surface of support layer casted at HC = 65% showed the highest water permeability [26.9 (L/m2 h MPa)] and considerable low salt permeability [0.0390 (L/m2 h)]. It was found that the water flux of FO-65 was 27% and 46% higher than that of FO-80 in AL-DS and AL-FS mode, respectively, and the salt rejection was as high as 98%. Our work highlighted the importance of considering the effect of atmosphere humidity during casting when design an FO membrane for appropriate performance.

  20. Controlling the rejection of protein during membrane filtration by adding selected polyelectrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinelo, Manuel; Ferrer Roca, Carme; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    ) changing the pH, on the permeate flux and membrane transmission of bovin serum albumina (BSA) through a PVDF membrane. The addition of PS-co-AA to the feed solution resulted in significant increases of the BSA transmission at pH 7.4 as compared to the transmission of a pure BSA solution (1g....../L). The addition of pectin to BSA at pH 7.4 also resulted in higher permeate fluxes and improved BSA transmission, as compared to the individual solution of pectin or BSA. The BSA transmission decreased at lower pHs i.e. at 4.7 (isoelectric point of BSA) and 2 with each polyelectrolyte as the apparent interactions...... between the BSA and the polyelectrolyte favoured deposition and aggregation phenomena, resulting in higher fouling. The results suggest that the addition of a polyelectrolyte to a protein solution at a certain pH can dramatically modify the profile of electrostatic interactions causing fouling, and can...

  1. Phosphorylation of the Smo tail is controlled by membrane localisation and is dispensable for clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupinski, Adam P; Raabe, Isabel; Michel, Marcus; Ail, Divya; Brusch, Lutz; Weidemann, Thomas; Bökel, Christian

    2013-10-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling cascade is highly conserved and involved in development and disease throughout evolution. Nevertheless, in comparison with other pathways, our mechanistic understanding of Hh signal transduction is remarkably incomplete. In the absence of ligand, the Hh receptor Patched (Ptc) represses the key signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) through an unknown mechanism. Hh binding to Ptc alleviates this repression, causing Smo redistribution to the plasma membrane, phosphorylation and opening of the Smo cytoplasmic tail, and Smo oligomerisation. However, the order and interdependence of these events is as yet poorly understood. We have mathematically modelled and simulated Smo activation for two alternative modes of pathway activation, with Ptc primarily affecting either Smo localisation or phosphorylation. Visualising Smo activation through a novel, fluorescence-based reporter allowed us to test these competing models. Here, we show that Smo localisation to the plasma membrane is sufficient for phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail in the presence of Ptc. Using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), we also demonstrate that inactivation of Ptc by Hh induces Smo clustering irrespective of Smo phosphorylation. Our observations therefore support a model of Hh signal transduction whereby Smo subcellular localisation and not phosphorylation is the primary target of Ptc function.

  2. The speed-curvature power law of movements: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Myrka; Matic, Adam; Flash, Tamar; Gomez-Marin, Alex; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Several types of curvilinear movements obey approximately the so called 2/3 power law, according to which the angular speed varies proportionally to the 2/3 power of the curvature. The origin of the law is debated but it is generally thought to depend on physiological mechanisms. However, a recent paper (Marken and Shaffer, Exp Brain Res 88:685-690, 2017) claims that this power law is simply a statistical artifact, being a mathematical consequence of the way speed and curvature are calculated. Here we reject this hypothesis by showing that the speed-curvature power law of biological movements is non-trivial. First, we confirm that the power exponent varies with the shape of human drawing movements and with environmental factors. Second, we report experimental data from Drosophila larvae demonstrating that the power law does not depend on how curvature is calculated. Third, we prove that the law can be violated by means of several mathematical and physical examples. Finally, we discuss biological constraints that may underlie speed-curvature power laws discovered in empirical studies.

  3. Surface Curvatures and Diffraction Profiles of Sagittaly Bent Laue Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X.; Takacs, P.; Ghose, S.; Zhong, Z.; Rehak, M.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Dooryhee, E.

    2011-05-17

    The performance of a bent Laue crystal monochromator crucially depends on the sagittal and meridional bending curvatures of the crystal. To optimize the design of monochromator crystals, the surface curvatures and diffraction profiles of a set of sagittally bent Laue crystals with different aspect ratios have been studied experimentally by optical metrology and X-ray measurements. The results were confirmed with finite-element analysis using large-deformation theory. The nonlinear relationship between the curvatures necessitates an experimentally determined parameter in the theoretical modeling of the diffraction profiles. By taking into account the local stress and the aspect ratio of the sagittally bent Laue crystal, the modified analytical approach successfully predicts the rocking-curve width and the integrated reflecting power. The effect of extreme sagittal bending on the rocking curve is also discussed. To retain high reflectivity, the bending curvature should not exceed its critical value for the specified crystal geometry. Furthermore, the uniformity of the bending curvatures across the crystal surface has been examined, which suggests that the minimum crystal dimension should be approximately twice the size of the beam footprint.

  4. Performance of a sequencing-batch membrane bioreactor (SMBR) with an automatic control strategy treating high-strength swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qianwen; Jiang, Chao; Yu, Dawei; Chen, Meixue; Zhang, Junya; Wang, Yawei; Wei, Yuansong

    2018-01-15

    Due to high-strength of organic matters, nutrients and pathogen, swine wastewater is a major source of pollution to rural environment and surface water. A sequencing-batch membrane bioreactor (SMBR) system with an automatic control strategy was developed for high-strength swine wastewater treatment. Short-cut nitrification and denitrification (SND) was achieved at nitrite accumulation rate of 83.6%, with removal rates of COD, NH 4 + -N and TN at 95%, 99% and 93%, respectively, at reduced HRT of 6.0 d and TN loading rate of 0.02kgN/(kgVSS d). With effective membrane separation, the reduction of total bacteria (TB) and putative pathogen were 2.77 logs and 1%, respectively. The shift of microbial community was well responded to controlling parameters. During the SND process, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (Nitrospira) were enriched by 52 times and reduced by 2 times, respectively. The denitrifiers (Thauera) were well enriched and the diversity was enhanced. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome ''depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs

  7. Tilted membrane panel: A new module concept to maximize the impact of air bubbles for membrane fouling control in microalgae harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseus, A; Bilad, M R; Nordin, N A H M; Putra, Z A; Wirzal, M D H

    2017-10-01

    Microalgae harvesting using membrane technology is challenging because of its high fouling propensity. As an established fouling mitigation technique, efficacy of air bubbles can be improved by maximizing the impact of shear-rates in scouring foulant. In this study, it is achieved by tilting the membrane panel. We investigate the effect of tilting angle, switching period as well as aeration rate during microalgal broth filtration. Results show that higher tilting angles (up to 20°) improve permeability of up to 2.7 times of the vertical panel. In addition, operating a one-sided panel is better than a two-sided panel, in which the later involved switching mode. One-sided membrane panel only require a half of area, yet its performance is comparable with of a large-scale module. This tilted panel can lead to significant membrane cost reductions and eventually improves the competitiveness of membrane technology for microalgae harvesting application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  9. Light- and pH-dependent conformational changes in protein structure induce strong bending of purple membranes--active membranes studied by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinow, Daniel; Hampp, Norbert A

    2008-10-16

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) undergoes a conformational change during the photocycle and the proton transport through the membrane. For the first time, we could demonstrate by direct imaging of freely suspended native purple membranes (PMs) that the flat disk-like shape of PMs changes dramatically as soon as most of the BRs are in a state characterized by a deprotonated Schiff base. Light-induced shape changes are easily observed with mutated BRs of the BR-D96N type, i.e., all variants which show an increased M 2 lifetime. On the other hand, large-scale shape changes are induced by pH changes with PM containing mutated BRs of the BR-D85T type, where Asp85 is replaced for a neutral amino acid. In such PMs, all BRs are titrated simultaneously and the resulting shape of the membranes depends on the initial shape only. As the majority of PMs in the "flat" state are more or less round disks, the bent membranes often comprise bowl-like and tube-like bent structures. The method presented here enables one to derive size changes of membrane-embedded BRs on the single molecule level from "macroscopic", easily accessible data like the curvature radii observed in cryo-SEM. The potential of BR as a pH-controlled and/or light-controlled microscaled biological actuator needs further consideration.

  10. The control of mitochondrial respiration in yeast: a possible role of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, M; Horng, A; Colombini, M

    1996-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiration in yeast (S. cerevisiae) is regulated by the level of glucose in the medium. Glucose is known to inhibit respiration by repressing key enzymes in the respiratory chain. We present evidence that the early events in this inhibition include the closure of VDAC channels, the primary pathway for metabolite flow across the outer membrane. Aluminum hydroxide is known to inhibit the closure of VDAC. Addition of aluminum acetylacetonate to yeast cells, which should elevate the aluminum hydroxide concentrations in the cytoplasm, caused the inhibition of cell respiration by glucose to be delayed for up to 100 min. No significant effect of aluminum was observed in cells grown on glycerol. Yeast cells lacking the VDAC gene were also unresponsive to the addition of aluminum salt in the presence of glucose. Therefore, the closure of VDAC channels may be an early step in the inhibition of the respiration of yeast by glucose.

  11. Effect of IX dosing on polypropylene and PVDF membrane fouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Darli Theint

    2013-07-01

    The performance of ion exchange (IX) resin for organics removal from wastewater was assessed using advanced characterisation techniques for varying doses of IX. Organic characterisation using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array (PDA) and fluorescence spectroscopy (Method A), and UV254, organic carbon and organic nitrogen detectors (Method B), was undertaken on wastewater before and after magnetic IX treatment. Results showed partial removal of the biopolymer fraction at high IX doses. With increasing concentration of IX, evidence for nitrogen-containing compounds such as proteins and amino acids disappeared from the LC-OND chromatogram, complementary to the fluorescence response. A greater fluorescence response of tryptophan-like proteins (278nm/343nm) for low IX concentrations was consistent with aggregation of tryptophan-like compounds into larger aggregates, either by self-aggregation or with polysaccharides. Recycling of IX resin through multiple adsorption steps without regeneration maintained the high level of humics removal but there was no continued removal of biopolymer. Subsequent membrane filtration of the IX treated waters resulted in complex fouling trends. Filtration tests with either polypropylene (PP) or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher rates of initial fouling following treatment with high IX doses (10mL/L) compared to filtration of untreated water, while treatment with lower IX doses resulted in decreased fouling rates relative to the untreated water. However, at longer filtration times the rate of fouling of IX treated waters was lower than untreated water and the relative fouling rates corresponded to the amount of biopolymer material in the feed. It was proposed that the mode of fouling changed from pore constriction during the initial filtration period to filter cake build up at longer filtration times. The organic composition strongly influenced the rate of fouling during the initial filtration period due to

  12. Geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Lijun; Huai, Sainan; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Yunbo, E-mail: ybzhang@sxu.edu.cn

    2015-11-15

    We study the geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model. Under the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), we apply the gauge independent Berry curvature over a surface integral to calculate the Berry phase of the eigenstates for both single and two-qubit systems, which is found to be identical with the system of spin-1/2 particle in a magnetic field. We extend the idea to define a vacuum-induced geometric curvature when the system starts from an initial state with pure vacuum bosonic field. The induced geometric phase is related to the average photon number in a period which is possible to measure in the qubit–cavity system. We also calculate the geometric phase beyond the RWA and find an anomalous sudden change, which implies the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem and the Berry phases in an adiabatic cyclic evolution are ill-defined near the anti-crossing point in the spectrum.

  13. Revisiting the curvature cancellation in forced thin sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Witten, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    We revisit the numerically observed spontaneous vanishing of mean curvature on a developable cone or ``d-cone'' made by pushing a thin elastic sheet into a circular container. The deflection of the d-cone is the distance by which the sheet is pushed into the container. We investigate the ratio of the two principal curvatures versus sheet thickness h over a wider dynamic range than was used previously, holding the deflection and radius fixed. Instead of tending towards 1 as suggested by previous work, we find that the ratio scales as h 1 / 3 . Scaling arguments and geometric variants support this h 1 / 3 finding. Thus the mean curvature does not vanish for very thin sheets as previously claimed. Supported by NSF award DMR 0820054.

  14. Curvature affects Doppler investigation of vessels: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, S; Roatta, S; Guiot, C

    2005-01-01

    In clinical practice, blood velocity estimations from Doppler examination of curved vascular segments are normally different from those of nearby straight segments. The observed "accelerations," sometimes considered as a sort of stochastic disturbances, can actually be related to very specific physical effects due to vessel curvature (i.e., the development of nonaxial velocity [NAV] components) and the spreading of the axial velocity direction in the Doppler sample volume with respect to the insonation axis. The relevant phenomena and their dependence on the radius of curvature of the vessels and on the insonation angle are investigated with a beam-vessel geometry as close as possible to clinical setting, with the simplifying assumptions of steady flow, mild vessel curvature, uniform ultrasonic beam and complete vessel insonation. The insonation angles that minimize the errors are provided on the basis of the study results.

  15. Spinor description of the curvatures of D = 5 gauge fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarov, D. V.

    2017-03-01

    Spinor description of the curvatures of D = 5 Yang-Mills, Rarita-Schwinger and gravitational fields is considered. Restrictions imposed on the curvature spinors by the dynamical equations and Bianchi identities are studied. In the absence of sources symmetric curvature spinors with 2 s indices obey first-order equations that in the linearized limit reduce to Dirac-type equations for massless free fields. These equations allow for a higher-spin generalization similarly to 4 d case. Their solution in the form of the integral over Lorentz-harmonic variables parametrizing coset manifold SO(1, 4)/( SO(1,1) × ISO(3)) isomorphic to the three-sphere is considered.

  16. a Curvature Based Adaptive Neighborhood for Individual Point Cloud Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, E.; Chen, Q.; Wang, H.; Liu, X.

    2017-09-01

    As a key step in 3D scene analysis, point cloud classification has gained a great deal of concerns in the past few years. Due to the uneven density, noise and data missing in point cloud, how to automatically classify the point cloud with a high precision is a very challenging task. The point cloud classification process typically includes the extraction of neighborhood based statistical information and machine learning algorithms. However, the robustness of neighborhood is limited to the density and curvature of the point cloud which lead to a label noise behavior in classification results. In this paper, we proposed a curvature based adaptive neighborhood for individual point cloud classification. Our main improvement is the curvature based adaptive neighborhood method, which could derive ideal 3D point local neighborhood and enhance the separability of features. The experiment result on Oakland benchmark dataset shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the classification accuracy of point cloud.

  17. Hemocompatibility of poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane grafted with network-like and brush-like antifouling layer controlled via plasma-induced surface PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung; Shih, Yu-Ju; Ko, Chao-Yin; Jhong, Jheng-Fong; Liu, Ying-Ling; Wei, Ta-Chin

    2011-05-03

    In this work, the hemocompatibility of PEGylated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) microporous membranes with varying grafting coverage and structures via plasma-induced surface PEGylation was studied. Network-like and brush-like PEGylated layers on PVDF membrane surfaces were achieved by low-pressure and atmospheric plasma treatment. The chemical composition, physical morphology, grafting structure, surface hydrophilicity, and hydration capability of prepared membranes were determined to illustrate the correlations between grafting qualities and hemocompatibility of PEGylated PVDF membranes in contact with human blood. Plasma protein adsorption onto different PEGylated PVDF membranes from single-protein solutions and the complex medium of 100% human plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibodies. Hemocompatibility of the PEGylated membranes was evaluated by the antifouling property of platelet adhesion observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the anticoagulant activity of the blood coagulant determined by testing plasma-clotting time. The control of grafting structures of PEGylated layers highly regulates the PVDF membrane to resist the adsorption of plasma proteins, the adhesion of platelets, and the coagulation of human plasma. It was found that PVDF membranes grafted with brush-like PEGylated layers presented higher hydration capability with binding water molecules than with network-like PEGylated layers to improve the hemocompatible character of plasma protein and blood platelet resistance in human blood. This work suggests that the hemocompatible nature of grafted PEGylated polymers by controlling grafting structures gives them great potential in the molecular design of antithrombogenic membranes for use in human blood.

  18. Curvature-induced electron localization in developable Moebius-like nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, A P; Van der Heijden, G H M, E-mail: a.korte@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: g.heijden@ucl.ac.u [Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-02

    We study curvature effects and localization of non-interacting electrons confined to developable one-sided elastic sheets motivated by recent nanostructured origami techniques for creating and folding extremely thin membrane structures. The most famous one-sided sheet is the Moebius strip but the theory we develop allows for arbitrary linking number. Unlike previous work in the literature we do not assume a shape for the elastic structures. Rather, we find the shape by minimizing the elastic energy, i.e., solving the Euler-Lagrange equations for the bending energy functional. This shape varies with the aspect ratio of the sheet and affects the potential experienced by the particles. Depending on the link there is a number of singular points on the edge of the structure where the bending energy density goes to infinity, leading to deep potential wells. The inverse participation ratio is used to show that electrons are increasingly localized to the higher-curvature regions of the higher-width structures, where sharp creases radiating out from the singular points could form channels for particle transport. Our geometric formulation could be used to study transport properties of Moebius strips and other components in nanoscale devices.

  19. Curvature-induced electron localization in developable Moebius-like nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, A P; Van der Heijden, G H M

    2009-01-01

    We study curvature effects and localization of non-interacting electrons confined to developable one-sided elastic sheets motivated by recent nanostructured origami techniques for creating and folding extremely thin membrane structures. The most famous one-sided sheet is the Moebius strip but the theory we develop allows for arbitrary linking number. Unlike previous work in the literature we do not assume a shape for the elastic structures. Rather, we find the shape by minimizing the elastic energy, i.e., solving the Euler-Lagrange equations for the bending energy functional. This shape varies with the aspect ratio of the sheet and affects the potential experienced by the particles. Depending on the link there is a number of singular points on the edge of the structure where the bending energy density goes to infinity, leading to deep potential wells. The inverse participation ratio is used to show that electrons are increasingly localized to the higher-curvature regions of the higher-width structures, where sharp creases radiating out from the singular points could form channels for particle transport. Our geometric formulation could be used to study transport properties of Moebius strips and other components in nanoscale devices.

  20. Facial Curvature Detects and Explicates Ethnic Differences in Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttie, Michael; Wetherill, Leah; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L; Hoyme, H Eugene; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Coles, Claire; Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Riley, Edward P; Jones, Kenneth L; Foroud, Tatiana; Hammond, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Our objective is to help clinicians detect the facial effects of prenatal alcohol exposure by developing computer-based tools for screening facial form. All 415 individuals considered were evaluated by expert dysmorphologists and categorized as (i) healthy control (HC), (ii) fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), or (iii) heavily prenatally alcohol exposed (HE) but not clinically diagnosable as FAS; 3D facial photographs were used to build models of facial form to support discrimination studies. Surface curvature-based delineations of facial form were introduced. (i) Facial growth in FAS, HE, and control subgroups is similar in both cohorts. (ii) Cohort consistency of agreement between clinical diagnosis and HC-FAS facial form classification is lower for midline facial regions and higher for nonmidline regions. (iii) Specific HC-FAS differences within and between the cohorts include: for HC, a smoother philtrum in Cape Coloured individuals; for FAS, a smoother philtrum in Caucasians; for control-FAS philtrum difference, greater homogeneity in Caucasians; for control-FAS face difference, greater homogeneity in Cape Coloured individuals. (iv) Curvature changes in facial profile induced by prenatal alcohol exposure are more homogeneous and greater in Cape Coloureds than in Caucasians. (v) The Caucasian HE subset divides into clusters with control-like and FAS-like facial dysmorphism. The Cape Coloured HE subset is similarly divided for nonmidline facial regions but not clearly for midline structures. (vi) The Cape Coloured HE subset with control-like facial dysmorphism shows orbital hypertelorism. Facial curvature assists the recognition of the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and helps explain why different facial regions result in inconsistent control-FAS discrimination rates in disparate ethnic groups. Heavy prenatal alcohol exposure can give rise to orbital hypertelorism, supporting a long-standing suggestion that prenatal alcohol exposure at a particular time causes

  1. A simple approach to uniform PdAg alloy membranes: Comparative study of conventional and silver concentration-controlled co-plating

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2014-03-01

    An Ag-controlled co-plating method was developed for the preparation of palladium/silver alloy membranes on porous tubular alumina supports. By controlling the feed rate of Ag to the Pd bath, the concentration of the silver in the plating bath was restricted during the course of plating. As a result, preferential deposition of silver at the beginning was suppressed and uniform dispersion of silver inside the membrane with silver composition in the desired range was achieved. Ultrathin (∼2.5 μm) PdAg alloy membranes with uniform silver composition of ∼25% were successfully obtained. The membrane showed a hydrogen permeance of 0.88 mol m-2 s-1 and pure-gas H2/N2 selectivity of 2140 at 823 K with ΔP = 100 kPa. Only one hydride phase existed in the studied temperature range from 373 to 823 K with ΔPH=100kPa. Direct comparisons with the conventional simply-mixed co-plating method showed that membranes made by the novel Ag-controlled co-plating method had much more uniform silver distribution, smoother surface, denser membrane structure, higher utilization rate of metal sources, and shorter alloying time. © 2013, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Model-independent Constraints on Cosmic Curvature and Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Wei, Jun-Jie; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Jun-Qing; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose to estimate the spatial curvature of the universe and the cosmic opacity in a model-independent way with expansion rate measurements, H(z), and type Ia supernova (SNe Ia). On the one hand, using a nonparametric smoothing method Gaussian process, we reconstruct a function H(z) from opacity-free expansion rate measurements. Then, we integrate the H(z) to obtain distance modulus μ H, which is dependent on the cosmic curvature. On the other hand, distances of SNe Ia can be determined by their photometric observations and thus are opacity-dependent. In our analysis, by confronting distance moduli μ H with those obtained from SNe Ia, we achieve estimations for both the spatial curvature and the cosmic opacity without any assumptions for the cosmological model. Here, it should be noted that light curve fitting parameters, accounting for the distance estimation of SNe Ia, are determined in a global fit together with the cosmic opacity and spatial curvature to get rid of the dependence of these parameters on cosmology. In addition, we also investigate whether the inclusion of different priors for the present expansion rate (H 0: global estimation, 67.74 ± 0.46 km s-1 Mpc-1, and local measurement, 73.24 ± 1.74 km s-1 Mpc-1) exert influence on the reconstructed H(z) and the following estimations of the spatial curvature and cosmic opacity. Results show that, in general, a spatially flat and transparent universe is preferred by the observations. Moreover, it is suggested that priors for H 0 matter a lot. Finally, we find that there is a strong degeneracy between the curvature and the opacity.

  3. Some curvature properties of quarter symmetric metric connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, S.C.

    1986-08-01

    A linear connection Γ ji h with torsion tensor T j h P i -T i h P j , where T j h is an arbitrary (1,1) tensor field and P i is a 1-form, has been called a quarter-symmetric connection by Golab. Some properties of such connections have been studied by Rastogi, Mishra and Pandey, and Yano and Imai. In this paper based on the curvature tensor of quarter-symmetric metric connection we define a tensor analogous to conformal curvature tensor and study some properties of such a tensor. (author)

  4. Vertex Normals and Face Curvatures of Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2016-08-12

    This study contributes to the discrete differential geometry of triangle meshes, in combination with discrete line congruences associated with such meshes. In particular we discuss when a congruence defined by linear interpolation of vertex normals deserves to be called a ʼnormal’ congruence. Our main results are a discussion of various definitions of normality, a detailed study of the geometry of such congruences, and a concept of curvatures and shape operators associated with the faces of a triangle mesh. These curvatures are compatible with both normal congruences and the Steiner formula.

  5. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...... had serial 1.5 T MR images from baseline (within 5 weeks from injury) to 5 years after injury. Of these, 86 had ACL reconstruction (ACLR) performed early or delayed, 25 were treated with rehabilitation alone. Measures of articulating bone curvature were obtained from computer-assisted segmentation...

  6. Nonlinear Spectroscopic Theory of Displaced Harmonic Oscillators with Differing Curvatures: A Correlation Function Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theory for a bath model in which we approximate the adiabatic nuclear potential surfaces on the ground and excited electronic states by displaced harmonic oscillators that differ in curvature. Calculations of the linear and third-order optical response functions employ an effective short-time approximation coupled with the cumulant expansion. In general, all orders of correlation contribute to the optical response, indicating that the solvation process cannot be described as Gaussian within the model. Calculations of the linear absorption and fluorescence spectra resulting from the theory reveal a stronger temperature dependence of the Stokes shift along with a general asymmetry between absorption and fluorescence line shapes, resulting purely from the difference in the phonon side band. We discuss strategies for controlling spectral tuning and energy-transfer dynamics through the manipulation of the excited-state and ground-state curvature. Calculations of the nonlinear response also provide insights into the dynamics of the system-bath interactions and reveal that multidimensional spectroscopies are sensitive to a difference in curvature between the ground- and excited-state adiabatic surfaces. This extension allows for the elucidation of short-time dynamics of dephasing that are accessible in nonlinear spectroscopic methods.

  7. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl-chain...... mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D-MCI, which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent...... concentration range below the cmc-value of the LPC molecule....

  8. Observer-Based Perturbation Extremum Seeking Control with Input Constraints for Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation Process

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2017-05-08

    An Observer-based Perturbation Extremum Seeking Control (PESC) is proposed for a Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) process. The process is described with a dynamic model that is based on a 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation (ADE) model which has pump flow rates as process inputs. The objective of the controller is to optimize the trade-off between the permeate mass flux and the energy consumption by the pumps inside the process. Cases of single and multiple control inputs are considered through the use of only the feed pump flow rate or both the feed and the permeate pump flow rates. A nonlinear Lyapunov-based observer is designed to provide an estimation for the temperature distribution all over the designated domain of the DCMD process. Moreover, control inputs are constrained with an anti-windup technique to be within feasible and physical ranges. Performance of the proposed structure is analyzed, and simulations based on real DCMD process parameters for each control input are provided.

  9. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  10. Effect of IX dosing on polypropylene and PVDF membrane fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myat, Darli Theint; Mergen, Max; Zhao, Oliver; Stewart, Matthew B; Orbell, John D; Merle, Tony; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Gray, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The performance of ion exchange (IX) resin for organics removal from wastewater was assessed using advanced characterisation techniques for varying doses of IX. Organic characterisation using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array (PDA) and fluorescence spectroscopy (Method A), and UV254, organic carbon and organic nitrogen detectors (Method B), was undertaken on wastewater before and after magnetic IX treatment. Results showed partial removal of the biopolymer fraction at high IX doses. With increasing concentration of IX, evidence for nitrogen-containing compounds such as proteins and amino acids disappeared from the LC-OND chromatogram, complementary to the fluorescence response. A greater fluorescence response of tryptophan-like proteins (278 nm/343 nm) for low IX concentrations was consistent with aggregation of tryptophan-like compounds into larger aggregates, either by self-aggregation or with polysaccharides. Recycling of IX resin through multiple adsorption steps without regeneration maintained the high level of humics removal but there was no continued removal of biopolymer. Subsequent membrane filtration of the IX treated waters resulted in complex fouling trends. Filtration tests with either polypropylene (PP) or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher rates of initial fouling following treatment with high IX doses (10 mL/L) compared to filtration of untreated water, while treatment with lower IX doses resulted in decreased fouling rates relative to the untreated water. However, at longer filtration times the rate of fouling of IX treated waters was lower than untreated water and the relative fouling rates corresponded to the amount of biopolymer material in the feed. It was proposed that the mode of fouling changed from pore constriction during the initial filtration period to filter cake build up at longer filtration times. The organic composition strongly influenced the rate of fouling during the initial filtration period due to

  11. Sensory transduction at the frog semicircular canal: how hair cell membrane potential controls junctional transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Marta; Canella, Rita; Rubbini, Gemma; Fesce, Riccardo; Rossi, Maria Lisa

    2015-01-01

    At the frog semicircular canals, the afferent fibers display high spontaneous activity (mEPSPs), due to transmitter release from hair cells. mEPSP and spike frequencies are modulated by stimulation that activates the hair cell receptor conductance. The relation between receptor current and transmitter release cannot be studied at the intact semicircular canal. To circumvent the problem, we combined patch-clamp recordings at the isolated hair cell and electrophysiological recordings at the cytoneural junction in the intact preparation. At isolated hair cells, the K channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) is shown to block a fraction of total voltage-dependent K-conductance (IKD) that depends on TEA concentration but not on membrane potential (Vm). Considering the bioelectric properties of the hair cell, as previously characterized by this lab, a fixed fractional block of IKD is shown to induce a relatively fixed shift in Vm, provided it lies in the range −30 to −10 mV. The same concentrations of TEA were applied to the intact labyrinth while recording from single afferent fibers of the posterior canal, at rest and during mechanical stimulation. At the peak of stimulation, TEA produced increases in mEPSP rate that were linearly related to the shifts produced by the same TEA concentrations (0.1–3 mM) in hair cell Vm (0.7–5 mV), with a slope of 29.8 Hz/mV. The membrane potential of the hair cell is not linearly related to receptor conductance, so that the slope of quantal release vs. receptor conductance depends on the prevailing Vm (19.8 Hz/nS at −20 mV; 11 Hz/nS at −10 mV). Changes in mEPSP peak size were negligible at rest as well as during stimulation. Since ample spatial summation of mEPSPs occurs at the afferent terminal and threshold-governed spike firing is intrinsically nonlinear, the observed increases in mEPSP frequency, though not very large, may suffice to trigger afferent spike discharge. PMID:26157360

  12. Genital infections and risk of premature rupture of membranes in Mulago Hospital, Uganda: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakubulwa, Sarah; Kaye, Dan K; Bwanga, Freddie; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Mirembe, Florence M

    2015-10-16

    Inflammatory mediators that weaken and cause membrane rupture are released during the course of genital infections among pregnant women. We set out to determine the association of common genital infections (Trichomonas vaginalis, syphilis, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis, Group B Streptococcus, Bacterial vaginosis, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and candidiasis) and premature rupture of membranes in Mulago hospital, Uganda. We conducted an unmatched case-control study among women who were in the third trimester of pregnancy at New Mulago hospital, Uganda. The cases had PROM and the controls had intact membranes during latent phase of labour in the labour ward. We used interviewer-administered questionnaires to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, obstetric and medical history. Laboratory tests were conducted to identify T. vaginalis, syphilis, N. gonorrhea, C. trachomatis, Group B Streptococcus, Bacterial vaginosis, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) and candidiasis. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI of the association between genital infections and PROM. There was an association between PROM and abnormal vaginal discharge (OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.10-3.70 and AOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.18-4.47), presence of candidiasis (OR = 0.27, 95% CI 0.14-0.52 and AOR = 0.22, 95% CI 0.10-0.46) and T. vaginalis (OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.18-7.56 and AOR = 4.22, 95% CI 1.51-11.80). However, there was no association between PROM and presence of C. trachomatis (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 0.37-11.49) and HSV-2 serostatus (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.63-2.09). Few or no patients with Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, Group B streptococcus or syphilis were identified among the cases and controls. Co-infection of Trichomoniasis and candidiasis was not associated with PROM (AOR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.16-11.10). Co infection with T. vaginalis and C. trachomatis was associated with PROM (OR = 3.09, 95% CI 1.21-7.84 and AOR = 4.22, 95% CI 1

  13. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker

    High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane(HTPEM) fuel cells offer many advantages due to their increased operating tempera-tures compared to similar Nafion-based membrane tech-nologies, that rely on the conductive abilities of liquid water. The polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes are especially...

  14. Controlled magnetosomes: Embedding of magnetic nanoparticles into membranes of monodisperse lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixner, Oliver; Reimhult, Erik

    2016-03-15

    Magnetic nanoparticle-containing capsules have been proposed for many uses, including triggered drug delivery and imaging. Combining superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with existing liposome drug delivery technology is an enticing near-future prospect, but it requires efficient methods of synthesis and formulation compatible with pharmaceutical applications. We report a facile way of producing large, unilamellar, and homogeneously sized magnetoliposomes with high content of monodisperse, hydrophobic SPIONs integrated in the lipid membrane by use of a solvent inversion technique. For low lipid concentrations, unilamellar and monodisperse vesicles were obtained that became increasingly multilamellar with higher lipid fraction. Both, the co-self-assembled structure and loading content were significantly influenced by the purity of the nanoparticle shell. SPIONs with homogeneous shells of nitrodopamine-anchored hydrophobic dispersants could be quantitatively loaded up to 20%w/w, while SPIONs also containing residual physisorbed oleic acid exhibited a loading cut-off around 10%w/w SPIONs accompanied by drastic changes in size distribution. Lipid acyl chain length crucially influenced the formation and resultant stability of the loaded assemblies. The formation of nanoparticle-loaded vesicles is exemplified in different biologically important media, yielding ready-to-use magnetoliposome formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Amino Acid Changes in the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal Region Control Virus Neutralization Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Todd; Trama, Ashley; Tumba, Nancy; Gray, Elin; Lu, Xiaozhi; Madani, Navid; Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Eaton, Amanda; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Bowman, Cindy M; Barnett, Susan; Abdool-Karim, Salim S; Boyd, Scott D; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Montefiori, David; Santra, Sampa; Morris, Lynn; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-10-01

    Most HIV-1 vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies that are active against highly sensitive (tier-1) viruses or rare cases of vaccine-matched neutralization-resistant (tier-2) viruses, but no vaccine has induced antibodies that can broadly neutralize heterologous tier-2 viruses. In this study, we isolated antibodies from an HIV-1-infected individual that targeted the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) that may have selected single-residue changes in viral variants in the MPER that resulted in neutralization sensitivity to antibodies targeting distal epitopes on the HIV-1 Env. Similarly, a single change in the MPER in a second virus from another infected-individual also conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity. These gp41 single-residue changes thus transformed tier-2 viruses into tier-1 viruses that were sensitive to vaccine-elicited tier-1 neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate that Env amino acid changes within the MPER bnAb epitope of naturally-selected escape viruses can increase neutralization sensitivity to multiple types of neutralizing antibodies, and underscore the critical importance of the MPER for maintaining the integrity of the tier-2 HIV-1 trimer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the control structures for an integrated ethanol processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biset, S.; Nieto Deglioumini, L.; Basualdo, M. [GIAIP-CIFASIS (UTN-FRRo-CONICET-UPCAM-UNR), BV. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Garcia, V.M.; Serra, M. [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, C. Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate which would be a good preliminary plantwide control structure for the process of Hydrogen production from bioethanol to be used in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) accounting only steady-state information. The objective is to keep the process under optimal operation point, that is doing energy integration to achieve the maximum efficiency. Ethanol, produced from renewable feedstocks, feeds a fuel processor investigated for steam reforming, followed by high- and low-temperature shift reactors and preferential oxidation, which are coupled to a polymeric fuel cell. Applying steady-state simulation techniques and using thermodynamic models the performance of the complete system with two different control structures have been evaluated for the most typical perturbations. A sensitivity analysis for the key process variables together with the rigorous operability requirements for the fuel cell are taking into account for defining acceptable plantwide control structure. This is the first work showing an alternative control structure applied to this kind of process. (author)

  17. Controlling steady-state bipartite entanglement and quadrature squeezing in a membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical system with two Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalafi, A.; Naderi, M. H.

    2017-09-01

    We study theoretically a driven hybrid optomechanical system with a membrane-in-the-middle configuration containing two identical elongated cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in each side of the membrane. In the weakly interacting regime, the BECs can be considered as single-mode oscillators in the Bogoliubov approximation which are coupled to the optical field through the radiation pressure interaction so that they behave as two quasimembranes. We show that the degree of squeezing of each BEC and its entanglement with the moving membrane can be controlled by the s -wave scattering frequency of the other one. Since the s -wave frequency of each BEC depends on the transverse trapping frequency of the atoms, which is an experimentally controllable parameter, one can control the entanglement and squeezing of each BEC through the trapping frequency of the other one.

  18. Cosmological models with positive scalar spatial curvature and Λ>0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    1987-12-01

    Some exact spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations with Λ>0 and positive three-curvature are given. They have reasonable physical properties and represent universes which do not undergo inflation but have a non-de Sitter behaviour for large times. This paper extends some previous results in the literature. Permanent address: Apartado 2816, Caracas 1010-A, Venezuela.

  19. Three-dimensional ultrasound palmprint recognition using curvature methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iula, Antonio; Nardiello, Donatella

    2016-05-01

    Palmprint recognition systems that use three-dimensional (3-D) information of the palm surface are the most recently explored techniques to overcome some two-dimensional palmprint difficulties. These techniques are based on light structural imaging. In this work, a 3-D ultrasound palmprint recognition system is proposed and evaluated. Volumetric images of a region of the human hand are obtained by moving an ultrasound linear array along its elevation direction and one by one acquiring a number of B-mode images, which are then grouped in a 3-D matrix. The acquisition time was contained in about 5 s. Much information that can be exploited for 3-D palmprint recognition is extracted from the ultrasound volumetric images, including palm curvature and other under-skin information as the depth of the various traits. The recognition procedure developed in this work is based on the analysis of the principal curvatures of palm surface, i.e., mean curvature image, Gaussian curvature image, and surface type. The proposed method is evaluated by performing verification and identification experiments. Preliminary results have shown that the proposed system exhibits an acceptable recognition rate. Further possible improvements of the proposed technique are finally highlighted and discussed.

  20. Curvature Effect and the Spectral Softening Phenomenon Detected ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999; Kumar & Panaitescu 2000; Qin 2002; Ryde & Petrosian 2002; Kocevski et al. 2003; Qin et al. 2004). Several factors influence the curvature effect in distinct aspects. (a) The expanding motion of the fireball influences the time contraction, the Doppler effect factor, the growth of the fireball radius or enhancement of the ...

  1. The infinite curvature limit of AdS/CFT

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    Some kinematical speculations on the infinite curvature limit of the conjectured duality of Maldacena between ten-dimensional strings living in $AdS_5\\times S_5$ and a ordinary four-dimensional quantum field theory, namely ${\\cal{N}}=4$ super Yang-Mills with gauge group SU(N) are given.

  2. Effect of track asymmetry and curvature on shingle writing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Shaoping; Bai, Daniel; Mendez, Hector; Pan, Tao; Han, Dehua; Mao, Sining

    2011-04-01

    Written transition curvature in perpendicular magnetic recording is generally understood to result in increased transition jitter noise and degraded signal to noise ratio or byte error rate (BER) performance. For the shingle writing scheme, asymmetry or curvature in written tracks is considered inherent due to the erasure and track edge writing characteristics. It is proposed that such a track asymmetry is more prominent at high track density/smaller track pitch recording conditions. In this report we present spin stand experimental results to study the effect of the possible track asymmetry or curvature by shingle writing and reading back in different skews. By comparing shingle writing BER bathtub profiles in different writing skew conditions 0°, +/-2°, +/-4°, +/-6°, the effect of varying shingle track asymmetry and curvature is analyzed via subsequent skewed reading process. The shingle writing BER bathtub profiles as well as the read back amplitude cross track profile are generally symmetric upon one sided erasure at different track pitches. We found that the 0° skew writing and reading process provides both the maximum BER and amplitude.

  3. Phase error correction in wavefront curvature sensing via phase retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almoro, Percival; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront curvature sensing with phase error correction system is carried out using phase retrieval based on a partially-developed volume speckle field. Various wavefronts are reconstructed: planar, spherical, cylindrical, and a wavefront passing through the side of a bare optical fiber. Spurious...

  4. Frustration and curvature - Glasses and the cholesteric blue phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    An analogy is drawn between continuum elastic theories of the blue phase of cholesteric liquid crystals and recent theories of frustration in configurational glasses. Both involve the introduction of a lattice of disclination lines to relieve frustration; the frustration is due to an intrinsic curvature in the natural form of parallel transport. A continuum theory of configurational glasses is proposed.

  5. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... variously described as determined by the ocular biometric variables. There have been many studies on the relationship between refractive error and ocular axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth, corneal radius of curvature (CR), keratometric readings as well as other ocular biometric variables such as ...

  6. Temperature insensitive curvature sensor based on cascading photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangwei; Li, Yunpu; Fu, Xinghu; Jin, Wa; Bi, Weihong

    2018-03-01

    A temperature insensitive curvature sensor is proposed based on cascading photonic crystal fiber. Using the arc fusion splicing method, this sensor is fabricated by cascading together a single-mode fiber (SMF), a three layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (3PCF), a five layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (5PCF) and a SMF in turn. So the structure SMF-3PCF-5PCF-SMF can be obtained with a total length of 20 mm. During the process of fabrication, the splicing machine parameters and the length of each optical fiber are adjusted to obtain a high sensitivity curvature sensor. The experimental results show that the curvature sensitivity is -8.40 nm/m-1 in the curvature variation range of 0-1.09 m-1, which also show good linearity. In the range of 30-90 °C, the temperature sensitivity is only about 3.24 pm/°C, indicating that the sensor is not sensitive to temperature. The sensor not only has the advantages of easy fabricating, simple structure, high sensitivity but also can solve the problem of temperature measurement cross sensitivity, so it can be used for different areas including aerospace, large-scale bridge, architectural structure health monitoring and so on.

  7. Curvature Effect and the Spectral Softening Phenomenon Detected ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    soft spectral evolution, indicating that ... this definition of observation time, basic formulas of the full curvature effect are as follows: fν(t) = 2πc2. D2( v/c) ... (d) In most cases, the temporal power law index α and the spectral power law index β will be ...

  8. Zero mean curvature surfaces of mixed type in Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyachin, V A

    2003-01-01

    We investigate zero mean curvature surfaces in the Minkowski space R 3 1 such that their first fundamental quadratic form changes signature. Part of such a surface is space-like and part is time-like. We obtain complete information about the structure of the set of points where the surface changes type and prove the related existence and uniqueness theorems

  9. Curvature-induced symmetry breaking in nonlinear Schrodinger models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Mingaleev, S. F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2000-01-01

    We consider a curved chain of nonlinear oscillators and show that the interplay of curvature and nonlinearity leads to a symmetry breaking when an asymmetric stationary state becomes energetically more favorable than a symmetric stationary state. We show that the energy of localized states decrea...

  10. A quasifibration of spaces of positive scalar curvature metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Chernysh, Vladislav

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that for Riemannian manifolds with boundary the natural restriction map is a quasifibration between spaces of metrics of positive scalar curvature. We apply this result to study homotopy properties of spaces of such metrics on manifolds with boundary.

  11. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, South West ...

  12. Other Earths: Search for Life and the Constant Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshyaran M. M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a search methodology for finding other exactly similar earth like planets (or sister earths. The theory is based on space consisting of Riemann curves or highways. A mathematical model based on constant curvature, a moving frame bundle, and gravitational dynamics is introduced.

  13. Generalized Curvature-Matter Couplings in Modified Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Harko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we review a plethora of modified theories of gravity with generalized curvature-matter couplings. The explicit nonminimal couplings, for instance, between an arbitrary function of the scalar curvature R and the Lagrangian density of matter, induces a non-vanishing covariant derivative of the energy-momentum tensor, implying non-geodesic motion and, consequently, leads to the appearance of an extra force. Applied to the cosmological context, these curvature-matter couplings lead to interesting phenomenology, where one can obtain a unified description of the cosmological epochs. We also consider the possibility that the behavior of the galactic flat rotation curves can be explained in the framework of the curvature-matter coupling models, where the extra terms in the gravitational field equations modify the equations of motion of test particles and induce a supplementary gravitational interaction. In addition to this, these models are extremely useful for describing dark energy-dark matter interactions and for explaining the late-time cosmic acceleration.

  14. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile‑Ife, South West Nigeria, free of ...

  15. Curvature Properties of Lorentzian Manifolds with Large Isometry Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batat, Wafaa [Ecole Normale Superieure de L' Enseignement Technique d' Oran, Departement de Mathematiques et Informatique (Algeria)], E-mail: wafa.batat@enset-oran.dz; Calvaruso, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.calvaruso@unile.it; Leo, Barbara De [University of Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica ' E. De Giorgi' (Italy)], E-mail: barbara.deleo@unile.it

    2009-08-15

    The curvature of Lorentzian manifolds (M{sup n},g), admitting a group of isometries of dimension at least 1/2n(n - 1) + 1, is completely described. Interesting behaviours are found, in particular as concerns local symmetry, local homogeneity and conformal flatness.

  16. On the Curvature and Heat Flow on Hamiltonian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohta Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the differential geometric and geometric analytic studies of Hamiltonian systems. Key ingredients are the curvature operator, the weighted Laplacian, and the associated Riccati equation.We prove appropriate generalizations of the Bochner-Weitzenböck formula and Laplacian comparison theorem, and study the heat flow.

  17. Effect of curvature on structures and vibrations of zigzag carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By determining the correlation between vibrational modes of a graphene sheet and of the nanotube, we understand how rolling of the sheet results in mixing between modes and changes in vibrational spectrum of graphene. We find that the radial breathing mode softens with decreasing curvature. We estimate thermal ...

  18. The flow curvature method applied to canard explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginoux, Jean-Marc [Laboratoire Protee, IUT de Toulon, Universite du Sud, BP 20132, F-83957 La Garde cedex (France); Llibre, Jaume, E-mail: ginoux@univ-tln.fr, E-mail: jllibre@mat.uab.cat [Departament de Matematiques, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-11-18

    The aim of this work is to establish that the bifurcation parameter value leading to a canard explosion in dimension 2 obtained by the so-called geometric singular perturbation method can be found according to the flow curvature method. This result will be then exemplified with the classical Van der Pol oscillator. (paper)

  19. The flow curvature method applied to canard explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, Jean-Marc; Llibre, Jaume

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work is to establish that the bifurcation parameter value leading to a canard explosion in dimension 2 obtained by the so-called geometric singular perturbation method can be found according to the flow curvature method. This result will be then exemplified with the classical Van der Pol oscillator.

  20. Draping Double-Layer Woven Fabrics Onto Double-Curvature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Draping woven fabrics to complex parts with double curvature leads to complex redistribution and reorientation of the yarns in composites reinforced with woven preforms. To reduce the risk of fabric tearing or wrinkling we propose to use double-layer woven fabrics. This paper presents a simulation model for draping