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Sample records for melt-spun mg-ni-la alloy

  1. TEM studies of nanostructure in melt-spun Mg-Ni-La alloy manifesting enhanced hydrogen desorbing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Miwa, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kuroda, K.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a magnesium-rich Mg-Ni-La alloy prepared by melt-spinning are significantly improved by nanostructure formation during crystallization and activation. It can absorb and desorb ∼5 wt% hydrogen at temperatures as low as 200 deg. C in moderate time periods. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies on this alloy indicate that the nanostructure, consisting of LaH 3 and Mg 2 NiH 4 nano-particles dispersed homogeneously in MgH 2 matrices after hydrogenation, is rather stable at temperatures below 300 deg. C but undergoes coarsening and segregation of these particles and matrices above ∼400 deg. C. These structural changes have been confirmed by electron energy-loss spectroscopic (EELS) imaging as well as high-resolution TEM techniques. A new EELS peak associated with a plasmon excitation in the MgH 2 phase (H-plasmon) is found for the first time in this study. By imaging the H-plasmon peak, the hydrogen distribution in the alloy has been clearly visualized. We have succeeded in observing the hydrogen desorption process at ∼400 deg. C in-situ in the microscope using this EELS imaging technique.

  2. Melt spun aluminium alloys for moulding optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, G.; Tegelaers, L.; Senden, R.

    2013-09-01

    Melt spinning is a rapid quenching process that makes it possible to create materials with a very fine microstructure. Due to this very fine microstructure the melt spinning process is an enabler for diamond turning optics and moulds without the need of post-polishing. Using diamond turning of melt spun aluminium one can achieve coating concept RSA-905 can be upgraded to a competitive alternative to steel in terms of price, performance and logistics. This paper presents some recent developments for improved mould performance of such concept. Hardness, wear resistance and adhesion are topics of interest and they can be applied by special coatings such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and chromium nitride (CrN). These coatings make the aluminium alloy suitable for moulding mass production of small as well as larger optics, such as spectacle lenses.

  3. Processing and microstructure of melt spun NiAl alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, I. E.; Noebe, R. D.; Moser, J. A.; Lee, D. S.; Nathal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of various melt spinning parameters and the effect of consolidation on the microstructure of melt spun NiAl and NiAl + W alloys have been examined by optical and electron microscopy techniques. It was found that the addition of 0.5 at. pct W to NiAl results in a fine dispersion of W particles after melt spinning which effectively controls grain growth during annealing treatments or consolidation at temperatures between 1523 and 1723 K. Increased wheel speeds are effective at reducing both the ribbon thickness and grain size, such that proper choice of both composition and casting parameters can produce structures with grain sizes as small as 2 microns. Finally, fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced composites which used pulverized ribbon as the matrix material was demonstrated.

  4. Microstructure and grain refining performance of melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B master alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhonghua; Bian Xiufang; Wang Yan; Liu Xiangfa

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure and grain refining performance of the melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B (wt%) master alloy have been investigated, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and grain refining tests. It has been found that the microstructure of the melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B master alloy is mainly composed of two phases: metastable, supersaturated α-Al solid solution and uniformly dispersed TiB 2 particles, quite different from that of the rod-like alloy consisting of three phases: α-Al, blocky TiAl 3 , and clusters of TiB 2 particles. Quenching temperatures and wheel speeds (cooling rates), however, have no obvious effect on the microstructure of the melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B alloy. Grain refining tests show that rapid solidification has a significant effect on the grain refining performance of Al-5Ti-1B alloy and leads to the great increase of nucleation rate of the alloy. Nevertheless, the melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B master alloy prepared at different wheel speeds and quenching temperatures possesses the similar grain refining performance. The reasons for the microstructure formation and the improvement of the grain refining performance of the melt-spun Al-5Ti-1B master alloy have been also discussed

  5. Magnetic properties of ND Rich Melt-Spun ND-FE-B alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As a part of these experimental investigations of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B alloy with Nd rich content in relation to Nd2Fe14B prepared by rapid quenching process for optimally selected cooling rate and heat treatment, the influence of the chosen chemical composition on magnetic properties was observed. The results of X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy phase analysis and magnetic measurement of investigated melt-spun Nd14.5Fe78.5B7 alloy are presented to bring some new information concerning the relation between their structure and magnetic properties.

  6. Methods of characterization of multiphase Nd-Fe-B melt-spun alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite permanent magnetic materials based on Nd-Fe-B alloys with a low Nd content are a new type of permanent magnetic material. The microstructure of these nanocomposite permanent magnets is composed of a mixture of magnetically soft and hard phases providing the so called exchange coupling effect. Beside the optimization process parameters, methods of characterization have a very important role in the design of an optimal magnetic matrix of multiphase melt-spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Different methods and techniques of characterization were used for observation and study of the microstructure evolution during crystallization. A summary results of measurements using different methods of characterization are presented to enable a better insight into relations between the microstructure and magnetic properties of the investigated melt-spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. .

  7. Microstructures and microhardness evolutions of melt-spun Al-8Ni-5Nd-4Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakoese, Ercan, E-mail: ekarakose@karatekin.edu.tr [Karatekin University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, 18100 Cank Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    Al-Ni-Nd-Si alloy with nominal composition of Al-8 wt.%Ni-5 wt.%Nd-4 wt.%Si was rapidly solidified by using melt-spinning technique to examine the influence of the cooling rate/conditions on microstructure and mechanical properties. The resulting conventional cast (ingot) and melt-spun ribbons were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy together with energy dispersive spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis and Vickers microhardness tester. The ingot alloys consists of four phases namely {alpha}-Al, intermetallic Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 11}Nd{sub 3} and fcc Si. Melt-spun ribbons are completely composed of {alpha}-Al phase. The optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy results show that the microstructures of rapidly solidified ribbons are clearly different from their ingot alloy. The change in microhardness is discussed based on the microstructural observations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid solidification allows a reduction in grain size, extended solid solution ranges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed the matrix lattice parameter increases with increasing wheel speed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt-spun ribbons consist of partly amorphous phases embedded in crystalline phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification rate is high enough to retain most of alloying elements in the Al matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The rapid solidification has effect on the phase constitution.

  8. Hard magnetic properties and coercivity mechanism of melt-spun Misch Metal-Fe-B alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Ningtao; Luo, Yang, E-mail: eluoyang@foxmail.com; Yan, Wenlong; Yuan, Chao; Yu, Dunbo; Sun, Liang; Lu, Shuo; Li, Hongwei; Zhang, Hongbin

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Melt-spun MM{sub 13}Fe{sub 81}B{sub 6} alloy shows that the distributions of the La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Fe and B elements is uniformly distributed, and the grain size is in the range of 30–40 nm, it can be seen that Pr-rich and La-rich phases concentrated on grain boundaries, which resulted in the coercivity augment with the increase of MMFe{sub 2} content, and the grain size is around 40–50 nm in MM{sub 16}Fe{sub 78}B{sub 6}. • There is a significant formation of MMFe{sub 2} with abundant Pr and La, and a small amount of Ce and Nd enriched at the interfacial region in MM{sub 16}Fe{sub 78}B{sub 6}, thus an inhomogeneous region was formed. It is considered that the inhomogeneous region is effective in increasing the coercivity. • The optimum-quenched MM{sub 13}Fe{sub 81}B{sub 6} alloy have been shown to exhibit a coercive force of 6.9 kOe and an energy product of 8.5 MGOe, which is superior to anisotropic ferrite magnets of 4.5 MGOe. - Abstract: Magnetic and structural properties of Misch Metal (MM)-Fe-B alloys, were examined in the melt-spun ribbons. Melt-spun MM-Fe-B samples were prepared at the surface velocities of 18–30 m/s. Crystalline structure and their room-temperature magnetization characteristics were analyzed, and the optimum surface velocity of 20 m/s and nominal composition of MM{sub 13}Fe{sub 81}B{sub 6} were obtained. Microstructural analyses indicate that the grain size is approximately 30–50 nm in the alloys with the optimum characteristics. In the MM{sub 16}Fe{sub 78}B{sub 6} alloys, Pr-rich and La-rich phases concentrated on grain boundaries, which resulted in the coercivity augment with the increase of MMFe{sub 2} content. Dependence of coercivity on applied magnetic field suggested that the mechanism of coercivity in moderate MM-content samples was inhomogeneous domain wall pinning type. The melt-spun ribbons in the optimum condition exhibit a coercive force of 6.9 kOe and an energy product of 8.5 MGOe, which can be used as

  9. Cellular microstructure of chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, S. N.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt pct Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient. Microsegregation across cells and its variation with distance from the quench surface and alloy composition have been examined and compared with theoretical predictions.

  10. A new dental powder from nanocrystalline melt-spun Ag-Sn-Cu alloy ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do-Minh, N.; Le-Thi, C.; Nguyen-Anh, S.

    2003-01-01

    A new non-gamma-two dental powder has been developed from nanocrystalline melt-spun Ag-Sn-Cu alloy ribbons. The amalgam made from this powder exhibits excellent properties for dental filling. The nanocrystalline microstructure was found for the first time in as-spun and heat treated Ag(27-28)Sn(9-32) Cu alloy ribbons, using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. As-spun ribbons exhibited a multi-phase microstructure with preferred existence of β (Ag 4 Sn) phase formed during rapid solidification (RS) due to supersaturating of copper (Cu) atoms and homogenous nanostructure with subgrain size of about (40-50) nm, which seems to be developed during RS process and can be caused by eutectic reaction of the Ag 3 Sn/Ag 4 Sn-Cu 3 Sn system. In heat treated ribbons the clustering of Cu atoms was always favored and stable in an ageing temperature and time interval determined by Cu content. The heat treatment led to essential changes of subgrain morphology, resulted in the appearance of large-angle boundaries with fine Cu 3 Sn precipitates and forming typical recrystallization twins. Such a microstructure variation in melt-spun ribbons could eventually yield enhanced technological, clinical and physical properties of the dental products, controlled by the ADA Specification N deg 1 and reported before. Thus, using the rapid solidification technique a new non-gamma-two dental material of high quality, nanocrystalline ribbon powder, can be produced. Copyright (2003) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  11. TEM microstructural characterization of melt-spun aged Al-6Si-3Cu-xMg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Ismeli Alfonso; Zepeda, Cuauhtemoc Maldonado; Gonzalez Reyes, Jose Gonzalo; Flores, Ariosto Medina; Rodriguez, Juan Serrato; Gomez, Luis Bejar

    2007-01-01

    Three Al-6Si-3Cu-xMg alloys (x = 0.59, 3.80 and 6.78 wt.%) were produced using melt-spinning. As-melt-spun ribbons were aged at 150, 180 and 210 deg. C for times between 0.05 and 100 h. Microstructural changes were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microhardness was measured. TEM analysis of the as-melt-spun alloys revealed 5 nm nanoparticles and larger particles (50 nm) composed of Al 2 Cu (θ) for the 0.59% Mg alloy and Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 (Q) for 3.80% and 6.78% Mg alloys. Silicon solid solubility was extended to 9.0 at.% and Mg in solid solution reached 6.7 at.%. After aging treatments the 6.78% Mg alloy exhibited the most significant increase in microhardness, reaching 260 kg/mm 2 . TEM analysis of aged specimens also showed θ and Q phase (5-20 nm nanoparticles and 35-40 nm particles). The combination of the volume fraction and size of the particles plays an important role in microhardness variation

  12. Morphological characteristic of the conventional and melt-spun Al-10Ni-5.6Cu (in wt.%) alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakoese, Ercan [Erciyes University, Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-12-15

    The Al-10Ni-5.6Cu alloy was prepared by conventional casting and further processed melt-spinning technique. The resulting conventional cast and melt-spun ribbons were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy together with energy dispersive spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and microhardness techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that ingot samples were {alpha}-Al, intermetallic Al{sub 3}Ni and Al{sub 2}Cu phases. The optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy results show that the microstructures of rapidly solidified ribbons are clearly different from their ingot alloy. Al-10Ni-5.6Cu ribbons reveal a very fine cellular structure with intermetallic Al{sub 3}Ni particles. Moreover, at high solidification rates the melt-spun ribbons have a polygonal structure dispersed in a supersaturated aluminum matrix. The differential scanning calorimetry measurements revealed that exothermic reaction was between 290 deg. C and 440 deg. C which are more pronounced in the ternary Al-10Ni-5.6Cu alloy.

  13. Morphological characteristic of the conventional and melt-spun Al-10Ni-5.6Cu (in wt.%) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoese, Ercan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The Al-10Ni-5.6Cu alloy was prepared by conventional casting and further processed melt-spinning technique. The resulting conventional cast and melt-spun ribbons were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy together with energy dispersive spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and microhardness techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that ingot samples were α-Al, intermetallic Al 3 Ni and Al 2 Cu phases. The optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy results show that the microstructures of rapidly solidified ribbons are clearly different from their ingot alloy. Al-10Ni-5.6Cu ribbons reveal a very fine cellular structure with intermetallic Al 3 Ni particles. Moreover, at high solidification rates the melt-spun ribbons have a polygonal structure dispersed in a supersaturated aluminum matrix. The differential scanning calorimetry measurements revealed that exothermic reaction was between 290 deg. C and 440 deg. C which are more pronounced in the ternary Al-10Ni-5.6Cu alloy.

  14. Reversible structural relaxation in melt-spun Co80-xCrxB20 (x=20, 25 or 30) amorphous alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haruyama, O; Ocelik, [No Value; Asahi, N; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1996-01-01

    The structural relaxation in melt-spun Co80-xCrxB20 (x=20, 25 or 30) amorphous alloys was investigated by measuring the residual electrical resistance (liquid-N-2 temperature). The reversibility, the specific logarithmic kinetics and the cross-over effect were confirmed for the chemical short-range

  15. Analysis of grain growth process in melt spun Fe-B alloys under the initial saturated grain boundary segregation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Liu, F.; Yang, X.Q.; Fan, Y.; Shen, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → We compared pure kinetic, pure thermodynamic and extended thermo-kinetic models. → An initial saturated GB segregation condition of nanoscale Fe-B alloys was determined. → The controlled-mechanism was proposed using two characteristic times (t 1 and t 2 ). - Abstract: A grain growth process in the melt spun low-solid-solubility Fe-B alloys was analyzed under the initial saturated grain boundary (GB) segregation condition. Applying melt spinning technique, single-phase supersaturated nanograins were prepared. Grain growth behavior of the single-phase supersaturated nanograins was investigated by performing isothermal annealing at 700 deg. C. Combined with the effect of GB segregation on the initial GB excess amount, the thermo-kinetic model [Chen et al., Acta Mater. 57 (2009) 1466] was extended to describe the initial GB segregation condition of nanoscale Fe-B alloys. In comparison of pure kinetic model, pure thermodynamic model and the extended thermo-kinetic model, an initial saturated GB segregation condition was determined. The controlled-mechanism of grain growth under initial saturated GB segregation condition was proposed using two characteristic annealing times (t 1 and t 2 ), which included a mainly kinetic-controlled process (t ≤ t 1 ), a transition from kinetic-mechanism to thermodynamic-mechanism (t 1 2 ) and pure thermodynamic-controlled process (t ≥ t 2 ).

  16. Molecular field analysis for melt-spun amorphous Fe sub 1 sub 0 sub 0 sub - sub x Gd sub x alloys (18<=60)

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, K

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic properties for the melt-spun amorphous Fe sub 1 sub 0 sub 0 sub - sub x Gd sub x alloys were analyzed using the molecular field theory (MFT). A concentration dependence of three exchange interaction constants was derived over a wide concentration range (18=T sub c sub o sub m sub p. Curvature of the Arrott plot in Gd-rich region was qualitatively simulated.

  17. Structure and magnetic properties of Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}RuSi melt-spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Yuepeng; Ma, Yuexing; Hao, Hongyue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Luo, Hongzhi, E-mail: luo_hongzhi@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Meng, Fanbin; Liu, Heyan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Liu, Enke; Wu, Guangheng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • New Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}RuSi has been prepared by melt-spinning successfully. • Magnetic and electronic properties of Co{sub 2}RuSi were investigated. • Ru has a strong site preference for A, C sites in the lattice of Co{sub 2}RuSi. • Site preference of Ru cannot be determined by “number of valence electrons”. - Abstract: Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}RuSi has been synthesized by melt-spinning technology successfully. Co{sub 2}RuSi bulk sample after annealing is composed of an HCP Co-rich phase and a BCC Ru-Si phase, but melt-spinning can suppress the precipitation of the HCP phase and produce a single Co{sub 2}RuSi Heusler phase. In the XRD pattern, it is found that Ru has a strong preference for the (A, C) sites, though it has fewer valence electrons compared with Co. This site preference is different from the case in Heusler alloys containing only 3d elements and is supported further by first-principles calculations. Melt-spun Co{sub 2}RuSi has a M{sub s} of 2.67 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 5 K and a Tc of 491 K. An exothermic peak is observed at 871 K in the DTA curve, corresponding to the decomposition of the Heusler phase. Finally, the site preference and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}RuSi were discussed based on electronic structure calculation and charge density difference.

  18. Second phase formation in melt-spun Mg-Ca-Zn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, P.M.; Solorzano, G.; Sande, J.B. Vander

    2004-01-01

    Three ternary alloys based on the Mg-Ca-Zn system were produced by melt spinning in the form of ribbons. The alloys were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) with scanning transmission electron Microscopy (STEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the alloys showed a difference in microstructure between the wheel contact side and the free surface side. The second phase found in the three ternary alloys studied was identified as the compound Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 (trigonal with space group P3-bar1c and lattice parameters a=0.97 nm and c=1.0 nm). The alloys thermal behavior was investigated by measuring the changes in microhardness after isochronal aging and only a modest age hardening behavior was observed principally in one of the alloys. The alloys phase stability was also studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the results indicate that the melting onset for the three alloys is near 400 deg.C and it decreases with Zn content

  19. Second phase formation in melt-spun Mg-Ca-Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardim, P.M.; Solorzano, G.; Sande, J.B. Vander

    2004-09-15

    Three ternary alloys based on the Mg-Ca-Zn system were produced by melt spinning in the form of ribbons. The alloys were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) with scanning transmission electron Microscopy (STEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the alloys showed a difference in microstructure between the wheel contact side and the free surface side. The second phase found in the three ternary alloys studied was identified as the compound Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} (trigonal with space group P3-bar1c and lattice parameters a=0.97 nm and c=1.0 nm). The alloys thermal behavior was investigated by measuring the changes in microhardness after isochronal aging and only a modest age hardening behavior was observed principally in one of the alloys. The alloys phase stability was also studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the results indicate that the melting onset for the three alloys is near 400 deg.C and it decreases with Zn content.

  20. HRTEM characterization of melt-spun Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys solidified at different rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, Ismeli; Maldonado, Cuauhtemoc; Medina, Ariosto; Gonzalez, Gonzalo; Bejar, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Six quaternary alloys Al-6Si-3Cu-xMg (x = 0.59, 3.80 and 6.78 wt.%) were produced by melt spinning using two different tangential speeds of the copper wheel (30 and 45 ms -1 ), and characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness. At 30 ms -1 , XRD and TEM investigations revealed the presence of Al 2 Cu (θ) for the alloy with 0.59%Mg and Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 (Q) for the alloys with 3.80 and 6.78%Mg. The increase in microhardness of the alloys with higher Mg content is attributed to the presence of nanosized a-Al particles and a higher content of Q nanoparticles. At 45 ms -1 the alloying element content in solid solution is increased due to the fact that the quantity of free second phases (θ and Q nanoparticles) has decreased. For this rotation speed, amorphous regions of α -Al were observed, increasing microhardness compared to the 30 ms -1 ribbons

  1. Phase formation and crystallization behavior of melt spun Sm-Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shield, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The phase formation and microstructures of Sm-Fe alloys have been investigated at Sm levels of 11 and 17 atomic percent and with alloying additions of Ti and C. At lower Sm content, virtually phase pure SmFe 7 formed, while higher Sm content resulted in the formation of SmFe 7 , SmFe 2 and amorphous phases. The addition of Ti and C resulted in greater stability and a larger volume fraction of the amorphous phase. The binary Sm-Fe alloys at both Sm levels had tremendously variable microstructures, with large discrepancies in grain size and phase distribution from region to region. The addition of Ti and C tended to result in a more homogeneous microstructure, as well as a refinement in the microstructural scale. (orig.)

  2. Coercivity and nanostructure of melt-spun Ti-Fe-Co-B-based alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline Ti-Fe-Co-B-based alloys, prepared by melt spinning and subsequent annealing, have been characterized structurally and magnetically. X-ray diffraction and thermomagnetic measurements show that the ribbons consist of tetragonal Ti3(Fe,Co5B2, FeCo-rich bcc, and NiAl-rich L21 phases; Ti3(Fe,Co5B2, is a new substitutional alloy series whose end members Ti3Co5B2 and Ti3Fe5B2 have never been investigated magnetically and may not even exist, respectively. Two compositions are considered, namely Ti11+xFe37.5-0.5xCo37.5−0.5xB14 (x = 0, 4 and alnico-like Ti11Fe26Co26Ni10Al11Cu2B14, the latter also containing an L21-type alloy. The volume fraction of the Ti3(Fe,Co5B2 phase increases with x, which leads to a coercivity increase from 221 Oe for x = 0 to 452 Oe for x = 4. Since the grains are nearly equiaxed, there is little or no shape anisotropy, and the coercivity is largely due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the tetragonal Ti3(Fe,Co5B2 phase. The alloy containing Ni, Al, and Cu exhibits a magnetization of 10.6 kG and a remanence ratio of 0.59. Our results indicate that magnetocrystalline anisotropy can be introduced in alnico-like magnets, adding to shape anisotropy that may be induced by field annealing.

  3. Evolution of the microstructure and hardness of a rapidly solidified/melt-spun AZ91 alloy upon aging at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baishu; Liu Yongbing; An Jian; Li Rongguang; Su Zhenguo; Su Guihua; Lu You; Cao Zhanyi

    2009-01-01

    The effect of aging at different temperatures on a rapidly solidified/melt-spun AZ91 alloy has been investigated in depth. The microstructures of as-spun and aged ribbons with a thickness of approximately 60 μm were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and laser optical microscopy; microhardness measurements were also conducted. It was found that the commercial AZ91 alloy undergoes a cellular/dendritic transition during melt-spinning at a speed of 34 m/s. A strengthening effect due to aging was observed: a maximum hardness of 110 HV/0.05 and an age-hardenability of 50% were obtained when the ribbon was aged at 200 deg. C for 20 min. The β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase exhibits net and dispersion types of distribution during precipitation. The dispersion of precipitates in dendritic grains or cells is the main source of strengthening

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of melt-spun Y{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}Co{sub 2} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, A.; Puzniak, R. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Śniadecki, Z. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. M. Smoluchowskiego 17, PL-60-179 Poznan (Poland); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76 344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Musiał, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. M. Smoluchowskiego 17, PL-60-179 Poznan (Poland); NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, PL-61-614 Poznan (Poland); Jarek, M. [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, PL-61-614 Poznan (Poland); Idzikowski, B. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. M. Smoluchowskiego 17, PL-60-179 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Substitution of Gd leads to a significant, linear increase in the Curie temperature. • Origin of the low temperature magnetic susceptibility maximum is due to the ordering induced by microstructure effects. • Melt-spun samples exhibit features both of superparamagnets and spin glasses. - Abstract: Structural and magnetic properties of a series of melt spun alloys Y{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}Co{sub 2}, with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8 and 1, were investigated. The studied samples were prepared by arc melting in argon atmosphere and next were synthesized in the melt-spinning process in the form of flakes. During the synthesis, large number of defects such as free volumes, vacancies, and alloyed atoms were introduced into the samples. It was found that magnetic properties of the studied samples are determined by two factors: the effect of Y substitution by Gd and by the impact of microstructure defects. The substitution of gadolinium leads to a significant, linear increase in the Curie temperature, T{sub C}, at which transition to paramagnetic phase occurs, T{sub C} = 75, 195, 245, 280 K, for the samples with x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, respectively, and is above 340 K for the samples with x = 0.8 and 1. At lower temperatures, of about 20–30 K, an additional peak in ac susceptibility is observed. Position of this peak depends both on frequency and on Gd content. The origin of the low temperature maximum appears to be due to magnetic ordering induced by microstructure effects.

  5. Composition-dependent magnetic properties of melt-spun La or/and Ce substituted nanocomposite NdFeB alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, M.; Zhao, L.Z.; Zhang, C.; Jiao, D.L.; Zhong, X.C.; Liu, Z.W.

    2016-02-15

    Aiming at high-performance low-cost NdFeB magnets, the magnetic properties and microstructure for melt spun nanocrystalline (Nd{sub 1−x}M{sub x}){sub 10}Fe{sub 84}B{sub 6} (M=La, Ce, or La{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}; x=0–0.7) alloys were investigated. Relatively, LaCe-substituted alloys show high values of the remanent magnetization M{sub r}, the maximum energy product (BH){sub max} and the coercivity H{sub c}, up to 114 emu/g (1.07 T), 147 kJ/m{sup 3} and 471 kA/m, respectively, at x=0.1. The unusual increase in coercivity for the alloys with 10% La or 10% La{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5} substitution is possibly attributed to the phase segregation in alloys with certain La or LaCe contents. The reduced Curie temperature and spin-reorientation temperature were obtained for La, Ce or LaCe substituted alloys. Transmission electron microscope analysis has revealed that a fine and uniform distributed grain structure leads to remanence enhancement for La{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5} substituted alloys. The present results indicate that partially substituting Nd by La or/and Ce cannot only effectively reduce the cost of nanocrystalline NdFeB based magnetic powders but also can maintain a relatively good combination of magnetic properties.

  6. Effect of P addition on glass forming ability and soft magnetic properties of melt-spun FeSiBCuC alloy ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Yang, Y.Z., E-mail: yangyzgdut@163.com; Li, W.; Chen, X.C.; Xie, Z.W.

    2016-11-01

    The dependency of phosphorous content on the glass forming ability, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of Fe{sub 83.4}Si{sub 2}B{sub 14−x}P{sub x}Cu{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.1} (x=0,1,2,3,4) alloys was investigated. The experimental results showed that the substitution of B by P increased the glass forming ability in this alloy system. The Fe{sub 83.4}Si{sub 2}B{sub 10}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.1} alloy shows a fully amorphous character. Thermal stability of melt-spun ribbons increases and temperature interval between the first and second crystallization peaks enlarges with the increase of P content. And the saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) shows a slight increase with the increase of P content. The Fe{sub 83.4}Si{sub 2}B{sub 11}P{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.1} nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high Bs about 200.6 emu/g. The Bs of fully amorphous alloy Fe{sub 83.4}Si{sub 2}B{sub 10}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.1} drops dramatically to 172.1 emu/g, which is lower than that of other nanocrystallines. Low material cost and excellent soft magnetic properties make the FeSiBPCuC alloys promise soft magnetic materials for industrial applications. - Highlights: • Partial substituting B by P helps to improve the glass forming ability of the alloy. • The addition of P content reduces the thermal stability and improves heat treatment temperature region for these alloys. • The Fe{sub 83.4}Si{sub 2}B{sub 11}P{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.1} nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high saturation magnetic density of 200.6 emu/g.

  7. Effect of solidification rate on the microstructure and microhardness of a melt-spun Al-8Si-1Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoese, E.; Keskin, M.

    2009-01-01

    The properties of rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy, produced by melt-spinning technique at a different solidification rates, were investigated using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), the optical microscopy (OM), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the microhardness technique. The properties of rapidly solidified ribbons were then compared with those of the chill-casting alloy. The results show that rapid solidification has influence on the phase constitution of the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy. The phases present in the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb ingot alloy were determined to be α-Al, fcc Si and intermetallic AlSb phases whereas only α-Al and fcc Si phases were identified in the melt-spinning alloy. The rapid solidification has a significant effect on the microstructure of the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy. Particle size in the microstructure of the ribbons is too small to compare with particle size in the microstructure of the ingot alloy. Moreover, the significant change in hardness occurs that is attributed to changes in the microstructure.

  8. Effect of solidification rate on the microstructure and microhardness of a melt-spun Al-8Si-1Sb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakoese, E. [Erciyes University, Institute of Science, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, M. [Erciyes University, Institute of Science, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Erciyes University, Physics Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr

    2009-06-24

    The properties of rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy, produced by melt-spinning technique at a different solidification rates, were investigated using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), the optical microscopy (OM), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the microhardness technique. The properties of rapidly solidified ribbons were then compared with those of the chill-casting alloy. The results show that rapid solidification has influence on the phase constitution of the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy. The phases present in the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb ingot alloy were determined to be {alpha}-Al, fcc Si and intermetallic AlSb phases whereas only {alpha}-Al and fcc Si phases were identified in the melt-spinning alloy. The rapid solidification has a significant effect on the microstructure of the hypoeutectic Al-8Si-1Sb alloy. Particle size in the microstructure of the ribbons is too small to compare with particle size in the microstructure of the ingot alloy. Moreover, the significant change in hardness occurs that is attributed to changes in the microstructure.

  9. Magnetic properties of melt-spun Nd-rich NdFeB alloys with Dy and Ga substitutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harland, C.L.; Davies, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a systematic investigation of the effects of Dy and Ga additions on the magnetic properties of a Nd-rich NdFeB alloy are presented and discussed. Particular attention is given to the effect of increasing Dy substitutions on the coercivity of the Nd 18 Fe 76 B 6 alloy. Substitution of 30% of the Nd by Dy resulted in a coercivity increase from 1590 to 3290 kA m -1 . However, contrary to previous suggestions, substitution of 1% of the Fe by Ga was found to have only a small influence on the magnetic properties of all the alloys in the compositional series (Nd 100-x Dy x ) 18 Fe 76 B 6 (x=0-30). (orig.)

  10. A comparative thermomagnetic study of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B alloys with different Nd content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the phase composition and magnetic properties of three types of commercial Nd-Fe-B alloys with different Nd content - low (10-12 wt%, near stoichiometric (21-25 wt% and rich (26-29 wt% caused by thermomagnetic analysis (TM were observed in regard to optimal magnetic state. Phase compositions of investigated alloys before and after TM measurement up to 800°C were compared using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray analysis. The TM measurements decompose all three materials and the main products of decomposition process α-Fe and Fe2B phase. Observed changes in structure and phase composition had direct influence on magnetic properties. Loss of magnetic properties induced by thermal decomposition is clearly illustrated on corresponding SQUID hysteresis loops.

  11. Magnetic properties of Sm5Fe17 melt-spun ribbons and their borides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Saito

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sm5Fe17 melt-spun ribbons exhibited low coercivity and partly or mostly consisted of the amorphous phase. Annealing of Sm5Fe17 melt-spun ribbon resulted in the formation of the Sm5Fe17 phase. The annealed Sm5Fe17 melt-spun ribbon exhibited a high coercivity. It was found that the addition of B to the Sm5Fe17 alloy resulted in the promotion of the Sm2Fe14B phase. Annealed Sm5Fe17Bx (x = 0.5 melt-spun ribbons consisted of the Sm5Fe17 phase together with the Sm2Fe14B and SmFe2 phases. On the other hand, annealed Sm5Fe17Bx (x = 1.0-1.5 melt-spun ribbons consisted of the Sm2Fe14B and SmFe2 phases without the Sm5Fe17 phase. The resultant Sm5Fe17Bx (x = 1.0-1.5 melt-spun ribbons still showed a coercivity of around 2 kOe. The annealed Sm5Fe17 melt-spun ribbon exhibited a high coercivity over 25 kOe and a remanence of 40 emu/g, whereas the annealed Sm5Fe17B1.0 melt-spun ribbon exhibited a high remanence of 65 emu/g and a coercivity of 2.0 kOe.

  12. Effect of Zr Purity and Oxygen Content on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Melt-Spun and Suction-Cast Cu46Zr42Al7Y5 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozieł T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of oxygen content in zirconium on the structure and mechanical properties of the Cu46Zr42Al7Y5 alloy, in the form of melt-spun ribbons and suction-cast rods, was investigated. Two types of Zr, rod and crystal bar of different nominal purities and oxygen contents, were used to synthesize the alloy by arc melting. Rapidly solidified ribbons were produced by melt spinning and their amorphous structures were confirmed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Bulk samples in the form of rods were cast using a special water-cooled suction casting unit attached to the arc melting system. XRD and DSC studies proved the amorphous structure of the bulk alloy synthesized from low-oxygen Zr and partial crystallization of the same alloy for high-oxygen Zr. In both bulk samples, uniformly distributed crystalline particles were identified as yttrium oxides. Higher mean compressive strength of amorphous alloy was observed. The hardness of amorphous phase was close to 500 HV1 in both bulk alloys, while the hardness of crystalline dendritic areas, observed in the alloy synthesized from high oxygen Zr, was lower by about 50 HV1.

  13. Impact of beryllium additions on thermal and mechanical properties of conventionally solidified and melt-spun Al–4.5 wt.%Mn–x wt.%Be (x = 0, 1, 3, 5) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öz, Turan; Karaköse, Ercan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal and mechanical properties of Al–Mn–Be alloys were investigated. • IQC Al–Mn–Be alloys were synthesized by the CS and MS techniques. • The volume fraction of IQC increases continuously with Be content. • The melting points of the QC i-phase were determined between 652 °C and 675 °C. • The maximum H V and σ values were found to be 124 kg/mm 2 and 458 MPa with the addition of 5% Be. - Abstract: The influence of beryllium (Be) addition on the quasicrystal-forming ability, thermal and mechanical properties of Al–4.5 wt.%Mn–x wt.%Be (x = 0, 1, 3, 5) alloys was investigated in this study. Quasicrystalline Al–Mn–Be alloys were synthesized by the conventionally casting and melt spinning techniques. The microstructures of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The phase transition during the solidification process was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the conventionally solidified (CS) and melt-spun (MS) samples were measured by a Vickers micro-hardness indenter and tensile-strength tests. The Al–4.5 wt.%Mn alloy has a hexagonal structure and minor dendritic icosahedral quasicrystalline phase (IQC) precipitates surrounded by an α-Al matrix. Addition of Be into the Al–4.5 wt.%Mn alloy generates intermetallic Be 4 AlMn and IQC phases with the extinction of the hexagonal phase, and the fraction of IQC increases continuously with the increase in Be content. A considerable improvement in microhardness and tensile strength values was observed due to the addition of Be in different percentages into the composition

  14. TEM Nanostructural Study of Al-6Si-3Cu-Mg Melt-Spun Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismeli Alfonso López

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three quaternary Al-6Si-3Cu-xMg (x = 0.59, 3.80, and 6.78 wt.% alloys were produced by melt-spun and characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and microhardness techniques. Obtained second phases were Al2Cu( for the alloy with 0.59% Mg and Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 (Q for the alloys with 3.80 and 6.78% Mg. These phases are present as 30–50 nm or as 5–10 nm nanoparticles. Alloying elements content in solid solution increased, mainly for Si and Mg. The high alloying elements content in solid solution and the small -Al cell size for melt-spun alloys leads to microhardness values about 2 times higher than those of ingot counterparts. The microhardness increase for melt-spun alloys with 3.80 and 6.78% Mg depends on Mg content in solid solution.

  15. Superparamagnetic behaviour in melt-spun Ni{sub 2}FeAl ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qian Zhengnan [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang Jinke [Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Zhao Lei [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sui Yu [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang Hongxia [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Yu [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Su Wenhui [Center for the Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Ming [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Liu Zhuhong [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Liu Guodong [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wu Guangheng [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2007-03-07

    Heusler alloy Ni{sub 2}FeAl has been synthesized by the melt-spinning technique. The dc magnetization and frequency-dependent ac susceptibility measurements reveal that this alloy exhibits the characteristic feature of superparamagnetism. This behaviour may be associated with a structural disorder stemming from the fast quenching after the heat treatment. The small frequency-dependent ac susceptibility shifts in the blocking temperature and the existence of a pronounced peak in FC magnetization as well as Vogel-Fulcher activation processes indicate that intergranular interactions dominate in the melt-spun ribbons of Ni{sub 2}FeAl.

  16. Dysprosium-free melt-spun permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D N; Wu, Z; He, F; Miller, D J; Herchenroeder, J W

    2014-01-01

    Melt-spun NdFeB powders can be formed into a number of different types of permanent magnet for a variety of applications in electronics, automotive and clean technology industries. The melt-spinning process produces flake powder with a fine uniform array of nanoscale Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains. These powders can be net-shape formed into isotropic polymer-bonded magnets or hot formed into fully dense magnets. This paper discusses the influence of heavy rare earth elements and microstructure on the magnetic performance, thermal stability and material cost of NdFeB magnets. Evidence indicates that melt-spun nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets are less dependent on heavy rare earth elements for high-temperature performance than the alternative coarser-grained sintered NdFeB magnets. In particular, hot-pressed melt-spun magnets are an attractive low-cost solution for applications that require thermal stability up to 175–200 °C. (paper)

  17. Dysprosium-free melt-spun permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D N; Wu, Z; He, F; Miller, D J; Herchenroeder, J W

    2014-02-12

    Melt-spun NdFeB powders can be formed into a number of different types of permanent magnet for a variety of applications in electronics, automotive and clean technology industries. The melt-spinning process produces flake powder with a fine uniform array of nanoscale Nd2Fe14B grains. These powders can be net-shape formed into isotropic polymer-bonded magnets or hot formed into fully dense magnets. This paper discusses the influence of heavy rare earth elements and microstructure on the magnetic performance, thermal stability and material cost of NdFeB magnets. Evidence indicates that melt-spun nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets are less dependent on heavy rare earth elements for high-temperature performance than the alternative coarser-grained sintered NdFeB magnets. In particular, hot-pressed melt-spun magnets are an attractive low-cost solution for applications that require thermal stability up to 175-200 °C.

  18. Magnetic properties of Cu80Co20 and Cu80Co15Fe5 melt-spun ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark; Harris, V. G.; Das, B. N.; Koon, N. C.

    1994-11-01

    The magnetic properties of granular, annealed, melt-spun ribbons of the ``giant'' magnetoresistors, Cu80Co20 and Cu80Co15Fe5, have been studied by a variety of techniques. These include x-ray dfiffraction, electron microscopy, ferromagnetic resonance, SQUID magnetometry, Mössbauer-effect spectroscopy, and magnetoresistance. We utilize each of these measurements to reveal different aspects of the particle size distribution as a function of annealing temperatures. These melt-spun alloys require large magnetic fields for magnetic saturation, impairing their utility as magnetic sensors. However, the properties of melt-spun ribbons provide an understanding of why all granular magnetic materials are difficult to saturate. The magnetoresistance ratio of these alloys is maximized by a 500 °C anneal with Δρ/ρ~=14% at 4.2 K. The paramagnetic fraction determined by SQUID magnetometry at 4.2 K is 33% for this annealing temperature. The paramagnetic fraction determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy is 14% for samples annealed by 500 °C, and vanishes when the sample is annealed at 900 °C. The discrepancy between the two measurements of the paramagnetic fraction is due to the vastly different averaging times of the two techniques.

  19. Magnetic properties of (misch metal, Nd-Fe-B melt-spun magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of replacing Nd with misch metal (MM on magnetic properties and thermal stability has been investigated on melt-spun (Nd1-xMMx13.5Fe79.5B7 ribbons by varying x from 0 to 1. All of the alloys studied crystallize in the tetragonal 2:14:1 structure with single hard magnetic phase. Curie temperature (Tc, coercivity (Hcj, remanence magnetization (Br and maximum energy product ((BHmax all decrease with MM content. The melt-spun MM13.5Fe79.5B ribbons with high ratio of La and Ce exhibit high magnetic properties of Hcj = 8.2 kOe and (BHmax= 10.3 MGOe at room temperature. MM substitution also significantly strengthens the temperature stability of coercivity. The coercivities of the samples with x = 0.2 and even 0.4 exhibit large values close to that of Nd13.5Fe79.5B7 ribbons above 400 K.

  20. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changping [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd2Fe14B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  1. Magnetic viscosity and coercivity mechanisms in sintered and melt spun NdFeB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Street, R.; Bingham, D.; Day, R.K.; Dunlop, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic viscosity parameters kT/q(=Sv) of sintered and melt spun NdFeB vary with internal field. During initial magnetization of thermally demagnetized specimens signifiant viscosity occurs with melt spun NdFeB but is negligible with sintered NdFeB. Differences in mechanisms of magnetization account for this behaviour

  2. Exchange correlation length and magnetoresistance in Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-Ni melt-spun ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghannami, M.; Gomez-Polo, C.; Rivero, G.; Hernando, A.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic properties of Fe 30 Cu 70 melt-spun ribbons are reported for the first time. In the as-cast state, the microstructure consists of b.c.c.-Fe grains immersed in a Cu-rich matrix. However, the addition of a small percentage of Ni gives rise to the appearance of new Cu-Fe-Ni phases. Under suitable thermal treatments, the microstructure of both alloys evolves towards a complete phase segregation in b.c.c-Fe and f.c.c.-Cu immiscibles phases. The temperature dependence of the magnetic properties is analysed and related to the microstructural changes produced during the thermal treatments. Remarkable magneto-resistance effects have been observed in both as-cast alloys, with maximum values of the order of 6% at low measuring temperatures. (orig.)

  3. Microstructure of the Ni–Fe–Cu–P melt-spun ribbons produced from the single-chamber and from the double-chamber crucibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziewiec, Krzysztof, E-mail: kziewiec@up.krakow.pl [Institute of Technology, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Technical Science, Pedagogical University of Cracow, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Błachowski, Artur; Ruebenbauer, Krzysztof [Mössbauer Spectroscopy Division, Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Ziewiec, Aneta [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Prusik, Krystian [Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, University of Silesia, ul. Bankowa 12, PL-40-007 Katowice (Poland); Latuch, Jerzy [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, ul. Wołoska 141, PL-02-507 Warszawa (Poland); Zięba, Marcin; Bryła, Krzysztof [Institute of Technology, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Technical Science, Pedagogical University of Cracow, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • A new method for production of metallic amorphous/amorphous composite is proposed. • The unique microstructure was obtained by rapid cooling of the two unmixed liquids. • The composite TCMS Ni–Fe–Cu–P amorphous alloy forms ductile fracture. - Abstract: The aim of the work was to investigate the influence of the processing on the final microstructure and properties of the melt-spun Ni–Fe–Cu–P, Ni–Fe–P and Ni–Cu–P alloys ejected in two ways. In the first case, the alloy was molten in a simple single-chamber crucible, then ejected as uniform liquid. In the second case the double-chamber crucible was used, and the flux composed of the two Ni–Fe–P and Ni–Cu–P liquids was cooled on a copper roller before forming a uniform mixture. The two component melt spinning (TCMS) was performed starting from the Ni{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}P{sub 20} and Ni{sub 70}Cu{sub 10}P{sub 20} alloys. Three of the alloys i.e. Ni{sub 55}Fe{sub 20}Cu{sub 4}P{sub 20}, Ni{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}P{sub 20} and Ni{sub 70}Cu{sub 10}P{sub 20} were melt-spun from the traditional single-chamber crucible. The methods applied in this study for microstructural investigations include scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Thermal stability of the melt-spun alloys was tested using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of the investigations are described and discussed in terms of the unique features of the TCMS amorphous microstructure. It is shown that this complex phase composition of the amorphous alloy favors formation of the ductile fracture and the multiple shear band formation.

  4. Effect of boron additions on phase formation and magnetic properties of TbCu{sub 7}-type melt spun SmFe ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chuanjiang; Yu, Dunbo, E-mail: yudb2008@126.com; Li, Kuoshe; Luo, Yang; Jin, Jinling; Lu, Shuo; Li, Hongwei; Mao, Yongjun; Quan, Ningtao

    2016-08-15

    Melt spun ribbons of a series of SmFe{sub 12}B{sub x} (x=0.0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25, and 1.5) have been prepared by the melt spinning technique. Sm–Fe–B melt spun ribbons with single phase TbCu{sub 7}-type structure were prepared from the SmFe{sub 12}B{sub x} (x=0.5, 0.75, and 1.0) alloys at the surface velocity around 40 m/s. The addition of boron not only inhibits the appearance of soft magnetic phase α-Fe, but also enhances the ability of amorphous formation for melt spun Sm–Fe ribbons. The concentration of boron atoms, however, exceeds the limit of the solubility (x>1.0) of Sm–Fe alloys, which does not impede the appearance of α-Fe but accelerates the formation of metastable phase Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 23}B{sub 3} that is unfavorable to their magnetic properties. Moreover, it is found that the addition of boron whose concentration is 0.0≤x≤0.75 can stabilize the metastable TbCu{sub 7}-type structure because of the increase of the lattice parameter ratio c/a. The magnetic properties of as-annealed SmFe{sub 12}B{sub 1.0} melt spun ribbons with an energy product of 2.19MGOe, a coercivity of 2.36 kOe and a remanence of 4.8 kGs have been achieved. The microstructural characteristics of as-annealed melt spun SmFe{sub 12} and SmFe{sub 12}B{sub 1.0} ribbons have been discussed as well. The following sequence of the hyperfine field H(6l)melt spun Sm–Fe alloys with TbCu{sub 7}-type structure, and the

  5. Preparation of melt-spun antimicrobially modified LDH/polyolefin nanocomposite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Burak; Schröttner, Percy; Leuteritz, Andreas; Boldt, Regine; Jacobs, Enno; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-08-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) was synthesized and organically modified with camphorsulfonic acid (CSA) and ciprofloxacin. The thermal stability of CSA was improved remarkably under LDH shielding. A minimal inhibitory concentration of free CSA against tested bacteria was determined in order to define the essential quantity in LDH modification. The modified LDHs were melt-compounded with high density polyethylene and the prepared nanocomposites were further melt-spun using a piston-type spinning device. The melt-spun fibers were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. CSA integrated fibers show susceptibility against Gram-positive bacteria and ciprofloxacin integrated fibers showed activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Properties of melt-spun Co15Fe5Cu80, a bulk granular magnetic solid (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, M.; Das, B. N.; Koon, N. C.

    1993-05-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and transport properties of melt-spun Co15Fe5Cu80 as a function of heat treatment. Recently Xiao, Jiang, and Chien1 reported clustering and giant magnetoresistance in thin films of related alloys prepared by sputtering. We report qualitatively similar phenomena in these rapidly quenched ribbons. The unannealed samples exhibited saturation magnetoresistance of 0.2%. Annealing at 500 °C for 15 min in hydrogen increases the room temperature for magnetoresistance to 3%, and lowering the temperature to 77 K increased the magnetoresistance to 12.6%. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements at 35 GHz were also made. At room temperature the unannealed sample displayed a very broad resonance centered at 10 kG, consistent with a broad distribution of single domain particles of roughly spherical shape and an overall global magnetization 4πM=3.5 kOe. As the annealing temperature increases, the single domain particles with an inhomogeneous linewidth of ˜2 kOe grow into multidomain particles with a linewidth of ˜6 kOe.

  7. Microstructural characterization of a rapidly solidified Al-5 Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhonghua; Bian Xiufang; Wang Yan

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure of a melt-spun Al-5 Sb alloy has been characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The phases present in the melt-spun Al-5 Sb alloy were determined to be the equilibrium α-Al and AlSb, identical to those in the ingot-cast alloy. The microstructure of the melt-spun Al-5 Sb alloy is composed of primary AlSb phase embedded in the matrix comprising α-Al cells with intercellular nanoscale AlSb particles, different from that of the ingot-cast alloy composed of the primary AlSb phase within an α-Al/AlSb eutectic matrix. Rapid solidification has a marked effect on the morphology, size and distribution of the primary AlSb phase in the melt-spun Al-5 Sb alloy. Furthermore, some orientation relationships were determined in the melt-spun alloy

  8. Investigation on the magnetocaloric effect in RNi{sub 2} (R: Dy, tb) melt-spun ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, M.V. de

    2016-08-15

    We report a theoretical and experimental investigation on the magnetocaloric properties of the rare earth RNi{sub 2} (R=Dy,Tb) in melt-spun ribbon and bulk form. The theoretical calculations were performed using a Hamiltonian model including the Zeeman-exchange interactions and the crystalline electrical field. Thus the magnetocaloric potential was calculated in the easy magnetic axes, in order an average over all of the possible directions. The isothermal entropy-change dependence on temperature calculated was compared with available experimental data for melt-spun ribbon and bulk material. We also investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the behavior of a DyNi{sub 2} and TbNi{sub 2} composite with optimized molar proportions and discussed this in the context of the optimum regeneration Ericsson cycle. - Highlights: • We investigate the effects of texture on the MCE of a melt-spun ribbon and a composite formed by RNi{sub 2} (R=Dy and Tb). • We compare the experimental data of MCE of a bulk and melt-spun ribbon. • We have successfully modeled the MCE in bulk and melt-spun ribbon considering the magnetic field applied along the easy magnetic axis and also averaged over all of the possible directions. • We describe a possible source of the increase in potential magnetocaloric.

  9. Thermal Treatment of Melt-Spun Fibers Based on High Density PolyEthylene and Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Goulis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the synthesis of novel low-cost carbon fibers along with the investigation of the optimal parameters of temperature and time for the stabilization of hybrid high-density polyethylene (HDPE and lignin melt-spun fibers. These fibers were manufactured by physical compounding of HDPE and chemically-modified softwood kraft lignin (SKL in order to produce green fiber precursors for carbon fiber synthesis. Stabilization tests were performed with respect to thermal treatment (physical method and sulfonation treatment (chemical method. The results revealed that only chemical methods induce the desired thermal process-ability to the composite fibers in order to manufacture carbon fibers by using a simple method. This investigation shed light on the stabilization techniques of polymeric fibers in the absence of any cyclic groups in terms of environmentally-friendly mass production of carbon fibers using low-cost and green raw materials. This study facilitates incorporation of softwood lignin in homegrown polymeric fibers by a low-cost production process via melt-spinning of composite fibers, which were successfully stabilized using a facile chemical method and carbonized. Additionally, a comprehensive investigation of the thermal behavior of the samples was accomplished, by examining several ways and aspects of fiber thermal treating. The properties of all studied fibers are presented, compared, and discussed.

  10. The dry-heat loss effect of melt-spun phase change material fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjønnås, Maria Suong; Færevik, Hilde; Sandsund, Mariann; Reinertsen, Randi E

    2015-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) have the ability to store latent heat when they change phases, a property that gives clothing that incorporates PCM its cooling effect. This study investigated the effect of dry-heat loss (cooling) of a novel melt-spun PCM fibre on the basis of the area covered, mass, the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature, compared to a known PCM clothing product. PCM fibres with melting temperatures of 28.4 and 32.0°C and PCM packs with melting temperatures of 28.0 and 32.0°C were studied. The results showed that the PCM fibres had a larger initial peak cooling effect than that of the PCM packs. The duration of the cooling effect of PCM fibres was primarily dependent on the PCM mass and the latent heat of fusion capacity, and secondly on the covered area and melting temperature of the PCM. This study investigates the cooling effect of PCM fibres on a thermal manikin. The PCM fibres had a high but short-lasting cooling effect. This study contributes to the knowledge of how the body's temperature regulation may be affected by the cooling properties of clothing that incorporates PCM.

  11. TEM observations of a rapidly solidified Al-20 Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Zhang Zhonghua; Zheng Shaohua; Bian Xiufang

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructural characterization of a melt-spun Al-20 Sb alloy has been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phases present in the melt-spun Al-20 Sb alloy were determined to be α-Al and AlSb, identical to those in the ingot-cast alloy. The microstructure of the melt-spun Al-20 Sb alloy is dominantly composed of primary AlSb dendrites embedded in the α-Al matrix, different from that of the ingot-cast alloy composed of primary AlSb plates within an α-Al/AlSb eutectic matrix. In addition, some areas comprise primary AlSb particles within the α-Al matrix in the melt-spun alloy

  12. Effect of precipitation on the shape memory effect of Ti50Ni25Cu25 melt-spun ribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Yunxiang; Liu Yong; Xie Zeliang; Zarinejad, Mehrdad

    2008-01-01

    The present research aims to provide accurate understanding of the relation between precipitation (volume fraction, morphology, type) and shape memory effect of Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 melt-spun ribbon. Rapid thermal annealing was used to control the microstructural development while the shape memory effect of the ribbon was determined under constraint thermal cycling. The results show that the precipitation process takes the following sequence: B11 TiCu → B11 TiCu + Ti 2 (Ni, Cu) → Ti 2 (Ni, Cu) with increasing annealing temperature or duration. The shape memory effect is found to depend on both the volume fraction and the distribution of the precipitates. The former affects the shape recovery strain through reduction of the transformation volume participating the shape recovery. The latter affects the shape recovery strain through strengthening the matrix thus reducing the martensite strain which is more predominant under low constraint stresses. Precipitation strengthening, on the other hand, reduces the tendency of dislocation generation/movement, thus reducing the irreversible strain and improving shape recovery strain. This understanding provides guidelines on the optimization of the shape memory properties of the Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 melt-spun ribbon via post-processing annealing

  13. Giant magnetoresistance in melt spun Cu85Co10Ni5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiotto, Stefano; Johnson, Erik; Celegato, Federica; Coisson, Marco; Pryds, Nini

    2009-01-01

    CuCoNi rapidly solidified alloys are interesting because they display giant magnetoresistance (GMR). In the present work a Cu 85 Co 10 Ni 5 alloy has been synthesized by melt spinning and analysed for GMR. The ribbons obtained have been annealed at different temperatures and the evolution of the crystal structure with annealing has been studied by X-ray diffraction. The fine microstructure has been observed by TEM and related to the magnetic properties, investigated in a vibrating sample magnetometer. In the studied composition the magnetoresistance was found to be lower than in binary CuCo alloys without Ni addition

  14. Giant magnetoresistance in melt spun Cu85Co10Ni5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curiotto, Stefano; Johnson, Erik; Celegato, Federica

    2009-01-01

    CuCoNi rapidly solidified alloys are interesting because they display giant magnetoresistance (GMR). In the present work a Cu85Co10Ni5 alloy has been synthesized by melt spinning and analysed for GMR. The ribbons obtained have been annealed at different temperatures and the evolution of the crystal...... structure with annealing has been studied by X-ray diffraction. The. ne microstructure has been observed by TEM and related to the magnetic properties, investigated in a vibrating sample magnetometer. In the studied composition the magnetoresistance was found to be lower than in binary CuCo alloys without...

  15. Effect of stretching on the mechanical properties in melt-spun poly(butylene succinate)/microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Fan, Mao; Zhao, Yongsheng; Jin, Tianxiang; Fu, Qiang

    2016-04-20

    In order to prepare poly(butylene succinate)/microfibrillated cellulose composites with high performance, in this work, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was first treated by acetylchloride with ball-milling to improve its interfacial compatibility with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS). Then melt stretching processing was adopted to further improve the dispersion and orientation of MFC in as-spun PBS fiber. And the effect of MFC on the crystalline structure and mechanical properties were systematically investigated for the melt-spun fibers prepared with two different draw ratios. The dispersion, alignment of the MFC and interfacial crystalline structure in the composite fibers are significantly influenced by the stretching force during the melt spinning. The possible formation of nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) superstructure where aligned MFC as shish and PBS lamellae as kebab has been suggested via SEM and SAXS in the composite fibers prepared at the high draw ratio. Large improvement in tensile strength has been realized at the high draw ratio due to the enhanced orientation and dispersion of MFC as well as the formation of NHSK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hot deformed anisotropic nanocrystalline NdFeB based magnets prepared from spark plasma sintered melt spun powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y.H.; Huang, Y.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Z.W., E-mail: zwliu@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zeng, D.C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, S.C.; Zhong, Z.C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure evolution and its influence on the magnetic properties were investigated. • The increase of stray field and weakening of domain-wall pinning effects were the main reasons of the decrease of the coercivity with increasing the compression ratio. • The influences of non-uniform plastic deformation on the microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. • Magnetic properties and temperature coefficient of coercivity are indeed very promising without heavy rare earth elements. -- Abstract: Anisotropic magnets were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) followed by hot deformation (HD) using melt-spun powders as the starting material. Good magnetic properties with the remanence J{sub r} > 1.32 T and maximum of energy product (BH){sub max} > 303 kJ/m{sup 3} have been obtained. The microstructure evolution during HD and its influence on the magnetic properties were investigated. The fine grain zone and coarse grain zone formed in the SPS showed different deformation behaviors. The microstructure also had an important effect on the temperature coefficients of coercivity. A strong domain-wall pinning model was valid to interpret the coercivity mechanism of the HDed magnets. The increase of stray field and weakening of domain-wall pinning effects were the main reasons of the decrease of the coercivity with increasing the compression ratio. The influences of non-uniform plastic deformation on the microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. The polarization characteristics of HDed magnets were demonstrated. It was found out that the HDed magnets had better corrosion resistance than the counterpart sintered magnet.

  17. Melt-spun shaped fibers with enhanced surface effects: fiber fabrication, characterization and application to woven scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S J; Lee, B-K; Na, M H; Kim, D S

    2013-08-01

    Scaffolds with a high surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA:V) are advantageous with regard to the attachment and proliferation of cells in the field of tissue engineering. This paper reports on the development of novel melt-spun fibers with a high SA:V, which enhanced the surface effects of a fiber-based scaffold while maintaining its mechanical strength. The cross-section of the fibers was altered to a non-circular shape, producing a higher SA:V for a similar cross-sectional area. To obtain fibers with non-circular cross-sectional shape, or shaped fibers, three different types of metal spinnerets were fabricated for the melt-spinning process, each with circular, triangular or cruciform capillaries, using deep X-ray lithography followed by nickel electroforming. Using these spinnerets, circular and shaped fibers were manufactured with biodegradable polyester, polycaprolactone. The SA:V increase in the shaped fibers was experimentally investigated under different processing conditions. Tensile tests on the fibers and indentation tests on the woven fiber scaffolds were performed. The tested fibers and scaffolds exhibited similar mechanical characteristics, due to the similar cross-sectional area of the fibers. The degradation of the shaped fibers was notably faster than that of circular fibers, because of the enlarged surface area of the shaped fibers. The woven scaffolds composed of the shaped fibers significantly increased the proliferation of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells. This approach to increase the SA:V in shaped fibers could be useful for the fabrication of programmable, biodegradable fiber-based scaffolds in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Joule-Heating Annealing on Giant Magnetoimpedance of Co64Fe4Ni2B19-xSi8Cr3Alx (x = 0, 1 and 2 Melt-Spun Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Gholamipour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied the influence of dc joule-heating thermal processing on the structure, magnetoimpedance (MI and thermal properties of Co64Fe4Ni2B19-xSi8Cr3Alx (x = 0, 1, and 2 rapidly solidified melt-spun ribbons. The nanocrystallization process was carried out by the current annealing of as-spun samples at various current densities. As-spun and joule-heated samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and magnetoimpedance (MI measurements. DSC results revealed that by the replacement of B by Al the first and second crystallization peaks are overlapped with each other and the initial nanocrystallization temperature is decreased with the increase in Al content of the alloy. Also it was shown that the replacement of B by Al atoms can improve soft magnetic properties confirmed by magnetoimpedance ratio (MIR% results for the amorphous joule-heated ribbons. Furthermore, increase in dc joule current density increases the MI ratio first, however; after formation of crystalline phases, it decreases.

  19. Structural and Electrical Properties Characterization of Sb1.52Bi0.48Te3.0 Melt-Spun Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriia Ohorodniichuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Melt-spinning (MS has been reported as a promising tool to tailor the microstructure of bulk thermoelectric materials leading to enhanced thermoelectric performances. Here, we report on a detailed characterization of p-type Bi0.48Sb1.52Te3 ribbons produced by melt-spinning. The microstructure of the melt-spun ribbons has been studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The analyses indicate that the ribbons are highly-textured with a very good chemical homogeneity. TEM reveals clear differences in the microstructure at large and short-range scales between the surface that was in contact with the copper wheel and the free surface. These analyses further evidence the absence of amorphous regions in the melt-spun ribbons and the precipitation of elemental Te at the grain boundaries. Low-temperature electrical resistivity and thermopower measurements (20–300 K carried out on several randomly-selected ribbons confirm the excellent reproducibility of the MS process. However, the comparison of the transport properties of the ribbons with those of bulk polycrystalline samples of the same initial composition shows that MS leads to a more pronounced metallic character. This difference is likely tied to changes in deviations from stoichiometry due to the out-of-equilibrium conditions imposed by MS.

  20. Alloy composition dependence of formation of porous Ni prepared by rapid solidification and chemical dealloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Zhen [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn; Jia Haoling [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Qu Yingjie [Shandong Labor Occupational Technology College, Jingshi Road 388, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu Guodong; Bian Xiufang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2009-03-20

    In this paper, the effect of alloy composition on the formation of porous Ni catalysts prepared by chemical dealloying of rapidly solidified Al-Ni alloys has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption experiments. The experimental results show that rapid solidification and alloy composition have a significant effect on the phase constituent and microstructure of Al-Ni alloys. The melt spun Al-20 at.% Ni alloy consists of {alpha}-Al, NiAl{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3}, while the melt spun Al-25 and 31.5 at.% Ni alloys comprise NiAl{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3}. Moreover, the formation and microstructure of the porous Ni catalysts are dependent upon the composition of the melt spun Al-Ni alloys. The morphology and size of Ni particles in the Ni catalysts inherit from those of grains in the melt spun Al-Ni alloys. Rapid solidification can extend the alloy composition of Al-Ni alloys suitable for preparation of the Ni catalysts, and obviously accelerate the dealloying process of the Al-Ni alloys.

  1. Physical and electrical properties of melt-spun Fe-Si (3–8 wt.%) soft magnetic ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Jiang, Xiujuan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Clark, Trevor; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Coffey, Gregory; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Mathaudhu, Suveen N.

    2018-02-01

    Fe-Si alloys ranging from 3 to 8 wt% Si were rapidly solidified using melt spinning. Wheel speeds of 30 m/s and 40 m/s were employed to vary cooling rates. Mössbauer spectroscopic studies indicated the Si content significantly influenced the number of Fe sites, relative abundance of various Fe species, and internal magnetic fields/structural environments. Wheel speed altered Fe speciation only in the 3 wt% sample. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that increasing the wheel speed refined both the ribbon thickness and grain size. Electron backscatter diffraction results suggest tailoring melt spinning process parameters and alloy chemistry may offer the ability to manipulate {001} texture development. Electrical resistivity measurements were observed to increase in response to elevated Si content. Increased hardness was correlated to elevated Si content and wheel speed.

  2. The effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the magnetic properties of Heusler Ni–Mn–Sn melt-spun ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamazares, J.L. Sánchez; Quintana-Nedelcos, A.; Ríos-Jara, D.; Sánchez-Valdes, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of low temperature vacuum annealing (823 K; 550 °C) on the elemental chemical composition, structural phase transition temperatures, phase structure, and magnetic properties of Ni 50.6 Mn 36.3 Sn 13.1 as-solidified ribbons. Their elemental chemical composition, highly oriented columnar-like microstructure and single-phase character (L2 1 -type crystal structure for austenite) remain unchanged after this low temperature annealing. Annealed ribbons show a reduction of interatomic distances which lead to a small change in the characteristic phase transition temperatures (~3–6 K) but to a significant rise of ~73 and 63% in the saturation magnetization of the martensite and austenite phases, respectively, that can be strictly ascribed to the strengthening of ferromagnetic interactions due to the change in interatomic distances. - Highlights: • We study the effect of low temperature annealing on Ni 50.6 Mn 36.3 Sn 13.1 melt-spun ribbons. • Low temperature annealing preserves the crystal structure, composition and microstructure of the ribbons. • Low temperature annealing reduces the cell volume. • The strengthening of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction significant increases σ S .

  3. Magnetic Property and Microstructure of Melt-Spun (Ndcentre dotDy)-(Fe{center_dot}Co{center_dot}Al{center_dot}M)-B ribbon (M:Sn, Mo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, ByungChul; KangKiWon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, JungSoo; Song, JinTae [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    The microstructures, temperature stability and magnetic properties of melt-spun (Nd{center_dot}Dy)-(Fe{center_dot}Co{center_dot}Al)-B ribbons with the addition of Sn and Mo were studied. The addition of Sn and Mo greatly increased the Curie temperature of (Nd{center_dot}Dy)-(Fecentre dotCo{center_dot}Al)-B ribbon and improved magnetic properties, especially the coercivity over 1 KOe. It was considered that disturbed grain boundary, a kind of defects of the grain boundary region, could be observed along the grain boundaries by HREM(high resolution electron microscopy) which seemed to be responsible for the marked improvement of coercivity. Also, the additive element of Sn and Mo decreased the irreversible loss to 3% and 6%, respectively and improved the temperature stability of the ribbons. It seemed that the additions of Sn and Mo were resulted in higher coercivity. A linear relationship was found between HRT(heat resistance temperature)of (Ndcentre dotDy)-(Fe{center_dot}Co{center_dot}Al{center_dot}M)-B ribbons and irreversible loss (author). 14 refs.15 figs.

  4. Novel Melt-Spun Polymer-Optical Poly(methyl methacrylate Fibers Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Beckers

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural properties of novel melt-spun polymer optical fibers (POFs are investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering. The amorphous PMMA POFs were subjected to a rapid cooling in a water quench right after extrusion in order to obtain a radial refractive index profile. Four fiber samples were investigated with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. The resulting distance-distribution functions obtained from the respective equatorial and meridional SAXS data exhibit a real-space correlation peak indicative of periodic cross-sectional and axial variations in the scattering density contrast. Simple model calculations demonstrate how the structural information contained particularly in the equatorial distance distribution function can be interpreted. The respective results are qualitatively verified for one of the fiber samples by comparison of the model curve with the measured SAXS data. Eventually, the study confirms that the cross-sectional variation of the (scattering- density is the main reason for the formation of radial refractive-index profiles in the POFs.

  5. The effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the magnetic properties of Heusler Ni–Mn–Sn melt-spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llamazares, J.L. Sánchez, E-mail: jose.sanchez@ipicyt.edu.mx [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Quintana-Nedelcos, A. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Marmara University, Department of Material and Metalurgy Eng., Kadıkoy 34777, Istanbul (Turkey); Ríos-Jara, D. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Sánchez-Valdes, C.F. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 14, Ensenada 22860, Baja California, México (Mexico); and others

    2016-03-01

    We report the effect of low temperature vacuum annealing (823 K; 550 °C) on the elemental chemical composition, structural phase transition temperatures, phase structure, and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 50.6}Mn{sub 36.3}Sn{sub 13.1} as-solidified ribbons. Their elemental chemical composition, highly oriented columnar-like microstructure and single-phase character (L2{sub 1}-type crystal structure for austenite) remain unchanged after this low temperature annealing. Annealed ribbons show a reduction of interatomic distances which lead to a small change in the characteristic phase transition temperatures (~3–6 K) but to a significant rise of ~73 and 63% in the saturation magnetization of the martensite and austenite phases, respectively, that can be strictly ascribed to the strengthening of ferromagnetic interactions due to the change in interatomic distances. - Highlights: • We study the effect of low temperature annealing on Ni{sub 50.6}Mn{sub 36.3}Sn{sub 13.1} melt-spun ribbons. • Low temperature annealing preserves the crystal structure, composition and microstructure of the ribbons. • Low temperature annealing reduces the cell volume. • The strengthening of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction significant increases σ{sub S}.

  6. Influence of the fabrication conditions on the high frequency magnetic response of melt spun Fe73.5Si13.5B9Nb3Cu1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, L.; El Ghannami, M.; Vazquez, M.; Gomez-Polo, C.; Univ. Publica de Navarra, Pamplona

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of the fabrication conditions on the magnetic properties of Fe 73.5 Si 13.5 B 9 Nb 3 Cu 1 melt-spun nanocrystalline ribbons. Different initial structures, amorphous and partially crystalline, have been obtained during the rapid solidification procedure. The structural characterization shows that a decrease in the quenching rate through a reduction in the tangential wheel velocity, gives rise to a partially crystalline state, characterized by the appearance of a textured α-FeSi nanocrystalline phase. The occurrence of the crystalline fraction in the initial as-cast state gives rise to a magnetic hardening with respect to the amorphous sample casted at higher quenching rate. However, the evolution of coercivity under thermal treatments is roughly independent of the initial structure. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the ac susceptibility as a function of annealing temperature shows that the ribbon obtained at lower quenching rate presents higher susceptibility values in the optimum magnetic state (T a = 550 C. 1 h) in a wide range of driving frequency (up to 100 kHz). (orig.)

  7. Materials developed by mechanical alloying and melt spinning

    OpenAIRE

    Suñol Martínez, Joan Josep; Fort, Joaquim

    2008-01-01

    Materials science is a multidisciplinary research topic related to the development of physics and technology. Mechanical alloying of ribbon flakes is a two steps route to develop advanced materials. In this work, a Fe based alloy was obtained using three pathways: mechanical alloying, melt-spinning and mechanical alloying of previously melt-spun samples. Processing conditions allow us to obtain amorphous or nanocrystalline structures. Furthermore, a bibliographic revision of mechanical al...

  8. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn melt spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziarz, W. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Czaja, P., E-mail: p.czaja@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Szczerba, M.J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Cesari, E. [Department de Fisica, Universitat de Illes Balears, Ctra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca E-07071 (Spain); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni{sub 48}Mn{sub 39.5}Sn{sub 12.5−x}Al{sub x} (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔT{sub MT}=49 K; ΔT{sub RMT}=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite T{sub C}{sup M} decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite T{sub C}{sup A} remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune T{sub C}{sup A} and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L2{sub 1} type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32{sup ¯}) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31{sup ¯}) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the T{sub C}{sup M} has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications. - Highlights: • Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn based ferromagnetic Heusler alloys were produced by melt spinning. • Martensitic, reverse martensitic and intermartensitic transformations were observed, their temperatures and magnitude changed with Al substitution. • Different types of martensite structures were identified depending on Al

  9. Structure and coercivity of nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–Nb–Cu alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Structure and coercivity of nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–Nb–Cu alloys. B MAJUMDAR* and D AKHTAR. Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, P.O. Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058, India. MS received 5 February 2005; revised 24 February 2005. Abstract. Crystallization behaviour and magnetic properties of melt-spun ...

  10. Effect of quenching rate on the microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al-5Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Zhang Zhonghua; Zheng Shaohua; Fan Suhua; Cheng Xin; Wang Weimin; Bian Xiufang; Geng Haoran

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of quenching rate (wheel speed) on the microstructure of a melt-spun Al-5Sb alloy has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phases were identified to be α-Al and AlSb in the alloy melt-spun at 500 and 1500 rpm. The microstructure of the alloy melt-spun at 500 rpm is composed of primary AlSb particles embedded in a matrix comprising equiaxed α-Al cells with intercellular nanoscale AlSb particles and α-Al/AlSb eutectic. Furthermore, intracellular nanoscale AlSb particles were also found in some areas. With increasing quenching rate to 1500 rpm, the matrix microstructure comprises elongated α-Al cells with intercellular nanoscale AlSb particles. The intercellular AlSb particles exhibiting intense Bragg reflections with monocrystalline characteristics possess the same crystallographic orientation but the intracellular ones are randomly oriented exhibiting spotty rings in the Al-5Sb alloy melt-spun at 500 rpm

  11. Microstructural characterization of a rapidly solidified Al-10 Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Zhang Zhonghua; Geng Haoran; Wang Weimin; Bian Xiufang

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure of a melt-spun Al-10 Sb alloy has been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that rapid solidification has no influence on the phase constitution of the Al-10 Sb alloy. Moreover, the phase constitution does not change with increasing quenching rate (wheel speed). However, rapid solidification has a significant effect on the microstructure of the Al-10 Sb alloy. The microstructure of the melt-spun Al-10 Sb alloy dominantly comprises equiaxed primary AlSb dendrites and nanoscale α-Al/AlSb eutectic, different from that of the ingot-cast alloy consisting of coarse primary AlSb plates within the α-Al/AlSb eutectic matrix. Some epitaxial orientation relationships were found between AlSb particles and α-Al matrix in the melt-spun Al-10 Sb alloy as follows: α-Al [310] parallel AlSb [110] and α-Al (002) parallel AlSb (22-bar 0)

  12. Study of the high temperature characteristics of hydrogen storage alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Li; Shaoxiong, Zhou; Yan, Qi; 10.1016/j.jallcom.2004.07.006

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the phase structure of as-cast and melt-spun (MmY)/sub 1/(NiCoMnAl)/sub 5/ alloys (the content of yttrium is 0-2.5wt.%) and their electrochemical properties were studied with regard to discharge capacity at different temperatures (30-80 degrees C) and cycling life at 30 degrees C. It is found that the substitution of yttrium increase the electrochemical capacity of the compounds and decrease the difference in capacity between as-cast and as-quenched compounds at 30 degrees C. When increasing the yttrium concentration from 0 to 2.5wt.%, the cycling life of both the as-cast and the melt- spun compounds deteriorated, although the latter have a slightly longer cycle life than the former. The remarkable feature of the alloys obtained by yttrium substitution is the improvement of the high temperature electrochemical properties. It shows that the stability of the hydrides is increased. Compared with the as-cast alloys, the melt-spun ribbons have higher electrochemical charge /discharge capacity in the ...

  13. Recovery Phenomenon During Annealing of an As-Rapidly Solidified Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhigang; Mao, Shuaiying; Lin, Yaojun; Zhang, Yaqi; Wang, Limin

    2017-06-01

    It has been well documented that recovery occurring in metals/alloys produced via solid-state quenching involves only annihilation of supersaturated vacancies. Interestingly, in the present study, we observed completely different mechanisms underlying recovery during annealing of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (7075 Al) alloy processed via liquid-state quenching, i.e., rapid solidification (specifically melt spinning herein). The as-melt-spun alloy consists of refined grains containing tangled dislocations inside the grains. Following annealing at 393 K (120 °C) for 24 hours, refined grain structure was still retained and grain sizes essentially remained unchanged, but subgrains separated by dense dislocation walls were generated at grain interiors, with a much lower density of dislocations at subgrain interiors than that in the as-melt-spun 7075 Al alloy and dislocation arrays inside some subgrains. The microstructural evolution suggests the absence of recrystallization and the occurrence of recovery primarily via the annihilation and rearrangement of dislocations and the formation of subgrains. Based on the stored energy in dislocations in, and the annealing temperature of, the as-melt-spun 7075 Al alloy, the recovery phenomenon was analyzed and discussed in detail.

  14. Deformation behavior of NiAl-based alloys containing iron, cobalt, and hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pank, D. R.; Koss, D. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of alloying additions on the mechanical properties of the B2 intermetallic NiAl have been investigated in both the melt-spun ribbon and consolidated, bulk form. The study is based on a matrix of NiAl-based alloys with up to 20 at. pct Co and Fe additions and with reduced Al levels in the range of 30-40 at. pct. Characterization of the melt-spun ribbon by optical and scanning electron microscopy indicates a range of microstructures, including single-phase beta, gamma-prime necklace phase surrounding either martensitic or beta grains, and a mixture of equiaxed martensitic and gamma-prime grains. Bend ductility is present in melt-spun and annealed ribbons exhibiting the gamma-prime necklace structure and in a single-phase beta material containing 20 at. pct Fe. The analysis of compressive flow behavior on consolidated, bulk specimens indicates that the single-phase beta alloys exhibit a continuous decrease in yield stress with increasing temperature and profuse microcracking at grain boundaries. In contrast, multiphase (gamma-prime + either martensite or beta) alloys tend to display a peak in flow stress between 600 and 800 K, with little or no signs of microcracking. In general, heat treatments which convert the martensitic grains to beta + gamma-prime result in improved strength at temperatures above 600 K and better resistance to crack initiation.

  15. Hysteresis loops and the demagnetization process at 4.2 K for melt-spun Nd sub 1 sub 3 Fe sub 7 sub 7 B sub 1 sub 0

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Han Min; Park, W S; Park, M J; Wang Xue Feng

    1998-01-01

    Hysteresis loops of melt-spun Nd sub 1 sub 3 Fe sub 7 sub 7 B sub 1 sub 0 cooled down at the remanent state were measured at 4.2 K. The loop for fields of H sub m sub a sub x =6.4 MA m sup - sup 1 is characterized by low- and high-field steps. The loop for fields of H sub m sub a sub x =4.0 MA m sup - sup 1 is very thin with only a low-field step and is shifted profoundly along the H-axes. The loops and the spin distribution during the demagnetization process were analysed by micromagnetic finite-element calculations. Quantitatively, the calculations reproduce the experimental loops fairly well. The spin distribution is fairly nonuniform, and a domain-wall-like distribution appears not only at some grain boundaries but also within some grains at the high-field step. The demagnetization proceeds by nonuniform reversion as a whole, and neither the model of single-domain reversion nor the model of domain-wall pinning in the grain boundary model describes the process appropriately. (author)

  16. Coercivity enhancement and thermal-stability improvement in the melt-spun NdFeB ribbons by grain boundary diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiajun; Yuan, Chao; Luo, Yang; Yang, Yuanfei; Hu, Bin; Yu, Dunbo; Yan, Wenlong

    2018-01-01

    Rapidly quenched NdFeB ribbons with high coercivity were obtained by Nd70Cu30 diffusion process. Samples with a high coercivity of 22.02 kOe at room temperature were obtained after grain boundary diffusion with 20 wt% Nd70Cu30 alloys. The NdCu diffusion process promoted grain growth in the ribbons, and grain boundary phases were formed with Cu segregation among NdFeB grains. Coercivity above 10 kOe at 150 °C was achieved in the bonded magnets with NdCu content over 10 wt%. The flux loss of bonded magnets was reduced by ∼32% at 120 °C after diffusion treatment with only a small amount (2 wt%) of NdCu.

  17. Investigation of structural and magnetic properties of rapidly-solidified iron-silicon alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, T. V.; Meka, V. M.; Jiang, X.; Overman, N. R.; Doyle, J.; Shield, J. E.; Mathaudhu, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the ambient temperature structural properties (~300 K) and the ambient and high temperature (up to 900 K) direct current (DC) magnetic properties of melt-spun Fe-x wt.% Si (x = 3, 5, & 8) alloys. The wheel surface speeds selected for the study were 30 m/s and 40 m/s. The thickness, width, lattice parameter, saturation magnetization (MS), and intrinsic coercivity (HCI) of the melt spun ribbons are presented and compared with data in the literature. The ribbons produced at the lower wheel surface speed (30 m/s) were continuous having relatively uniform edges compared to the ribbons produced at the higher wheel surface speed. The thickness and the width of the melt-spun ribbons ranged between ~15-60 μm and 500-800 μm, respectively. The x-ray diffraction spectra of the melt-spun ribbons indicated the presence of disordered α-phase, irrespective of the composition, and the wheel-surface speed. The lattice parameter decreased gradually as a function of increasing silicon content from ~0.2862 nm (Fe-3 wt.% Si) to ~0.2847 nm (Fe-8 wt.% Si). Wheel surface speed was not shown to have a significant effect on the magnetization, but primarily impacted the ribbon structure. A decreasing trend in the saturation magnetization was observed as a function of increased silicon content. The intrinsic coercivity of the melt-spun alloys ranged between ~50 to 200 A/m. Elevated temperature evaluation of the magnetization in the case of Fe-3 & 5 wt.% Si alloy ribbons was distinctly different from the Fe-8 wt.% Si alloy ribbons. The curves of the as-prepared Fe-3 wt.% Si and Fe-5 wt.% Si alloy ribbons were irreversible while that of Fe-8 wt.% Si was reversible. The MS for any of the combinations of wheel surface speed and composition decreased monotonically with the increase in temperature (from 300 – 900 K). The percentage decrease in MS from 300 K to 900 K for the Fe-3 wt.% Si and Fe-5 wt.% Si alloys was ~19-22 %, while the percentage decrease in the same

  18. Hardness and microstructural characteristics of rapidly solidified Al-8-16 wt.%Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, O.; Karaaslan, T.; Gogebakan, M.; Keskin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Al-Si alloys with nominal composition of Al-8 wt.%Si, Al-12 wt.%Si, and Al-16 wt.%Si were rapidly solidified by using melt-spinning technique to examine the influence of the cooling rate/conditions on microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the rapidly solidified ribbons and ingot samples were investigated by the optical microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results showed that the structures of all melt-spun ribbons were completely composed of finely dispersed α-Al and eutectic Si phase, and primary silicon was not observed. The XRD analysis indicated that the solubility of Si in the α-Al matrix was greatly increased with rapid solidification. Additionally, mechanical properties of both conventionally cast (ingot) and melt-spun ribbons were examined by using Vickers indenter for one applied load (0.098 N). The hardness values of the melt-spun ribbons were about three times higher than those of ingot counterparts. The high hardness of the rapidly solidified state can be attributed to the supersaturated solid solutions. Besides, hardness values with different applied loads were measured for melt-spun ribbons. The results indicated that Vickers hardness values (H v ) of the ribbons depended on the applied load. Applying the concept of Hays-Kendall, the load independent hardness values were calculated as 694.0, 982.8 and 1186.8 MN/m 2 for Al-8 wt.%Si, Al-12 wt.%Si and Al-16 wt.%Si, respectively

  19. Designing new biocompatible glass-forming Ti75-x Zr10 Nbx Si15 (x = 0, 15) alloys: corrosion, passivity, and apatite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Somayeh; Oswald, Steffen; Gostin, Petre Flaviu; Helth, Arne; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Calin, Mariana; Schultz, Ludwig; Eckert, Jürgen; Gebert, Annett

    2016-01-01

    Glass-forming Ti-based alloys are considered as potential new materials for implant applications. Ti75 Zr10 Si15 and Ti60 Zr10 Nb15 Si15 alloys (free of cytotoxic elements) can be produced as melt-spun ribbons with glassy matrix and embedded single β-type nanocrystals. The corrosion and passivation behavior of these alloys in their homogenized melt-spun states have been investigated in Ringer solution at 37°C in comparison to their cast multiphase crystalline counterparts and to cp-Ti and β-type Ti-40Nb. All tested materials showed very low corrosion rates as expressed in corrosion current densities icorr  alloys passive states in a wide potential range. This corresponds to low passive current densities ipass  = 2 ± 1 µA/cm(2) based on the growth of oxide films with thickness d alloys is beneficial for stable surface passivity. The addition of Nb does not only improve the glass-forming ability and the mechanical properties but also supports a high pitting resistance even at extreme anodic polarization up to 4V versus SCE were oxide thickness values of d ∼35 nm are reached. With regard to the corrosion properties, the Nb-containing nearly single-phase glassy alloy can compete with the β-type Ti-40Nb alloy. SBF tests confirmed the ability for formation of hydroxyapatite on the melt-spun alloy surfaces. All these properties recommend the new glass-forming alloys for application as wear- and corrosion-resistant coating materials for implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  1. Microstructural evolution in Mg-rich Mg-Zn-Y alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, T.; Ranganathan, S.; Nair, S.; Bajargan, G.

    2005-01-01

    Mg-rich Mg-Zn-Y alloys with nominal compositions Mg 97 Zn 1 Y 2 , Mg 97 Zn 2 Y 1 , Mg 92 Zn 6.5 Y 1.5 and Mg 97-x Zn 1 Y 2 Zr x have been chosen for the present study. These alloys are prepared by using sand casting mold. The sand cast alloys are remelted and subjected to copper mold casting and melt spinning techniques. The effect of cooling rate on microstructures was studied. It is observed that the size of the precipitates decreases with an increase of cooling rate. The formation of nano precipitates results in higher strength of the alloy as compared to the conventional alloys. The microstructures of melt spun ribbons are compared with RS/PM (rapidly solidified power metallurgy) Mg 97 Zn 1 Y 2 alloy, obtained from a different source. (author)

  2. Hydrogen absorption study of Ti-based alloys performed by melt-spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, R.M.; Lemus, L.F.; Santos, D.S. dos, E-mail: rafaella@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEMM/COPPEP/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption of Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} icosahedral quasicrystal (ICQ) and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} shape memory alloy (SMA) melt-spun ribbons was studied. Samples were exposed to hydrogen gas at 623 K and 4 MPa for 1000 minutes. The total capacity of hydrogen obtained for Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} was 3.2 and 2.4 wt. % respectively. The Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) of the hydrogenated alloys shows that both alloys start to desorb hydrogen around 750 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, performed after hydrogenation, indicate a complete amorphization of the Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} i-phase alloy, while the Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} alloy remained crystalline after hydride formation. (author)

  3. Ultra-soft magnetic Co-Fe-B-Si-Nb amorphous alloys for high frequency power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Karl; Masood, Ansar; Kulkarni, Santosh; Stamenov, Plamen

    2018-05-01

    With the continuous shrinkage of the footprint of inductors and transformers in modern power supplies, higher flux, while still low-loss metallic replacements of traditional ferrite materials are becoming an intriguing alternative. One candidate replacement strategy is based on amorphous CoFeBSi soft-magnetic alloys, in their metallic glass form. Here the structural and magnetic properties of two different families of CoFeBSi-based soft magnetic alloys, prepared by arc-melting and subsequent melt spinning (rapid quenching) are presented, targeting potential applications at effective frequencies of 100 kHz and beyond. The nominal alloy compositions are Co67Fe4B11Si16Mo2 representing commercial Vitrovac and Co72-xFexB28-y (where B includes non-magnetic elements such as Boron, Silicon etc. x varies between 4 and 5 % and y is varied from 0 to 2 %) denoted Alloy #1 and prepared as a possible higher performance alternative, i.e. lower power loss and lower coercivity, to commercial Vitrovac. Room temperature magnetization measurements of the arc-melted alloys reveal that compared to Vitrovac, Alloy #1 already presents a ten-fold decrease in coercivity, with Hc ˜ 1.4 Am-1 and highest figure of merit of (Ms/Hc > 96). Upon melt-spinning the alloys into thin (< 30 μm) ribbons, the alloys are essentially amorphous when analyzed by XRD. Magnetization measurements of the melt-spun ribbons demonstrate that Alloy #1 possesses a coercivity of just 2 Am-1, which represents a significant improvement compared to melt-spun ribbons of Vitrovac (17 Am-1). A set of prototype transformers of approximately 10 turns of Alloy #1 ribbon exhibits systematically Hc < 10 Am-1 at 100 kHz, without a noticeable decrease in coupled flux and saturation.

  4. Chemical sensitive interfacial free volume studies of nanophase Al-rich alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, W.; Puff, W.; Wuerschum, R.; Wilde, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Al-based nanocrystalline alloys have attracted substantial interest due to their outstanding mechanical properties. These alloys can be obtained by crystallization of melt-spun amorphous precursors or by grain refinement upon repeated cold-rolling of elemental layers. For both synthesis routes, the nanocrystallization process is sensitively affected by interfacial chemistry and free volumes. In order to contribute to an atomistic understanding of the interfacial structure and processes during nanocrystallization, the present work deals with studies of interfacial free volumes by means of positron-annihilation-spectroscopy. In addition to positron lifetime spectroscopy which yields information on the size of free volumes, coincident Doppler broadening of the positron-electron annihilation photons is applied as novel technique for studying the chemistry of interfaces in nanophase materials on an atomistic scale. Al-rich alloys of the above mentioned synthesis routes were studied in this work. (author)

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of multiphase NiAl-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pank, D. R.; Koss, D. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the gamma-prime phase on the deformation behavior and fracture resistance of melt-spun ribbons and consolidated bulk specimens of a series of Nial-based alloys with Co and Hf additions has been examined. The morphology, location, and volume fraction of the gamma-prime phase are significant factors in enhancing the fracture resistance of the normally brittle NiAl-based alloys. In particular, the results indicate that a continuous-grain-boundary film of gamma-prime can impart limited room-temperature ductility regardless of whether B2 or L10 NiAl is present. Guidelines for microstructure control in multiphase NiAl-based alloys are also presented.

  6. Corrosion-resistant amorphous alloy ribbons for electromagnetic filtration of iron rusts from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Asahi; Asami, Katsuhiko; Sato, Takeaki; Hashimoto, Koji

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use corrosion-resistant amorphous Fe-9Cr-13P-7C alloy ribbons as an electromagnetic filter material for trapping various iron rusts suspended in water at 40 0 C. The ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 rust was trapped with the 100 % efficiency and paramagnetic rusts such as α-Fe 2 O 3 , α-FeOOH and amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide were trapped with certain efficiencies at the magnetic field strength of 0.5-10 kOe. The regeneration of the filter by back-washing was easy. The trapping capacity of electromagnetic filter was proportional to the edge length of the filter material where the high magnetic field strength existed. Therefore, melt-spun thin and narrow amorphous alloy ribbons having the high corrosion resistance have the potential utility as electromagnetic filter material. (author)

  7. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of rapidly quenched and as-cast bulk NdFeBCu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Ll, J.L.; Bustamante S, R.; Barthem, V.M.T.S.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    2005-01-01

    A study of the structural and magnetic properties of as-cast and melt spun (x)Nd 2 Fe 14 B(100-x)Nd 70 Cu 30 alloys (x=10, 50 and 75%wt.) is presented. In as-cast alloys for x=10wt%. the formation of a high coercivity phase, referred to as N (T C =240 deg. C, i H C =4.9kOe) is found. N is a (Nd-Fe)-based phase with a Fe/Nd ratio lower than that of phase Nd 2 Fe 14 B (φ). It is suggested that this phase is related to the A 1 phase found in binary Nd-Fe alloys. In melt-spun alloys, at the same x value of 10wt%, another hard phase is found which is suggested to be the Nd 6 Fe 13 Cu δ-phase (T C =192 deg. C, i H C =4.8kOe). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs of the ribbons with x=10wt% shows the formation of nanograins with a non-uniform grain size distribution. In cast alloys with x=50 and 75wt% large slab-like grains of φ are formed, in the inter-granular region a Nd-Cu eutectic phase and Nd grains, are observed. High coercivities are obtained in ribbons with x=50wt% ( i H C =19.7kOe) and 75wt% ( i H C =13.0kOe). A slight reduction in the Curie temperature of the φ-phase with respect to the bulk value is found in these ribbons

  9. XMCD and TEM studies of as-cast and rapidly quenched Fe50Nd50 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menushenkov, V. P.; Menushenkov, A. P.; Shchetinin, I. V.; Wilhelm, F.; Ivanov, A. A.; Rudnev, I. A.; Ivanov, V. G.; Rogalev, A.; Savchenko, A. G.; Zhukov, D. G.; Rafalskiy, A. V.; Ketov, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    We present the XMCD analysis of as-cast and melt spun Fe50Nd50 samples performed at L2,3 -Nd and K-Fe absorption edges at 5 and 50 K in comparison with macroscopic data of XRD, TEM and magnetic properties measurements. In addition, we have measured the magnetic field dependence of XMCD signal for both types of the samples in magnetic fields up/down to 17 T. The obtained results pointed to the strong difference between structure and magnetic properties of the as-cast and melt spun Fe50Nd50 alloys for both macroscopic and local measurements. The element selective XMCD loops for melt spun alloy show almost identical value of the coercive force Hci for L 2-Nd and K-Fe edges and practically do not depend on temperature. XMCD loop at K-Fe edge is a sum of contributions of the Fe-based phases. The main Fe-rich phase has high Hci ≈ 2,4 T as a highly anisotropic phase. The absence of the K-Fe XMCD loop saturation in the field up to 17 T points to presence of the second Nd-rich Nd-Fe phase which is ferromagnetic at temperature lower than 50 K. In accordance to the TEM results these both phases may coexist as the mixture of nanocrystals which was formed as a result of decomposition of the amorphous-like matrix phase. The XMCD loop at L2 -Nd edge with Hci ≈ 1,9 T is the sum of contributions from two Nd-based phases: hard Fe-rich phase (Hci ≈ 2,4 T) and Nd-Fe matrix phase of medium hardness with Hci ≈ 1,3 T. The macroscopic loop showed the higher Hci compared to XMCD loops. Such discrepancy may be caused by the fact that XMCD signal is collected from a 5-10 mcm thick surface layer, which contains many defects that reduce anisotropy and coercivity.

  10. Structural relaxation in an amorphous rapidly quenched cobalt-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradin, V.; Grynszpan, R.I.; Alves, F.; Houzali, A.; Perron, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    An amorphous melt-spun Co-based alloy (Metglas 2705 MN) is investigated by Doppler Broadening and Positron Lifetime techniques in order to follow the microstructural changes yielded by isochronal annealings before crystallization. The results are correlated with those of Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Coercive Field measurements. The quenched empty spaces underlined by Lifetime measurements are less than one atomic volume in size and migrate without clustering in larger voids. Both Positron Annihilation and Coercive Field investigations suggest that the overall decrease of free volume related to structural relaxation in this amorphous material, proceeds mainly via compositional short-range ordering. These local chemical rearrangements which lead to a partial disorientation of the magnetic moments act as strong pinning points for Bloch Walls. (orig.)

  11. Directional annealing studies on rapidly solidified Sm–Co–Nb–C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, T.V.; Shield, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a process that develops texture in nanocrystalline permanent magnet alloys is presented. An originally isotropic material is passed through a high up-temperature gradient, inducing directional grain growth. Texture development by directional annealing of melt-spun Sm 12 Co 88 , (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 99 Nb 1 , (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 99 C 1 , and (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 98 Nb 1 C 1 alloys was examined. Samples directionally annealed were compared with conventionally annealed samples. Strong (0 0 6) in-plane texture was observed by X-ray diffraction in Sm 12 Co 88 and (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 99 Nb 1 alloys and the anisotropy was corroborated by magnetic measurements (magnetic texture ∼20–53%). Directional annealing produced only slight texture in the (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 99 C 1 and (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 98 Nb 1 C 1 alloys. The development of texture is critically dependent on annealing temperature, the up-temperature gradient, translational velocity, and alloy composition. The activation energy for anisotropic grain growth was estimated to be ∼28 and ∼42 kJ mol −1 for Sm 12 Co 88 and (Sm 12 Co 88 ) 99 Nb 1 , respectively. These results indicate that directional annealing as a route to texture development in nanocrystalline permanent magnet alloys is a feasible process.

  12. The effect of phase constitution on the magnetic structure of nanophase NdFeB alloys observed by magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khafaji, M. A.; Rainforth, W. M.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Davies, H. A.; Bishop, J. E. L.

    1998-09-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been employed to image the magnetic structure in nanocrystalline melt spun ribbon samples of NdFeB alloys of three markedly different and contrasting compositions: Low-Nd (Nd 9.5Fe 84.5B 6) containing Nd 2Fe 14B and α-Fe phases, stoichiometric (Nd 11.8Fe 82.3B 5.9), and high-Nd (Nd 18Fe 76B 6) containing Nd 2Fe 14B and Nd-rich phases. It was found that the magnetic domain length scale is significantly larger than the mean Nd 2Fe 14B grain size (˜35 nm) in each case, although small changes in force gradient occurred down to ˜20 nm. However, both the domain length scale and the tip-sample interaction `strength' were found to decrease with increasing Nd-content. An interpretation of these results in terms of the microstructure is given.

  13. Effect of low-melting point phases on the microstructure and properties of spark plasma sintered and hot deformed Nd-Fe-B alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Meiyu; Yan, Xueliang; Lin, Ye; Shield, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    The effect of adding a low melting point Pr-Cu-Al alloy during spark plasma sintering of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B ribbons is investigated. Regions of coarse grains were reduced and overall grain refinement was observed after the addition of Pr68Cu25Al7, leading to an enhancement of coercivity from 12.7 kOe to 20.4 kOe. Hot deformation of the samples in the spark plasma sintering system resulted in the formation of platelet-like grains, producing crystallographic alignment and magnetic anisotropy. The hot deformation process improved the remanence and energy product but reduced the coercivity. The decrease of coercivity resulted from grain growth and aggregation of Pr and Nd elements at triple-junction phases.

  14. High frequency magnetic properties of Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy powder cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.K. [Seoul National University of Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea); Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Kim, Yoon B.; Jee, K.K. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Choi, G.B. [R and D Center, Changsung Corporation, Incheon (Korea)

    2007-12-15

    Toroidal shape Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy powder cores were prepared from the melt spun Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} ribbons by cold pressing using silicon and phenol resin as an insulating material, respectively. The effect of the insulating materials and their content on the high-frequency magnetic properties of the compacted cores were investigated. The Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy powder cores using phenol resin exhibit stable permeability over 1 MHz, showing excellent high-frequency characteristics. The core loss was reduced significantly and the dc-bias property was improved by using phenol resin. Uniform and good insulation by phenol resin leads to the excellent high-frequency characteristics of the cores. Silicon resin as an insulating material was also effective in improving the high frequency characteristics of the Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy powder cores. However, an appropriate coating process for silicon resin should be applied in order to achieve more improved high frequency characteristics of the nanocrystalline alloy powder cores by controlling the thickness of coated layer. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Characterisation and structure development of Ni64Cu9Fe8P19 glass forming alloy at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziewiec, K.; Bryla, K.; Blachowski, A.; Ruebenbauer, K.; Przewoznik, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nickel-copper-iron-phosphorus Ni 64 Cu 9 Fe 8 P 19 alloy was prepared using 99.95 wt.% Ni, 99.95 wt.% Cu, 99.95 wt.% Fe and the Ni-P master alloy. The precursors were melted in the arc furnace under argon gettered protective atmosphere. Then the alloy was induction melted in quartz tubes under vacuum (10 -2 bar) and quenched in water to obtain ingot of 10 mm diameter. The primary microstructure of the ingot was investigated by the use of light microscope. The Ni 64 Cu 9 Fe 8 P 19 alloy was cast using melt spinning. The ribbon in the as cast state was characterised with use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) of the melt-spun ribbon was made to determine the thermal stability and glass forming ability of the alloy. The pieces of ribbon were heated to different temperatures and annealed during 1 h then characterised with use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction to see the change of the microstructure after heating to elevated temperatures. It has been found that the devitrification sequence consists of progressive formation of the (Ni, Fe, Cu) 3 P phase and (Ni, Fe, Cu)-FCC phase. The temperature range of the sequence is determined under isochronal conditions

  16. Effect of Fe addition on the magnetic and giant magneto-impedance behaviour of CoCrSiB rapidly solidified alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Seema; Chattoraj, I; Panda, A K; Mitra, A; Pal, S K [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831 007 (India)

    2006-05-21

    Thermal electrical resistivity, magnetic hysteresis and magneto-impedance behaviour of melt spun and annealed Co{sub 71-X}Fe{sub X}Cr{sub 7}Si{sub 8}B{sub 14} (X = 0, 2, 3.2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 at.%) were investigated. The addition of Fe in the system changed crystallization as well as the magnetic properties of the materials. The alloy containing 6 at.% Fe showed an increase in resistivity during the first crystallization process. A TEM micrograph indicated the formation of nanostructure during the crystallization process. The GMI properties of the alloys are evaluated at a driving current amplitude of 5 mA and a frequency of 4 MHz. The two-peak behaviour in the GMI profile was observed for all the samples. It is found that the alloy with 4 at.% Fe has the maximum GMI ratio because of the nearly zero magnetostriction value of the sample. About 62% change in the GMI ratio was observed in the alloy with 4 at.% Fe when annealed at 673 K. The anisotropy field was also minimum for the annealed alloy. The results were explained by the formation of directional ordering and the reduction of the magnetostriction constant of the alloy due to nanocrystallization during the annealing process.

  17. Effect of Fe addition on the magnetic and giant magneto-impedance behaviour of CoCrSiB rapidly solidified alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Seema; Chattoraj, I; Panda, A K; Mitra, A; Pal, S K

    2006-01-01

    Thermal electrical resistivity, magnetic hysteresis and magneto-impedance behaviour of melt spun and annealed Co 71-X Fe X Cr 7 Si 8 B 14 (X = 0, 2, 3.2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 at.%) were investigated. The addition of Fe in the system changed crystallization as well as the magnetic properties of the materials. The alloy containing 6 at.% Fe showed an increase in resistivity during the first crystallization process. A TEM micrograph indicated the formation of nanostructure during the crystallization process. The GMI properties of the alloys are evaluated at a driving current amplitude of 5 mA and a frequency of 4 MHz. The two-peak behaviour in the GMI profile was observed for all the samples. It is found that the alloy with 4 at.% Fe has the maximum GMI ratio because of the nearly zero magnetostriction value of the sample. About 62% change in the GMI ratio was observed in the alloy with 4 at.% Fe when annealed at 673 K. The anisotropy field was also minimum for the annealed alloy. The results were explained by the formation of directional ordering and the reduction of the magnetostriction constant of the alloy due to nanocrystallization during the annealing process

  18. Generation and Characterization of Anisotropic Microstructures in Rare Earth-Iron-Boron Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oster, Nathaniel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate methods in which anisotropy could be induced in fine-grained alloys. We have identified two general processing routes to creating a fine, textured microstructure: form an amorphous precursor and devitrify in a manner that induces texture or form the fine, textured microstructure upon cooling directly from the liquid state. Since it is possible to form significant amounts of amorphous material in RE-Fe-B alloys, texture could be induced through biasing the orientationof the crystallites upon crystallization of the amorphous material. One method of creating this bias is to form glassy material and apply uniaxial pressure during crystallization. Experiments on this are presented. All of the work presented here utilizes melt-spinning, either to create precursor material, or to achieve a desired final microstructure. To obtain greater control of the system to process these materials, a study was done on the effects of heating the wheel and modifying the wheel’s surface finish on glass formation and phase selection. The second general approach—creating the desired microstructure directly from the liquid—can be done through directional rapid solidification. In particular, alloys melt-spun at low tangential wheel speeds often display directional columnar growth through a portion of the ribbon. By refining and stabilizing the columnar growth, a highly textured fine microstructure is achieved. The effects of adding a segregating element (Ag) on the columnar growth are characterized and presented.

  19. Small angle scattering investigation of nanostructured binary Au-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A.; Spizzo, F.; Ronconi, F.; Bosco, E.; Baricco, M.

    2004-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements have been performed on granular materials with composition Au 100-x Fe x (x=20, 27, 30, 38) obtained in the form of melt spun ribbons and of co-sputtered thin films. The as cast melt spun ribbons, show only the presence of nearly atomic iron precipitates, subsequent thermal treatments induce the formation of lamellar-shaped iron precipitates. In the co-sputtered films the iron nanoparticles are non-uniformly distributed in the Au matrix

  20. Formation of metastable phases and nanocomposite structures in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.S.; Chang, H.J.; Kim, D.H.; Pabi, S.K.; Murty, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Structures of nanocomposites in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated. → Nanoquasicrystalline, amorphous and intermetallics phases coexist with α-Al. → Nanoquasicrystalline phase was observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys. → Thermodynamic driving force plays dominant role in precipitation of Fe-rich phases. → High hardness (3.57 GPa) was observed for nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy. - Abstract: In the present work the structure and morphology of the phases of nanocomposites formed in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated in details using analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Nanoquasicrystalline phases, amorphous phase and intermetallics like Al 5 Fe 2 , Al 13 F 4 coexisted with α-Al in nanocomposites of the melt spun alloys. It was seen that the Fe supersaturation in α-Al diminished with the increase in Fe content and wheel speed indicating the dominant role of the thermodynamic driving force in the precipitation of Fe-rich phases. Nanoquasicrystalline phases were observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys like Al-2.5Fe and Al-5Fe as confirmed by high resolution TEM. High hardness (3.57 GPa) was measured in nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy, which was attributed to synergistic effect of solid solution strengthening due to high solute content (9.17 at.% Fe), dispersion strengthening by high volume fraction of nanoquasicrystalline phase; and Hall-Petch strengthening from finer cell size (20-30 nm) of α-Al matrix.

  1. HfCo7-Based Rare-Earth-Free Permanent-Magnet Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B; Balamurugan, B; Kumar, P; Skomski, R; Shah, VR; Shield, JE; Kashyap, A; Sellmyer, DJ

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the structural and magnetic properties of melt-spun HfCo7, HfCo7-xFex (0.25 <= x <=), and HfCo7Six (0.2 <= x <= 1.2) alloys. Appreciable permanent-magnet properties with a magnetocrystalline anisotropy of about 9.6-16.5, Mergs/cm(3), a magnetic polarization J(s) approximate to 7.2-10.6 kG, and coercivities H-c = 0.5-3.0 kOe were obtained by varying the composition of these alloys. Structural analysis reveals that the positions of x-ray diffraction peaks of HfCo7 show good agreement with those corresponding to an orthorhombic structure having lattice parameters of about a = 4.719 angstrom, b = 4.278 angstrom, and c = 8.070 angstrom. Based on these results, a model crystal structure for HfCo7 is developed and used to estimate the magnetic properties of HfCo7 using density-functional calculations, which agree with the experimental results.

  2. Deformation-driven catalysis of nanocrystallization in amorphous Al alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer J. Hebert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals develop in amorphous alloys usually during annealing treatments with growth- or nucleation-controlled mechanisms. An alternative processing route is intense deformation and nanocrystals have been shown to develop in shear bands during the deformation process. Some controversy surrounded the idea of adiabatic heating in shear bands during their genesis, but specific experiments have revealed that the formation of nanocrystals in shear bands has to be related to localized deformation rather than thermal effects. A much less debated issue has been the spatial distribution of deformation in the amorphous alloys during intense deformation. The current work examines the hypothesis that intense deformation affects the regions outside shear bands and even promotes nanocrystal formation in those regions upon annealing. Melt-spun amorphous Al88Y7Fe5 alloy was intensely cold rolled. Microcalorimeter measurements at 60 °C indicated a slight but observable growth of nanocrystals in shear bands over the annealing time of 10 days. When the cold-rolled samples were annealed at 210 °C for one hour, transmission electron images did not show any nanocrystals for as-spun ribbons, but nanocrystals developed outside shear bands for the cold rolled samples. X-ray analysis indicated an increase in intensity of the Al peaks following the 210 °C annealing while the as-spun sample remained “X-ray amorphous”. These experimental observations strongly suggest that cold rolling affects regions (i.e., spatial heterogeneities outside shear bands and stimulates the formation of nanocrystals during annealing treatments at temperatures well below the crystallization temperature of undeformed ribbons.

  3. Topological instability and glass forming ability of Al-Ni-Sm alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, L.C.R.; Danez, G.P.; Kiminami, C.S.; Bolfarini, C.; Botta, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Thermal crystallization of Al-Sm-Ni metallic glasses. → Topological instability with no association with the crystallization behavior. → Type and proportion of Sm-Al and Ni-Al clusters define the crystallization behavior. - Abstract: The thermal crystallization of Al-based metallic glasses can be described in association with the topological instability λ criterion. In the present work, we report on the crystallization behavior and glass forming ability of Al-rich, Al-Ni-Sm alloys, designed with compositions corresponding to the same topological instability condition of λ ∼ 0.1. Amorphous melt-spun alloys were prepared with the following compositions, varying the ratio of Ni and Sm elements: Al 87.5 Ni 4 Sm 8.5 , Al 83.5 Ni 10 Sm 6.5 , Al 80.5 Ni 14.5 Sm 5 and Al 76.5 Ni 20.5 Sm 3 . The glass forming ability of each alloy composition was evaluated based on the thermal parameters obtained from DSC runs and on X-ray diffraction patterns. Better glass forming ability was observed in compositions whose Sm content was increased and Ni content reduced. Thermal crystallization of the alloys with low Sm content showed only one crystallization peak and no glass transition event. In alloys with higher rare-earth content, a glass transition event was clearly detected before the crystallization event. The results are interpreted considering the different types and proportions of Sm-Al and Ni-Al clusters that can be formed in the alloys along the λ ∼ 0.1 line. They also emphasize the relevance of these different types of clusters in the amorphous phase in defining the stability of the glass and the types of thermal crystallization.

  4. Crystallization and Moessbauer studies of the Fe sub 7 sub 8 Al sub 4 Nb sub 5 B sub 1 sub 2 Cu sub 1 alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C S; Kim, S B; Park, J Y; Kim, K Y; Noh, T H; Oak, H N

    1998-01-01

    A melt-spun Fe sub 7 sub 8 Al sub 4 Nb sub 5 B sub 1 sub 2 Cu sub 1 alloy with an ultra-thin ribbon has been studied by x-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The average hyperfine field H sub h sub f (T) of the amorphous state shows temperature dependence of [H sub h sub f (T) - H sub h sub f (0)]/H sub h sub f (0) -0.53(T/T sub c) sup 3 sup / sup 2 - 0.21(T/T sub c < 0.7, indicative of spin-wave excitation. The quadrupole splitting just above the Curie temperature Tc is 0.42 mm/s, whereas the quadrupole shift below T sub c is zero. The Curie and the crystallization temperature are T sub c = 450 K and T sub x = 703 K, respectively, for a heating rate of 5 K/min. The occupied area ratio of the alpha-Fe phase flash-annealed at 723 K is 59% and remains unchanged. The crystallization temperature of the flash-annealed alloy becomes lower, and the formation of an alpha-Fe is easier than that of the conventional alloy. The flash-annealing technique is effective in improvin...

  5. Enhanced magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of (Fe0.72Cr0.28)3Al alloys for near room temperature cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Maheshwar Repaka, D. V.; Chaudhary, V.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic cooling is an environmentally friendly, energy efficient, thermal management technology relying on high performance magnetocaloric materials (MCM). Current research has focused on low cost, corrosion resistant, rare earth (RE) free MCMs. We report the structural and magnetocaloric properties of novel, low cost, RE free, iron based (Fe0.72Cr0.28)3Al alloys. The arc melted buttons and melt spun ribbons possessed the L21 crystal structure and B2 crystal structure, respectively. A notable enhancement of 33% in isothermal entropy change (-ΔS m) and 25% increase in relative cooling power (RCP) for the ribbons compared to the buttons can be attributed to higher structural disorder in the Fe-Cr and Fe-Al sub-lattices of the B2 structure. The critical behavior was investigated using modified Arrott plots, the Kouvel-Fisher plot and the critical isotherm technique; the critical exponents were found to correspond to the short-range order 3D Heisenberg model. The field and temperature dependent magnetization curves of (Fe0.72Cr0.28)3Al alloys revealed their soft magnetic nature with negligible hysteresis. Thus, these alloys possess promising performance attributes for near room temperature magnetic cooling applications.

  6. Stability of an amorphous alloy of the Mm-Al-Ni-Cu system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Triveño Rios

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made of the stability of melt-spun ribbons of Mm55Al25Ni10Cu10 (Mm = Mischmetal amorphous alloy. The structural transformations that occurred during heating were studied using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Crystallization took place through a multi-stage process. The first stage of transformation corresponded to the formation of a metastable phase followed by cfc-Al precipitation, while in the second stage, exothermic transformations led to the formation of complex and unidentified Mm(Cu, Ni and MmAl(Cu, Ni phases. The transformation curves recorded from isothermal treatments at 226 °C and 232 °C indicated that crystallization occurred through nucleation and growth, with diffusion-controlled growth occurring in the first crystallization stage. The supercooled liquid region, ∆Tx, at 40 K/min was ~80 K. This value was obtained by the substitution of Mm (=Ce + La + Nd + Pr for La or Ce, saving chemical element-related costs.

  7. Mechanical spectroscopy studies of partially amorphous Nd60Fe30Al10 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnowski, German C.; Salva, Horacio; Ghilarducci, Ada A.; Urreta, Silvia E.; Billoni, Orlando V.; Fabietti, Luis M.

    2004-01-01

    The hard magnetic properties of melt spun Nd 60 Fe 30 Al 10 alloys are attributed to a major matrix nominally amorphous for X-ray diffraction, composed by two metastable nanosized (∼5 nm) phases with different intrinsic magnetic properties. This composite system is investigated for the first time by mechanical spectroscopy techniques in the temperature range between 50 K and 450 K (1 kHz) where large annealing effects and two damping phenomena are detected. The as-cast microstructure irreversibly changes during annealing above 330 K, leading to a large modulus recovery accompanied by a reduction in the internal friction level. A relatively large relaxation effect is observed about 290 K, evidenced by a narrow internal friction peak with the corresponding step in the elastic modulus; this peak remains stable under thermal cycling between 200 K and 300 K but is affected by aging at 330 K and practically vanishes after heating to 450 K. Another internal friction peak is observed at about 250 K which has associated an anomalous modulus effect; in this temperature range, the internal friction and the elastic modulus exhibit heating/cooling hysteresis, which strongly depends on the extreme temperatures of the thermal cycle, a behavior frequently associated to first-order phase transformations

  8. Thermal aging of melt-spun NdFeB magnetic powder in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkerton, Frederick E.; Balogh, Michael P.; Ellison, Nicole; Foto, Aldo; Sechan, Martin; Tessema, Misle M.; Thompson, Margarita P.

    2016-01-01

    High energy product neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets are the premier candidate for demanding electrified vehicle traction motor applications. Injection molded (IM) or compression molded (CM) magnets made using NdFeB powders are promising routes to improve motor efficiency, cost, and manufacturability. However, IM and CM NdFeB magnets are susceptible to substantial thermal aging losses at motor operating temperatures when exposed to the automatic transmission fluid (ATF) used as a lubricant and cooling medium. The intrinsic coercivity H ci of NdFeB IM and CM magnets degrades by as much as 18% when aged for 1000 h in ATF at 150 °C, compared to a 3% loss when aged in air. Here we report aging studies of rapidly quenched NdFeB powder in air, ATF, and H 2 gas. Expansion of the NdFeB crystal lattice in both ATF and H 2 identified hydrogen dissociated from the ATF during aging and diffused into the primary NdFeB phase as the probable cause of the coercivity loss of IM and CM magnets. - Highlights: • Injection molded NdFeB magnets age rapidly in automatic transmission fluid (ATF). • Coercivity loss is not due to direct chemical reaction between ATF and the powder. • Chemical reaction with the binder does not play a major role in aging. • Hydrogen dissociates from ATF and diffuses into Nd 2 Fe 14 B, reducing coercivity.

  9. Thermal aging of melt-spun NdFeB magnetic powder in hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick.e.pinkerton@gm.com [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48092 (United States); Balogh, Michael P.; Ellison, Nicole [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48092 (United States); Foto, Aldo [Element Materials Technology Wixom, Inc (United States); Sechan, Martin; Tessema, Misle M.; Thompson, Margarita P. [Powertrain Materials/Fluids/AMPPD Engineering and Labs, GFL VE/PT Materials Engineering, General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI 48340 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    High energy product neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets are the premier candidate for demanding electrified vehicle traction motor applications. Injection molded (IM) or compression molded (CM) magnets made using NdFeB powders are promising routes to improve motor efficiency, cost, and manufacturability. However, IM and CM NdFeB magnets are susceptible to substantial thermal aging losses at motor operating temperatures when exposed to the automatic transmission fluid (ATF) used as a lubricant and cooling medium. The intrinsic coercivity H{sub ci} of NdFeB IM and CM magnets degrades by as much as 18% when aged for 1000 h in ATF at 150 °C, compared to a 3% loss when aged in air. Here we report aging studies of rapidly quenched NdFeB powder in air, ATF, and H{sub 2} gas. Expansion of the NdFeB crystal lattice in both ATF and H{sub 2} identified hydrogen dissociated from the ATF during aging and diffused into the primary NdFeB phase as the probable cause of the coercivity loss of IM and CM magnets. - Highlights: • Injection molded NdFeB magnets age rapidly in automatic transmission fluid (ATF). • Coercivity loss is not due to direct chemical reaction between ATF and the powder. • Chemical reaction with the binder does not play a major role in aging. • Hydrogen dissociates from ATF and diffuses into Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B, reducing coercivity.

  10. Thermal aging of melt-spun NdFeB magnetic powder in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Frederick E.; Balogh, Michael P.; Ellison, Nicole; Foto, Aldo; Sechan, Martin; Tessema, Misle M.; Thompson, Margarita P.

    2016-11-01

    High energy product neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets are the premier candidate for demanding electrified vehicle traction motor applications. Injection molded (IM) or compression molded (CM) magnets made using NdFeB powders are promising routes to improve motor efficiency, cost, and manufacturability. However, IM and CM NdFeB magnets are susceptible to substantial thermal aging losses at motor operating temperatures when exposed to the automatic transmission fluid (ATF) used as a lubricant and cooling medium. The intrinsic coercivity Hci of NdFeB IM and CM magnets degrades by as much as 18% when aged for 1000 h in ATF at 150 °C, compared to a 3% loss when aged in air. Here we report aging studies of rapidly quenched NdFeB powder in air, ATF, and H2 gas. Expansion of the NdFeB crystal lattice in both ATF and H2 identified hydrogen dissociated from the ATF during aging and diffused into the primary NdFeB phase as the probable cause of the coercivity loss of IM and CM magnets.

  11. SUPRAMOLECULAR MORPHOLOGY OF TWO-STEP MELT-SPUN POLY(LACTIC ACID) FIBERS. (R826733)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Melt-spun polylactic acid fibers: effect of cellulose nanowhiskers on processing and properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bio-based continuous fibers were processed from polylactic acid (PLA) and cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs) by melt spinning. Melt compounding of master batches of PLA with 10 wt % CNWs and pure PLA was carried out using a twin-screw extruder in which...

  13. The practical limits for enhancing magnetic property combinations for bulk nanocrystalline NdFeB alloys through Pr, Co and Dy substitutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z.W. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (Singapore)]. E-mail: phylz@nus.edu.sg; Davies, H.A. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (Singapore)

    2007-06-15

    Pr, Co and Dy additions have been employed to improve the combinations of magnetic properties for nanocrystalline Nd {sub x} Fe{sub 94-} {sub x} B{sub 6} melt spun alloys. The dependences of the magnetic properties on the solute element concentrations have been extensively investigated and the relationships between the measured remanence, maximum energy product (BH){sub max} and intrinsic coercivity for several compositional series are discussed. The composition ranges for these elemental substitutions which can be used to achieve the highest values of (BH){sub max} are identified. It is found that, when we employ individual or combined substitutions of Pr and Dy for Nd and Co for Fe in NdFeB alloys with various RE:Fe ratios, the practical limit of (BH){sub max} lies in the range {approx}160-180 kJ/m{sup 3}, combined with a coercivity in the range {approx}400-800 kA/m.

  14. The effect of vanadium and grain refiner additions on the nucleation of secondary phases in 1XXX Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C.M.; O' Reilly, K.A.Q.; Evans, P.V.; Cantor, B.

    1999-11-26

    High purity Al-0.3 wt% Fe-0.1 wt% Si alloys with different Si, V and grain refiner contents were melt spun to produce microstructures of submicron secondary phases entrained in a higher melting point Al matrix. On reheating, a dispersion of eutectic liquid droplets forms that represents an exaggerated version of the liquid puddles that solidify punched-off between Al dendrite arms during conventional casting. The subsequent resolidification of the droplets, analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), allows the nucleation-controlled aspects of secondary phase selection to be studied. The droplets solidify as the metastable FeAl{sub m} phase in ribbons containing {approx{underscore}equal}500 ppm V or {approx{underscore}equal}100 ppm V plus Al-Ti-B, Al-Ti-C or Al-B grain refiner. This phase contributes to the fir-tree surface defect in commercial sheet products. this work suggests that the combination of V and Al-Ti-B promotes FeAl{sub m} in commercial ingots, and confirms that solidification rate and bulk Si content also influence phase content.

  15. Effect of Nb doping on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Nd-Ce-Fe-B alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Qichen; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Qingzheng; Lei, Weikai; Zeng, Qingwen; Hu, Xianjun; Wang, Lei; Yu, Xi; Du, Junfeng; Fu, Gang; Liu, Renhui; Zhong, Minglong; Zhong, Zhenchen

    2017-11-01

    With the intention to reduce the Nd content in Nd2Fe14B-type alloys, 20 at.% Ce and 0.5 at.% Nb substituting Nd and Fe in the Nd13Fe82B5 alloys were previously employed to improve successfully the coercivity and the thermal stability without the energy product reduction. In this study, a light increase of the remnant polarization Jr was observed in (Nd0.8Ce0.2)13Fe82-xNbxB5 alloy at x = 0.5 and x = 1.0, resulting from the increasing amount of α-Fe phase. The optimum magnetic properties obtained with 0.5 at.% Nb doping are Hcj = 13.1 kOe, Jr = 0.79 T, (BH)max = 13.3 MGOe, respectively. Besides, the coercivity Hcj and maximum energy product (BH)max for the melt-spun ribbons with 0.5 at.% Nb addition are higher than those of the Nb-free ribbons in the temperature range of 300-450 K. Both the variations of Curie temperature Tc and a increase of lattice constants a and c of the hard magnetic phase with Nb addition imply that some of Nb atoms may directly enter into the hard magnetic phase, occupying the Fe sites. With the analysis on the demagnetization curve, Henkel curve and the observation of transmission electron microscope (TEM), the results indicate that a small amount of Nb can enhance the coercivity and exchange coupling though improving the microstructure of alloys.

  16. Magnetocaloric properties of rapidly solidified Dy{sub 3}Co alloy ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Llamazares, J. L., E-mail: jose.sanchez@ipicyt.edu.mx; Flores-Zúñiga, H.; Sánchez-Valdés, C. F. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4" a, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78216 (Mexico); Álvarez-Alonso, Pablo [Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, UPV/EHU, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Lara Rodríguez, G. A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, México, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Fernández-Gubieda, M. L. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, UPV/EHU, 48940 Leioa (Spain); BC Materials, Camino de Ibaizabal, Edificio 500, Planta 1, Parque Científico y Tecnológico de Zamudio, 48160 Derio (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    The magnetic and magnetocaloric (MC) properties of melt-spun ribbons of the Dy{sub 3}Co intermetallic compound were investigated. Samples were fabricated in an Ar environment using a homemade melt spinner system at a linear speed of the rotating copper wheel of 40 ms{sup −1}. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that ribbons crystallize into a single-phase with the Fe{sub 3}C-type orthorhombic crystal structure. The M(T) curve measured at 5 mT reveals the occurrence of a transition at 32 K from a first to a second antiferromagnetic (AFM) state and an AFM-to-paramagnetic transition at T{sub N} = 43 K. Furthermore, a metamagnetic transition is observed below T{sub N}, but the magnetization change ΔM is well below the one reported for bulk alloys. Below 12 K, large inverse MC effect and hysteresis losses are observed. This behavior is related to the metamagnetic transition. For a magnetic field change of 5 T (2 T) applied along the ribbon length, the produced ribbons show a peak value of the magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub M}{sup peak} of −6.5 (− 2.1) Jkg{sup −1}K{sup −1} occurring close to T{sub N} with a full-width at half-maximum δT{sub FWHM} of 53 (37) K, and refrigerant capacity RC = 364 (83) Jkg{sup −1} (estimated from the product |ΔS{sub M}{sup peak}| × δT{sub FWHM})

  17. Composition design for (PrNd–La–Ce)2Fe14B melt-spun magnets by machine learning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Liu, Yao; Zuo, Shu-Lan; Zhao, Tong-Yun; Hu, Feng-Xia; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2018-04-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB643702), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51590880), the Knowledge Innovation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05), and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0700903).

  18. Substitution of Nd with other rare earth elements in melt spun Nd2Fe14B magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Brown

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a contemporary study of rapidly quenched Nd1.6X0.4Fe14B magnetic materials (where X= Nd, Y, Ce, La, Pr, Gd and Ho. A 20% substitution of the Nd component from Nd2Fe14B can bring about some commercial advantage. However, there will be some compromise to the magnetic performance. Light rare earth elements are definitely more abundant (Y, Ce, La than the heavier rare earth elements, but when they are included in RE2Fe14B magnets they tend to lower magnetic performance and thermal stability. Substituting heavy rare earth elements (Gd, Ho for Nd in Nd2Fe14B improves the thermal stability of magnets but causes a loss in magnet remanence.

  19. Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties of Melt-Spun p-Type Yb0.9Fe3CoSb12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Geonsik; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Choi, Soon-Mok

    2017-05-01

    We herein report an enhancement of the thermoelectric properties of p-type Yb0.9Fe3CoSb12 skutterudite by melt spinning combined with spark plasma sintering (SPS). By thermal aging (873 K for 120 h) of the starting Yb0.9Fe3 CoSb12 compound for melt spinning, fabricated by conventional melting and quenching, highly dense single phase bulks with reduced grain sizes of 300 nm are successfully fabricated after SPS. The power factor value of the sample ( 3.6 mW m-1 K-2 at 723 K) is increased, benefiting from an enhancement of the electrical conductivity due to the elimination of the secondary phase CoSb2 during the thermal aging process. In addition, lattice thermal conductivity is significantly decreased due to the reduced grain size, thus intensifying the grain boundary phonon scattering. Through these synergetic effects, the maximum dimensionless figure of merit ZT increases by 25% (0.70 at 723 K) compared to a pristine sample with microscale grains.

  20. EFFECTS OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON TWO-STEP MELT-SPUN POLY(LACTIC ACID) FIBERS. (R826733)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Upper critical fields and superconducting transition temperatures of some zirconium-base amorphous transition-metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkut, M.G.; Hake, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting upper critical fields H/sub c/2(T), transition temperatures T/sub c/, and normal-state electrical resistivities rho/sub n/ have been measured in the amorphous transition-metal alloy series Zr/sub 1-z/Co/sub x/, Zr/sub 1-x/Ni/sub x/, (Zr/sub 1-x/Ti/sub x/)/sub 0.78/Ni/sub 0.22/, and (Zr/sub 1-x/Nb/sub x/)/sub 0.78/Ni/sub 0.22/. Structural integrity of these melt-spun alloys is indicated by x-ray, density, bend-ductility, normal-state electrical resistivity, superconducting transition width, and mixed-state flux-pinning measurements. The specimens display T/sub c/ = 2.1--3.8 K, rho/sub n/ = 159--190 μΩ cm, and Vertical Bar(dH/sub c/2/dT)cVertical Bar = 28--36 kG/K. These imply electron mean free paths lroughly-equal2--6 A, zero-temperature Ginzburg-Landau coherence distances xi/sub G/0roughly-equal50--70 A, penetration depths lambda/sub G/0roughly-equal(7--10) x 10 3 A, and extremely high dirtiness parameters xi 0 /lroughly-equal300--1300. All alloys display H/sub c/2(T) curves with negative curvature and (with two exceptions) fair agreement with the standard dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM) for physically reasonable values of spin-orbit-coupling induced, electron-spin-flip scattering time tau/sub so/. This is in contrast to the anomalously elevated H/sub c/2(T) behavior which is nearly linear in T that is observed by some, and the unphysically low-tau/sub so/ fits to WHHM theory obtained by others, for various amorphous alloys

  2. Tuning magneto-structural properties of Ni{sub 44}Co{sub 6}Mn{sub 39}Sn{sub 11} Heusler alloy ribbons by Fe-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wójcik, Anna, E-mail: a.wojcik@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta Street, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Maziarz, Wojciech; Szczerba, Maciej J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta Street, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Sikora, Marcin [Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Dutkiewicz, Jan [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta Street, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Cesari, Eduard [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Ctra. De Valldemossa, km 7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe substitution for Ni in Ni{sub 44}Co{sub 6}Mn{sub 39}Sn{sub 11} causes a drastic decrease of M{sub T} temperature. • The type of structure changes with increasing of iron (12M → 10M + L2{sub 1} → L2{sub 1}). • Content of Fe above 1 at.% has a negative influence on magneto-structural properties. - Abstract: Microstructure, martensitic transformation behavior and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 44−x}Fe{sub x}Co{sub 6}Mn{sub 39}Sn{sub 11} (x = 0, 1, 2 at.%) melt spun ribbons have been investigated. The influence of iron addition has been thoroughly studied by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results show that addition of 1 at.% of iron into quaternary Ni–Co–Mn–Sn Heusler alloy drastically decreases the martensitic transformation temperature by more than 100 K. Higher concentration of iron leads to complete suppression of martensitic transition. The structure of samples change from fully martensite (12 M) through mixed austenite-martensite (L2{sub 1} + 10 M) to fully austenite (L2{sub 1}) with increase of iron content. Addition of 1 at.% of iron leads to enhance magnetization of both austenitic and martensitic phases and also a small increase of Curie temperature occurs. The largest change of magnetic entropy under 15 kOe measured 2.9 and 0.65 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} for alloys where x = 0 and 1, respectively.

  3. The effect of minor addition of insoluble elements on transformation kinetics in amorphous Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Y.; Perepezko, J.H., E-mail: perepezk@engr.wisc.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • By doping Pb or In in AlYFe alloys, the primary crystallization of Al is promoted. • The catalytic effect is based on the good wetting behavior between Al and Pb. • Pb promotes crystallization by providing heterogeneous nucleation sites. • Through doping 0.5–2 at.% of In, T{sub x} decreases by 35–47 °C. • The coherent interface shows a good contacting behavior between Al and In. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline metallic materials based on partial devitrification of amorphous aluminum alloys show an attractive combination of high strength and low density. A key feature concerning the improved mechanical properties is the high number density of Al nanocrystals (10{sup 22}–10{sup 23} m{sup −3}) that precipitate within the amorphous precursor structure upon low temperature annealing. For Al{sub 87}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}Pb, the melt-spun ribbons consisted of an amorphous matrix with a dispersion of Pb nanoparticles (10 nm diameter). HRTEM images of the Pb–Al interface revealed a good wetting behavior between the Al and the Pb nanoparticles. Isothermal annealing for Al{sub 87}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}Pb showed no transient stage even though the crystallization onset, T{sub x}, was at a much lower temperature (247 °C) compared with Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5} (267 °C). For Al{sub (88−x)}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}In{sub x} (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0), the DSC results indicated that T{sub x} continuously decreased from 232 °C to 220 °C as the indium level increases from 0.5 at.% to 2.0 at.%. Under STEM, the image showed a coherent interface between Al and In particles. In the analysis of the transformation kinetics, the addition of minor elements can effectively promote additional nucleation of Al nanocrystals by providing heterogeneous nucleation sites. These developments offer new opportunities for the control of nanoscale microstructures.

  4. The effect of heat treatments on Ni43Mn42Co4Sn11 meta-magnetic shape memory alloys for magnetic refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Yegin, Cengiz; Karaman, Ibrahim; Chen, Jing-Han; Ross, Joseph H.; Liu, Jian; Li, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    The inverse magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in bulk polycrystalline and melt-spun ribbons of the Ni 43 Mn 42 Co 4 Sn 11 meta-magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) is investigated. The influence of several material properties on the MCE and relative cooling power (RCP) are discussed and the property combinations for optimum MCE and RCP identified for a given thermodynamic framework. These include a small slope of magnetic field vs. martensitic transformation temperature phase diagram, a narrow transformation range, low transformation thermal hysteresis and a large change in magnetization on martensitic transformation, which results in low levels of applied magnetic fields desired for repeated MCE on field cycling. The thermo-magnetic responses of the samples were measured before and after heat treatments. The heat-treated ribbons produced the most favorable MCE by exhibiting the highest magnetization change and smallest elastic energy storage through the transformation. This was attributed to the specific microstructural features, including grain size to thickness ratio and degree of L2 1 ordering. In addition, issues in the literature in determining RCP for MSMAs are discussed, and a new method to find RCP is proposed and implemented. Completely reversible magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation cycles were used to investigate hysteresis losses relative to actual refrigeration cycles, whereby the RCP was calculated using the defined thermodynamic framework and indirectly measured entropy changes. The annealed ribbons exhibited the high RCP level of 242 J kg −1 under the applied field of 7 T compared with a theoretical maximum of 343 J kg −1 . Similar values of RCP in other MSMAs can be achievable if microstructural elastic energy storage and hysteresis loss are minimized during the transformation with the help of annealing treatments

  5. Study on glass formation and crystallization of Zr54.5Cu20Al10Ni8Ti75 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogy, S.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.; Vaibhaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of Zr 54.5 Cu 20 Al 10 Ni 8 Ti 75 alloy has been examined after solidification involving three different techniques viz., copper mould casting, suction casting and melt spinning. The bulk glass microstructure of the alloy obtained through copper mould casting was found to comprise of big cube Zr 2 Ni phase in a dendritic morphology and tetragonal Zr 2 Ni phase in a faulted morphology besides the amorphous phase. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) was carried out to examine the internal structure and interface structure of the phases. The dendritic phase was found to consist of primary and secondary dendrite arms with faceted as well rounded interfaces with the amorphous phase. Ledges were noticed at either of the interfaces with higher density at the rounded interfaces. The presence of the faulted phase was noticed in between dendritic arms. The faulted phase was found to consist of different domains corresponding to different orientations. A variety of interfaces could be noticed between these individual domains and also within a single domain itself. At least three different kinds of faulted region were identified to coexist in a single domain. The melt spun ribbon and bulk glass made through suction casting was found to be fully amorphous. The amorphous phase obtained from the three different techniques showed different degrees of medium range order as revealed by the fluctuation microscopy technique. Crystallization behavior of as solidified structures has been examined by comparing the crystallization kinetics and microstructure. Crystallization led to the transformation of the amorphous phase to nanocrystals in all the cases. The crystallization event was found to be singular in the case of copper mold cast bulk glass and multiple in the case of suction cast bulk glass and ribbon. The phase forming on crystallization was found to be the same faulted tetragonal Zr 2 Ni that was encountered during solidification. Multiple domains

  6. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  7. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  8. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  9. Heat capacity and point-contact spectra of the melt-spun cubic RECu.sub.5./sub. compounds (RE - heavy rare earths)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiffers, M.; Ilkovič, S.; Idzikowski, B.; Šebek, Josef; Šantavá, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 3 (2010), 032061/1-032061/4 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Magnetism - ICM 2009. Karlsruhe, 26.07.2009-31.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : heat capacity * RE intermetallic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Substitution of Nd with other rare earth elements in melt spun Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. N.; Lau, D.; Chen, Z. [Magnequench Technology Centre, 01-19 The Galen, 61 Science Park Rd, Singapore 117525 (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    This is a contemporary study of rapidly quenched Nd{sub 1.6}X{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic materials (where X= Nd, Y, Ce, La, Pr, Gd and Ho). A 20% substitution of the Nd component from Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B can bring about some commercial advantage. However, there will be some compromise to the magnetic performance. Light rare earth elements are definitely more abundant (Y, Ce, La) than the heavier rare earth elements, but when they are included in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnets they tend to lower magnetic performance and thermal stability. Substituting heavy rare earth elements (Gd, Ho) for Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B improves the thermal stability of magnets but causes a loss in magnet remanence.

  11. Anomalous magnetic aftereffect and thermal remagnetization in melt-spun Nd{sub 4} Fe{sub 77} B{sub 19} permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K.H.; Eckert, D.; Handstein, A.; Wolf, M. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Collocott, S.; Andrikidis, C. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    Usually measurements of the magnetic after effect in permanent magnet materials are performed on the major demagnetization curve. In this investigation, however, we measured the time dependence of magnetization of the spring magnet Nd{sub 4} Fe{sub 77} B{sub 19} for different magnetic pre histories. The measurements were done with SQUID magnetometers. Depending on the magnetic pre history the magnetic viscosity S can be positive as well as negative, even for the same `coordinate` (J,H), i.e. the system does not always move directly towards the thermal equilibrium state. In particular the samples spontaneously remagnetize after being field demagnetized. The driving force for this effect may be similar as that for thermal remagnetization. For certain magnetic pre histories the magnetization J (t) depends non-monotonically on time t, i.e. it can not always be described by a formula S 1 n(1 + t/t{sub o}). Similar effects observed for {alpha}Fe, many years ago, have been called anomalous aftereffect. These observations were attributed to the reversible aftereffect associated with the diffusion of C-atoms in {alpha}-Fe. However, the reversible aftereffect is not typical for permanent magnet materials. THe anomalous aftereffect found in our investigation as well as the effects of spontaneous remagnetization will be explained in terms of magnetic interactions in the material. (author) 33 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  13. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  14. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  15. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.

    1993-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper

  16. Castability of Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, A. L.; Han, Q.; Horton, J. A.

    There is intense research effort into the development of high pressure die cast-able creep resistant magnesium alloys. One of the difficulties encountered in magnesium alloy development for creep resistance is that many additions made to improve the creep properties have reportedly resulted in alloys that are difficult to cast. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the effect of alloying elements on the castability. This paper gives a review of the state of the knowledge of the castability of magnesium alloys.

  17. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  18. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  19. High strength alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smelikov, V.G.; Obukhov, A.S.; Ryzhkov, I.V.; Koshelev, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    The magnesium-based alloy in question contains alloy components in the form of elements chosen from the Al, Zn, Mn, Zr and rare earth group, and compounds of nitrogen and oxygen with any of these elements in the following proportions (wt%): alloy components chosen from the Al, Zn, Mn, Zr, Th and rare earth group 0.6-8.0, compound of nitrogen and oxygen with any of the above 0.1-6.0, magnesium the remainder. (author)

  20. High field magnetisation studies in some rare earth based amorphous ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, R.; Lassri, H.; Driouch, L.

    1995-02-01

    We have carried out magnetisation studies at fields up to 20 T of melt spun amorphous Fe 72- xY xHo 8B 20 alloys. The approach to saturation for H ≤ 11 T has been analysed on the basis of Chudnovsky's model, and the exchange constant, random anisotropy etc. have been calculated. We have also extracted the local anisotropy from the coercivity.

  1. Machinability of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Wong, Yoke San; Zareena, A. Rahmath

    Titanium and its alloys find wide application in many industries because of their excellent and unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio and high resistance to corrosion. The machinability of titanium and its alloys is impaired by its high chemical reactivity, low modulus of elasticity and low thermal conductivity. A number of literatures on machining of titanium alloys with conventional tools and advanced cutting tool materials is reviewed. The results obtained from the study on high speed machining of Ti-6Al-4V alloys with cubic boron nitride (CBN), binderless cubic boron nitride (BCBN) and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) are also summarized.

  2. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  3. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  4. Shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA), when deformed, have the ability of returning, in certain circumstances, to their initial shape. Deformations related to this phenomenon are for polycrystals 1-8% and up to 15% for monocrystals. The deformation energy is in the range of 10 6 - 10 7 J/m 3 . The deformation is caused by martensitic transformation in the material. Shape memory alloys exhibit one directional or two directional shape memory effect as well as pseudoelastic effect. Shape change is activated by temperature change, which limits working frequency of SMA to 10 2 Hz. Other group of alloys exhibit magnetic shape memory effect. In these alloys martensitic transformation is triggered by magnetic field, thus their working frequency can be higher. Composites containing shape memory alloys can also be used as shape memory materials (applied in vibration damping devices). Another group of composite materials is called heterostructures, in which SMA alloys are incorporated in a form of thin layers The heterostructures can be used as microactuators in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Basic SMA comprise: Ni-Ti, Cu (Cu-Zn,Cu-Al, Cu-Sn) and Fe (Fe-Mn, Fe-Cr-Ni) alloys. Shape memory alloys find applications in such areas: automatics, safety and medical devices and many domestic appliances. Currently the most important appears to be research on magnetic shape memory materials and high temperature SMA. Vital from application point of view are composite materials especially those containing several intelligent materials. (author)

  5. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  6. Aluminum battery alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  7. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  8. Alloys in energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  9. Alloying principles for magnesium base heat resisting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Oreshkina, A.A.; Nikitina, N.I.

    1982-01-01

    Some binary systems of magnesium-base alloys in which solid solutions are formed, are considered for prospecting heat resistant alloys. It is shown that elements having essential solubility in solid magnesium strongly decreasing with temperature should be used for alloying maqnesium base alloys with high strength properties at increased temperatures. The strengthening phases in these alloys should comprise essential quantity of magnesium and be rather refractory

  10. Uranium-Niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de

    1985-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the phase diagram of the U-Nb alloy are presented. Structural and morphological aspects of the kinectics of phase transformation are discussed, based in the phase diagram. (Author) [pt

  11. Characteristics of mechanical alloying of Zn-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Hong Kong Polytechnic; Perez Hernandez, A.; Lee, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Three pure elemental powder mixtures of Zn-22%Al-18%Cu, Zn-5%Al-11%Cu, and Zn-27%Al-3%Cu (in wt.%) were mechanically alloyed by steel-ball milling processing. The mechanical alloying characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. It was explored that mechanical alloying started with the formation of phases from pure elemental powders, and this was followed by mechanical milling-induced phase transformation. During mechanical alloying, phases stable at the higher temperatures formed at the near room temperature of milling. Nano-structure Zn-Al-based alloys were produced by mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  12. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  13. Refractory alloy component fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe joining procedures, primarily welding techniques, which were developed to construct reliable refractory alloy components and systems for advanced space power systems. Two systems, the Nb-1Zr Brayton Cycle Heat Receiver and the T-111 Alloy Potassium Boiler Development Program, are used to illustrate typical systems and components. Particular emphasis is given to specific problems which were eliminated during the development efforts. Finally, some thoughts on application of more recent joining technology are presented. 78 figures

  14. Texture in low-alloyed uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sariel, J.

    1982-08-01

    The dependence of the preferred orientation of cast and heat-treated polycrystalline adjusted uranium and uranium -0.1 w/o chromium alloys on the production process was studied. The importance of obtaining material free of preferred orientation is explained, and a survey of the regular methods to determine preferred orientation is given. Dilatometry, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the extent of the directionality of these alloys. Data processing showed that these methods are insufficient in a case of a material without any plastic forming, because of unreproducibility of results. Two parameters are defined from the results of Schlz's method diffraction test. These parameters are shown theoretically and experimentally (by extreme-case samples) to give the deviation from isotropy. Application of these parameters to the examined samples showes that cast material has preferred orientation, though it is not systematic. This preferred orientation was reduced by adequate heat treatments

  15. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  16. Impact toughness of laser alloyed aluminium AA1200 alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4kW Nd:YAG laser and impact resistance of the alloys was investigated. The alloying powders were a mixture of Ni, Ti and SiC in different proportions. Surfaces reinforced...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  18. Structural thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Manenc, Jack

    1973-01-01

    Technical progress has for a very long time been directly dependent on progress in metallurgy, which is itself connected with improvements in the technology of alloys. Metals are most frequently used in the form of alloys for several reasons: the quantity of pure metal in its native state in the earth's crust is very limited; pure metals must be extracted from ores which are themselves impure. Finally, the methods of treatment used lead more easily to alloys than to pure metals. The most typical case is that of iron, where a pure ore may be found, but which is the starting point for cast iron or steel, alloys of iron and carbon. In addition, the properties of alloys are in general superior to those of pure metals and modem metallurgy consists of controlling these properties so as to make them conform to the requirements of the design office. Whilst the engineer was formerly compelled to adapt his designs and constructions to the materials available, such as wood, stone, bronze, iron, cast iron and ordinary st...

  19. Shape memory alloy engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a shape memory alloy engine, developed for the purpose of extracting the mechanical energy from a small difference in temperature. The engine is mainly composed of two pulleys (high temperature and low temperature) and single belt made of the nickel titanium shape memory alloy. The alloy memorizes a shape arcing in the direction opposite to the direction of the belt arc around the pulleys. When the temperature of the belt which is in contact with the high temperature pulley rises above the transformation temperature, a return to the memorized shape generates a force which rotates the pulleys. To make the heat transfer more effective, the engine was designed so that the lower part of the two pulleys are embedded in hot and cold water, respectively. To predict the performance of the shape memory alloy engine, the stress change of the shape memory alloy caused by temperature change has been also investigated with the bending stress test, and a torque loss of the engine system was measured. The predicted results were coincident with the output power experiment

  20. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Berat Barıs BULDUM; Aydın SIK; Iskender OZKUL

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attra...

  1. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  2. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  3. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  4. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of

  5. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesgo, O.; Bianchi, G.L.; Duffo, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  6. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  7. Fracture of Shape Memory Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Shuichi; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1981-01-01

    The initiation and the propagation of cracks during both quenching and deformation in polycrystalline Cu-Al-Ni alloys have been investigated under various conditions. The fracture surfaces of Ti-Ni and Cu-Al-Ni alloys were also observed by a scanning electron microscope. From these results, it was concluded that the brittleness of Cu-Al-Ni alloy and other β phase alloys are due to large elastic anisotropy and large grain sizes, while that the large ductility in Ti-Ni alloy being due to the sm...

  8. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  10. Amorphization of equimolar alloys with HCP elements during mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Liang [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Armaments Bureau, MND, P.O. Box 90008-8-5, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan 32599, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Che-Wei; Juan, Chien-Chang; Chuang, Ming-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Jien-Wei, E-mail: jwyeh@mx.nthu.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chin, Tsung-Shune [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen District, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Chen, Swe-Kai [Center for Nanotechnology, Materials Science and Microsystems, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-10

    This study prepares two equimolar alloys, entirely composed of HCP elements, BeCoMgTi and BeCoMgTiZn, from elemental powders by mechanical alloying. No crystalline solid solutions and compounds formed during milling except an amorphous phase formed gradually until full amorphization was attained. The amorphization processes of these two alloys conform to type II according to the Weeber and Bakker classification based on binary alloys. The inhibition of crystalline solid solutions and compounds before amorphization relates to chemical compatibility, high entropy effect and large atomic size difference effect.

  11. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  12. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Liu, C. T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  13. Rare earth ferrosilicon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiquan, L.; Zeguang, T.; Zaizhang, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to obtain RE ferrosilicon alloy with good quality and competitive price, it is essential that proper choice of raw materials, processing technology and equipments should be made based on the characteristics of Bai-Yun-Ebo mineral deposits. Experimental work and actual production practice indicate that pyrometallurgical method is suitable for the extraction and isolation of the rare earths and comprehensive utilization of the metal values contained in the feed material is capable of reducing cost of production of RE ferrosilicon alloy. In the Bai-Yun-Ebo deposit, the fluorite type medium lean ore (with respect to iron content) makes a reserve of considerable size. The average content of the chief constituents are given

  14. Metastable superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.

    1978-07-01

    The study of metastable metals and alloys has become one of the principal activities of specialists working in the field of superconducting materials. Metastable crystalline superconductors such as the A15-type materials have been given much attention. Non-crystalline superconductors were first studied over twenty years ago by Buckel and Hilsch using the technique of thin film evaporation on a cryogenic substrate. More recently, melt-quenching, sputtering, and ion implantation techniques have been employed to produce a variety of amorphous superconductors. The present article presents a brief review of experimental results and a survey of current work on these materials. The systematics of superconductivity in non-crystalline metals and alloys are described along with an analysis of the microscopic parameters which underlie the observed trends. The unique properties of these superconductors which arise from the high degree of structural disorder in the amorphous state are emphasized

  15. Informatics Aided Design for Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-28

    alloying discoveries/ predictions of new ternary cobalt based alloys that can have improved properties from conventional nickel based superalloys ...Using this approach we have proposed new ternary alloy additions for binary cobalt based intermetallics. Through comparison with some recent...that are even better than nickel base superalloys . This strategy has also been extended to the development of new type of design maps that identify

  16. Pareto-optimal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Johannesson, Gisli Holmar; Ruban, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties and the ......, the Pareto-optimal set, to determine optimal alloy solutions for the compromise between low compressibility, high stability, and cost....

  17. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  18. Aluminum Alloy 7050 Extrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    tooling used in the 25-inch diameter casting trials at the laboratory was transferred to Lafayette Works and installed at a ladle casting station. The...for the laboratory casting trials was transferred to Alcoa’s Lafayette Works and installed on a ladle pour casting unit. After some minor adjustments...Fatigue Alloy Compressive Modulus of Elasticity Crack Propagation Ingot Fabricating Stress-Strain Stress-Corrosion Casting Heat

  19. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  20. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Large plastic stability in magnesium alloys: crystalline vs. amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boissiere, R.; Puech, S.; Blandin, J.J. [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (INPG), SIMaP Laboratory - GPM2 group, CNRS/UJF, Domaine Universitaire, Saint-Martin d' Heres (France)

    2008-04-15

    Except if strain induces damage, the plastic stability can be roughly estimated thanks to the value of the strain rate sensitivity parameter m. In conventional magnesium alloys, moderate values of m (typically close to 0.3) can be frequently obtained during high temperature deformation. Such values allow reaching significant elongations to fracture. For alloys displaying fine grains, superplastic properties associated with values of m of about 0.5 or more are achievable leading to large elongations to fracture in optimized conditions for which damage processes remain limited. Quite recently, amorphous magnesium alloys have been produced in bulk conditions. In appropriate conditions of deformation, these alloys display Newtonian behaviour (i.e. m=1). With such rheologies, the plastic stability is expected to be maximal. In this presentation, features in relation with high temperature deformation of amorphous and crystalline magnesium alloys will be compared and apparent similitudes and differences will be discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Neodymium alloys and their fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, F.; Boudot, B.

    1985-01-01

    Neodymium alloys, particularly neodymium-iron alloys, are prepared by reduction of a neodymium halogenide, preferentially neodymium fluoride by a reducing metal (e.g. Ca) with the addition of the metal M to introduce in the final alloy. From these alloys metallic neodymium can be obtained [fr

  3. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  5. Amorphous Semiconductor Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Arun

    1985-08-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based alloys have attracted a considerable amount of interest because of their applications in a wide variety of technologies. However, the major effort has concentrated on inexpensive photovoltaic device applications and has moved from a laboratory curiosity in the early 1970's to viable commercial applications in the 1980's. Impressive progress in this field has been made since the group at University of Dundee demonstrated that a low defect, device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) 12 material could be produced using the radio frequency (r.f.) glow discharge in SiH4 gas ' and that the material could be doped n- and p-type.3 These results spurred a worldwide interest in a-Si based alloys, especially for photovoltaic devices which has resulted in a conversion efficiency approaching 12%. There is now a quest for even higher conversion efficiencies by using the multijunction cell approach. This necessitates the synthesis of new materials of differing bandgaps, which in principle amorphous semiconductors can achieve. In this article, we review some of this work and consider from a device and a materials point of view the hurdles which have to be overcome before this type of concept can be realized.

  6. Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-26

    densities of 10, 15 and 20 % with the dimensions shown in Table 1. The alloy compositions were high strength maraging steel (M200) and Super Invar ... alloys made from LCA processing3 are shown in Table 3. Super Invar in the as-reduced state is a ductile (25-30%) austenitic alloy . When cooled to...Final Report for Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures from Structured Alloys , Inc. Joe K

  7. Competition between elements during mechanical alloying in an octonary multi-principal-element alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-L.; Hu, Y.-H.; Hsieh, C.-A.; Yeh, J.-W.; Chen, S.-K.

    2009-01-01

    The competition between the constituent elements of the Cu 0.5 NiAlCoCrFeTiMo alloy system during mechanical alloying was investigated and ranked with their alloying rates in getting alloyed in the mixture. By using XRD analysis, EDS mapping, extended X-ray absorption fine structure technique, and synchrotron radiation diffraction, the alloying sequence for the present alloy system is determined as Al → Cu → Co → Ni → Fe → Ti → Cr → Mo in the order of decreasing alloying rate. The alloying rate is found to correlate best with the melting point of the elements among metallurgical factors. The mechanism for this correlation is explained through the effect of melting point on solid-state diffusion and mechanical disintegration which are critical for the final alloying. This finding is valuable in predicting the alloying sequence of elements, and thus the phase evolution in multi-component alloys during mechanical alloying.

  8. Alloying Solid Solution Strengthening of Fe-Ga Alloys: A First-Principle Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Kuiying; Cheng, Leon M

    2006-01-01

    ... and Co in cubic solid solution of Fe-Ga alloys. Mayer bond order "BO" values were used to evaluate the atomic bond strengths in the alloys, and were then used to assess the alloying strengthening characteristics...

  9. Effects of segregation of primary alloying elements on the creep response in magnesium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Y.D.; Dieringa, H.; Hort, N.

    2008-01-01

    The segregation of primary alloying elements deteriorates the high temperature creep resistance of magnesium alloys. Annealing at high temperatures alleviating their segregations can improve the creep resistance. Present investigation on the effect of segregation of primary alloying elements on t...

  10. Laser surface alloying on aluminum and its alloys: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yiming; Gu, Guochao; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys have been widely used in aerospace, automotive and transportation industries owing to their excellent properties such as high specific strength, good ductility and light weight. Surface modification is of crucial importance to the surface properties of aluminum and its alloys since high coefficient of friction, wear characteristics and low hardness have limited their long term performance. Laser surface alloying is one of the most effective methods of producing proper microstructure by means of non-equilibrium solidification which results from rapid heating and cooling. In this paper, the influence of different processing parameters, such as laser power and scanning velocity is discussed. The developments of various material systems including ceramics, metals or alloys, and metal matrix composites (MMCs) are reviewed. The microstructure, hardness, wear properties and other behaviors of laser treated layer are analyzed. Besides, the existing problems during laser surface treatment and the corresponding solutions are elucidated and the future developments are predicted.

  11. Alloying and Casting Furnace for Shape Memory Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept in the proposed project is to create a melting, alloying and casting furnace for the processing titanium based SMA using cold crucible techniques. The...

  12. Mechanical alloying of biocompatible Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-De Jesús, F; Bolarín-Miró, A M; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Cortés-Escobedo, C A; Betancourt-Cantera, J A

    2010-07-01

    We report on an alternative route for the synthesis of crystalline Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy, which could be used for surgical implants. Co, Cr and Mo elemental powders, mixed in an adequate weight relation according to ISO Standard 58342-4 (ISO, 1996), were used for the mechanical alloying (MA) of nano-structured Co-alloy. The process was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using hardened steel balls and vials as milling media, with a 1:8 ball:powder weight ratio. Crystalline structure characterization of milled powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction in order to analyze the phase transformations as a function of milling time. The aim of this work was to evaluate the alloying mechanism involved in the mechanical alloying of Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy. The evolution of the phase transformations with milling time is reported for each mixture. Results showed that the resultant alloy is a Co-alpha solid solution, successfully obtained by mechanical alloying after a total of 10 h of milling time: first Cr and Mo are mechanically prealloyed for 7 h, and then Co is mixed in for 3 h. In addition, different methods of premixing were studied. The particle size of the powders is reduced with increasing milling time, reaching about 5 mum at 10 h; a longer time promotes the formation of aggregates. The morphology and crystal structure of milled powders as a function of milling time were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and XR diffraction.

  13. Microstructure, mechanical and functional properties of NiTi-based shape memory ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabi, K.; Bruncko, M.; Kneissl, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Melt-spun samples exhibited martensite structure and shape memory effects immediately after processing at room temperature. ► Using a new etchant and interference contrast, it is possible to reveal the fine microstructures and grain boundaries. ► The martensite structure in NiTi is very fine, and nano-sized twin boundaries could be revealed using TEM only. ► Two-way effects have been successfully introduced by different thermomechanical training methods in NiTi, NiTiCu and NiTiW alloys, which can be used for several applications, e.g. microsensors and microactuators. - Abstract: The present work has been aimed to study the microstructures, functional properties and the influence of different thermomechanical training methods on the two-way shape memory effect in NiTi-based melt-spun ribbons. In order to get small-dimensioned shape memory alloys (SMAs) with good functional and mechanical properties, a rapid solidification technique was employed. Their fracture and elasticity characteristics have been determined, as well as shape memory properties by thermomechanical cycling. The ribbons were trained under tensile and bending deformation by thermal cycling through the phase transformation temperature range. The results displayed that all different training methods were effective in developing a two-way shape memory effect (TWSME). The influence of copper (5–25 at.% Cu) and tungsten (2 at.% W) on the microstructure, and the functional and mechanical behavior of NiTi thin ribbons was also investigated. All samples show a shape memory effect immediately after processing without further heat treatment. The melt-spun ribbons were trained under constant strain (bending and tensile deformation) by thermal cycling through the phase transformation temperature range. The addition of copper was effective to narrow the transformation hysteresis. The W addition has improved the TWSME stability of the NiTi alloys and mechanical properties. Results about

  14. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  15. Magnetoimpedance effect in Nanoperm alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, B.; Alvarez, P.; Santos, J.D.; Gorria, P.; Sanchez, M.L.; Olivera, J.; Perez, M.J.; Prida, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of isothermal annealing (1 h at 600 deg. C in Ar atmosphere) on the soft magnetic properties and magnetoimpedance (MI) effect has been studied in ribbons of the following Nanoperm alloys: Fe 91 Zr 7 B 2 , Fe 88 Zr 8 B 4 , Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 and Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 . A maximum MI ratio of about 27% was measured for the nanocrystalline alloy Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 at a driving frequency of 0.2 MHz. The thermal annealing led to magnetic softening for this alloy, while a hardening is observed for the Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 alloy

  16. Multiple allergies to metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Eng Tu

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Metal alloys may induce multiple metal allergies. Patients suspected of having a metal allergy should be patch tested with an extended series of metals. We recommend adding palladium and gold, at least, to the standard series.

  17. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  18. The microstructures of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, G.M.K.; Ranganathan, S.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenon of ordering in substitutional alloys confers special properties on them by introducing various types of structures and structural defects. Some of the important structural defects (translational and rotational antiphase boundaries, dissociated antiphase boundaries and superdislocations) and their observation by various microscopical methods, with particular emphasis on the applications of the electron microscope are described with illustrations drawn from the studies on nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten alloys. (M.G.B.)

  19. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Yussouff, M.

    1983-06-01

    Starting from the augmented space formalism by one of us, and the use of the Ward identity and Bethe Salpeter equation, a complete formalism for the calculation of the electrical conductivity in tight-binding models of random binary alloys has been developed. The formalism is practical in the sense that viable calculations may be carried out with its help for realistics models of alloy systems. (author)

  20. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Thakur, P.K.; Yussouff, M.

    1984-12-01

    Based on the augmented space formalism introduced by one of us and the use of the Ward identity and the Bethe-Sapeter equation, a formalism has been developed for the calculation of electrical conductivity for random alloys. A simple application is made to a model case, and it is argued that the formalism enables us to carry out viable calculations on more realistic models of alloys. (author)

  1. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  2. Microstructural studies on Alloy 693

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, R.; Dutta, R.S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sengupta, P., E-mail: praneshsengupta@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Samajdar, I. [Dept. of Metall. Engg. and Mater. Sci., Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 072 (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Superalloy 693, is a newly identified ‘high-temperature corrosion resistant alloy’. Present study focuses on microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy prepared by double ‘vacuum melting’ route. In general, the alloy contains ordered Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates distributed within austenitic matrix. M{sub 6}C primary carbide, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type secondary carbide and NbC particles are also found to be present. Heat treatment of the alloy at 1373 K for 30 min followed by water quenching (WQ) brings about a microstructure that is free from secondary carbides and Ni{sub 3}Al type precipitates but contains primary carbides. Tensile property of Alloy 693 materials was measured with as received and solution annealed (1323 K, 60 min, WQ) and (1373 K, 30 min, WQ) conditions. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of the alloy are found to drop with annealing. It is noted that in annealed condition, considerable cold working of the alloy can be performed.

  3. Wettability of magnesium based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Victor Manuel

    The premise of this project was to determine the wettability behavior of Mg-based alloys using three different liquids. Contact angle measurements were carried out along with utilizing the Zisman method for obtaining values for the critical surface tension. Adhesion energy values were also found through the use of the Young-Dupre equation. This project utilized the Mg-based alloy Mg-2Zn-2Gd with supplemented alpha-Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Phosphate Buffer Saline solution (PBS), and distilled water. These three liquids are commonly used in cell cultivation and protein adsorption studies. Supplemented alpha-MEM consisted of alpha-MEM, fetal bovine serum, and penicillin-streptomycin. Mg-2Zn-2Gd was used because of observed superior mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance as compared to conventional Mg-alloys. These attractive properties have made it possible for this alloy to be used in biomedical devices within the human body. However, the successful use of this alloy system in the human body requires knowledge in the response of protein adsorption on the alloy surface. Protein adsorption depends on many parameters, but one of the most important factors is the wettability behavior at the surface.

  4. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  5. Design and testing of a microchannel reactor for the PROX reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Sylvia A.; Sanz, Oihane; Poyato, Rosalía; Laguna, Óscar H.; Echave, F. Javier; Almeida, L. C.; Centeno, Miguel Ángel; Arzamendi, G.; Gandía, L.M.; Souza-Aguiar, E. F.; Montes, Mario; Odriozola, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The different steps for manufacturing a microchannel reactor for the PROX reaction are discussed. Transient Liquid Phase bonding (TLP) using a Ni-B-Si amorphous melt spun is used for joining micromilled Al-alloyed ferritic stainless steel plates followed by recrystallization at 1200°C for 5h. A CuOx-CeO2 catalyst synthesized by the coprecipitation method was washcoated on the microchannel block resulting in a homogenous 20-30μm thick layer. The catalytic activity for CO-PROX reaction is simil...

  6. Magnetic and Random Anisotropy Studies in some Amorphous Fe-Based Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlemçani, Mohamed; Benbachir, Khadija; Sayouri, Salaheddine; Meknassi, K.; Kadiri, H.

    2000-12-01

    We have studied the magnetization of melt spun amorphous Fe100-x-yCrx(PCSi)y alloys with 4≤x≤11 and 19≤y≤22 under magnetic fields up to 18 kOe, and have analyzed the results at 10 K in the framework of the phenomenological model of Chudnovsky and Serota. Behaviour of magnetic moment and exchange and anisotropy constants has been compared to that of the same parameters in amorphous FeNi(BSi), FeNiCr(BSi) and FeV(BSi).

  7. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...... and hydrogen uptake points of view, to the above-mentioned alloys. This alloy is of particular interest because the addition of MgO leads to no neutron penalty and the dispersion-strengthening entails the possibility of tailoring an alloy with the desired mechanical properties....

  8. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides. Keywords. Corrosion; iron aluminides; Fe3Al; potentiodynamic polarization. 1. Introduction. Ordered intermetallic alloys based on iron aluminides of.

  9. The comparison of corrosion resistance between Baosteel's alloy 690 tube and foreign alloy 690 tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mingjuan; Zhang Lefu; Li Yan

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 690 having excellent corrosion resistance is widely used for SG tubes. The intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube, Country A alloy 690 tube and Country B alloy 690 tube have been analysed by comparison. It shows that: The intergranular corrosion of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube tested complied with ASTM G28 Standard could satisfy the technical requirement. However.some of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube in intergranular corrosion resistance had less performance than Country A. In addition, pitting corrosion tested with ASTM G48 Standard shown the Baosteel's alloy 690 tube better than Country B. (authors)

  10. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  11. New Theoretical Technique for Alloy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, John

    2005-01-01

    During the last 2 years, there has been a breakthrough in alloy design at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A new semi-empirical theoretical technique for alloys, the BFS Theory (Bozzolo, Ferrante, and Smith), has been used to design alloys on a computer. BFS was used, along with Monte Carlo techniques, to predict the phases of ternary alloys of NiAl with Ti or Cr additions. High concentrations of each additive were used to demonstrate the resulting structures.

  12. Microstructural and technological optimisation of magnesium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Facchinelli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most abundance element in nature, and it's characterised by a lower density than aluminium. These characteristics confer great potential to magnesium alloys, which are so used for specialised applications, like for military purposes and in the aerospace industry. While some magnesium alloys, including the AM60B alloy, are historically associated to high pressure die casting, for such applications the magnesium alloy components are usually produced by the gravity castin...

  13. Self-disintegrating Raney metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Russell, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing a Raney metal alloy which is capable of self-disintegrating when contacted with water vapor. The self-disintegrating property is imparted to the alloy by incorporating into the alloy from 0.4 to 0.8 weight percent carbon. The alloy is useful in forming powder which can be converted to a Raney metal catalyst with increased surface area and catalytic activity.

  14. Fe-Cr-Ni system alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Phase diagram of Fe-Cr-Ni system, which is the basic one for production of corrosion resistant alloys, is considered. Data on corrosion resistance of such alloys are correlated depending on a number of factors: quality and composition of modifying elements, corrosion medium, temperature, alloy structure, mechanical and thermal treatment. Grades of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys are presented, and fields of their application are pointed out

  15. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  16. Shape memory alloys – characterization techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Shape memory alloys are the generic class of alloys that show both thermal and mechan- ical memory. The basic physics involved in the shape memory effect is the reversible thermoelastic martensitic transformation. In general, there exists two phases in shape memory alloys, viz., a high- temperature phase or ...

  17. Shape memory alloys – characterization techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shape memory alloys are the generic class of alloys that show both thermal and mechanical memory. The basic physics involved in the shape memory effect is the reversible thermoelastic martensitic transformation. In general, there exists two phases in shape memory alloys, viz., a hightemperature phase or austenitic ...

  18. Impact toughness of laser surface alloyed Aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4kW Nd:YAG laser and the impact resistance of the alloys was investigated. The alloying powders were a mixture of Ni, Ti and SiC in different proportions. Surfaces reinforced...

  19. Electrodeposition of engineering alloy coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse

    Nickel based electrodeposited alloys were investigated with respect to their deposition process, heat treatment, hardness, corrosion resistance and combined wear-corrosion resistance. The investigated alloys were Ni-B, Ni-P and Ni-W, which are not fully developed for industrial utilisation...... at the moment. It was the intention of this study to investigate whether the mentioned alloy processes are able to substitute conventional deposition techniques for wear and corrosion resistance, namely Ni-P produced by electroless deposition and electrodeposited hard chromium. The considerations...... for substitution focussed on were increased deposition rates as well as improved corrosion and wear resistance.Some systems exhibited interesting deposition rates. Examples are 178 µm per hour of Ni-P(6), 85 µm per hour of Ni-P(15), 142 µm per hour of Ni-W(44) and 62 µm per hour of Ni-B(0.8) (weight percentages...

  20. Magnesium and related low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Caillat, R.; Darras, R.

    1959-01-01

    In the first part the authors examine the comparative corrosion of commercial magnesium, of a magnesium-zirconium alloy (0,4 per cent ≤ Zr ≤ 0,7 per cent) of a ternary magnesium-zinc-zirconium alloy (0,8 per cent ≤ Zn ≤ 1,2 per cent) and of english 'Magnox type' alloys, in dry carbon dioxide-free air, in damp carbon dioxide-free air, and in dry and damp carbon dioxide, at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. In the second part the structural stability of these materials is studied after annealings, of 10 to 1000 hours at 300 to 450 deg. C. Variations in grain after these heat treatments and mechanical stretching properties at room temperature are presented. Finally various creep rate and life time diagrams are given for these materials, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 deg. C. (author) [fr

  1. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  2. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  3. Theoretical studies of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, J.S.; Wille, L.T.

    1991-07-01

    A new method to predict and understand the structure and phase stability of solid-solution alloys from a knowledge only of the atomic numbers of the constituent atoms is being developed. The coherent potential approximation will be used to obtain the electronic contribution to the energy and the Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics will be used for the thermodynamic part of the calculation. An improved coherent potential approximation will be developed by combining the standard approach with the quadratic KKR (QKKR) band theory method. This will make it easier to predict the properties of alloys from first principles. The QKKR method will be developed further

  4. Alloys studied by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Yukio

    1993-01-01

    Neutron scattering study on the martensitic transformation and spinodal decomposition of alloys is described. Lattice vibration mode [110]TA 1 in various noble metal bcc-based alloys was measured. An analysis of the (110) interplanar force constants revealed a relation between the force constants and the martensite phase at low temperatures. Time resolved experiments of spinodal decomposition of MnCu were carried out to investigate how the separated (decomposed) phase grows in time. In the late regime of the decomposition, the size of the precipitate increased with a power law oft 0.37 while the crystallite grew as t 0.236 . (author)

  5. ALLOY DESIGN AND PROPERTY EVALUATION OF TI ALLOY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. Ti-Mo alloy containing Nb and Sn were arc melted and composition analyzed by EDX. The XRD analysis indicates that the crystal structure and mechanical properties are sensitive to Sn concentration. A combination of Sn and Nb elements in synergy hindered formation athermal ω phase and significantly.

  6. An introduction to surface alloying of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmani, Santosh S; Goyal, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Surface Alloying of Metals aims to serve as a primer to the basic aspects of surface alloying of metals. The book serves to elucidate fundamentals of surface modification and their engineering applications. The book starts with basics of surface alloying and goes on to cover key surface alloying methods, such as carburizing, nitriding, chromizing, duplex treatment, and the characterization of surface layers. The book will prove useful to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as also to researchers and practitioners looking for a quick introduction to surface alloying.

  7. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  8. Optical Characterization of AlAsSb Digital Alloy and Random Alloy on GaSb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Chau Juang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available III-(As, Sb alloys are building blocks for various advanced optoelectronic devices, but the growth of their ternary or quaternary materials are commonly limited by spontaneous formation of clusters and phase separations during alloying. Recently, digital alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy has been widely adopted in preference to conventional random alloy growth because of the extra degree of control offered by the ordered alloying. In this article, we provide a comparative study of the optical characteristics of AlAsSb alloys grown lattice-matched to GaSb using both techniques. The sample grown by digital alloy technique showed stronger photoluminescence intensity, narrower peak linewidth, and larger carrier activation energy than the random alloy technique, indicating an improved optical quality with lower density of non-radiative recombination centers. In addition, a relatively long carrier lifetime was observed from the digital alloy sample, consistent with the results obtained from the photoluminescence study.

  9. Mechanical properties of biomedical titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinomi, M. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technol. (Japan). Sch. of Production Syst. Eng.

    1998-03-15

    Titanium alloys are expected to be much more widely used for implant materials in the medical and dental fields because of their superior biocompatibility, bioaffinity, corrosion resistance and specific strength compared with other metallic implant materials. Pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, in particular, Ti-6Al-4V ELI have been, however, mainly used for implant materials among various titanium alloys to date. V free alloys like Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe have been recently developed for biomedical use. More recently V and Al free alloys have been developed. Titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr and so on with lower modulus have been started to be developed mainly in the USA. The {beta} type alloys are now the main target for medical materials. The mechanical properties of the titanium alloys developed for implant materials to date are described in this paper. (orig.) 17 refs.

  10. Requirements of titanium alloys for aeronautical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiban, Brânduşa; Bran, Dragoş-Teodor; Elefterie, Cornelia Florina

    2018-02-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aeronatical components made from Titanium based alloys. Asignificant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys). For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  11. Irradiation effects in magnesium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure, mechanical properties and swelling of several magnesium and aluminium alloys were studied. The neutron fluences of 2-3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 , >0.2 MeV produced displacement doses of 20 to 45 displacements per atom (dpa). Ductility of the magnesium alloys was severely reduced by irradiation induced recrystallization and precipitation of various forms. Precipitation of transmuted silicon occurred in the aluminium alloys. However, the effect on ductility was much less than for the magnesium alloys. The magnesium and aluminium alloys had excellent resistance to swelling: The best magnesium alloy was Mg/3.0 wt% Al/0.19 wt% Ca; its density decreased by only 0.13%. The best aluminium alloy was 6063, with a density decrease of 0.22%. (Auth.)

  12. Applications of shape memory alloys in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, a first application of shape memory TiNi alloy was a moving flap in an air-conditioner which was developed as sensing function of shape memory alloy at Matsushista Electric Industrial Co. Then, shape memory utilized in a coffee maker, an electric rice-cooker, a thermal mixing valve and etc. were commercialized in Japan. And brassiere wires, a guide wire for medical treatment, an antenna for portable telephone and others were commercialized utilizing superelasticity. At the same time with these commercial products, there was not only progress in fabrication technology to effect accurate transformation temperature, but also the discovery of small hysteresis alloy such as R-phase or TiNiCu alloy and low transformation temperature alloy such as TiNiFe, TiNiV and TiNiCo alloys. Therefore the shape memory alloy market has expanded widely to electric appliances, automobile, residence, medical care and other field today. (orig.)

  13. Aeronautical Industry Requirements for Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran, D. T.; Elefterie, C. F.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aviation components made from Titanium based alloys. A significant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys).For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  14. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  15. Magnetic alloys with vanishing anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couderchon, G.

    1991-01-01

    Co-based amorphous alloys and 80 Ni Permalloys have vanishingly-low anisotropies and show the highest permeabilities and lowest losses among commercial magnetic materials. In spit of their different atomic arrangements, these two types of material show close similarities in domain structure and in their temperature and frequency behavior. Information is also given concerning material technology and applications. (orig.)

  16. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  17. Palladium alloys for hydrogen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A palladium-base alloy with tin and/or a silicon addition and its use in the production of hydrogen from water via a cycle of chemical reactions, of which the decomposition of HI into H 2 and I 2 is the most important, is described

  18. Electroless alloy/composite coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The market for these coatings is expanding fast as the potential applications are on the rise. In the present article, an attempt has been made to review different electroless alloy/composite coatings with respect to bath types and their composition, properties and applications. Different characterisation studies have been ...

  19. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  20. Heat treatment of nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F. Jr.; Clatworthy, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    A heat treating process is described that can be used to produce desired combinations of strength, ductility, and fabricability characteristics in heat resistant age-hardenable alloys having precipitation-hardening amounts of niobium, titanium, and/or tantalum in a nickel-containing matrix. (U.S.)

  1. Shape memory alloy based motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Duerig et al 1990) of the alloy. Unlike conventional materials, which show only, limited effect on stress–strain behaviour (Duerig et al 1990; Mellor 1989), SMA shows marked temperature dependence, because of reversible austenite to martensite transformation. The underlying phenomenon of the shape memory effect is ...

  2. Hydrostatic extrusion of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bohlen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the capabilities and limitations of the hydrostatic extrusion process for the manufacturing of magnesium alloy sections. Firstly, the process basics for the hydrostatic extrusion of materials in general and of magnesium in particular are introduced. Next, some recent research

  3. Studies on neutron irradiation effects of iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    1987-09-01

    The present paper describes the results of neutron irradiation effects on iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys. As for the iron alloys, irradiation hardening and embrittlement were investigated using internal friction measurement, electron microscopy and tensile testings. The role of alloying elements was also investigated to understand the irradiation behavior of iron alloys. The essential factors affecting irradiation hardening and embrittlement were thus clarified. On the other hand, postirradiation tensile and creep properties were measured of Hastelloy X alloy. Irradiation behavior at elevated temperatures is discussed. (author)

  4. Oxide characterization and hydrogen behaviors of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, D. J.; Kwon, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Oh, S. J.; Yim, B. J.; Son, S. B.; Yun, S. P.

    2006-03-01

    The work scope and contents of the research are as follows : basic properties of zirconium alloys, hydrogen pick-up mechanism of zirconium alloy, effects of hydride on the corrosion behaviors of zirconium alloys, estimation on stress of oxide layer in the zirconium alloy, microstructure and characteristic of oxide in pre-hydrided zirconium alloys

  5. PERSPECTIVES OF MOLIBDENUM CONTAINING MATERIALS APPLICATION FOR ALLOYING OF IRONCARBON ALLOYS DURING MANUFACTURING OF CRITICAL CASTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Slutsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor is one of most important part of automobile determine its economical effectiveness of usage. On the other hand, sleeves, pistons and rings are crucible parts as they determine the service life of a motor. These parts are producing in big scale – dozens of millions pieces. Increase of cylinder sleeves physical-mechanical properties results in prolongation of motor service life and improvement of motor’s characteristics. Nowadays low alloyed cast irons with perlite structure are used to manufacture motor’s sleeves. For alloying purposes such traditional elements as Cr, Ni, Cu, and V are applied. But it is interesting to use molybdenum for cast iron alloying. It is known that alloying of alloys allows considerable increasing of consumption properties of castings. But in spite of advantages of alloys alloying the increase of molybdenum containing iron-carbon alloys production is restricted by economical reasons – high cost of alloying additions. Expenditures on alloying additions can be reduced by the application cheap secondary alloys in the charge. So, the present paper is devoted to investigation of alloying peculiarities during the treatment of ferrous alloys with molybdenum applying different initial materials.

  6. Novel antibacterial biodegradable Fe-Mn-Ag alloys produced by mechanical alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudehbagha, Pedram; Sheibani, Saeed; Khakbiz, Mehrdad; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hermawan, Hendra

    2018-07-01

    Various compositions and synthesis methods of biodegradable iron-based alloys have been studied aiming for the use of temporary medical implants. However, none is focused on nano-structured alloy and on adding antibacterial property to the alloy. In this study, new Fe-30Mn-(1-3)Ag alloys were synthesized by means of mechanical alloying and assessed for their microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion rate, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. Results showed that the alloy with 3 wt% Ag content displayed the highest relative density, shear strength, micro hardness and corrosion rate. However, optimum cytotoxicity and the antibacterial activity were reached by the alloy with 1 wt% Ag content. The compositional and processing effects of the alloys' properties are further discussed in this work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparation of TiMn alloy by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Weidmann, A.; Nebe, B. J.; Burkel, E.

    2009-01-01

    TiMn alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique for exploration of biomedical applications. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of the TiMn alloys were investigated in comparison with the pure Ti and Mn metals. Ti8Mn and Ti12Mn alloys with high relative density (99%) were prepared by mechanical alloying for 60 h and SPS at 700 °C for 5 min. The doping of Mn in Ti has decreased the transformation temperature from α to β phase, increased the relative density and enhanced the hardness of the Ti metal significantly. The Ti8Mn alloys showed 86% cell viability which was comparable to that of the pure Ti (93%). The Mn can be used as a good alloying element for biomedical Ti metal, and the Ti8Mn alloy could have a potential use as bone substitutes and dental implants.

  8. Investigation on mechanical alloying process for v-cr-ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciulescu, M.; Carlan, P.; Mihalache, M.; Bucsa, G.; Abrudeanu, M.; Galateanu, A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) is an efficient approach for fabricating oxide-dispersion alloys and structural materials including vanadium alloys for fusion and fission application. Dissolution behaviour of the alloying elements is a key issue for optimizing the mechanical alloying process in fabricating vanadium alloys. This paper studies the MA process of V-4wt.%Cr-4wt.%Ti alloy. The outcomes of the MA powders in a planetary ball mill are reported in terms of powder particle size and morphology evolution and elemental composition. The impact of spark-plasma sintering process on the mechanically alloyed powder is analysed. An optimal set of sintering parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time and the heating rate are determined. (authors)

  9. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  10. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio...... and a low glass transition temperature. The alloys were prepared by using a relatively simple technique, i.e. rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The essential structural changes that are achieved by going from the amorphous to the crystalline state through the supercooled liquid state...... are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  11. Theory of Random Anisotropic Magnetic Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1976-01-01

    A mean-field-crystal-field theory is developed for random, multicomponent, anisotropic magnetic alloys. It is specially applicable to rare-earth alloys. A discussion is given of multicritical points and phase transitions between various states characterized by order parameters with different...... spatial directions or different ordering wave vectors. Theoretical predictions based on known parameters for the phase diagrams and magnetic moments for the binary rare-earth alloys of Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, Tb-Tm, Nd-Pr, and pure double-hcp Nd agree qualitatively with the experimental observations....... Quantitative agreement can be obtained by increasing the interaction between different alloy elements, in particular for alloys with very different axial anisotropy, e.g., Tb-Tm. A model system consisting of a singlet-singlet and singlet-doublet alloy is discussed in detail. A simple procedure to include...

  12. Anodic oxidation of Ta/Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mato, S.; Alcala, G.; Thompson, G.E.; Skeldon, P.; Shimizu, K.; Habazaki, H.; Quance, T.; Graham, M.J.; Masheder, D.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of iron during anodizing of sputter-deposited Ta/Fe alloys in ammonium pentaborate electrolyte has been examined by transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anodic films on Ta/1.5 at.% Fe, Ta/3 at.% Fe and Ta/7 at.% Fe alloys are amorphous and featureless and develop at high current efficiency with respective formation ratios of 1.67, 1.60 and 1.55 nm V -1 . Anodic oxidation of the alloys proceeds without significant enrichment of iron in the alloy in the vicinity of the alloy/film interface and without oxygen generation during film growth, unlike the behaviour of Al/Fe alloys containing similar concentrations of iron. The higher migration rate of iron species relative to that of tantalum ions leads to the formation of an outer iron-rich layer at the film surface

  13. Swelling in neutron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Immersion density measurements have been performed on a series of titanium alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 450 and 550 0 C. The materials irradiated were the near-alpha alloys Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S, the alpha-beta alloy Ti-64, and the beta alloy Ti-38644. Swelling was observed in all alloys with the greater swelling being observed at 550 0 C. Microstructural examination revealed the presence of voids in all alloys. Ti-38644 was found to be the most radiation resistant. Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S also displayed good radiation resistance, whereas considerable swelling and precipitation were observed in Ti-64 at 550 0 C

  14. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co 71 4 Fe 4 6 Si 9 6 B 14 4 were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400 0 C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400 0 C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation

  15. Phonons in fcc binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amita; Rathore, R.P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Born-Mayer potential has been modified to account for the unpaired (three body) forces among the common nearest neighbours of the ordered binary fcc alloys i.e. Ni 3 Fe 7 , Ni 5 Fe 5 and Ni 75 Fe 25 . The three body potential is added to the two body form of Morse to formalize the total interaction potential. Measured inverse ionic compressibility, cohesive energy, lattice constant and one measured phonon frequency are used to evaluate the defining parameters of the potential. The potential seeks to bring about the binding among 140 and 132 atoms though pair wise (two body) and non-pair wise (three body) forces respectively. The phonon-dispersion relations obtained by solving the secular equation are compared with the experimental findings on the aforesaid alloys. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs

  16. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.

  17. Magnesium-titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Ilona

    Magnesium has been identified as a promising biodegradable implant material because it does not cause systemic toxicity and can reduce stress shielding. However, it corrodes too quickly in the body. Titanium, which is already used ubiquitously for implants, was chosen as the alloying element because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance in physiological environments. Thus, alloying magnesium with titanium is expected to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium. Mg-Ti alloys with a titanium content ranging from 5 to 35 at.-% were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. Spark plasma sintering was identified as a processing route to consolidate the alloy powders made by ball-milling into bulk material without destroying the alloy structure. This is an important finding as this metastable Mg-Ti alloy can only be heated up to max. 200C° for a limited time without reaching the stable state of separated magnesium and titanium. The superior corrosion behavior of Mg 80-Ti20 alloy in a simulated physiological environment was shown through hydrogen evolution tests, where the corrosion rate was drastically reduced compared to pure magnesium and electrochemical measurements revealed an increased potential and resistance compared to pure magnesium. Cytotoxicity tests on murine pre-osteoblastic cells in vitro confirmed that supernatants made from Mg-Ti alloy were no more cytotoxic than supernatants prepared with pure magnesium. Mg and Mg-Ti alloys can also be used to make novel polymer-metal composites, e.g., with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to avoid the polymer's detrimental pH drop during degradation and alter its degradation pattern. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys can be fabricated and consolidated while achieving improved corrosion resistance and maintaining cytocompatibility. This work opens up the possibility of using Mg-Ti alloys for fracture fixation implants and other biomedical applications. KEYWORDS: Magnesium, titanium, corrosion

  18. FE-based long range ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-T.; Inouye, H.; Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    Malleable long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Co,Fe) 3 and V(Co,Fe,Ni) 3 system having a specified composition with an electron density no greater than 8.00. Excellent high temperature properties occur in alloys in this system, having specified compositions. The alloys are fabricable by casting, deforming and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure. (author)

  19. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M [Sandia Park, NM; Powers, Dana A [Albuquerque, NM; Zhang, Zhenyuan [Durham, NC

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  20. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  1. Characterization of aluminium alloys rapidly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed the investigation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloys (3003; 7050; Al-9% Mg) rapidly solidified by melt spinning process (cooling rate 10 4 - 10 6 K/s). The rapidly solidification process of the studied aluminium alloys brought a microcrystallinity, a minimum presence of coarse precipitation and, also, better mechanical properties of them comparing to the same alloys using ingot process. (author) [pt

  2. Recent developments in advanced aircraft aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dursun, Tolga; Soutis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To compete with composites, performance of aluminium alloys should be increased. • Al–Li alloys have higher strength, fracture and fatigue/corrosion resistance. • Improvements of aerospace Al alloys are due to optimised solute content and ratios. • In selecting new materials, there should be no reduction in the level of safety. • The use of hybrid materials could provide additional opportunities for Al alloys. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys have been the primary material for the structural parts of aircraft for more than 80 years because of their well known performance, well established design methods, manufacturing and reliable inspection techniques. Nearly for a decade composites have started to be used more widely in large commercial jet airliners for the fuselage, wing as well as other structural components in place of aluminium alloys due their high specific properties, reduced weight, fatigue performance and corrosion resistance. Although the increased use of composite materials reduced the role of aluminium up to some extent, high strength aluminium alloys remain important in airframe construction. Aluminium is a relatively low cost, light weight metal that can be heat treated and loaded to relatively high level of stresses, and it is one of the most easily produced of the high performance materials, which results in lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. There have been important recent advances in aluminium aircraft alloys that can effectively compete with modern composite materials. This study covers latest developments in enhanced mechanical properties of aluminium alloys, and high performance joining techniques. The mechanical properties on newly developed 2000, 7000 series aluminium alloys and new generation Al–Li alloys are compared with the traditional aluminium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of the joining methods, laser beam welding and friction stir welding, are also discussed

  3. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  4. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  5. Microstructural characterization of EXCEL alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroza Z E, Celiz; Saumell M, Lani; Versaci, R A; Bozzano, P B

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure of Excel alloy was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the present phases. Characteristic peaks of α-Zr (HCP), β-Zr (BCC) and δhydride (FCC) were identified. The high relatives intensities of certain peaks suggest that samples are textured. Basal poles were dominant in radial-longitudinal planes and prismatic poles have the highest concentration in radial-tangential planes (author)

  6. Thermally activated martensite formation in ferrous alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetometry was applied to investigate the formation of α/α´martensite in 13ferrous alloys during immersion in boiling nitrogen and during re-heating to room temperature at controlled heating rates in the range 0.0083-0.83 K s-1. Data showsthat in 3 of the alloys, those that form {5 5 7}γ...... martensite, no martensite developsduring cooling. For all investigated alloys, irrespective of the type of martensiteforming, thermally activated martensite develops during heating. The activationenergy for thermally activated martensite formation is in the range 8‒27 kJ mol-1and increases with the fraction...... of interstitial solutes in the alloy...

  7. Structure effect on wear resistance of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, A.I.; Sidorova, L.I.; Tolstenko, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of wear resistance on hardness of steels with different microstructure is studied under conditions of gas-abrasion wear of surface layers. It is found out that at the same hardness the wear resistance of α-alloys is higher than that of γ-alloys in spite of considerable surface hardening of austenitic alloys. Fracture of surface in the process of abrasive wear occurs after achievement of definite values of microhardness and the width of a diffraction line for each structural class of alloys [ru

  8. Synthesis of shape memory alloys using electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Timothy Roy

    Shape memory alloys are used in a variety of applications. The area of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) is a developing field for thin film shape memory alloys for making actuators, valves and pumps. Until recently thin film shape memory alloys could only be made by rapid solidification or sputtering techniques which have the disadvantage of being "line of sight". At the University of Missouri-Rolla, electrolytic techniques have been developed that allow the production of shape memory alloys in thin film form. The advantages of this techniques are in-situ, non "line of sight" and the ability to make differing properties of the shape memory alloys from one bath. This research focused on the electrodeposition of In-Cd shape memory alloys. The primary objective was to characterize the electrodeposited shape memory effect for an electrodeposited shape memory alloy. The effect of various operating parameters such as peak current density, temperature, pulsing, substrate and agitation were investigated and discussed. The electrodeposited alloys were characterized by relative shape memory effect, phase transformation, morphology and phases present. Further tests were performed to optimize the shape memory by the use of a statistically designed experiment. An optimized shape memory effect for an In-Cd alloy is reported for the conditions of the experiments.

  9. Titanium alloys Russian aircraft and aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseyev, Valentin N

    2005-01-01

    This text offers previously elusive information on state-of-the-art Russian metallurgic technology of titanium alloys. It details their physical, mechanical, and technological properties, as well as treatments and applications in various branches of modern industry, particularly aircraft and aerospace construction. Titanium Alloys: Russian Aircraft and Aerospace Applications addresses all facets of titanium alloys in aerospace and aviation technology, including specific applications, fundamentals, composition, and properties of commercial alloys. It is useful for all students and researchers interested in the investigation and applications of titanium.

  10. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process

  11. Elaboration of a Mn-Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meny, L.

    1957-06-01

    The manganese-nickel alloy with a high manganese content is used to produce very low thickness sensors for the measurement of neutron flows in a reactor. The author reports the elaboration of such an alloy with a 75 per cent content of manganese and 25 per cent content of nickel, by using a powder metallurgy approach. Purity and homogeneity were looked for more than good mechanical properties. In this note, the author presents the alloy fabrication apparatus, and reports some properties of sheets produced with this alloy

  12. Characterization of a NIMONIC TYPE super alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora Rangel, L.; Martinez Martinez, E.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical properties of strength and thermofluence of a NIMONIC type super alloy under thermal treatment was determined. The relationship between microstructure, phases and precipitates was also studied. (author)

  13. Use of low fusing alloy in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, A G; Schneider, R L; Aquilino, S A

    1998-11-01

    Low fusing alloy has been used in dentistry for remount procedures in both fixed and removable prosthodontics, in implant prosthodontics for the fabrication of solid implant casts, in maxillofacial prosthetics as oral radiation shields, and in dental research for its unique properties. Previously, the use of low fusing alloy was thought to offer a high degree of dimensional accuracy. However, multiple in vitro studies have shown that its presumed dimensional accuracy may be questionable. This article reviews the physical properties, metallurgical considerations of low fusing alloy, its applications in dentistry, and a safe, simple method of using low fusing alloy.

  14. Nondestructive determination of mechanical properties. [aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E.; Chu, S. L.; Salma, K.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys of types 1100, 3003, 5052, 6061, and 2024 were used to study the sensitivity of the acousto-elastic constant to changes in the microstructure. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the acousto-elastic constants and the yield strength and hardness. This relationship depends on whether the alloy is strain hardened or precipitation hardened. In strain hardened alloys, the constants increase as the amount of solid solution is decreased, while the behavior is the opposite in precipitation hardened alloys.

  15. Application of mechanical alloying to synthesis of intermetallic phases based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is the process of synthesis of powder materials during milling in high energetic mills, usually ball mills. The central event in mechanical alloying is the ball-powder-ball collision. Powder particles are trapped between the colliding balls during milling and undergo deformation and/or fracture. Fractured parts are cold welded. The continued fracture and cold welding results in a uniform size and chemical composition of powder particles. The main applications of mechanical alloying are: processing of ODS alloys, syntheses of intermetallic phases, synthesis of nonequilibrium structures (amorphous alloys, extended solid solutions, nanocrystalline, quasi crystals) and magnetic materials. The present paper deals with application of mechanical alloying to synthesis Ni A l base intermetallic phases as well as phases from the Nb-Al binary system. The alloy were processed from elemental powders. The course of milling was monitored by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After milling, the collected powders were sieved by 45 μm grid and hot pressed (Nb alloys and NiAl) or hot extruded (NiAl). The resulting material was fully dense and exhibited fine grain (< 1 μm) and uniform distribution of oxide dispersoid. The consolidated material was compression and creep tested. The mechanical properties of mechanically alloys were superior to properties of their cast counterparts both in the room and elevated temperatures. Higher strength of mechanically alloyed materials results from their fine grains and from the presence of dispersoid. At elevated temperatures, the Nb-Al alloys have higher compression strength than NiAl-based alloys processed at the same conditions. The minimum creep rates of mechanically alloyed Nb alloys are an order of magnitude lower than analogously processed NiAl-base alloys. (author)

  16. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  17. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Thomas; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition–structure–property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  18. Ti-Pt Alloys form mechanical milling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available orthorhombic structure at a temperature of approximately 1000oC. The martensite phase results in shape memory effect being observed in this alloy at this temperature. Other alloys such as TiNi and TiPd have also been investigated for the martensitic...

  19. Design optimization of shape memory alloy structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langelaar, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores the possibilities of design optimization techniques for designing shape memory alloy structures. Shape memory alloys are materials which, after deformation, can recover their initial shape when heated. This effect can be used for actuation. Emerging applications for shape memory

  20. Methods for Electrodepositing Composition-Modulated Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, Peter; Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Tang, Peter Torben

    1996-01-01

    Materials exhibiting unique mechanical, physical and chemical properties can be obtained by combining thin layers of different metals or alloys forming a multilayered structure. Two general techniques exist for electrodepositing composition-modulated alloy (CMA) materials; dual-bath and single...

  1. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  2. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  3. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  4. TERNARY ALLOYS OF URANIUM, COLUMBIUM, AND ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, F.G.

    1960-08-01

    Ternary alloys of uranium are described which are useful as neutron- reflecting materials in a fast neutron reactor. They are especially resistant to corrosion caused by oxidative processes of gascous or aqueous origin and comprise uranium as the predominant metal with zirconiunn and niobium wherein the total content of the minor alloying elements is between 2 and 8% by weight.

  5. Electrodeposition of zinc--nickel alloys coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J W; Johnson, H R

    1977-10-01

    One possible substitute for cadmium in some applications is a zinc--nickel alloy deposit. Previous work by others showed that electrodeposited zinc--nickel coatings containing about 85 percent zinc and 15 percent nickel provided noticeably better corrosion resistance than pure zinc. Present work which supports this finding also shows that the corrosion resistance of the alloy deposit compares favorably with cadmium.

  6. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  7. Ternary alloy nanocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 2. Ternary alloy nanocatalysts for ... It is to be noted that synthesis of nanocrystallineternary alloys with precise composition is a big challenge which can be overcome by choosing an appropriate microemulsion system. High electrocatalytic activity towards ...

  8. Fundamental irradiation studies on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Garner, F.A.; Ermi, A.M.

    1985-05-01

    A joint experiment on the irradiation response of simple vanadium alloys has been initiated under the auspices of the DAFS and BES progams. Specimen fabrication is nearly complete and the alloys are expected to be irradiated in lithium in FFTF-MOTA Cycles 7 and 8

  9. Grain refinement of zinc-aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2006-01-01

    It is now well-established that the structure of the zinc-aluminum die casting alloys can be modified by the binary Al-Ti or the ternary Al-Ti-B master alloys. in this paper, grain refinement of zinc-aluminum alloys by rare earth materials is reviewed and discussed. The importance of grain refining of these alloys and parameters affecting it are presented and discussed. These include parameters related to the Zn-Al alloys cast, parameters related to the grain refining elements or alloys and parameters related to the process. The effect of addition of other alloying elements e.g. Zr either alone or in the presence of the main grain refiners Ti or Ti + B on the grain refining efficiency is also reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, based on the grain refinement and the parameters affecting it, a criterion for selection of the optimum grain refiner is suggested. Finally, the recent research work on the effect of grain refiners on the mechanical behaviour, impact strength, wear resistance, and fatigue life of these alloys are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Heat storage in alloy transformations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchenall, C E; Gueceri, S I; Farkas, D; Labdon, M B; Nagaswami, N; Pregger, B

    1981-03-01

    A study conducted to determine the feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media is described. The study had the following major elements: (1) the identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements, (2) the development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients, (3) the development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase-change materials, and (4) the identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases have been determined. A new method employing x-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data that are obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase-change media. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide has been identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were considered.

  11. Improving mechanical properties of aluminium alloy through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy (Al-Si-Fe) reinforced with coconut shell-ash particulate. The aluminium (Al-Si-Fe) alloy composite was produced by a double-stir casting process at a speed of 700 rpm for 10 and 5 minutes at first and second stirring respectively.

  12. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  13. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  14. Experimental Evaluation of New Alloy Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-19

    are in agreement with the iridium-hafnium phase diagram1 1 . The iridium-50 at% hafnium alloy is an intermetallic compound HfIr , while the iridium-5...and -65 at% hafnium alloys are two-phase mixtures of hafnium-Hf2 Ir and HfIr - HfIr 3 , respectively. In Fig. 1, the observed weight changes for iridium

  15. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  16. Corrosion resistance improvement of titanium base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion resistance of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy in comparison with ternary Ti-6Al-4V alloy in Ringer-Brown solution and artificial Carter-Brugirard saliva of different pH values was studied. In Ringer-Brown solution, the new alloy presented an improvement of all electrochemical parameters due to the alloying with Zr; also, impedance spectra revealed better protective properties of its passive layer. In Carter-Brugirard artificial saliva, an increase of the passive film thickness was proved. Fluoride ions had a slight negative influence on the corrosion and ion release rates, without to affect the very good stability of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy.

  17. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  18. Machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys (5, 10, 20, and 30 mass% Ag) as a new dental titanium alloy candidate for CAD/CAM use. The alloys were slotted with a vertical milling machine and carbide square end mills under two cutting conditions. Machinability was evaluated through cutting force using a three-component force transducer fixed on the table of the milling machine. The horizontal cutting force of the Ti-Ag alloys tended to decrease as the concentration of silver increased. Values of the component of the horizontal cutting force perpendicular to the feed direction for Ti-20% Ag and Ti-30% Ag were more than 20% lower than those for titanium under both cutting conditions. Alloying with silver significantly improved the machinability of titanium in terms of cutting force under the present cutting conditions.

  19. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  20. The interaction of hydrogen with metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured for several alloys, and these were determined to be about the same at 25 C for all alloys investigated. The relation of structure, both metallurgical and crystallographic, to the observed hydrogen distribution on charging was investigated, as well as the role of hydride formation in the hydrogen resistance of metal alloys. An attempt was made to correlate the structures and compositions of metal alloys as well as other parameters with the ratios of their notched tensile strengths in hydrogen to that in helium, R(H2/He), which are believed to represent a measure of their hydrogen resistance. Evidence supports the belief that hydrogen permeability and hydrogen resistance are increased by smaller grain sizes for a given alloy composition.

  1. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  2. Phase diagrams for surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Ruban, Andrei; Stoltze, Per

    1997-01-01

    We discuss surface alloy phases and their stability based on surface phase diagrams constructed from the surface energy as a function of the surface composition. We show that in the simplest cases of pseudomorphic overlayers there are four generic classes of systems, characterized by the sign...... is based on density-functional calculations using the coherent-potential approximation and on effective-medium theory. We give self-consistent density-functional results for the segregation energy and surface mixing energy for all combinations of the transition and noble metals. Finally we discuss...

  3. Thermal stability of high temperature structural alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, C.E.; Rasefske, R.K.; Castagna, A. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1999-03-01

    High temperature structural alloys were evaluated for suitability for long term operation at elevated temperatures. The effect of elevated temperature exposure on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a number of alloys was characterized. Fe-based alloys (330 stainless steel, 800H, and mechanically alloyed MA 956), and Ni-based alloys (Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, Alloy 718, and mechanically alloyed MA 758) were evaluated for room temperature tensile and impact toughness properties after exposure at 750 C for 10,000 hours. Of the Fe-based alloys evaluated, 330 stainless steel and 800H showed secondary carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) precipitation and a corresponding reduction in ductility and toughness as compared to the as-received condition. Within the group of Ni-based alloys tested, Alloy 718 showed the most dramatic structure change as it formed delta phase during 10,000 hours of exposure at 750 C with significant reductions in strength, ductility, and toughness. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy X showed significant M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitation and a resulting reduction in ductility and toughness. Haynes 230 was also evaluated after 10,000 hours of exposure at 850, 950, and 1050 C. For the 750--950 C exposures the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in Haynes 230 coarsened. This resulted in large reductions in impact strength and ductility for the 750, 850 and 950 C specimens. The 1050 C exposure specimens showed the resolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} secondary carbides, and mechanical properties similar to the as-received solution annealed condition.

  4. Effect of ternary alloying elements on microstructure and superelastictity of Ti-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D.C.; Mao, Y.F.; Li, Y.L.; Li, J.J.; Yuan, M. [Key Laboratory of Low Di-mensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Faculty of Material and Optical-Electronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: lin_j_g@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low Di-mensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Faculty of Material and Optical-Electronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2013-01-01

    The effect of ternary alloying elements (X=Ta, Fe, Zr, Mo, Sn and Si) on the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the superelasticity of Ti--22Nb-X alloys were investigated. The 1% addition of a ternary alloying element (X=Ta, Fe, Zr, Mo, Sn and Si) has a slight influence on the microstructure of the Ti-22Nb alloy. All the alloys after solution-treatment at 1073 K for 1.8 ks contain {beta} and {alpha} Double-Prime phases. The elements of Sn, Si, Fe and Ta with a high number of valence electrons or a small atomic size have a strong solid-solution strengthening effect to the {beta} phases in the alloys and the alloys with high Md{sup Macron} and low Bo{sup Macron} exhibit low elastic moduli. All the alloying elements improve the superelasticity of Ti-22Nb-X alloys. The elements, Fe, Mo, Sn and Si, which are with a high number of valence electrons and a small atomic size, strongly increase {sigma}{sub SIM} of the Ti-22Nb alloy.

  5. Characterization of zinc–nickel alloy electrodeposits obtained from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc alloy offers superior sacrificial protection to steel as the alloy dissolves more slowly than pure zinc. The degree of protection and the rate of dissolution depend on the alloying metal and its composition. Zinc-nickel alloy may also serve as at less toxic substitute for cadmium. In this paper the physico-chemical ...

  6. Study of fatigue behaviour of 7475 aluminium alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    controlled toughness alloy developed for applications that require a combination of high strength, superior fracture toughness and resistance to fatigue crack propagation both in air and aggressive environment. The 7475 alu- minium alloy is basically a modified version of 7075 alloy. Properties in 7075 alloy are improved by ...

  7. Nanoporous gold obtained from a metallic glass precursor used as substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, F.; Paschalidou, E. M.; Rizzi, P.; Bordiga, S.; Battezzati, L.

    2015-09-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) has been synthesized by electrochemical de-alloying a new precursor, amorphous Au30Cu38Ag7Pd5Si20 (at.%), starting from melt-spun ribbons. Ligaments ranging from 75 to 210 nm depending on the de-alloying time were obtained. Analytical and electrochemical evidence showed the ligaments contain residual Cu, Ag and Pd. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the NPG was investigated using pyridine and 4,4‧-bi-pyridine as probe molecules. It was found that the activity is at maximum when the ribbon is fully de-alloyed although the ligaments then have a larger size. The enhancement is attributed to the small size of crystals in the ligaments, to their morphology and to trapped atoms.

  8. Recent research and developments on wrought magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihang You

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wrought magnesium alloys attract special interests as lightweight structural material due to their homogeneous microstructure and enhanced mechanical properties compared to as-cast alloys. In this contribution, recent research and developments on wrought magnesium alloys are reviewed from the viewpoint of the alloy design, focusing on Mg-Al, Mg-Zn and Mg-rare earth (RE systems. The effects of different alloying elements on the microstructure and mechanical properties are described considering their strengthening mechanisms, e.g. grain refinement, precipitation and texture hardening effect. Finally, the new alloy design and also the future research of wrought magnesium alloys to improve their mechanical properties are discussed.

  9. Shot peening of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guernic, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Shot peening is a process of cold-hammering where a metallic surface is pelted with spherical grains. Each grain bumping into the surface acts as a hammer head and creates a small crater. The overlapping of these craters produces a residual compression layer just underneath the surface. It is well known that cracks cannot spread in a compression zone. In most cases of fatigue rupture and stress corrosion cracks propagate from the surface towards the inside so shot peening allows a longer lifetime of castings. Moreover most materials present a better resistance due to the cold-hammering effect of shot peening. Metallic surfaces can be treated in workshops or directly on site. Typical pieces that undergo shot peening on site are storing tanks, gas and steam turbines, tubes of steam generators and piping in oil or nuclear or chemical industries. This article describes shot peening from a theoretical and general point of view and presents the application to aluminium-lithium alloys. In the case of aluminium alloys shot peening can be used to shape the piece (peen-forming). (A.C.)

  10. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  11. Vibrational entropies in metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Wolverton, Christopher

    2000-03-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that vibrational entropy can have significant effects on the phase stability of metallic alloys. Using density functional linear response calculations and molecular dynamics simulations we study three representative cases: (i) phase diagram of Al-rich Al-Sc alloys, (ii) stability of precipitate phases in CuAl_2, and (iii) phonon dynamics in bcc Zr. We find large vibrational entropy effects in all cases. In the Al-Sc system, vibrations increase the solid solubility of Sc in Al by decreasing the stability of the L12 (Al_3Sc) phase. This leads to a nearly ten-fold increase in the solid solubility of Sc in Al at T=800 K. In the Cu-Al system, our calculations predict that the tetragonal Laves phase of CuAl2 has 0.35 kB/atom higher vibrational entropy than the cubic CaF_2-type phase (the latter is predicted to be the T=0 K ground state of CuAl_2). This entropy difference causes a structural transformation in CuAl2 precipitates from the fluorite to the tetragonal Laves phase around T=500 K. Finally, we analyze the highly unusual dynamics of anharmonically stabilized bcc Zr, finding large diffuse-scattering intensity streaks between the bcc Bragg peaks.

  12. Oxide films on magnesium and magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-S.; Liu, J.-B.; Wei, P.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are very active and readily ignite during heating and melting. In this study, we discuss the combustion of magnesium and magnesium alloys and propose prospective anti-ignition mechanisms for magnesium alloys during the heating process. When magnesium and magnesium alloys were heated in air, the sample surfaces produced layers of thermally formed oxides. These thermally formed oxides played an important role in affecting the combustion of the magnesium and magnesium alloys. When magnesium was heated in air, brucite that formed in the early stage was then transformed into periclase by dehydroxylation. By extending the heating time, more periclase formed and increased in thickness which was associated with microcracks formation. When magnesium was heated in a protective atmosphere (SF 6 ), a film of MgF 2 formed at the interface between the oxide layer and the Mg substrate. This film generated an anti-ignition behavior which protected the substrate from oxidation. When solution-treated AZ80 alloy was heated, spinel developed at the interface between the thermally formed oxide layer and the Mg substrate, improving the anti-ignition properties of the substrate. In addition, we also explain the effects of beryllium in an AZB91 alloy on the ignition-proofing behavior

  13. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m 2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600 0 C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520 0 C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys

  15. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  16. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  17. Electric field gradients in copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, L.R.

    1974-02-01

    The electric field gradients at Cu atoms which are near neighbors to the nickel impurity in a dilute CuNi alloy were measured. The technique used is zero field pure quadrupole resonance which was first demonstrated by Redfield [Redfield, Phys. Rev. 130, 589 (1963)]. The measured electric field gradients for this alloy system are 4.1 x 10 23 cm -3 , 0.84 x 10 23 cm -3 , 0.46 x 10 23 cm -3 and 0.146 x 10 23 cm -3 . These measured values are compared with the values calculated by Beal-Monod [Beal-Monod, Phys. Rev. 164, 360 (1967)]. In addition the following alloy systems were measured; CuCo, CuFe, and CuV. The nuclear relaxation of the alloys was measured but no satellite structure was detected. Results of these measurements show the similarity of the interactions measured here to the interactions in CuZn measured by Redfield. Since nickel has an unfilled 3d shell in its electronic structure, magnetic interactions in the CuNi alloy might be expected. Magnetic interactions were not found. Like the nickel alloy, the zinc alloy with copper exhibits no magnetic effects. (U.S.)

  18. The Influence of Forging Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Al-V Titanium Alloys,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanium alloys, *Forging, Aluminum alloys, Vanadium alloys, Mechanical properties, Heat treatment, High temperature, Press forging, Quenching, Toughness, Charpy impact tests , Notch toughness, Resistance

  19. Isotropic and anisotropic nanocrystalline NdFeB-based magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering and hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.W.; Huang, Y.L.; Huang, H.Y.; Zhong, X.C.; Yu, Y.H.; Zeng, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic NdFeB permanent magnets were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and SPS followed hot deformation (HD), respectively, using melt spun NdFeB ribbons with various compositions as starting materials. It is found that, based on RE-rich composition, SPSed magnets sintered at low temperatures (<700 C) almost maintained the uniform fine grain structure inherited from rapid quenching. At higher temperatures, a distinct two-zone (coarse grain and fine grain zones) structure was formed in the SPSed magnets. The SPS temperature and pressure have important effects on the grain structure, which led to the variations in the magnetic properties. By employing low SPS temperature and high pressure, high-density magnets with negligible coarse grain zone and an excellent combination of magnetic properties can be obtained. For single phase NdFeB alloy, because of the deficiency of Nd-rich phases, it is relatively difficult to consolidate micro-sized melt spun powders into high density bulk magnet, but generally a larger particle size is beneficial to achieve better magnetic properties. Anisotropic magnets with a maximum energy product of approx. equal to 38 MGOe were produced by the SPS+HD process. HD did not lead to obvious grain growth and the two-zone structure still existed in the hot deformed magnets. The results indicated that nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets without significant grain growth and with excellent properties could be obtained by SPS and HD processes. (author)

  20. Fatigue Characteristics of Selected Light Metal Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśla M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses results of fatigue testing of light metal alloys used in the automotive as well as aerospace and aviation industries, among others. The material subject to testing comprised hot-worked rods made of the AZ31 alloy, the Ti-6Al-4V two-phase titanium alloy and the 2017A (T451 aluminium alloy. Both low- and high-cycle fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature on the cycle asymmetry ratio of R=-1. The low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using the MTS-810 machine on two levels of total strain, i.e.Δεc= 1.0% and 1.2%. The high-cycle fatigue tests, on the other hand, were performed using a machine from VEB Werkstoffprufmaschinen-Leipzig under conditions of rotary bending. Based on the results thus obtained, one could develop fatigue life characteristics of the materials examined (expressed as the number of cycles until failure of sample Nf as well as characteristics of cyclic material strain σa=f(N under the conditions of low-cycle fatigue testing. The Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy was found to be characterised by the highest value of fatigue life Nf, both in lowand high-cycle tests. The lowest fatigue life, on the other hand, was established for the aluminium alloys examined. Under the high-cycle fatigue tests, the life of the 2017A aluminium and the AZ31 magnesium alloy studied was determined by the value of stress amplitude σa. With the stress exceeding 150 MPa, it was the aluminium alloy which displayed higher fatigue life, whereas the magnesium alloy proved better on lower stress.

  1. PRODUCTION OF WELDMENTS FROM SINTERED TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. YE. Kapustyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Limited application of details from powder titanium alloys is connected with the difficulties in obtaining of long-length blanks, details of complex shape and large size. We can solve these problems by applying the welding production technology. For this it is necessary to conduct a research of the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints of sintered titanium alloys produced by flash welding. Methodology. Titanium industrial powders, type PT5-1 were used as original substance. Forming of blanks, whose chemical composition corresponded to BT1-0 alloy, was carried out using the powder metallurgy method. Compounds were obtained by flash welding without preheating. Microstructural investigations and mechanical tests were carried out. To compare the results investigations of BT1-0 cast alloy were conducted. Findings. Samples of welded joints of sintered titanium blanks from VT1-0 alloy using the flash butt welding method were obtained. During welding the microstructure of basic metal consisting of grains of an a-phase, with sizes 40...70 mkm, is transformed for the seam weld and HAZ into the lamellar structure of an a-phase. The remaining pores in seam weld were practically absent; in the HAZ their size was up to 2 mkm, with 30 mkm in the basic metal. Attainable level of mechanical properties of the welded joint in sintered titanium alloys is comparable to the basic metal. Originality. Structure qualitative changes and attainable property complex of compounds of sintered titanium alloys, formed as a result of flash butt welding were found out. Practical value. The principal possibility of high-quality compounds obtaining of sintered titanium alloys by flash welding is shown. This gives a basis for wider application of sintered titanium alloys due to long-length blanks production that are correspond to deformable strand semi finished product.

  2. Welding the four most popular aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, B.

    1994-02-01

    The fact that business is good in aluminum welding is a sure sign that more manufacturers and fabricators are using GMA and GTA welding to build new products out of this lightweight nonferrous metal. Among the most widely specified weldable grades are Alloys 6061, 5083, 5052 and 5454. A rundown on these four alloys, including properties and selected applications, is provided. Any company working with aluminum for the first time needs to know something about these four alloys. Alloys of copper-magnesium-silicon combination, of which 6061 is one, are heat-treatable. The three 5XXX series alloys, on the other hand, are nonheat-treatable. According to P.B. Dickerson, consultant, Lower Burrell, Pa., 5083, because of its high magnesium content, is the easiest of the four alloys to arc weld. Dickerson put the cut-off point in weldability at 3.5% magnesium. To prevent cracking, he added, both 6061 and 5052 require much more filler metal than do the other two alloys. Alloy 6061 consists of 0.25Cu, 0.6Si, 1.0Mg, and 0.20Cr. The main applications for 6061 aluminum are structural, architectural, automotive, railway, marine and pipe. It has good formability, weldability, corrosion resistance and strength. Although the 6XXX series alloys are prone to hot cracking, this condition can be readily overcome by correct choice of joint design and electrode. The most popular temper for 6061 is T6, although the -T651, -T4, and -F temper are also popular. The -T651 temper is like a -T6 temper, only it has received some final stretch hardening. The -T4 temper has been solution heat-treated and quenched. The -F temper is in the as-fabricated condition.

  3. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4 and aging (T6 heat treatment.The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH2 and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7, revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269, and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  4. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  5. Development of environmentally friendly cast alloys and composites. High zinc Al-base cast alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.K. Krajewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to grain refinement of the foundry Al-20 wt% Zn (AlZn20 alloy, aiming at improving ductility of the sand-cast alloy The melted alloy was inoculated using traditional AlTi5B1 (TiBAl and AlTi3C0.15 (TiCAl master alloys and newly introduced (Zn,Al-Ti3 one. The performed structural examinations showed out significant increasing of the grain population of the inoculated alloy and plas-ticity increase represented by elongation. The high damping properties of the initial alloy, measured using an ultrasonic Olympus Epoch XT device, are basicly preserved after inoculation. Also tensile strength preserves its good values, while elongation shows an increase – which are beneficials of the employed grain-refining process.

  6. Hysteresis behaviour of thermoelastic alloys: some shape memory alloys models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lexcellent, C.; Torra, V.; Raniecki, B.

    1993-01-01

    The hysteretic behaviour of shape memory alloys (SMA) needs a more and more thin analysis because of its importance for technological applications. The comparison between different approaches allows to explicite the specifity of every model (macroscopic approach, micro-macro level, local description, phenomenological approach) and their points of convergence. On one hand, a thermodynamic treatment with a free energy expression as a mixing rule of each phase (parent or austenite phase and martensite) by adding a coupling term: the configurational energy, allowes modelling of material hysteresis loops. On the other hand, a phenomenological treatment based on a local investigation of two single crystals with a visualisation of microscopic parameters allows to perceive the phase transition mechanisms (nucleation, growth). All the obtained results show the importance of entropy production (or of the definition of the configurational energy term) for the correct description of hysteresis loops (subloops or external). (orig.)

  7. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versaci, R.A.; Ipohorski, Miguel

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author) [es

  8. Local environment effects in disordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic moment of an atom in a ferromagnetic disordered alloy depends on the local environment of that atom. This is particularly true for Ni and Pd based alloys for which neutron diffuse scattering measurements of the range and magnitude of the moment disturbances indicate that both magnetic and chemical environment are important in determining the moment distribution. In this paper we review recent neutron studies of local environment effects in Ni based alloys. These are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model that allows a separation of the total moment disturbance at a Ni site into its chemical and magnetic components

  9. Current assisted superplastic forming of titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assisted superplastic forming combines electric heating technology and superplastic forming technology, and can overcome some shortcomings of traditional superplastic forming effectively, such as slow heating rate, large energy loss, low production efficiency, etc. Since formability of titanium alloy at room temperature is poor, current assisted superplastic forming is suitable for titanium alloy. This paper mainly introduces the application of current assisted superplastic forming in the field of titanium alloy, including forming technology of double-hemisphere structure and bellows.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  11. Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-08-01

    Graded glass and glass-hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been prepared using a simple enameling technique. The composition of the glasses has been tailored to match the thermal expansion of the alloys. By controlling the firing time, and temperature, it has been possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25 to 150 mu m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate, resistant to corrosion and able to precipitate hydroxyapatite during in vitro tests in simulated body fluid.

  12. Pulse reversal plating of nickel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2007-01-01

    Pulse plating has previously been reported to improve the properties of nickel and nickel alloy deposits. Typically, focus has been on properties such as grain size, hardness and smoothness. When pulse plating is to be utilised for microtechnologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS......), internal stress and material distribution are even more important. With baths based upon nickel chloride, and nickel and cobalt chlorides, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for microinjection moulding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft...... magnetic alloys, comprising 45-65%Co, 15-35%Fe and 15-35%Ni, is also reported....

  13. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  14. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  15. Influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the phase formation in Cu-Zn alloys

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kozana; St. Rzadkosz; M. Piękoś

    2010-01-01

    Influence of the selected alloy additions into copper and zinc alloys was investigated in order to find out the possibility of limiting the precipitation of unfavourable phase . The observation of microstructures and strength tests were performed. The results of metallographic and strength investigations indicate positive influence of small amounts of nickel, cobalt or tellurium. The precise determination of the influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the gamma phase formation ...

  16. Local atomic order in nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jartych, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using the 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, a local atomic order in nanocrystalline alloys of iron with Al, Ni, W and Mo has been determined. Alloys were prepared by mechanical alloying method. Analysis of Moessbauer spectra was performed on the basis of the local environment model in terms of Warren-Cowley parameters. It was shown that impurity atoms are not randomly distributed in the volume of the first and the second co-ordination spheres of 57 Fe nuclei and they form clusters

  17. The Examination of the Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems by Tyrone L Jones and Brian E Placzankis Approved for public release...2016 US Army Research Laboratory The Examination of the Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor ...Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  18. Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function of Braze Alloy and Process Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    alloying additions are predicted to optimize corrosion performance and be compatible with AA 6061 and 5052 from the standpoint of mitigating...34Corrosion of metals and alloys . Determination of resistance to intergranular corrosion of solution heat- treatable aluminium alloys " 1996. 25. ASTM...binary aluminium alloys —I. Al-Cu alloys . Pitting and intergranular corrosion," Corros Sei 17, 3 (1977): p. 179. 42. I.L. Müller and J.R. Galvele

  19. Determination of local constitutive properties of titanium alloy matrix in boron-modified titanium alloys using spherical indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreeranganathan, A.; Gokhale, A.; Tamirisakandala, S.

    2008-01-01

    The constitutive properties of the titanium alloy matrix in boron-modified titanium alloys are different from those of the corresponding unreinforced alloy due to the microstructural changes resulting from the addition of boron. Experimental and finite-element analyses of spherical indentation with a large penetration depth to indenter radius ratio are used to compute the local constitutive properties of the matrix alloy. The results are compared with that of the corresponding alloy without boron, processed in the same manner

  20. Reducing thermal conductivity of binary alloys below the alloy limit via chemical ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, John C; English, Timothy S; Jordan, Donald A; Norris, Pamela M; Soffa, William A

    2011-01-01

    Substitutional solid solutions that exist in both ordered and disordered states will exhibit markedly different physical properties depending on their exact crystallographic configuration. Many random substitutional solid solutions (alloys) will display a tendency to order given the appropriate kinetic and thermodynamic conditions. Such order-disorder transitions will result in major crystallographic reconfigurations, where the atomic basis, symmetry, and periodicity of the alloy change dramatically. Consequently, the dominant scattering mechanism in ordered alloys will be different than that in disordered alloys. In this study, we present a hypothesis that ordered alloys can exhibit lower thermal conductivities than their disordered counterparts at elevated temperatures. To validate this hypothesis, we investigate the phononic transport properties of disordered and ordered AB Lennard-Jones alloys via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and harmonic lattice dynamics calculations. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of an ordered alloy is the same as the thermal conductivity of the disordered alloy at ∼0.6T melt and lower than that of the disordered alloy above 0.8T melt .

  1. HAYNES 244 alloy – a new 760 ∘C capable low thermal expansion alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrmann Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HAYNES® 244TM alloy is a new 760∘C capable, high strength low thermal expansion (CTE alloy. Its nominal chemical composition in weight percent is Ni – 8 Cr – 22.5 Mo – 6 W. Recently, a first mill-scale heat of 244 alloy was melted by Haynes International, and processed to various product forms such as re-forge billet, plate, and sheet. This paper presents key attributes of this new alloy (CTE, strength, low-cycle fatigue performance, oxidation resistance, thermal stability as they pertain to the intended use in rings and seals of advanced gas turbines.

  2. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  3. Wear resistance of alloy вт-22 with non-ferrous alloys at reverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.М. Хімко

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article presents the results of tests of non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 with aviation non-ferrous alloys in reverse sliding friction. The main objective of the work is the selection of the optimum combination of materials depending on changes in loading conditions. Study of alloy ВТ-22 wear resistance was carried out in pairs with БрОФ-10-1, БрБ2, БрАЖ-9-4, ВТ-22, МЛ5, Д16Т, 7Х21ГАН5Ш and 95Х18Ш. The dependencies of the materials wear at pressures 10, 20 and 30 Mpa we determined. The linear nature of titanium alloy wear curves indicates that the change in the wear mechanism occurs gradually. The histograms of non-ferrous materials wear and the total wear of the friction pair are presented. It is established that the bronze БрАЖ-9-4 is the most preferable material for contact with non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22, the least wear among the tested materials. The established coefficients of the titanium alloy ВТ-22 friction in pair with aviation structural non-ferrous alloys are presented. The results of research will be relevant for the engineering industry, where non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 in pair with non-ferrous alloys is applied.

  4. Grain refinement of an AZ63B magnesium alloy by an Al-1C master alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yichuan Pan; Xiangfa Liu; Hua Yang [The Key Lab. of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong Univ., Jinan (China)

    2005-12-01

    In order to develop a refiner of Mg-Al alloys, an Al-1C (in wt.%) master alloy was synthesized using a casting method. The microstructure and grain-refining performance of the Al-1C master alloy were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and a grain-refining test. The microstructure of the Al-1C master alloy is composed of {alpha}-Al solid solution, Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles, and graphite phases. After grain refinement of AZ63B alloy by the Al-1C master alloy, the mean grain size reached a limit when 2 wt.% Al-C master alloy was added at 800 C and held for 20 min in the melt before casting. The minimum mean grain size is approximately 48 {mu}m at the one-half radius of the ingot and is about 17% of that of the unrefined alloy. The Al-1C master alloy results in better grain refinement than C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} and MgCO{sub 3} carbon-containing refiners. (orig.)

  5. Strength and fracture of two-phase alloys: a comparison of two alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurland, J.

    1978-01-01

    The functional roles of the hard and soft constituents in the deformation and fracture of two-phase alloys are discussed on the basis of two commercially important alloy systems, namely spheroidized carbon steels and cemented carbides, WC-Co. A modified rule of mixtures provides a structural approach to the yield and flow strength. Consideration of the fracture toughness is attempted by means of a phenomenological modelling of the fracture process on the microscale. While there are large differences in properties between the two alloys, the deformation and fracture processes show broad smilarities which are associated with the features of the interaction between constituents common to both alloys

  6. Cytotoxicity of alloying elements and experimental titanium alloys by WST-1 and agar overlay tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yo-Han; Kim, Min-Kang; Park, Eun-Jin; Song, Ho-Jun; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the biocompatibility of nine types of pure metals using 36 experimental prosthetic titanium-based alloys containing 5, 10, 15, and 20wt% of each substituted metal. The cell viabilities for pure metals on Ti alloys that contain these elements were compared with that of commercially pure (CP) Ti using the WST-1 test and agar overlay test. The ranking of pure metal cytotoxicity from most potent to least potent was: Co>Cu>In>Ag>Cr>Sn>Au>Pd>Pt>CP Ti. The cell viability ratios for pure Co, Cu, In, and Ag were 13.9±4.6%, 21.7±10.4%, 24.1±5.7%, and 24.8±6.0%, respectively, which were significantly lower than that for the control group (pcytotoxic', whereas all Ti alloys were ranked as 'noncytotoxic'. The cytotoxicity of pure Ag, Co, Cr, Cu, and In suggests a need for attention in alloy design. The cytotoxicity of alloying elements became more biocompatible when they were alloyed with titanium. However, the cytotoxicity of titanium alloys was observed when the concentration of the alloying element exceeded its respective allowable limit. The results obtained in this study can serve as a guide for the development of new Ti-based alloy systems. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  7. Ageing of zirconium alloy components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak; Dubey, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    India has two types (pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs)) of commercial nuclear reactors in operation, in addition to research reactors. Many of the life limiting critical components in these reactors are fabricated from zirconium alloys. The progressive degradation of these components caused by the cumulative exposure of high energy neutron irradiation with increasing period of reactor operation was monitored to assess the degree of ageing. The components/specimens examined included fuel element claddings removed from BWRs, pressure tubes and garter springs removed from PHWRs and calandria tube specimens used in PHWRs. The tests included tension test (for cladding, garter spring), fracture toughness test (for pressure tube), crush test (for garter spring), and measurement of irradiation induced growth (for calandria tube). Results of various tests conducted are presented and applications of the test results are elaborated for residual life estimation/life extension of the components.

  8. Shape memory alloy consortium (SMAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacot, A. Dean

    1999-07-01

    The application of smart structures to helicopter rotors has received widespread study in recent years. This is one of the major thrusts of the Shape Memory Alloy Consortium (SMAC) program. SMAC includes 3 companies and 4 Universities in a cost sharing consortium funded under DARPA Smart Materials and Structures program. This paper describes the objective of the SMAC effort, and its relationship to a previous DARPA smart structure rotorcraft program from which it originated. The SMAC program includes NiTinol fatigue/characterization studies, SMA actuator development, and ferromagnetic SMA material development. The paper summarizes the SMAC effort, and includes background and details on Boeing's development of a SMA torsional actuator for rotorcraft applications. SMA actuation is used to retwist the rotorcraft blade in flight, and result in a significant payload increase for either helicopters or tiltrotors. This paper is also augmented by several other papers in this conference with specific results from other SMAC consortium members.

  9. Incology alloy 908 data handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, L.S.; Steeves, M.M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Reed, R.P. [Cryogenic Materials Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This handbook is a compilation of all available properties of Incoloy alloy 908 as of March, 1994. Data included in this paper cover mechanical, elastic, thermal and magnetic characteristics. The mechanical properties include tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue, and stress-rupture for both the base metal and related weld filler metals. Elastic properties listed are Young`s, shear and bulk moduli and Poisson`s ratio. Thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and specific heat and magnetization are also reported. Data presented are summarized in the main body and presented in detail in the supplements. Areas of ongoing research are briefly described, and topics for future research are suggested. The data have been compiled to assist in the design of large-scale superconducting magnets for fusion reactors.

  10. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  11. Low content uranium alloys for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given of the structure and the properties of low content alloys containing from 0.1 to 0.5 per cent by weight of Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo or a combination of these elements. A study of the kinetics and of the mode of transformation has made it possible to choose the most satisfactory thermal treatment. An attempt has been made to prepare alloys suitable for an economical industrial development having a small α grain structure without marked preferential orientation, with very fine and stable precipitates as well as a high creep-resistance. The physical properties and the mechanical strength of these alloys are given for temperatures of 20 to 600 deg C. These alloys proved very satisfactory when irradiated in the form of normal size fuel elements. (authors) [fr

  12. STACKING FAULT ENERGY IN HIGH MANGANESE ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mazancová

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Stacking fault energy of high manganese alloys (marked as TWIP and TRIPLEX is an important parameter determining deformation mechanism type realized in above mentioned alloys. Stacking fault energy level can be asserted with a gliding of partial and/or full dislocations, b gliding mechanism and twinning deformation process in connection with increasing of fracture deformation level (deformation elongation and with increasing of simultaneously realized work hardening proces., c gliding mechanism and deformation induced e-martensite formation. In contribution calculated stacking fault energies are presented for various chemical compositions of high manganese alloys. Stacking fault energy dependences on manganese, carbon, iron and alluminium contents are presented. Results are confronted with some accessible papers.The aim of work is to deepen knowledge of presented data. The TWIP and TRIPLEX alloys can be held for promissing new automotive materials.

  13. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  14. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licai Fu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on the synthesis of nanocrystalline metals and alloys prepared by combustion synthesis technique are reviewed. Then, the mechanical and tribological properties of these materials with microstructure control are discussed.

  15. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi 5 -phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified

  16. Tough and corrosion resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns austenitic alloys of high corrosion resistance, which can be deformed hot and tempered, so that they can be forged, rolled, and drawn into tubes and other shapes. The alloys have a basis of nickel, chromium and iron. The silicon content is between 2 and 4% by weight, and the molybdenum content is between 0 and 2% by weight. The alloys can be hardened by ageing and contain up to 0.1% by weight of boron. The other alloying materials are 1 to 3.5% by weight of manganese, 4 to 7.5% by weight of cobalt, 2.5 to 8% by weight of copper and 0.05 to 0.25% by weight of carbon. (IHOE) [de

  17. Steam Initiated Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud

    The extensive demand of aluminium alloys in various industries such as in transportationis mainly due to the high strength to weight ratio, which could be translated into fuel economy and efficiency. Corrosion protection of aluminium alloys is an important aspect for all applications which includes...... to 12 present various experimental results in the form of appended papers. The chapters consist of the experimental results obtained by the use of steam-based process and its effect on microstructureand corrosion resistance of the alloy as a function of steam pressure, use of various chemicals...... the use of aluminium alloys in the painted form requiring a conversion coating to improve the adhesion. Chromate based conversion coating processes are extremely good for these purposes, however the carcinogenic and toxic nature of hexavalent chromium led to the search for more benign and eco...

  18. Filler metal development for Hastelloy alloy XR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Hajime; Sahira, Kensho

    1991-11-01

    In order to develop the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall, the weldability and high temperature strength properties of Hastelloy alloy XR weldment were investigated using the filler metals, which were alloy-designed on the basis of multiple regression analysis. The former was examined through the chemical analysis in the deposited metal, bend test, FISCO cracking test, optical microscopy and hardness measurement. The latter was investigated by means of tensile and creep test. It was found from these results that the crack susceptibility in the weldment was apparent to be lowered without degrading the high temperature strength properties. Therefore, it is concluded that these filler metals possess excellent performance as the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall. (author)

  19. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  20. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  1. Towards an understanding of zirconium alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1976-08-01

    A brief historical summary is given of the development of a programme for understanding the corrosion mechanisms operating for zirconium alloys. A general summary is given of the progress made, so far, in carrying through this programme. (author)

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Magnesium (Mg) Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work is to investigate additive manufacturing techniques for Mg alloys.  It will leverage off research being conducted at University of Florida and...

  3. Pitting corrosion of 5052 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, F.; Lee, S.; Faunce, J.; Green, J. A. S.; Ptashnick, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relative degree of pitting of 5052 aluminum alloy in a prepaint cleaning process is correlated with the proportion of MgO in the surface oxide of the alloy. Magnesium oxide, formed on the surface during process heat treatments of the alloy, is soluble in the acidic environment of the particular cleaning solutions, thus allowing easier access of corrosive ion to the aluminum metal. The pitting mechanism involves the: (1) formation of microscopic, localized galvanic cells between aluminum (anode) and iron-containing constituents (cathodic sites) normally found in the matrix of 5052 (and other 5xxx aluminum alloys), (2) aggravation of pit formation by chloride, and (3) enhancement of cathodic reactions and hence the overall corrosion process due to penetration of the oxide layer by cupric and ferric ions, and dissolved O 2 present in the cleaning solutions. Pitting was eliminated by adding 0.1% NaNO 3 to the cleaning bath.

  4. Theory of Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    A mean-field random alloy theory combined with a simple calculation of the exchange interaction J(c,Q) is shown to quantitatively account for the phase diagrams for alloys of rare-earth metals with Y, Lu, Sc, and other rare-earth metals. A concentration-dependent J(c,Q) explains the empirical 2...... to account for all alloys except the Sc based. The exceptional behavior of the Sc alloys is due to a low density of states for Sc. A brief discussion is given of the effect on the mean-field results of changes in volume or c/a ratio and of critical fluctuations. Since the physical mechanisms of these ideal...

  5. Shape Memory Alloy Adaptive Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will demonstrate and scale up an innovative manufacturing process that yields aerospace grade shape memory alloy (SMA) solids and periodic...

  6. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibler, Lisa Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Characterization and Performance

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  7. Viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaev, Dmitriy; Boretsky, Evgeny; Verkhorubov, Dmitriy

    2018-03-01

    The measurement of dynamic viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys has been performed using low-frequency vibrational viscometer at five temperatures in the range 313-353 K and four gallium-based dilute alloy compositions containing 0-1.15 at.% Li. It was found that the viscosity of the considered alloys increases with decreasing temperature and increasing lithium concentration in the above ranges. It was shown that dependence of the viscosity of Ga-Li alloys in the investigated temperature range has been described by Arrhenius equation. For this equation the activation energy of viscous flow and pre-exponential factor were calculated. This study helped to determine the conditions of the alkali metals separating process in gallam-exchange systems.

  8. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  9. Thermodynamic properties of indium-antimony alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, Ya.I.; Goryacheva, V.I.; Gejderikh, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Method of electromotive forces is used to obtain thermodynamic parameters of reaction of In x Sb (1-x) phase formation from liquid indium and solid indium mono-antimonide. For alloy compositions with x=0.75-0.55 liquidus coordinates on phase diagram are determined. Nonmonotonous dependence of partial entropy and enthalpy of indium on composition of liquid alloys, that is connected with ordering, is detected. 20 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Anomalous lattice parameter of magnetic semiconductor alloys

    OpenAIRE

    CAETANO, Clovis; MARQUES, Marcelo; FERREIRA, Luiz G.; TELES, Lara K.

    2009-01-01

    The addition of transition metals (TM) to III-V semiconductors radically changes their electronic, magnetic and structural properties. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor alloys, the lattice parameter in magnetic semiconductor alloys, including the ones with diluted concentration (the diluted magnetic semiconductors - DMS), cannot be determined uniquely from the composition. By using first-principles calculations, we find a direct correlation between the magnetic moment and the anio...

  11. Composition profile determination in isomorphous binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.Y.; Bandeira, I.N.

    1983-07-01

    The inhomogeneity along the growth axis of the pseudo-binary alloys is due to the segregation of the solute which will be mixed in the melt due to convective and diffusive flows. A process for determination of the exact composition profile by measurements of the crystal density, for alloys of the type A sub(1-x) B sub(x), is shown. (Author) [pt

  12. Rapidly solidified long-range-ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Koch, C.C.; Liu, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of rapid solidification processing on the microstructure of long-range-ordered alloys in the (Fe, Co, Ni) 3 V system has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. The main microstructural feature of the as-quenched alloys was a fine cell structure (approx. 300 nm diameter) decorated with carbide particles. This structure was maintained aftr annealing treatments which develop the ordered crystal structure. Other features of the microstructures both before and after annealing are presented and discussed. 6 figures

  13. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    equilibrium H content for unstressed exposure of the superalloy in a given H2 pressure ( PH2 ) and temperature (T) environment, coupled with enhancement...CRACKING OF HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Richard P. Ganqloff August, 2003 Page 72 of 194 decreasing pH , H2S addition, temperature , and other chemical variables...mechanism for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and sulfide stress cracking for alloys in aqueous H2S -bearing electrolytes. Electrochemical reactions leading

  14. Phonon broadening in high entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmann, Fritz; Ikeda, Yuji; Grabowski, Blazej; Sluiter, Marcel H. F.

    2017-09-01

    Refractory high entropy alloys feature outstanding properties making them a promising materials class for next-generation high-temperature applications. At high temperatures, materials properties are strongly affected by lattice vibrations (phonons). Phonons critically influence thermal stability, thermodynamic and elastic properties, as well as thermal conductivity. In contrast to perfect crystals and ordered alloys, the inherently present mass and force constant fluctuations in multi-component random alloys (high entropy alloys) can induce significant phonon scattering and broadening. Despite their importance, phonon scattering and broadening have so far only scarcely been investigated for high entropy alloys. We tackle this challenge from a theoretical perspective and employ ab initio calculations to systematically study the impact of force constant and mass fluctuations on the phonon spectral functions of 12 body-centered cubic random alloys, from binaries up to 5-component high entropy alloys, addressing the key question of how chemical complexity impacts phonons. We find that it is crucial to include both mass and force constant fluctuations. If one or the other is neglected, qualitatively wrong results can be obtained such as artificial phonon band gaps. We analyze how the results obtained for the phonons translate into thermodynamically integrated quantities, specifically the vibrational entropy. Changes in the vibrational entropy with increasing the number of elements can be as large as changes in the configurational entropy and are thus important for phase stability considerations. The set of studied alloys includes MoTa, MoTaNb, MoTaNbW, MoTaNbWV, VW, VWNb, VWTa, VWNbTa, VTaNbTi, VWNbTaTi, HfZrNb, HfMoTaTiZr.

  15. Thermomechanical macroscopic model of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.E.; Sakharov, V.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenological macroscopic model of the mechanical behaviour of the titanium nickelide-type shape memory alloys is proposed. The model contains as a parameter the average phase shear deformation accompanying the martensite formation. It makes i possible to describe correctly a number of functional properties of the shape memory alloys, in particular, the pseudoelasticity ferroplasticity, plasticity transformation and shape memory effects in the stressed and unstressed samples [ru

  16. Properties isotropy of magnesium alloy strip workpieces

    OpenAIRE

    Р. Кавалла; В. Ю. Бажин

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the issue of obtaining high quality cast workpieces of magnesium alloys produced by strip roll-casting. Producing strips of magnesium alloys by combining the processes of casting and rolling when liquid melt is fed continuously to fast rolls is quite promising and economic. In the process of sheet stamping considerable losses of metal occur on festoons formed due to anisotropy of properties of foil workpiece, as defined by the macro- and microstructure and modes of rolling...

  17. Manufacturing development of low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.P.; Johnson, W.R.; Baxi, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    General Atomics is developing manufacturing methods for vanadium alloys as part of a program to encourage the development of low activation alloys for fusion use. The culmination of the program is the fabrication and installation of a vanadium alloy structure in the DIII-D tokamak as part of the Radiative Divertor modification. Water-cooled vanadium alloy components will comprise a portion of the new upper divertor structure. The first step, procuring the material for this program has been completed. The largest heat of vanadium alloy made to date, 1200 kg of V-4Cr-4Ti, has been produced and is being converted into various product forms. Results of many tests on the material during the manufacturing process are reported. Research into potential fabrication methods has been and continues to be performed along with the assessment of manufacturing processes particularly in the area of joining. Joining of vanadium alloys has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for their use in the Radiative Divertor Program. Joining processes under evaluation include resistance seam, electrodischarge (stud), friction and electron beam welding. Results of welding tests are reported. Metallography and mechanical tests are used to evaluate the weld samples. The need for a protective atmosphere during different welding processes is also being determined. General Atomics has also designed, manufactured, and will be testing a helium-cooled, high heat flux component to assess the use of helium cooled vanadium alloy components for advanced tokamak systems. The component is made from vanadium alloy tubing, machined to enhance the heat transfer characteristics, and joined to end flanges to allow connection to the helium supply. Results are reported

  18. Microscopic Analysis of Welded Dental Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    S. Porojan; L. Sandu; F. Topalâ

    2011-01-01

    Microplasma welding is a less expensive alternative to laser welding in dental technology. The aim of the study was to highlight discontinuities present in the microplasma welded joints of dental base metal alloys by visual analysis. Five base metal alloys designated for fixed prostheses manufacture were selected for the experiments. Using these plates, preliminary tests were conducted by microplasma welding in butt joint configuration, without filler material, bilaterall...

  19. Progress in Preparation and Research of High Entropy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yong-xing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The current high entropy alloys' studies are most in block, powder, coating, film and other areas. There are few studies of high entropy alloys in other areas and they are lack of unified classification. According to the current high entropy alloys' research situation, The paper has focused on the classification on all kinds of high entropy alloys having been researched, introduced the selecting principle of elements, summarized the preparation methods, reviewed the research institutions, research methods and research contents of high entropy alloys, prospected the application prospect of high entropy alloys, put forward a series of scientific problems of high entropy alloys, including less research on mechanism, incomplete performance research, unsystematic thermal stability study, preparation process parameters to be optimized, lightweight high entropy alloys' design, the expansion on the research field, etc, and the solutions have been given. Those have certain guiding significance for the expansion of the application of high entropy alloys subjects in the future research direction.

  20. Strength and microstructure of gallium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B H; Woldu, M; Nakajima, H; Okabe, T

    1999-03-01

    This study investigated the physical and mechanical properties and the microstructure of four different gallium alloys. For all gallium alloys, the compressive strengths measured at one hour (86-223 MPa) and 24 hours (265-286 MPa) after specimen preparation were found to be well within the range exhibited by many high-copper amalgams. The creep values and dimensional change of the gallium alloys were comparable to those of leading amalgams, except for the dimensional change value of one alloy. The set gallium alloys consisted of a multi-phase structure including beta-Sn, CuGa2, In4Ag9, Ag72Ga28, and Ga5Pd (except for one product that did not contain Pd) that was more complicated than the structure of dental amalgams. Although the gallium alloys had physical and mechanical properties comparable to those of high-copper amalgams, the microstructure, coupled with the instability of the element gallium itself, could make these materials more prone to corrosive attack compared to amalgams.

  1. Nanoprecipitation in a beta-titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, James, E-mail: j.coakley06@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, England (United Kingdom); Vorontsov, Vassili A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, England (United Kingdom); Littrell, Kenneth C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heenan, Richard K. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX, England (United Kingdom); Ohnuma, Masato [Laboratory of Quantum Beam System Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0808 (Japan); Jones, Nicholas G. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, England (United Kingdom); Dye, David [Department of Materials, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, England (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • In-situ SANS has been applied to study precipitation in β -Ti alloy. • Rate of precipitation is far more rapid in the cold-rolled alloy than non cold-rolled. • The rapid precipitation dramatically improves the alloy hardness. • Extensive ω phase is present after 400 °C/16 h heat-treatment. • SANS modelling and TEM-EDX shows the precipitates are Ti rich. - Abstract: This paper represents the first application of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to the study of precipitate nucleation and growth in β-Ti alloys in an attempt to observe both the precipitation process in-situ and to quantify the evolving microstructure that affects mechanical behaviour. TEM suggests that athermal ω can be induced by cold-rolling Gum metal, a β-Ti alloy. During thermal exposure at 400°C, isothermal ω particles precipitate at a greater rate in cold-rolled material than in the recovered, hot deformed state. SANS modelling is consistent with disc shaped nanoparticles, with length and radius under 6nm after thermal exposures up to 16h. Modelling suggests that the nanoprecipitate volume fraction and extent of Nb partitioning to the β matrix is greater in the cold-rolled material than the extruded. The results show that nucleation and growth of the nanoprecipitates impart strengthening to the alloy.

  2. Nickel-base alloys for severe environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.K.; Flower, H.L. [Inco Alloys International Inc., Huntington, WV (United States); Hack, G.A.J. [Inco Alloys Ltd., Hereford (United Kingdom); Isobe, S. [Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Inconel alloys MA754 and MA758 are nickel-base, oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloys made by mechanical alloying. The simple nickel-chromium matrix, when combined with the strengthening effect of the yttrium oxide dispersoid during mechanical alloys, provides excellent creep properties, resistance to thermal fatigue, and surface stability suitable for operation without protective coatings. Gas turbine engine components are primary applications for alloy MA754, but this aerospace alloy has been applied in many other products that operate in severe conditions, and alloy MA758 was developed specifically for aggressive, elevated temperature industrial environments. Billets for large bar and plate are typically consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), because this technology allows production of forms suitable for a variety of industrial components. Material consolidated by HIP and conventionally worked by extrusion and hot rolling generally exhibits properties that are more isotropic than those of material consolidated by extrusion. However, the degree of anisotropy depends strongly on the specific processing of the consolidated billet. This article describes production of new mill shapes from HIP billets, and reviews current and potential applications such as skid rails for high-temperature walking-beam furnaces, heat treating furnace parts, equipment for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes.

  3. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  4. Fabrication of Ti-Cu-Ni-Al amorphous alloys by mechanical alloying and mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Ti-based amorphous alloys are produced by the mechanical alloying and by the mechanical milling. → The amorphization by the mechanical alloying is slower than that by the mechanical milling. → Activation energy and temperature of crystallization of both alloys are different. - Abstract: Ti-based amorphous alloy powders were synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of pure elements and the mechanical milling (MM) of intermetallic compounds. The amorphous alloy powders were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the vein morphology of these alloy powders shows deformation during the milling. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectral maps confirm that each constituent is uniformly dispersed, including Fe and Cr. The XRD and DSC results showed that the milling time required for amorphization for the MA of pure elements was longer than that of the MM for intermetallic compounds. The activation energy and crystallization temperature of the MA powder are different from those of the MM powder.

  5. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Effect of alloy elements on corrosion of low alloy steel was studied under simulated offshore condi- tions. The results showed that the elements Cu, P, Mo, W, V had evident effect on corrosion resistance in the atmosphere zone; Cu, P, V, Mo in the splash zone and Cr, Al, Mo in the submerged zone. Keywords.

  6. Corrosion and wear protective composition modulated alloy coatings based on ternary Ni-P-X alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, P.; Benzon, M. E.; Christoffersen, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    Scattered reporting in the litterature describes a number of ternary Ni-P-X alloyes (where X can be Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pd, Re or W) with promising corrosin and wear protective performance. Based on a systematic study of Ni-P-X alloys it is the intention to produce coatings with improved corrosion...

  7. First principles analysis of hydrogen chemisorption on Pd-Re alloyed overlayers and alloyed surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallassana, Venkataraman; Neurock, Matthew; Hansen, Lars Bruno

    2000-01-01

    Gradient corrected periodic density functional theory (DFT-GGA) slab calculations were used to examine the chemisorption of atomic hydrogen on various Pd-Re alloyed overlayers and uniformly alloyed surfaces. Adsorption was examined at 33% surface coverage, where atomic hydrogen preferred the thre...

  8. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...... additive. This method makes it possible to deposit nickel, cobalt, nickel or cobalt platings without internal stresses....

  9. Improvement of magnetocaloric properties of Gd-Ge-Si alloys by alloying with iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erenc-Sędziak T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of annealing of Gd5Ge2Si2Fex alloys at 1200°C and of alloying with various amount of iron on structure as well as thermal and magnetocaloric properties is investigated. It was found that annealing for 1 to 10 hours improves the entropy change, but reduces the temperature of maximum magnetocaloric effect by up to 50 K. Prolonged annealing of the Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy results in the decrease of entropy change due to the reduction of Gd5Ge2Si2 phase content. Addition of iron to the ternary alloy enhances the magnetocaloric effect, if x = 0.4 – 0.6, especially if alloying is combined with annealing at 1200°C: the peak value of the isothermal entropy change from 0 to 2 T increases from 3.5 to 11 J/kgK. Simultaneously, the temperature of maximum magnetocaloric effect drops to 250 K. The changes in magnetocaloric properties are related to the change in phase transformation from the second order for arc molten ternary alloy to first order in the case of annealed and/or alloyed with iron. The results of this study indicate that the minor addition of iron and heat treatment to Gd-Ge-Si alloys may be useful in improving the materials’ magnetocaloric properties..

  10. Effect of alloying addition and microstructural parameters on mechanical properties of 93% tungsten heavy alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi Kiran, U., E-mail: uravikiran@gmail.com [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Panchal, A.; Sankaranarayana, M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nageswara Rao, G.V.S. [National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506004 (India); Nandy, T.K. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India)

    2015-07-29

    Liquid phase sintering, heat treatment and swaging studies on three tungsten heavy alloys, 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe (wt%), 93W–4.2Ni–1.2Fe–1.6Co (wt%) and 93W–4.9Ni–1.9Fe–0.2Re (wt%) were carried out in detail with respect to microstructure, tensile and impact properties. All the alloys were sintered and swaged to 40% deformation. The results indicate that Re addition reduces the grain size of the alloy compared to W–Ni–Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co alloys. W–Ni–Fe–Re alloy shows superior tensile properties in heat treated condition as compared to W–Ni–Fe and W–Ni–Fe–Co alloys. SEM study of fractured specimens clearly indicates that the failure in case of W–Ni–Fe–Re was due to transgranular cleavage of tungsten grains and W–W de-cohesion. W–Ni–Fe and W–Ni–Fe–Co alloys also failed by mixed mode failure. However, in these cases, ductile dimples corresponding the failure of the matrix phase was rarely seen. Thermo-mechanical processing resulted in significant changes in mechanical properties. While W–Ni–Fe–Re alloy showed the highest tensile strength (1380 MPa), W–Ni–Fe–Co exhibited the highest elongation (12%) to failure. A detailed analysis involving microstructure, mechanical properties and failure behavior was undertaken in order to understand the property trends.

  11. Study on microstructure and properties of Mg-alloy surface alloying layer fabricated by EPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AZ91D surface alloying was investigated through evaporative pattern casting (EPC technology. Aluminum powder (0.074 to 0.104 mm was used as the alloying element in the experiment. An alloying coating with excellent properties was fabricated, which mainly consisted of adhesive, co-solvent, suspending agent and other ingredients according to desired proportion. Mg-alloy melt was poured under certain temperature and the degree of negative pressure. The microstructure of the surface layer was examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. It has been found that a large volume fraction of network new phases were formed on the Mg-alloy surface, the thickness of the alloying surface layer increased with the alloying coating increasing from 0.3 mm to 0.5 mm, and the microstructure became compact. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the new phases. It showed that the new phases mainly consist of β-Mg17Al12, in addition to a small quantity of inter-metallic compounds and oxides. A micro-hardness test and a corrosion experiment to simulate the effect of sea water were performed. The result indicated that the highest micro-hardness of the surface reaches three times that of the matrix. The corrosion rate of alloying samples declines to about a fifth of that of the as-cast AZ91D specimen.

  12. The Influence of Novel Alloying Additions on the Performance of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    properties were determined using dog- bone specimens with a 4-mm diameter and 16-mm gage length cut from the longitudinal section of the extruded bars...content of the major alloying elements (Al, Zn, [ manganese ] Mn) of the alloys was in reasonably good agreement with the standard composition. The

  13. Hot workability of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwembela, Aaron Absalom

    For the alloy AZ91 (Mg-9.OAl-0.7Zn-0.13Mn) die cast specimens were subjected to torsion testing at 150, 180, 240, 300, 420 and 450°C at 0.05 0.5 and 5.0 s--1 The as-cast specimens exhibited hot shortness at 360°C and above; however in that domain, after prior thermomechanical processing (TMP) at 300°C, they showed much improved properties (which were reported along with as-cast properties at 300°C and below). For AZ31-Mn (Mg-3.2Al-1-1Zn-0.34Mn), AZ31 (Mg-2-8Al-0-88Zn-0.01Mn), AZ63 (Mg-5-5Al-2.7Zn-0.34Mn) and ZK60 (Mg-5.7Zn-0.65Zr-O-O1A]), the specimens were subjected to hot torsion testing in the range 180 to 450°C and 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 s--1. In the temperature range below 300°C flow curves rise to a peak with failure occurring immediately thereafter. Above 300°C the flow curves exhibited a peak and a gradual decline towards steady state. The temperature and strain rate dependence of the strength is described by a sinh-Arrhenius equation with QHW between 125 and 144 kJ/mol; this indicates control by climb in comparison with creep in the range 200--400°C. The alloy strength and activation energy declined in the order AZ63, AZ31-Mn AZ91, AZ31 and ZK60, while ductility increased with decreasing strength. In working of Mg alloys from 150 to 450°C, the flow curves harden to a peak and work soften to a steady state regime above 300°C. At temperatures below 300°C, twinning is observed initially to bring grains into more suitable slip orientations. At high T a substructure develops due to basal and prismatic slip, Forming cells of augmented misorientation first near the grain boundaries and later towards the grain cores. Near the peak, new grains appear along the old boundaries (mantle) as a result of dynamic recrystallization DRX but not in the core of the initial grains. As T rises, the new grains are larger and the mantle broader, enhanced DRX results in higher ductility. At intermediate T, shear bands form through alignment of mantle zones resulting in

  14. Analysis of heavy alloying elements segregation in gravity cast experimental Mg-Al-Zn-RE alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Żydek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure of experimental AZ91 alloy with an addition of rare earth elements (RE at a level of 4 wt.% was examined by means of light microscopy. The investigated AZ91 + 4 wt.% RE alloy was fabricated by adding cerium rich mish metal to molten commercial AZ91 alloy. In the microstructure of the resulting alloy, besides α solid solution, α + γ eutectic and discontinuous precipitates of γ phase, also the Al11RE3 phase with needle-like morphology and the polygonal Al10RE2Mn7 phase were revealed. No segregation of rare earth elements was found in the investigated gravity cast alloy, which was confirmed by statistical analysis of cerium concentrations in selected parts of the cast. Similar results were obtained for manganese. Ce and Mn concentrations were determined by a spectrophotometric method.

  15. On improving the fracture toughness of a NiAl-based alloy by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubanic, J.; Koss, D. A.; Locci, I. E.; Nathal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) has been used to process the NiAl-based alloy Ni-35Al-20Fe, such that a fine-grain (about 2 microns) microstructure is obtained through the addition of 2 vol pct Y2O3 particles. When compared to a conventionally processed, coarse-grained (about 28 microns) Ni-35-20 alloy without the Y2O3 particles, the MA alloy exhibits two to three times higher fracture toughness values, despite a 50-percent increase in yield strength. Room-temperature K(O) values as high as 34 MPa sq rt m are observed, accompanied by a yield strength in excess of 1100 MPa. Fractography confirms a change in fracture characteristics of the fine-grained MA alloy.

  16. Method for producing La/Ce/MM/Y base alloys, resulting alloys and battery electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    2016-12-20

    A carbothermic reduction method is provided for reducing a La-, Ce-, MM-, and/or Y-containing oxide in the presence of carbon and a source of a reactant element comprising Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, As, Sb, Bi, and/or P to form an intermediate alloy material including a majority of La, Ce, MM, and/or Y and a minor amount of the reactant element. The intermediate material is useful as a master alloy for in making negative electrode materials for a metal hydride battery, as hydrogen storage alloys, as master alloy additive for addition to a melt of commercial Mg and Al alloys, steels, cast irons, and superalloys; or in reducing Sm.sub.2O.sub.3 to Sm metal for use in Sm--Co permanent magnets.

  17. Corrosion resistant Ti alloy for sulphuric acid medium: Suitability of Ti-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balusamy, T.; Jamesh, M.; Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T.S.N. Sankara [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Madras Centre, CSIR Complex, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2012-09-15

    The corrosion resistance of Ti-Mo (5, 10, 15 and 25 wt% molybdenum) alloys in 5-25% sulphuric acid was evaluated. The Ti-Mo alloys offered a better corrosion resistance than commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The higher impedance values, higher phase angle maximum, ability to reach the phase angle maximum at relatively lower frequencies, ability to exhibit a constant phase angle maximum over a wider range of frequencies, higher phase angle values at 0.01 Hz, have confirmed the formation of a stable passive oxide film on Ti-Mo alloys. The study recommends the use of Ti-Mo alloys, particularly Ti-25Mo alloy, as a suitable material of construction for sulphuric acid medium. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  19. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  20. Dispersion strengthening of precipitation hardened Al-Cu-Mg alloys prepared by rapid solidification and mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, P. S.; Sankaran, K. K.

    1988-01-01

    Several Al-4Cu-1Mg-1.5Fe-0.75Ce alloys have been processed from either rapidly solidified or mechanically alloyed powder using various vacuum degassing parameters and consolidation techniques. Strengthening by the fine subgrains, grains, and the dispersoids individually or in combination is more effective when the alloys contain shearable precipitates; consequently, the strength of the alloys is higher in the naturally aged rather than the artificially aged condition. The strengths of the mechanically alloyed variants are greater than those produced from prealloyed powder. Properties and microstructural features of these dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in regards to their processing histories.

  1. Influence of alloying elements and density on aqueous corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandavel, T.K.; Chandramouli, R.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of low alloy P/M steels under HCl acid pickling environment has been studied. ► Influence of density, strain and alloying elements on the rate of corrosion of the steels has been investigated. ► Residual porosity has significant effect on acid corrosion. ► Addition of the alloying elements Cu, Mo and Ti reduces the corrosion rate significantly. ► Carbide forming elements Mo and Ti improve further the resistance of the steels to aqueous corrosion. -- Abstract: Low alloy steels produced through powder metallurgy route of sintering followed by forging are promising candidate materials for high strength small components. Porosity in such steels poses a real challenge during acid pickling treatment, which is one of the processing steps during manufacturing. The present research work attempts to investigate the mechanism underlying the acid corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels under induced acid pickling conditions. Sintered-forged low alloy steel samples containing molybdenum (Mo), copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) were subjected to aqueous corrosion attack by immersing the samples in 18% HCl (Hydrochloric acid) solution for 25 h. Sample weight loss and Fe (Iron) loss were estimated for the corroded samples. The morphology of the corroded surfaces was studied through metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Higher porosity alloys underwent enhanced corrosion rates. Both corrosion rate and iron loss are found to decrease linearly with reduction in porosity in all cases of the alloys. The alloying elements Mo, Ti and Cu, when added in combination, have played a complementary role in the reduction of corrosion rate by almost one order of magnitude compared to unalloyed steel. Presence of carbides of the carbide forming elements Mo and Ti played a positive role on the corrosion behaviour of the low alloy steels.

  2. The influence of alloy composition on residual stresses in heat treated aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); Redington, W. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The as quenched properties of eight different heat treatable aluminium alloys are related to residual stress magnitudes with the objective being to establish if there is a relationship between the residual stress and the as quenched alloy hardness and strength. Near surface residual stresses were assessed with X-ray diffraction using both the established sin{sup 2}ψ method and the more recent cos α technique. Through thickness residual stresses were also characterised using neutron diffraction. The alloys were chosen to encompass a wide range of strengths. The low to medium strength alloys were 6060 and 6082, medium to high strength 2618A, 2014A, 7075, 7010 and two variants of 7449, while the very high strength alloy was the powder metallurgy alloy N707. To assess the as quenched strength, dynamic hardness and tensile properties were determined from samples tested immediately after quenching to minimise the influence of precipitation hardening by natural aging. In addition, hot hardness measurements were made in situ on samples cooled to simulate quench paths. Within the experimental constraints of the investigation, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness was found to follow the same pattern for all the alloys investigated, varying from tensile in the interior to surface compression. The influence of alloy strength was manifested as a change in the observed residual stress magnitudes, and surface residual stresses were found to vary linearly with as quenched hardness and strength. - Highlights: • As quenched aluminium alloys contain high magnitude residual stresses. • Surface is compressive balance by a tensile core. • As quenched surface residual stress is linear function of alloy strength. • In situ hot hardness demonstrates rapid change in intrinsic hardness during rapid cooling.

  3. In vitro mechanical integrity of hydroxyapatite coated magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, M Bobby; Orr, Lynnley

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical integrity of resorbable implants during service, especially in load bearing orthopaedic applications, is critical. The high degradation rate of resorbable magnesium and magnesium-based implants in body fluid may potentially cause premature in-service failure. In this study, a magnesium alloy (AZ91) was potentiostatically coated with hydroxyapatite at different cathodic voltages in an attempt to enhance the mechanical integrity. The mechanical integrity of the uncoated and hydroxyapatite coated alloys was evaluated after in vitro testing of the coated samples in simulated body fluid (SBF). The uncoated alloy showed 40% loss in the mechanical strength after five days exposure to SBF. However, the hydroxyapatite coated alloy exposed to SBF showed 20% improvement in the mechanical strength as compared to that of the uncoated alloy. The alloy coated potentiostatically at -2 V performed better than the -3 V coated alloy. The cross-sectional analysis of the coatings revealed relatively uniform coating thickness for the -2 V coated alloy, whereas the -3 V coated alloy exhibited areas of uneven coating. This can be attributed to the increase in hydrogen evolution on the alloy during -3 V coating as compared to -2 V coating. The scanning electron micrographs of the in vitro tested alloy revealed that hydroxyapatite coating significantly reduced the localized corrosion of the alloy, which is critical for better in-service mechanical integrity. Thus, the study suggests that the in vitro mechanical integrity of resorbable magnesium-based alloy can be improved by potentiostatic hydroxyapatite coating. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  4. Machinability evaluation of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-03-01

    In the present study, the machinability of titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6A1-7Nb, and free-cutting brass was evaluated using a milling machine. The metals were slotted with square end mills under four cutting conditions. The cutting force and the rotational speed of the spindle were measured. The cutting forces for Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb were higher and that for brass was lower than that for titanium. The rotational speed of the spindle was barely affected by cutting. The cross sections of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb chips were more clearly serrated than those of titanium, which is an indication of difficult-to-cut metals. There was no marked difference in the surface roughness of the cut surfaces among the metals. Cutting force and the appearance of the metal chips were found to be useful as indices of machinability and will aid in the development of new alloys for dental CAD/CAM and the selection of suitable machining conditions.

  5. Surface treatments for aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelean, M.; Lascău, S.; Ardelean, E.; Josan, A.

    2018-01-01

    Typically, in contact with the atmosphere, the aluminium surface is covered with an aluminium oxide layer, with a thickness of less than 1-2μm. Due to its low thickness, high porosity and low mechanical strength, this layer does not protect the metal from corrosion. Anodizing for protective and decorative purposes is the most common method of superficial oxidation processes and is carried out through anodic oxidation. The oxide films, resulted from anodizing, are porous, have a thickness of 20-50μm, and are heat-resistant, stable to water vapour and other corrosion agents. Hard anodizing complies with the same obtains principles as well as decorative and protective anodization. The difference is in that hard anodizing is achieved at low temperatures and high intensity of electric current. In the paper are presented the results of decorative and hard anodization for specimens made from several aluminium alloys in terms of the appearance of the specimens and of the thickness of the anodized.

  6. Development the Mechanical Properties of (AL-Li-Cu Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Kadhom AlNaimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop mechanical properties of a new aluminium-lithium-copper alloy. This alloy prepared under control atmosphere by casting in a permanent metal mould. The microstructure was examined and mechanical properties were tested before and after heat treatment to study the influence of heat treatment on its mechanical properties including; modulus of elasticity, tensile strength, impact, and fatigue. The results showed that the modulus of elasticity of the prepared alloy is higher than standard alloy about 2%. While the alloy that heat treated for 6 h and cooled in water, then showed a higher ultimate tensile stress comparing with as-cast alloy. The homogenous heat treatment gives best fatigue behaviour comparing with as-cast and other heat treatment alloys. Also, the impact test illustrates that the homogeneous heat treatment alloy gives the highest value.

  7. Impact and modal analysis for different alloy wheel compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shwetabh; Abhimanyu Abrol, J.; Ravi, K.

    2017-11-01

    Wheels are an important component in the vehicle. The strength of the Alloy wheel rim is an important property of the Alloy wheel, which plays an important part in determining the overall performance of the vehicle, the structural integrity of the rim and the life of the Alloy wheel rim. With the advent of new Alloy wheel materials, new options are available to replace the conventional Aluminium Alloy wheels with new ones. The new Alloy wheel rim material and design need to be tested virtually for optimizing the appropriate design and material and the optimised wheel in virtual mode can be tested experimentally for the performance in real-time conditions before they can be used in the vehicles. The work in this project includes doing the impact and modal analysis for different alloy wheel compositions. From the results obtained, the optimum alloy wheel is suggested, which can be considered with further experimental validation.

  8. The Origin of the Name "Onion's Fusible Alloy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the history of fusible alloys, including Newton's metal, D'Arcet's metal, Rose's metal, Onion's fusible alloy, and Wood's metal. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  9. PDTI metal alloy as a hydrogen or hydrocarbon sensitive metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A hydrogen sensitive metal alloy contains palladium and titanium to provide a larger change in electrical resistance when exposed to the presence of hydrogen. The alloy can be used for improved hydrogen detection.

  10. Metallurgical characterization of experimental Ag-based soldering alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Ntasi

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: The experimental alloys tested demonstrated similar microstructures and melting ranges. Ga and Sn might be used as alternative to Cu and Zn to modify the selected properties of Ag based soldering alloys.

  11. Enhanced Performance Near Net Shape Titanium Alloys by Thermohydrogen Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Froes, F

    2001-01-01

    ...), powder metallurgy and cast titanium alloys. Fundamental results have been obtained which can now be used to develop optimum THP steps to refine the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of titanium alloys...

  12. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  13. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  14. Ion-induced surface modification of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1983-11-01

    In addition to the accumulation of the implanted species, a considerable number of processes can affect the composition of an alloy in the surface region during ion bombardment. Collisions of energetic ions with atoms of the alloy induce local rearrangement of atoms by displacements, replacement sequences and by spontaneous migration and recombination of defects within cascades. Point defects form clusters, voids, dislocation loops and networks. Preferential sputtering of elements changes the composition of the surface. At temperatures sufficient for thermal migration of point defects, radiation-enhanced diffusion promotes alloy component redistribution within and beyond the damage layer. Fluxes of interstitials and vacancies toward the surface and into the interior of the target induce fluxes of alloying elements leading to depth-dependent compositional changes. Moreover, Gibbsian surface segregation may affect the preferential loss of alloy components by sputtering when the kinetics of equilibration of the surface composition becomes competitive with the sputtering rate. Temperature, time, current density and ion energy can be used to influence the individual processes contributing to compositional changes and, thus, produce a rich variety of composition profiles near surfaces. 42 references

  15. The manufacture of superplastic magnesium alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, R.; Jackson, M.; Moorhouse, B.; Dashwood, R. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    Probably because of their propensity to dynamically recrystallise, superplastic behaviour can be obtained from magnesium alloys considerably more easily than from comparable aluminium alloys. In some cases even as cast magnesium alloys can exhibit reasonable superplasticity and there appears no need for the special alloying additions or complex thermal mechanical treatments required by aluminium alloys such as AA2004 or AA7475. The paper describes the superplastic behaviour (in uniaxial tension) and microstructure of sheet processed from strip cast AZ31 and AZ91. The material was tested in the as-cast condition and after warm rolling to a number of gauges. Industrially useful superplastic capability was demonstrated in strip cast AZ31 and AZ91 in the as cast condition. Furthermore good superplastic capability was also demonstrated in sheet rolled from the cast metal and the ductilities obtained were not significantly influenced by rolling strain. Twin roll strip casting represents a feasible and simple route for the production of superplastic material either for use in the as cast condition or after rolling to the required gauge. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Phase stability of transition metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, R.S.; Schiferl, D.; Wills, J.M.; Hill, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project was focused on resolving unexplained differences in calculated and measured phase transition pressures in transition metals. Part of the approach was to do new, higher accuracy calculations of transmission pressures for group 4B and group 6B metals. Theory indicates that the transition pressures for these baseline metals should change if alloyed with a d-electron donor metal, and calculations done using the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) indicate that this is true. Alloy systems were calculated for Ti, Zr and Hf based alloys with various solute concentrations. The second part of the program was to do new Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) measurements to experimentally verify calculational results. Alloys were prepared for these systems with grain size suitable for Diamond Anvil Cell experiments. Experiments were done on pure Ti as well as Ti-V and Ti-Ta alloys. Measuring unambiguous transition pressures for these systems proved difficult, but a new technique developed yielded good results

  17. Corrosion resistance of tantalum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Brabers, M.; Deruyttre, A.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of substitutional Ta-Mo, Ta-W, Ta-Nb, Ta-Hf, Ta-Zr, Ta-Re, Ta-Ni, Ta-V, Ta-W-Mo, Ta-W-Nb, Ta-W-Hf and Ta-W-Re alloys has been investigated in various corrosive media, i.e. (1) concentrated sulfuric acid at 250 0 C and 200 0 C, (2) boiling hydrochloric acid of azeotropic composition, (3) concentrated hydrochloric acid at 150 0 C under pressure, (4) HF-Containing solutions and (5) 0.5% H 2 SO 4 at room temperature (anodisation). In highly corrosive media such as concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C and concentrated HCl at 150 0 C tantalum is hydrogen embrittled, probably by stress induced precipitation of β-hydride. Both corrosion rate and hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C are strongly influenced by alloying elements. Small alloying additions of either Mo or Re decrease the corrosion rate and the hydrogen embrittlement, while Hf has the opposite effect. Hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C is completely eliminated by alloying Ta with 1 to 3 at % Mo (0.5 to 1.5 wt % Mo). These results can be explained in terms of oxygen deficiency of the Ta 2 O 5 film and the electronic structure of these alloys. (orig.) [de

  18. Precision forging technology for aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Xia, Juchen

    2018-03-01

    Aluminum alloy is a preferred metal material for lightweight part manufacturing in aerospace, automobile, and weapon industries due to its good physical properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good corrosion resistance. However, during forging processes, underfilling, folding, broken streamline, crack, coarse grain, and other macro- or microdefects are easily generated because of the deformation characteristics of aluminum alloys, including narrow forgeable temperature region, fast heat dissipation to dies, strong adhesion, high strain rate sensitivity, and large flow resistance. Thus, it is seriously restricted for the forged part to obtain precision shape and enhanced property. In this paper, progresses in precision forging technologies of aluminum alloy parts were reviewed. Several advanced precision forging technologies have been developed, including closed die forging, isothermal die forging, local loading forging, metal flow forging with relief cavity, auxiliary force or vibration loading, casting-forging hybrid forming, and stamping-forging hybrid forming. High-precision aluminum alloy parts can be realized by controlling the forging processes and parameters or combining precision forging technologies with other forming technologies. The development of these technologies is beneficial to promote the application of aluminum alloys in manufacturing of lightweight parts.

  19. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  20. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in microstructure.

  1. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  2. Properties and applications of ion-implanted alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Ion implantation is a controlled and versatile means for near-surface alloying of metals. Supersaturated solutions, metastable compounds, amorphous phases, and equilibrium alloys have been produced. Uses include the investigation of new metastable phases, characterization of alloying reactions occurring in conventional materials, and improvement of surface properties such as hardness, wear, and corrosion. A brief review is given of the physical processes occurring during ion implantation, the types of alloys which result, and representative applications

  3. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  4. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  5. Relaxation resistance of heat resisting alloys with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzdyka, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Relaxation resistance of refractory nickel-chromium alloys containing 5 to 14 % cobalt is under study. The tests involve the use of circular samples at 800 deg to 850 deg C. It is shown that an alloy containing 14% cobalt possesses the best relaxation resistance exceeding that of nickel-chromium alloys without any cobalt by a factor of 1.5 to 2. The relaxation resistance of an alloy with 5% cobalt can be increased by hardening at repeated loading

  6. The physical metallurgy of mechanically-alloyed, dispersion-strengthened Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Powder processing of Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys by mechanical alloying (MA) is described, with a discussion of physical and mechanical properties of early experimental alloys of these compositions. The experimental samples were mechanically alloyed in a Szegvari attritor, extruded at 343 and 427 C, and some were solution-treated at 520 and 566 C and naturally, as well as artificially, aged at 170, 190, and 210 C for times of up to 1000 hours. All alloys exhibited maximum hardness after being aged at 170 C; lower hardness corresponds to the solution treatment at 566 C than to that at 520 C. A comparison with ingot metallurgy alloys of the same composition shows the MA material to be stronger and more ductile. It is also noted that properly aged MA alloys can develop a better combination of yield strength and notched toughness at lower alloying levels.

  7. Mechanical alloying and sitering of TI - 10WT.% MG powders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machio, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A Ti-10wt.%Mg powder alloy has been produced by mechanical alloying. Elemental powders of Ti and Mg were ball milled in a Zoz-Simoloyer CM01 for 16 and 20 hours under argon. Mechanical alloying was followed by XRD, SEM and particle size analysis...

  8. Advanced alloy design technique: High temperature cobalt base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Sandrock, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced alloy design technique was developed for treating alloys that will have extended life in service at high temperature and intermediate temperatures. Process stabilizes microstructure of the alloy by designing it so that compound identified with embrittlement is eliminated or minimized. Design process is being used to develop both nickel and cobalt-base superalloys.

  9. Fatigue Analysis of Magnesium Alloys Components for Car Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsavina, Liviu; Rusu, Lucian; Șerban, Dan Andrei; Negru, Radu Marcel; Cernescu, Anghel

    2017-12-01

    The use of magnesium alloys in the automotive industry increased in the last decade because of their low weight and relative good mechanical properties. However, the variable loading conditions require a good fatigue behavior. This paper summaries the fatigue properties of magnesium alloys and presents new fatigue curve results for die cast AM50 magnesium alloy.

  10. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Grain refinement plays a crucial role in improving characteristics and properties of cast and wrought aluminium alloys. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys to grain refine the solidified product. The mechanism of grain refinement is of considerable controversy in the scientific ...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  12. Sulfuric Acid Corrosion of Low Sb - Pb Battery Alloys | Ntukogu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion properties of low Sb - Pb alloys developed for maintenance free motive power industrial batteries was studied by a bare grid constant current method and compared to those of the conventional Pb- 6% Sb alloy. Low Sb-Pb alloys with Se and As grain refiners were found to have higher corrosion rates than the ...

  13. SULFURIC ACID CORROSION OF LOW Sb - Pb BATTERY ALLOYS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1983-09-01

    Sep 1, 1983 ... (Manuscript received February,1983). ABSTRACT. The corrosion properties of low Sb - Pb alloys developed for maintenance free motive power industrial batteries was studied by a bare grid constant current method and compared to those of the conventional. Pb- 6% Sb alloy. Low Sb-Pb alloys with Se and ...

  14. Corrosion wear fracture of new {beta} biomedical titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinomi, M.; Fukunaga, K.-I. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technol. (Japan). Dept. of Production Syst. Eng.; Kuroda, D.; Morinaga, M.; Kato, Y.; Yashiro, T.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-05-15

    Metallic materials such as stainless steel, Co-Cr alloy, pure titanium and titanium alloys have been used for surgical implant materials. The {alpha} + {beta} type titanium alloy such as Ti-6Al-4V ELI has been most widely used as an implant material for artificial hip joint and dental implant because of its high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Toxicity of alloying elements in conventional biomedical titanium alloys like Al and V, and the high modulus of elasticity of these alloy as compared to that of bone have been, however, pointed out [1,2]. New {beta} type titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr, Mo and Sn with lower moduli of elasticity, greater strength and greater corrosion resistance were, therefore, designed in this study. The friction wear properties of titanium alloys are, however, low as compared to those of other conventional metallic implant materials such as stainless steels and Co-Cr alloy. Tensile tests and friction wear tests in Ringer`s solution were conducted in order to investigate the mechanical properties of designed alloys. The friction wear characteristics of designed alloys and typical conventional biomedical titanium alloys were evaluated using a pin-on-disk type friction wear testing system and measuring the weight loss and width of groove of the specimen. (orig.) 8 refs.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver, that... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food...

  16. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  17. ZINTL IONS AS STRUCTURAL UNITS IN LIQUID ALLOYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLUGT, W

    1991-01-01

    Anion clustering according to a rule discovered by E. Zintl may occur in ionic alloys. The chemical bonds between the anions are predominantly covalent. The drastic consequences of this effect for the electronic and structural properties of liquid ionic alloys are demonstrated for alloys of alkali

  18. Friction factor of CP aluminium and aluminium–zinc alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    zinc alloys using ring compression test at different temperatures from 303 K to 773 K. It is found that CP aluminium exhibits stick- ing whereas Al–Zn alloys do not exhibit sticking at elevated temperatures. Hot working of Al–Zn alloy is easier.

  19. Development and application of titanium alloy casting technology in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Hai

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and research of casting titanium alloy and its casting technology, especially its application in aeronautical industry in China are presented. The technology of moulding, melting and casting of titanium alloy, casting quality control are introduced. The existing problem and development trend in titanium alloy casting technology are also discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  1. Nanostructured Platinum Alloys for Use as Catalyst Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor); Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A series of binary and ternary Pt-alloys, that promote the important reactions for catalysis at an alloy surface; oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and hydrogen and oxygen evolution. The first two of these reactions are essential when applying the alloy for use in a PEMFC.

  2. Structure of nanocomposites of Al–Fe alloys prepared by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    This difference in the product structure can be attributed to the difference in alloying mechanisms in MA and RSP. Keywords. Nanocomposites; Al–Fe; mechanical alloying; rapid solidification; quasicrystalline. 1. Introduction. Al–Fe alloys are attractive for applications at temperatures beyond those normally associated with ...

  3. Thin-film cryogenic resistors from aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, N. N.; Holdeman, L. B.

    The temperature dependence of the resistances of thin films sputtered from three commercially available aluminium alloys (5052, 5086, 5456) has been measured in the temperature range 1.5-4.2 K. The 5052-alloy films had a positive temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) throughout this temperature range, whereas films of the other two alloys had a negative TCR.

  4. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Grain refinement plays a crucial role in improving characteristics and properties of cast and wrought aluminium alloys. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys to grain refine the solidified product. The mechanism of grain refinement is of considerable controversy in the ...

  5. Electronic-Structure-Based Design of Ordered Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Andersson, M.P.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We describe some recent advances in the methodology of using electronic structure calculations for materials design. The methods have been developed for the design of ordered metallic alloys and metal alloy catalysts, but the considerations we present are relevant for the atomic-scale computational...... discovery of a promising catalytic metal alloy surface with high reactivity and low cost....

  6. Effects of alloying element and metallurgical structure on semiconducting characteristics of oxide film of zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Masahisa; Kanno, Masayosi; Maki, Hideo.

    1991-01-01

    Semiconducting characteristics of oxide films formed on pure Zr, Zr-Sn binary alloy and Zr-Sn-X (X: Fe, Ni or Cr) ternary alloys were evaluated by photo-electrochemical method, in order to make clear the effects of alloying elements on oxidation mechanism of Zr alloy in BWR environment. Oxide films of the alloys showed the characteristics of n-type semiconductor. Maximum photocurrent (I max) was generated by an illumination of monochromatic light with the energy of 5 ∼ 6 eV, i.e. the band gap energy of the Zr alloy oxide was 5 ∼ 6 eV. This value is lower by 2 ∼ 3 eV than the theoretical band gap energy (8 eV) of stoichiometric ZrO 2 . These facts suggest that the generation of I max was resulted from an excitation of electrons trapped with anion vacancies (oxygen vacancies) of non-stoichiometric ZrO 2-x . Therefore, the value of I max is considered to be proportional to the density of anion vacancy. High corrosion resistant alloys showed lower value of I max. The changes of I max, due to change of chemical composition of alloys and due to the change of metallurgical structure, was able to be explained by the valence theory of oxide semiconductor, i.e. the decrease of 1 max was considered to be resulted from the decrease of anion vacancies due to the substitution of divalent cations (Ni 2+ ) and trivalent cations (Fe 3+ , Cr 3+ ) at Zr 4+ cation sites. From these results, it was concluded that oxidation rate of Zr alloy depended on the density of oxygen vacancies in oxide film. (author)

  7. Mechanical evaluation of cerebral aneurysm clip scissoring phenomenon: comparison of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Keiji; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-13

    Cerebral aneurysm clip blades crossing during surgery is well known as scissoring. Scissoring might cause rupture of the aneurysm due to laceration of its neck. Although aneurysm clip scissoring is well known, there have been few reports describing the details of this phenomenon. Quasi-scissoring phenomenon was introduced mechanically by rotating the clip head attached to a silicone sheet. The anti-scissoring torque during the twist of the blades was measured by changing the depth and the opening width. The closing force was also evaluated. Sugita straight clips of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy were used in the present study. In both materials, the anti-scissoring torque and the closing force were bigger 3 mm in thickness than 1 mm. The initial closing forces and the anti-scissoring torque values at each rotation angles were increased in proportion to depth. Closing forces of titanium alloy clip were slightly higher than those of cobalt alloy clip. By contrast, anti-scissoring torque values of cobalt alloy clip were bigger than those of titanium alloy clip in all conditions. In condition of 3 mm in thickness and 3 mm in depth, anti-scissoring torque vales of titanium alloy clip decreased suddenly when an angle surpassed 70 degrees. Aneurysm clip scissoring phenomenon tends to occur when clipping the aneurysm neck only with blade tips. Based on the results of this experiment, titanium alloy clip is more prone to scissoring than cobalt alloy clip under the condition that the wide blade separation distance and the shallow blade length.

  8. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  9. Modeling of the mechanical alloying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, D.; Courtney, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to compute the dimensional and property changes that occur with repetitive impacts during the mechanical alloying process. The more sophisticated of the programs also maintains a running count of the fractions of particles present and from this calculates a population distribution. The programs predict powder particle size and shape changes in accord with the accepted stages of powder development during mechanical alloying of ductile species. They also predict hardness and lamellar thickness changes with processing, again with reasonable agreement with experimental results. These predictions offer support of the model (and thereby give insight into the possible 'actual' happenings of mechanical alloying) and hence allow refinement and calibration of the myriad aspects of the model. They also provide a vehicle for establishing control over the dimensions and properties of the output powders used for consolidation, thereby facilitating optimization of the consolidation process.

  10. Positron annihilation characterization of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Glade, S.C.; Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were produced by mechanically alloying Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.25Y 2 O 3 (wt%) powders followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation at 850, 1000 and 1150 deg. C. Positron annihilation lifetime and orbital momentum spectroscopy measurements are in qualitative agreement with small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography observations, indicating that up to 50% of the annihilations occur at high densities of Y-Ti-O enriched nm-scale features (NFs). Some annihilations may also occur in small cavities. In Y-free control alloys, that do not contain NFs, positrons primarily annihilate in the Fe-Cr matrix and at features such as dislocations, while a small fraction annihilate in large cavities or Ar bubbles.

  11. Alloys having improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, R.D.; Greer, J.B.; Jacobs, D.F.; Berkowitz, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention involves a process of improving the hydrogen embrittlement resistance of a cold-worked high yield strength nickel/cobalt base alloy containing chromium, and molybdenum and/or tungsten and having individual elemental impurity concentrations as measured by Auger spectroscopy at the crystallographic boundaries of up to about 1 Atomic percent. These elemental impurities are capable of becoming active and mobile at a temperature less than the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. The process involves heat treating the alloy at a temperature above 1300 degrees F but below the temperature of recrystallization for a time of from 1/4 to 100 hours. This is sufficient to effect a reduction in the level of the elemental impurities at the crystallographic boundaries to the range of less than 0.5 Atomic percent without causing an appreciable decrease in yield strength

  12. Steam generated conversion coating on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium and its alloys are widely used in aerospace industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (2.5-10 nm) responsible for its inherent corrosion resistance. This oxide film can further be converted or transformed...... into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use of hexavalent chromium is strictly...... and growth of oxide film on different intermetallic particles and corrosion behaviour of such alloys.Surface morphology was observed by using FEG-SEM, EDX and FIB-SEM. Metal oxide surface characterization and compositional depth profiling were investigated by using XPS and GD-OES respectively...

  13. Kinetics of hydrogen release from alloyed iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomozov, P.A.; Mogutnov, B.M.; Shvartsman, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of evolution of hydrogen from Armco-iron and alloys of iron with small amounts of carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, titanium, silicon and nickel was studied in the temperature range from 24 to 110 deg C. This process is described in terms of a kinetic equation which follows from the solution of the equation of diffusion with boundary conditions allowing for the rate of the chemical reaction on the surface of the specimen. A strong dependence is noted of the surface reaction on the presence of small amounts of alloying elements in the iron. The reaction of evolution of hydrogen from iron and its alloys in the temperature range from 24 to 110 deg C takes place in a combined diffusion-kinetic range

  14. Machinability of cast commercial titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, I; Kiyosue, S; Ohkubo, C; Aoki, T; Okabe, T

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the machinability of cast orthopedic titanium (metastable beta) alloys for possible application to dentistry and compared the results with those of cast CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-7Nb, which are currently used in dentistry. Machinability was determined as the amount of metal removed with the use of an electric handpiece and a SiC abrasive wheel turning at four different rotational wheel speeds. The ratios of the amount of metal removed and the wheel volume loss (machining ratio) were also evaluated. Based on these two criteria, the two alpha + beta alloys tested generally exhibited better results for most of the wheel speeds compared to all the other metals tested. The machinability of the three beta alloys employed was similar or worse, depending on the speed of the wheel, compared to CP Ti. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. On the superconductivity of vanadium based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouers, F.; Rest, J. Van der

    1984-01-01

    The electron density of states of solid solutions of vanadium based transition metal alloys V 90 X 10 is computed with the aim of calculating the superconducting transition temperature using the McMillan formula. As observed experimentally for X on the left hand side of V in the periodic table, one obtains an increase of Tc while for X on the right hand side of V the critical temperature decreases. The detailed comparison with experiments indicate that when the bandwidths of the two constituents are different, one cannot neglect the variation of the electron-phonon interactions. Another important conclusion is that for alloys which are in the split-band limit like VAu, VPd and VPt, the agreement with experimental data can be obtained only by assuming that these alloys have a short-range order favouring clusters of pure vanadium. (Author) [pt

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  17. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  18. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  19. Copper-rich invar by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, K.; Qi, Qinian; Ilyushin, A. S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    1993-05-01

    An fcc alloy of composition Fe 64Cu 26Cr 7Ni 3 with a0 = 0.362 nm and an average crystalline size of 5 nm was produced by high-energy ball milling iron and copper powder in a stainless-steel container. The average number of electrons per atom is 8.7. The Curie temperature of the alloy is 410 K and the room-temperature magnetization is 48 JT -1 kg -1. The Mössbauer spectrum at 15 K shows a broad distribution of hyperfine field with an average of 15.6 T, which indicates coexistence of high and low moment states for iron. The alloy decomposes exothermically at 775 K to yield a mixture of bcc and fcc phases, but 50% of the iron remains in the fcc form with a low moment.

  20. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  1. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of the nickel base alloy (Alloy 600) after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Stela Maria de Carvalho

    1993-01-01

    The characterization of microstructural and mechanical properties of cold rolled and heat treated alloys 600 made in Brazil were investigated. The recovery and recrystallization behavior as well as solubilization and aging have been studied using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness and tensile testing have been carried out. The recovery process of the cold rolled alloy 600 occurred until 600 deg C and the recrystallization stage was situated between 600 and 850 deg C. The primary recrystallization temperature was obtained at 850 deg C after 1 hour (isochronal heat treatments). The aged alloy 600 shows carbide precipitation on grains bu with ductility maintenance. (author)

  2. Formation and characterization of Al–Ti–Nb alloys by electron-beam surface alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkov, S., E-mail: stsvalkov@gmail.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrov, P. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lazarova, R. [Institute of Metal Science, Equipment and Technologies with Hydro and Aerodynamics Center, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 67 Shipchenski Prohod blvd., 1574 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bezdushnyi, R. [Department of Solid State Physics and Microelectronics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridsky”, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dechev, D. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Al–Ti–Nb surface alloys have been successfully obtained by electron-beam surface alloying technology. • The alloys consist of (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} fractions, distributed in the biphasic structure of (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} particles dispersed in α-Al. • The alloying speed does not affect the lattice parameters of (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} and, does not form additional stresses, strains etc. • It was found that lower velocity of the specimen motion during the alloying process develops more homogeneous structures. • The measured hardness of (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} compound reaches 775 HV[kg/cm{sup 2}] which is much greater than the values of NbAl{sub 3}. - Abstract: The combination of attractive mechanical properties, light weight and resistance to corrosion makes Ti-Al based alloys applicable in many industrial branches, like aircraft and automotive industries etc. It is known that the incorporation of Nb improves the high temperature performance and mechanical properties. In the present study on Al substrate Ti and Nb layers were deposited by DC (Direct Current) magnetron sputtering, followed by electron-beam alloying with scanning electron beam. It was chosen two speeds of the specimen motion during the alloying process: V{sub 1} = 0.5 cm/s and V{sub 2} = 1 cm/s. The alloying process was realized in circular sweep mode in order to maintain the melt pool further. The obtained results demonstrate a formation of (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} fractions randomly distributed in biphasic structure of intermetallic (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} particles, dispersed in α-Al solid solution. The evaluated (Ti,Nb)Al{sub 3} lattice parameters are independent of the speed of the specimen motion and therefore the alloying speed does not affect the lattice parameters and thus, does not form additional residual stresses, strains etc. It was found that lower velocity of the specimen motion during the alloying process develops more homogeneous structures. The metallographic analyses demonstrate a

  3. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  4. Non-alloyed Ni3Al based alloys – preparation and evaluation of mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Malcharcziková

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the fabrication and mechanical properties of Ni3Al based alloy, which represents the most frequently used basic composition of nickel based intermetallic alloys for high temperature applications. The structure of the alloy was controlled through directional solidification. The samples had a multi-phase microstructure. The directionally solidified specimens were subjected to tensile tests with concurrent measurement of acoustic emission (AE. The specimens exhibited considerable room temperature ductility before fracture. During tensile testing an intensive AE was observed.

  5. Magnesium alloy AZ63A reinforcement by alloying with gallium and using high-disperse ZrO2 particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Khokhlova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to obtain an experimental magnesium alloy by remelting standard AZ63A alloy with addition of gallium ligatures and ZrO2 particles. This allowed reinforcement of alloy and increase its hardness and Young's modulus. The chemical analysis of this alloy shows two types of structures which are evenly distributed in volume. Thus we can conclude that reinforcing effect is the result of formation of intermetallic phase Mg5-Ga2.

  6. Electrocatalysts having platium monolayers on palladium, palladium alloy, and gold alloy core-shell nanoparticles, and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-12-21

    The invention relates to platinum-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of a noble metal or metal alloy core at least partially encapsulated by an atomically thin surface layer of platinum atoms. The invention particularly relates to such particles having a palladium, palladium alloy, gold alloy, or rhenium alloy core encapsulated by an atomic monolayer of platinum. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  7. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  8. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  9. Creep behavior of Zr-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Chan; Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Sung Soo; Choo, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    The creep characteristics of Zirconium alloy is affected by several parameters. Out-reactor creep increases both with an increasing amount of Nb, Sn and S contained in alpha-Zr and decreases with the increasing volume of alpha-Zr. Especially, the creep of Zr-2.5Nb alloy depends on the solubility of Nb in alpha-Zr, which is associated with the decomposition of beta-Zr. Since Zr of the hcp structure is strongly anisotropic, it shows the characteristics of texture and results in the anisotropy of creep. Due to the circumferential texture of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy (CANDU Pressure tube), the longitudinal slip is easier than the circumferential one, resulting in the high creep rate. The irradiation creep also increases with increasing neutron fluence. The neutron irradiation increases the strength of the zirconium alloys but decreases their creep strength. In contrast to the out-reactor creep, the irradiation creep is little sensitive to temperature, resulting in the lower activation energy. The most important factor to affect the in-reactor and out-reactor creep of niobium containing alloys seems to be the solution hardening by Nb or Sn which is soluble in alpha-zirconium and the texture as well. Irradiation growth is the mechanism which is caused only by the irradiation. It becomes saturated at lower fluence than the critical fluence but beyond it, shows the break-away growth. The onset of accelerated irradiation growth corresponds with the c-dislocation loop formation, though its mechanism needs better understanding. Generally, the irradiation growth of Zr-Nb alloys increases with an increase in fluence, cold working, dislocation, density and temperature, and with a decrease in the grain size. 141 refs., 59 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  10. The influence of the pure metal components of four different casting alloys on the electrochemical properties of the alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Süleyman H; Pekmez, Nuran Ozçiçek; Keyf, Filiz; Canli, Fulya

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the pure metal components of the four different casting alloys on the corrosion behaviors of these alloys tested. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out on four different types of casting alloys and their pure metals at 37 degrees C in an artificial saliva solution. The ions released from the alloys into the solutions during the polarization test were also determined quantitatively using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Ni-Cr (M1) and Co-Cr (M2) alloys had a more homogenous structure than palladium based (M3) and gold based (M4) alloys in terms of the pitting potentials of the casting alloys and those of the pure metals composing the alloys. The total ion concentration released from M3 and M4 was less than from M1 and M2. This may be because M3 and M4 alloys contained noble metals. It was also found that the noble metals in the M3 and M4 samples decreased the current density in the anodic branch of the potentiodynamic polarization curves. In other words, noble metals contributed positively to dental materials. Corrosion resistance of the casting alloys can be affected by the pure metals they are composed of. Au and Pd based noble alloys dissolved less than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr based alloys.

  11. Mechanical Alloying for Making Thermoelectric Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, Jeffrey; Blair, Richard; May, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    An economical room-temperature mechanical alloying process has been shown to be an effective means of making a homogeneous powder that can be hot-pressed to synthesize a thermoelectric material having reproducible chemical composition. The synthesis of a given material consists of the room temperature thermomechanical-alloying process followed b y a hot-pressing process. Relative to synthesis of nominally the same material by a traditional process that includes hot melting, this s ynthesis is simpler and yields a material having superior thermoelect ric properties.

  12. A Study of Protection of Copper Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. A.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile treatment of high capacity boiler water with hydrazine and ammonia is studied. Ammonia comes from the decomposition of excess hydrazine injected to treat dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is also injected for the control of pH. To find an effect of such ammonia on the copper alloy, the relations between pH and iron, and ammonia and copper are studied. Since the dependence of corrosion of iron on pH differs from that of copper, a range of pH was selected experimentally to minimize the corrosion rates of both copper and iron. Corrosion rates of various copper alloys are also compared

  13. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-05-18

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration.

  14. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration

  15. Electromagnetic Characterization Of Metallic Sensory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  16. The Delayed Fracture of Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    equipment. 3) The Mg-H complex formed but decomposed so rapidly in the vacuum that its PLE could not be measured. -39- Two magnesium hydrides are...Zn-Mg Alloys," Corros. Sci., 1976, vol. 16, no. 7, p. 443. 15. C.D.S. Tuck: "Evidence for the Formation of Magnesium Hydride on the Grain Boundaries...1977). 17. W. Pistulka and G. Lang: "Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Test Methods for Al-Zn-Mg Type Alloys," Aluminium , Duesseldorf, 1977, vol. 53, no. 6

  17. Hydrogenation properties of Mg-Al alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    to disproportionation with the formation of magnesium hydride and metallic aluminum as the final product. Experimental evidence renders this process reversible. It is observed that the enthalpy of hydride formation of magnesium is lowered upon alloying with Al due to a slightly endothermic disproportionation reaction......In this paper the properties of Mg-Al alloys in relation to hydrogen storage are reviewed. The main topics of this paper are materials preparation, hydrogen capacity, thermodynamics of hydride formation, and the kinetics of hydride formation and decomposition. Hydrogenation of Mg-Al leads...

  18. A bidirectional shape memory alloy folding actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Jamie K; Wood, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a low-profile bidirectional folding actuator based on annealed shape memory alloy sheets applicable for meso- and microscale systems. Despite the advantages of shape memory alloys—high strain, silent operation, and mechanical simplicity—their application is often limited to unidirectional operation. We present a bidirectional folding actuator that produces two opposing 180° motions. A laser-patterned nickel alloy (Inconel 600) heater localizes actuation to the folding sections. The actuator has a thin ( < 1 mm) profile, making it appropriate for use in robotic origami. Various design parameters and fabrication variants are described and experimentally explored in the actuator prototype. (paper)

  19. An all aluminum alloy UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Kenzaburo

    1985-01-01

    An all aluminum components was developed for use with UHV system. Aluminum alloy whose advantage are little discharge gas, easy to bake out, light weight, little damage against radieactivity radiation is used. Therefore, as it is all aluminum alloy, baking is possible. Baking temperature is 150 deg C in case of not only ion pump, gate valve, angle valve but also aluminum components. Ion pump have to an ultrahigh vacuum of order 10 -9 torr can be obtained without baking, 10 -10 torr order can be obtained after 24 hour of baking. (author)

  20. Thermal expansion: Metallic elements and alloys. [Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Kirby, R. K.; Taylor, R. E.; Desai, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The introductory sections of the work are devoted to the theory of thermal expansion of solids and to methods for the measurement of the linear thermal expansion of solids (X-ray methods, high speed methods, interferometry, push-rod dilatometry, etc.). The bulk of the work is devoted to numerical data on the thermal linear expansion of all the metallic elements, a large number of intermetallics, and a large number of binary alloy systems and multiple alloy systems. A comprehensive bibliography is provided along with an index to the materials examined.

  1. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakine, C.; Prioul, C.; Alamo, A.; Francois, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two 13%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys, DT and DY, exhibiting different oxide particle size distribution and a χ phase precipitation were studied. Their tensile properties have been tested from 20 to 700 C. Experimental observations during room temperature tensile tests performed in a scanning electronic microscope have shown that the main damage mechanism consists in microcracking of the χ phase precipitates on grain boundaries. These alloys are high tensile and creep resistant between 500 and 700 C. Their strongly stress-sensitive creep behaviour can be described by usual creep laws and incorporating a threshold stress below which the creep rate is negligible. (orig.)

  2. The effect of cooling rate on the phase formation and magnetocaloric properties in La0.6Ce0.4Fe11.0Si2.0 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Shao, Yanyan; Feng, Zaixin; Liu, Jian

    2018-04-01

    In this work, the microstructure, phase formation behavior of the NaZn13-type 1:13 phase and related magnetocaloric effect have been investigated in La0.6Ce0.4Fe11.0Si2.0 as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbons with different cooling rates. A multi-phase structure consisting of 1:13, α-Fe and La-rich phases is observed in the induction-melted sample with slow cooling. By fast cooling in the melt spinning processing, the La-rich phase can be almost eliminated and thus 1:13 phases with volume fraction as high as 74.4% directly form in the absence of further heat treatment. The resulting maximum magnetic entropy change of 3.1 J/kg K in 2 T field appears at its Curie temperature of 210 K for the La0.6Ce0.4Fe11.0Si2.0 ribbon prepared in 25 m/s.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility of Dirac fermions, Bi-Sb alloys, interacting Bloch fermions, dilute nonmagnetic alloys, and Kondo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buot, Felix A., E-mail: fbuot@gmu.edu [Computational Materials Science Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines); C& LB Research Institute, Carmen, Cebu 6005 (Philippines); Otadoy, Roland E.S.; Rivero, Karla B. [TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines)

    2017-03-01

    Wide ranging interest in Dirac Hamiltonian is due to the emergence of novel materials, namely, graphene, topological insulators and superconductors, the newly-discovered Weyl semimetals, and still actively-sought after Majorana fermions in real materials. We give a brief review of the relativistic Dirac quantum mechanics and its impact in the developments of modern physics. The quantum band dynamics of Dirac Hamiltonian is crucial in resolving the giant diamagnetism of bismuth and Bi-Sb alloys. Quantitative agreement of the theory with the experiments on Bi-Sb alloys has been achieved, and physically meaningful contributions to the diamagnetism has been identified. We also treat relativistic Dirac fermion as an interband dynamics in uniform magnetic fields. For the interacting Bloch electrons, the role of translation symmetry for calculating the magnetic susceptibility avoids any approximation to second order in the field. The expressions for magnetic susceptibility of dilute nonmagnetic alloys give a firm theoretical foundation of the empirical formulas used in fitting experimental results. The unified treatment of all the above calculations is based on the lattice Weyl-Wigner formulation of discrete phase-space quantum mechanics. For completeness, the magnetic susceptibility of Kondo alloys is also given since Dirac fermions in conduction band and magnetic impurities exhibit Kondo effect.

  4. A review on hot tearing of magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot tearing is often a major casting defect in magnesium alloys and has a significant impact on the quality of their casting products. Hot tearing of magnesium alloys is a complex solidification phenomenon which is still not fully understood, it is of great importance to investigate the hot tearing behaviour of magnesium alloys. This review attempts to summarize the investigations on hot tearing of magnesium alloys over the past decades. The hot tearing criteria including recently developed Kou's criterion are summarized and compared. The numeric simulation and assessing methods of hot tearing, factors influencing hot tearing, and hot tearing susceptibility (HTS of magnesium alloys are discussed.

  5. Numerical predicting of recycling friendly wrought aluminium alloy compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varužan Kevorkijan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and non-standard “recycling-friendly” compositions and properties of wrought aluminium alloys with significantly increased amounts of post-consumed scrap. The following two routes were modelled in detail: (i the blending of standard and non-standard compositions of wrought aluminium alloys starting from post-consumed aluminium scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model; and (ii changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminium alloys to non-standard “recycling friendly” ones - with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements, without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance.

  6. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  7. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  8. Phase transformations during sintering of mechanically alloyed TiPt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available first and high temperature melting phases form last12. This behaviour is what is observed in this work with the four phases with low melting points being formed which are Ti(Pt), Ti3Pt, TiPt and Ti3Pt5. It is therefore, probable that phase formation.... 1.0 Introduction TiPt is a potential alloy for use as a high temperature shape memory alloy (SMA). Shape memory alloys are alloys that will revert to the shape they had before deformation if the deformed alloy is annealed at a certain temperature...

  9. On the principles of microstructure scale development for titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolachev, B.A.; Mal'kov, A.V.; Gus'kova, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of an existing standard scale of microstructures for two-phase (α+#betta#)-titanium alloy semiproducts is given. The basic principles of development of control microstructure scales for titanium alloys are presented on the base of investigations and generalization of literature data on connection of microstructure of titanium intermediate products from (α+#betta#)-alloys with their mechanical properties and service life characteristics. A possibilities of changing mechanical and operating properties at the expense of obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively regulated microstructure in the alloy are disclosed on the example of the (α+#betta#)-titanium alloy

  10. Neutron irradiation effect on thermomechanical properties of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.Ya.; Ionajtis, R.R.; Kotov, V.V.; Loguntsev, E.N.; Ushakov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Alloys of Ti-Ni, Ti-Ni-Pd, Fe-Mn-Si, Mn-Cu-Cr, Mn-Cu, Cu-Al-Mn, Cu-Al-Ni systems are investigated after irradiation in IVV-2M reactor at various temperatures with neutron fluence of 10 19 - 10 20 cm -2 . The degradation of shape memory effect in titanium nickelide base alloys is revealed after irradiation. Mn-Cu and Mn-Cu-Cr alloys show the best results. Trends in shape memory alloy behaviour depending on irradiation temperature are found. A consideration is given to the possibility of using these alloys for components of power reactor control and protection systems [ru

  11. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  12. Corrosion behavior of friction stir welded AZ31B Mg alloy - Al6063 alloy joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, AZ31B Mg alloy and Al6063 alloy-rolled sheets were successfully joined by friction stir welding. Microstructural studies revealed a sound joint with good mechanical mixing of both the alloys at the nugget zone. Corrosion performance of the joint was assessed by immersing in 3.5% NaCl solution for different intervals of time and the corrosion rate was calculated. The joint has undergone severe corrosion attack compared with both the base materials (AZ31B and Al6063 alloys. The predominant corrosion mechanism behind the high corrosion rate of the joint was found to be high galvanic corrosion. From the results, it can be suggested that the severe corrosion of dissimilar Mg–Al joints must be considered as a valid input while designing structures intended to work in corroding environment.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Thermoelectric Fe2VAl Alloy Powders by Mechanical Alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Hyo

    2015-01-01

    A mixture of elemental Fe50V25Al25 powders has been subjected to mechanical alloying (MA) at room temperature to prepare the Heusler Fe2VAl thermoelectric alloy. Fe2VAI alloy with a grain size of 90 nm can be obtained by MA of Fe50V25Al25 powders for 60 h and subsequently annealed at 700 degrees C. Consolidation of the MA powders was performed in a spark plasma sintering (SPS) machine using graphite dies up to 900-1000 degrees C under 60 MPa. The shrinkage of consolidated samples during SPS was significant at about 400 degrees C. X-ray diffraction data shows that the SPS compact from 60 h MA powders consolidated up to 900 degrees C consists of only nanocrystalline Fe2VAl alloy with a grain size of 200 nm.

  14. Synthesis of Al/Al sub 3 Ti two-phase alloys by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, S.; Chen, S.R.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    We have mechanically alloyed mixtures of elemental powders to prepare fine-grain two-phase A1/A1{sub 3}Ti powders at the compositions A1-20at% Ti and Al-10at% Ti. Hexane was used to prevent agglomeration of the powder during MA. Carbon from the decomposition of the hexane was incorporated in the powder. It reacted with Ti to form a fine dispersion of carbides in the final hot-pressed compact. We consolidated the mechanically alloyed powders by hot-pressing. Yield strength and ductility were measured in compression. At 25{degree}C, the compressive yield strengths were 1.25 and 0.6 GPa for the A1-20at% Ti and Al-10at% Ti alloys, respectively. The ductility of the A1-10at% Ti alloy exceeded 20% for 25 < T < 500{degree}C. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Role of alloying additions on the properties of Cu–Al–Mn shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Rupa; Jain, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Pravir; Hussain, Shahadat; Pandey, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu based SMAs with high transition temperature could be made using LM route. • The properties depend on alloying composition. • Property characterisation establishes feasibility of making SMAs. - Abstract: The effect of alloying seven different elements [Zn, Si, Fe, Ni, Mg, Cr and Ti] on the microstructure, hardness, phase precipitation and transformation temperature in a Cu–12.5Al–5Mn alloy with a view to possible improvements as a result of these additions is the focus of the reported study. The base alloy has been chosen keeping in mind its ability to exhibit shape memory properties and improved ductility over other Cu-based SMAs. The objective was to ascertain changes or improvements attained due to the individual tertiary additions. The samples were prepared through liquid metallurgy route using pure copper, aluminum, manganese and the respective quaternary alloying elements in right quantities to weigh 1000 g of the alloy in total and were melted together. Samples from the cast alloys were subject to homogenisation treatment at 200 °C for 2 h in a muffle furnace and furnace cooled. Samples from the homogenised alloys were heated and held for 2 h at 920 °C followed by ice quenching to obtain the desired martensitic structure for shape memory behaviour. The alloys in the cast, homogenised and quenched conditions were metallographically polished to observe the martensitic phase formation mainly in quenched samples which is a pre requisite for exhibiting shape memory properties in these alloys. X-ray Diffraction studies were carried out on the cast and quenched samples using Cu Kα target; and the phases identified indicate martensitic phase precipitation; however in some cases the precipitation is incomplete. Differential Scanning Calorimetric [DSC] studies were carried out on quenched samples from room temperature to 600 °C maintaining a constant rate of 10 °C/min. Results indicate clear transformation peaks in all the samples which

  16. Applications of thermodynamic calculations to Mg alloy design: Mg-Sn based alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In-Ho; Park, Woo-Jin; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kang, Dae Hoon; Kim, Nack J.

    2007-01-01

    Recently an Mg-Sn based alloy system has been investigated actively in order to develop new magnesium alloys which have a stable structure and good mechanical properties at high temperatures. Thermodynamic modeling of the Mg-Al-Mn-Sb-Si-Sn-Zn system was performed based on available thermodynamic, phase equilibria and phase diagram data. Using the optimized database, the phase relationships of the Mg-Sn-Al-Zn alloys with additions of Si and Sb were calculated and compared with their experimental microstructures. It is shown that the calculated results are in good agreement with experimental microstructures, which proves the applicability of thermodynamic calculations for new Mg alloy design. All calculations were performed using FactSage thermochemical software. (orig.)

  17. Role of alloying additions on the properties of Cu–Al–Mn shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Rupa, E-mail: rupadasgupta@ampri.res.in; Jain, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Pravir; Hussain, Shahadat; Pandey, Abhishek

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • Cu based SMAs with high transition temperature could be made using LM route. • The properties depend on alloying composition. • Property characterisation establishes feasibility of making SMAs. - Abstract: The effect of alloying seven different elements [Zn, Si, Fe, Ni, Mg, Cr and Ti] on the microstructure, hardness, phase precipitation and transformation temperature in a Cu–12.5Al–5Mn alloy with a view to possible improvements as a result of these additions is the focus of the reported study. The base alloy has been chosen keeping in mind its ability to exhibit shape memory properties and improved ductility over other Cu-based SMAs. The objective was to ascertain changes or improvements attained due to the individual tertiary additions. The samples were prepared through liquid metallurgy route using pure copper, aluminum, manganese and the respective quaternary alloying elements in right quantities to weigh 1000 g of the alloy in total and were melted together. Samples from the cast alloys were subject to homogenisation treatment at 200 °C for 2 h in a muffle furnace and furnace cooled. Samples from the homogenised alloys were heated and held for 2 h at 920 °C followed by ice quenching to obtain the desired martensitic structure for shape memory behaviour. The alloys in the cast, homogenised and quenched conditions were metallographically polished to observe the martensitic phase formation mainly in quenched samples which is a pre requisite for exhibiting shape memory properties in these alloys. X-ray Diffraction studies were carried out on the cast and quenched samples using Cu Kα target; and the phases identified indicate martensitic phase precipitation; however in some cases the precipitation is incomplete. Differential Scanning Calorimetric [DSC] studies were carried out on quenched samples from room temperature to 600 °C maintaining a constant rate of 10 °C/min. Results indicate clear transformation peaks in all the samples which

  18. Anodic behavior of alloy 22 in bicarbonate containing media: Effect of alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozne, N S; Giordano, C M; Rebak, R B; Ares, A E; Carranza, R M

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 22 is one of the candidates for the manufacture of high level nuclear waste containers. These containers provide services in natural environments characterized by multi-ionic solutions.It is estimated they could suffer three types of deterioration: general corrosion, localized corrosion (specifically crevice corrosion) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). It has been confirmed that the presence of bicarbonate and chloride ions is necessary to produce cracking, . It has also been determined that the susceptibility to SCC could be related to the occurrence of an anodic peak in the polarization curves in these media at potentials below transpassivity. The aim of this work is to study the effect of alloying elements on the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in media containing bicarbonate and chloride ions at different concentrations and temperatures. Polarization curves were made on alloy 22 (Ni-22% Cr-13% Mo), Ni-Mo (Ni-28, 5% Mo) and Ni-Cr (Ni-20% Cr) in the following solutions: 1 mol/L NaCl at 90 o C, and 1.148 mol/L NaHCO 3 ; 1.148 mol/L NaHCO 3 + 1 mol/L NaCl; 1.148 mol/L NaHCO 3 + 0.1 mol/L NaCl, at 90 o C, 75 o C, 60 o C and 25 o C. It was found that alloy 22 has a anodic current density peak at potentials below transpassivity, only in the presence of bicarbonate ions. Curves performed in 1 mol/L NaCl did not show any anodic peak, in any of the tested alloys. The curves made on alloys Ni-Mo and Ni-Cr in the presence of bicarbonate ions, allowed to determine that Cr, is responsible for the appearance of the anodic peak in alloy 22. The curves of alloy Ni-Mo showed no anodic peak in the studied conditions. The potential at which the anodic peak appears in alloy 22 and Ni-Cr alloy, increases with decreasing temperature. The anodic peak was also affected by solution composition. When chloride ion is added to bicarbonate solutions, the anodic peak is shifted to higher potential and current densities, depending on the concentration of added chloride ions (author)

  19. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  20. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2017-10-10

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.