WorldWideScience

Sample records for melanosome limiting membrane

  1. Membrane compartmentalization of melanosomal gp75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, P; Fraioli, R; Cuomo, M; Natali, P G

    1992-03-01

    A melanosomal integral membrane glycoprotein of 75 kD (gp75) has been previously identified as the human homologue of the product specified by the murine brown locus. We presently report that this molecule may be susceptible to limited proteolysis and extrinsic radioiodination in intact, live cells. Consequently, it is suggested that its cellular location might include the plasma membrane and/or a cellular compartment easily accessible to proteases and to chemically catalyzed vectorial iodination. This is of interest in view of the potential applicative value of gp75 as a target for the radioimmunoscintography of melanoma lesions.

  2. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum-Ho Bin

    Full Text Available The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP. Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4. However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH.

  3. Melanosome transfer to keratinocyte in the chicken embryonic skin is mediated by vesicle release associated with Rho-regulated membrane blebbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Murai, Hidetaka; Sakai, Ken-Ichiro; Okui, Takahiro; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2016-12-02

    During skin pigmentation in amniotes, melanin synthesized in the melanocyte is transferred to keratinocytes by a particle called the melanosome. Previous studies, mostly using dissociated cultured cells, have proposed several different models that explain how the melanosome transfer is achieved. Here, using a technique that labels the plasma membrane of melanocytes within a three-dimensional system that mimics natural tissues, we have visualized the plasma membrane of melanocytes with EGFP in chicken embryonic skin. Confocal time-lapse microscopy reveals that the melanosome transfer is mediated, at least in part, by vesicles produced by plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the vesicle release is accompanied by the membrane blebbing of melanocytes. Blebs that have encapsulated a melanosome are pinched off to become vesicles, and these melanosome-containing vesicles are finally engulfed by neighboring keratinocytes. For both the membrane blebbing and vesicle release, Rho small GTPase is essential. We further show that the membrane vesicle-mediated melanosome transfer plays a significant role in the skin pigmentation. Given that the skin pigmentation in inter-feather spaces in chickens is similar to that in inter-hair spaces of humans, our findings should have important consequences in cosmetic medicine.

  4. Melanosomal dynamics assessed with a live-cell fluorescent melanosomal marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Bruder

    Full Text Available Melanocytes present in skin and other organs synthesize and store melanin pigment within membrane-delimited organelles called melanosomes. Exposure of human skin to ultraviolet radiation (UV stimulates melanin production in melanosomes, followed by transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Melanosomal function is critical for protecting skin against UV radiation, but the mechanisms underlying melanosomal movement and transfer are not well understood. Here we report a novel fluorescent melanosomal marker, which we used to measure real-time melanosomal dynamics in live human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs and transfer in melanocyte-keratinocyte co-cultures. A fluorescent fusion protein of Ocular Albinism 1 (OA1 localized to melanosomes in both B16-F1 cells and HEMs, and its expression did not significantly alter melanosomal distribution. Live-cell tracking of OA1-GFP-tagged melanosomes revealed a bimodal kinetic profile, with melanosomes exhibiting combinations of slow and fast movement. We also found that exposure to UV radiation increased the fraction of melanosomes exhibiting fast versus slow movement. In addition, using OA1-GFP in live co-cultures, we monitored melanosomal transfer using time-lapse microscopy. These results highlight OA1-GFP as a specific and effective melanosomal marker for live-cell studies, reveal new aspects of melanosomal dynamics and transfer, and are relevant to understanding the skin's physiological response to UV radiation.

  5. Keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions during melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberg, M

    2001-08-01

    The epidermal-melanin unit is composed of one melanocyte and approximately 36 neighboring keratinocytes, working in synchrony to produce and distribute melanin. Melanin is synthesized in melanosomes, transferred to the dendrite tips, and translocated into keratinocytes, forming caps over the keratinocyte nuclei. The molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in melanosome transfer and the keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions required for this process are not yet completely understood. Suggested mechanisms of melanosome transfer include melanosome release and endocytosis, direct inoculation ('injection'), keratinocyte-melanocyte membrane fusion, and phagocytosis. Studies of the keratinocyte receptor protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) support the phagocytosis theory. PAR-2 controls melanosome ingestion and phagocytosis by keratinocytes and exerts a regulatory role in skin pigmentation. Modulation of PAR-2 activity can enhance or decrease melanosome transfer and affects pigmentation only when there is keratinocyte-melanocyte contact. Moreover, PAR-2 is induced by UV irradiation and inhibition of PAR-2 activation results in the prevention of UVB-induced tanning. The role of PAR-2 in mediating UV-induced responses remains to be elucidated.

  6. Acoustic detection of melanosome transport in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Rickard; Norström, Elisabeth; Bodin, Lovisa; Langhammer, Christoph; Sturve, Joachim; Wallin, Margareta; Svedhem, Sofia

    2013-04-01

    Organelle transport studies are often performed using melanophores from lower vertebrates due to the ease of inducing movements of pigment granules (melanosomes) and visualizing them by optical microscopy. Here, we present a novel methodology to monitor melanosome translocation (which is a light-sensitive process) in the dark using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. This acoustic sensing method was used to study dispersion and aggregation of melanosomes in Xenopus laevis melanophores. Reversible sensor responses, correlated to optical reflectance measurements, were obtained by alternating addition and removal of melatonin (leading to melanosome aggregation) and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) (leading to melanosome dispersion). By confocal microscopy, it was shown that a vertical redistribution of melanosomes occurred during the dispersion/aggregation processes. Furthermore, the transport process was studied in the presence of cytoskeleton-perturbing agents disrupting either actin filaments (latrunculin) or microtubules (nocodazole). Taken together, these experiments suggest that the acoustic responses mainly originate from melanosome transport along actin filaments (located close to the cell membrane), as expected based on the penetration depth of the QCM-D technique. The results clearly indicate the potential of QCM-D for studies of intracellular transport processes in melanophores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Melanosome evolution indicates a key physiological shift within feathered dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanguo; Clarke, Julia A; Gao, Ke-Qin; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Meng, Qingjin; Li, Daliang; D'Alba, Liliana; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2014-03-20

    Inference of colour patterning in extinct dinosaurs has been based on the relationship between the morphology of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) and colour in extant bird feathers. When this relationship evolved relative to the origin of feathers and other novel integumentary structures, such as hair and filamentous body covering in extinct archosaurs, has not been evaluated. Here we sample melanosomes from the integument of 181 extant amniote taxa and 13 lizard, turtle, dinosaur and pterosaur fossils from the Upper-Jurassic and Lower-Cretaceous of China. We find that in the lineage leading to birds, the observed increase in the diversity of melanosome morphologies appears abruptly, near the origin of pinnate feathers in maniraptoran dinosaurs. Similarly, mammals show an increased diversity of melanosome form compared to all ectothermic amniotes. In these two clades, mammals and maniraptoran dinosaurs including birds, melanosome form and colour are linked and colour reconstruction may be possible. By contrast, melanosomes in lizard, turtle and crocodilian skin, as well as the archosaurian filamentous body coverings (dinosaur 'protofeathers' and pterosaur 'pycnofibres'), show a limited diversity of form that is uncorrelated with colour in extant taxa. These patterns may be explained by convergent changes in the key melanocortin system of mammals and birds, which is known to affect pleiotropically both melanin-based colouration and energetic processes such as metabolic rate in vertebrates, and may therefore support a significant physiological shift in maniraptoran dinosaurs.

  8. Melanoregulin regulates a shedding mechanism that drives melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufeng S; Masedunskas, Andreas; Weigert, Roberto; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A; Hammer, John A

    2012-07-31

    Mammalian pigmentation is driven by the intercellular transfer of pigment-containing melanosomes from the tips of melanocyte dendrites to surrounding keratinocytes. Tip accumulation of melanosomes requires myosin Va, because melanosomes concentrate in the center of melanocytes from myosin Va-null (dilute) mice. This distribution defect results in inefficient melanosome transfer and a dilution of coat color. Dilute mice that simultaneously lack melanoregulin, the product of the dilute suppressor locus, exhibit a nearly complete restoration of coat color, but, surprisingly, melanosomes remain concentrated in the center of their melanocytes. Here we show that dilute/dsu melanocytes, but not dilute melanocytes, readily transfer the melanosomes concentrated in their center to surrounding keratinocytes in situ. Using time-lapse imaging of WT melanocyte/keratinocyte cocultures in which the plasma membranes of the two cells are marked with different colors, we define an intercellular melanosome transfer pathway that involves the shedding by the melanocyte of melanosome-rich packages, which subsequently are phagocytosed by the keratinocyte. Shedding, which occurs primarily at dendritic tips but also from more central regions, involves adhesion to the keratinocyte, thinning behind the forming package, and apparent self-abscission. Finally, we show that shedding from the cell center is sixfold more frequent in cultured dilute/dsu melanocytes than in dilute melanocytes, consistent with the in situ data. Together, these results explain how dsu restores the coat color of dilute mice without restoring intracellular melanosome distribution, indicate that melanoregulin is a negative regulator of melanosome transfer, and provide insight into the mechanism of intercellular melanosome transfer.

  9. Fossilization of melanosomes via sulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E; van Dongen, Bart E; Lockyer, Nick P; Bull, Ian D; Orr, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Fossil melanin granules (melanosomes) are an important resource for inferring the evolutionary history of colour and its functions in animals. The taphonomy of melanin and melanosomes, however, is incompletely understood. In particular, the chemical processes responsible for melanosome preservation have not been investigated. As a result, the origins of sulfur-bearing compounds in fossil melanosomes are difficult to resolve. This has implications for interpretations of original colour in fossils based on potential sulfur-rich phaeomelanosomes. Here we use pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess the mode of preservation of fossil microstructures, confirmed as melanosomes based on the presence of melanin, preserved in frogs from the Late Miocene Libros biota (NE Spain). Our results reveal a high abundance of organosulfur compounds and non-sulfurized fatty acid methyl esters in both the fossil tissues and host sediment; chemical signatures in the fossil tissues are inconsistent with preservation of phaeomelanin. Our results reflect preservation via the diagenetic incorporation of sulfur, i.e. sulfurization (natural vulcanization), and other polymerization processes. Organosulfur compounds and/or elevated concentrations of sulfur have been reported from melanosomes preserved in various invertebrate and vertebrate fossils and depositional settings, suggesting that preservation through sulfurization is likely to be widespread. Future studies of sulfur-rich fossil melanosomes require that the geochemistry of the host sediment is tested for evidence of sulfurization in order to constrain interpretations of potential phaeomelanosomes and thus of original integumentary colour in fossils.

  10. Different Approaches for Assaying Melanosome Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Berens, Werner; Van Den Bossche, Karolien; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Westbroek, Wendy; Valencia, Julio C.; Out, Coby J.; Naeyaert, Jean Marie; Hearing, Vincent J.; Lambert, Jo

    2005-01-01

    Many approaches have been tried to establish assays for melanosome transfer to keratinocytes. In this report we describe and summarize various novel attempts to label melanosomes in search of a reliable, specific, reproducible and quantitative assay system. We tried to fluorescently label melanosomes by transfection of GFP-labeled melanosomal proteins and by incubation of melanocytes with fluorescent melanin intermediates or homologues. In most cases a weak cytoplasmic fluorescence was percei...

  11. Role of Rab family GTPases and their effectors in melanosomal logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-04-01

    Rab GTPases constitute a family of small GTPases that regulate a variety of membrane trafficking events in all eukaryotic cells by recruiting their specific effector molecules. Recent accumulating evidence indicates that members of the mammalian Rab small GTPase family are involved in certain physiological and pathological processes. In particular, functional impairments of specific Rab proteins, e.g. Rab38 and Rab27A, their regulators or their effectors cause pigmentation disorders in humans and coat colour variations in mice because such impairments cause defects in melanosomal logistics, i.e. defects in melanosome biogenesis and transport. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the gene products responsible for mammalian pigmentation disorders in the past decade have revealed that Rab-mediated endosomal transport systems and melanosome transport systems play crucial roles in the efficient darkening of mammalian hair and skin. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding melanosomal logistics, with particular focus on the roles of Rab small GTPases and their effectors.

  12. A simple assay method for melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Ryung; Park, So-Hee; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung Chan

    2012-02-01

    Pigmentation is induced by production of melanin in specialized organelles termed melanosomes and by transfer of these organelles from melanocytes to surrounding keratinocytes. The chemical basis of melanogenesis is relatively well known but the mechanism of melanosome transfer is not well studied. Various pigmentary disorders and cosmetic applications require the use of depigmenting agents. Currently available topical agents used for the reduction of pigmentation mainly include tyrosinase inhibitors and/or melanocyte-cytotoxic agents. Recently, several agents have been introduced to inhibit melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. However, an experimental model for melanosome transfer is not well established. In this study, a simple assay method using flow cytometry is described.

  13. Effective inhibition of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes by lectins and niacinamide is reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatens, Amanda; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Koshoffer, Amy; Epstein, Howard; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Bissett, Donald; Takiwaki, Hirotsugu; Arase, Seiji; Wickett, R Randall; Boissy, Raymond E

    2005-07-01

    Skin pigmentation results in part from the transfer of melanized melanosomes synthesized by melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates expressed by these epidermal cells are critical molecules involved in this transfer process. In addition, the derivative of vitamin B(3), niacinamide, can inhibit melanosome transfer and induce skin lightening. We investigated the effects of these molecules on the viability of melanocytes and keratinocytes and on the reversibility of melanosome-transfer inhibition induced by these agents using an in vitro melanocyte-keratinocyte coculture model system. While lectins and neoglycoproteins could induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner to melanocytes or keratinocytes in monoculture, similar dosages of the lectins, as opposed to neoglycoproteins, did not induce apoptosis to either cell type when treated in coculture. The dosages of lectins and niacinamide not affecting cell viability produced an inhibitory effect on melanosome transfer, when used either alone or together in cocultures of melanocytes-keratinocytes. Cocultures treated with lectins or niacinamide resumed normal melanosome transfer in 3 days after removal of the inhibitor, while cocultures treated with a combination of lectins and niacinamide demonstrated a lag in this recovery. Subsequently, we assessed the effect of niacinamide on facial hyperpigmented spots using a vehicle-controlled, split-faced design human clinical trial. Topical application of niacinamide resulted in a dose-dependent and reversible reduction in hyperpigmented lesions. These results suggest that lectins and niacinamide at concentrations that do not affect cell viability are reversible inhibitors of melanosome transfer.

  14. Inhibition of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes by lectins and neoglycoproteins in an in vitro model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minwalla, L; Zhao, Y; Cornelius, J; Babcock, G F; Wickett, R R; Le Poole, I C; Boissy, R E

    2001-06-01

    We propose that some of the critical molecules involved in the transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to keratinocytes include plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates. To investigate this mechanism, co-cultures of human melanocytes and keratinocytes derived from neonatal foreskins were established. The process of melanosome transfer was assessed by two experimental procedures. The first involved labeling melanocyte cultures with the fluorochrome CFDA. Labeled melanocytes were subsequently co-cultured with keratinocytes, and the transfer of fluorochrome assessed visually by confocal microscopy and quantitatively by flow cytometry. The second investigative approach involved co-culturing melanocytes with keratinocytes, and processing the co-cultures after 3 days for electron microscopy to quantitate the numbers of melanosomes in keratinocytes. Results from these experimental approaches indicate significant transfer of dye or melanosomes from melanocytes to keratinocytes that increased with time of co-culturing. Using these model systems, we subsequently tested a battery of lectins and neoglycoproteins for their effect in melanosome transfer. Addition of these selected molecules to co-cultures inhibited transfer of fluorochrome by approximately 15-44% as assessed by flow cytometry, and of melanosomes by 67-93% as assessed by electron microscopy. Therefore, our results suggest the roles of selected lectins and glycoproteins in melanosome transfer to keratinocytes in the skin.

  15. Silencing of GPNMB by siRNA Inhibits the Formation of Melanosomes in Melanocytes in a MITF-Independent Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cansheng; Yuan, Xiaoying; Li, Dongguang; Gu, Weijie; Ma, Huimin; Xie, Xin; Gao, Tianwen

    2012-01-01

    Background Melanosomes are specialized membrane-surrounded organelles, which are involved in the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin. Glycoprotein (transmembrane) non-metastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB), a melanosome-specific structural protein, shares significant amino acid sequence homology with Pmel-17. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that GPNMB is present in all stages (I-IV) of melanosomes. However, little is known about the role of GPNMB in melanosomes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we demonstrated that the expression of GPNMB in PIG1 melanocytes was up-regulated by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the total number of melanosomes in PIG1 melanocytes was sharply reduced by GPNMB-siRNA transfection. Simultaneously, the expression levels of tyrosinase (Tyr), tyrosinase related protein 1 (Trp1), Pmel17/gp100 and ocular albinism type 1 protein (OA1) were all significantly attenuated. But the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) was up-regulated. Intriguingly, in GPNMB silenced PIG1 melanocytes, UVB radiation sharply reduced MITF expression. Conclusion Our present work revealed that the GPNMB was critical for the formation of melanosomes. And GPNMB expression down-regulation attenuated melanosome formation in a MITF-independent fashion. PMID:22912767

  16. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoashi, Toshihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Passeron, Thierry; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are organelles specialized for the production of melanin pigment and are specifically produced by melanocytic cells. More than 150 pigmentation-related genes have been identified, including glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB). A recent proteomics analysis revealed that GPNMB is localized in melanosomes, and GPNMB is a membrane-bound glycoprotein that shows high homology with a well-known melanosomal structural protein, Pmel17/gp100. In this study, we show that GPNMB is expressed in melanocytes of normal human skin, as well as in human melanoma cells. GPNMB is heavily glycosylated and is enriched in mature (stage III and IV) melanosomes in contrast to MART-1 and Pmel17, which are abundant in early (stage I and II) melanosomes. MART-1 and Pmel17 play critical roles in the maturation of early melanosomes; thus, we speculate that GPNMB might be important in the functions of late melanosomes, possibly their transport and/or transfer to keratinocytes. We also demonstrate that a secreted form of GPNMB is released by ectodomain shedding from the largely Golgi-modified form of GPNMB and that the PKC and Ca2+ intracellular signaling pathways regulate that shedding. We conclude that GPNMB is a melanosomal protein that is released by proteolytic ectodomain shedding and might be a useful and specific histological marker of melanocytic cells.—Hoashi, T., Sato, S., Yamaguchi, Y., Passeron, T., Tamaki, K., Hearing, V. J. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein. PMID:20056711

  17. Melanosomes are a primary target of Q-switched ruby laser irradiation in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polla, L.L.; Margolis, R.J.; Dover, J.S.; Whitaker, D.; Murphy, G.F.; Jacques, S.L.; Anderson, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The specific targeting of melanosomes may allow for laser therapy of pigmented cutaneous lesions. The mechanism of selective destruction of pigmented cells by various lasers, however, has not been fully clarified. Black, brown, and albino guinea pigs were exposed to optical pulses at various radiant exposure doses from a Q-switched, 40 nsec, 694 nm ruby laser. Biopsies were analyzed by light and electron microscopy (EM). Albino animals failed to develop clinical or microscopic evidence of cutaneous injury after irradiation. In both black and brown animals, the clinical threshold for gross change was 0.4 J/cm2, which produced an ash-white spot. By light microscopy, alterations appeared at 0.3 J/cm2 and included separation at the dermoepidermal junction, and the formation of vacuolated epidermal cells with a peripheral cytoplasmic condensation of pigment. By EM, enlarged melanosomes with a central lucent zone were observed within affected epidermal cells at 0.3 J/cm2. At 0.8 and 1.2 J/cm2, individual melanosomes were more intensely damaged and disruption of melanosomes deep in the hair papillae was observed. Dermal-epidermal blisters were formed precisely at the lamina lucida, leaving basal cell membranes and hemidesmosomes intact. Possible mechanisms for melanosomal injury are discussed. These observations show that the effects of the Q-switched ruby laser are melanin-specific and melanin-dependent, and may be useful in the selective destruction of pigmented as well as superficial cutaneous lesions.

  18. A Simple Assay Method for Melanosome Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hye Ryung; Park, So-Hee; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung Chan

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation is induced by production of melanin in specialized organelles termed melanosomes and by transfer of these organelles from melanocytes to surrounding keratinocytes. The chemical basis of melanogenesis is relatively well known but the mechanism of melanosome transfer is not well studied. Various pigmentary disorders and cosmetic applications require the use of depigmenting agents. Currently available topical agents used for the reduction of pigmentation mainly include tyrosinase in...

  19. Different approaches for assaying melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, Werner; Van Den Bossche, Karolien; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Westbroek, Wendy; Valencia, Julio C; Out, Coby J; Marie Naeyaert, Jean; Hearing, Vincent J; Lambert, Jo

    2005-10-01

    Many approaches have been tried to establish assays for melanosome transfer to keratinocytes. In this report, we describe and summarize various novel attempts to label melanosomes in search of a reliable, specific, reproducible and quantitative assay system. We tried to fluorescently label melanosomes by transfection of GFP-labeled melanosomal proteins and by incubation of melanocytes with fluorescent melanin intermediates or homologues. In most cases a weak cytoplasmic fluorescence was perceived, which was probably because of incorrect sorting or deficient incorporation of the fluorescent protein and different localization. We were able to label melanosomes via incorporation of 14C-thiouracil into melanin. Consequently, we tried to develop an assay to separate keratinocytes with transferred radioactivity from melanocytes after co-culture. Differential trypsinization and different magnetic bead separation techniques were tested with unsatisfactory results. An attempt was also made to incorporate fluorescent thiouracil, since this would allow cells to be separated by FACS. In conclusion, different methods to measure pigment transfer between donor melanocytes and acceptor keratinocytes were thoroughly examined. This information could give other researchers a head start in the search for a melanosome transfer assay with said qualities to better understand pigment transfer.

  20. Signaling pathways in melanosome biogenesis and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2010-07-01

    Melanosomes are the specialized intracellular organelles of pigment cells devoted to the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin pigments, which are responsible for most visible pigmentation in mammals and other vertebrates. As a direct consequence, any genetic mutation resulting in alteration of melanosomal function, either because affecting pigment cell survival, migration and differentiation, or because interfering with melanosome biogenesis, transport and transfer to keratinocytes, is immediately translated into color variations of skin, fur, hair or eyes. Thus, over 100 genes and proteins have been identified as pigmentary determinants in mammals, providing us with a deep understanding of this biological system, which functions by using mechanisms and processes that have parallels in other tissues and organs. In particular, many genes implicated in melanosome biogenesis have been characterized, so that melanosomes represent an incredible source of information and a model for organelles belonging to the secretory pathway. Furthermore, the function of melanosomes can be associated with common physiological phenotypes, such as variation of pigmentation among individuals, and with rare pathological conditions, such as albinism, characterized by severe visual defects. Among the most relevant mechanisms operating in melanosome biogenesis are the signal transduction pathways mediated by two peculiar G protein-coupled receptors: the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), involved in the fair skin/red hair phenotype and skin cancer; and OA1 (GPR143), whose loss-of-function results in X-linked ocular albinism. This review will focus on the most recent novelties regarding the functioning of these two receptors, by highlighting emerging signaling mechanisms and general implications for cell biology and pathology. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Melanosome transfer evaluation by quantitative measurement of Pmel 17 in human normal melanocyte-keratinocyte co-cultures: effect of an Alaria esculenta extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdy, Clotilde; Branka, Jean-Eric; Mekideche, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Numerous strategies have been proposed to evaluate melanosome transfer. Methods allowing quantitative measurements of this transfer in human normal cellular models, however, are very few and often require extremely specialized devices that are expensive and difficult to use. As a part of the melanosome-specific membrane-bound glycoprotein, Pmel 17 is released from the melanosome membrane by ectodomain shedding. We reasoned, therefore, that it should be possible to evaluate melanosome transfer by quantifying this "soluble" Pmel 17. The Pmel 17 ELISA assay developed permits a detection of 10 to 1000 ng/ml of this glycoprotein in human normal melanocyte-keratinocyte co-culture media. As expected, niacinamide, a well-known melanosome transfer inhibitor, significantly reduced the Pmel 17 quantities found in the culture media. This validated our experimental design. We then used our model to show that a whitening cosmetic active compound, i.e., an Alaria esculenta extract, can (at least in part) enable a significant decrease in the melanosome transfer to produce a lightening effect without affecting melanin production. This research provides a simple and efficient method to quantify melanosome transfer in a human normal co-culture model. It is a particularly useful tool with which to facilitate the development of new active whitening compounds.

  2. Morphological changes in hair melanosomes by aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Takashi

    2018-02-28

    Various changes appear in hair by aging, and graying is the most remarkable one. Changes in melanocytes have been well studied as the cause; however, little is known about the change in melanosomes which have a role of carrying melanin pigments into hair shafts. Using pigmented hairs of Japanese females from their age of 4-75, I isolated melanosomes and observed them. As a result, I found a significant change in the morphology of hair melanosomes with age. They were ellipsoidal on the whole and there was no age dependence in the major axis, while the minor axis significantly increased and its frequency distribution broadened with age. The anticipated volume of the melanosome of the oldest person hairs was about twice larger than that of child hairs. This enlargement of melanosome seems to be a cause of the age-related color change in pigmented hairs from brown to black. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Demonstration of melanosome transfer by a shedding microvesicle mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Glynis

    2012-04-01

    The process of melanosome transfer has fascinated pigment cell biologists for decades. Whole-organelle transfer is a unique property of melanocytes, suggesting that the biologic underpinnings of the process reflect melanocyte- and keratinocyte-specific proteins and pathways. Although several mechanisms of melanosome transfer are likely to occur in the skin, Ando et al. focused on a new mechanism of melanosome transfer that involves release of melanosome-containing globules, similar to shedding vesicles into the extracellular space, followed by uptake by keratinocytes. This model adds further complexity to the process of melanosome transfer in the skin.

  4. Differences in the melanosome distribution within the epidermal melanin units and its association with the impairing background of leukoderma in vitiligo and halo nevi: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xi-Xi; Ding, Gao-Zhong; Zhao, Wen-E; Li, Xue; Ling, Yu-Ting; Sun, Li; Gong, Qing-Li; Lu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Skin color is determined by the number of melanin granules produced by melanocytes that are transferred to keratinocytes. Melanin synthesis and the distribution of melanosomes to keratinocytes within the epidermal melanin unit (EMU) within the skin of vitiligo patients have been poorly studied. The ultrastructure and distribution of melanosomes in melanocytes and surrounding keratinocytes in perilesional vitiligo and normal skin were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, we performed a quantitative analysis of melanosome distribution within the EMUs with scatter plot. Melanosome count within keratinocytes increased significantly compared with melanocytes in perilesional stable vitiligo (P vitiligo. Furthermore, melanosome counts within melanocytes and their surrounding keratinocytes in perilesional active vitiligo skin decreased significantly compared with the other groups. In addition, taking the means-standard error of melanosome count within melanocytes and keratinocytes in healthy controls as a normal lower limit, EMUs were graded into 3 stages (I-III). Perilesional active vitiligo presented a significantly different constitution in stages compared to other groups (P vitiligo. Active vitiligo varies in stages and in stage II, EMUs are slightly impaired, but can be resuscitated, providing a golden opportunity with the potential to achieve desired repigmentation with an appropriate therapeutic choice. Adverse milieu may also contribute to the low melanosome count in keratinocytes.

  5. The effect of the NMDA receptor-dependent signaling pathway on cell morphology and melanosome transfer in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jing; Wang, Nan; Gao, Lili; Li, Lili; Zheng, Siwen; Liu, Yuejian; Ozukum, Molu; Nikiforova, Anna; Zhao, Guangming; Song, Zhiqi

    2016-12-01

    The pigmentation of skin and hair in mammals is driven by the intercellular transfer of melanosome from the melanocyte to surrounding keratinocytes However, the detailed molecular mechanism is still a subject of investigation. To investigate the effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent signaling pathway on melanocyte morphologic change and melanosome transfer between melanocytes and keratinocytes. The expression and the intracellular distribution of NMDA receptor in human melanocyte were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Melanocytes were treated with 100μM NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate] and 100μM NMDA receptor agonist NMDA, after which the morphological change of melanocyte dendrites and filopodias were observed by scanning electron microscope. The β-tubulin distribution and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) were observed by immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry under the same treatment respectively. In addition, melanocytes and keratinocytes were co-cultured with or without treatment of MK-801, and the melanosome transfer efficacy were analyzed by flow cytometry. We show that human epidermal melanocytes expresses NMDA receptor 1, one subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). Stimulation with agonist of NMDA receptor increased the number of melanocyte filopodia. In contrast, blockage of NMDA receptor with antagonist decreased the number of melanocyte filopodia and this morphological change was accompanied by the disorganization of β-tubulin microfilaments in the intracellular cytoskeleton. In melanocyte-keratinocyte co-cultures, numerous melanocyte filopodia connect to keratinocyte plasma membranes; agonist of NMDA receptor exhibited an increased number of melanocyte filopodia attachments to keratinocyte, while antagonist of NMDA receptor led to a decreased. Moreover, antagonist of NMDA receptor decreased

  6. Analysis of initial melanogenesis including tyrosinase transfer and melanosome differentiation through interrupted melanization by glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imokawa, G

    1989-07-01

    Because glycosylation-dependent melanization inhibition induced in cultured B-16 melanoma cells by glucosamine is reversible, producing synchronized initiation of melanogenesis after its removal, we have analyzed the possible dynamics of initial melanogenesis through their interruption by glutathione. The addition of glutathione at 0.2% concentration to the theophylline-stimulated recovery process completely interrupts the initiation of melanization for at least 72 h. At the electron microscopic level, theophylline-treated cells have many vacuolar melanosomes with distinct pigmentation which contain some vesicles (64% of total premelanosomes) or amorphous, filamentous, or granular materials within the interior which are suggestive of pheomelanotic melanosomes. The addition of glutathione induces a complete absence of melanization in the premelanosomes, within which a filamentous interior with periodicity is generally re-formed with almost complete disappearance of internal vesicles, providing dramatic changes to the size and shape characteristic of eumelanotic melanosome. Electron microscopic dopa reaction of glutathione-treated cells shows a predominant localization of tyrosinase activity in the Golgi-associated endoplasmic reticulum-lysosome and coated vesicles, but not in premelanosomes, in contrast to their dispersed distribution in all melanogenic organelles in the theophylline-treated control, suggesting a lack of tyrosinase translocation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of tyrosinase in the large granule fraction shows that in analogy with electron microscopic observations, glutathione blocks the reappearance of membrane-bound T3 tyrosinase which occurs in the theophylline-treated control during the recovery process, whereas the dynamics of T1 tyrosinase is almost the same as that of the control. These findings suggest that glutathione provides a new situation of interrupted melanogenesis in which melanization cannot proceed despite

  7. Filopodia are conduits for melanosome transfer to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Glynis; Leopardi, Sonya; Printup, Stacey; Madden, Brian C

    2002-04-01

    Melanosomes are specialized melanin-synthesizing organelles critical for photoprotection in the skin. Melanosome transfer to keratinocytes, which involves whole organelle donation to another cell, is a unique biological process and is poorly understood. Time-lapse digital movies and electron microscopy show that filopodia from melanocyte dendrites serve as conduits for melanosome transfer to keratinocytes. Cdc42, a small GTP-binding protein, is known to mediate filopodia formation. Melanosome-enriched fractions isolated from human melanocytes expressed the Cdc42 effector proteins PAK1 and N-WASP by western blotting. Expression of constitutively active Cdc42 (Cdc42(V12)) in melanocytes co-cultured with keratinocytes induced a highly dendritic phenotype with extensive contacts between melanocytes and keratinocytes through filopodia, many of which contained melanosomes. These results suggest a unique role for filopodia in organelle transport and, in combination with our previous work showing the presence of SNARE proteins and rab3a on melanosomes, suggest a novel model system for melanosome transfer to keratinocytes.

  8. A role for Na+,K+-ATPase α1 in regulating Rab27a localisation on melanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia E G Booth

    Full Text Available The mechanism(s by which Rab GTPases are specifically recruited to distinct intracellular membranes remains elusive. Here we used Rab27a localisation onto melanosomes as a model to investigate Rab targeting. We identified the α1 subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase (ATP1a1 as a novel Rab27a interacting protein in melanocytes and showed that this interaction is direct with the intracellular M4M5 loop of ATP1a1 and independent of nucleotide bound status of the Rab. Knockdown studies in melanocytes revealed that ATP1a1 plays an essential role in Rab27a-dependent melanosome transport. Specifically, expression of ATP1a1, like the Rab27a GDP/GTP exchange factor (Rab3GEP, is essential for targeting and activation of Rab27a to melanosomes. Finally, we showed that the ability of Rab27a mutants to target to melanosomes correlates with the efficiency of their interaction with ATP1a1. Altogether these studies point to a new role for ATP1a1 as a regulator of Rab27a targeting and activation.

  9. Topology of membrane proteins-predictions, limitations and variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Govindarajan, Sudha; Bassot, Claudio; Västermark, Åke; Lamb, John; Shu, Nanjiang; Elofsson, Arne

    2017-10-26

    Transmembrane proteins perform a variety of important biological functions necessary for the survival and growth of the cells. Membrane proteins are built up by transmembrane segments that span the lipid bilayer. The segments can either be in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices or beta-sheets which create a barrel. A fundamental aspect of the structure of transmembrane proteins is the membrane topology, that is, the number of transmembrane segments, their position in the protein sequence and their orientation in the membrane. Along these lines, many predictive algorithms for the prediction of the topology of alpha-helical and beta-barrel transmembrane proteins exist. The newest algorithms obtain an accuracy close to 80% both for alpha-helical and beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. However, lately it has been shown that the simplified picture presented when describing a protein family by its topology is limited. To demonstrate this, we highlight examples where the topology is either not conserved in a protein superfamily or where the structure cannot be described solely by the topology of a protein. The prediction of these non-standard features from sequence alone was not successful until the recent revolutionary progress in 3D-structure prediction of proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Melanosome transfer: It is best to give and receive

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xufeng; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The pigmentation of skin and hair in mammals is driven by the creation within melanocytes of melanosomes, a specialized pigment-producing organelle, and the subsequent intercellular transfer of this organelle to keratinocytes. This latter process is absolutely required for visible pigmentation and effective photo-protection because it serves to disperse the pigment in skin and hair. Therefore, the transfer of melanosomes from the melanocyte to the keratinocyte is as important for the biologic...

  11. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal limiting membrane (ILM, the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies.

  12. Inhibition of melanosome transfer results in skin lightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberg, M; Paine, C; Sharlow, E; Andrade-Gordon, P; Costanzo, M; Eisinger, M; Shapiro, S S

    2000-08-01

    The chemical basis of melanogenesis is well documented, but the mechanism of melanosome transfer and the regulation of pigmentation by keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions are not well understood. Therefore we examined the effects of serine protease inhibitors on skin pigmentation and found that the protease-activated receptor 2, expressed on keratinocytes, may regulate pigmentation via keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions. Here we show that modulation of protease-activated receptor 2 activation affects melanosome transfer into keratinocytes, resulting in changes in pigment production and deposition. SLIGRL, the protease-activated receptor 2 activating peptide, enhanced melanosome ingestion by keratinocytes, thus increasing pigment deposition. RWJ-50353, a serine protease inhibitor, led to reduced pigment deposition in melanocytes and depigmentation. Electron microscopy studies illustrated an accumulation of immature melanosomes inside melanocytes and abnormal dendrite dynamics in RWJ-50353-treated epidermal equivalents. RWJ-50353 induced a visible and dose-dependent skin lightening effect in the dark-skinned Yucatan swine. Examinations by electron microscopy indicated that the in vivo transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to keratinocytes was affected. Our data suggest that modulation of keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions via the protease-activated receptor 2 pathway affects melanosome transfer. The use of RWJ-50353 to modulate protease-activated receptor 2 activation could lead to a new class of depigmenting agents.

  13. Melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs contributes to the intractability of malignant melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Lai, Barry; Zhang, Guofeng; Paterson, Jill K.; Rouzaud, François; Berens, Werner; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Garfield, Susan H.; Leapman, Richard D.; Hearing, Vincent J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-06-01

    Multidrug resistance mechanisms underlying the intractability of malignant melanomas remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the development of multidrug resistance in melanomas involves subcellular sequestration of intracellular cytotoxic drugs such as cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin; CDDP). CDDP is initially sequestered in subcellular organelles such as melanosomes, which significantly reduces its nuclear localization when compared with nonmelanoma/KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The melanosomal accumulation of CDDP remarkably modulates melanogenesis through a pronounced increase in tyrosinase activity. The altered melanogenesis manifested an 8-fold increase in both intracellular pigmentation and extracellular transport of melanosomes containing CDDP. Thus, our experiments provide evidence that melanosomes contribute to the refractory properties of melanoma cells by sequestering cytotoxic drugs and increasing melanosome-mediated drug export. Preventing melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs by inhibiting the functions of melanosomes may have great potential as an approach to improving the chemosensitivity of melanoma cells. cancer | melanosomes | skin | tumor therapy | multidrug resistance

  14. Melanoregulin regulates a shedding mechanism that drives melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xufeng S.; Masedunskas, Andreas; Weigert, Roberto; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Hammer, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian pigmentation is driven by the intercellular transfer of pigment-containing melanosomes from the tips of melanocyte dendrites to surrounding keratinocytes. Tip accumulation of melanosomes requires myosin Va, because melanosomes concentrate in the center of melanocytes from myosin Va-null (dilute) mice. This distribution defect results in inefficient melanosome transfer and a dilution of coat color. Dilute mice that simultaneously lack melanoregulin, the product of the dilute suppress...

  15. Melanosome transfer to and translocation in the keratinocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissy, Raymond E

    2003-01-01

    Complexion coloration in humans is primarily regulated by the amount and type of melanin synthesized by the epidermal melanocyte. However, additional and equally contributing factors consist of (1) efficient transfer of melanin from the melanocytes to the neighboring keratinocytes and (2) distribution and degradation of the transferred melanosomes by the recipient keratinocytes. Once synthesized in the cell body of the epidermal melanocyte, pigmented melanosomes are translocated down the dendrites and captured at the dendritic tips via various cytoskeletal elements. Molecules recently identified that participate in this process consist of Rab27a, myosin-Va and melanophilin. Eventually, these peripherally localized melanosomes are transferred to keratinocytes by a presently undefined mechanism. The protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) and unidentified surface lectins and glycoproteins facilitate this transfer process. Once incorporated into the keratinocytes, melanosomes are distributed individually or as clusters, aggregated towards the apical pole of the nucleus, and degraded as the keratinocytes undergo terminal differentiation and desquamation. Ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) can modulate the process of melanosome transfer from the melanocytes to the keratinocytes. UVR can upregulate expression of PAR-2 and lectin-binding receptors and increase phagocytic activity of cultured keratinocytes. Therefore, many cellular and molecular events that occur after melanogenesis contribute to skin color.

  16. Melanosome transfer: it is best to give and receive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufeng; Hammer, John A

    2014-08-01

    The pigmentation of skin and hair in mammals is driven by the creation within melanocytes of melanosomes, a specialized pigment-producing organelle, and the subsequent intercellular transfer of this organelle to keratinocytes. This latter process is absolutely required for visible pigmentation and effective photo-protection because it serves to disperse the pigment in skin and hair. Therefore, the transfer of melanosomes from the melanocyte to the keratinocyte is as important for the biological endpoint of mammalian pigmentation as the biogenesis of this fascinating organelle. Here we review new findings that shed light on, and raise additional questions about, the mechanism of this enigmatic process. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. mc1r Pathway regulation of zebrafish melanosome dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Jennifer; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Reynolds, Natalie L

    2008-01-01

    upon stimulation by alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) or reduce with melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). In mammals and birds, the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) responds to MSH, and stimulates the synthesis of black eumelanin. While MSH-cAMP signaling stimulates melanogenesis...... in mammals, and melanosome dispersal in cold-blood vertebrates, the pathway components are highly conserved. However, it has only been assumed that mc1r mediates melanosome dispersal in fish. Here, using morpholino oligonucleotides designed to knockdown mc1r expression, we find that mc1r morphants are unable...

  18. A method for quantifying melanosome transfer efficacy from melanocytes to keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwang-Chi; Shieh, Bin-Han; Lu, Mei-Hua; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chang, Li-Tze; Chao, Chung-Faye

    2008-10-01

    Several different in vivo and in vitro bioassays are used to evaluate melanosome transfer efficacy from melanocytes to keratinocytes. However, these methods are complicated and time consuming. Here, we report on a simple, rapid, direct, and reliable in vitro method for observing the process of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. First, we selected and tested a melanoma cell line RPMI-7951 that can normally synthesize melanin and transfer from mature melanosomes to keratinocytes in vitro. We cocultured these cells with a human ovarian teratoma transformed epidermal carcinoma cell line, which is also capable of accepting melanosomes transferred from melanocytes, as in normal keratinocytes. The cells were cocultured for 24-72 h and double labeled with FITC-conjugated antibody against the melanosome-associated protein TRP-1, and with Cy5-conjugated antibody against the keratinocyte-specific marker keratin 14. The cells were examined by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. Melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes increased in a time-dependent manner. To verify the accessibility of this method, the melanosome transfer inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor, 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, and a melanosome transfer stimulator, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, were added. The serine protease inhibitor decreased melanosome transfer, and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone increased melanosome transfer, in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, this is a simple, rapid, and effective model system to quantify the melanosome transfer efficacy from melanocytes to keratinocytes in vitro.

  19. The outer limiting membrane (OLM revisited: clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Omri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available S Omri1,2,3, B Omri1,2,3, M Savoldelli1,2,3,4, L Jonet1,2,3, B Thillaye-Goldenberg1,2,3, G Thuret5, P Gain5, J C Jeanny1,2,3, P Crisanti1,2,3, Francine Behar-Cohen1,2,3,41INSERM, U872 Physiopathology of ocular diseases: Therapeutic innovations, Paris, France; 2Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris6, Paris, France; 3Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Hôtel-Dieu de Paris, France; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Bellevue Hospital, University of Saint-Etienne, FrancePurpose: The outer limiting membrane (OLM is considered to play a role in maintaining the structure of the retina through mechanical strength. However, the observation of junction proteins located at the OLM and its barrier permeability properties may suggest that the OLM may be part of the retinal barrier.Material and methods: Normal and diabetic rat, monkey, and human retinas were used to analyze junction proteins at the OLM. Proteome analyses were performed using immunohistochemistry on sections and flat-mounted retinas and western blotting on protein extracts obtained from laser microdissection of the photoreceptor layers. Semi-thin and ultrastructure analyses were also reported.Results: In the rat retina, in the subapical region zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1, junction adhesion molecule (JAM, an atypical protein kinase C, is present and the OLM shows dense labeling of occludin, JAM, and ZO-1. The presence of occludin has been confirmed using western blot analysis of the microdissected OLM region. In diabetic rats, occludin expression is decreased and glial cells junctions are dissociated. In the monkey retina, occludin, JAM, and ZO-1 are also found in the OLM. Junction proteins have a specific distribution around cone photoreceptors and Müller glia. Ultrastructural analyses suggest that structures like tight junctions may exist between retinal glial Müller cells and photoreceptors.Conclusions: In the OLM

  20. The slaty mutation affects the morphology and maturation of melanosomes in the mouse melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroyuki

    2006-10-01

    The slaty (Dct(slt)) mutation is known to reduce the activity of dopachrome tautomerase in melanocytes and to reduce the melanin content in skin, hairs and eyes. Although the melanosomes in slaty melanocytes are reported to be eumelanosome-like, detailed melanosome biogenesis is not well studied. To address this point, melanosomes in neonatal epidermal melanocytes from wild-type (Dct+/Dct+) mice at the slaty locus as well as its congenic mouse mutant (Dct(slt)/Dct(slt)) in serum-free primary culture were observed under the electron microscope. Wild-type melanocytes possessed exclusively elliptical melanosomes with internal longitudinal structures, whereas in mutant melanocytes, numerous spherical melanosomes with globular depositions of pigment and elliptical melanosomes as well as mixed type of the two melanosomes were observed. Mature stage IV melanosomes were greatly decreased in mutant melanocytes, whereas immature stage III melanosomes were more numerous than in wild-type melanocytes. These results suggest that the slaty mutation affects the morphology and maturation of melanosomes in mouse melanocytes.

  1. Spectral Analysis by XANES Reveals that GPNMB Influences the Chemical Composition of Intact Melanosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Haraszti; C Trantow; A Hedberg-Buenz; M Grunze; M Anderson

    2011-12-31

    GPNMB is a unique melanosomal protein. Unlike many melanosomal proteins, GPNMB has not been associated with any forms of albinism, and it is unclear whether GPNMB has any direct influence on melanosomes. Here, melanosomes from congenic strains of C57BL/6J mice mutant for Gpnmb are compared to strain-matched controls using standard transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (XANES). Whereas electron microscopy did not detect any ultrastructural changes in melanosomes lacking functional GPNMB, XANES uncovered multiple spectral phenotypes. These results directly demonstrate that GPNMB influences the chemical composition of melanosomes and more broadly illustrate the potential for using genetic approaches in combination with nano-imaging technologies to study organelle biology.

  2. AP-1/KIF13A Blocking Peptides Impair Melanosome Maturation and Melanin Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Cécile; Ripoll, Léa; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Raposo, Graça; Delevoye, Cédric

    2018-02-14

    Melanocytes are specialized cells that generate unique organelles called melanosomes in which melanin is synthesized and stored. Melanosome biogenesis and melanocyte pigmentation require the transport and delivery of melanin synthesizing enzymes, such as tyrosinase and related proteins (e.g., TYRP1), from endosomes to maturing melanosomes. Among the proteins controlling endosome-melanosome transport, AP-1 together with KIF13A coordinates the endosomal sorting and trafficking of TYRP1 to melanosomes. We identify here β1-adaptin AP-1 subunit-derived peptides of 5 amino acids that block the interaction of KIF13A with AP-1 in cells. Incubating these peptides with human MNT-1 cells or 3D-reconstructed pigmented epidermis decreases pigmentation by impacting the maturation of melanosomes in fully pigmented organelles. This study highlights that peptides targeting the intracellular trafficking of melanocytes are candidate molecules to tune pigmentation in health and disease.

  3. AP-1/KIF13A Blocking Peptides Impair Melanosome Maturation and Melanin Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Campagne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Melanocytes are specialized cells that generate unique organelles called melanosomes in which melanin is synthesized and stored. Melanosome biogenesis and melanocyte pigmentation require the transport and delivery of melanin synthesizing enzymes, such as tyrosinase and related proteins (e.g., TYRP1, from endosomes to maturing melanosomes. Among the proteins controlling endosome-melanosome transport, AP-1 together with KIF13A coordinates the endosomal sorting and trafficking of TYRP1 to melanosomes. We identify here β1-adaptin AP-1 subunit-derived peptides of 5 amino acids that block the interaction of KIF13A with AP-1 in cells. Incubating these peptides with human MNT-1 cells or 3D-reconstructed pigmented epidermis decreases pigmentation by impacting the maturation of melanosomes in fully pigmented organelles. This study highlights that peptides targeting the intracellular trafficking of melanocytes are candidate molecules to tune pigmentation in health and disease.

  4. Molecular preservation of the pigment melanin in fossil melanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Johan; Uvdal, Per; Sjövall, Peter; Nilsson, Dan E; Engdahl, Anders; Schultz, Bo Pagh; Thiel, Volker

    2012-05-08

    Fossil feathers, hairs and eyes are regularly preserved as carbonized traces comprised of masses of micrometre-sized bodies that are spherical, oblate or elongate in shape. For a long time, these minute structures were regarded as the remains of biofilms of keratinophilic bacteria, but recently they have been reinterpreted as melanosomes; that is, colour-bearing organelles. Resolving this fundamental difference in interpretation is crucial: if endogenous then the fossil microbodies would represent a significant advancement in the fields of palaeontology and evolutionary biology given, for example, the possibility to reconstruct integumentary colours and plumage colour patterns. It has previously been shown that certain trace elements occur in fossils as organometallic compounds, and hence may be used as biomarkers for melanin pigments. Here we expand this knowledge by demonstrating the presence of molecularly preserved melanin in intimate association with melanosome-like microbodies isolated from an argentinoid fish eye from the early Eocene of Denmark.

  5. Keratinocyte growth factor promotes melanosome transfer to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Giorgia; Ceccarelli, Simona; Kovacs, Daniela; Aspite, Nicaela; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Picardo, Mauro

    2005-12-01

    Melanogenesis and melanosome transfer from the melanocytes to the neighboring keratinocytes are induced by ultraviolet radiation and modulated by autocrine and paracrine factors. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/fibroblast growth factor (FGF)7) is a paracrine mediator of human keratinocyte growth and differentiation. We evaluated the influence of KGF on melanosome transfer in co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis using anti-tyrosinase and anti-human cytokeratin antibodies, phagocytic assays using fluorescent latex beads, and ultrastructural analysis indicated that KGF is able to induce melanosome transfer acting only on the recipient keratinocytes and as a consequence of a general role of KGF in the promotion of the phagocytic process. Inhibition of proteinase-activated receptor-2, to block the Rho-dependent phagocytic pathway, or of the Src family tyrosine kinases, to inhibit the Rac-dependent pathway, showed that KGF promotes phagocytosis through both mechanisms. Increased expression of the KGF receptor (KGFR) on the keratinocytes by transfection led to increased phagocytosis of latex beads following KGF treatment, suggesting that the KGF effect is directly mediated by KGFR expression and activation. Moreover, confocal microscopic analysis revealed that KGFR localize in phagosomes during KGF-induced phagocytosis, suggesting a direct role of the receptor in regulating both the early steps of uptake and the intracellular traffic of the phagosomes.

  6. Wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Zhang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Melanosome is an organelle for synthesis, storage and transport the melanin, a major intrinsic pigment. In retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), it is generally accepted that melanosome plays a critical photoprotective role, and it has been shown that that loss of melanin from RPE could be an early event towards age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, melanosome is also the major contributor to the optical properties of RPE, due to its high refractive index and the strong optical absorption of melanin. Therefore, a characterization and understanding the optical properties of melanin is of great interest to relate the physical and chemical changes of melanosomes, and their fundamental roles in RPE-related retinal diseases such as AMD. Here, we present a theoretical study to characterize the full optical properties of melanosomes. We modeled melanosomes as uniformly melanin filled spheroids, based on their morphology under transmission electron microscopy. T-matrix method was used to simulate the wavelength dependent total scattering, backscattering, absorption cross sections, and anisotropy factor. We verified our simulation on backscattering cross section of melanosome by comparing optical coherence tomography taken in visible and NIR ranges. In addition, we studied the changes of the optical properties of melanosomes on melanin bleaching. The results suggested a spectroscopic mechanism for optical detection of melanin loss by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

  7. FK506 regulates pigmentation by maturing the melanosome and facilitating their transfer to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Chang, Sung Eun; Kang, Duk-Hee; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    Despite the clinical ability of topical tacrolimus (FK506) to effectively promote repigmentation in vitiligo, the underlying mechanism through which FK506 regulates melanogenesis was previously unclear. We found that FK506 treatment increased the melanin contents (especially that of eumelanin) in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. This treatment did not affect the transcription levels of tyrosinase, suggesting that FK506 increases melanin synthesis by regulating cellular levels of tyrosinase. Interestingly, FK506 promoted melanosome maturation by increasing melanosomal pH (a marker of melanosome maturation), thereby enhancing the stability of melanosome-localized tyrosinase. In addition, FK506 enhanced UVB-mediated melanosome secretion, the uptake of melanosomes by HaCaT cells, and the transfer of melanosomes to keratinocytes co-cultured with melanocytes. Together, these findings suggest that FK506 contributes to melanin synthesis by regulating the maturation of melanosomes and their transfer to keratinocytes. This offers a novel regulatory mechanism through which FK506 and UVB can have a combined effect on melanogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Visualization of the melanosome transfer-inhibition in a mouse epidermal cell co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Jong; Kazi, Julhash U; Lee, You-Ree; Nguyen, Dung H; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Shin, Jeong-Hyun; Soh, Jae-Won; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-02-01

    Transfer of melanin-containing melanosomes from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes results in skin pigmentation. To provide a more practical method of visualizing melanosomes in melanocytes as well as in keratinocytes, we attempted to use murine cell lines instead of human primary cells. We generated various fluorescent fusion proteins of tyrosinase, a melanin synthesis enzyme located in the melanosome, by using green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein. The intracellular localization of tyrosinase was then examined by fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Co-culture of murine melanocytes and keratinocytes was optimized and melanosome transfer was either stimulated with alphaMSH or partially inhibited by niacinamide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a murine co-culture model, in addition to human primary cell co-culture, can be a good tool for depigmenting agent screening by monitoring melanosome transfer.

  9. The outer membrane, not a coat of host proteins, limits antigenicity of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D L; Chang, P; McDowall, A W; Radolf, J D

    1992-01-01

    Virulent Treponema pallidum reacts poorly with the specific antibodies present in human and rabbit syphilitic sera, a phenomenon often attributed to an outer coat of host serum proteins. Here we present additional evidence that the limited antigenicity of virulent organisms actually is due to a paucity of proteins in the outer membrane. Initially, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that the outer membrane is highly susceptible to damage from physical manipulation (i.e., centrifugation and resuspension) and nonionic detergents. Organisms with disrupted outer membranes were markedly more antigenic than intact treponemes as determined by immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) with rabbit syphilitic and antiendoflagellar antisera. Data obtained with a new radioimmunoassay, designated the T. pallidum surface-specific radioimmunoassay, corroborated these IEM findings by demonstrating that the major T. pallidum immunogens are not surface exposed; the assay also was unable to detect serum proteins, including fibronectin, on the surfaces of intact organisms. Furthermore, IEM of T. pallidum on ultrathin cryosections with monospecific anti-47-kDa-immunogen antiserum confirmed the intracellular location of the 47-kDa immunogen. On the basis of these and previous findings, we proposed a new model for T. pallidum ultrastructure in which the outer membrane contains a small number of transmembrane proteins and the major membrane immunogens are anchored by lipids to the periplasmic leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane. This unique ultrastructure explains the remarkable ability of virulent organisms to evade the humoral immune response of the T. pallidum-infected host. Images PMID:1541522

  10. Combined epiretinal and internal limiting membrane peeling facilitated by high dilution indocyanine green negative staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Kaehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the utilization of indocyanine green (ICG dye to facilitate combined/en bloc removal of epiretinal membranes (ERM along with internal limiting membranes (ILM. The method utilizes a highly diluted preparation of ICG in dextrose water solvent (D5W. Elimination of fluid air exchange step facilitating staining in the fluid phase and low intensity lighting help minimize potential ICG toxicity. The technique demonstrates how ICG facilitates negative staining of ERMs and how ILM peeling concomitantly can allow complete and efficient ERM removal minimizing surgical time and the necessity for dual or sequential staining.

  11. Comparison of structural and chemical properties of black and red human hair melanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Hong, Lian; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Adhyaru, Bhavin; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Bowers, Clifford R; Simon, John D

    2005-01-01

    Melanosomes in black and red human hair are isolated and characterized by various chemical and physical techniques. Different yields of 4-amino-hydroxyphenolanaline by HI hydrolysis (a marker for pheomelanin) and pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid by KMnO(4)/H(+) oxidation (a marker for eumelanin) indicate that the melanosomes in black hair are eumelanosomes, whereas those in red hair are mainly pheomelanosomes. Atomic force microscopy reveals that eumelanosomes and pheomelanosomes have ellipsoidal and spherical shapes, respectively. Eumelanosomes maintain structural integrity upon extraction from the keratin matrix, whereas pheomelanosomes tend to fall apart. The black-hair eumelanosomes have an average of 14.6 +/- 0.5% amino acids content, which is attributed to the internal proteins entrapped in the melanosomes granules. The red-hair melanosomes contain more than 44% of amino acid content even after extensive proteolytic digestion. This high content of amino acids and the poorly reserved integrity of red-hair melanosomes suggest that some proteins are possibly covalently bonded with the melanin constituents in addition to those that are entrapped inside the melanin species. Soluene solubilization assay indicates the absorbance of melanin per gram of sample, adjusted for the amino acid content, is a factor of 2.9 greater for the black-hair melanosomes than the red-hair melanosomes. Metal analysis reveals significant amounts of diverse heavy metal ions bound to the two types of melanosomes. The amount of Cu(II) and Zn(II) are similar but Fe(III) content is four times higher in the red-hair melanosomes. (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and infrared spectra are presented and are shown to be powerful techniques for discerning differences in the amino acid contents, the 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid:5,6-dihydroxyindole ratio, and the degree of cross-linking in the pigment. Excellent agreement is observed between these spectral results and the

  12. Displacement of fovea toward optic disk after macular hole surgery with internal limiting membrane peeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Kouichi; Sato, Atsuko; Senda, Nami; Fukui, Emi

    2017-01-01

    Kouichi Ohta, Atsuko Sato, Nami Senda, Emi Fukui Department of Ophthalmology, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, Nagano, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a displacement of the foveal depression toward the optic disk after idiopathic macular hole (MH) surgery with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling.Methods: Two patients with a unilateral MH developed an MH in the fellow eyes. Vitrectomy with ILM peeling was performed on the fellow...

  13. Melanosomes or Microbes: Testing an Alternative Hypothesis for the Origin of Microbodies in Fossil Feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Alison E.; Zheng, Wenxia; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Li, Da-Qing; Lacovara, Kenneth J.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2014-03-01

    Microbodies associated with fossil feathers, originally attributed to microbial biofilm, have been reinterpreted as melanosomes: pigment-containing, eukaryotic organelles. This interpretation generated hypotheses regarding coloration in non-avian and avian dinosaurs. Because melanosomes and microbes overlap in size, distribution and morphology, we re-evaluate both hypotheses. We compare melanosomes within feathers of extant chickens with patterns induced by microbial overgrowth on the same feathers, using scanning (SEM), field emission (FESEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Melanosomes are always internal, embedded in a morphologically distinct keratinous matrix. Conversely, microbes grow across the surface of feathers in continuous layers, more consistent with published images from fossil feathers. We compare our results to both published literature and new data from a fossil feather ascribed to Gansus yumenensis (ANSP 23403). `Mouldic impressions' were observed in association with both the feather and sediment grains, supporting a microbial origin. We propose criteria for distinguishing between these two microbodies.

  14. Cholesterol solubility limit in lipid membranes probed by small angle neutron scattering and MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumit; Castro-Roman, Francisco; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Bautista, Pedro Jesus; Krzyzanowski, Natalie; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2014-12-14

    The solubility limits of cholesterol in small unilamellar vesicles made of POPS and POPC were probed using Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) and coarse grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. SANS, being non-invasive, allowed the direct and quantitative measurement of cholesterol in intact vesicles. Our experimental measurements reveal a 61% mole fraction solubility limit of cholesterol in POPC, consistent with previous studies. However, in POPS the solubility limit of cholesterol is found to be 73% mole fraction. Previous work reports solubility limits of cholesterol in POPS varying significantly, ranging from 36% up to 66%. The CG MD simulations are in remarkable quantitative agreement with our experimental results showing similar solubility limits. Further, neither experiments nor simulations show evidence of stable nanodomains of cholesterol in POPS membranes as suggested in some previous reports.

  15. INVERTED INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE FLAP TECHNIQUE FOR MACULAR HOLE SURGERY WITHOUT EXTRA MANIPULATION OF THE FLAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Giamberto; Mura, Marco; Figus, Michele; Loiudice, Pasquale; Peiretti, Enrico; De Cillà, Stefano; Fuentes, Taiusha; Nasini, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether surgical manipulation steps of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap, such as ILM trimmed, ILM tuck inside the hole, ILM massage, are mandatory to obtain satisfactory outcomes for the repair of large stage IV idiopathic macular hole using the inverted ILM flap technique. In this interventional comparative prospective single-masked study, 81 eyes were randomized into 2 treatments groups. In Group 1 (41 eyes), the classic inverted ILM flap technique was performed. In Group 2 (40 eyes), a modified procedure was used: after ILM peeling, no extra flap manipulation was performed. The macular hole was covered by the inverted ILM flap because of the air pressure at the time of the fluid-air exchange. At 12 months, macular hole closure was observed in 40 eyes (97.6%) in Group 1 and in 39 eyes in Group 2 (97.5%). U-shape closure rate, ellipsoid zone defects, and external limiting membrane defects were similar in both groups. The results indicate no statistical difference in anatomical and functional success between both groups. The macular hole closure rate, improved visual acuity, and no extra complications indicate noninferiority of the modified inverted ILM technique. Internal limiting membrane finishing, tucking, and massage may not be required to obtain surgical success.

  16. Manakins can produce iridescent and bright feather colours without melanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2016-06-15

    Males of many species often use colourful and conspicuous ornaments to attract females. Among these, male manakins (family: Pipridae) provide classic examples of sexual selection favouring the evolution of bright and colourful plumage coloration. The highly iridescent feather colours of birds are most commonly produced by the periodic arrangement of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) within barbules. Melanin increases the saturation of iridescent colours seen from optimal viewing angles by absorbing back-scattered light; however, this may reduce the wide-angle brightness of these signals, contributing to a dark background appearance. We examined the nanostructure of four manakin species (Lepidothrix isidorei, L. iris, L. nattereri and L. coeruleocapilla) to identify how they produce their bright plumage colours. Feather barbs of all four species were characterized by dense and fibrous internal spongy matrices that likely increase scattering of light within the barb. The iridescent, yet pale or whitish colours of L. iris and L. nattereri feathers were produced not by periodically arranged melanosomes within barbules, but by periodic matrices of air and β-keratin within barbs. Lepidothrix iris crown feathers were able to produce a dazzling display of colours with small shifts in viewing geometry, likely because of a periodic nanostructure, a flattened barb morphology and disorder at a microstructural level. We hypothesize that iridescent plumage ornaments of male L. iris and L. nattereri are under selection to increase brightness or luminance across wide viewing angles, which may potentially increase their detectability by females during dynamic and fast-paced courtship displays in dim light environments. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Progress on Background-Limited Membrane-Isolated TES Bolometers for Far-IR/Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, M.; Day, P. K.; Bradford, C. M.; Bock, J. J.; Leduc, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the lowest attainable phonon noise equivalent power (NEP) for membrane-isolation bolometers, we fabricated and measured the thermal conductance of suspended Si3N4 beams with different geometries via a noise thermometry technique. We measured beam cross-sectional areas ranging from 0.35 x 0.5 (micro)m(sup 2) to 135 x 1.0 (micro)m(sup 2) and beam lengths ranging from (micro)m to 8300 (micro)m. The measurements directly imply that membrane-isolation bolometers are capable of reaching a phonon noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4 x 10(sup -20)W/Hz(sup 1)/O . This NEP adequate for the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) proposed for the Japanese SPICA observatory, and adequate for NASA's SAFIR observatory, a 10-meter, 4 K telescope to be deployed at L2. Further, we measured the heat capacity of a suspended Si3N4 membrane and show how this result implies that one can make membrane-isolation bolometers with a response time which is fast enough for BLISS.

  18. Purity and stability of the membrane-limited glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone-BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Grant L; Rainville, Jennifer R; Zhao, Qi; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2017-09-20

    Cellular effects of glucocorticoids can be separated into classical transcriptional regulation via activation of the canonical nuclear glucocorticoid receptor and rapid actions mediated by activation of one or more putative membrane-associated glucocorticoid receptors that regulate both transcriptional and non-transcriptional signaling. Dexamethasone-bovine serum albumin (Dex-BSA) is one of several membrane-limited steroid receptor agonists. Dex-BSA and other steroid conjugates such as corticosterone-, estradiol- and testosterone-BSA have been used to study rapid steroid effects initiated by putative membrane receptors. The purity and stability of the steroid-BSA conjugate is crucial, therefore, since any steroid that is not bound to or that dissociates from the BSA conjugate could penetrate into the intracellular compartment and confound the experiment. We used fluorine NMR to determine if free Dex could be detected in a commercially available Dex-BSA dissolved in H 2 O. Non-covalently bound Dex was detected in the Dex-BSA solution, but the level of free Dex remained constant over time and with increasing temperature, indicating that the free Dex was not a result of instability of the Dex-BSA conjugate. The free Dex was lost when the Dex-BSA was denatured and subjected to dialysis, which suggested that it was trapped in the Dex-BSA three-dimensional structure and not covalently bound to the BSA. The purified, renatured Dex-BSA retained its rapid activity, which confirmed that the observed effects of Dex-BSA are not caused by non-covalently-bound Dex. Therefore, the Dex contaminant found in the Dex-BSA solution is likely to be tightly, but non-covalently, bound to BSA, and the Dex-BSA activity remains membrane-limited. Our findings indicate that Dex-BSA remains a suitable membrane-restricted glucocorticoid receptor agonist, but suggest that denaturing purification is a useful control for the study of membrane-initiated steroid-BSA actions. Copyright © 2017

  19. Photoaging of retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes: The effect of photobleaching on morphology and reactivity of the pigment granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Kozinska, Anna; Pilat, Anna; Kaczara, Patrycja; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of age-related changes in antioxidant and photoprotective properties of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanosomes, the effect of in vitro photoaging of bovine RPE melanosomes was examined employing an array of complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, saturation recovery EPR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to determine melanin content of control and photobleached melanosomes, and to monitor changes in their morphology. Methylene blue (MB), TEMPO choline, dysprosium(III) ions and singlet oxygen were employed as molecular probes to characterize the efficiency of control and photobleached melanosomes to interact with different reagents. EPR oximetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, iodometric assay of lipid hydroperoxides and time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence were used to analyze the efficiency of photobleached and untreated melanosomes to inhibit MB-photosensitized oxidation of liposomal lipids. The obtained results revealed that, compared to untreated melanosomes, moderately photobleached melanosomes protected unsaturated lipids less efficiently against photosensitized peroxidiation, while weakly photobleached melanosomes were actually better antioxidant and photoprotective agents. The observed changes could be attributed to two effects - modification of the melanosome morphology and oxidative degradation of the melanin functional groups induced by different degree of photobleaching. While the former increases the accessibility of melanin nanoaggregates to reagents, the latter reduces the efficiency of melanin to interact with chemical and physical agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Macular hole repair by vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling in highly myopic eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lan-Hsin; Chen, Yen-Po; Wang, Nan-Kai; Yeung, Ling; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Chen, Tun-Lu; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes of macular hole (MH) repair by vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling in highly myopic eyes. In this retrospective interventional case series, 30 highly myopic eyes with MH in 29 consecutive patients who underwent vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling to repair MH were studied. The mean follow-up time was 36.4 months. The anatomical outcomes of the MH were evaluated by optical coherence tomography. The best-corrected visual acuities before and after surgery were compared as the functional outcome. Women accounted for 69% of MH in highly myopic eyes. The mean age was 49 years. The mean refraction error and mean axial length were -9.80 (± 2.93) diopter and 28.13 (± 2.41) mm, respectively. Myopic foveoschisis was observed in 3 eyes (10%). The MHs were closed by a single surgery in 26 eyes (87%), and the final closure rate was 97% (29/30 eyes). Macular hole surgery significantly improved best-corrected visual acuity from 1.20 ± 0.70 to 0.77 ± 0.51 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (P = 0.003). However, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment developed in 3 eyes (10%) during the follow-up. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling is effective to repair MH in highly myopic eyes in terms of anatomical and functional outcomes, although visual acuity may continue to improve slowly until 3 years after successful MH-closing surgery. In addition, a small proportion of MH cases were associated with myopic foveoschisis. Delayed hole closure and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment may occur in these highly myopic eyes after surgery.

  1. Macular morphology and visual acuity after macular hole surgery with or without internal limiting membrane peeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U.C.; Kroyer, K.; Sander, B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine postoperative macular morphology and visual outcome after 12 months in relation to internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus no peeling, indocyanine green (ICG) staining and re-operation in eyes that achieved macular hole closure after surgery. Methods: Seventy-four eyes...... tomography was used to assess central foveal thickness, central photoreceptor layer thickness (CPRT), central photoreceptor layer discontinuity (PRD) and relative reflectivity of the outer nuclear layer. Outcomes were correlated with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 12 months after surgery. Results: BCVA...

  2. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degreif, Daniel [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); de Rond, Tristan [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bertl, Adam [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Budin, Itay [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-18

    Cells modulate lipid metabolism in order to maintain membrane homeostasis. In this paper, we use a metabolic engineering approach to manipulate the stoichiometry of fatty acid unsaturation, a regulator of cell membrane fluidity, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, reduced lipid unsaturation triggered cell-cell adhesion (flocculation), a phenomenon characteristic of industrial yeast but uncommon in laboratory strains. We find that ER lipid saturation sensors induce expression of FLO1 – encoding a cell wall polysaccharide binding protein – independently of its canonical regulator. In wild-type cells, Flo1p-dependent flocculation occurs under oxygen-limited growth, which reduces unsaturated lipid synthesis and thus serves as the environmental trigger for flocculation. Transcriptional analysis shows that FLO1 is one of the most highly induced genes in response to changes in lipid unsaturation, and that the set of membrane fluidity-sensitive genes is globally activated as part of the cell's long-term response to hypoxia during fermentation. Finally, our results show how the lipid homeostasis machinery of budding yeast is adapted to carry out a broad response to an environmental stimulus important in biotechnology.

  3. Histopathologic and Electron Microscopic Features of Internal Limiting Membranes in Maculopathies of Various Etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rezaei Kanavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report micro- and ultrastructural features of internal limiting membranes (ILMs in various maculopathies and to evaluate the effects of indocyanine green (ICG and triamcinolone acetonide (TA on epiretinal proliferations associated with ILM and on retinal cleavage plane. Methods: ILMs from various maculopathies were evaluated regarding presence or absence of membrane-associated cells, type of cells and ILM thickness based on routine histopathology, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Results: Thirty ILM specimens were enrolled; 25 of which were evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry and 5 by TEM. ICG only had been used in 17 specimens, TA in 4, and both agents in one specimen. The majority of specimens were immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuron specific enolase. No significant difference in specimen cellularity and alteration of cleavage plane was noted between ICG-stained and non-ICG-stained ILMs or between TA-assisted and non-TAassisted ones. Excluding central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO cases, acellularity was not observed in any of ILMs from diabetic macular edema (DME, cystoid macular edema (CME, and traumatic macular hole (TMH eyes. TEM disclosed ILM thickening and cellularity in DME as compared to CRVO. Conclusion: Acellular membranes from CRVO maculopathy may be a sequel of acute retinal ischemia. Thickened diabetic ILMs with high cellularity may be related to chronic activation of Muller cells. No obvious influence of ICG or TA on epiretinal cellularity was detected and the dyes seem to have no significant effect on cleavage plane.

  4. Nano-scale morphology of melanosomes revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gorniak

    Full Text Available Melanosomes are highly specialized organelles that produce and store the pigment melanin, thereby fulfilling essential functions within their host organism. Besides having obvious cosmetic consequences--determining the color of skin, hair and the iris--they contribute to photochemical protection from ultraviolet radiation, as well as to vision (by defining how much light enters the eye. Though melanosomes can be beneficial for health, abnormalities in their structure can lead to adverse effects. Knowledge of their ultrastructure will be crucial to gaining insight into the mechanisms that ultimately lead to melanosome-related diseases. However, due to their small size and electron-dense content, physiologically intact melanosomes are recalcitrant to study by common imaging techniques such as light and transmission electron microscopy. In contrast, X-ray-based methodologies offer both high spatial resolution and powerful penetrating capabilities, and thus are well suited to study the ultrastructure of electron-dense organelles in their natural, hydrated form. Here, we report on the application of small-angle X-ray scattering--a method effective in determining the three-dimensional structures of biomolecules--to whole, hydrated murine melanosomes. The use of complementary information from the scattering signal of a large ensemble of suspended organelles and from single, vitrified specimens revealed a melanosomal sub-structure whose surface and bulk properties differ in two commonly used inbred strains of laboratory mice. Whereas melanosomes in C57BL/6J mice have a well-defined surface and are densely packed with 40-nm units, their counterparts in DBA/2J mice feature a rough surface, are more granular and consist of 60-nm building blocks. The fact that these strains have different coat colors and distinct susceptibilities to pigment-related eye disease suggest that these differences in size and packing are of biological significance.

  5. Displacement of fovea toward optic disk after macular hole surgery with internal limiting membrane peeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohta K

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kouichi Ohta, Atsuko Sato, Nami Senda, Emi Fukui Department of Ophthalmology, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, Nagano, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a displacement of the foveal depression toward the optic disk after idiopathic macular hole (MH surgery with internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling.Methods: Two patients with a unilateral MH developed an MH in the fellow eyes. Vitrectomy with ILM peeling was performed on the fellow eye to close the MH. Images of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT were used to measure the disk-to-fovea distances pre MH formation, after MH formation, and 6 months after the closure of the MH.Results: The disk-to-fovea distance was shorter at 6 months than after the development of the MH (4,109 µm and 4,174 µm in Case 1 and 4,001 µm and 4,051 µm in Case 2.Conclusion: These results indicate that the fovea moves nasally after the MH surgery with ILM peeling. Keywords: idiopathic macular hole, internal limiting membrane, optical coherence tomography, pars plana vitrectomy

  6. Pores of the inner limiting membrane in flat-mounted surgical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandorfer, Arnd; Schumann, Ricarda; Scheler, Renate; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm

    2011-05-01

    To demonstrate the incidence of pores in the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in flat-mounted ILM specimens and to show the immunocytochemical properties of cellular proliferation associated with them. One hundred and twelve ILM specimens from patients with idiopathic macular holes were flat mounted and screened for pores. The ILM was assessed by phase-contrast and interference microscopy. Various antibodies were used against glial cells, hyalocytes, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. In total, only three pores were found. They were characterized by a full-thickness defect of the ILM with irregular borders and cellular proliferation on the ILM. Glial cells were seen in direct association with the ILM pore. Glial cell and hyalocyte markers were the main immunologic features observed. Inner limiting membrane pores are a rare finding. Glial cells are likely to cross the ILM through these pores on their way from the retina to the vitreoretinal border. Given the frequency of cellular proliferation and the rare finding of ILM pores, other pathways have to be considered in playing the leading role in epiretinal proliferation. They might include migration of cells through ILM thinning along retinal vessels and proliferation of vitreous cortex hyalocytes at the vitreoretinal border.

  7. Melanosome transfer promoted by keratinocyte growth factor in light and dark skin-derived keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Giorgia; Bolasco, Giulia; Aspite, Nicaela; Lucania, Giuseppe; Lotti, Lavinia V; Torrisi, Maria R; Picardo, Mauro

    2008-03-01

    The transfer of melanin from melanocytes to keratinocytes is upregulated by UV radiation and modulated by autocrine and paracrine factors. Among them, the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF7) promotes melanosome transfer acting on the recipient keratinocytes through stimulation of the phagocytic process. To search for possible differences in the melanosome uptake of keratinocytes from different skin color, we analyzed the uptake kinetics and distribution pattern of fluorescent latex beads in primary cultures of light and dark skin-derived keratinocytes stimulated with KGF and we compared the direct effect of KGF on the melanosome transfer in co-cultures of human primary melanocytes with light and dark keratinocytes. KGF-promoted melanosome transfer was more significant in light keratinocytes compared to dark, due to an increased expression of KGF receptor in light skin keratinocytes. Colocalization studies performed by confocal microscopy using FITC-dextran as a phagocytic marker and fluorescent beads as well as inhibition of particle uptake by cytochalasin D, revealed that beads internalization induced by KGF occurs via actin-dependent phagocytosis. 3D image reconstruction by fluorescence microscopy and ultrastructural analysis through transmission electron microscopy showed differences in the distribution pattern of the beads in light and dark keratinocytes, consistent with the different melanosome distribution in human skin.

  8. Fossilized melanosomes and the colour of Cretaceous dinosaurs and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fucheng; Kearns, Stuart L; Orr, Patrick J; Benton, Michael J; Zhou, Zhonghe; Johnson, Diane; Xu, Xing; Wang, Xiaolin

    2010-02-25

    Spectacular fossils from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China have greatly expanded our knowledge of the diversity and palaeobiology of dinosaurs and early birds, and contributed to our understanding of the origin of birds, of flight, and of feathers. Pennaceous (vaned) feathers and integumentary filaments are preserved in birds and non-avian theropod dinosaurs, but little is known of their microstructure. Here we report that melanosomes (colour-bearing organelles) are not only preserved in the pennaceous feathers of early birds, but also in an identical manner in integumentary filaments of non-avian dinosaurs, thus refuting recent claims that the filaments are partially decayed dermal collagen fibres. Examples of both eumelanosomes and phaeomelanosomes have been identified, and they are often preserved in life position within the structure of partially degraded feathers and filaments. Furthermore, the data here provide empirical evidence for reconstructing the colours and colour patterning of these extinct birds and theropod dinosaurs: for example, the dark-coloured stripes on the tail of the theropod dinosaur Sinosauropteryx can reasonably be inferred to have exhibited chestnut to reddish-brown tones.

  9. Fossil melanosomes or bacteria? A wealth of findings favours melanosomes: Melanin fossilises relatively readily, bacteria rarely, hence the need for clarification in the debate over the identity of microbodies in fossil animal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Jakob

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of fossil melanosomes has resulted in a wealth of research over the last 7 years, notably the reconstruction of colour in dinosaurs and fossil mammals. In spite of these discoveries some authors persist in arguing that the observed microbodies could represent preserved bacteria. They contend that bacteria fossilise easily and everywhere, which means that one can never be certain that a microbody is a melanosome without an extraordinary burden of evidence. However, this critique mischaracterises the morphological and structural evidence for interpreting microbodies as fossil melanosomes, and hence the basis for using them in reconstructing prehistoric colours. The claims for bacterial omnipresence in the fossil record are themselves not supported, thus tipping the scales strongly towards melanosomes in the bacteria-versus-melanosome controversy. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experimental Investigation and Discussion on the Mechanical Endurance Limit of Nafion Membrane Used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As a solution of high efficiency and clean energy, fuel cell technologies, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, have caught extensive attention. However, after decades of development, the performances of PEMFCs are far from achieving the target from the Department of Energy (DOE. Thus, further understanding of the degradation mechanism is needed to overcome this obstacle. Due to the importance of proton exchange membrane in a PEMFC, the degradation of the membrane, such as hygrothermal aging effect on its properties, are particularly necessary. In this work, a thick membrane (Nafion N117, which is always used as an ionic polymer for the PEMFCs, has been analyzed. Experimental investigation is performed for understanding the mechanical endurance of the bare membranes under different loading conditions. Tensile tests are conducted to compare the mechanical property evolution of two kinds of bare-membrane specimens including the dog-bone and the deeply double edge notched (DDEN types. Both dog-bone and DDEN specimens were subjected to a series of degradation tests with different cycling times and wide humidity ranges. The tensile tests are repeated for both kinds of specimens to assess the strain-stress relations. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation and water absorption measurement were conducted to speculate the cause of this variation. The initial cracks along with the increasing of bound water content were speculated as the primary cause.

  11. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. Biomechanical Properties of the Internal Limiting Membrane after Intravitreal Ocriplasmin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielmuth, Franziska; Schumann, Ricarda G; Spindler, Volker; Wolf, Armin; Scheler, Renate; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Henrich, Paul B; Haritoglou, Christos

    2016-01-01

    To assess the stiffness of the human internal limiting membrane (ILM) and evaluate potential changes of mechanical properties following intravitreal ocriplasmin injection for vitreomacular traction. This is an interventional comparative case series of 12 surgically excised ILM specimens consecutively obtained from 9 eyes of 9 patients after unsuccessful pharmacologic vitreolysis with ocriplasmin. During the same time period, 16 specimens from 13 other eyes without ocriplasmin treatment were harvested during vitrectomy and served as controls. All patients presented with macular holes or vitreomacular traction and underwent vitrectomy with ILM peeling either with or without brilliant blue (BB) staining. All specimens were analyzed using atomic force microscopy with scan regions of 25 × 25 μm. In all specimens, both the retinal side and vitreal side of the ILM were analyzed. Atomic force microscopy revealed no significant differences in elasticity of ILM specimens removed from eyes with or without ocriplasmin treatment. Undulated areas of the retinal side presented stiffer than the vitreal side of the ILM. Topographical mapping of both the vitreal and retinal side of the ILM showed no apparent alteration of the morphology in ocriplasmin-treated eyes compared to untreated eyes. Staining with BB resulted in an increase of tissue stiffness. Intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin does not change biomechanical properties of the human ILM. There is no evidence of a potential enzymatic effect of ocriplasmin interfering with the stiffness of this basement membrane. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Effects of iron limitation on the respiratory chain and the membrane cytochrome pattern of the Euryarchaeon Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubmacher, Dirk; Matzanke, Berthold F; Anemüller, Stefan

    2003-12-01

    The effects of iron limitation on the electron transport chain of the extremely halophilic Euryarchaeon Halobacterium salinarum were analyzed. When iron was growth-limiting, the respiratory rates as well as the inhibition pattern of the membranes were significantly different from membranes of iron replete cells. Changes in the availability of iron cause the formation of different respiratory pathways including different entry sites for electrons, different terminal oxidases of the respiratory chain, and drastic changes of the cytochrome composition and of the relative amounts of cytochromes. Under iron-limiting conditions, mainly low-potential cytochromes were measured. EPR spectroscopic studies revealed that the amount of proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters is reduced in membranes under iron-limiting growth conditions. Taken together, our results strongly suggest for the first time an important role of iron supply for the bioenergetics of an Archaeon.

  14. Limitations of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Korona, D.; Haemers, S.; Weber, F.J.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine the reliability of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation (SSF) system. Methods and Results: In overcultures of Aspergillus oryzae on sterilized wheat flour discs overlaid with a polycarbonate membrane, we demonstrated that the presence of membrane filters reduced the

  15. Surface oxygen vacancy and oxygen permeation flux limits of perovskite ion transport membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Anton

    2015-09-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The mechanisms and quantitative models for how oxygen is separated from air using ion transport membranes (ITMs) are not well understood, largely due to the experimental complexity for determining surface exchange reactions at extreme temperatures (>800°C). This is especially true when fuels are present at the permeate surface. For both inert and reactive (fuels) operations, solid-state oxygen surface vacancies (δ) are ultimately responsible for driving the oxygen flux, JO2. In the inert case, the value of δ at either surface is a function of the local PO2 and temperature, whilst the magnitude of δ dictates both the JO2 and the inherent stability of the material. In this study values of δ are presented based on experimental measurements under inert (CO2) sweep: using a permeation flux model and local PO2 measurements, collected by means of a local gas-sampling probe in our large-scale reactor, we can determine δ directly. The ITM assessed was La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF); the relative resistances to JO2 were quantified using the pre-defined permeation flux model and local PO2 values. Across a temperature range from 825°C to 1056°C, δ was found to vary from 0.007 to 0.029 (<1%), safely within material stability limits, whilst the permeate surface exchange resistance dominates. An inert JO2 limit was identified owing to a maximum sweep surface δ, δmaxinert. The physical presence of δmaxinert is attributed to a rate limiting step shift from desorption to associative electron transfer steps on the sweep surface as PO2 is reduced. Permeate surface exchange limitations under non-reactive conditions suggest that reactive (fuel) operation is necessary to accelerate surface chemistry for future work, to reduce flux resistance and push δpast δmaxinert in a stable manner.

  16. Postoperative eccentric macular holes after vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzas, Dimitrios; Dettoraki, Maria; Lavaris, Anastasios; Kourvetaris, Dimitrios; Nomikarios, Nikolaos; Moschos, Marilita M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of eccentric macular holes presenting after vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for the treatment of macular pathology and discuss the pathogenesis of holes formation. A retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case-series study of five patients who developed eccentric macular holes postoperatively following vitrectomy in 198 consecutive patients who underwent ILM peeling for idiopathic macular hole and epiretinal membrane formation between 2008 and 2015. Five patients (2.5 %) developed full-thickness eccentric macular holes postoperatively. Three patients presented with a single eccentric macular hole, one patient had an eccentric hole after a failed idiopathic macular hole surgery and one patient developed four eccentric macular holes. The mean diameter of the holes was 584 μm (range 206-1317 μm) and the average time of holes formation after vitrectomy was 27.7 weeks (range 1-140 weeks). Postoperative best-corrected visual acuity ranged from "counting fingers" to 20/25. The eyes with the holes distant from the fovea had the best final visual acuity. No further intervention was attempted and no complications occurred. The mean follow-up time was 26.8 months. The postoperative macular holes after vitrectomy and ILM peeling were variable in number, size, and time of appearance but remained stable and were not associated with any complications. The pathogenesis of macular holes is most consistent with contraction of the residual ILM or secondary epimacular proliferation probably stimulated by ILM peeling.

  17. Residual cellular proliferation on the internal limiting membrane in macular pucker surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandorfer, Arnd; Haritoglou, Christos; Scheler, Renate; Schumann, Ricarda; Zhao, Fei; Kampik, Anselm

    2012-03-01

    To provide pathology data on the completeness of epiretinal membrane (ERM) removal with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. Twenty-two patients with idiopathic ERM formation underwent vitrectomy with ERM removal and subsequent staining of the vitreomacular interface with brilliant blue. If the ILM was still present after ERM removal, it was peeled off. Both ERM and ILM specimens were harvested in different containers and prepared for flat-mount phase-contrast and interference microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. In 14 patients (64%), the ILM was still present at the macula after ERM removal. On average, 20% (range, 2-51%) of the total cell count was left behind at the ILM if the ERM was removed only. There were mainly glial cells on the ILM, and few hyalocytes. In nine eyes, the cells were forming cell clusters. In 8 patients (36%), both ERM and ILM were removed together. Electron microscopy showed cellular proliferation directly attached to the ILM in these eyes, whereas in the sequentially peeled group, there was collagen interposed between the ERM and the ILM. Surgical ERM removal resulted in splitting of the vitreous cortex in these eyes, leaving the ILM with residual cells behind. Simple ERM removal results in sufficient separation of fibrocellular tissue in one third of cases, only. In 2 of 3 patients with idiopathic ERM, the vitreous cortex splits when the ERM is removed, leaving an average of 20% of the total cell count behind on the ILM. As these cells are capable of proliferation and causing ERM recurrence, staining of the ILM with subsequent removal seems beneficial in macular pucker surgery.

  18. A direct contact between astrocyte and vitreous body is possible in the rabbit eye due to discontinuities in the basement membrane of the retinal inner limiting membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haddad

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Different from most mammalian species, the optic nerve of the rabbit eye is initially formed inside the retina where myelination of the axons of the ganglion cells starts and vascularization occurs. Astrocytes are confined to these regions. The aforementioned nerve fibers known as medullated nerve fibers form two bundles that may be identified with the naked eye. The blood vessels run on the inner surface of these nerve fiber bundles (epivascularization and, accordingly, the accompanying astrocytes lie mostly facing the vitreous body from which they are separated only by the inner limiting membrane of the retina. The arrangement of the astrocytes around blood vessels leads to the formation of structures known as glial tufts. Fragments (N = 3 or whole pieces (N = 3 of the medullated nerve fiber region of three-month-old male rabbits (Orictolagus cuniculus were fixed in glutaraldehyde followed by osmium tetroxide, and their thin sections were examined with a transmission electron microscope. Randomly located discontinuities (up to a few micrometers long of the basement membrane of the inner limiting membrane of the retina were observed in the glial tufts. As a consequence, a direct contact between the astrocyte plasma membrane and vitreous elements was demonstrated, making possible functional interactions such as macromolecular exchanges between this glial cell type and the components of the vitreous body.

  19. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer mediated by protease-activated receptor-2 in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Kang, Young-Gyu; Kim, Jaekyung; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is the result of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a key mediator of melanosome transfer, which occurs as the melanocyte extends its dendrite toward surrounding keratinocytes that take up melanosomes by phagocytosis. We investigated the effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans HOUTT. (nutmeg) on melanosome transfer and the regulation of PAR-2 in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). HaCaT cells stimulated by the PAR-2-activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH₂ (SLIGRL) were treated with macelignan; PAR-2 expression was then determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. We evaluated the effects of macelignan on calcium mobilization and keratinocyte phagocytosis. In addition, B16F10 melanoma cells and keratinocytes were co-cultured to assess the effects of macelignan on prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) secretion and subsequent dendrite formation. Macelignan decreased HaCaT PAR-2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, macelignan markedly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and significantly downregulated keratinocyte phagocytosis, as shown by decreased ingestion of Escherichia coli bioparticles and fluorescent microspheres. In co-culture experiments, macelignan reduced keratinocyte PGE₂ secretion, thereby preventing dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells compared with SLIGRL-treated controls. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer by downregulating PAR-2, thereby reducing keratinocyte phagocytosis and PGE₂ secretion, which in turn inhibits dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that macelignan could be used as a natural depigmenting agent to ameliorate hyperpigmentation.

  20. Defects in the outer limiting membrane are associated with rosette development in the Nrl-/- retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Stuck

    Full Text Available The neural retinal leucine zipper (Nrl knockout mouse is a widely used model to study cone photoreceptor development, physiology, and molecular biology in the absence of rods. In the Nrl(-/- retina, rods are converted into functional cone-like cells. The Nrl(-/- retina is characterized by large undulations of the outer nuclear layer (ONL commonly known as rosettes. Here we explore the mechanism of rosette development in the Nrl(-/- retina. We report that rosettes first appear at postnatal day (P8, and that the structure of nascent rosettes is morphologically distinct from what is seen in the adult retina. The lumen of these nascent rosettes contains a population of aberrant cells protruding into the subretinal space that induce infolding of the ONL. Morphologically adult rosettes do not contain any cell bodies and are first detected at P15. The cells found in nascent rosettes are photoreceptors in origin but lack inner and outer segments. We show that the adherens junctions between photoreceptors and Müller glia which comprise the retinal outer limiting membrane (OLM are not uniformly formed in the Nrl(-/- retina and thus allow protrusion of a population of developing photoreceptors into the subretinal space where their maturation becomes delayed. These data suggest that the rosettes of the Nrl(-/- retina arise due to defects in the OLM and delayed maturation of a subset of photoreceptors, and that rods may play an important role in the proper formation of the OLM.

  1. [Internal limiting membrane role in primary surgery of the macular hole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănişteanu, D; Moraru, Andreea

    2013-01-01

    To assess the anatomical result after primary macular hole surgery with or without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. To assess the safety and stability results; Prospective, comparative, interventional case study of 47 eyes with stage 3 or 4 macular hole treated by pars-plana vitrectomy between 2006 and 2011. In 19 cases (40.42%) only posterior hyaloid was removed (control group) while in the other 28 cases (59.57%) additional ILM peeling was performed. All cases had gas endotamponade. Postoperatively the cases were followed-up at least 6 months clinically and by OCT. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests. The mean age of patients in the study was 54, 47 +/- 4, 83 years (ranging from 47 to 74 years). In 36 cases (76.59%) the macular hole was idiopathic. After surgery, the macular hole closed in 22 out of 28 cases with ILM peeling (78.57%) as compared to only 13 out of 19 cases from the control group (68.42%). No intraoperative complications were noted. Main postoperative complications were cataract augmentation and macular hole enlargement in 4 out of 12 failed cases (33.33%). No recurrence was noted if macular hole closed after surgery. These results confirm the stability, safety and efficacy of both techniques but with a significant higher success rate if ILM is peeled. The main postoperative complication was macular hole enlargement if surgery failed.

  2. Pathology of the macular hole rim in flat-mounted internal limiting membrane specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandorfer, Arnd; Scheler, Renate; Haritoglou, Christos; Schumann, Ricarda; Nentwich, Martin; Kampik, Anselm

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to image the pathology of vitreoretinal adhesion and cellular proliferation at the macular hole rim for a better understanding of macular hole formation. Internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, ILM flat-mount preparation, phase contrast and interference microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry of the macular hole rim were performed in 10 eyes with idiopathic macular holes. Phase contrast and interference microscopy showed cellular proliferation on the vitreal side of the ILM in all specimens. There were single cells in three eyes, cell clusters in six eyes, and continuous proliferation in one eye. Surrounding the macular hole, only a few cells were present. Cellular proliferation started at a distance of 80 mum to 940 mum from the macular hole edge. Transmission electron microscopy showed vitreous adhesion at the macular hole rim. In ultrastructural terms, there was a continuous insertion of vitreous collagen fibers into the ILM. Immunocytochemistry was positive for collagen type II, laminin, and fibronectin in the area of vitreous attachment. Cells were stained with markers for glial cells, retinal pigment epithelial cells, and hyalocytes. There is ultrastructural evidence that macular hole formation is caused by an insertion of the cortical vitreous into the foveal ILM. Vitreous collagen fibers may exert vitreofoveal traction, resulting in a foveal tear. Cellular proliferation is not continuously distributed surrounding the macular hole but separated from the macular hole edge and seems to originate from cell clusters forming centers of proliferation distant from the macular hole rim.

  3. Behaviour of bipolar membranes at high current density. Water diffusion limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, J.J.; Jansink, M.G.J.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the behaviour of bipolar membranes at very high current density is discussed. Current–voltage curves are determined, both for the Tokuyama Soda BP-1 and the WSI Technologies bipolar membrane. The current–voltage curves are characterised by an inflection point at which a drastic

  4. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus vitrectomy with no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiteri Cornish, Kurt; Lois, Noemi; Scott, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Several observational studies have suggested the potential benefit of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling to treat idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH). However, no strong evidence is available on the potential benefit(s) of this surgical manoeuvre and uncertainty remains among vitr...

  5. Testing the limits of model membrane simulations-bilayer composition and pressure scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Nikoleta; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-03-30

    Studying transfer of bioactive compounds across cell membranes by simulations attracts growing attention. To perform such calculations accurately, it is necessary to verify the validity of computational protocols established for description of unperturbed lipid bilayers also with translocating substances present. The current work reports the results from 1 μs long atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two types of model plasma membranes-one built of a single phospholipid (DPPC) and one constructed of four types of phospholipids-in the presence of a drug-peptide complex experimentally known to cross cell membranes. The influence of membrane composition and of applied pressure scaling algorithm on the simulations outcome is analyzed with particular focus on membrane structure and on complex-lipid interactions during the initial penetration stage. It is found that the mixed composition of the membrane is important for correct assessment of the interactions with the complex both from purely structural perspective and because of the uneven charge distribution. The structure of the mixed lipid bilayer is affected more markedly by the pressure scaling algorithm. When the pressure is isotropically scaled, lipids are distributed almost homogeneously along the membrane in liquid ordered state. On semi-isotropic scaling, the lipid tails undergo significant rearrangement and a long-range ordered state is established. This results in "freezing" of the membrane and expulsion of the complex. The statistical analysis of the MD data points to the conclusion that a mixed-lipid membrane model with isotropic pressure scaling would be more suitable for describing the process of complex translocation across neoplastic membranes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fossil melanosomes or bacteria? A wealth of findings favours melanosomes:Melanin fossilises relatively readily, bacteria rarely, hence the need for clarification in the debate over the identity of microbodies in fossil animal specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Vinther, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of fossil melanosomes has resulted in a wealth of research over the last 7 years, notably the reconstruction of colour in dinosaurs and fossil mammals. In spite of these discoveries some authors persist in arguing that the observed microbodies could represent preserved bacteria. They contend that bacteria fossilise easily and everywhere, which means that one can never be certain that a microbody is a melanosome without an extraordinary burden of evidence. However, this critique ...

  7. Effect of internal limiting membrane peeling on the development of epiretinal membrane after pars plana vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Yup; Kim, Jung Yeul

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the difference in the occurrence of postoperative epiretinal membranes (ERMs) in vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with and without peeling of the internal limiting membrane (ILM). The medical records of the 135 patients, who underwent vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment from November 2007 to August 2011, were analyzed retrospectively. Of the subjects, 70 patients underwent ILM peeling during the surgery and 65 did not. The best-corrected visual acuity, fundus photograph, and optical coherence tomography were collected 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The relationship between ILM peeling and the preoperative findings of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and development of a postoperative ERM was analyzed. No ERM occurred in the ILM peeling group, whereas an ERM occurred in 14 of 65 patients who underwent vitrectomy without ILM peeling (21.5%). This difference was significant (P detachment.

  8. Strength degradation and failure limits of dense and porous ceramic membrane materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pećanac, G.; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Lipińska-Chwałek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin dense membrane layers, mechanically supported by porous substrates, are considered as the most efficient designs for oxygen supply units used in Oxy-fuel processes and membrane reactors. Based on the favorable permeation properties and chemical stability, several materials were suggested...... as promising membrane and substrate materials: Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ, La0.6−xSr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3−δ (x=0, 0.02) and Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ. Although membranes operate at elevated temperatures, the ends of tubes in certain three-end concepts remain almost at room temperature. The current work concentrates...... on the failure potential of these membrane parts, where in a complex device also the highest residual stresses should arise due to differences in thermal expansion. In particular, sensitivity of the materials to subcritical crack growth was assessed since the long-term reliability of the component does not only...

  9. Vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular folds secondary to hypotony in myopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadal J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeroni Nadal,1–3 Elisa Carreras,2,3 Maria Isabel Canut,1–3 Rafael I Barraquer1–3 1Centro de Oftalmologia Barraquer, 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 3Instituto Barraquer, Barcelona, Spain Background: Hypotony maculopathy (HM changes may persist, and visual acuity remains poor, despite normalization of intraocular pressure (IOP. The aim of this study was to evaluate the visual and anatomical results of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV, internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling, and 20% SF6 gas tamponade in five myopic patients with HM.Methods: This retrospective interventional study was conducted at the Barraquer Center of Ophthalmology, a tertiary care center in Barcelona, Spain, and included five eyes from five consecutive patients (aged 55.4±13.1 years with HM caused by different conditions. All the patients were treated with 23-gauge PPV, ILM peeling, and 20% SF6 gas tamponade. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation was performed using anterior and posterior biomicroscopy and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA by logMAR charts.Results: Before surgery, median spherical equivalent was -13.1 (range -7, -19 diopters of myopia. Preoperatively, four cases presented IOP <6.5 mmHg for 3 (range 2–8 weeks. In three of these four cases, IOP >6.5 mmHg was achieved over 16 (range 16–28 weeks, without resolution of HM; increased IOP was not achieved in the remaining case treated 2 weeks after diagnosis of HM. One case presented IOP >6.5 mmHg with HM for 28 weeks before surgery. Preoperative BCVA was 0.7 (range 0.26–2.3 logMAR, and 0.6 (range 0.3–0.7 logMAR and 0.5 (range 0.2–1 logMAR, respectively, at 4 and 12 months after surgery. There was no statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative BCVA. Hyperpigmentation lines in the macular area were observed in three cases with hypotony. These lines progressed after surgery despite resolution of the retinal folds in the three cases, and BCVA decreased in parallel

  10. N-Nicotinoyl dopamine inhibits skin pigmentation by suppressing of melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Hwang, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of a niacinamide derivative, N-Nicotinoyl dopamine (NND) on melanogenesis. NND inhibits melanosome transfer in a normal human melanocyte-keratinocyte co-culture system and through phagocytic ability without affecting viability of cells while it did not show inhibitory effects of tyrosinase and melanin synthesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. In addition, safety of NND was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay. Our findings indicate that NND may potentially be used for cosmetic industry for improvement of skin whitening and therapies related with several skin disorders, and the effect of NND may be acquired via reduction of melanosome transfer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Photic Injury to Cultured RPE Varies Among Individual Cells in Proportion to Their Endogenous Lipofuscin Content as Modulated by Their Melanosome Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareba, Mariusz; Skumatz, Christine M. B.; Sarna, Tadeusz J.; Burke, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined whether photic stress differentially impairs organelle motility of RPE lipofuscin and melanin granules, whether lethal photic stress kills cells in proportion to lipofuscin abundance, and whether killing is modulated by melanosome content. Methods. Motility of endogenous lipofuscin and melanosome granules within the same human RPE cells in primary culture was quantified by real-time imaging during sublethal blue light irradiation. Cell death during lethal irradiation was quantified by dynamic imaging of the onset of nuclear propidium iodide fluorescence. Analyzed were individual cells containing different amounts of autofluorescent lipofuscin, or similar amounts of lipofuscin and a varying content of phagocytized porcine melanosomes, or phagocytized black latex beads (control for light absorbance). Results. Lipofuscin granules and melanosomes showed motility slowing with mild irradiation, but slowing was greater for lipofuscin. On lethal irradiation, cell death was earlier in cells with higher lipofuscin content, but delayed by the copresence of melanosomes. Delayed death did not occur with black beads, suggesting that melanosome protection was due to properties of the biological granule, not simple screening. Conclusions. Greater organelle motility slowing of the more photoreactive lipofuscin granule compared to melanosomes suggests that lipofuscin mediates mild photic injury within RPE cells. With lethal light stress endogenous lipofuscin mediates killing, but the effect is cell autonomous and modulated by coincident melanosome content. Developing methods to quantify the frequency of individual cells with combined high lipofuscin and low melanosome content may have value for predicting the photic stress susceptibility of the RPE monolayer in situ. PMID:25034597

  12. Limits on diffractive scattering by woven radome membranes to 900 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed N.; Tkachov, Igor I.; Wells, Tom

    1996-12-01

    Transmittance of 'Gore-Tex' woven radome membranes with various diameter of threads and thickness of the laminate has been studied as a continuous function of frequency over the range 90-900 GHz by utilizing Fourier transform spectroscopy. For the first time the transmittance has been measured with various angles of incidence of the incident wave. Strong diffractive scattering has been found above the frequency with wavelength comparable with period of the fabrics. Gore-Tex woven membrane materials are suitable for radome applications up to 1000 GHz.

  13. A possible dysfunction of melanosome transfer in leprosy: an electron-microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, W

    1977-01-01

    An E.M. study was carried out to investigate whether Mycobacterium leprae occur intracellularly in epidermal melanocytes. As this could not be confirmed, the selective killing of melanocytes by cytotoxic lymphocytes could not explain the hypopigmentation in types of leprosy with a relative good immune response. There were indications that these hypopigmented lesions resulted from a disturbed transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to keratinocytes. Further research is in progress.

  14. Ion permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane limits the maximum growth temperature of bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.L C M; Ubbink-Kok, T.; Elferink, M.G.L.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Protons and sodium ions are the most commonly used coupling ions in energy transduction in bacteria and archaea. At their growth temperature, the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane of thermophilic bacteria to protons is high compared with that of sodium ions. In some thermophiles, sodium is

  15. Reduced membrane cholesterol limits pulmonary endothelial Ca2+entry after chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bojun; Naik, Jay S; Jernigan, Nikki L; Walker, Benjimen R; Resta, Thomas C

    2017-06-01

    Chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with diminished production of endothelium-derived Ca 2+ -dependent vasodilators such as nitric oxide. Interestingly, ATP-induced endothelial Ca 2+ entry as well as membrane cholesterol (Chol) are decreased in pulmonary arteries from CH rats (4 wk, barometric pressure = 380 Torr) compared with normoxic controls. Store-operated Ca 2+ entry (SOCE) and depolarization-induced Ca 2+ entry are major components of the response to ATP and are similarly decreased after CH. We hypothesized that membrane Chol facilitates both SOCE and depolarization-induced pulmonary endothelial Ca 2+ entry and that CH attenuates these responses by decreasing membrane Chol. To test these hypotheses, we administered Chol or epicholesterol (Epichol) to acutely isolated pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) from control and CH rats to either supplement or replace native Chol, respectively. The efficacy of membrane Chol manipulation was confirmed by filipin staining. Epichol greatly reduced ATP-induced Ca 2+ influx in PAECs from control rats. Whereas Epichol similarly blunted endothelial SOCE in PAECs from both groups, Chol supplementation restored diminished SOCE in PAECs from CH rats while having no effect in controls. Similar effects of Chol manipulation on PAEC Ca 2+ influx were observed in response to a depolarizing stimulus of KCl. Furthermore, KCl-induced Ca 2+ entry was inhibited by the T-type Ca 2+ channel antagonist mibefradil but not the L-type Ca 2+ channel inhibitor diltiazem. We conclude that PAEC membrane Chol is required for ATP-induced Ca 2+ entry and its two components, SOCE and depolarization-induced Ca 2+ entry, and that reduced Ca 2+ entry after CH may be due to loss of this key regulator. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This research is the first to examine the direct role of membrane cholesterol in regulating pulmonary endothelial agonist-induced Ca 2+ entry and its components. The results provide a potential

  16. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  17. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Calton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  18. Severe hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: exploring the limits of extracorporeal respiratory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Brescovici Nunes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation for respiratory support has emerged as a rescue alternative for patients with hypoxemia. However, in some patients with more severe lung injury, extracorporeal support fails to restore arterial oxygenation. Based on four clinical vignettes, the aims of this article were to describe the pathophysiology of this concerning problem and to discuss possibilities for hypoxemia resolution. METHODS: Considering the main reasons and rationale for hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, some possible bedside solutions must be considered: 1 optimization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow; 2 identification of recirculation and cannula repositioning if necessary; 3 optimization of residual lung function and consideration of blood transfusion; 4 diagnosis of oxygenator dysfunction and consideration of its replacement; and finally 5 optimization of the ratio of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow to cardiac output, based on the reduction of cardiac output. CONCLUSION: Therefore, based on the pathophysiology of hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation support, we propose a stepwise approach to help guide specific interventions.

  19. Epiretinal cell proliferation in macular pucker and vitreomacular traction syndrome: analysis of flat-mounted internal limiting membrane specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Gandorfer, Arnd; Haritoglou, Christos; Scheler, Renate; Schaumberger, Markus M; Kampik, Anselm; Schumann, Ricarda G

    2013-01-01

    To describe new details of epiretinal cell proliferation in flat-mounted internal limiting membrane specimens. One hundred nineteen internal limiting membrane specimens were removed en bloc with epiretinal membranes from 79 eyes with macular pucker (MP) and 40 eyes with vitreomacular traction syndrome. Intraoperatively, posterior vitreous detachment was assessed as complete or incomplete. Whole specimens were flat-mounted on glass slides and processed for interference and phase-contrast microscopy, cell viability assay, and immunocytochemistry. Mean cell viability percentage was higher in MP than in vitreomacular traction syndrome. Two cell distribution patterns were found. Anti-CD163 labeling presented predominantly in MP with complete posterior vitreous detachment. CD45 expression was similar in all groups of diagnosis. Anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) labeling was found in MP irrespective of the extent of posterior vitreous detachment. Alpha-SMA (α-smooth muscle actin) labeling was mainly presented in MP with incomplete posterior vitreous detachment and in vitreomacular traction syndrome. Simultaneous antibody labeling included GFAP/CD45, GFAP/CD163, CD163/CD45, and CD163/α-SMA. Hyalocytes constitute a major cell type of epiretinal cell proliferation in eyes with MP and vitreomacular traction syndrome. Glial cells, notably retinal Muller cells, are involved as well. It appears that transdifferentiation of cells in vitreomacular traction might be more frequent than previously thought and that those cells possess a greater variability of immunocytochemical properties than expected.

  20. The extracellular membrane-proximal domain of membrane-bound IgE restricts B cell activation by limiting B cell antigen receptor surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanshylla, Kanika; Opazo, Felipe; Gronke, Konrad; Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are key mediators of allergic reactions. Due to their potentially harmful anaphylactic properties, their production is tightly regulated. The membrane-bound isoform of IgE (mIgE), which is an integral component of the B cell antigen receptor, has been shown to be critical for the regulation of IgE responses in mice. In primate species including humans, mIgE can be expressed in two isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of the primary ε Ig heavy chain transcript, and differ in the absence or presence of an extracellular membrane-proximal domain (EMPD) consisting of 52 amino acids. However, the function of the EMPD remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the EMPD restricts surface expression of mIgE-containing BCRs in human and murine B cells. The EMPD does not interfere with BCR assembly but acts as an autonomous endoplasmic reticulum retention domain. Limited surface expression of EMPD-containing mIgE-BCRs caused impaired activation of intracellular signaling cascades and hence represents a regulatory mechanism that may control the production of potentially anaphylactic IgE antibodies in primate species. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Efficacy of quantifying melanosome transfer with flow cytometry in a human melanocyte-HaCaT keratinocyte co-culture system in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Guang; Zi, Shao-Xia; Li, Dong-Guang; Liu, Wen; Yang, Qing-Qi

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we describe a simple, specific, reproducible and quantitative assay system to assess melanosome transfer. We first established a co-culture model of normal human epidermal melanocytes and HaCaT keratinocytes. The cells were co-cultured for 72 h in a serum-free keratinocyte growth media and double labelled with Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antibody against the melanosome-specific protein gp100, and with Phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated antibody against the keratinocyte-specific marker cytokeratin. Then, the cells were examined using co-focal microscope and flow cytometry. The increased melanosome transfer from melanocytes to HaCaT keratinocytes was observed in a time-dependent manner. To verify the accessibility of this method, two known melanosome transfer inhibitors and two known melanosome transfer stimulators were applied. Consistent with previous investigation, soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI), niacinamide inhibited melanosome transfer, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) increased melanosome transfer, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. The model used in this study could thus represent a rapid and reliable tool to identify modulators of human melanosome transfer.

  2. The natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation inhibits melanin synthesis by modulating tyrosinase activity and downregulating melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Rhee, Do Young; Bang, Seung Hyun; Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Chong Hyun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Chang, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of EP-2, a natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on melanogenesis and to determine its underlying mechanism of action. Our results show that although EP-2 is not a direct tyrosinase inhibitor, when EP-2 was added to the culture media of B16F10 melanoma cells, intracellular tyrosinase activity was decreased. However, EP-2 had no effect on the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor or tyrosinase. EP-2 was found to inhibit melanogenesis and melanosome transfer when it was added to melanocytes and keratinocytes in coculture. In addition, protease-activated receptor 2, a key protein associated with melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes, was downregulated in the presence of EP-2. In conclusion, EP-2 is a potent inhibitor of melanogenesis and its hypomelanogenic effect is related to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity and transfer of melanosomes.

  3. Wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelium and their changes with melanin bleaching: a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiye; Zhang, Lei; Ness, Steve; Yi, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the first numerical study on full metrics of wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. T-matrix method was used to simulate the spheroidal shapes of mature melanosomes, and the complex refractive index was calculated by a subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation for melanin. The validity of the method was first confirmed by Mie theory, and corroborated by a comparison between visible light and near infrared (NIR) optical coherence tomography (OCT) on human retinal imaging. We also studied the changes of melanosome optical properties due to melanin bleaching by numerically reducing the absorption of melanin. This study implies a unique approach to detect melanin changes specifically in RPE by a spectroscopic contrast of optical coherence tomography.

  4. Down-regulated PAR-2 is associated in part with interrupted melanosome transfer in pigmented basal cell epithelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Kazuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Makoto; Imokawa, Genji

    2004-08-01

    In pigmented basal cell epithelioma (BCE), there seems to be an abnormal transfer of melanized melanosomes from proliferating melanocytes to basaloid tumor cells. In this study, the interruption of that melanosome transfer was studied with special respect to the altered function of a phagocytic receptor, protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in the basaloid tumor cells. We used electron microscopy to clarify the disrupted transfer at the ultrastructural level and then performed immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to examine the regulation of a phagocytic receptor, PAR-2, expressed on basaloid tumor cells. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that basaloid tumor cells of pigmented BCE have a significantly lower population of melanosomes ( approximately 16.4%) than do normal keratinocytes located in the perilesional normal epidermis ( approximately 91.0%). In contrast, in pigmented seborrheic keratosis (SK), a similarly pigmented epidermal tumor, the distribution of melanin granules does not differ between the lesional ( approximately 93.9%) and the perilesional normal epidermis ( approximately 92.2 %), indicating that interrupted melanosome transfer occurs in BCE but not in all pigmented epithelial tumors. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of PAR-2 mRNA transcripts in basaloid cells is significantly decreased in pigmented BCE compared with the perilesional normal epidermis. In contrast, in pigmented SK, where melanosome transfer to basaloid tumor cells is not interrupted, the expression of PAR-2 mRNA transcripts is comparable between the basaloid tumor cells and the perilesional normal epidermis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that basaloid cells in pigmented BCE have less immunostaining for PAR-2 than do keratinocytes in the perilesional normal epidermis whereas in pigmented SK, there is no difference in immunostaining for PAR-2 between the basaloid tumor and the perilesional normal epidermis. These

  5. Pushing desalination recovery to the maximum limit: Membrane and thermal processes integration

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2017-05-05

    The economics of seawater desalination processes has been continuously improving as a result of desalination market expansion. Presently, reverse osmosis (RO) processes are leading in global desalination with 53% share followed by thermally driven technologies 33%, but in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries their shares are 42% and 56% respectively due to severe feed water quality. In RO processes, intake, pretreatment and brine disposal cost 25% of total desalination cost at 30–35% recovery. We proposed a tri-hybrid system to enhance overall recovery up to 81%. The conditioned brine leaving from RO processes supplied to proposed multi-evaporator adsorption cycle driven by low temperature industrial waste heat sources or solar energy. RO membrane simulation has been performed using WinFlow and IMSDesign commercial softwares developed by GE and Nitto. Detailed mathematical model of overall system is developed and simulation has been conducted in FORTRAN. The final brine reject concentration from tri-hybrid cycle can vary from 166,000ppm to 222,000ppm if RO retentate concentration varies from 45,000ppm to 60,000ppm. We also conducted economic analysis and showed that the proposed tri-hybrid cycle can achieve highest recovery, 81%, and lowest energy consumption, 1.76kWhelec/m3, for desalination reported in the literature up till now.

  6. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  7. The effect of niacinamide on reducing cutaneous pigmentation and suppression of melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, T; Minwalla, L; Zhuang, J; Chhoa, M; Matsubara, A; Miyamoto, K; Greatens, A; Hillebrand, G G; Bissett, D L; Boissy, R E

    2002-07-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentation occurs in multiple conditions. In addition, many Asian women desire a lighter skin colour. Thus, there is a need for the development of skin lightening agents. Niacinamide is a possible candidate. To investigate the effects of niacinamide on melanogenesis in vitro and on facial hyperpigmentation and skin colour in vivo in Japanese women. Melanin production was measured in a purified mushroom tyrosinase assay, cultured melanocytes, a keratinocyte/melanocyte coculture model, and a pigmented reconstructed epidermis (PREP) model. The clinical trials included 18 subjects with hyperpigmentation who used 5% niacinamide moisturizer and vehicle moisturizer in a paired design, and 120 subjects with facial tanning who were assigned to two of three treatments: vehicle, sunscreen and 2% niacinamide + sunscreen. Changes in facial hyperpigmentation and skin colour were objectively quantified by computer analysis and visual grading of high-resolution digital images of the face. Niacinamide had no effect on the catalytic activity of mushroom tyrosinase or on melanogenesis in cultured melanocytes. However, niacinamide gave 35-68% inhibition of melanosome transfer in the coculture model and reduced cutaneous pigmentation in the PREP model. In the clinical studies, niacinamide significantly decreased hyperpigmentation and increased skin lightness compared with vehicle alone after 4 weeks of use. The data suggest niacinamide is an effective skin lightening compound that works by inhibiting melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes.

  8. Mechanism of melanosomes action in antioxidant reactions following optic irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapina, Victoria A.; Dontsov, Alexander E.; Sakina, Natalia L.; Ostrovsky, Michail A.

    1996-05-01

    Hyphema is often associated with traumatic eye injuries. Its blood is subjected to considerable changes in aqueous humor and causes toxic effect on eye tissues. The metabolism disturbances in eye tissues unfavorably affecting their cell structures play a significant role in the development of pathologic conditions in cases of intraocular hemorrhages. This is to be attributed to the correlation of lipid peroxidation (LP) processes and antioxidant system (AOS) activity of both the cellular membrane and its environment necessary for maintaining cell homeostasis as a whole. The aim of the present work is an experimental study of LP processes of aqueous humor (AH) in total traumatic hyphema (TTH) after magnet-laser stimulation different doses (3 and 6 minutes). TTH and aqueous humor collection were made on the eyes on rabbit (Schinchilla) according to Krasnov A.M. under the local anaesthesia (dicaine 0.25%). The study of biochemical aqueous indices was carried out on healthy eyes and after development of hyphema on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 30, and 45. The animals were divided into three groups: in the first group the biochemical indices were defined in the aqueous humor in TTH; in the second and the third groups the similar investigation was carried out after magnet- laser radiation with 3 and 6 minutes exposition. The malonic dialdehyde (MDA) was defined according to Ishihara, Shiff's bases -- and their concentration was determined on the total amount of lipids (reagent kit of 'Lachema'). He-Ne laser (with power density of 0.05 mVt) was used, streaming impulsed magnet field voltage being 10 mTl. The magnet head of a magnet radiator was fixed 0.5 cm from the eye; laser beam being sent to the central hole of the magnet head. The duration of exposure was 3 minutes in the second group and 6 minutes in the third group, daily for 10 days. Significant increase of LP product concentration level with two clear ascending peaks was seen on the third and tenth days in the first

  9. Oxidation levels differentially impact melanocytes: low versus high concentration of hydrogen peroxide promotes melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luyan; Li, Jian; Lin, Xiao; Wu, Wenyu; Kang, Kefei; Fu, Wenwen

    2012-01-01

    UVB light can generate potentially harmful hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in vivo, but it can also promote the beneficial proliferation and migration of melanocytes. The successful use of UVB monotherapy for treatment of vitiligo suggests that H(2)O(2) may have a biphasic effect on melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer. To study the beneficial role of H(2)O(2) on melanogenesis and melanosome transport in living melanocytes and keratinocytes. A co-culture system model was constructed using the primary human melanocytes and keratinocytes. The MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to determine cell proliferation, NaOH was used to determine the melanin content, and real-time PCR was used to determine tyrosinase expression. Western blot was used to determine Rab-27A and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) expression. This study demonstrated that tyrosinase was activated by low concentrations of H(2)O(2) (≤0.3 mM); however, this activity was downregulated by high concentrations of H(2)O(2) (>0.3 mM). Activation of high levels of melanin synthesis was induced when cells were treated with low concentrations of H(2)O(2) (0.3 mM). Further observation using an in vitro co-culture system of fluorescein (carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, CFDA-SE)-labeled melanocytes and keratinocytes indicated that melanosome transfer occurred in normal human epidermal melanocytes. Fluorescence microscopy revealed increased melanosome transfer into keratinocytes treated with 0.3 mM H(2)O(2) in the co-culture compared to the control. Examination of melanosomes in the keratinocytes by flow cytometry confirmed these results. Furthermore, treatment with H(2)O(2) (0.3 mM) upregulated the expression of Rab-27A and PAR-2, significant proteins involved in melanosome transfer, according to Western blot. These results confirmed that low concentration levels of H(2)O(2) play a major role in the regulation of human pigmentation by increasing

  10. Outcomes of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling with brilliant blue in macular hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohutcu A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Huseyin Sanisoglu1, Mehmet Sahin Sevim1, Betul Aktas1, Semra Sevim2, Ahmet Nohutcu11Haydarpasa Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, 2Uskudar State Hospital, Eye Clinic, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: The evaluation of anatomic and visual outcomes in macular hole cases treated with internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling, brilliant blue (BB, and 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV.Materials and methods: Fifty eyes of 48 patients who presented between July 2007 and December 2009 with the diagnosis of stage 2, 3, or 4 macular holes according to Gass Classification who had undergone PPV and ILM peeling were included in this study. Pre- and postoperative macular examinations were assessed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. 23 G sutureless PPV and ILM peeling with BB was performed on all patients.Results: The mean age of patients was 63.34 ± 9.6 years. Stage 2 macular hole was determined in 17 eyes (34%, stage 3 in 24 eyes (48%, and stage 4 in 9 eyes (18%. The mean follow-up time was 13.6 ± 1.09 months. Anatomic closure was detected in 46/50 eyes (92%, whereas, in four cases, macular hole persisted and a second operation was not required due to subretinal fluid drainage. At follow-up after 2 months, persistant macular hole was detected in one case and it was closed with reoperation. At 12 months, an increase in visual acuity in 41 eyes was observed, while it remained at the same level in six eyes. In three eyes visual acuity decreased. There was a postoperative statistically significant increase in visual acuity in stage 2 and 3 cases (P < 0.05, however, no increase in visual acuity in stage 4 cases was observed.Conclusion: PPV and ILM peeling in stage 2, 3, and 4 macular hole cases provide successful anatomic outcomes, however, in delayed cases, due to photoreceptor loss, it has no effect on functional recovery. BB, used for clarity of ILM, may be beneficial due to its low retinal toxicity.Keywords: macular

  11. Comparisons of foveal thickness and slope after macular hole surgery with and without internal limiting membrane peeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohta K

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kouichi Ohta, Atsuko Sato, Nami Senda, Emi Fukui Department of Ophthalmology, Matsumoto Dental University, Nagano, Japan Background: We have shown that the foveal contour was asymmetrical after idiopathic macular hole (MH closure by pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these morphological changes differ in eyes after PPV without ILM peeling. Methods: Ten eyes of 10 patients that underwent PPV without ILM peeling and 12 eyes of 11 patients with ILM peeling were studied. The MH in all eyes was <400 µm in diameter. Six months after the PPV, the macular thickness and foveal slope around the closed MH were determined by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. The thickness of the ganglion cell complex was measured by another spectral-domain optical coherence tomography instrument >6 months after the surgery. Results: The mean parafoveal retinal thickness in the non-peeled group was 367.1 µm in the nasal (N, 353.0 µm in the temporal (T, 366.9 µm in the superior (S, and 357.3 µm in the inferior (I sectors. The T, S, and I sectors were significantly thicker than the corresponding sectors in the ILM peeled group (p=0.0008, 0.003, and 0.03, respectively. The mean ganglion cell complex was thicker not only in the N sector but also in the T sector in the non-peeled group. The mean retinal slopes in the non-peeled group (N, 40.2°; T, 37.6°; S, 41.2°; I, 39.5° were flatter than those in the peeled group (N, 52.3°; T, 43.6°; S, 50.8°; I, 51.9°; p=0.009, 0.09, 0.008, and 0.017, respectively. Conclusion: The symmetrical fovea after MH surgery in the non-ILM peeled eyes indicates that the asymmetrical fovea after ILM peeling was probably due to the ILM peeling. Keywords: idiopathic macular hole, foveal contour, internal limiting membrane, vitrectomy

  12. Evaluation of the effect of Q-switched ruby and Q-switched Nd-YAG laser irradiation on melanosomes in dermal melanocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, H

    1997-12-01

    Q-switched ruby laser (QSRL) and Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (QSNYL) treatment of dermal melanocytosis, especially nevus of Ota, has produced favorable results that are mediated by selective photothermolysis. However, the precise effects of irradiation on melanosomes and cells containing melanosomes remain unclear, and an optimal method of irradiation has not been found. In this study synthetic melanin powder and pigmented dermal tissue obtained from five blue nevus lesions, also classified as dermal melanocytosis, were used as targets to identify the specific effects of these forms of irradiation in vitro. Morphological changes were assessed by microscopy after irradiation with QSRL and QSNYL at a fluence of 5 J/cm2, the fluence ordinarily utilized in clinical applications. Light microscopy revealed that most of the synthetic melanin powder retained in 1% agar was no longer visible after QSRL irradiation. In contrast, melanin powder particles were partly crushed by QSNYL irradiation. Electron microscopic examination of melanosomes in the blue nevus tissue after irradiation showed expansion and various other forms of disruption. Statistical analysis by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the length of the major axis of the melanosomes indicated that QSRL irradiation caused significantly greater melanosome expansion than QSNYL irradiation. These findings indicate that QSRL irradiation had a greater photothermal effect on dermal melanosomes than QSNYL irradiation. This suggests that QSRL is more efficacious in the treatment of dermal melanocytosis than QSNYL.

  13. Glucose oxidase as a biocatalytic enzyme-based bio-fuel cell using Nafion membrane limiting crossover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, S; Blottnitz, H; Naidoo, Q; Vaivars, G

    2013-01-01

    A novel combination for an Enzyme-based Biofuel cell included a Nafion membrane as an ion transporter that maintained a working cell charge and inhibited membrane degradation. The prototype cell chamber used oxygen (O 2 ) in the cathode cell and glucose in the anode. The Nafion membrane stability studied here was evidently in the region of 0% loss of conductivity as the charge was constant and increased after the addition of glucose. The prototype cell chamber used NaCl in the cathode cell and glucose oxidase (GOx) in the anodic chamber was successfully studied for membrane stability showed in this study no evidence of poisoning from membrane leakage in a controlled pH environment. There was no crossover at the anaerobic operating ambient temperatures and under physiological pH 5 – 7 conditions. In this research we have successfully used a Nafion membrane together with GOx and under controlled conditions produced respectable power densities

  14. Autologous Transplantation of the Internal Limiting Membrane for Refractory Macular Hole following Ruptured Retinal Arterial Macroaneurysm: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Iwakawa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of macular hole (MH secondary to a retinal arterial macroaneurysm (RAMA which was successfully treated with an autologous transplantation of internal limiting membrane (ILM. Case Report: An 87-year-old female presented with a sudden decrease in central vision in the right eye. A fundus examination revealed a RAMA in the superonasal macular region, a subretinal hemorrhage (SRH, involving the macula, and a sub-ILM hemorrhage. A pars plana vitrectomy (PPV was performed. Intraoperatively, an MH filled with coagulum was detected. We tried to blow off and drain the SRH with a current of BSS and a gentle suction with a 27-gauge vitreous cutter from the MH, but some amount of SRH at the bottom of the MH remained. The ILM was peeled off for 2 disc diameters around the MH. The vitreous cavity was filled with air at the end of the operation. Two weeks after the surgery, the MH was not closed. One month following the initial PPV, a second PPV was performed to achieve closure of the MH. Results: An autologous transplantation of ILM was performed as second PPV. Six months after the final surgery, the MH was successfully closed and the best-corrected decimal visual acuity was 0.6. Conclusions: Autologous ILM transplantation can be an effective treatment option for MH closure following RAMA rupture.

  15. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target

  16. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, A.; Dijken, H. van; Hamstra, H.J.; Flier, M. van der; Vidarsson, G.; Putten, J.P. van; Boog, C.J.; Dobbelsteen, G. van den; Ley, P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent

  17. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; van Dijken, Harry; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; van der Flier, Michiel; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Boog, Claire J. P.; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie; van der Ley, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent

  18. Limitations of the colloidal silica method in mapping the endothelial plasma membrane proteome of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Selvam; Reinartz, Michael; Emde, Barbara; Zanger, Klaus; Schrader, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) membrane is an important interface, which plays a crucial role in signal transduction. Our aim was to selectively purify luminal EC membrane proteins from the coronary vasculature of the isolated perfused mouse heart and analyze its composition with mass spectrometry (MS). To specifically label coronary ECs in the intact heart, the colloidal silica method was applied, which is based on the binding of positively charged colloidal silica to the surface of EC membranes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the specific labeling of ECs of macro and microvessels. Two different methods of tissue homogenization (Teflon pestle and ultra blade) together with density centrifugation were used for membrane protein enrichment. Enrichment and purity was controlled by Western blot analysis using the EC-specific protein caveolin 1 and various intracellular marker proteins. The ultra blade method resulted in a tenfold enrichment of caveolin 1, while there was negligible contamination as judged by Western blot. However, protein yield was low and required pooling of ten hearts for MS. When enriched endothelial membrane proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by LC-MS, a total of 56 proteins could be identified, of which only 12 were membrane proteins. We conclude that coronary endothelial membranes can be conveniently labeled with colloidal silica. However, due to the ionic nature of interaction of colloidal silica with the EC membrane the shear rate required for cardiac homogenization resulted in a substantial loss of specificity.

  19. Characterization of melanosomes and melanin in Japanese patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome types 1, 4, 6, and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Ken; Abe, Yuko; Araki, Yuta; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Seishima, Mariko; Umetsu, Takafumi; Kato, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Masahiro; Hozumi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Tamio

    2018-03-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), a bleeding tendency, and ceroid deposition. Most of the causative genes for HPS encode subunits of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC). In this study, we identified one patient each with HPS4, HPS6, and HPS9 by whole-exome sequencing. Next, we analyzed hair samples from the three patients and representative patients with HPS1 and controls using electron microscopy and chemical methods. All HPS patients had fewer, smaller, and more immature melanosomes than healthy controls. Further, all patients showed reduced total melanin content and increased levels of benzothiazine-type pheomelanin. The results of this study demonstrate the impact of the dysfunctions of BLOCs on the maturation of melanosomes and melanin levels and composition through analysis of their hair samples. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Differential recognition of a dileucine-based sorting signal by AP-1 and AP-3 reveals a requirement for both BLOC-1 and AP-3 in delivery of OCA2 to melanosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaram, Anand; Dennis, Megan K.; Chaudhuri, Rittik; De Jesus-Rojas, Wilfredo; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Wood, Christopher S.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell types that generate unique lysosome-related organelles (LROs), such as melanosomes in melanocytes, populate nascent LROs with cargoes that are diverted from endosomes. Cargo sorting toward melanosomes correlates with binding via cytoplasmically exposed sorting signals to either heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 or AP-3. Some cargoes bind both adaptors, but the relative contribution of each adaptor to cargo recognition and their functional interactions with other effectors during transport to melanosomes are not clear. Here we exploit targeted mutagenesis of the acidic dileucine–based sorting signal in the pigment cell–specific protein OCA2 to dissect the relative roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in transport to melanosomes. We show that binding to AP-1 or AP-3 depends on the primary sequence of the signal and not its position within the cytoplasmic domain. Mutants that preferentially bound either AP-1 or AP-3 each trafficked toward melanosomes and functionally complemented OCA2 deficiency, but AP-3 binding was necessary for steady-state melanosome localization. Unlike tyrosinase, which also engages AP-3 for optimal melanosomal delivery, both AP-1– and AP-3–favoring OCA2 variants required BLOC-1 for melanosomal transport. These data provide evidence for distinct roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in OCA2 transport to melanosomes and indicate that BLOC-1 can cooperate with either adaptor during cargo sorting to LROs. PMID:22718909

  1. MACULAR HOLE CLOSURE OVER RESIDUAL SUBRETINAL FLUID BY AN INVERTED INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE FLAP TECHNIQUE IN PATIENTS WITH MACULAR HOLE RETINAL DETACHMENT IN HIGH MYOPIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Tetsuhiko; Higashide, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Koh; Ikuno, Yasushi; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    To describe the closure of a macular hole over residual subretinal fluid in patients with macular hole retinal detachment in high myopia who had been treated using an inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique. Three patients with macular hole retinal detachment in high myopia underwent pars plana vitrectomy using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique. One patient received a silicone oil injection, and the other two patients received a long-acting gas injection at the end of the surgery. After surgery, spectral domain ocular coherence tomography examination was performed. In the patient with the silicone oil injection, spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed that the macular hole was sealed with an inverted internal limiting membrane flap in the presence of subretinal fluid 1 day after surgery. The inner retinal layers gradually regained a more physiologic configuration over the residual subretinal fluid. In all patients, macular holes were completely closed over the subretinal fluid, which was gradually absorbed. Using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique, macular holes were closed over residual subretinal fluid in patients with macular hole retinal detachment. The results indicate that reattachment of the retina may not be necessary for closure of macular holes.

  2. Long-term operation of oxygen-limiting membrane bioreactor (MBR) for the development of simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuanqi; Wang, Gang; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Yuesuo; Yang, Fenglin

    2017-07-18

    In this study, an oxygen-limiting membrane bioreactor (MBR) with recirculation of biogas for relieving membrane fouling was successfully operated to realize the simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) process. The MBR operation was considered effective in the long-term test with total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of 94.86% and 98.91%, respectively. Membrane fouling was significantly alleviated due to the recirculation of biogas and the membrane had been cleaned four times with a normal filtration period of 52 days. The co-existence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anammox and denitrifying bacteria in MBR was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) analysis. Furthermore, AOB were found close to the granule surface, while denitrifying bacteria and anammox were in the deeper layer of granules. Potential in excellent TN and COD removal, operational stability and sustainability, as well as in alleviating membrane fouling is expected by using this oxygen-limiting MBR.

  3. [Observation of single-layered inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique for macular hole with retinal detachment in high myopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C Z; Wu, J H; He, J W; Feng, C

    2017-05-11

    Objective: To compare the outcome of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with a single-layered inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap versus PPV with ILM peeling for the treatment of macular hole associated retinal detachment (MHRD) in high myopia. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, PPV with 2 kinds of adjuvant surgical procedures were used in 35 moderately high myopia eyes with MHRD. These eyes were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (17 eyes) receiving PPV and ILM peeling and group 2 (18 eyes) receiving PPV with a single-layered inverted ILM flap. Anatomical reattachment of the retina, macular hole closure, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were measured at 6 months after surgery. Results: The retina was successfully reattached in all cases. The difference of the retinal reattachment rate between the two groups was not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, P= 1.000). The rate of macular hole closure was 47.1% in group 1 (8 eyes) and 88.9% in group 2 (16 eyes). The difference of the macular hole closure rate between the two groups was statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, P= 0.012). Significant improvement in logarithm of minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) BCVA was achieved in both groups. There was no difference in the initial, final, or improved logMAR BCVA in the 2 groups. Conclusion: Single-layered inverted ILM flap technique effectively helps close the macular hole in moderately high myopia with MHRD. This may prevent the possible redetachment from the macular hole. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 338 - 343) .

  4. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural evidence of glial cells and hyalocytes in internal limiting membrane specimens of idiopathic macular holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ricarda G; Eibl, Kirsten H; Zhao, Fei; Scheerbaum, Martin; Scheler, Renate; Schaumberger, Markus M; Wehnes, Helga; Walch, Axel K; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Gandorfer, Arnd

    2011-10-03

    To provide new information on epiretinal cell proliferation and the cells' origin in idiopathic macular holes and to overcome the effects of embedding and sectioning preparation procedures on cell-distribution patterns. Interference and phase-contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy were performed on surgically excised whole-mounted internal limiting membrane (ILM) specimens removed from 60 eyes with idiopathic macular holes. Cell distribution and cell morphology were correlated with immunocytochemical staining characteristics. Twelve cell type-specific antibodies were used to detect glial cells, hyalocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells, retinal ganglion cells, and immune cells. Cell viability was analyzed. Epiretinal cell proliferation was found in all ILM specimens, irrespective of the stage of the macular hole. Cell density showed a broad variety. Immunocytochemistry frequently revealed simultaneous expression of GFAP/CD45, GFAP/CD64, GFAP/CD68, GFAP/CRALBP, and GFAP/CD90. Some cells presented with intracellular contractile filaments (anti-αSMA); others were not immunoreactive to any antibody examined. The percentage of viable cells showed a broad variety with a mean of 73% (SD 29%). Electron microscopy demonstrated glial cells, hyalocytes, and myofibroblast-like cells. The presence of epiretinal cells at the ILM in all macular hole stages strongly suggests a substantial involvement of cell migration and proliferation in the course of macular hole development. Glial cells and hyalocytes play the predominant role in epiretinal cell proliferation. Given the co-expression of glial cell and hyalocyte markers, transdifferentiation of epiretinal cells needs further elucidation, especially with respect to αSMA-positive cells leading to traction at the vitreoretinal interface.

  5. Pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for recurrent macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion after antivascular endothelial growth factor treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirakata Y

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yukari Shirakata,1 Kouki Fukuda,1 Tomoyoshi Fujita,1 Yuki Nakano,1 Hiroyuki Nomoto,2 Hidetaka Yamaji,3 Fumio Shiraga,4 Akitaka Tsujikawa1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, 2Nomoto Eye Clinic, Himeji, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Shirai Eye Hospital, Mitoyo, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan Purpose: To evaluate the anatomic and functional outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for recurrent macular edema (ME due to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO after intravitreal injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF agents. Methods: Twenty-four eyes of 24 patients with treatment-naive ME from BRVO were treated with intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents. Recurred ME was treated with pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling. Results: After the surgery, ME was significantly reduced at 1 month (P=0.031 and the reduction increased with time (P=0.007 at the final visit. With the reduction in ME, treated eyes showed a slow improvement in visual acuity (VA. At the final visit, improvement in VA was statistically significant compared with baseline (P=0.048. The initial presence of cystoid spaces, serous retinal detachment, or subretinal hemorrhage under the fovea, as well as retinal perfusion status, showed no association with VA improvement. However, the presence of epiretinal membrane showed a significant association with the visual recovery. Although eyes without epiretinal membrane showed visual improvement (-0.10±0.32 in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR], eyes with epiretinal membrane showed greater visual improvement (-0.38±0.12 in logMAR, P=0.012. Conclusion: For recurrent ME due to BRVO after anti-VEGF treatment, particularly when accompanied by epiretinal membrane, pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling might be a

  6. Rapid evaporation at the superheat limit of methanol, ethanol, butanol and n-heptane on platinum films supported by low-stress SiN membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Eric J; Avedisian, C Thomas; Cavicchi, Richard C; Chung, Do Hyun; Rah, Jeff; Carrier, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    The bubble nucleation temperatures of several organic liquids (methanol, ethanol, butanol, n-heptane) on stress-minimized platinum (Pt) films supported by SiN membranes is examined by pulse-heating the membranes for times ranging from 1 µs to 10 µs. The results show that the nucleation temperatures increase as the heating rates of the Pt films increase. Measured nucleation temperatures approach predicted superheat limits for the smallest pulse times which correspond to heating rates over 10 8 K/s, while nucleation temperatures are significantly lower for the longest pulse times. The microheater membranes were found to be robust for millions of pulse cycles, which suggests their potential in applications for moving fluids on the microscale and for more fundamental studies of phase transitions of metastable liquids.

  7. Taphonomic controls on the distribution of melanosomes in tissues from river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and the implications for interpreting the anatomy of Mayomyzon pieckoensis from the Carboniferous, Mazon Creek Lagerstätte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedza, Christopher; Purnell, Mark; Vinther, Jakob; Gabbott, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Pigment bearing organelles - melanosomes - are found in a variety of tissues across a broad range of taxa. Melanin, the pigment found within these organelles, has an array of uses, including determining colouration patterns in integument, alongside acting as an antimicrobial agent in vertebrate organs. Famously, work on fossilised melanosomes has enabled palaeontologists to reconstruct the colour patterning of extinct organisms thereby providing ecological insights. Recent studies on the retina of vertebrate fossils have demonstrated the potential for fossil melanosomes to help elucidate phylogenetic relationships. However, little is known about the distribution and morphology of melanosomes throughout a single taxon in different tissues and how their distribution may be affected by decay. Here we present preliminary results into the distribution and morphology of melanosomes within different tissues of the extant river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, in comparison to the extinct Carboniferous lamprey Mayomyzon pieckoensis. These data indicate that melanosome morphology can vary between different tissues in M. pieckoensis, particularly melanosomes found within the eyes. This has significant implications for interpreting the pigmented anatomy of extinct organisms, and provides evidence that understanding melanosome distribution and morphology could help untangle debates surrounding controversial interpretations of pigmented anatomy.

  8. Evaluation of Macular Retinal Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness after Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Idiopathic Macular Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso L. Sabater

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate macular retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL thickness changes after Brilliant Blue G-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic macular hole repair using a high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods. 32 eyes from 32 patients with idiopathic macular holes who underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling between January 2011 and July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. GCIPL thickness was measured before surgery, and at one month and at six months after surgery. Values obtained from automated and semimanual SD-OCT segmentation analysis were compared (Cirrus HD-OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA. Results. No significant differences were found between average GCIPL thickness values between preoperative and postoperative analysis. However, statistical significant differences were found in GCIPL thickness at the temporal macular quadrants at six months after surgery. Quality measurement analysis performed by automated segmentation revealed a significant number of segmentation errors. Semimanual segmentation slightly improved the quality of the results. Conclusion. SD-OCT analysis of GCIPL thickness found a significant reduction at the temporal macular quadrants at 6 months after Brilliant Blue G-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic macular hole.

  9. Evaluation of Macular Retinal Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness after Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Idiopathic Macular Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Villoria, Álvaro; Zapata, Miguel A.; Figueroa, Marta S.; Suárez-Leoz, Marta; Arrevola, Luis; Teijeiro, María-Ángeles; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate macular retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness changes after Brilliant Blue G-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic macular hole repair using a high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. 32 eyes from 32 patients with idiopathic macular holes who underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling between January 2011 and July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. GCIPL thickness was measured before surgery, and at one month and at six months after surgery. Values obtained from automated and semimanual SD-OCT segmentation analysis were compared (Cirrus HD-OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Results. No significant differences were found between average GCIPL thickness values between preoperative and postoperative analysis. However, statistical significant differences were found in GCIPL thickness at the temporal macular quadrants at six months after surgery. Quality measurement analysis performed by automated segmentation revealed a significant number of segmentation errors. Semimanual segmentation slightly improved the quality of the results. Conclusion. SD-OCT analysis of GCIPL thickness found a significant reduction at the temporal macular quadrants at 6 months after Brilliant Blue G-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic macular hole. PMID:25110679

  10. Plasma-membrane hyperpolarization diminishes the cation efflux via Nha1 antiporter and Ena ATPase under potassium-limiting conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zahrádka, Jaromír; Sychrová, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2012), s. 439-446 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110801 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 33779266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : potassium uptake * potassium efflux * yeast * plasma-membrane potential Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2012

  11. Schistosoma mansoni Infection of Mice, Rats and Humans Elicits a Strong Antibody Response to a Limited Number of Reduction-Sensitive Epitopes on Five Major Tegumental Membrane Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greice Krautz-Peterson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major disease of the developing world for which no vaccine has been successfully commercialized. While numerous Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens have been identified that elicit antibody responses during natural infections, little is known as to the identities of the schistosome antigens that are most prominently recognized by antibodies generated through natural infection. Non-reducing western blots probed with serum from schistosome-infected mice, rats and humans on total extracts of larval or adult schistosomes revealed that a small number of antigen bands predominate in all cases. Recognition of each of these major bands was lost when the blots were run under reducing condition. We expressed a rationally selected group of schistosome tegumental membrane antigens in insect host cells, and used the membrane extracts of these cells to unambiguously identify the major antigens recognized by S. mansoni infected mouse, rat and human serum. These results revealed that a limited number of dominant, reduction-sensitive conformational epitopes on five major tegumental surface membrane proteins: SmTsp2, Sm23, Sm29, SmLy6B and SmLy6F, are primary targets of mouse, rat and human S. mansoni infection sera antibodies. We conclude that, Schistosoma mansoni infection of both permissive (mouse and non-permissive (rat rodent models, as well as humans, elicit a dominant antibody response recognizing a limited number of conformational epitopes on the same five tegumental membrane proteins. Thus it appears that neither infecting schistosomula nor mature adult schistosomes are substantively impacted by the robust circulating anti-tegumental antibody response they elicit to these antigens. Importantly, our data suggest a need to re-evaluate host immune responses to many schistosome antigens and has important implications regarding schistosome immune evasion mechanisms and schistosomiasis vaccine development.

  12. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin in rats. An application of the capillary membrane-limited model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sawada, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1987-07-01

    In order to simulate the distribution and elimination of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-EP) after iv bolus injection in rats, we proposed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating diffusional transport of /sup 125/I-beta-EP across the capillary membrane. This model assumes that the distribution of /sup 125/I-beta-EP is restricted only within the blood and the tissue interstitial fluid, and that a diffusional barrier across the capillary membrane exists in each tissue except the liver. The tissue-to-blood partition coefficients were estimated from the ratios of the concentration in tissues to that in arterial plasma at the terminal (pseudoequilibrium) phase. The total body plasma clearance (9.0 ml/min/kg) was appropriately assigned to the liver and kidney. The transcapillary diffusion clearances of /sup 125/I-beta-EP were also estimated and shown to correlate linearly with that of inulin in several tissues. Numerically solving the mass-balance differential equations as to plasma and each tissue simultaneously, simulated concentration curves of /sup 125/I-beta-EP corresponded well with the observed data. It was suggested by the simulation that the initial rapid disappearance of /sup 125/I-beta-EP from plasma after iv injection could be attributed in part to the transcapillary diffusion of the peptide.

  14. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariri, Afshin; van Dijken, Harry; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; van der Flier, Michiel; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Putten, Jos P M; Boog, Claire J P; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie; van der Ley, Peter

    2013-11-12

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent interactions are mediated through the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family of receptors. Importantly, binding of Opa to CEACAM1 has been reported to suppress human CD4 T cell proliferation in vitro in response to OMV preparations. This raises the question whether OMV vaccines should contain Opa proteins at all. Until now it has been difficult to answer this question, as the proposed immunosuppressive effect was only demonstrated with human cells in vitro, while immunization experiments in mice are not informative because the Opa interaction is specific for human CEACAM1. In the present study we have used Opa+ and Opa- OMVs for immunization experiments in a human CEACAM1 transgenic mouse model. OMVs were prepared from a meningococcal strain H44/76 variant expressing the CEACAM1-binding OpaJ protein, and from an isogenic variant in which all opa genes have been inactivated. Both the CEACAM1 expressing transgenic mice and their congenic littermates lacking it were immunized twice with the OMV preparations, and the sera were analyzed for bactericidal activity and ELISA antibody titres. Total IgG antibodies against the OMVs were similar in both mouse strains. Yet the titres for IgG antibodies specific for purified OpaJ protein were significantly lower in the mice expressing human CEACAM1 than in the nontransgenic mice. No significant differences were found in bactericidal titres among the four groups. Overall, these data indicate that expression of human CEACAM1 confers a reduced Opa-specific antibody response in vivo without affecting the overall immune response against other OMV antigens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaginal Fluid Urea and Creatinine in the Diagnosis of Premature Rupture of Membranes in Resource Limited Community Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Jasmina; Samal, Sunil Kumar; Ghose, Seetesh; Niranjan, Gopal

    2017-03-01

    Objective: Diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PROM) is difficult in equivocal cases with traditional methods. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of vaginal washing fluid urea and creatinine for diagnosis of PROM and to determine the cut off value. Materials and methods: The current study was a prospective case control. Women having gestational age of 28 to 42 weeks were divided into two equal groups: Fifty with history of leaking per vagina (study group) and an equal number with gestation matched none leaking (control group) were recruited. Data analysis was done by Student's t-test, receiver operator curve and chi square test. Results: The demographic data of both groups were comparable at the time of sampling (p > 0.05).Vaginal fluid urea and creatinine was significantly higher in study group (p 6mg/dl and creatinine with a cut off value of > 0.3 mg/dl to diagnose PROM were all more than 90%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of amniotic fluid index (AFI) to diagnose PROM were 30%, 91.8%, 83.33%, 57.32% and 62 % respectively, with a cut-off value of ≤ 7 cm. The areas under the curves are 0.952 for creatinine, 0.999 for urea and 0.635 for AFI. Conclusion: Detection of vaginal fluid urea and creatinine to diagnose PROM is a simple, reliable and rapid test. Introduction of this method into routine use even in low resource community setting is feasible, practical and cost effective.

  16. Vaginal Fluid Urea and Creatinine in the Diagnosis of Premature Rupture of Membranes in Resource Limited Community Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Begum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PROM is difficult in equivocal cases with traditional methods. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of vaginal washing fluid urea and creatinine for diagnosis of PROM and to determine the cut off value.Materials and methods: The current study was a prospective case control. Women having gestational age of 28 to 42 weeks were divided into two equal groups: Fifty with history of leaking per vagina (study group and an equal number with gestation matched none leaking (control group were recruited. Data analysis was done by Student’s t-test, receiver operator curve and chi square test.Results: The demographic data of both groups were comparable at the time of sampling (p > 0.05.Vaginal fluid urea and creatinine was significantly higher in study group (p < 0.001. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, and accuracy of vaginal fluid urea with a cut off value > 6mg/dl and creatinine with a cut off value of > 0.3 mg/dl to diagnose PROM were all more than 90%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of amniotic fluid index (AFI to diagnose PROM were 30%, 91.8%, 83.33%, 57.32% and 62 % respectively, with a cut-off value of ≤ 7 cm. The areas under the curves are 0.952 for creatinine, 0.999 for urea and 0.635 for AFI.Conclusion: Detection of vaginal fluid urea and creatinine to diagnose PROM is a simple, reliable and rapid test. Introduction of this method into routine use even in low resource community setting is feasible, practical and cost effective.

  17. Protease-activated receptor 2, a receptor involved in melanosome transfer, is upregulated in human skin by ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G; Deng, A; Rodriguez-Burford, C; Seiberg, M; Han, R; Babiarz, L; Grizzle, W; Bell, W; Pentland, A

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the protease-activated receptor 2 is involved in skin pigmentation through increased phagocytosis of melanosomes by keratinocytes. Ultraviolet irradiation is a potent stimulus for melanosome transfer. We show that protease-activated receptor 2 expression in human skin is upregulated by ultraviolet irradiation. Subjects with skin type I, II, or III were exposed to two or three minimal erythema doses of irradiation from a solar simulator. Biopsies were taken from nonexposed and irradiated skin 24 and 96 h after irradiation and protease-activated receptor 2 expression was detected using immunohistochemical staining. In nonirradiated skin, protease-activated receptor 2 expression was confined to keratinocytes in the lower one-third of the epidermis. After ultraviolet irradiation protease-activated receptor 2 expression was observed in keratinocytes in the upper two-thirds of the epidermis or the entire epidermis at both time points studied. Subjects with skin type I showed delayed upregulation of protease-activated receptor 2 expression, however, compared with subjects with skin types II and III. Irradiated cultured human keratinocytes showed upregulation in protease-activated receptor 2 expression as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. Cell culture supernatants from irradiated keratinocytes also exhibited a dose-dependent increase in protease-activated receptor-2 cleavage activity. These results suggest an important role for protease-activated receptor-2 in pigmentation in vivo. Differences in protease-activated receptor 2 regulation in type I skin compared with skin types II and III suggest a potential mechanism for differences in tanning in subjects with different skin types.

  18. Induction of retinal-dependent calcium influx in human melanocytes by UVA or UVB radiation contributes to the stimulation of melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Mei; Yi, Wen-Juan; Su, Meng-Yun; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shi-Zheng; Lei, Tie-Chi

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to neighbouring keratinocytes is critical to protect the skin from the deleterious effects of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation; however, the initial factor(s) that stimulates melanosome transfer remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the induction of retinal-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) influx in melanocytes (MCs) by UVA or UVB irradiation and the effect of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 1 (TRPM1) (melastatin1)-related Ca 2+ influx on melanosome transfer. Primary human epidermal MCs were exposed to physiological doses of UVB or UVA light and loaded with a calcium indicator Fluo-4 dye. The change of intracellular calcium of MCs was monitored using a two-photon confocal fluorescence microscopy. MCs were co-cultured with human epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) in the absence or presence of voriconazole (a TRPM1 blocker) or calcium chelators. MCs were also transfected with TRPM1 siRNA for silencing the expression of TRPM1 gene. The melanosome transfer in the co-cultured cells was quantitatively analysed using flow cytometry and was further confirmed by immunofluorescent double-staining. The protein levels and distributions of TRPM1, OPN3 and OPN5 in MCs were measured by Western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. The retinal-dependent Ca 2+ influx of UVA-exposed melanocytes differed greatly from that of UVB-exposed melanocytes in the timing-phase. The protein expression of TRPM1 in mono- and co-cultured MCs was dose-dependently up-regulated by UVA and UVB. TRPM1 siRNA-mediated knockdown and the blockage of TRPM1 channel using a putative antagonist (voriconazole) significantly inhibited melanosome transfer in co-cultures following UVA or UVB exposure. The distinct time-phases of Ca 2+ influx in MCs induced by UVA or UVB contribute to the consecutive stimulation of melanosome transfer, thereby providing a potent photoprotection against harmful UV radiation. © 2017

  19. Bifunctional effects of O-methylated flavones from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi on melanocytes: Inhibition of melanin production and intracellular melanosome transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Kudo

    Full Text Available The growing interest in skin lightening has recently renewed attention on the esthetic applications of Chinese herbal medicine. Although Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is used for antipyretic and antiinflammatory purposes, its whitening effect remains unclear. This study reports three major findings: (1 S. baicalensis has a potent inhibitory effect on melanogenesis; (2 wogonin and its glycoside are the active components of S. baicalensis; and (3 O-methylated flavones from S. baicalensis, such as wogonin, inhibit intracellular melanosome transport. Using a melanin quantification assay, we showed that S. baicalensis potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Componential analyses revealed that the main components of S. baicalensis are baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A. Among these five flavones, wogonin and wogonoside consistently inhibited melanogenesis in both B16F10 melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Wogonin exhibited the strongest inhibition of melanin production and markedly lightened the color of skin equivalents. We identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase-related proteins as potential targets of wogonin- and wogonoside-induced melanogenesis suppression. In culture, we found that the melanosomes in wogonin-treated B16F10 cells were localized to the perinuclear region. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that wogonin significantly reduced in melanophilin protein, which is required for actin-based melanosome transport. Other actin-based melanosome transport-related molecules, i.e., Rab27A and myosin Va, were not affected by wogonin. Cotreatment with MG132 blocked the wogonin-induced decrease in melanophilin, suggesting that wogonin promotes the proteolytic degradation of melanophilin via the calpain/proteasomal pathway. We determined that the structural specificities of the mono-O-methyl group in the flavone A-ring and the aglycone form were responsible for reducing melanosome

  20. Evaluation of Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness after Vitreoretinal Surgery with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling in Cases with Idiopathic Macular Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Demirel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate macular retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL thickness after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling for idiopathic macular holes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Materials and Methods: Eighteen eyes of 18 patients with unilateral idiopathic macular hole who underwent vitrectomy with ILM peeling were retrospectively analyzed. Healthy fellow eyes of the patients and 18 eyes of 18 age-matched healthy individuals constituted the control group. The patients were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after surgery. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA measurements, biomicroscopic examination findings and SD-OCT measurements were recorded. Ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness was evaluated with ganglion cell analysis software of Cirrus HD-OCT before surgery and at 1 month and 3 months after surgery and compared with control groups. Presence of dissociated optic nerve fiber layer (DONFL was evaluated with C-scan mode. Results: Of the 18 patients, 9 were male and 9 were female with a mean age of 65.6±5.6 (55-77 years. Preoperative BCVA was 0.75±0.19 logMAR, while it was 0.44±0.17 logMAR and 0.36±0.15 logMAR at postoperative 1 and 3 months, respectively (p0.05. Conclusion: Internal limiting membrane peeling during macular hole surgery may cause functional and /or structural changes that may be associated with visual acuity. Significant GCIPL thinning and DONLF appearance may occur postoperatively.

  1. The silver locus product (Silv/gp100/Pmel17) as a new tool for the analysis of melanosome transfer in human melanocyte-keratinocyte co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman K; Nizard, Carine; Kurfurst, Robin; Bonte, Frederic; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Tobin, Desmond J

    2008-05-01

    Melanosomes are melanocyte-specific lysosome-related organelles that are transferred to keratinocytes of the epidermis and anagen hair bulb. Transferred melanin forms supra-nuclear caps that protect epidermal keratinocytes against UV irradiation. The mechanism(s) responsible for melanosome transfer into keratinocytes and their subsequent intra-keratinocyte distribution has long remained one of the most enigmatic of heterotypic cell interactions. Although there have been many attempts to study this process, significant progress has been hindered by the absence of an adequate in vitro model. During our ongoing study of melanocyte-keratinocyte interactions in skin and hair follicle, we have developed a novel in vitro assay that exploits the specificity of Silv/Pmel17/gp100 expression for melanosome/melanin granules. Using matched cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes isolated from normal healthy epidermis together with double immunofluorescence, we have determined that gp100 is a surprisingly useful tracker of transferred melanin. Moreover, transferred gp100 stained melanin granules emit a bright fluorescence signal, facilitating ready quantification of melanin transfer levels between melanocytes and keratinocytes. This quantitative approach was validated using known inducers and inhibitors of the melanocyte phenotype. This assay further confirmed that cytophagocytosis of melanocyte components (e.g. dendrite tips) by keratinocytes is one route for melanin incorporation into keratinocytes. Lastly, a role for the recently proposed filopodium as a direct conduit for melanin transfer was substantiated using this novel approach. In conclusion, this assay promises to significantly aid our investigations of the molecular basis of melanosome transfer and offers a new tool for the clinical evaluation of melanocyte modulators.

  2. Outcomes of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided center-sparing internal limiting membrane peeling for myopic traction maculopathy: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Ravani, Raghav; Mehta, Aditi; Simakurthy, Sriram; Dhull, Chirakshi

    2017-07-04

    To evaluate the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (I-OCT)-guided traction removal and center-sparing internal limiting membrane (cs-ILM) peeling. Nine eyes with myopic traction maculopathy as diagnosed on SD-OCT underwent PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling and were evaluated prospectively for resolution of central macular thickness (CMT) and improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications, if any, were noted. All patients were followed up for more than 9 months. Resolution of the macular retinoschisis was seen in all nine eyes on SD-OCT. At 36 weeks, there was a significant improvement in mean BCVA from the preoperative BCVA (P = 0.0089) along with a reduction in the CMT from 569.77 ± 263.19 to 166.0 ± 43.91 um (P = 0.0039). None of the eyes showed worsening of BCVA or development of full-thickness macular hole in the intraoperative or follow-up period. PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling helps in complete removal of traction, resolution of retinoschisis and good functional recovery with low intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  3. INCREASED SERUM LEVELS OF UREA AND CREATININE ARE SURROGATE MARKERS FOR DISRUPTION OF RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR EXTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE AND INNER SEGMENT ELLIPSOID ZONE IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sandeep; Ruia, Surabhi; Prasad, Senthamizh; Jain, Astha; Mishra, Nibha; Natu, Shankar M; Meyer, Carsten H; Gilhotra, Jagjit S; Kruzliak, Peter; Akduman, Levent

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the role of serum urea and creatinine as surrogate markers for disruption of retinal photoreceptor external limiting membrane (ELM) and inner segment ellipsoid zone (EZ) in Type 2 diabetic retinopathy (DR) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, for the first time. One hundred and seventeen consecutive cases of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes without retinopathy [No DR; n = 39], nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy [NPDR; n = 39], proliferative diabetic retinopathy [PDR; n = 39]) and 40 healthy control subjects were included. Serum levels of urea and creatinine were assessed using standard protocol. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to grade the disruption of ELM and EZ as follows: Grade 0, no disruption of ELM and EZ; Grade 1, ELM disrupted, EZ intact; Grade 2, ELM and EZ disrupted. Data were analyzed statistically. Increase in serum levels of urea (F = 22.93) and creatinine (F = 15.82) and increased grades of disruption of ELM and EZ (γ = 116.3) were observed with increased severity of DR (P serum levels of urea (F = 10.45) and creatinine (F = 6.89) was observed with increased grades of disruption of ELM and EZ (P = 0.001). Serum levels of urea and creatinine are surrogate markers for disruption of retinal photoreceptor ELM and EZ on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in DR.

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of genital tract bacteria in pregnant women with preterm premature rupture of membranes in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, George U; Adinma, Joseph I; Ghasi, Samuel; Ikechebelu, Joseph I; Igwegbe, Anthony O; Okonkwo, John E; Okafor, Charles I; Ezeama, Chukwuemeka O; Ezebialu, Ifeanyichukwu U; Ogbuagu, Chukwuanugo N

    2014-10-01

    To identify microbes prevalent in the genital tract of pregnant women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and to assess the susceptibility of the microbial isolates to a range of antibiotics to determine appropriate antibiotics for treating cases of PPROM in resource-limited settings. A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken involving women with (n=105) and without (n=105) a confirmed diagnosis of PPROM admitted to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, southeast Nigeria, between January 1, 2011, and April 30, 2013. Endocervical swabs were collected from all participants and examined microbiologically. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli were significantly more prevalent among women with PPROM than among those without PPROM (P<0.01). Among the antibiotics considered safe to use during pregnancy, the bacteria were most sensitive to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefixime, cefuroxime, and erythromycin. For the first 48hours, women with PPROM should receive an intravenous dose combining ampicillin-sulbactam, cefixime, cefuroxime, or erythromycin with metronidazole followed by oral administration of the chosen antibiotic combination to complete a 7-day course. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior hyaloid detachment and internal limiting membrane peeling assisted by anthocyanins from acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea) and 10 other natural vital dyes: experimental study in cadaveric eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jane; Ferreira, Magno Antonio; Farah, Michel Eid; de Carvalho, André Maia; Alves Ferreira, Raquel Eustaquio; de Moraes Filho, Milton Nunes; Souza Lima-Filho, Acácio Alves; Lago, João Henrique G; Sartorelli, Patricia; Rodrigues, Eduardo Buchele; Ferreira, Eber; Peris, Cristiane; Maia, Maurício

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether natural dyes facilitate posterior hyaloid detachment (posterior vitreous detachment [PVD]) and retinal internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in human eyes. Open-sky vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid and ILM removal was performed in 86 human cadaveric eyes. After core vitrectomy, 11 different dyes were injected into the vitreous cavity to aid hyaloid detachment and ILM removal. The dyes were allowed to settle on the macula for 5 minutes after PVD and were removed by mechanical aspiration. Intraocular forceps were used for ILM peeling, which was confirmed by light microscopy of the peeled tissue. Acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea) extract and 10 additional dyes from plants or animal sources were tested: pomegranate (Punica granatum), logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum), chlorophyll extract from alfalfa (Medicago sativa), cochineal (Dactylopius coccus), hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis), indigo (Indigofera tinctoria), paprika (Capiscum annuum), turmeric (Curcuma longa), old fustic (Maclura tinctoria), and grape (Vitis vinifera). The dyes facilitated PVD and ILM peeling. Acai fruit (E. oleracea) extract, logwood (H. campechianum), cochineal (D. coccus), and old fustic (M. tinctoria) facilitated PVD in all cases; dye-assisted PVD was compared with triamcinolone-assisted PVD performed previously in a comparative model. Acai fruit (E. oleracea) extract, cochineal (D. coccus), and chlorophyll extract from alfalfa (M. sativa) showed the best capability for ILM staining; dye-assisted ILM removal was compared with the ILM peeling guided by indocyanine green staining performed previously in a comparative model. Light microscopy confirmed the ILM removal in all cases. Anthocyanin dye of the acai fruit (E. oleracea) and the dyes from cochineal (D. coccus) and chlorophyll extract from alfalfa (M. sativa) resulted in the best capability for posterior hyaloid and ILM staining in human cadaveric eyes and may be a useful tool for

  6. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Intraparticle Mass Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    For partial oxidation systems, where the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target product is smaller than the reaction order in oxygen of the consecutive reaction rate toward the waste product, a packed bed membrane reactor can be applied to distributively dose oxygen along the

  7. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  8. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  9. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  10. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various

  11. Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotube attenuated the cytotoxicity by limiting the oxidative stress initiated cell membrane integrity damage, cell cycle arrestment, and death receptor mediated apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effects of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) on human normal liver cell line L02 was compared with that of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). It was shown that compared with MWCNTs-COOH, p-MWCNTs induced apoptosis, reduced the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione more significantly, and caused severer cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Cell cycles were arrested by both MWCNTs, while p-MWCNTs induced higher ratio of G0/G1 phase arrestment as compared with MWCNTs-COOH. Caspase-8 was also activated after both MWCNTs exposure, indicating extrinsic apoptotic pathway was involved in the apoptosis induced by MWCNTs exposure, more importantly, MWCNTs-COOH significantly reduced the activation of caspase-8 as compared with p-MWCNTs. All these results suggested that MWCNTs-COOH might be safer for in vivo application as compared with p-MWCNTs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Accuracy and cost-analysis of placental alpha-microglobulin-1 test in the diagnosis of premature rupture of fetal membranes in resource-limited community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, George Uchenna; Ezugwu, Euzebus Chinonye; Ogunyemi, Dotun; Eleje, Lydia Ijeoma; Ikechebelu, Joseph Ifeanyichukwu; Igwegbe, Anthony Osita; Okonkwo, John E; Ikpeze, Okechukwu Christian; Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Onah, Hyacinth Eze; Nwosu, Betrand Obi; Ezeama, Chukwuemeka Okwudili; Ezenkwele, Eziamaka Pauline

    2015-01-01

    To determine accuracy and costs of placental α-microglobulin-1 (PAMG-1) test compared to standard clinical assessment (SCA) for diagnosing rupture of membranes (ROM). A multicenter double-blind study of consecutive women with symptoms and signs of ROM in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi and University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, both in south-east Nigeria using SCA for ROM and the PAMG-1 test was done. ROM was diagnosed if two out of three methods from SCA (pooling, positive nitrazine test or ferning) were present and confirmed post-delivery based on presence of any two of these clinical criteria: delivery in 48 h to 7 days, evidence of chorioamnionitis, membranes overtly ruptured at delivery and adverse perinatal outcomes strongly correlated with prolonged PROM. A cost-analysis was also done. The outcome measures included sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and costs for the two tests. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the PAMG-1 test were 97.2%, 97.4% and 96.7%, higher than for SCA which were 83.7%, 87.9% and 70.5%, respectively (P < 0.001). Accuracy of SCA was higher at less than 34 weeks than 34 weeks or more (88.3% vs 81.4%) while the PAMG-1 test performed equally at both gestational age categories (96.1% vs 97.7%). In women without pooling, accuracy of the PAMG-1 test was 96.7%, while it was 40.0% with SCA. Analysis showed that the overall cost of SCA was 45% higher than the PAMG-1 test. This study confirms that the PAMG-1 test has a consistently high diagnostic accuracy at all gestational ages and with equivocal cases of ROM. The PAMG-1 test appears less costly than SCA. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Elevated oxidative membrane damage associated with genetic modifiers of Lyst-mutant phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen M Trantow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available LYST is a large cytosolic protein that influences the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, and mutation of the encoding gene, LYST, can cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Recently, Lyst-mutant mice were recognized to also exhibit an iris disease resembling exfoliation syndrome, a common cause of glaucoma in humans. Here, Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes were used in a search for genes that influence Lyst pathways. In a candidate gene-driven approach, albino Lyst-mutant mice homozygous for a mutation in Tyr, whose product is key to melanin synthesis within melanosomes, exhibited complete rescue of Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes. In a genetic background-driven approach using a DBA/2J strain of congenic mice, an interval containing Tyrp1 enhanced Lyst-dependent iris phenotypes. Thus, both experimental approaches implicated the melanosome, an organelle that is a potential source of oxidative stress, as contributing to the disease phenotype. Confirming an association with oxidative damage, Lyst mutation resulted in genetic context-sensitive changes in iris lipid hydroperoxide levels, being lowest in albino and highest in DBA/2J mice. Surprisingly, the DBA/2J genetic background also exposed a late-onset neurodegenerative phenotype involving cerebellar Purkinje-cell degeneration. These results identify an association between oxidative damage to lipid membranes and the severity of Lyst-mutant phenotypes, revealing a new mechanism that contributes to pathophysiology involving LYST.

  14. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis Complement levels Cryoglobulin test Treatment The goal of treatment ... not as helpful for people with membranous nephropathy. Medicines used treat membranous nephropathy include: Angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ...

  15. Effectiveness of a ground-surface polymer membrane covering as a method for limiting infiltration into burial trenches at Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyverse, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Maxey Flats Disposal Site (MFDS) was operated as a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive wastes for a period of 14 years (1963-1977). In 1977, radionuclides were found to be migrating from a closed disposal trench into an adjacent newly constructed trench. This discovery prompted closure of the site. Over time, deterioration of the shale and clay cover on the trenches had resulted from subsidence due to the collapse of buried metallic containers and the decomposition of various organic wastes within the trenches. This subsidence increased infiltration of water into the trenches as surface water was retained over the waste in potholes and small ponds. Although infiltration rates to the waste increased, seepage rates of leachate out of the bottom and sides of the trenches were very slow due to the low permeability of surrounding native shale soils (average hydraulic conductivity 4 x 10 -3 ft/day). In 1981, a program was implemented to correct deficiencies and stabilize the site. This paper describes the effectiveness of one design method where a low permeable (hydraulic conductivity -9 ft/sec) polyvinylchloride membrane cover (PVC) 0.015 to 0.020 inches thick was placed over the burial trenches. The covers were installed over trenches beginning in the fall of 1981. Each trench is equipped with several sumps for the collection and removal of leachate. Water-level data were collected on sumps from five trenches during the study period May 1978 to October 1984, which spanned a period prior to and after installation of the PVC cover. 3 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  16. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  17. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane filtration technologies have emerged as cost competitive and viable techniques in drinking and industrial water production. Despite advancements in membrane manufacturing and technology, membrane scaling and fouling remain major problems and may limit future growth in the industry. Scaling

  18. Human glioblastoma ADF cells express tyrosinase, L-tyrosine hydroxylase and melanosomes and are sensitive to L-tyrosine and phenylthiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, Antonella; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Colafarina, Sabrina; Cimini, Anna Maria; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Miranda, Michele

    2006-06-01

    Melanocytes and neuroblasts share the property of transforming L-tyrosine through two distinct metabolic pathways leading to melanogenesis and catecholamine synthesis, respectively. While tyrosinase (TYR) activity has been shown to be expressed by neuroblastoma it remains to be established as to whether also glioblastomas cells are endowed with this property. We have addressed this issue using the human continuous glioblastoma cell line ADF. We demonstrated that these cells possess tyrosinase as well as L-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and synthesize melanosomes. Because the two pathways are potentially cyto-genotoxic due to production of quinones, semiquinones, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have also investigated the expression of the peroxisomal proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) transcription factor as well the effect of L-tyrosine concentration on cell survival. We report that L-tyrosine down-regulates PPARalpha expression in ADF cells but not neuroblastoma and that this aminoacid and phenylthiourea (PTU) induces apoptosis in glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  20. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  1. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  2. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Correlation Between En Face Optical Coherence Tomography Defects of the Inner Retinal Layers and Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer Analysis After Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Idiopathic Full-Thickness Macular Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Dalia; El-Kannishy, Amr; Kamel, Rania; Abou Samra, Waleed

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to report en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) inner retinal changes after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (IFTMH) and to correlate these findings with macular ganglion cell inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) analysis. This prospective study included 20 patients with IFTMH treated using pars plana vitrectomy with ILM peeling. All patients were analyzed using en face OCT at 6 months after surgery to determinate the effect of ILM peeling on the inner retinal layers. Correlation between the GC-IPL en face OCT findings and that obtained by three-dimensional volumetric OCT scanning also was performed. Seven patients (35%) showed defects in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) that appeared as multiple dark dots with no visible defects at the GC-IPL, either with en face OCT or 3D volumetric OCT scanning. Thirteen patients (65%) showed a similar combination of RNFL defects and well-circumscribed defects in the underlying GC-IPL. These defects could be visualized on en face OCT display, and they correlated with areas of GC-IPL thinning detected in the 3D volumetric OCT scanning. With ILM peeling, en face OCT scanning showed two forms of inner retinal layers changes. The first form was the concentric macular dark spots (CMDS) with intact GC-IPL. The second form appeared in the CMDS with evident localized defects in the underlying GC-IPL. These defects correlate with the areas of GC-IPL thinning detected using 3D volumetric OCT scanning.

  4. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  5. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) drive melanosome transfer by promoting filopodia delivery and shedding spheroid granules: Evidences from atomic force microscopy observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui-Jun; Ma, Hui-Yong; Yang, Yang; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zi, Shao-Xia; Jia, Chi-Yu; Chen, Rong

    2014-12-01

    Skin pigmentation is accomplished by production of melanin in melanosome and by transfer of these organelles from melanocytes (MCs) to surrounding keratinocytes (KCs). However, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. We aimed to investigate the morphological structure changes on human epidermal MCs and KCs, which were either mono-cultured or co-cultured, with or without the treatment of both α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and to provide more direct proofs for process of melanosome transfer. Human epidermal MCs and KCs were isolated and co-cultured with 1:10 ratio in a defined Keratinocyte-serum free medium (K-SFM). After exposure with 100 nM α-MSH or 20 μM PGE2 for 3 days, cells were fixed with 0.5% glutaraldehyde and AFM images of scanning observation were captured by contacting and tapping model under normal atmospheric pressure and temperature. It showed that human epidermal MCs in culture had secondary or tertiary branches. Except for globular granules structure on the surface of dendrites, some filopodia were protruded on the tips and lateral sides of the dendrites. The administration of α-MSH and PGE2 made not only the dendrites thinner and longer, but also the globular granules more intensive and denser. Many spheroid granules were shed from branches of dendrite and most of them adhered with dense filopodia. Compared with untreated group, the number of filopodia per cell, diameter of filopodia, and shedding spheroid granules per field all increased following α-MSH and PGE2 exposure (P<0.05, n=3). However, many crest-like protrusions, which were distributed homogenously on the surface of mono-cultured KCs, were less changed after α-MSH and PGE2 exposure. In co-culture model, α-MSH and PGE2 increased the number of transferred melanosomes in KCs under laser confocal microscopic examination. Filopodia were observed only on the adhesion area of KCs and MCs in a coiled style by AFM

  6. Improved Fuel Transport Selectivity in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kyle Tyler

    2014-01-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, fuel crossover through the membrane is a significant problem that contributes to reduction in cell efficiency and accelerated membrane degradation. The need for high water content in the membrane to produce acceptable conductivities leads to excessive fuel crossover while also limiting cell operating temperature to

  7. Anion permselective membrane. [For redox fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, S.S.; Hodgdon, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental anion permeselective membranes were improved and characterized for use as separators in a chemical redox, power storage cell being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The goal of minimal Fe/sup +3/ ion transfer was achieved for each candidate membrane system. Minimal membrane resistivity was demonstrated by reduction of film thickness using synthetic backing materials but usefulness of thin membranes was limited by the scarcity of compatible fabrics. The most durable and useful backing fabrics were modacrylics. One membrane, a copolymer of 4 vinylpyridine and vinyl benzylchloride was outstanding in overall electrochemical and physical properties. Long term (1000 hrs) membrane chemical and thermal durability in redox environment was shown by three candidate polymers and two membranes. The remainder had good durability at ambient temperature. Manufacturing capability was demonstrated for large scale production of membrane sheets 5.5 ft/sup 2/ in area for two candidate systems.

  8. Carbon membranes - current progress and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennison, St.; Arnott, K.; Richter, H.

    2007-01-01

    The future use of nano-porous gas separation membranes will be dependent on significant reductions in the membrane and module costs, improvements in production methods to allow better reproducibility, ability to scale up production and improved performance and understanding of the mode of operation of the membrane systems. New approaches to ceramic supported carbon membranes could offer solutions to these problems. Whilst the performance characteristics underline the limitations of these membranes they also show where specific process opportunities might be accessible particularly in environmental and high temperature separations. (authors)

  9. Application of membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Membrane separation processes have made impressive progress since the first synthesis of membranes almost 40 years ago. This progress was driven by strong technological needs and commercial expectations. As a result the range of successful applications of membranes and membrane processes is continuously broadening. In addition, increasing application of membrane processes and technologies lies in the increasing variations of the nature and characteristics of commercial membranes and membrane apparatus. The objective of the report is to review the information on application of membrane technologies in the processing of liquid radioactive waste. The report covers the various types of membranes, equipment design, range of applications, operational experience and the performance characteristics of different membrane processes. The report aims to provide Member States with basic information on the applicability and limitations of membrane separation technologies for processing liquid radioactive waste streams

  10. Membrane bioreactors: present and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H N; Furusaki, S

    1991-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors have a very handy in-situ separation capability lacking in other types of bioreactors. Combining various functions of membrane separations and biocatalyst characteristics of enzymes, microbial cells, organelles, animal and plant tissues can generate quite a number of membrane bioreactor systems. The cell retaining property of membranes and selective removal of inhibitory byproducts makes high cell density culture possible and utilizes enzyme catalytic activity better, which leads to high productivity of bioreactors. Enzyme reactions utilizing cofactors and hydrolysis of macromolecules are advantageous in membrane bioreactors. Anaerobic cell culture may be efficiently carried out in membrane cell recycle systems, while aerobic cultures work well in dual hollow fiber reactors. Animal and plant cells have much a better chance of success in membrane reactors because of the protective environment of the reactor and the small oxygen uptake rate of these cells. Industrial use of these reactors are still in its infancy and limited to enzyme and animal tissue culture, but applications will expand as existing problems are resolved.

  11. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Daoutidis, Prodromos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Lima, Fernando [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Iyer, Aparna [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Agrawal, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Sabnis, Sanket [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  12. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Zheng, Xiaoting; Sullivan, Corwin; Wang, Xiaoli; Xing, Lida; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; O'Connor, Jingmai K; Zhang, Fucheng; Pan, Yanhong

    2015-05-07

    The wings of birds and their closest theropod relatives share a uniform fundamental architecture, with pinnate flight feathers as the key component. Here we report a new scansoriopterygid theropod, Yi qi gen. et sp. nov., based on a new specimen from the Middle-Upper Jurassic period Tiaojishan Formation of Hebei Province, China. Yi is nested phylogenetically among winged theropods but has large stiff filamentous feathers of an unusual type on both the forelimb and hindlimb. However, the filamentous feathers of Yi resemble pinnate feathers in bearing morphologically diverse melanosomes. Most surprisingly, Yi has a long rod-like bone extending from each wrist, and patches of membranous tissue preserved between the rod-like bones and the manual digits. Analogous features are unknown in any dinosaur but occur in various flying and gliding tetrapods, suggesting the intriguing possibility that Yi had membranous aerodynamic surfaces totally different from the archetypal feathered wings of birds and their closest relatives. Documentation of the unique forelimbs of Yi greatly increases the morphological disparity known to exist among dinosaurs, and highlights the extraordinary breadth and richness of the evolutionary experimentation that took place close to the origin of birds.

  13. Neutrons and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragneto, G.

    2012-11-01

    Current research in membrane protein biophysics highlights the emerging role of lipids in shaping membrane protein function. Cells and organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for controlling the lipid composition and many diseases are related to the failure of these mechanisms. One of the recent advances in the field is the discovery of the existence of coexisting micro-domains within a single membrane, important for regulating some signaling pathways. Many important properties of these domains remain poorly characterized. The characterization and analysis of bio-interfaces represent a challenge. Performing measurements on these few nanometer thick, soft, visco-elastic and dynamic systems is close to the limits of the available tools and methods. Neutron scattering techniques including small angle scattering, diffraction, reflectometry as well as inelastic methods are rapidly developing for these studies and are attracting an increasing number of biologists and biophysicists at large facilities. This manuscript will review some recent progress in the field and provide perspectives for future developments. It aims at highlighting neutron reflectometry as a versatile method to tackle questions dealing with the understanding and function of biomembranes and their components. The other important scattering methods are only briefly introduced.

  14. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  15. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  16. Dependence of Shear and Concentration on Fouling in a Membrane Bioreactor with Rotating Membrane Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-01-01

    Rotating ceramic membrane discs were fouled with lab-scale membrane bioreactors (MBR) sludge. Sludge filtrations were performed at varying rotation speeds and in different concentric rings of the membranes on different sludge concentrations. Data showed that the back transport expressed by limiting...... of shear stress and sludge concentration on the limiting flux. The model was developed by calculating the shear rate at laminar flow regime at different rotation speeds and radii on the membrane. Furthermore, through the shear rate and shear stress, the non-Newtonian behavior of MBR sludge was addressed...

  17. Novel Tripod Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Kruse, Andrew C; Gotfryd, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    . The use of a detergent or other amphipathic agents is required to overcome the intrinsic incompatibility between the large lipophilic surfaces displayed by the membrane proteins in their native forms and the polar solvent molecules. Here, we introduce new tripod amphiphiles displaying favourable......Integral membrane proteins play central roles in controlling the flow of information and molecules across membranes. Our understanding of membrane protein structures and functions, however, is seriously limited, mainly due to difficulties in handling and analysing these proteins in aqueous solution...

  18. Molecular Interactions at Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagalski, Vivien

    Biological membranes are essential and complex structures in every living cell consisting of a fluid lipid bilayer sheet and membrane proteins. Its significance makes biological membranes not only interesting for medical research, but also has made it a target for toxins in the course of evolution....... Today, we know more than ever before about the properties of biological membranes. Advanced biophysical techniques and sophisticated membrane models allow us to answer specific questions about the structure of the components within membranes and their interactions. However, many detailed structural...... mechanisms of membrane compounds, including compounds associated with membranes, are still unknown due to the challenges that arise when probing the hydrophobic nature of the membrane's interior. For integral membrane proteins that span through the entire membrane, the amphiphilic environment is essential...

  19. Membrane-based technologies for biogas separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhankar; Khan, Asim L; Cano-Odena, Angels; Liu, Chunqing; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2010-02-01

    Over the past two decades, membrane processes have gained a lot of attention for the separation of gases. They have been found to be very suitable for wide scale applications owing to their reasonable cost, good selectivity and easily engineered modules. This critical review primarily focuses on the various aspects of membrane processes related to the separation of biogas, more in specific CO(2) and H(2)S removal from CH(4) and H(2) streams. Considering the limitations of inorganic materials for membranes, the present review will only focus on work done with polymeric materials. An overview on the performance of commercial membranes and lab-made membranes highlighting the problems associated with their applications will be given first. The development studies carried out to enhance the performance of membranes for gas separation will be discussed in the subsequent section. This review has been broadly divided into three sections (i) performance of commercial polymeric membranes (ii) performance of lab-made polymeric membranes and (iii) performance of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for gas separations. It will include structural modifications at polymer level, polymer blending, as well as synthesis of mixed matrix membranes, for which addition of silane-coupling agents and selection of suitable fillers will receive special attention. Apart from an overview of the different membrane materials, the study will also highlight the effects of different operating conditions that eventually decide the performance and longevity of membrane applications in gas separations. The discussion will be largely restricted to the studies carried out on polyimide (PI), cellulose acetate (CA), polysulfone (PSf) and polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) membranes, as these membrane materials have been most widely used for commercial applications. Finally, the most important strategies that would ensure new commercial applications will be discussed (156 references).

  20. Isomeric Detergent Comparison for Membrane Protein Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Kyung Ho; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Mortensen, Jonas S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins encapsulated by detergent micelles are widely used for structural study. Because of their amphipathic property, detergents have the ability to maintain protein solubility and stability in an aqueous medium. However, conventional detergents have serious limitations in their scope...... and utility, particularly for eukaryotic membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes. Thus, a number of new agents have been devised; some have made significant contributions to membrane protein structural studies. However, few detergent design principles are available. In this study, we prepared meta....../stability of the membrane proteins. We propose that interplay between the hydrophile–lipophile balance (HLB) and alkyl chain length is of central importance for high detergent efficacy. In addition, differences in inter-alkyl-chain distance between the isomers influence the ability of the detergents to stabilise membrane...

  1. Zeolite membranes for efficient synthesis of biofuels

    OpenAIRE

    Sandström, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The greenhouse effect and the limited fossil oil resources have increased the demand of renewable fuels. Zeolite membranes have potential applications in numerous separation processes, and could be useful in the development of efficient processes for renewable fuel production. Methanol synthesis from synthesis gas is equilibrium limited, and continuous removal of products in a zeolite membrane reactor could improve the productivity of a conventional methanol synthesis process. In this work, m...

  2. Poly-thiosemicarbazide membrane for gold recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2014-11-01

    A novel polymeric membrane adsorber with a high density of adsorption sites that can selectively capture Au(III) ions, is proposed as an efficient alternative to recover gold from dilute solutions. Poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC), a polymer that contains one chelate site per monomeric unit, was used to fabricate the membranes. This polymer can be easily processed into membranes by a phase inversion technique, resulting in an open and interconnected porous structure suitable for high flux liquid phase applications. This method overcomes the usual low capacities of membrane adsorbents by selecting a starting material that contains the adsorption sites within it, therefore avoiding the necessity to add an external agent into the membrane matrix. The resulting mechanically stable PTSC membranes can operate in a pressure driven permeation process, which eliminates the diffusion limitations commonly present in packed column adsorption processes. This process can selectively recover 97% of the gold present in a solution containing a 9-fold higher copper concentration, while operating at a flux as high as 1868 L/m2 h. The maximum gold uptake measured without sacrificing the mechanical stability of the membrane was 5.4 mmol Au/g. Furthermore the gold can be easily eluted from the membrane with a 0.1 M thiourea solution and the membrane can be reused for at least three cycles without any decrease in its performance. Finally, the ability of this membrane for recovering metals from real-life samples, like seawater and tap water, was tested with promising results.

  3. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  4. Polymeric Membrane Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Sousa; Luís M. Madeira; João C. Santos; Adélio Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is the study of membrane reactors with polymeric membranes, particularly catalytic polymeric membranes. After an introduction where the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of polymeric membranes are summarised, a review of the main areas where they have been applied, integrated in chemical reactors, is presented. This excludes the field of bio-membranes processes, which is analysed in a specific chapter of this book. Particular attention is then given to model...

  5. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  6. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  7. Evaluation of thin film ceria membranes for syngas membrane reactors—Preparation, characterization and testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    , up to 16Nmlcm−2min−1 at 900°C, were obtained when placing the membrane between air and humidified hydrogen (H2/H2O=20). Initial experiments for syngas production were performed by testing the CGO10 membrane with methane and steam feed.The mechanical integrity of CGO10 membranes during operation (heat...... film CGO membrane should therefore lie below the expansion limit of 0.1% expected to be critical for mechanical stability and thereby allows for operation at high temperatures and low oxygen partial pressures....

  8. Progress of Nanocomposite Membranes for Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ursino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of membrane-based technologies has been applied for water treatment applications; however, the limitations of conventional polymeric membranes have led to the addition of inorganic fillers to enhance their performance. In recent years, nanocomposite membranes have greatly attracted the attention of scientists for water treatment applications such as wastewater treatment, water purification, removal of microorganisms, chemical compounds, heavy metals, etc. The incorporation of different nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide, graphene oxide, silver and copper nanoparticles, titanium dioxide, 2D materials, and some other novel nano-scale materials into polymeric membranes have provided great advances, e.g., enhancing on hydrophilicity, suppressing the accumulation of pollutants and foulants, enhancing rejection efficiencies and improving mechanical properties and thermal stabilities. Thereby, the aim of this work is to provide up-to-date information related to those novel nanocomposite membranes and their contribution for water treatment applications.

  9. Progress of Nanocomposite Membranes for Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursino, Claudia; Castro-Muñoz, Roberto; Drioli, Enrico; Gzara, Lassaad; Albeirutty, Mohammad H; Figoli, Alberto

    2018-04-03

    The use of membrane-based technologies has been applied for water treatment applications; however, the limitations of conventional polymeric membranes have led to the addition of inorganic fillers to enhance their performance. In recent years, nanocomposite membranes have greatly attracted the attention of scientists for water treatment applications such as wastewater treatment, water purification, removal of microorganisms, chemical compounds, heavy metals, etc. The incorporation of different nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide, graphene oxide, silver and copper nanoparticles, titanium dioxide, 2D materials, and some other novel nano-scale materials into polymeric membranes have provided great advances, e.g., enhancing on hydrophilicity, suppressing the accumulation of pollutants and foulants, enhancing rejection efficiencies and improving mechanical properties and thermal stabilities. Thereby, the aim of this work is to provide up-to-date information related to those novel nanocomposite membranes and their contribution for water treatment applications.

  10. New membrane structures with proton conducting properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Casper Frydendal

    Perfluorosulfonic acid membranes (e.g. Nafion®) are the most widely applied electrolytes in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) because of their good chemical stability, mechanical properties and high proton conductivity, when well hydrated. The upper limit of operating temperature...... for these membranes is restricted by the loss of conductivity and dimensional stability as the temperature reaches the boiling point of water and the glass transition temperature of the polymer. At low relative humidity the membranes dehydrate, resulting in loss of conductivity and reduced dimensions. High...... [1, 2, 3]. Improved fuel cell performance from incorporation of hygroscopic oxides or solid proton conductors (e.g. zirconium phosphates) has been reported. The poster exhibits upcoming work in the field of composite electrolyte membranes at the University of Southern Denmark, combining radiation...

  11. Whole genome and transcriptome analysis reveal MALDI-TOF MS and SDS-PAGE have limited performance for the detection of the key outer membrane protein in carbapenem-resistantKlebsiella pneumoniaeisolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Naina Adren; D'Souza, Roshan; Hwang, In Sik; Choi, Jongrak; In, Yong Ha; Park, Hyung Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2017-10-17

    To detect the outer membrane protein (OMP), which plays a key role in carbapenem resistance, whole-genome and transcriptome analysis of the clinical carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae was carried out. The index strain lacked both OmpK35 and OmpK36, whereas the other strains lacked only OmpK35. After SDS-PAGE, the putative OMP bands were excised and identified as OmpA and OmpK36. MALDI-TOF MS showed peaks at ∼36 and ∼38 kDa that corresponded to OmpA and OmpK36, respectively. In all the strains except YMC2014/03/P345, the ∼38 kDa peaks were present. The K . pneumoniae ATCC 13883 isolate showed three bands on SDS-PAGE and three corresponding peaks on MALDI-TOF MS. The additional third peak at ∼37 kDa corresponding to OmpK35 was observed. To verify OmpK35 peak detection in other K. pneumoniae isolates by MALDI-TOF MS, we analyzed six strains from our laboratory's strain bank. Whole genome sequence indicated that only two isolates had intact OmpK35. Both MALDI-TOF MS and SDS-PAGE did not show a ∼37 kDa peak or an OmpK35 band as observed in the K. pneumoniae ATCC 13883 isolate. Separation using SDS-PAGE showed a single peak representing OmpA. Therefore, both SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS were not completely reliable for OMP detection because they fail to detect OmpK35. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the performance of SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of OMP's using whole-genome and RNA sequencing analyses.

  12. Synthetic Biological Membrane (SBM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal of the Synthetic Biological Membrane project is to develop a new type of membrane that will enable the wastewater treatment system required on...

  13. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  14. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  15. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  16. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  17. Development of nanoporous TiO2 and SiC membranes for membrane filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Katja; Vigna, Erika; Farsi, Ali

    Reverse osmosis membranes are increasingly used for the production of drinking water (desalination of sea water or brackish water), for demineralisation of water in industrial processes (boiled feed water, microelectronics production) as well as in food processing and pharmaceutical production....... Today´s reverse osmosis membranes are made of polymers; however, these membranes have several technical limitations, for example, low water fluxes and high sensitivity to oxidizing chemicals. Since membrane fouling is still a major problem in reverse osmosis desalination plants, replacement of polymer...... reverse osmosis membranes by ceramic counterparts would provide higher fluxes and allow more efficient cleaning of the membranes. The aim of this work was to prepare defect-free nanoporous ceramic (TiO2 and SiC) layers on macroporous SiC supports by using electrophoretic deposition and dip...

  18. Surface modification of polysulfone membranes applied for a membrane reactor with immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Silau, Harald; Pinelo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Commercially available polysulfone (PSf) membranes with a polypropylene backing are used across a broad range of applications. However, the natural properties of the PSf surface sometimes limit their application. Here we present, how the surface of supported membranes can be heterogeneously...... activated by lithiation followed by functionalization with acid chlorides at 0 °C, permitting modification of commercial PSf membranes without compromising the mechanical integrity of the membrane. Post-functionalization polymer grafting was illustrated through both, a “grafting from” approach by surface...... initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and by a “grafting to” approach exploiting Cu(I) catalyzed 1,3-cycloadditions of alkynes with azides (CuAAC) introducing hydrophilic polymers onto the membrane surface. Poly(1-vinyl imidazole) (pVim) grafted membranes were exploited as support...

  19. Quench limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    With thirteen beam induced quenches and numerous Machine Development tests, the current knowledge of LHC magnets quench limits still contains a lot of unknowns. Various approaches to determine the quench limits are reviewed and results of the tests are presented. Attempt to reconstruct a coherent picture emerging from these results is taken. The available methods of computation of the quench levels are presented together with dedicated particle shower simulations which are necessary to understand the tests. The future experiments, needed to reach better understanding of quench limits as well as limits for the machine operation are investigated. The possible strategies to set BLM (Beam Loss Monitor) thresholds are discussed. (author)

  20. Pilot demonstration of energy-efficient membrane bioreactor (MBR) using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jaeho; Smith, Shaleena; Patamasank, Jaren; Tontcheva, Petia; Kim, Gyu Dong; Roh, Hyung Keun

    2015-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) is becoming popular for advanced wastewater treatment and water reuse. Air scouring to "shake" the membrane fibers is most suitable and applicable to maintain filtration without severe and rapidfouling. However, membrane fouling mitigating technologies are energy intensive. The goal of this research is to develop an alternative energy-saving MBR system to reduce energy consumption; a revolutionary system that will directly compete with air scouring technologies currently in the membrane water reuse market. The innovative MBR system, called reciprocation MBR (rMBR), prevents membrane fouling without the use of air scouring blowers. The mechanism featured is a mechanical reciprocating membrane frame that uses inertia to prevent fouling. Direct strong agitation of the fiber is also beneficial for the constant removal of solids built up on the membrane surface. The rMBR pilot consumes less energy than conventional coarse air scouring MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for membrane reciprocation for the pilot rMBR system was 0.072 kWh/m3 permeate produced at 40 LMH, which is 75% less than the conventional air scouring in an MBR system (0.29 kWh/m3). Reciprocation of the hollow-fiber membrane can overcome the hydrodynamic limitations of air scouring or cross-flow membrane systems with less energy consumption and/or higher energy efficiency.

  1. Idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is a fibrocellular membrane that proliferates on the inner surface of the retina at the macular area. Membrane contraction is an important sight-threatening event and is due to fibrotic remodeling. Methods: Analysis of the current literature

  2. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  3. Membrane contactor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a membrane contactor the membrane separation is completely integrated with an extraction or absorption operation in order to exploit the benefits of both technologies fully. Membrane contactor applications that have been developed can be found in both water and gas treatment. Several recently

  4. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  5. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  6. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  7. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  8. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  9. Composite hollow fiber membranes for organic solvent-based liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A.M.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Instability issues of liquid membranes extraction significantly limit its wide application in industry. We report research on the application of a new composite hollow fiber membrane to stabilizing liquid membrane extraction. These type of composite membranes have either a polysulfone (PSf)

  10. Use of biomimetic forward osmosis membrane for trace organics removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik T.; Bajraktari, Niada; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The use of forward osmosis for the removal of trace organics from water has recently attracted considerable attention as an alternative to traditional pressure driven membrane filtration. However, the existing forward osmosis membranes have been found to be ineffective at rejecting small neutral...... organic pollutants, which limits the applicability of the forward osmosis process. In this study a newly developed biomimetic membrane was tested for the removal of three selected trace organics that can be considered as a bench marking test for a membrane[U+05F3]s ability to reject small neutral organic...... pollutants in aqueous solution. The performance of this membrane was compared with a standard cellulose acetate forward osmosis membrane. The aquaporin membrane was found to have rejection values above 97% for all three trace organics, which was significantly higher than the cellulose acetate membrane...

  11. Constitutive analysis of thin biological membranes with application to radial stretching of a hollow circular membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarda, V. A.

    2010-06-01

    The constitutive analysis of the mechanical response of thin elastic membranes under inplane deformation is presented by using the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into its areal and distortional parts. Specific results are obtained for the Evans-Skalak form of the strain energy function. The solution to the problem of radial stretching of a hollow circular membrane obeying this constitutive model is then derived. The stress concentration factor is determined as a function of the relative hole size and the magnitude of the applied tension. The tension boundary is identified above which no compressive stress appears in the membrane. The limit boundary is introduced below which the membrane cannot support the applied loading without unstable wrinkling. For the loading between the tension and the limit boundary, nonuniformly distributed infinitesimal wrinkles appear within the inner portion of the membrane, carrying radial tension but no circumferential stress (tension field). The specific form of the strain energy function is used to describe this behavior, and to calculate the amount of the membrane area absorbed by infinitesimal wrinkles. The wrinkled portion is surrounded by the outer portion of the membrane carrying both radial and circumferential stresses. The limit boundary is reached when wrinkles spread throughout the membrane. It is shown that for a sufficiently large tension at the outer boundary, the wrinkling does not spread throughout the membrane no matter how large the applied tension at the inner boundary of the membrane is, provided that no rupture takes place. The limiting extent of the tension field in such cases is calculated. The linearized version of the analysis is characterized by a closed form solution.

  12. Zeolite membranes for effective production of biofuels

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    To deal with the increasing demand of renewable fuels, more efficient processes for the production of biofuels are needed. Zeolite membranes have the potential to improve many existing processes that could be used for production of biofuels. Methanol is a potential biofuel that may be produced from synthesis gas in an equilibrium limited reaction. The production of methanol from synthesis gas could be improved by use of a membrane reactor, which could increase the conversion of synthesis gas ...

  13. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Membrane Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A. Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein folding has been one of the great challenges in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. Over the past 50 years, many thermodynamic and kinetic studies have been performed addressing the stability of globular proteins. In comparison, advances in the membrane protein folding field lag far behind. Although membrane proteins constitute about a third of the proteins encoded in known genomes, stability studies on membrane proteins have been impaired due to experimental limitations. Furthermore, no systematic experimental strategies are available for folding these biomolecules in vitro. Common denaturing agents such as chaotropes usually do not work on helical membrane proteins, and ionic detergents have been successful denaturants only in few cases. Refolding a membrane protein seems to be a craftsman work, which is relatively straightforward for transmembrane β-barrel proteins but challenging for α-helical membrane proteins. Additional complexities emerge in multidomain membrane proteins, data interpretation being one of the most critical. In this review, we will describe some recent efforts in understanding the folding mechanism of membrane proteins that have been reversibly refolded allowing both thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. This information will be discussed in the context of current paradigms in the protein folding field.

  14. Ion Transport through Diffusion Layer Controlled by Charge Mosaic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic transport behaviors in near interface of the membranes were studied using commercial anion and cation exchange membrane and charge mosaic membrane. Current-voltage curve gave the limiting current density that indicates the ceiling of conventional flux. From chronopotentiometry above the limiting current density, the transition time was estimated. The thickness of boundary layer was derived with conjunction with the conventional limiting current density and the transition time from steady state flux. On the other hand, the charge mosaic membrane was introduced in order to examine the ion transport on the membrane surface in detail. The concentration profile was discussed by the kinetic transport number with regard to the water dissociation (splitting on the membrane surface.

  15. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  16. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  17. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  18. Large Deformation and Adhesive Contact Studies of Axisymmetric Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Evan J.; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and polydimethyl-siloxane substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during non-contact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. A time dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. A displacement controlled geometry was more easily modeled than the pressure controlled geometry, the applicability of the analysis was limited by wrinkling instabilities. The substantial viscoelastic behavior of these membranes made it difficult to describe the entire membrane with a single modulus, given the nonuniform deformation history of the membranes. Given the difficulty in determining membrane tension from the measured pressure and profile fits using the model, the peel energy was used as a simpler measure of adhesion. Using an analytical balance in the displacement controlled geometry, the membrane tension at the contact line was directly measured. Coupled with contact angle imaging, the peel energy was determined. For the model membranes studied, this peel energy described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions quite well, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane. PMID:23289644

  19. Large deformation and adhesive contact studies of axisymmetric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Evan J; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan T; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred J; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R

    2013-02-05

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and a PDMS substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during noncontact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. Two membrane contact geometries, exhibiting significantly different strain distributions during withdrawal, were investigated. The first examines the wet contact of an air pressurized membrane. The second looks at the dry contact of a fluid deformed membrane in which a stepper motor controls membrane-substrate separation. A time-dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. The applicability of this numerical analysis for determining membrane tension, however, is limited by wrinkling instabilities and viscoelasticity. For this reason, a conceptually simpler method, based on the direct measurement of the membrane tension and contact angle, was also utilized. The traditional peel energy defined with this direct measurement accurately described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane.

  20. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  1. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  2. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  3. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  4. Membrane processes in nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of radioactive wastes is necessary taking into account the potential hazard of radioactive substances to human health and surrounding environment. The choice of appropriate technology depends on capital and operational costs, wastes amount and their characteristics, appointed targets of the process, e.g. the values of decontamination factors and volume reduction coefficients. The conventional technologies applied for radioactive waste processing, such as precipitation coupled with sedimentation, ion exchange and evaporation have many drawbacks. These include high energy consumption and formation of secondary wastes, e.g. the sludge from sediment tanks, spent ion exchange adsorbents and regeneration solutions. There are also many limitations of such processes, i.e. foaming and drop entrainment in evaporators, loses of solvents and production of secondary wastes in solvent extraction or bed clogging in ion exchange columns. Membrane processes as the newest achievement of the process engineering can successfully supersede many non-effective, out-of-date methods. But in some instances they can also complement these methods whilst improving the parameters of effluents and purification economy. This monograph presents own research data on the application of recent achievements in the area of membrane processes for solving selected problems in nuclear technology. Relatively big space was devoted to the use of membrane processing of low and intermediate radioactive liquid wastes because of numerous applications of these processes in nuclear centres over the world and also because of the interests of the author that was reflected by her recent research projects and activity. This work presents a review on the membrane methods recently introduced into the nuclear technology against the background of the other, commonly applied separation techniques, with indications of the possibilities and prospects for their further developments. Particular attention was paid

  5. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Sajjad, Syed Dawar; Gao, Yan; Liu, Zengcai; Chen, Qingmei

    2017-12-26

    An anion-conducting polymeric membrane comprises a terpolymer of styrene, vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x. R.sub.s is a positively charged cyclic amine group. R.sub.x is at least one constituent selected from the group consisting Cl, OH and a reaction product between an OH or Cl and a species other than a simple amine or a cyclic amine. The total weight of the vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x groups is greater than 0.3% of the total weight of the membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  6. Gas separation with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, G.; Michele, H.; Werner, U.

    1982-01-01

    Gas separation with membranes has already been tested in numerous fields of application, e.g. uranium enrichment of H 2 separation. In many of these processes the mass transfer units, so-called permeators, have to be connected in tandem in order to achieve high concentrations. A most economical operating method provides for each case an optimization of the cascades with regard to the membrane materials, construction and design of module. By utilization of the concentration gradient along the membrane a new process development has been accomplished - the continuously operating membrane rectification unit. Investment and operating costs can be reduced considerably for a number of separating processes by combining a membrane rectification unit with a conventional recycling cascade. However, the new procedure requires that the specifications for the module construction, flow design, and membrane properties be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  7. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  8. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.W.; Li, J.X.; Gao, C.Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of Key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  9. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  11. Age Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Antfolk

    2017-01-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men—regardless of their age—have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes’ age preferences is resolved according to women’s preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in...

  12. Mutational Analysis on Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) and Their Structural Consequences in Oculocutaeous Albinism Type 4 (OCA4)-A Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2016-11-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type IV (OCA4) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder which is characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigmentation in skin, hair, and eyes and caused by the genetic mutations in the membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP) encoded by SLC45A2 gene. The MATP protein consists of 530 amino acids which contains 12 putative transmembrane domains and plays an important role in pigmentation and probably functions as a membrane transporter in melanosomes. We scrutinized the most OCA4 disease-associated mutation and their structural consequences on SLC45A2 gene. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant structures were modeled. Further the structural behavior of native and mutant MATP protein was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) approach in explicit lipid and water background. We found Y317C as the most deleterious and disease-associated SNP on SLC45A2 gene. In MDS, mutations in MATP protein showed loss of stability and became more flexible, which alter its structural conformation and function. This phenomenon has indicated a significant role in inducing OCA4. Our study explored the understanding of molecular mechanism of MATP protein upon mutation at atomic level and further helps in the field of pharmacogenomics to develop a personalized medicine for OCA4 disorder. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2608-2619, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enantioseparation with liquid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gössi, Angelo; Riedl, Wolfgang; Schuur, Boelo

    Chiral resolution of racemic products is a challenging and important task in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, polymer and fragrances industries. One of the options for these challenging separations is to use liquid membranes. Although liquid membranes have been known for almost four decades

  14. Porous ceramic membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic membranes are increasingly used for energy-efficient separation of liquid and gaseous mixtures in household applications, environmental technology and the chemical and energy industry. Besides, membranes are used in component-specific sensors in gas and liquid streams, preferably combined

  15. Polymide gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  16. Membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  17. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Membrane projection lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  19. Membrane technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to prepare and characterize some synthetic membranes obtained by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of and A Am unitary and binary system onto nylon-6 films. The optimum conditions at which the grafting process proceeded homogeneously were determined. Some selected properties of the prepared membranes were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical properties and U.V./vis, instruments and techniques were used to characterize the prepared membranes. The use of such membranes for the decontamination of radioactive waste and some heavy metal ions as water pollutants were investigated. These grafted membranes showed good cation exchange properties and may be of practical interest in waste water treatment whether this water was radioactive or not. 4 tabs., 68 figs., 146 refs

  20. Plasma membrane isolation using immobilized concanavalin A magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Srajer Gajdosik, Martina; Josic, Djuro; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of highly purified plasma membranes is the key step in constructing the plasma membrane proteome. Traditional plasma membrane isolation method takes advantage of the differential density of organelles. While differential centrifugation methods are sufficient to enrich for plasma membranes, the procedure is lengthy and results in low recovery of the membrane fraction. Importantly, there is significant contamination of the plasma membranes with other organelles. The traditional agarose affinity matrix is suitable for isolating proteins but has limitation in separating organelles due to the density of agarose. Immobilization of affinity ligands to magnetic beads allows separation of affinity matrix from organelles through magnets and could be developed for the isolation of organelles. We have developed a simple method for isolating plasma membranes using lectin concanavalin A (ConA) magnetic beads. ConA is immobilized onto magnetic beads by binding biotinylated ConA to streptavidin magnetic beads. The ConA magnetic beads are used to bind glycosylated proteins present in the membranes. The bound membranes are solubilized from the magnetic beads with a detergent containing the competing sugar alpha methyl mannoside. In this study, we describe the procedure of isolating rat liver plasma membranes using sucrose density gradient centrifugation as described by Neville. We then further purify the membrane fraction by using ConA magnetic beads. After this purification step, main liver plasma membrane proteins, especially the highly glycosylated ones and proteins containing transmembrane domains could be identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. While not described here, the magnetic bead method can also be used to isolate plasma membranes from cell lysates. This membrane purification method should expedite the cataloging of plasma membrane proteome.

  1. Resultado funcional e índice macular em portadores de buraco macular submetidos à cirurgia com remoção da membrana limitante interna Functional outcome and macular index in macular hole patients who underwent surgery with internal limiting membrane removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o resultado funcional e o índice macular dos portadores de buraco macular submetidos à cirurgia com remoção da membrana limitante interna. MÉTODOS: Quinze olhos de 15 pacientes com buraco macular estágios 2, 3 e 4 foram incluídos no estudo. Todos foram submetidos à cirurgia de buraco macular convencional com remoção da membrana limitante interna corada pelo azul de tripan. Melhor acuidade visual com correção e cortes transversais medidos por tomografia de coerência óptica (OCT foram avaliados no pré- e pós-operatório. O índice macular (razão entre a altura e base do buraco macular foi calculado e correlacionado com o diâmetro mínimo do buraco macular e o ganho de acuidade visual pós-operatória. RESULTADOS: Obteve-se fechamento do buraco macular em todos pacientes operados. Em 86,7%, houve ganho de pelo menos três linhas de visão. O índice macular demonstrou correlação negativa significante com o diâmetro mínimo (r=0,811. Não foi observada correlação significante entre o índice macular e o ganho de acuidade visual pós-operatória (r=0,351. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados funcionais na cirurgia do buraco macular com remoção da membrana limitante interna foram bons neste grupo de pacientes. O índice macular demonstrou ser compatível com a configuração espacial do buraco macular, porém não foi preditor de resultados visuais.PURPOSE: To evaluate the functional outcome and macular index in patients with macular hole who underwent surgery with internal limiting membrane removal. METHODS: Fifteen eyes of 15 patients with idiopathic macular hole stages 2, 3 or 4 were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent conventional macular hole surgery with trypan blue staining to remove the internal limiting membrane. The best-corrected visual acuity and cross-sectional images of macular hole measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. The macular hole index

  2. Review on Modification of Sulfonated Poly (-ether-ether-ketone Membranes Used as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin GAO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC is a type of modern power, but the traditional proton exchange membranes (PEM of PEMFC are limited by high methanol permeability and water uptake. Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK is a widely used thermoplastic with good cost-effective property. Sulfonated poly (-ether-ether-ketone (SPEEK has high electric conductivity and low methanol permeability, as well as comprehensive property, which is expected to be used as PEMs. However, the proton exchange ability, methanol resistance, mechanical property and thermal stability of SPEEK are closely related to the degree of sulfonation (DS of SPEEK membranes. Additionally, the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, and stability of SPEEK membranes applied in various conditions need to be further improved. In this paper, the research into modification of SPEEK membranes made by SPEEK and other polymers, inorganic materials are introduced. The properties and modification situation of the SPEEK and the composite membranes, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of membranes prepared by different materials are summarized. From the results we know that, the methanol permeability of SPEEK/PES-C membranes is within the order of magnitude, 10-7cm2/s. The proton conductivity of the SPPESK/SPEEK blend membrane reaches 0.212 S cm-1 at 80 °C. The cross-linked SPEEK membranes have raised thermal and dimensional stability. The non-solvent caused aggregation of the SPEEK ionomers. The proton conductivity of SPEEK/50%BMIMPF6/4.6PA membrane maintains stable as 2.0 x 10-2S cm-1 after 600 h at 160 °C. Incorporation of aligned CNT into SPEEK increases the proton conductivity and reduces the methanol permeability of the composite membranes. The PANI improves the hydrothermal stability. More proton transfer sites lead to a more compact structure in the composite membranes. According to the results, the proton exchange capacity, water uptake, and conductivity of

  3. Higher boron rejection with a new TFC forward osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2014-07-17

    Due to the stringent limits for boron in drinking and irrigation water, water treatment facilities have to incur additional treatment to remove boron down to a safe concentration. Forward osmosis (FO) is a membrane technology that may reduce the energy required to remove boron present in seawater. In direct FO desalination hybrid systems, fresh water is recovered from seawater using a recoverable draw solution, FO membranes are expected to show high boron rejection. This study focuses on determining the boron rejection capabilities of a new generation thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane compared to a first generation cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. The effects of water permeate flux, membrane structure, draw solute charge, and reverse solute flux on boron rejection were determined. For TFC and CTA FO membranes, experiments showed that when similar operating conditions are applied (e.g. membrane type and draw solute type) boron rejection decreases with increase in permeate flux. Reverse draw solute flux and membrane fouling have no significant impact on boron rejection. Compared to the first generation CTA FO membrane operated at the same conditions, the TFC FO membrane showed a 40% higher boron rejection capability and a 20% higher water flux. This demonstrates the potential for boron removal for new generation TFC FO membranes. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  4. HIGH PERFORMANCE CERIA BASED OXYGEN MEMBRANE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention describes a new class of highly stable mixed conducting materials based on acceptor doped cerium oxide (CeO2-8 ) in which the limiting electronic conductivity is significantly enhanced by co-doping with a second element or co- dopant, such as Nb, W and Zn, so that cerium and the co-...... thin film membrane devices using these materials....

  5. Diagnosis of foetal membrane ruptures: Placental alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AbstRACt. Context: Pre‑labour rupture of membranes (PROM) is a common obstetric complication which presents a diagnostic challenge, especially in equivocal cases. Standard methods of diagnosis are limited by high false positives and negatives. This study compared the accuracy of a biomarker placental alpha ...

  6. Bioinspired Multifunctional Membrane for Aquatic Micropollutants Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xiaotong; Luo, Jianquan; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    the pollutants and breaking the "adsorption saturation limits"). Furthermore, the synergistic effect of the polydopamine (PDA) layer on the enzymatic oxidation of BPA was confirmed, which was due to its enhanced adsorption and electron transfer performance. The multifunctional membrane could be reused...

  7. Fouling Issues in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs for Wastewater Treatment: Major Mechanisms, Prevention and Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros K. Gkotsis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane fouling is one of the most important considerations in the design and operation of membrane systems as it affects pretreatment needs, cleaning requirements, operating conditions, cost and performance. Given that membrane fouling represents the main limitation to membrane process operation, it is unsurprising that the majority of membrane material and process research and development conducted is dedicated to its characterization and amelioration. This work presents the fundamentals of fouling issues in membrane separations, with specific regard to membrane fouling in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs and the most frequently applied preventive-control strategies. Feed pretreatment, physical and chemical cleaning protocols, optimal operation of MBR process and membrane surface modification are presented and discussed in detail. Membrane fouling is the major obstacle to the widespread application of the MBR technology and, therefore, fouling preventive-control strategies is a hot issue that strongly concerns not only the scientific community, but industry as well.

  8. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kim

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD. However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up.

  9. Crossing boundaries: the importance of cellular membranes in industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Van Bogaert, Inge N A

    2017-05-01

    How small molecules cross cellular membranes is an often overlooked issue in an industrial microbiology and biotechnology context. This is to a large extent governed by the technical difficulties to study these transport systems or by the lack of knowledge on suitable efflux pumps. This review emphasizes the importance of microbial cellular membranes in industrial biotechnology by highlighting successful strategies of membrane engineering towards more resistant and hence better performing microorganisms, as well as transporter and other engineering strategies for increased efflux of primary and secondary metabolites. Furthermore, the benefits and limitations of eukaryotic subcellular compartmentalization are discussed, as well as the biotechnological potential of membrane vesicles.

  10. Age Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  11. Age Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Antfolk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men—regardless of their age—have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes’ age preferences is resolved according to women’s preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years. Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men’s age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men’s sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  12. PERSISTENT PUPILLARY MEMBRANE OR ACCESSORY IRIS MEMBRANE?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriş, Monica; Horge, Ioan; Avram, Elena; Belicioiu, Roxana; Olteanu, Ioana Alexandra; Kedves, Hanga

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, in literature and curent practice, accessory iris membrane (AIM) and persistant pupillary membrane (PPM) are confused. Both AIM and PPM are congenital iris anomalies in which fine or thick iris strands arrise form the collarette and obscure the pupil. AIM, which is also called iris duplication, closely resembles the normal iris tissue in color and thickness and presents a virtual second pseudopupil aperture in the centre while PPM even in its extreme forms presents as a translucent or opaque membranous structure that extends across the pupil and has no pseudopupil. Mydriatiscs, laser treatment or surgery is used to clear the visual axis and optimize visual development. Surgical intervention is reserved for large, dense AIMs and PPMs. Our patient, a 29 year old male, has come with bilateral dense AIM, bilateral compound hyperopic astigmatism, BCVA OD = 0.6, BCVA OS = 0.4, IOP OU = 17 mmHg. To improve the visual acuity of the patient we decided to do a bilateral membranectomy, restoring in this way transparency of the visual axis. After surgery, the visual acuity improved to BCVA OD= 0.8, BCVA OS=0.8.

  13. Fuel cell membrane humidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1999-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a treatment that uses a pump to circulate blood through an artificial lung back into the bloodstream of a very ill baby. This system provides heart-lung bypass support ...

  15. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  16. Processing of membranes for oxygenation using the Bellhouse-effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neußer C.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art lung support systems are limited to short time application because of a lack of long term hemocompatibility and protein absorption on the membrane surfaces. In a highly interdisciplinary project at RWTH Aachen University a biohybrid lung assist system with endothelialised gas exchange flat membranes is developed to improve long term compatibility of oxygenators. To increase the gas exchange performance of flat membranes hollows are imprinted in the membrane surfaces. This approach is based on the research of B. J. Bell-house et al. [1], who discovered this effect, now known as Bellhouse-effect, around 1960. In this paper a processes to manufacture membrane assemblies for oxygenation with imprinted hollows on the flat membrane surfaces is reviewed.

  17. Perspective of Membrane Technology in Dairy Industry: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Sharma, Neelesh; Ranjan, Rajeev; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Z. F.; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2013-01-01

    Membrane technology has revolutionized the dairy sector. Different types of membranes are used in the industry for various purposes like extending the shelf life of milk without exposure to heat treatment, standardization of the major components of milk for tailoring new products as well increasing yield and quality of the dairy products, and concentrating, fractionation and purification of milk components especially valuable milk proteins in their natural state. In the cheese industry, membranes increase the yield and quality of cheese and control the whey volume, by concentrating the cheese milk. With the advancement of newer technology in membrane processes, it is possible to recover growth factor from whey. With the introduction of superior quality membranes as well as newer technology, the major limitation of membranes, fouling or blockage has been overcome to a greater extent. PMID:25049918

  18. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibrous membranes for membrane distillation application

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-02-01

    Nanofibrous membranes of Matrimid have been successfully fabricated using an electrospinning technique under optimized conditions. Nanofibrous membranes are found to be highly hydrophobic with a high water contact angle of 130°. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and pore size distribution analysis revealed the big pore size structure of electrospun membranes to be greater than 2 μm and the pore size distribution is found to be narrow. Flat sheet Matrimid membranes were fabricated via casting followed by phase inversion. The morphology, pore size distribution, and water contact angle were measured and compared with the electrospun membranes. Both membranes fabricated by electrospinning and phase inversion techniques were tested in a direct contact membrane distillation process. Electrospun membranes showed high water vapor flux of 56 kg/m2-h, which is very high compared to the casted membrane as well as most of the fabricated and commercially available highly hydrophobic membranes. ©2013 Desalination Publications.

  20. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  2. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  3. Nontopological Saddle-Splay and Curvature Instabilities from Anisotropic Membrane Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J. B.

    1996-06-01

    Anisotropic inclusions are shown to induce spontaneous deviatoric bendings in lipidic membranes, by orienting at right angles across the bilayer. In the limit of strong membrane curvatures, a nonanalytical bending energy term is generated that favors saddlelike and cylindrical shapes, without penalizing spherical ones. An ``egg-carton'' instability results in flat membranes as well as a wormlike shape instability for vesicles.

  4. Bicelles and Other Membrane Mimics: Comparison of Structure, Properties, and Dynamics from MD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Kraft, Johan Frederik; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The increased interest in studying membrane proteins has led to the development of new membrane mimics such as bicelles and nanodiscs. However, only limited knowledge is available of how these membrane mimics are affected by embedded proteins and how well they mimic a lipid bilayer. Herein, we pr...

  5. Polymer-metal organic frameworks (MOFs) mixed matrix membranes for gas separation applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, S.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of polymeric membranes is often limited by a trade-off between membrane permeability and selectivity, the so-called Robeson upper bound. Additionally, in high pressure CO2 capture applications, excessive swelling of the polymer membrane often leads to plasticization resulting in

  6. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  7. Novel bioresorbable strontium hydroxyapatite membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J; Acharya, A; Chen, K; Chou, J; Kasugai, S; Lang, N P

    2015-01-01

    Membrane materials have been widely used for guided bone regeneration (GBR). However, due to bio-functional limitation of the current membranes, the ideal resorbable membrane that can stimulate bone regeneration has yet to be developed. This study seeks to investigate the effects of a strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHA)-containing membrane for GBR. Strontium hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized and mixed with gelatin solution to the final concentration of 10 mg/ml (Sr10) and 20 mg/ml (Sr20). Approximately 100-μm-thick membranes were fabricated, and the mechanical properties and strontium ion release pattern were analyzed. Rat bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) responses were investigated in vitro. Bilaterial rat calvarial defects were used in vivo to compare the SrHA membranes against commercially available collagen membranes and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Strontium hydroxyapatite membranes exhibited higher elasticity and strength than the collagen membrane, and slow strontium ion release was also confirmed. No BMSC cytotoxicity was found on the SrHA membranes, and the alkaline phosphatase positively stained area was significantly greater than the collagen membrane at earlier time point. At 4 weeks, both micro-CT and histological analyses revealed that the Sr20 group yielded significantly greater bone formation. The SrHA-containing membrane developed in this study was found to be a biocompatible material that can stimulate BMSC differentiation as well as bone regeneration and maturation in rat calvarial defects at early time point compared with collagen membrane. The best result was observed in Sr20 group, which can be potentially effective for GBR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  9. The impact of physiological crowding on the diffusivity of membrane bound proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Justin R; Busch, David J; Bell, David R; Li, Brian; Ren, Pengyu; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-02-21

    Diffusion of transmembrane and peripheral membrane-bound proteins within the crowded cellular membrane environment is essential to diverse biological processes including cellular signaling, endocytosis, and motility. Nonetheless we presently lack a detailed understanding of the influence of physiological levels of crowding on membrane protein diffusion. Utilizing quantitative in vitro measurements, here we demonstrate that the diffusivities of membrane bound proteins follow a single linearly decreasing trend with increasing membrane coverage by proteins. This trend holds for homogenous protein populations across a range of protein sizes and for heterogeneous mixtures of proteins of different sizes, such that protein diffusivity is controlled by the total coverage of the surrounding membrane. These results demonstrate that steric exclusion within the crowded membrane environment can fundamentally limit the diffusive rate of proteins, regardless of their size. In cells this "speed limit" could be modulated by changes in local membrane coverage, providing a mechanism for tuning the rate of molecular interaction and assembly.

  10. Smart membranes for monitoring membrane based desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-10-12

    Various examples are related to smart membranes for monitoring membrane based process such as, e.g., membrane distillation processes. In one example, a membrane, includes a porous surface and a plurality of sensors (e.g., temperature, flow and/or impedance sensors) mounted on the porous surface. In another example, a membrane distillation (MD) process includes the membrane. Processing circuitry can be configured to monitor outputs of the plurality of sensors. The monitored outputs can be used to determine membrane degradation, membrane fouling, or to provide an indication of membrane replacement or cleaning. The sensors can also provide temperatures or temperature differentials across the porous surface, which can be used to improve modeling or control the MD process.

  11. Polyurethane Nanofiber Membranes for Waste Water Treatment by Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-sustained electrospun polyurethane nanofiber membranes were manufactured and tested on a direct-contact membrane distillation unit in an effort to find the optimum membrane thickness to maximize flux rate and minimize heat losses across the membrane. Also salt retention and flux at high salinities up to 100 g kg−1 were evaluated. Even though the complex structure of nanofiber layers has extreme specific surface and porosity, membrane performance was surprisingly predictable; the highest flux was achieved with the thinnest membranes and the best energy efficiency was achieved with the thickest membranes. All membranes had salt retention above 99%. Nanotechnology offers the potential to find modern solutions for desalination of waste waters, by introducing new materials with revolutionary properties, but new membranes must be developed according to the target application.

  12. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  13. Physics of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    The biological membrane is a complex system consisting of an aqueous biomolecular planar aggregate of predominantly lipid and protein molecules. At physiological temperatures, the membrane may be considered a thin (˜50Å) slab of anisotropic fluid characterized by a high lateral mobility of the various molecular components. A substantial fraction of biological activity takes place in association with membranes. As a very lively piece of condensed matter, the biological membrane is a challenging research topic for both the experimental and theoretical physicists who are facing a number of fundamental physical problems including molecular self-organization, macromolecular structure and dynamics, inter-macromolecular interactions, structure-function relationships, transport of energy and matter, and interfacial forces. This paper will present a brief review of recent theoretical and experimental progress on such problems, with special emphasis on lipid bilayer structure and dynamics, lipid phase transitions, lipid-protein and lipid-cholesterol interactions, intermembrane forces, and the physical constraints imposed on biomembrane function and evolution. The paper advocates the dual point of view that there are a number of interesting physics problems in membranology and, at the same time, that the physical properties of biomembranes are important regulators of membrane function.

  14. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  15. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Ravindra [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ma, Yi Hua [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Yen, Pei-Shan [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Deveau, Nicholas [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Fishtik, Ilie [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Mardilovich, Ivan [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM. The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 °C has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and

  16. Influence of membrane composition on its flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbelli, B.B.; Teixeira da Silva, E.R.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Oliveira, E.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lamellar phases and vesicles composed of lipids have been used as model systems to investigate biological process related to cell membrane as well as promising carriers for drugs and gene therapy. The composition of the membrane determines its three dimensional shape and its properties such as rigidity and compressibility which play an important role on membrane fusion, protein adhesion, interactions between proteins, etc. We present systematic study of a lamellar system composed mainly of lecithin which is a biocompatible phospholipid and simusol, which is a mixture of fatty acids that acts as a cosurfactant introducing flexibility to the membrane. Using X ray scattering we determine the lamellar periodicity as a function of the hydration for different formulations of the membrane; ranging from 100 % to 50 % mass fraction of lecithin. The X-ray spectra are fitted using a 4 Gaussian model [1]that allows us to determine the lamellar periodicity and the Caille parameter [2]. The ideal swelling law relating the membrane volume fraction ({phi}{sub m}) to the lamellar periodicity (D) is given by {phi}{sub m} ={delta}{sub m}/D, where {delta}{sub m} is the thickness membrane, however, when steric interactions are dominant with respect to electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, deviations from this behavior are expected [3]. We present experimental data illustrating the swelling behavior for the membrane compositions and the respective behavior of the hydration limit, membrane Luzzati [4], of the Caille parameter and qualitative interpretation of the interaction forces the systems studying the parameter membrane square amplitude fluctuation[5]. [1] Private communication with Prof. Dr. Cristiano Luis Pinto de Oliveira. [2] Caille A. et all, Acad. Sci. Paris B274 (1972) 891. [3] E. Kurtisovski et all, PRL 98, 258103 (2007). [4] Nagle et all, Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2000 Aug;10(4):474-80. [5] H. I. Petrache. Structure and interactions of fluid phospholipids

  17. Biopores/membrane proteins in synthetic polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garni, Martina; Thamboo, Sagana; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2017-04-01

    Mimicking cell membranes by simple models based on the reconstitution of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers represents a straightforward approach to understand biological function of these proteins. This biomimetic strategy has been extended to synthetic membranes that have advantages in terms of chemical and mechanical stability, thus providing more robust hybrid membranes. We present here how membrane proteins and biopores have been inserted both in the membrane of nanosized and microsized compartments, and in planar membranes under various conditions. Such bio-hybrid membranes have new properties (as for example, permeability to ions/molecules), and functionality depending on the specificity of the inserted biomolecules. Interestingly, membrane proteins can be functionally inserted in synthetic membranes provided these have appropriate properties to overcome the high hydrophobic mismatch between the size of the biomolecule and the membrane thickness. Functional insertion of membrane proteins and biopores in synthetic membranes of compartments or in planar membranes is possible by an appropriate selection of the amphiphilic copolymers, and conditions of the self-assembly process. These hybrid membranes have new properties and functionality based on the specificity of the biomolecules and the nature of the synthetic membranes. Bio-hybrid membranes represent new solutions for the development of nanoreactors, artificial organelles or active surfaces/membranes that, by further gaining in complexity and functionality, will promote translational applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  19. A novel bioactive membrane by cell electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Qingxi

    2015-11-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable matrices that can resemble the both scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration of cells within matrices with traditional technique remain challenging and time consuming. The cell electrospinning technique presented in this paper can mitigate the problems associated with these limitations. Cells encapsulated by the material in the cell electrospinning technique survived well and distributed homogenously within the nanofibrous membrane, and their vitality was improved to 133% after being cultured for 28 days. The electrospun nanofibrous membrane has a certain degradation property and favorable cell-membrane interaction that supports the active biocompatibility of the membrane. Its properties are helpful for supporting cell attachment and growth, maintaining phenotypic shape, and secreting an ample amount of extracellular matrix (ECM). This novel membrane may be a potential application within the field of tissue engineering. The ability of cell electrospinning to microintegrate cells into a biodegradable fibrous matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate a high cell density elastic tissue mimetic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver plasma membranes: an effective method to analyze membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Liang, Songping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of plasma membrane proteins make them difficult to analyze. The protocols given here are the efficient isolation/digestion procedures for liver plasma membrane proteomic analysis. Both protocol for the isolation of plasma membranes and protocol for the in-gel digestion of gel-embedded plasma membrane proteins are presented. The later method allows the use of a high detergent concentration to achieve efficient solubilization of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins while avoiding interference with the subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis.

  1. Membranes and pathophysiological mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowska, Monika; Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Bessueille, Laurence

    Vascular calcification accompanies the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Artery calcification results from trans-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into cells resembling mineralization-competent cells such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The activity of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a GPI-anchored enzyme necessary for physiological mineralization, is induced in VSMCs in response to inflammation. TNAP achieves its mineralizing function being anchored to plasma membrane of mineralizing cells and to the surface of their derived matrix vesicles (MVs), and numerous important reports indicate that membranes play a crucial role in initiating the crystal formation. In this review, we would like to highlight various functions of lipids and proteins associated to membranes at different stages of both physiological mineralization and vascular calcification, with an emphasis on the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation.

  2. Characterization of graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, Sean; Lee, Jongho; Jain, Tarun; Karnik, Rohit; Idrobo, Juan; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Motaz

    2011-11-01

    Graphene, which exhibits very high breaking strength, atomistic thickness, and the ability to maintain stable nanometer-scale pores, has the potential to be a superior membrane material in both liquid- and gas-phase separation processes. We have recently demonstrated high-quality transfer of ~1 cm2 LPCVD graphene from copper foil to 200 nm polycarbonate track etch membranes with less than 0.3% of the area constituting holes or tears in the graphene, which is essential for characterizing transport through graphene. Through gallium ion bombardment we have introduced nanometer-scale pores in the transferred graphene and will report on the molecular and ionic transport through these membranes. Funded by the Center for Clean Energy and Water at MIT and KFUPM.

  3. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  4. Membrane Affinity of Platensimycin and Its Dialkylamine Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Membrane permeability is a desired property in drug design, but there have been difficulties in quantifying the direct drug partitioning into native membranes. Platensimycin (PL is a new promising antibiotic whose biosynthetic production is costly. Six dialkylamine analogs of PL were synthesized with identical pharmacophores but different side chains; five of them were found inactive. To address the possibility that their activity is limited by the permeation step, we calculated polarity, measured surface activity and the ability to insert into the phospholipid monolayers. The partitioning of PL and the analogs into the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli was assessed by activation curve shifts of a re-engineered mechanosensitive channel, MscS, in patch-clamp experiments. Despite predicted differences in polarity, the affinities to lipid monolayers and native membranes were comparable for most of the analogs. For PL and the di-myrtenyl analog QD-11, both carrying bulky sidechains, the affinity for the native membrane was lower than for monolayers (half-membranes, signifying that intercalation must overcome the lateral pressure of the bilayer. We conclude that the biological activity among the studied PL analogs is unlikely to be limited by their membrane permeability. We also discuss the capacity of endogenous tension-activated channels to detect asymmetric partitioning of exogenous substances into the native bacterial membrane and the different contributions to the thermodynamic force which drives permeation.

  5. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  6. Fouling resistant membrane spacers

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-10-12

    Disclosed herein are spacers having baffle designs and perforations for efficiently and effectively separating one or more membrane layers a membrane filtration system. The spacer (504) includes a body (524) formed at least in part by baffles (520) that are interconnected, and the baffles define boundaries of openings or apertures (525) through a thickness direction of the body of the spacer. Alternatively or additionally, passages or perforations (526A, 526B) may be present in the spacer layer or baffles for fluid flow there through, with the passages and baffles having a numerous different shapes and sizes.

  7. Mitigating leaks in membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, Rohit N.; Bose, Suman; Boutilier, Michael S.H.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Jain, Tarun Kumar; O' Hern, Sean C.; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz A.; Jang, Doojoon

    2018-02-27

    Two-dimensional material based filters, their method of manufacture, and their use are disclosed. In one embodiment, a membrane may include an active layer including a plurality of defects and a deposited material associated with the plurality of defects may reduce flow therethrough. Additionally, a majority of the active layer may be free from the material. In another embodiment, a membrane may include a porous substrate and an atomic layer deposited material disposed on a surface of the porous substrate. The atomic layer deposited material may be less hydrophilic than the porous substrate and an atomically thin active layer may be disposed on the atomic layer deposited material.

  8. Organic separations with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of present and emerging applications of membrane technology for the separation and purification of organic materials. This technology is highly relevant for programs aimed at minimizing waste in processing and in the treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents. Application of membranes for organic separation is growing rapidly in the petrochemical industry to simplify processing and in the treatment of effluents, and it is expected that this technology will be useful in numerous other industries including the processing of nuclear waste materials

  9. Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01

    overcome this barrier, at least two improvements are required. First, new and different contactor geometries are necessary to achieve efficient contact with an extremely low pressure drop. Second, the temperature limits of the membranes must be increased. In the absence of these improvements, sweeping gas MD will not be economically competitive. However, the membranes may still find use in hybrid desalination systems

  10. Membrane order in the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaea, David B; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-01-01

    The cholesterol content of membranes plays an important role in organizing membranes for signal transduction and protein trafficking as well as in modulating the biophysical properties of membranes. While the properties of model or isolated membranes have been extensively studied, there has been little evaluation of internal membranes in living cells. Here, we use a Nile Red based probe, NR12S, and ratiometric live cell imaging, to analyze the membrane order of the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment. We find that after a brief incubation to allow endocytosis, NR12S is distributed between the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment. The NR12S reports that the endocytic recycling compartment is more highly ordered than the plasma membrane. We also find that the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment are differentially affected by altering cellular cholesterol levels. The membrane order of the plasma membrane, but not the endocytic recycling compartment, is altered significantly when cellular cholesterol content is increased or decreased by 20%. These results demonstrate that changes in cellular cholesterol differentially alter membrane order within different organelles.

  11. Dimensional analysis of membrane distillation flux through fibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan

    We developed a dimensional-analysis-based empirical modeling method for membrane distillation (MD) flux that is adaptable for novel membrane structures. The method makes fewer simplifying assumptions about membrane pore geometry than existing theoretical (i.e. mechanistic) models, and allows selection of simple, easily-measureable membrane characteristics as structural parameters. Furthermore, the model does not require estimation of membrane surface temperatures; it accounts for convective heat transfer to the membrane surface without iterative fitting of mass and heat transfer equations. The Buckingham-Pi dimensional analysis method is tested for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) using non-woven/fibrous structures as the model membrane material. Twelve easily-measured variables to describe DCMD operating conditions, fluid properties, membrane structures, and flux were identified and combined into eight dimensionless parameters. These parameters were regressed using experimentally-collected data for multiple electrospun membrane types and DCMD system conditions, achieving R2 values >95%. We found that vapor flux through isotropic fibrous membranes can be estimated using only membrane thickness, solid fraction, and fiber diameter as structural parameters. Buckingham-Pi model DCMD flux predictions compare favorably with previously-developed empirical and theoretical models, and suggest this simple yet theoretically-grounded empirical modeling method can be used practically for predicting MD vapor flux from membrane structural parameters.

  12. Fouling in Membrane Distillation, Osmotic Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Laqbaqbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various membrane separation processes are being used for seawater desalination and treatment of wastewaters in order to deal with the worldwide water shortage problem. Different types of membranes of distinct morphologies, structures and physico-chemical characteristics are employed. Among the considered membrane technologies, membrane distillation (MD, osmotic distillation (OD and osmotic membrane distillation (OMD use porous and hydrophobic membranes for production of distilled water and/or concentration of wastewaters for recovery and recycling of valuable compounds. However, the efficiency of these technologies is hampered by fouling phenomena. This refers to the accumulation of organic/inorganic deposits including biological matter on the membrane surface and/or in the membrane pores. Fouling in MD, OD and OMD differs from that observed in electric and pressure-driven membrane processes such electrodialysis (ED, membrane capacitive deionization (MCD, reverse osmosis (RO, nanofiltration (NF, ultrafiltration (UF, microfiltration (MF, etc. Other than pore blockage, fouling in MD, OD and OMD increases the risk of membrane pores wetting and reduces therefore the quantity and quality of the produced water or the concentration efficiency of the process. This review deals with the observed fouling phenomena in MD, OD and OMD. It highlights different detected fouling types (organic fouling, inorganic fouling and biofouling, fouling characterization techniques as well as various methods of fouling reduction including pretreatment, membrane modification, membrane cleaning and antiscalants application.

  13. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  14. Microencapsulation within crosslinked polyethyleneimine membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, D; Alexakis, T; Poncelet de Smet, B; Neufeld, R J

    1994-01-01

    A microencapsulation technique is proposed involving the formation of a polyethyleneimine (PEI) membrane crosslinked by an acid dichloride. The membranes were formed at pH 8 in a non-polar solvent, conditions which are better suited for the encapsulation of biocatalysts or fragile biochemicals than those using polyamide membranes. The mean diameter and size distribution of the PEI microcapsules were similar to that observed with nylon membranes. The resultant microcapsules were spherical, free-flowing with a strong membrane. The mass of membrane was seen to be independent of the reaction time (1-4 min), insensitive to the PEI concentration and proportional to the concentration of crosslinking agent.

  15. Melanosome transfer between melanocytes and keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Serrano

    2014-01-01

    RESUMO: A pele é o maior órgão do corpo humano e a sua pigmentação é essencial para a sua coloração e proteção contra os efeitos nocivos da radiação ultravioleta (UV). A pigmentação da pele resulta essencialmente de três processos: a síntese e o armazenamento de melanina pelos melanócitos, em organelos especializados denominados melanossomas; o transporte dos melanossomas dentro dos melanócitos; e finalmente, a transferência dos melanossomas para os queratinócitos adjacentes. N...

  16. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive silicone-membrane lenses: planar vs. shaped membrane

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or it is shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  18. Confining membranes and dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Dmitri

    2001-11-01

    The dual theory describing the 4D Coulomb gas of point-like magnetically charged objects, which confines closed electric strings, is considered. The respective generalization of the theory of confining strings to confining membranes is further constructed. The same is done for the analogous SU(3)-inspired model. We then consider a combined model which confines both electric charges and closed strings. Such a model is a mixture of the above-mentioned Coulomb gas with the condensate of the dual Higgs field, where the latter one is described by the dual abelian Higgs model. It is demonstrated that in a certain limit of this dual abelian Higgs model, the system under study undergoes naively the dimensional reduction and becomes described by the (completely integrable) 2D sine-Gordon theory. In particular, at finite temperature, this fact leads to the phase transition of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type with the respective critical temperature expressed in terms of the parameters of the dual abelian Higgs model. However, it is finally discussed that the dimensional reduction is rigorously valid only in the strong coupling limit of the original 4D Coulomb gas. In such a limit, this reduction transforms the combined model into the 2D free bosonic theory.

  19. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-03-23

    Active, GTP-bound small GTPases need to be attached to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications in order to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their termination by GTPase-activating proteins. Here, we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in 11 full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid-containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably, this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio toward RhoG by ∼30 fold and Rac1 by ∼10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity toward RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine-tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPase lipidation, which opens a variety of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  1. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small hemifusion diaphragm. To obtain a direct view of the fusion process, we have carried out extensive simulations of two bilayers, composed of block copolymers, which are immersed in a solvent which favors one of the blocks. As in the biological case, the membranes are placed under tension. This is essential as fusion ...

  2. Cell Membrane Coating Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutic, prevention, and detection modalities have the potential to greatly impact how diseases are diagnosed and managed in the clinic. With the wide range of nanomaterials available, the rational design of nanocarriers on an application-specific basis has become increasingly commonplace. Here, a comprehensive overview is provided on an emerging platform: cell-membrane-coating nanotechnology. As a fundamental unit of biology, cells carry out a wide range of functions, including the remarkable ability to interface and interact with their surrounding environment. Instead of attempting to replicate such functions via synthetic techniques, researchers are now directly leveraging naturally derived cell membranes as a means of bestowing nanoparticles with enhanced biointerfacing capabilities. This top-down technique is facile, highly generalizable, and has the potential to greatly augment existing nanocarriers. Further, the introduction of a natural membrane substrate onto nanoparticles surfaces has enabled additional applications beyond those traditionally associated with nanomedicine. Despite its relative youth, there exists an impressive body of literature on cell membrane coating, which is covered here in detail. Overall, there is still significant room for development, as researchers continue to refine existing workflows while finding new and exciting applications that can take advantage of this developing technology. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 6. Fusion of biological ... The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in ...

  4. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  5. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simu- lation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by tran- sient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified.

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being employed in South African intensive care units for the management of patients with refractory hypoxaemia and for haemodynamic support, particularly following cardiothoracic procedures. ECMO is expensive, however, and there is a danger that this ...

  7. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent ...

  8. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  10. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  11. Membrane fission by protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Wilton T; Hayden, Carl C; Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Lafer, Eileen M; Rangamani, Padmini; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-04-18

    Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that is independent of protein structure-steric pressure among membrane-bound proteins. In particular, random collisions among crowded proteins generate substantial pressure, which if unbalanced on the opposite membrane surface can dramatically increase membrane curvature, leading to fission. Using the endocytic protein epsin1 N-terminal homology domain (ENTH), previously thought to drive fission by hydrophobic insertion, our results show that membrane coverage correlates equally with fission regardless of the hydrophobicity of insertions. Specifically, combining FRET-based measurements of membrane coverage with multiple, independent measurements of membrane vesiculation revealed that fission became spontaneous as steric pressure increased. Further, fission efficiency remained equally potent when helices were replaced by synthetic membrane-binding motifs. These data challenge the view that hydrophobic insertions drive membrane fission, suggesting instead that the role of insertions is to anchor proteins strongly to membrane surfaces, amplifying steric pressure. In line with these conclusions, even green fluorescent protein (GFP) was able to drive fission efficiently when bound to the membrane at high coverage. Our conclusions are further strengthened by the finding that intrinsically disordered proteins, which have large hydrodynamic radii yet lack a defined structure, drove fission with substantially greater potency than smaller, structured proteins.

  12. Dialysis membranes for blood purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2000-01-01

    All of the artificial membranes in industrial use, such as a reverse-osmosis membrane, dialysis membrane, ultrafiltration membrane, microfiltration membrane and gas separation membrane, also have therapeutic applications. The most commonly used artificial organ is the artificial kidney, a machine that performs treatment known as hemodialysis. This process cleanses the body of a patient with renal failure by dialysis and filtration, simple physicochemical processes. Hemodialysis membranes are used to remove accumulated uremic toxins, excess ions and water from the patient via the dialysate, and to supply (deficit) insufficient ions from the dialysate. Dialysis membranes used clinically in the treatment of patients with renal failure account for by far the largest volume of membranes used worldwide; more than 70 million square meters are used a year. Almost all dialyzers now in use are of the hollow-fiber type. A hollow-fiber dialyzer contains a bundle of approximately 10000 hollow fibers, each with an inner diameter of about 200 microm when wet. The membrane thickness is about 20-45 microm, and the length is 160-250 mm. The walls of the hollow fibers function as the dialysis membrane. Various materials, including cellulose-based materials and synthetic polymers, are used for dialysis membranes. This paper reviews blood purification, hemodialysis and dialysis membranes.

  13. Autophagosomal membranes assemble at ER-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Codogno, Patrice; Morel, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    The biogenesis of autophagosome, the double membrane bound organelle related to macro-autophagy, is a complex event requiring numerous key-proteins and membrane remodeling events. Our recent findings identify the extended synaptotagmins, crucial tethers of Endoplasmic Reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, as key-regulators of this molecular sequence.

  14. Alternative energy efficient membrane bioreactor using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Smith, S; Roh, H K

    2014-01-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot system, using membrane reciprocation instead of air scouring, was operated at constant high flux and daily fluctuating flux to demonstrate its application under peak and diurnal flow conditions. Low and stable transmembrane pressure was achieved at 40 l/m(2)/h (LMH) by use of repetitive membrane reciprocation. The results reveal that the inertial forces acting on the membrane fibers effectively propel foulants from the membrane surface. Reciprocation of the hollow fiber membrane is beneficial for the constant removal of solids that may build up on the membrane surface and inside the membrane bundle. The membrane reciprocation in the reciprocating MBR pilot consumed less energy than coarse air scouring used in conventional MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for the membrane reciprocation was 0.072 kWh/m(3) permeate produced at 40 LMH flux, which is 75% less than for a conventional air scouring system as reported in literature without consideration of energy consumption for biological aeration (0.29 kWh/m(3)). The daily fluctuating flux test confirmed that the membrane reciprocation is effective to handle fluctuating flux up to 50 LMH. The pilot-scale reciprocating MBR system successfully demonstrated that fouling can be controlled via 0.43 Hz membrane reciprocation with 44 mm or higher amplitude.

  15. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Michael T; Wilcox, Kyle C; Klein, William L; Sligar, Stephen G

    2013-05-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membrane proteins and have been used to study a wide variety of purified membrane proteins. This report details the incorporation of an unbiased population of membrane proteins from Escherichia coli membranes into Nanodiscs. This solubilized membrane protein library (SMPL) forms a soluble in vitro model of the membrane proteome. Since Nanodiscs contain isolated proteins or small complexes, the SMPL is an ideal platform for interactomics studies and pull-down assays of membrane proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the protein population before and after formation of the Nanodisc library indicates that a large percentage of the proteins are incorporated into the library. Proteomic identification of several prominent bands demonstrates the successful incorporation of outer and inner membrane proteins into the Nanodisc library.

  16. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Robida, Mark D; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Loskutov, Andrey V; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F

    2016-02-24

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins.

  17. Current progress on zeolite membrane reactor for CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage via catalytic hydrogenation into methanol have been recognized as the most promising solution to not only global warming issue but also high fuel and methanol demand worldwide. However, methanol synthesis from CO2 involves equilibrium limited reaction that can be optimized using membrane reactor (MR). Among all selective membrane layer, the zeolite is the most promising material because it can selectively remove water and methanol from reaction mixture component, especially H2. To present a clear background of zeolite membrane reactor, this paper will bring the brief discussion on the recent progress towards utilization of zeolite membrane reactor for CO2 hydrogenation. The progress of selective layer used in said MR will be examined in detail. Critical issues related to zeolite membrane reactor will also be discussed to develop it further.

  18. Low cost membrane contactors based on hollow fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Mirko; Vesely, Tomas; Raudensky, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Membrane contactors are used to solve different chemical engineering tasks (e.g. water saturation with gases). Such elements are traditionally used for bubble less oxidation of blood. However, their industrial applications are rather limited by their high investment costs. This is probably the main reason why membrane contactors are not used so widely, e.g. classical absorbers, etc. If potted bundles of hollow fibres are available, then it is a relatively simple task to design an ad hoc membrane contactor. However, it must be emphasised that to achieve the highest mass transfer efficiency requires a rather time-consuming tuning of each ad hoc designed contactor. To check the differences by water evaporation were aligned two modes, the water inside the hollow fibre membrane and fan air outside, next with the water outsides and flowing pressure air inside the membrane.

  19. Low cost membrane contactors based on hollow fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raudensky Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane contactors are used to solve different chemical engineering tasks (e.g. water saturation with gases. Such elements are traditionally used for bubble less oxidation of blood. However, their industrial applications are rather limited by their high investment costs. This is probably the main reason why membrane contactors are not used so widely, e.g. classical absorbers, etc. If potted bundles of hollow fibres are available, then it is a relatively simple task to design an ad hoc membrane contactor. However, it must be emphasised that to achieve the highest mass transfer efficiency requires a rather time-consuming tuning of each ad hoc designed contactor. To check the differences by water evaporation were aligned two modes, the water inside the hollow fibre membrane and fan air outside, next with the water outsides and flowing pressure air inside the membrane.

  20. Ultramicroelectrode studies of oxygen reduction in polyelectrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdcroft, S.; Abdou, M.S.; Beattie, P.; Basura, V. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    A study on the oxygen reduction reaction in a solid state electrochemical cell was presented. The oxygen reduction reaction is a rate limiting reaction in the operation of solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells which use H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. Interest in the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum electrodes in contact with Nafion electrolytes stems from its role in fuel cell technology. The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction in different polyelectrolyte membranes, such as Nafion and non-Nafion membranes, were compared. The electrode kinetics and mass transport parameters of the oxygen reduction reaction in polyelectrolyte membranes were measured by ultramicroelectrode techniques. The major difference found between these two classes of membrane was the percentage of water, which is suggestive of superior electrochemical mass transport properties of the non-Nafion membranes. 2 refs. 1 fig.

  1. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored. PMID:24957121

  2. Dense ceramic membranes based on ion conducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, M.L.; Larring, Y.; Bredesen, R.; Norby, T.; Grande, T.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent progress made in the fields of high temperature oxygen and hydrogen separation membranes. Studies of membranes for oxygen separation are mainly focusing on materials design to improve flux, and to lesser extent, related to stability issues. High oxygen fluxes satisfying industrial requirements can be obtained but, for many materials, the surface exchange rate is limiting the performance. The current status on electrolyte-type and mixed proton and electron conducting membranes is outlined, highlighting materials with improved stability in typical applications as solid oxide fuel cell technology and gas separation. In our presentation more fundamental aspects related to transport properties, chemical and mechanical stability of membrane materials are also treated. It is concluded that a significantly better understanding of the long term effects of operation in chemical gradients is needed for these types of membrane materials. (authors)

  3. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Yan Lai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored.

  4. Antireflective "moth-eye" structures on tunable optical silicone membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert; Keil, Bettina; Morhard, Christoph; Lehr, Dennis; Draheim, Jan; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Spatz, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Flexible silicone membranes are key components for tunable optical lenses. The elastic operation of the membranes impedes the use of classical layer systems for an antireflective (AR) effect. To overcome this limitation, we equipped optical elastomer membranes with "moth-eye" structures directly in the flexible silicone substrate. The manufacturing of the AR structures in the flexible membrane includes a mastering process based on block copolymer micelle nanolithography followed by a replication method. We investigate the performance of the resulting AR structures under strain of up to 20% membrane expansion. A significant transmittance enhancement of up to 2.5% is achieved over the entire visible spectrum, which means that more than half of the surface reflection losses are compensated by the AR structures.

  5. Environmental behaviour of tensile membrane structures

    OpenAIRE

    Elnokaly, Amira; Chilton, John; Wilson, Robin

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the environmental properties of spaces enclosed by tensile membrane structures (TMS). Limitations in the understanding of the environmental and thermal performance of TMS have to some extent hindered their acceptance by building clients and the building industry. A review of the early attempts to model the thermal environment of spaces enclosed by TMS is given and their environmental and thermal properties are discussed. The lack of appropriate tools for the investigation...

  6. Xenobiotics removal by membrane technology: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Semião, Andrea J.C.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Small molecular weight xenobiotics are compounds of extreme concern in potable water applications due to their adverse human health and environmental effects. However, conventional water treatment processes cannot fully and systematically remove them due to their low concentrations in natural waters and wastewaters. Biological limitation to degrade such compounds is another cause for inefficient removal. Physical barriers like membranes possessing pore sizes smaller than the compounds to be r...

  7. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  8. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  9. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  10. Cheap Thin Film Oxygen Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane, comprising a porous support layer a gas tight electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer and a catalyst layer, characterized in that the electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer is formed from a material having a crystallite...

  11. The Effect of Platinum Electrocatalyst on Membrane Degradation in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Merit; Cermenek, Bernd; Rami, Mija; Hacker, Viktor

    2015-12-08

    Membrane degradation is a severe factor limiting the lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, obtaining a deeper knowledge is fundamental in order to establish fuel cells as competitive product. A segmented single cell was operated under open circuit voltage with alternating relative humidity. The influence of the catalyst layer on membrane degradation was evaluated by measuring a membrane without electrodes and a membrane-electrode-assembly under identical conditions. After 100 h of accelerated stress testing the proton conductivity of membrane samples near the anode and cathode was investigated by means of ex situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The membrane sample near the cathode inlet exhibited twofold lower membrane resistance and a resulting twofold higher proton conductivity than the membrane sample near the anode inlet. The results from the fluoride ion analysis have shown that the presence of platinum reduces the fluoride emission rate; which supports conclusions drawn from the literature.

  12. The Effect of Platinum Electrocatalyst on Membrane Degradation in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Merit; Cermenek, Bernd; Rami, Mija; Hacker, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Membrane degradation is a severe factor limiting the lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, obtaining a deeper knowledge is fundamental in order to establish fuel cells as competitive product. A segmented single cell was operated under open circuit voltage with alternating relative humidity. The influence of the catalyst layer on membrane degradation was evaluated by measuring a membrane without electrodes and a membrane-electrode-assembly under identical conditions. After 100 h of accelerated stress testing the proton conductivity of membrane samples near the anode and cathode was investigated by means of ex situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The membrane sample near the cathode inlet exhibited twofold lower membrane resistance and a resulting twofold higher proton conductivity than the membrane sample near the anode inlet. The results from the fluoride ion analysis have shown that the presence of platinum reduces the fluoride emission rate; which supports conclusions drawn from the literature. PMID:26670258

  13. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  14. Building membrane nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Membrane nanopores--hollow nanoscale barrels that puncture biological or synthetic membranes--have become powerful tools in chemical- and biosensing, and have achieved notable success in portable DNA sequencing. The pores can be self-assembled from a variety of materials, including proteins, peptides, synthetic organic compounds and, more recently, DNA. But which building material is best for which application, and what is the relationship between pore structure and function? In this Review, I critically compare the characteristics of the different building materials, and explore the influence of the building material on pore structure, dynamics and function. I also discuss the future challenges of developing nanopore technology, and consider what the next-generation of nanopore structures could be and where further practical applications might emerge.

  15. Aquaporin-2 membrane targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma T B; Fenton, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) to the apical plasma membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells is regulated mainly by the antidiuretic peptide hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). This process is of crucial importance for the maintenance of body water homeostasis....... In this brief review we assess the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and discuss the emerging concept that type 2 AVP receptor (V2R)-mediated AQP2 trafficking is cAMP-independent. the ability of the kidney to concentrate the urine and thereby maintain body water homeostasis depends on targeting....... For example, 1) stimulation with the nonspecific AC activator forskolin increases AQP2 membrane accumulation in a mouse cortical collecting duct cell line [e.g., Norregaard et al. (16)]; 2) cAMP increases CD water permeability (15); 3) the cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) can phosphorylate AQP2 on its...

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  17. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  18. Pulse radiolysis studies of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijman, M.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the structure of membranes on the processes in cell membranes were examined. Different models of the membranes were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis was used as the technique to examine the membranes. (R.B.)

  19. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.

    2009-01-01

    Cereal seed germination involves a complex coordination between different seed tissues. Plasma membranes must play crucial roles in coordination and execution of germination; however, very little is known about seed plasma membrane proteomes due to limited tissue amounts combined with amphiphilic...... was used to reduce soluble protein contamination and enrich for hydrophobic proteins. Sixty-one proteins in 14 SDS-PAGE bands were identified by LC-MS/MS and database searches. The identifications provide new insight into the plasma membrane functions in seed germination....

  20. Prospects and problems of dense oxygen permeable membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, P.V.; Larsen, P.H.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2000-01-01

    The prospects of using mixed ionic/electronic conducting ceramics for syngas production in a catalytic membrane reactor are analysed. Problems relating to limited thermodynamic stability and poor dimensional stability of candidate materials are addressed, The consequences for these problems......, of flux improving measures like minimization of membrane thickness and minimization of the losses due to oxygen exchange over the membrane surfaces, are discussed. The analysis is conducted on two candidate materials: La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-delta and SrFeCo0.5Ox. Finally. experimental investigations...

  1. Modal radiation patterns of baffled circular plates and membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    The far field velocity potential and radiation pattern of baffled circular plates and membranes are found analytically using the full set of modal velocity profiles derived from the corresponding equation of motion. The derivation is valid for a plate or membrane subjected to an external excitation...... of a plate with clamped, simply supported, and free edge boundary conditions as well as for the membrane. For all non-axisymmetric modes, the velocity potential along the axis of the radiator is found to be strictly zero. In the long wavelength limit, the radiationpattern of all axisymmetric modes approaches...

  2. Transplantation of amniotic membrane to the subretinal space in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Scherfig, Erik; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of transplanted amniotic membrane (AM) on subretinal wound healing. Methods. Nine Danish Landrace pigs had surgical removal of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and mechanical damage of Bruch's membrane (BM) and served as a control group. 15 pigs additionally had...... is well tolerated in the subretinal space, causes only limited inflammation, and is covered with a monolayer of pigmented cells when in contact with the host RPE. Conclusions. AM modifies choroidal neovascularisation after BM damage and may serve as a basement membrane substitute for the RPE....

  3. Lactobacillus casei combats acid stress by maintaining cell membrane functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-07-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains have traditionally been recognized as probiotics and frequently used as adjunct culture in fermented dairy products where lactic acid stress is a frequently encountered environmental condition. We have investigated the effect of lactic acid stress on the cell membrane of L. casei Zhang [wild type (WT)] and its acid-resistant mutant Lbz-2. Both strains were grown under glucose-limiting conditions in chemostats; following challenge by low pH, the cell membrane stress responses were investigated. In response to acid stress, cell membrane fluidity decreased and its fatty acid composition changed to reduce the damage caused by lactic acid. Compared with the WT, the acid-resistant mutant exhibited numerous survival advantages, such as higher membrane fluidity, higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids, and higher mean chain length. In addition, cell integrity analysis showed that the mutant maintained a more intact cellular structure and lower membrane permeability after environmental acidification. These results indicate that alteration in membrane fluidity, fatty acid distribution, and cell integrity are common mechanisms utilized by L. casei to withstand severe acidification and to reduce the deleterious effect of lactic acid on the cell membrane. This detailed comparison of cell membrane responses between the WT and mutant add to our knowledge of the acid stress adaptation and thus enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress.

  4. Electrochemical polymer electrolyte membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Jianhua; Wilkinson, David P

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical Polymer Electrolyte Membranes covers PEMs from fundamentals to applications, describing their structure, properties, characterization, synthesis, and use in electrochemical energy storage and solar energy conversion technologies. Featuring chapters authored by leading experts from academia and industry, this authoritative text: Discusses cutting-edge methodologies in PEM material selection and fabricationPoints out important challenges in developing PEMs and recommends mitigation strategies to improve PEM performanceAnalyzes the cur

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  6. Peptidomics for Studying Limited Proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto; Sasaki, Kazuki

    2015-11-06

    Limited proteolysis is a pivotal mechanism regulating protein functions. Identifying physiologically or pathophysiologically relevant cleavage sites helps to develop molecular tools that can be used for diagnostics or therapeutics. During proteolysis of secretory and membrane proteins, part of the cleaved protein is liberated and destined to undergo degradation but should retain original cleavage sites created by proteolytic enzymes. We profiled endogenous peptides accumulated for 4 h in media conditioned by primary cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts. A total of 3916 redundant peptide sequences from 94 secretory proteins and membrane proteins served to identify limited cleavage sites, both annotated and unannotated, for signal peptide or propeptide removal, peptide hormone processing, ectodomain shedding, and regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Incorrectly predicted signal cleavage sites are found in typical proteins such as extracellular matrix proteins and the peptide hormone precursor adrenomedullin ADM. The revealed signal peptide cleavage site for ADM was experimentally verified by identifying the major molecular form of flanking proadrenomedullin N-terminal peptide. We suggest that profiling of endogenous peptides, like transcriptome sequence reads, makes sense in regular cells such as fibroblasts and that peptidomics provides insight into proteolysis-regulated protein functions.

  7. Novicidin interactions with phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balakrishnan, Vijay Shankar

    Antimicrobial peptides target bacterial cell membranes and are considered as potential antibiotics. Their interactions with cell membranes are studied using different approaches. This thesis comprises of the biophysical investigations on the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin, interacting...... with liposomes. The lipid-induced changes in the peptide due to membrane binding, and the peptide-induced changes in the membrane properties were investigated using various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, and the structural and thermodynamic aspects of peptide-lipid interactions are discussed. This helps...... in understanding not only the antimicrobial nature of Novicidin, but also sheds light on the membrane-peptide interactions....

  8. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  9. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  10. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  11. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  12. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  13. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  14. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  15. Chemically Stable Lipids for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Peng, Lingling; Zinovev, Egor; Vlasov, Alexey; Lee, Sung Chang; Kuklin, Alexander; Mishin, Alexey; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Zhang, Qinghai; Cherezov, Vadim (MIPT); (USC); (Scripps)

    2017-05-01

    The lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has been widely recognized as a promising membrane-mimicking matrix for biophysical studies of membrane proteins and their crystallization in a lipidic environment. Application of this material to a wide variety of membrane proteins, however, is hindered due to a limited number of available host lipids, mostly monoacylglycerols (MAGs). Here, we designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of chemically stable lipids resistant to hydrolysis, with properties complementary to the widely used MAGs. In order to assess their potential to serve as host lipids for crystallization, we characterized the phase properties and lattice parameters of mesophases made of two most promising lipids at a variety of different conditions by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Both lipids showed remarkable chemical stability and an extended LCP region in the phase diagram covering a wide range of temperatures down to 4 °C. One of these lipids has been used for crystallization and structure determination of a prototypical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin at 4 and 20 °C.

  16. Porphyrin-functionalized porous polysulfone membrane towards an optical sensor membrane for sorption and detection of cadmium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lizhi, E-mail: zhaolizhi_phd@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Li, Min; Liu, Manman; Zhang, Yuecong [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wu, Chenglin [School of Pharmaceutical and Chemical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 317000, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Yuzhong, E-mail: zhangyz2004cn@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • An optical sensor membrane is prepared by TMPyP and PNaSS-grafted PSF membrane. • The optical sensor membrane shows enhanced sorption for cadmium(II). • Visual and spectrophotometric detection can be achieved. • The functional membrane exhibits good stability and reusability. - Abstract: In this study, an optical sensor membrane was prepared for sorption and detection of cadmium(II) (Cd(II)) in aqueous solution. A polyanion, poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PNaSS), was grafted onto the chloromethylated polysulfone (CMPSF) microporous membrane via surface-initiated ATRP. 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl) porphyrin p-toluenesulfonate (TMPyP) was immobilized onto the PNaSS-grafted polysulfone (PSF-PNaSS) membrane through electrostatic interaction. The TMPyP-functionalized membrane exhibited an enhanced sorption for, and distinct color and spectral response to cadmium(II) (Cd(II)) in aqueous solution. Larger immobilization capacity of TMPyP on the membrane led to stronger sorption for Cd(II), and smaller one made the optical sensor have a faster (in minutes) and more sensitive response to the ion. The detection limit study indicated that the functional membrane with proper amount of TMPyP (<0.5 mg/g) could still have color and spectral response to Cd(II) solutions at an extreme low concentration (10{sup −4} mg/L). The optical sensor membrane exhibited good stability and reusability which made it efficient for various sorptive removal and detection applications.

  17. Solid-state membrane module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard [Salt Lake City, UT; Taylor, Dale M [Murray, UT

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  18. The relevance of polymeric synthetic membranes in topical formulation assessment and drug diffusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Rouse, Jennifer J; Sanderson, Francis D; Eccleston, Gillian M

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic membranes are composed of thin sheets of polymeric macromolecules that can control the passage of components through them. Generally, synthetic membranes used in drug diffusion studies have one of two functions: skin simulation or quality control. Synthetic membranes for skin simulation, such as the silicone-based membranes polydimethylsiloxane and Carbosil, are generally hydrophobic and rate limiting, imitating the stratum corneum. In contrast, synthetic membranes for quality control, such as cellulose esters and polysulfone, are required to act as a support rather than a barrier. These synthetic membranes also often contain pores; hence, they are called porous membranes. The significance of Franz diffusion studies and synthetic membranes in quality control studies involves an understanding of the fundamentals of synthetic membranes. This article provides a general overview of synthetic membranes, including a brief background of the history and the common applications of synthetic membranes. This review then explores the types of synthetic membranes, the transport mechanisms across them, and their relevance in choosing a synthetic membrane in Franz diffusion cell studies for formulation assessment purposes.

  19. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crick, Duncan J.; Wang, Jue X. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Mott, Helen R.; Nietlispach, Daniel, E-mail: dn206@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  20. Insertion of Neurotransmitters into a Lipid Bilayer Membrane and Its Implication on Membrane Stability: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Xue, Minmin; Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-03-17

    The signaling molecules in neurons, called neurotransmitters, play an essential role in the transportation of neural signals, during which the neurotransmitters interact with not only specific receptors, but also cytomembranes, such as synaptic vesicle membranes and postsynaptic membranes. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the atomic-scale insertion dynamics of typical neurotransmitters, including methionine enkephalin (ME), leucine enkephalin (LE), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), and aspartic acid (ASP), into lipid bilayers is investigated. The results show that the first three neurotransmitters (ME, LE, and DA) are able to diffuse freely into both 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) membranes, and are guided by the aromatic residues Tyr and Phe. Only a limited number of these neurotransmitters are allowed to penetrate into the membrane, which suggests an intrinsic mechanism by which the membrane is protected from being destroyed by excessive inserted neurotransmitters. After spontaneous insertion, the neurotransmitters disturb the surrounding phospholipids in the membrane, as indicated by the altered distribution of components in lipid leaflets and the disordered lipid tails. In contrast, the last two neurotransmitters (ACh and ASP) cannot enter the membrane, but instead always diffuse freely in solution. These findings provide an understanding at the atomic level of how neurotransmitters interact with the surrounding cytomembrane, as well as their impact on membrane behavior. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Flux Enhancement in Membrane Distillation Using Nanofiber Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD is an emerging separation technology, whose largest application potential lies in the desalination of highly concentrated solutions, which are out of the scope of reverse osmosis. Despite many attractive features, this technology is still awaiting large industrial application. The main reason is the lack of commercially available membranes with fluxes comparable to reverse osmosis. MD is a thermal separation process driven by a partial vapour pressure difference. Flux, distillate purity, and thermal efficiency are always in conflict, all three being strictly connected with pore size, membrane hydrophobicity, and thickness. The world has not seen the ideal membrane yet, but nanofibers may offer a solution to these contradictory requirements. Membranes of electrospun PVDF were tested under various conditions on a direct contact (DCMD unit, in order to determine the optimum conditions for maximum flux. In addition, their performance was compared to commonly available PTFE, PE, and PES membranes. It was confirmed that thinner membranes have higher fluxes and a lower distillate purity and also higher energy losses via conduction across the membrane. As both mass and heat transfer are connected, it is best to develop new membranes with a target application in mind, for the specific membrane module and operational conditions.

  2. Wetting Resistance of Commercial Membrane Distillation Membranes in Waste Streams Containing Surfactants and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is becoming increasingly challenging and several technologies, including membrane distillation (MD are emerging. This technology is less affected by salinity compared to reverse osmosis and is able to treat brines up to saturation. The focus of MD research recently shifted from seawater desalination to industrial applications out of the scope of reverse osmosis. In many of these applications, surfactants or oil traces are present in the feed stream, lowering the surface tension and increasing the risk for membrane wetting. In this study, the technological boundaries of MD in the presence of surfactants are investigated using surface tension, contact angle and liquid entry pressure measurements together with lab-scale MD experiments to predict the wetting resistance of different membranes. Synthetic NaCl solutions mixed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS were used as feed solution. The limiting surfactant concentration was found to be dependent on the surface chemistry of the membrane, and increased with increasing hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Additionally, a hexadecane/SDS emulsion was prepared with a composition simulating produced water, a waste stream in the oil and gas sector. When hexadecane is present in the emulsion, oleophobic membranes are able to resist wetting, whereas polytetrafluoretheen (PTFE is gradually wetted by the feed liquid.

  3. Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, W. S. Winston

    2012-10-02

    Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes are provided. The membranes can include at least one hydrophilic polymer, at least one cross-linking agent, at least one base, and at least one amino compound. The methods of separating gases using membranes can include contacting a gas stream containing at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl with one side of a nonporous and at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl selectively permeable membrane such that at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl is selectively transported through the membrane.

  4. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-08-07

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various thermopl......A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various...... thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes...... electrolyte membrane by hot-press. The fuel cell can operate at temperatures up to at least 200 °C with hydrogen-rich fuel containing high ratios of carbon monoxide such as 3 vol% carbon monoxide or more, compared to the carbon monoxide tolerance of 10-20 ppm level for Nafion$m(3)-based polymer electrolyte...

  6. Amodiaquine polymeric membrane electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malongo, T Kimbeni; Blankert, B; Kambu, O; Amighi, K; Nsangu, J; Kauffmann, J-M

    2006-04-11

    The construction and electrochemical response characteristics of two types of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensors for the determination of amodiaquine hydrochloride (ADQ.2HCl) are described. The sensing membrane comprised an ion-pair formed between the cationic drug and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) or potassium tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl) borate (KTCPB) in a plasticized PVC matrix. Eight PVC membrane ion-selective electrodes were fabricated and studied. Several plasticizers were studied namely, dioctyl phthalate (DOP), 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), dioctyl phenylphosphonate (DOPP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (EHA). The sensors display a fast, stable and near-Nernstian response over a relative wide ADQ concentration range (3.2 x 10(-6) to 2.0 x 10(-2) M), with slopes comprised between 28.5 and 31.4 mV dec(-1) in a pH range comprised between pH 3.7 and 5.5. The assay of amodiaquine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms using one of the proposed sensors gave average recoveries of 104.3 and 99.9 with R.S.D. of 0.3 and 0.6% for tablets (Malaritab) and a reconstituted powder containing ADQ.2HCl, respectively. The sensor was also used for dissolution profile studies of two drug formulations. The sensor proved to have a good selectivity for ADQ.2HCl over some inorganic and organic compounds, however, berberine chloride interfered significantly. The results were validated by comparison with a spectrophotometric assay according to the USP pharmacopoeia.

  7. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  9. [Juvenile idiopathic epiretinal membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopoulou, K; Krause, S; Fili, S; Hayvazov, S; Schilling, H; Kohlhaas, M

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is very rare in adolescent patients. The pathogenesis remains unclear although the role of hyalocytes is of major importance. The clinical features in young patients are different from those in older patients. We describe a case of iERM in a 15-year-old girl who presented with metamorphopsia of the right eye. This case report presents the basis for the decision for surgical treatment as well as the clinical features at follow-up examination 9 months after surgery.

  10. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  12. Membrane technology as a promising alternative in biodiesel production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuit, Siew Hoong; Ong, Yit Thai; Lee, Keat Teong; Subhash, Bhatia; Tan, Soon Huat

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, environmental problems caused by the use of fossil fuels and the depletion of petroleum reserves have driven the world to adopt biodiesel as an alternative energy source to replace conventional petroleum-derived fuels because of biodiesel's clean and renewable nature. Biodiesel is conventionally produced in homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalysed processes, as well as by supercritical technology. All of these processes have their own limitations, such as wastewater generation and high energy consumption. In this context, the membrane reactor appears to be the perfect candidate to produce biodiesel because of its ability to overcome the limitations encountered by conventional production methods. Thus, the aim of this paper is to review the production of biodiesel with a membrane reactor by examining the fundamental concepts of the membrane reactor, its operating principles and the combination of membrane and catalyst in the catalytic membrane. In addition, the potential of functionalised carbon nanotubes to serve as catalysts while being incorporated into the membrane for transesterification is discussed. Furthermore, this paper will also discuss the effects of process parameters for transesterification in a membrane reactor and the advantages offered by membrane reactors for biodiesel production. This discussion is followed by some limitations faced in membrane technology. Nevertheless, based on the findings presented in this review, it is clear that the membrane reactor has the potential to be a breakthrough technology for the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  14. Membrane fouling and wetting in membrane distillation and their mitigation by novel membranes with special wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangxin; Lin, Shihong

    2017-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) has been identified as a promising technology to desalinate the hypersaline wastewaters from fracking and other industries. However, conventional hydrophobic MD membranes are highly susceptible to fouling and/or wetting by the hydrophobic and/or amphiphilic constituents in these wastewaters of complex compositions. This study systematically investigates the impact of the surface wetting properties on the membrane wetting and/or fouling behaviors in MD. Specifically, we compare the wetting and fouling resistance of three types of membranes of different wetting properties, including hydrophobic and omniphobic membranes as well as composite membranes with a hydrophobic substrate and a superhydrophilic top surface. We challenged the MD membranes with hypersaline feed solutions that contained a relatively high concentration of crude oil with and without added synthetic surfactants, Triton X-100. We found that the composite membranes with superhydrophilic top surface were robustly resistant to oil fouling in the absence of Triton X-100, but were subject to pore wetting in the presence of Triton X-100. On the other hand, the omniphobic membranes were easily fouled by oil-in-water emulsion without Triton X-100, but successfully sustained stable MD performance with Triton X-100 stabilized oil-in-water emulsion as the feed solution. In contrast, the conventional hydrophobic membranes failed readily regardless whether Triton X-100 was present, although via different mechanisms. These findings are corroborated by contact angle measures as well as oil-probe force spectroscopy. This study provides a holistic picture regarding how a hydrophobic membrane fails in MD and how we can leverage membranes with special wettability to prevent membrane failure in MD operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recent...

  16. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  17. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  18. Conical Nanopore PC Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clochard, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Template synthesis can be considered an alternative to conventional lithography methods. It is one way of providing a panel of nanoscale metallic wires, tubes or organic polymeric devices. Our interest is focused on track-etched membranes produced from swift heavy ions bombardment of polymer films. In comparison with self-assembly of block copolymers, this bottom-up approach has the advantage of being economic, it is not time-consuming and it allows track formation of diverse geometries. Tailoring of the conical nanopore tip opening would have a tremendous impact on sensing domain, as well as on fundamental understanding of perpendicular giant magneto Resistance properties observed in metallic multilayered cylindrical nanowires. By combining low-energy heavy ion beam radiation effects with asymmetric etching, the etching temperature and time can be tuned to prepare conical nanopores of controlled geometry from 0.5 to 1μm at the base to a few nanometers at the top. Asymmetric etching onto PC films was pH-monitored at various temperatures in the range of 65 degree to 80 degree. Fluence impact onto track etch pores was also investigated. The pore shape characterization was achieved by electronic microscopy measurements on membrane surfaces and on electrodeposited nanowires. We have also observed a difference in the conical shape of replicated nanowires. Some showed sting shapes and others displayed shell shapes depending on whether a neutralizing agent was used during etching or not

  19. A Review on the Production and Purification of Biomass-Derived Hydrogen Using Emerging Membrane Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen energy systems are recognized as a promising solution for the energy shortage and environmental pollution crises. To meet the increasing demand for hydrogen, various possible systems have been investigated for the production of hydrogen by efficient and economical processes. Because of its advantages of being renewable and environmentally friendly, biomass processing has the potential to become the major hydrogen production route in the future. Membrane technology provides an efficient and cost-effective solution for hydrogen separation and greenhouse gas capture in biomass processing. In this review, the future prospects of using gas separation membranes for hydrogen production in biomass processing are extensively addressed from two perspectives: (1 the current development status of hydrogen separation membranes made of different materials and (2 the feasibility of using these membranes for practical applications in biomass-derived hydrogen production. Different types of hydrogen separation membranes, including polymeric membranes, dense metal membranes, microporous membranes (zeolite, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, silica, etc. are systematically discussed in terms of their fabrication methods, gas permeation performance, structure stability properties, etc. In addition, the application feasibility of these membranes in biomass processing is assessed from both practical and economic perspectives. The benefits and possibilities of using membrane reactors for hydrogen production in biomass processing are also discussed. Lastly, we summarize the limitations of the currently available hydrogen membranes as well as the gaps between research achievements and industrial application. We also propose expected research directions for the future development of hydrogen gas membrane technology.

  20. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compare eight synthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy. • We predict the behavior of membranes in the release experiments. • The polymeric synthetic membranes varied in shape and size. • We detect substructures in pores of cellulose esters and nylon membranes. • Substructures limit the release rate of active compound. - Abstract: Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  1. Chain scission and anti fungal effect of electron beam on cellulose membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanichapichart, Pikul; Taweepreeda, Wirach; Nawae, Safitree; Choomgan, Pastraporn; Yasenchak, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Two types of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes were produced under a modified H and S medium using sucrose as a carbon source, with (CCB) and without (SHB) coconut juice supplement. Both membranes showed similar crystallinity of 69.24 and 71.55%. After being irradiated with E-beams under oxygen limited and ambient condition, the results from water contact angle showed that only the irradiated membrane CCB was increased from 30 to 40 degrees, and irradiation under oxygen ambient condition provided the greatest value. Comparing with the control membranes, smaller water flux was the cases after electron beam irradiation which indicated a reduction of membrane pore area. However, the results from molecular weight cut off (MWCO) revealed that chain scission was greater for membrane SHB and its cut off was increased from 28,000 Da to more than 35,000 Da. FTIR analysis revealed some changes in membrane functional groups, corresponding with the above results. These changes initiated new property of cellulose membranes, an anti-fungal food wrap. - Highlights: ► Electron beam irradiation increased membrane hydrophobicity and molecular weight cut off. ► The irradiation caused chain scissoring and anti fungal property of cellulose membrane. ► FT-IR studies revealed changes in functional groups causing a decrease in membrane moisture. ► Anti fungal test of cellulose membrane showed the same shelf life as polyethylene sheet.

  2. Fouling in a MBR system with rotating membrane discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are an attractive alternative solution for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The MBR, which is a combination of a bioreactor for sludge degradation and a membrane for separation, has the advantages of a low footprint, ability to handle high sludge...... to conventionally activated sludge systems. Therefore, it is essential to understand the impact of enhanced shear on filtration performance. The influence of shear and sludge concentration on the limiting flux is investigated using the limiting flux as a measure of the degree of fouling. The utilized MBR system...

  3. Deashing of coal liquids with ceramic membrane microfiltration and diafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Removal of mineral matter from liquid hydrocarbons derived from the direct liquefaction of coal is required for product acceptability. Current methods include critical solvent deashing (Rose{sup {reg_sign}} process from Kerr-McGee) and filtration (U.S. Filter leaf filter as used by British Coal). These methods produce ash reject streams containing up to 15% of the liquid hydrocarbon product. Consequently, CeraMem proposed the use of low cost, ceramic crossflow membranes for the filtration of coal liquids bottoms to remove mineral matter and subsequent diafiltration (analogous to cake washing in dead-ended filtration) for the removal of coal liquid from the solids stream. The use of these ceramic crossflow membranes overcomes the limitations of traditional polymeric crossflow membranes by having the ability to operate at elevated temperature and to withstand prolonged exposure to hydrocarbon and solvent media. In addition, CeraMem`s membrane filters are significantly less expensive than competitive ceramic membranes due to their unique construction. With these ceramic membrane filters, it may be possible to reduce the product losses associated with traditional deashing processes at an economically attractive cost. The performance of these ceramic membrane microfilters is discussed.

  4. Free-energy calculation methods for collective phenomena in membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Fuhrmans, Marc; Barragan Vidal, Israel A.; Müller, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    Collective phenomena in membranes are those which involve the co-operative reorganization of many molecules. Examples of these are membrane fusion, pore formation, bending, adhesion or fission. The time and length scales, on which these processes occur, pose a challenge for atomistic simulations. Therefore, in order to solve the length scale problem it is popular to introduce a coarse-grained representation. To facilitate sampling of the relevant states additional computational techniques, which encourage the system to explore the free-energy landscape far from equilibrium and visit transition states, are needed. These computational techniques provide insights about the free-energy changes involved in collective transformations of membranes, yielding information about the rate limiting states, the transformation mechanism and the influence of architectural, compositional and interaction parameters. A common approach is to identify an order parameter (or reaction coordinate), which characterizes the pathway of membrane reorganization. However, no general strategy exists to define such an order parameter that can properly describe cooperative reorganizations in membranes. Recently developed methods can overcome this problem of the order-parameter choice and allow us to study collective phenomena in membranes. We will discuss such methods as thermodynamic integration, umbrella sampling, and the string method and results provided by their applications to particle-based simulations, particularly focusing on membrane fusion and pore formation.

  5. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  6. Recent advances in membrane technologies for biorefining and bioenergy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Bagley, David M; Leung, Kam Tin; Liss, Steven N; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The bioeconomy, and in particular, biorefining and bioenergy production, have received considerable attention in recent years as a shift to renewable bioresources to produce similar energy and chemicals derived from fossil energy sources, represents a more sustainable path. Membrane technologies have been shown to play a key role in process intensification and products recovery and purification in biorefining and bioenergy production processes. Among the various separation technologies used, membrane technologies provide excellent fractionation and separation capabilities, low chemical consumption, and reduced energy requirements. This article presents a state-of-the-art review on membrane technologies related to various processes of biorefining and bioenergy production, including: (i) separation and purification of individual molecules from biomass, (ii) removal of fermentation inhibitors, (iii) enzyme recovery from hydrolysis processes, (iv) membrane bioreactors for bioenergy and chemical production, such as bioethanol, biogas and acetic acid, (v) bioethanol dehydration, (vi) bio-oil and biodiesel production, and (vii) algae harvesting. The advantages and limitations of membrane technologies for these applications are discussed and new membrane-based integrated processes are proposed. Finally, challenges and opportunities of membrane technologies for biorefining and bioenergy production in the coming years are addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of Polymeric Nanofiltration Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncic, B.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As membrane processes are increasingly used in industrial applications, there is a growing interest in methods of membrane characterization. Traditional membrane characteristics, such as cut-off value and pore size distribution, are being supplemented by membrane surface characteristics, such as charge density or zeta potential and hydrophobicity. This study, therefore, characterizes the three different polymeric membranes used (NFT-50, DL and DK. The molecular mass cut-off (MMCO value was determined using a set of reference solutes within the molecular range 150-600 Da, whereas streaming potential measurements enabled quantification of the surface charge characteristics. Hydrophobicity was studied using contact angle measurements. The results indicated that even though all three membranes had very similar layer compositions which consisted of poly(piperazneamide, as top layers they showed different values of measured quantitive. The NFT-50 membrane had the lowest MMCO value and the most hydrophilic membrane surface, followed by DK and DL. Membrane fouling as measured by flux reduction was determined by streaming potential measurements and accompanied by a positive change in zeta potential.

  8. Track membranes, production, properties, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesjan, Yu.Ts.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of producing track membranes on heavy ion beams of the Flerov Laboratory are considered. The parameters of the running accelerators and equipment for the irradiation of polymer foils are presented. The process of production of track membranes based on different polymeric materials and various applications of the membranes are described. Special attention is given to the principally new applications and devices developed at the Laboratory. This report presents the results obtained by a big group of scientists and engineers working in the field of elaboration, investigation and application of track membranes (author). 21 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  9. Amniotic membrane for burn trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaluddin Zainol; Hasim Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Amniotic membranes are derived from human placentae at birth. They have two layers mainly the amniotic and the chorionic surfaces which are separated by a thin layer of connective tissues. The two layers are separated during procurement, the placenta and the chorionic side are discarded and the amnion membranes are then further processed. Amnion membranes are normally procured from placentae which are normally free of infections, i.e; the mothers are antenatally screened for sexually transmitted diseases or AlDs related diseases. Intrapartum the mother should not be having chorioamnionitis or jaundice. Sometimes the amniotic membranes are acquired from fresh elective caeserian sections. After processing, the amniotic membranes are packed in two layers of polypropylene and radiated with cobalt 60 at a dose of about 25 kGy. The amniotic membranes are clinically used to cover burn surfaces especially effective for superficial or partial thickness burns. The thin membranes adhered well to the trauma areas and peeled off automatically by the second week. No change of dressing were necessary during these times because of the close adherence, there were less chance of external contamination or infections of these wounds. Due to their flexibility they are very useful to cover difference contours of the human body for example the face, body, elbows or knees. However our experience revealed that amniotic membranes are not useful for third degree bums because the membranes dissolves by the enzymes present in the wounds

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  11. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes....

  12. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  13. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  14. Composite membrane with integral rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  15. Modal radiation patterns of baffled circular plates and membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    force, which is used as a sound receiver in any medium or as a sound transmitter in a gaseous medium. A general, concise expression is given for the radiation pattern of any mode of the membrane and the plate with arbitrary boundary conditions. Specific solutions are given for the four special cases......The far field velocity potential and radiation pattern of baffled circular plates and membranes are found analytically using the full set of modal velocity profiles derived from the corresponding equation of motion. The derivation is valid for a plate or membrane subjected to an external excitation...... of a plate with clamped, simply supported, and free edge boundary conditions as well as for the membrane. For all non-axisymmetric modes, the velocity potential along the axis of the radiator is found to be strictly zero. In the long wavelength limit, the radiationpattern of all axisymmetric modes approaches...

  16. Membranes obtained from alumina from separation water/oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosas Neto, M.I.; Lira, H.L; Guimaraes, I.O; Franca, K.B.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate by flow test emulsion water/oil a membrane obtained from a crude residue of the alumina industry and see if this membrane is able to filter this emulsion within the limits specified by CONAMA. In this work, tubular membranes composed of the alumina and the residue bentonite clay were produced by extrusion and were sintered at 900, 1000 and 1100 ° C. tangential flow tests were conducted with deionized water and subsequently with an emulsion of water / oil, all done with a pressure of 1.5 bar. The results showed that membranes produced from the crude residue the alumina industry were quite efficient the emulsion's oil removal, reducing the concentration of about 100 ppm in the feed, to below 5ppm and flow rates of around 30L/h.m 2 . (author)

  17. Defining thermostability of membrane proteins by western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Y; Nanekar, R; Jaakola, V-P

    2015-12-01

    Membrane proteins are relatively challenging targets for structural and other biophysical studies. Insufficient expression in various expression systems, inherent flexibility, and instability in the detergents that are required for membrane extraction are the main reasons for this limited success. Therefore, identification of suitable conditions and membrane protein variants that can help stabilize functional protein for extended periods of time is critical for structural studies. Here, we describe a western blot-based assay that simplifies identification of thermostabilizing conditions for membrane proteins. We show successful testing of a variety of parameters such as additive lipids, ligands and detergents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Comparison and analysis of membrane fouling between flocculent sludge membrane bioreactor and granular sludge membrane bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing-Feng

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of inoculating granules on reducing membrane fouling. In order to evaluate the differences in performance between flocculent sludge and aerobic granular sludge in membrane reactors (MBRs, two reactors were run in parallel and various parameters related to membrane fouling were measured. The results indicated that specific resistance to the fouling layer was five times greater than that of mixed liquor sludge in the granular MBR. The floc sludge more easily formed a compact layer on the membrane surface, and increased membrane resistance. Specifically, the floc sludge had a higher moisture content, extracellular polymeric substances concentration, and negative surface charge. In contrast, aerobic granules could improve structural integrity and strength, which contributed to the preferable permeate performance. Therefore, inoculating aerobic granules in a MBR presents an effective method of reducing the membrane fouling associated with floc sludge the perspective of from the morphological characteristics of microbial aggregates.

  19. Tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes results from balanced water-headgroup interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; de Vries, Alex H.; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric; Demé, Bruno; Netz, Roland R.; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-04-01

    Membrane systems that naturally occur as densely packed membrane stacks contain high amounts of glycolipids whose saccharide headgroups display multiple small electric dipoles in the form of hydroxyl groups. Experimentally, the hydration repulsion between glycolipid membranes is of much shorter range than that between zwitterionic phospholipids whose headgroups are dominated by a single large dipole. Using solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, here we reproduce the experimentally observed, different pressure-versus-distance curves of phospholipid and glycolipid membrane stacks and show that the water uptake into the latter is solely driven by the hydrogen bond balance involved in non-ideal water/sugar mixing. Water structuring effects and lipid configurational perturbations, responsible for the longer-range repulsion between phospholipid membranes, are inoperative for the glycolipids. Our results explain the tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes at their swelling limit, which we here determine by neutron diffraction, and their unique interaction characteristics, which are essential for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  20. Thermal curing of PBI membranes for high temperature PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Cleemann, Lars N.; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) has emerged as one of the most promising electrolyte materials for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operating under anhydrous conditions at temperatures of up to 200 °C. The limited long-term durability of the membrane electrode assemblies...... (MEAs) is currently hampering the commercial viability of the technology. In the present study, thermoset PBI membranes were prepared by curing the membranes under inert atmosphere at temperatures of up to 350 °C prior to the acid doping. The systematic membrane characterizations with respect...... to solubility, phosphoric acid doping, radical-oxidative resistance and mechanical strength indicated that the PBI membranes were irreversibly cured by the thermal treatment. After curing, the PBI membranes demonstrated features that are fundamental characteristics of a thermoset resin including complete...

  1. Degradation of Polypropylene Membranes Applied in Membrane Distillation Crystallizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Gryta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies on the resistance to degradation of capillary polypropylene membranes assembled in a membrane crystallizer were performed. The supersaturation state of salt was achieved by evaporation of water from the NaCl saturated solutions using membrane distillation process. A high feed temperature (363 K was used in order to enhance the degradation effects and to shorten the test times. Salt crystallization was carried out by the application of batch or fluidized bed crystallizer. A significant membrane scaling was observed regardless of the method of realized crystallization. The SEM-EDS, DSC, and FTIR methods were used for investigations of polypropylene degradation. The salt crystallization onto the membrane surface accelerated polypropylene degradation. Due to a polymer degradation, the presence of carbonyl groups on the membranes’ surface was identified. Besides the changes in the chemical structure a significant mechanical damage of the membranes, mainly caused by the internal scaling, was also found. As a result, the membranes were severely damaged after 150 h of process operation. A high level of salt rejection was maintained despite damage to the external membrane surface.

  2. Effect of temperature shocks on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.; Satpradit, O.A.; Bentem, van A.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Temmink, B.G.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature is known to influence the biological performance of conventional activated sludge systems. In membrane bioreactors (MBRs), temperature not only affects the bioconversion process but is also shown to have an effect on the membrane performance. Four phenomena are generally reported to

  3. Taming Membranes : Functional Immobilization of Biological Membranes in Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; Mukherjee, Nobina; de Jong, Menno R.; Tans, Sander; Kocer, Armagan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single molecule studies on membrane proteins embedded in their native environment are hampered by the intrinsic difficulty of immobilizing elastic and sensitive biological membranes without interfering with protein activity. Here, we present hydrogels composed of nano-scaled fibers as a generally

  4. How membrane permeation is affected by donor delivery solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Elliott, Russell P

    2012-11-28

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally how the rate and extent of membrane permeation is affected by switching the donor delivery solvent from water to squalane for different permeants and membranes. In a model based on rate-limiting membrane diffusion, we derive explicit equations showing how the permeation extent and rate depend mainly on the membrane-donor and membrane-receiver partition coefficients of the permeant. Permeation results for systems containing all combinations of hydrophilic or hydrophobic donor solvents (aqueous solution or squalane), permeants (caffeine or testosterone) and polymer membranes (cellulose or polydimethylsiloxane) have been measured using a cell with stirred donor and re-circulating receiver compartments and continuous monitoring of the permeant concentration in the receiver phase. Relevant partition coefficients are also determined. Quantitative comparison of model and experimental results for the widely-differing permeation systems successfully enables the systematic elucidation of all possible donor solvent effects in membrane permeation. For the experimental conditions used here, most of the permeation systems are in agreement with the model, demonstrating that the model assumptions are valid. In these cases, the dominant donor solvent effects arise from changes in the relative affinities of the permeant for the donor and receiver solvents and the membrane and are quantitatively predicted using the separately measured partition coefficients. We also show how additional donor solvent effects can arise when switching the donor solvent causes one or more of the model assumptions to be invalid. These effects include a change in rate-limiting step, permeant solution non-ideality and others.

  5. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  6. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  7. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  8. Limits of mass-transfer in parallel plate dialyzers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolev, S.D.; Kolev, Spas D.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The absolute limits of mass transfer across the membrane in a parallel-plate dialyser set by the flow pattern in both channels were determined on the basis of a mathematical model assuming axially dispersed plug flow. The lower limit corresponds to the case of mass transfer under laminar flow

  9. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  11. High-performance nanocomposite membranes realized by efficient molecular sieving with CuBDC nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanqin; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Rong; Bae, Tae-Hyun

    2017-04-11

    Two-dimensional (2-D) CuBDC nanosheets (ns-CuBDC) with high-aspect-ratios were deliberately paired with polymers possessing high free volumes to fabricate high performance gas separation membranes. Owing to the molecular sieving effect of the filler, a small ns-CuBDC loading (2-4 wt%) could significantly improve the CO 2 /CH 4 selectivities of membranes, resulting in performances that surpass the upper bound limit for polymer membranes.

  12. Recovery of [CO2]T from Aqueous Bicarbonate using a Gas Permeable Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-25

    Gabelman, A.; Hwang, S-T. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors . J. Membr. Sci. 1999, 159, 61. 17. Bhave, R. R.; Sirkar, K. K. Gas Permeation and...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--08-9129 Recovery of [CO2]T from Aqueous Bicarbonate using a Gas Permeable Membrane ...17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Recovery of [CO2]T from Aqueous Bicarbonate using a Gas Permeable Membrane Heather D. Willauer, Dennis R. Hardy, M. Kathleen

  13. In-plane resolved in-situ measurements of the membrane resistance in PEFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F.N.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The conductivity of the membrane is a limiting factor for the efficiency and power density of PEFCs. Because this conductivity is strongly dependent on the membrane hydration, water management is an important aspect of PEFC optimisation. Single cell model experiments were made in order to determine the in-plane hydration of a Nafion{sup R} membrane under fuel cell conditions as function of the gas humidities. (author) 4 fig., 3 refs.

  14. Kinetics of structural reorganizations in multilamellarphotosynthetic membranes monitored by small-angle neutronscattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Gergely; Kovacs, Laszlo; Unnep, Renata

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the power of time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments for the investigation of the structure and structural reorganizations of multilamellar photosynthetic membranes. In addition to briefly summarizing our results on thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants...... and in unicellular organisms, we discuss the advantages and technical and methodological limitations of timeresolved SANS. We present a detailed and more systematical investigation of the kinetics of light-induced structural reorganizations in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes, which show how changes...

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  16. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane.

  17. Boron Removal in Radioactive Liquid Waste by Forward Osmosis Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Choi, Hei Min; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon Jeikwon

    2014-01-01

    These wastes contain about 0.3-0.8 wt% boric acid and have been concentrated through an evaporation treatment. Boric acid tends to crystallize owing to its solubility, and to plug the evaporator. The volume reduction obtained through evaporation is limited by the amount of boric acid in the waste. As an emerging technology, forward osmosis (FO) has attracted growing interest in wastewater treatment and desalination. FO is a membrane process in which water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a feed solution of lower osmotic pressure to a draw solution of higher osmotic pressure. However, very few studies on the removal of boron by FO have been performed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility of boron separation in radioactive liquid waste by FO. In this study, the performance of FO was investigated to separate boron in the simulated liquid waste under the factors such as pH, osmotic pressure, ionic strength of the solution, and membrane characteristic. The boron separation in radioactive borate liquid waste was investigated with an FO membrane. When the feed solution containing boron is treated by the FO membrane, the boron permeation depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7, and increases with an increase in the osmotic driving force. The boron flux of the CTA-ES and ALFD membrane orientation is higher than those of the CTA-NW and ALFF orientation, respectively. The boron permeation rate is constant regardless of the osmotic pressure and membrane orientation. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but it is not heavily influenced at a low salt concentration

  18. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane. (paper)

  19. Vacuum membrane distillation of seawater reverse osmosis brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericq, Jean-Pierre; Laborie, Stéphanie; Cabassud, Corinne

    2010-10-01

    Seawater desalination by Reverse Osmosis (RO) is an interesting solution for drinking water production. However, because of limitation by the osmotic pressure, a high recovery factor is not attainable. Consequently, large volumes of brines are discharged into the sea and the flow rate produced (permeate) is limited. In this paper, Vacuum Membrane Distillation (VMD) is considered as a complementary process to RO to further concentrate RO brines and increase the global recovery of the process. VMD is an evaporative technology that uses a membrane to support the liquid-vapour interface and enhance the contact area between liquid and vapour in comparison with conventional distillation. This study focuses on VMD for the treatment of RO brines. Simulations were performed to optimise the operating conditions and were completed by bench-scale experiments using actual RO brines and synthetic solutions up to a salt concentration of 300 g L(-1). Operating conditions such as a highly permeable membrane, high feed temperature, low permeate pressure and a turbulent fluid regime allowed high permeate fluxes to be obtained even for a very high salt concentration (300 g L(-1)). For the membrane studied, temperature and concentration polarisation were shown to have little effect on permeate flux. After 6 to 8 h, no organic fouling or biofouling was observed for RO brines. At high salt concentrations, scaling occurred (mainly due to calcium precipitation) but had only a limited impact on the permeate flux (24% decrease for a permeate specific volume of 43L m(-2) for the highest concentration of salt). Calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitated first due to their low solubility and formed mixed crystal deposits on the membrane surface. These phenomena only occurred on the membrane surface and did not totally cover the pores. The crystals were easily removed simply by washing the membrane with water. A global recovery factor of 89% can be obtained by coupling RO and VMD

  20. Electro-catalytic membrane reactors and the development of bipolar membrane technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Membrane reactors are currently under extensive research and development. Hardly any concept, however, is realized yet in practice. Frequently, forgotten as membrane reactors are electro-catalytic membrane reactors where electrodes perform chemical conversations and membranes separate the locations

  1. Biogenesis of plasma membrane cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A striking feature of the molecular organization of eukaryotic cells is the singular enrichment of their plasma membranes in sterols. The authors studies are directed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying this inhomogeneous disposition. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of plasma membrane cholesterol in intact cells, leaving intracellular cholesterol pools untouched. With this technique, the plasma membrane was shown to contain 95% of the unesterified cholesterol of cultured human fibroblasts. Cholesterol synthesized from [ 3 H] acetate moved to the plasma membrane with a half-time of 1 h at 37 0 C. They used equilibrium gradient centrifugation of homogenates of biosynthetically labeled, cholesterol oxidase treated cells to examine the distribution of newly synthesized sterols among intracellular pools. Surprisingly, lanosterol, a major precursor of cholesterol, and intracellular cholesterol both peaked at much lower buoyant density than did 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. This suggests that cholesterol biosynthesis is not taken to completion in the endoplasmic reticulum. The cholesterol in the buoyant fraction eventually moved to the plasma membrane. Digitonin treatment increased the density of the newly synthesized cholesterol fractions, indicating that nascent cholesterol in transit is associated with cholesterol-rich membranes. The authors are testing the hypothesis that the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis is spatially organized in various intracellular membranes such that the sequence of biosynthetic steps both concentrates the sterol and conveys it to the plasma membrane

  2. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...

  3. Fabrication of green polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2017-06-16

    Provided herein are methods of fabricating membranes using polymers with functionalized groups such as sulfone (e.g., PSf and PES), ether (e.g., PES), acrylonitrile (e.g., PAN), fluoride(e.g., pvdf and other fluoropolymers), and imide (e.g., extem) and ionic liquids. Also provided are membranes made by the provided methods.

  4. Inorganic membranes for pervaporation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekulic, J.; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Luiten, M.W.J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Keizer, Klaas

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of inorganic membranes that will enable broad application of pervaporation/vapour permeation technology in the chemical industry. This can be achieved by improvement of the existing microporous membranes and the development of new types with enhanced

  5. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated...... and the rejection coefficient. The second model is a stationary model for the flux of solvent and solute in a hollow fibre membrane. In the model we solve the time independent equations for transport of solvent and solute within the hollow fibre. Furthermore, the flux of solute and solvent through the membrane...

  6. Membranes and Films from Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on polymeric films and membranes including production methods, special industrial and medical applications, laboratory preparation, and an experimental investigation of a porous cellulose acetate membrane. Presents a demonstration to distinguish between high- and low-density polyethylene. (JM)

  7. Nitrocellulose Membrane: The New Canvas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Jasmin R; Kurien, Bianca A

    2015-01-01

    The use of nitrocellulose membranes for invisible ink-messaging or marking for orientation purposes has been carried out with diluted alkaline phosphatase, followed by development with nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate and chemiluminescence detection systems. Here, we show that nitrocellulose membrane can serve as a canvas for art using alkaline phosphatase and NBT/BCIP detection method.

  8. Gas separation membranes current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Membrane-based gas separation systems are now widely accepted and employed as unit operation in industrial gas, chemical and allied industries. Following their successful commercialization in the late Seventies to recover hydrogen from ammonia purge gas streams, membrane-based systems have gained acceptance in a wide variety of applications

  9. Membranes for Enhanced Emulsification Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güell, Carme; Ferrando, Montse; Schroen, C.G.P.H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of membrane technology for the production of single and double emulsions has been proven feasible for a wide range of systems. The low energy requirements and mild process conditions (shear stress and temperature) of membrane emulsification (ME) compared to conventional processes makes it of

  10. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  11. Physical model for membrane protrusions during spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamaraux, F; Ali, O; Fourcade, B; Keller, S; Bruckert, F

    2008-01-01

    During cell spreading onto a substrate, the kinetics of the contact area is an observable quantity. This paper is concerned with a physical approach to modeling this process in the case of ameboid motility where the membrane detaches itself from the underlying cytoskeleton at the leading edge. The physical model we propose is based on previous reports which highlight that membrane tension regulates cell spreading. Using a phenomenological feedback loop to mimic stress-dependent biochemistry, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be coupled to the stress which builds up at the margin of the contact area between the cell and the substrate. In the limit of small variation of membrane tension, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be written in a closed form. Our analysis defines characteristic lengths which depend on elastic properties of the membrane–cytoskeleton complex, such as the membrane–cytoskeleton interaction, and on molecular parameters, the rate of actin polymerization. We discuss our model in the case of axi-symmetric and non-axi-symmetric spreading and we compute the characteristic time scales as a function of fundamental elastic constants such as the strength of membrane–cytoskeleton adherence

  12. Nanoporous Membrane Immunosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    but not intended to be limited to blood, saliva, ocular lens fluid, cerebral spinal fluid, sweat, urine , milk, ascites fluid, mucous, synovial fluid...but are not intended to be limited to ferritin; creatinine kinase MIß (CK-MTB); digoxin; phenytoin; phenobarbitol; carbamazepine; 10 vancomycin...include tritium (3H), radioactive iodine (1251), radioactive carbon (14C), radioactive phosphorus (32P); or the like. Methods for labeling of 20

  13. Importance of balancing membrane and electrode water in anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omasta, T. J.; Wang, L.; Peng, X.; Lewis, C. A.; Varcoe, J. R.; Mustain, W. E.

    2018-01-01

    Anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFCs) offer several potential advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), most notably to overcome the cost barrier that has slowed the growth and large scale implementation of fuel cells for transportation. However, limitations in performance have held back AEMFCs, specifically in the areas of stability, carbonation, and maximum achievable current and power densities. In order for AEMFCs to contend with PEMFCs for market viability, it is necessary to realize a competitive cell performance. This work demonstrates a new benchmark for a H2/O2 AEMFC with a peak power density of 1.4 W cm-2 at 60 °C. This was accomplished by taking a more precise look at balancing necessary membrane hydration while preventing electrode flooding, which somewhat surprisingly can occur both at the anode and the cathode. Specifically, radiation-grafted ETFE-based anion exchange membranes and anion exchange ionomer powder, functionalized with benchmark benzyltrimethylammonium groups, were utilized to examine the effects of the following parameters on AEMFC performance: feed gas flow rate, the use of hydrophobic vs. hydrophilic gas diffusion layers, and gas feed dew points.

  14. Phosphoric acid distribution in the membrane electrode assembly of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Park, Jung Ock; Yoo, Duck Young; Yi, Jung S.

    2009-01-01

    The ionomer content in electrode is one of the most important parameters for the high performance of fuel cells. The high temperature PEMFC based on phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polymer membrane with unhumidified reactant gases has a difficulty in controlling the liquid state PA ionomer content in electrode. To evaluate the PA content in electrode, the three techniques of cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and acid-base titration (ABT) are carried out in situ or ex situ. The properties of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) such as electrochemical surface area (ESA), ohmic resistance, charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance and the amount of PA in MEA components (anode, cathode and membrane) are extracted by each technique. Ex situ CV with the usage of dry gases has a limitation in assessing the reliable ESA of unhumidified PEMFC. While in situ EIS presents some informative values of resistance and capacitance for understanding the PA distribution in MEA, its sensitivity to the PA content in MEA components needs to be higher for detecting a subtle change in PA distribution. Ex situ ABT supplies a clear PA distribution in MEA at room temperature but does not seem to reflect the operating state well at high temperatures. However, it can be used as a detection tool for the loss of the initial acid content in membrane during a long-term MEA durability study.

  15. Quantification of functional dynamics of membrane proteins reconstituted in nanodiscs membranes by single turnover functional readout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moses, Matias Emil; Hedegård, Per; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool to study the individual behavior of biomolecules, revolutionizing our understanding of biological processes. Their ability to measure the distribution of behaviors, instead of the average behavior, allows the direct observation and quan......Single-molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool to study the individual behavior of biomolecules, revolutionizing our understanding of biological processes. Their ability to measure the distribution of behaviors, instead of the average behavior, allows the direct observation...... and quantification of the activity, abundance, and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out in nonsynchronized ensemble measurements. Studying the function of membrane proteins at the single-molecule level remains a formidable challenge......, and to date there is limited number of available functional assays. In this chapter, we describe in detail our recently developed methodology to reconstitute membrane proteins such as the integral membrane protein cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase on membrane systems such as Nanodiscs and study their functional...

  16. Drug-model membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Usha K.

    1994-01-01

    In the present day world, drugs play a very important role in medicine and it is necessary to understand their mode of action at the molecular level, in order to optimise their use. Studies of drug-biomembrane interactions are essential for gaining such as understanding. However, it would be prohibitively difficult to carry out such studies, since biomembranes are highly complex systems. Hence, model membranes (made up of these lipids which are important components of biomembranes) of varying degrees of complexity are used to investigate drug-membrane interactions. Bio- as well as model-membranes undergo a chain melting transition when heated, the chains being in a disordered state above the transition point, T CM . This transition is of physiological importance since biomembranes select their components such that T CM is less than the ambient temperature but not very much so, so that membrane flexibility is ensured and porosity, avoided. The influence of drugs on the transition gives valuable clues about various parameters such as the location of the drug in the membrane. Deep insights into drug-membrane interactions are obtained by observing the effect of drugs on membrane structure and the mobilities of the various groups in lipids, near T CM . Investigation of such changes have been carried out with several drugs, using techniques such as DSC, XRD and NMR. The results indicate that the drug-membrane interaction not only depends on the nature of drug and lipids but also on the form of the model membrane - stacked bilayer or vesicles. The light that these results shed on the nature of drug-membrane interactions is discussed. (author). 13 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nanoporous Membrane Technologies for Pathogen Collection, Separation, and Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sang W; Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U; Griffin, Matthew T; Fulton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Partial contents: Nanoporous Membranes, Membrane Chemistries, Characterization of Membrane Chemistries,Protein Fouling, Collector,Gas and Liquid Permeabilities, Membrane Permeabilities in the Presence of Water...

  18. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  20. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

  1. Antithrombogenicity of Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated Nano Porous Polyethersulfone (PES Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Miki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A nano porous polyethersulfone (PES membrane is widely used for aspects of nanofiltration, such as purification, fractionation and dialysis. However, the low-blood-compatibility characteristic of PES membrane causes platelets and blood cells to stick to the surface of the membrane and degrades ions diffusion through membrane, which further limits its application for dialysis systems. In this study, we deposited the fluorinated-diamond-like-carbon (F-DLC onto the finger like structure layer of the PES membrane. By doing this, we have the F-DLC films coating the membrane surface without sacrificing the membrane permeability. In addition, we examined antithrombogenicity of the F-DLC/PES membranes using a microfluidic device, and experimentally found that F-DLC drastically reduced the amount of blood cells attached to the surface. We have also conducted long-term experiments for 24 days and the diffusion characteristics were found to be deteriorated due to fouling without any surface modification. On the other hand, the membranes coated by F-DLC film gave a consistent diffusion coefficient of ions transfer through a membrane porous. Therefore, F-DLC films can be a great candidate to improve the antithrombogenic characteristics of the membrane surfaces in hemodialysis systems.

  2. Patterned ion exchange membranes for improved power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-12-01

    Power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells (MRCs) can be limited by the internal resistance of the reverse electrodialysis stack. Typical MRC stacks use non-conductive spacers that block ion transport by the so-called spacer shadow effect. These spacers can be relatively thick compared to the membrane, and thus they increase internal stack resistance due to high solution (ohmic) resistance associated with a thick spacer. New types of patterned anion and cation exchange membranes were developed by casting membranes to create hemispherical protrusions on the membranes, enabling fluid flow between the membranes without the need for a non-conductive spacer. The use of the patterned membrane decreased the MRC stack resistance by ∼22 Ω, resulting in a 38% increase in power density from 2.50 ± 0.04 W m-2 (non-patterned membrane with a non-conductive spacer) to 3.44 ± 0.02 W m-2 (patterned membrane). The COD removal rate, coulombic efficiency, and energy efficiency of the MRC also increased using the patterned membranes compared to the non-patterned membranes. These results demonstrate that these patterned ion exchange membranes can be used to improve performance of an MRC. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antithrombogenicity of Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated Nano Porous Polyethersulfone (PES) Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihandana, Gunawan S.; Sanada, Ippei; Ito, Hikaru; Noborisaka, Mayui; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miki, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    A nano porous polyethersulfone (PES) membrane is widely used for aspects of nanofiltration, such as purification, fractionation and dialysis. However, the low-blood-compatibility characteristic of PES membrane causes platelets and blood cells to stick to the surface of the membrane and degrades ions diffusion through membrane, which further limits its application for dialysis systems. In this study, we deposited the fluorinated-diamond-like-carbon (F-DLC) onto the finger like structure layer of the PES membrane. By doing this, we have the F-DLC films coating the membrane surface without sacrificing the membrane permeability. In addition, we examined antithrombogenicity of the F-DLC/PES membranes using a microfluidic device, and experimentally found that F-DLC drastically reduced the amount of blood cells attached to the surface. We have also conducted long-term experiments for 24 days and the diffusion characteristics were found to be deteriorated due to fouling without any surface modification. On the other hand, the membranes coated by F-DLC film gave a consistent diffusion coefficient of ions transfer through a membrane porous. Therefore, F-DLC films can be a great candidate to improve the antithrombogenic characteristics of the membrane surfaces in hemodialysis systems. PMID:28788333

  4. Universal Behavior of Membranes with Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rowat, Amy C.; Brief, E.

    2006-01-01

    ) is obtained from deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. We compare these results, along with data for membrane-bending rigidity, to explore the relationship between membrane hydrophobic thickness and elastic properties. Together, such diverse approaches demonstrate that membrane properties are affected...

  5. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  6. Ultrasonic Reflectometry for Monitoring the Effect of Pressure on Sludge Fouling of MF Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Kujundzic, Elmira; Greenberg, Alan

    Membrane fouling remains the key limitation for the widespread use of membrane bioreactors (MBR) for wastewater treatment. This constraint has led to an increasing number of studies that examine the influence of various operational parameters and physicochemical properties on fouling layer...

  7. GLIAL CELLS AND COLLAGENS IN EPIRETINAL MEMBRANES ASSOCIATED WITH IDIOPATHIC MACULAR HOLES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Huiskamp, Eveline A.; De Lavalette, Victor W. Renardel; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    Purpose: To investigate the identity of collagens and cellular components in the epiretinal membrane (ERM) associated with full-thickness idiopathic macular hole and their clinical relevance. Methods: Pars plana vitrectomy with the peeling of internal limiting membrane and ERM was performed by 2

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  9. Separation of tritiated water using graphene oxide membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Motkuri, Radha K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gotthold, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frost, Anthony P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bratton, Wesley [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-28

    In future nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and possibly for nuclear power plants, the cleanup of tritiated water will be needed for hundreds of thousands of gallons of water with low activities of tritium. This cleanup concept utilizes graphene oxide laminar membranes (GOx) for the separation of low-concentration (10-3-10 µCi/g) tritiated water to create water that can be released to the environment and a much smaller waste stream with higher tritium concentrations. Graphene oxide membranes consist of hierarchically stacked, overlapping molecular layers and represent a new class of materials. A permeation rate test was performed with a 2-µm-thick cast Asbury membrane using mixed gas permeability testing with zero air (highly purified atmosphere) and with air humidified with either H2O or D2O to a nominal 50% relative humidity. The membrane permeability for both H2O and D2O was high with N2 and O2 at the system measurement limit. The membrane water permeation rate was compared to a Nafion® membrane and the GOx permeation was approximately twice as high at room temperature. The H2O vapor permeation rate was 5.9 × 102 cc/m2/min (1.2 × 10-6 g/min-cm2), which is typical for graphene oxide membranes. To demonstrate the feasibility of such isotopic water separation through GOX laminar membranes, an experimental setup was constructed to use pressure-driven separation by heating the isotopic water mixture at one side of the membrane to create steam while cooling the other side. Several membranes were tested and were prepared using different starting materials and by different pretreatment methods. The average separation result was 0.8 for deuterium and 0.6 for tritium. Higher or lower temperatures may also improve separation efficiency but neither has been tested yet. A rough estimate of cost compared to current technology was also included as an indication of potential viability of the process. The relative process costs were based on the rough size of facility to

  10. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  11. Removal of Brettanomyces bruxellensis from red wine using membrane filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    While sulfites help limit growth of the spoilage yeast, Brettanomyces, SO2 has been reported to decrease cell size, thereby potentially decreasing the porosities of filtration membranes required for removal. B. bruxellensis strains B1b and F3 were inoculated into red wines and after 12 days, half th...

  12. Activated sludge filterability and full-scale membrane bioreactor operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeminski, P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite continuous developments in the field of MBR technology, membrane fouling together with the associated energy demand and related costs issues remain major challenges. The efficiency of the filtration process in an MBR is governed by the activated sludge filterability, which is still limitedly

  13. Recording membrane potential changes through photoacoustic voltage sensitive dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Jeeun; Yan, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of the membrane potential is possible using voltage sensitive dyes (VSD), where fluorescence intensity changes in response to neuronal electrical activity. However, fluorescence imaging is limited by depth of penetration and high scattering losses, which leads to low sensitivity in viv...

  14. The defouling of membranes using polymer beads containing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-12

    Oct 12, 2010 ... steel part of the plant to the cell using 1 000 kPa flexible pipes and very convenient snap-in connections. Therefore this system limited the testing to low pressure membranes, designed for brackish water. In this plant the pressure was measured at the input of the cell and the flow rate after the throttling valve ...

  15. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recently discovered that invadopodia breach basement membrane during anchor cell invasion in C. elegans, a genetically and visually tractable in vivo invasion event. Further, we found that the netrin receptor DCC localizes to the initial site of basement membrane breach and directs invasion through a single gap in the matrix. In this commentary, we examine how the dynamics and structure of AC-invadopodia compare with in vitro invadopodia and how the netrin receptor guides invasion through a single basement membrane breach. We end with a discussion of our surprising result that the anchor cell pushes the basement membrane aside, instead of completely dissolving it through proteolysis, and provide some ideas for how proteases and physical displacement may work together to ensure efficient and robust invasion. PMID:24778942

  16. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  17. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  18. Ultrastructure of Reissner's membrane in the rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K.; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit......Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit...

  19. Isolation of plasma membrane-associated membranes from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Jan M; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Duszynski, Jerzy; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic interplay between intracellular organelles requires a particular functional apposition of membrane structures. The organelles involved come into close contact, but do not fuse, thereby giving rise to notable microdomains; these microdomains allow rapid communication between the organelles. Plasma membrane-associated membranes (PAMs), which are microdomains of the plasma membrane (PM) interacting with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, are dynamic structures that mediate transport of proteins, lipids, ions and metabolites. These structures have gained much interest lately owing to their roles in many crucial cellular processes. Here we provide an optimized protocol for the isolation of PAM, PM and ER fractions from rat liver that is based on a series of differential centrifugations, followed by the fractionation of crude PM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The procedure requires ∼8-10 h, and it can be easily modified and adapted to other tissues and cell types.

  20. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    -like dependence D ∝ 1/R. We propose that this 1/R law mainly arises due to geometrical factors: smaller proteins are able to avoid confinement effects much better than their larger counterparts. The results highlight that the lateral dynamics in the crowded setting found in native membranes is radically different......The lateral diffusion of embedded proteins along lipid membranes in protein-poor conditions has been successfully described in terms of the Saffman-Delbrück (SD) model, which predicts that the protein diffusion coefficient D is weakly dependent on its radius R as D ∝ ln(1/R). However, instead...... of being protein-poor, native cell membranes are extremely crowded with proteins. On the basis of extensive molecular simulations, we here demonstrate that protein crowding of the membrane at physiological levels leads to deviations from the SD relation and to the emergence of a stronger Stokes...

  1. Towards Enhanced Gas Sensor Performance with Fluoropolymer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Graunke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on how to increase the selectivity of gas sensors by using fluoropolymer membranes. The mass transport of polar and non-polar gases through a polymer membrane matrix was studied by systematic selection of polymers with different degrees of fluorination, as well as polymers whose monomers have ether groups (-O- in addition to fluorine groups (-F. For the study, a set of application-relevant gases including H2, CO, CO2, NO2, methane, ethanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde as well as various concentrations of relative humidity were used. These gases have different functional groups and polarities, yet have a similar kinetic diameter and are therefore typically difficult to separate. The concentrations of the gases were chosen according to international indicative limit values (TWA, STEL. To measure the concentration in the feed and permeate, we used tin-dioxide-based metal oxide gas sensors with palladium catalyst (SnO2:Pd, catalytic sensors (also SnO2:Pd-based and thermal conductivity sensors. This allows a close examination of the interdependence of diffusion and physicochemical operating principle of the sensor. Our goal is to increase the selectivity of gas sensors by using inexpensive fluoropolymer membranes. The measurements showed that through membranes with low polarity, preferably non-polar gases are transported. Furthermore, the degree of crystallization influences the permeability and selectivity of a polymer membrane. Basically the polar polymers showed a higher permeability to water vapor and polar substances than non-polar polymer membranes.

  2. Membrane-initiated actions of estrogens in neuroendocrinology: emerging principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Nandini; Pfaff, Donald W

    2007-02-01

    Hormonal ligands for the nuclear receptor superfamily have at least two interacting mechanisms of action: 1) classical transcriptional regulation of target genes (genomic mechanisms); and 2) nongenomic actions that are initiated at the cell membrane, which could impact transcription. Although transcriptional mechanisms are increasingly well understood, membrane-initiated actions of these ligands are incompletely understood. Historically, this has led to a considerable divergence of thought in the molecular endocrine field. We have attempted to uncover principles of hormone action that are relevant to membrane-initiated actions of estrogens. There is evidence that the membrane-limited actions of hormones, particularly estrogens, involve the rapid activation of kinases and the release of calcium. Membrane actions of estrogens, which activate these rapid signaling cascades, can also potentiate nuclear transcription. These signaling cascades may occur in parallel or in series but subsequently converge at the level of modification of transcriptionally relevant molecules such as nuclear receptors and/or coactivators. In addition, other hormones or neurotransmitters may also activate cascades to crosstalk with estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The idea of synergistic coupling between membrane-initiated and genomic actions of hormones fundamentally revises the paradigms of cell signaling in neuroendocrinology.

  3. Membrane-based seawater desalination: Present and future prospects

    KAUST Repository

    Amy, Gary L.

    2016-10-20

    Given increasing regional water scarcity and that almost half of the world\\'s population lives within 100 km of an ocean, seawater represents a virtually infinite water resource. However, its exploitation is presently limited by the significant specific energy consumption (kWh/m) required by conventional desalination technologies, further exasperated by high unit costs ($/m) and environmental impacts including GHG emissions (g CO-eq/m), organism impingement/entrainment through intakes, and brine disposal through outfalls. This paper explores the state-of-the-art in present seawater desalination practice, emphasizing membrane-based technologies, while identifying future opportunities in step improvements to conventional technologies and development of emerging, potentially disruptive, technologies through advances in material science, process engineering, and system integration. In this paper, seawater reverse osmosis (RO) serves as the baseline conventional technology. The discussion extends beyond desalting processes into membrane-based salinity gradient energy production processes, which can provide an energy offset to desalination process energy requirements. The future membrane landscape in membrane-based desalination and salinity gradient energy is projected to include ultrahigh permeability RO membranes, renewable-energy driven desalination, and emerging processes including closed-circuit RO, membrane distillation, forward osmosis, pressure retarded osmosis, and reverse electrodialysis according various niche applications and/or hybrids, operating separately or in conjunction with RO.

  4. Efficiency and temperature dependence of water removal by membrane dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, K. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The vapor pressure of water in equilibrium with sorption sites within a Nafion membrane is given by log P(WN) = -3580/T + 10.01, where P(WN) is expressed in Torr and T is the membrane temperature, in kelvin. The efficiency of dryers based on selective permeation of water through Nafion can thus be enhanced by cooling the membrane. Residual water in effluents exceeds equilibrium levels if insufficient time is allowed for water to diffuse to the membrane surface as gas passes through the dryer. For tubular configurations, this limitation can be avoided if L > or = Fc(10(3.8)/120 pi D), where L is the length of the tubular membrane, in centimeters, Fc is the gas flow rate, in mL/ min, and D is the diffusion coefficient for water in the carrier gas at the operating temperature of the dryer, in cm2/s. An efficient dryer that at room temperature dries gas to a dew point of -61 degrees C is described; the same dryer maintained at 0 degrees C yields a dew point of -80 degrees C and removes water as effectively as Mg(ClO4)2 or a dry ice/acetone slush. The use of Nafion membranes to construct devices capable of delivering gas streams with low but precisely controlled humidities is discussed.

  5. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  6. Development of silica RO membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ayumi; Kawamoto, Takashi; Matsuyama, Emi; Utsumi, Keisuke; Nomura, Mikihiro; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Silica based membranes have been developed by using a counter diffusion CVD method. Effects of alkyl groups in the silica precursors and deposition temperatures had investigated in order to control pore sizes of the silica membranes. In this study, this type of a silica membrane was applied for RO separation. Effects of silica sources, deposition temperatures and post treatments had been investigated. Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Ethyltrimethoxysilane (ETMOS) and Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMOS) were used as silica precursors. A counter diffusion CVD method was carried out for 90 min at 270 - 600degC on γ-alumina capillary substrates (effective length: 50 mm, φ: 4 nm: NOK Co.). O 3 or O 2 was introduced into the inside of the substrate at the O 2 rate of 0.2 L min -1 . Ion beam irradiation was carried out for a post treatment using Os at 490 MeV for 1.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 or 3.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 . Single gas permeance was measured by using H 2 , N 2 and SF 6 . RO tests were employed at 3.0 or 5.4 MPa for 100 mg L -1 of feed NaCl solution. First, effects of the silica sources were investigated. The total fluxes increased by increasing N 2 permeance through the silica membrane deposited by ETMOS. The maximum NaCl rejection was 28.2% at 12.2 kg m -2 h -1 of the total flux through the membrane deposited at 270degC. N 2 permeance was 9.6 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 . While, total fluxes through the membrane deposited by using PhTMOS were smaller than those through the ETMOS membranes. The phenyl groups for the PhTMOS membrane must be important for the hydrophobic properties through the membrane. Next, effects of ion beam irradiation were tested for the TMOS membranes. Water is difficult to permeate through the TMOS membranes due to the low N 2 permeance through the membrane (3.1 x 10 -11 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 ). N 2 permeance increased to 7.3 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 by the irradiation. Irradiation amounts had little effects on N 2 permeance. However, NaCl rejections

  7. SiO2/polyacrylonitrile membranes via centrifugal spinning as a separator for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem; Lu, Yao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal spinning is a fast, cost-effective and safe alternative to the electrospinning technique, which is commonly used for making fiber-based separator membranes. In this work, SiO2/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes were produced by using centrifugal spinning and they were characterized by using different electrochemical techniques for use as separators in Li-ion batteries. SiO2/PAN membranes exhibited good wettability and high ionic conductivity due to their highly porous fibrous structure. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN membrane separators were assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells and these cells delivered high capacities and exhibited good cycling performance at room temperature. In addition, cells using SiO2/PAN membranes showed superior C-rate performance compared to those using microporous PP membrane.

  8. Nitrogen dioxide solubility and permeation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Santiago; Möller, Matías N; Coitiño, E Laura; Denicola, Ana

    2011-08-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (()NO(2)) is an important oxidant molecule in biology that is produced by several biological processes, and it is also an important air pollutant. It can oxidize proteins and lipids with important consequences on their biological functions. Despite its relevance, the interaction of ()NO(2) with the cell barrier, the lipid membrane, is poorly understood. For instance, can lipid membranes limit ()NO(2) diffusion? To estimate the permeability of lipid membranes to ()NO(2) it is necessary to learn more about its solubility in the lipid phase. However, experimental data on ()NO(2) solubility is very limited. To improve our knowledge on this matter, we used a mixed approach consisting in calculating the solubility of ()NO(2) and related diatomic and triatomic gases (()NO, O(2), CO(2), etc.) in different solvents using quantum calculations and Tomasi's Polarizable Continuum Model and validating and correcting these results using experimental data available for the related gases. This approach led to an estimated partition coefficient for ()NO(2) of 2.7 between n-octanol and water, and 1.5 between lipid membranes and water, meaning that ()NO(2) is a moderately hydrophobic molecule (less than ()NO, more than CO(2)). Based on the solubility-diffusion permeability theory, the permeability coefficient was estimated to be 5 cms(-1), up to 4000 times higher than that of peroxynitrous acid. It is concluded that lipid membranes are not significant barriers to ()NO(2) transport. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Control of recoil losses in nanomechanical SiN membrane resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrielli, A.; Marconi, L.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Pandraud, G.; Pontin, A.; Prodi, G. A.; Sarro, P. M.; Serra, E.; Bonaldi, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of a recoil damping analysis, we have designed and produced a membrane resonator equipped with a specific on-chip structure working as a "loss shield" for a circular membrane. In this device the vibrations of the membrane, with a quality factor of 107, reach the limit set by the intrinsic dissipation in silicon nitride, for all the modes and regardless of the modal shape, also at low frequency. Guided by our theoretical model of the loss shield, we describe the design rationale of the device, which can be used as effective replacement of commercial membrane resonators in advanced optomechanical setups, also at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Membrane fluidity in the presence of membrane-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Arf proteins are GTP-ases that participate in vesicle trafficking inside cells. They are able to interact with membranes through their N-terminus when they are bound to GTP, and they detach from the membrane when GTP is hydrolyzed. The N-terminus of Arf1 (amino acids 2-17) folds into an amphipathic helix that can insert into lipid bilayers. Arf1 is also myristoylated; it has myristic acid, a 14-carbon fatty acid `tail', attached to it. We set out to test the hypothesis that the binding of the myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 to lipid membranes changes the mechanical properties of the membrane, in ways that myristic acid alone or amphipathic peptides alone do not. We use three reporter molecules embedded in vesicles, whose fluorescence emission spectrum depends on the properties of the environment in which they are found, to measure three distinct aspects of membrane fluidity: Bispyrene is sensitive to lateral motion along the membrane, Prodan's emission gives a measure of the packing of the head groups, and DPH polarization reflects the packing of the hydrophobic tails. We will present effects found for four molecules (myristic acid, myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and the ALPS domain of KES) in a concentration-dependent manner, and discuss the importance of these results in the vesicle-trafficking picture.

  11. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  12. The Role of Ion Exchange Membranes in Membrane Capacitive Deionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanvand, Armineh; Wei, Kajia; Talebi, Sahar; Chen, George Q; Kentish, Sandra E

    2017-09-14

    Ion-exchange membranes (IEMs) are unique in combining the electrochemical properties of ion exchange resins and the permeability of a membrane. They are being used widely to treat industrial effluents, and in seawater and brackish water desalination. Membrane Capacitive Deionisation (MCDI) is an emerging, energy efficient technology for brackish water desalination in which these ion-exchange membranes act as selective gates allowing the transport of counter-ions toward carbon electrodes. This article provides a summary of recent developments in the preparation, characterization, and performance of ion exchange membranes in the MCDI field. In some parts of this review, the most relevant literature in the area of electrodialysis (ED) is also discussed to better elucidate the role of the ion exchange membranes. We conclude that more work is required to better define the desalination performance of the proposed novel materials and cell designs for MCDI in treating a wide range of feed waters. The extent of fouling, the development of cleaning strategies, and further techno-economic studies, will add value to this emerging technique.

  13. Omniphobic Hollow-Fiber Membranes for Vacuum Membrane Distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang Jia; Zuo, Jian; Chang, Jian; Kuan, Hong Nan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2018-04-03

    Management of produced water from shale gas production is a global challenge. Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is considered a promising solution because of its various advantages. However, low-surface-tension species in produced water can easily deposit on the membrane surface and cause severe fouling or wetting problems. To solve the problems, an omniphobic polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber membrane has been developed via silica nanoparticle deposition followed by a Teflon AF 2400 coating in this study. The resultant membrane shows good repellency toward various liquids with different surface tensions and chemistries, including water, ethylene glycol (EG), cooking oil, and ethanol. It also exhibits stable performance in 7 h VMD tests with a feed solution containing up to 0.6 mM of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In addition, the effects of surface energy and surface morphology as well as nanoparticle size on membrane omniphobicity have been systematically investigated. This work may provide valuable guidance to molecularly design omniphobic VMD membranes for produced water treatment.

  14. The Tat System for Membrane Translocation of Folded Proteins Recruits the Membrane-stabilizing Psp Machinery in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tat systems transport folded proteins across energized membranes of bacteria, archaea, and plant plastids. In Escherichia coli, TatBC complexes recognize the transported proteins, and TatA complexes are recruited to facilitate transport. We achieved an abstraction of TatA from membranes without use of detergents and observed a co-purification of PspA, a membrane-stress response protein. The N-terminal transmembrane domain of TatA was required for the interaction. Electron microscopy displayed TatA complexes in direct contact with PspA. PspB and PspC were important for the TatA-PspA contact. The activator protein PspF was not involved in the PspA-TatA interaction, demonstrating that basal levels of PspA already interact with TatA. Elevated TatA levels caused membrane stress that induced a strictly PspBC- and PspF-dependent up-regulation of PspA. TatA complexes were found to destabilize membranes under these conditions. At native TatA levels, PspA deficiency clearly affected anaerobic TMAO respiratory growth, suggesting that energetic costs for transport of large Tat substrates such as TMAO reductase can become growth limiting in the absence of PspA. The physiological role of PspA recruitment to TatA may therefore be the control of membrane stress at active translocons. PMID:22689583

  15. Next-generation outer membrane vesicle vaccines from concept to clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterbeemd, van de B.

    2013-01-01

    Only vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV) have successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemics. The OMV vaccines, however, provide limited coverage and are difficult to produce. This is caused by an obligatory detergent treatment, which removes lipopolysaccharide

  16. The earliest ion channels in protocellular membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijajlovic, Milan; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Wei, Chenyu

    Cellular membranes with their hydrophobic interior are virtually impermeable to ions. Bulk of ion transport through them is enabled through ion channels. Ion channels of contemporary cells are complex protein molecules which span the membrane creating a cylindrical pore filled with water. Protocells, which are widely regarded as precursors to modern cells, had similarly impermeable membranes, but the set of proteins in their disposal was much simpler and more limited. We have been, therefore, exploring an idea that the first ion channels in protocellular membranes were formed by much smaller peptide molecules that could spontaneously self-assemble into short-lived cylindrical bundles in a membrane. Earlier studies have shown that a group of peptides known as peptaibols is capable of forming ion channels in lipid bilayers when they are exposed to an electric field. Peptaibols are small, non-genetically encoded peptides produced by some fungi as a part of their system of defense against bacteria. They are usually only 14-20 residues long, which is just enough to span the membrane. Their sequence is characterized by the presence of non-standard amino acids which, interestingly, are also expected to have existed on the early earth. In particular, the presence of 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) gives peptaibols strong helix forming propensities. Association of the helices inside membranes leads to the formation of cylindrical bundles, typically containing 4 to 10 monomers. Although peptaibols are excellent candidates for models of the earliest ion channels their struc-tures, which are stabilized only by van der Waals forces and occasional hydrogen bonds between neighboring helices, are not very stable. Although it might properly reflect protobiological real-ity, it is also a major obstacle in studying channel behavior. For this reason we focused on two members of the peptaibol family, trichotoxin and antiamoebin, which are characterized by a single conductance level. This

  17. The Earliest Ion Channels in Protocellular Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijajlovic, Milan; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Wei, Chenyu

    2010-01-01

    Cellular membranes with their hydrophobic interior are virtually impermeable to ions. Bulk of ion transport through them is enabled through ion channels. Ion channels of contemporary cells are complex protein molecules which span the membrane creating a cylindrical pore filled with water. Protocells, which are widely regarded as precursors to modern cells, had similarly impermeable membranes, but the set of proteins in their disposal was much simpler and more limited. We have been, therefore, exploring an idea that the first ion channels in protocellular membranes were formed by much smaller peptide molecules that could spontaneously selfassemble into short-lived cylindrical bundles in a membrane. Earlier studies have shown that a group of peptides known as peptaibols is capable of forming ion channels in lipid bilayers when they are exposed to an electric field. Peptaibols are small, non-genetically encoded peptides produced by some fungi as a part of their system of defense against bacteria. They are usually only 14-20 residues long, which is just enough to span the membrane. Their sequence is characterized by the presence of non-standard amino acids which, interestingly, are also expected to have existed on the early earth. In particular, the presence of 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) gives peptaibols strong helix forming propensities. Association of the helices inside membranes leads to the formation of cylindrical bundles, typically containing 4 to 10 monomers. Although peptaibols are excellent candidates for models of the earliest ion channels their structures, which are stabilized only by van der Waals forces and occasional hydrogen bonds between neighboring helices, are not very stable. Although it might properly reflect protobiological reality, it is also a major obstacle in studying channel behavior. For this reason we focused on two members of the peptaibol family, trichotoxin and antiamoebin, which are characterized by a single conductance level. This

  18. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of

  19. Characterization of polyacrylonitrile ultrafiltration membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germic, J.; Germic, J.; Ebert, K.; Ebert, K.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Borneman, Zandrie; Mulder, M.H.V.; Strathmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    Various methods have been used to characterize ultrafiltration membranes, such as gas flux measurements, (field emission) scanning electron microscopy, permporometry and liquid-liquid displacement. Significant differences in the pore size distributions determined from permporometry and liquid-liquid

  20. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    hemophagocytic syndrome) and metabolic (diabe- tes) disorders [2, 23, 33]. Mutations in the genes of the basic secretory protein machinery lead to a number of membrane trafficking diseases such as Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, Cohen.

  1. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  2. Renewable energy powered membrane technology. 1. Development and characterization of a photovoltaic hybrid membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, A I; Broeckmann, A; Richards, B S

    2007-02-01

    In isolated communities where potable water sources as well as energy grids are limited or nonexistent, treating brackish groundwater aquifers with small-scale desalination systems can be a viable alternative to existing water infrastructures. Given the unavailability of power in many such situations, renewable energy is an obvious solution to power such systems. However, renewable energy is an intermittent power supply and with regards to the performance of intermittently operated desalination systems, only very limited experience exists, both with regards to efficiency as well as water quality. In this paper, this lack of knowledge is addressed by evaluating a system operated with varying parameters (pressure and flow) with constant power as a step toward defining a safe operating window, and they provide a basis for interpreting future data obtained with a renewable energy source. Field trials were performed on a brackish (5300 mg/L TDS; 8290 microS/cm) bore in Central Australia with a photovoltaic-powered membrane filtration (PV-membrane) system. Four nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes (BW30, ESPA4, NF90, TFC-S) and a number of operation parameter combinations (transmembrane pressure, feed flow, TFC-S) and operating parameters transmembrane pressure and feed flow were investigated to find the best operating conditions for maximum drinking water production and minimum specific energy consumption (SEC). The ESPA4 membrane performed best for this brackish source, producing 250 L/h of excellent drinking water (257 mg/L TDS; 400 microS/ cm) at an SEC of 1.2 kWh/m3. The issue of brine disposal or reuse is also discussed and the article compares the salinity of the produced brine with livestock water. Since the feedwater is disinfected physically using ultrafiltration (UF), the brine is free from bacteria and most viruses and hence can be seen more as a reusable product stream than a waste stream with a disposal problem.

  3. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Hou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed.

  4. Static and Dynamic Membrane Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While originally P systems were defined to contain multiset rewriting rules, it turned out that considering different types of rules may produce important results, such as increasing the computational power of the rules. This paper focuses on factoring out the concept of a membrane structure out of various P system models with the goal of providing useful formalisations. Both static and dynamic membrane structures are considered.

  5. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Nicholas P [Palo Alto, CA; Fulton, Donald A [Fairfield, CA

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  6. Hybrid membranes for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, S. S.; Shashkina, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    Fuel cells are a very efficient, reliable, durable, and environmentally friendly energy source. Membranes for fuel cells were developed based on nitrogen-containing high-molecular compounds and organic–inorganic composites. Their electrical conductivities were measured. The influence of a silicon block of composites on the proton exchange properties of membranes was proved.The comparative characterization of the studied materials was performed.

  7. Biofouling in capillary and spiral wound membranes facilitated by marine algal bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villacorte, L.O.; Ekowati, Y.; Calix-Ponce, H.N.

    2017-01-01

    tends to adhere to clean membranes and even more strongly to AOM-fouled membranes. Batch growth tests illustrate that the capacity of seawater to support bacterial growth can significantly increase with AOM concentration. Biofouling experiments with spiral wound and capillary membranes illustrate...... that when nutrients availability are not limited in the feed water, a high concentration of AOM – whether in suspension or attached to the membrane – can substantially accelerates biofouling. A significantly lower biofouling rate was observed on membranes exposed to feed water spiked only with AOM or easily...... biodegradable nutrients. The abovementioned findings indicate that AOM facilitates the onset of membrane biofouling primarily as a conditioning platform and to some extent as a nutrient source for biofilm-forming bacteria....

  8. Neonatal and pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in developing Latin American countries

    OpenAIRE

    Kattan, Javier; González, Álvaro; Castillo, Andrés; Caneo, Luiz Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To review the principles of neonatal‐pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy, prognosis, and its establishment in limited resource‐limited countries in Latino America. Sources: The PubMed database was explored from 1985 up to the present, selecting from highly‐indexed and leading Latin American journals, and Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reports. Summary of the findings: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation provides “time” for pulmonary and cardiac res...

  9. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... to diffuse through the membrane into the mass spectrometer in a few seconds. In this fashion we could completely separate many similar volatile compounds, for example toluene from xylene and trichloroethene from tetrachloroethene. Typical detection limits were at low or sub-nanogram levels, the dynamic range...

  10. Membrane re-modelling by BAR domain superfamily proteins via molecular and non-molecular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tamako; Morone, Nobuhiro; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2018-03-14

    Lipid membranes are structural components of cell surfaces and intracellular organelles. Alterations in lipid membrane shape are accompanied by numerous cellular functions, including endocytosis, intracellular transport, and cell migration. Proteins containing Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains (BAR proteins) are unique, because their structures correspond to the membrane curvature, that is, the shape of the lipid membrane. BAR proteins present at high concentration determine the shape of the membrane, because BAR domain oligomers function as scaffolds that mould the membrane. BAR proteins co-operate with various molecular and non-molecular factors. The molecular factors include cytoskeletal proteins such as the regulators of actin filaments and the membrane scission protein dynamin. Lipid composition, including saturated or unsaturated fatty acid tails of phospholipids, also affects the ability of BAR proteins to mould the membrane. Non-molecular factors include the external physical forces applied to the membrane, such as tension and friction. In this mini-review, we will discuss how the BAR proteins orchestrate membrane dynamics together with various molecular and non-molecular factors. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Biofouling in capillary and spiral wound membranes facilitated by marine algal bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2017-10-11

    Algal-derived organic matter (AOM), particularly transparent exopolymer particles, has been suspected to facilitate biofilm development in membrane systems (e.g., seawater reverse osmosis). This study demonstrates the possible role of AOM on biofouling in membrane systems affected by marine algal blooms. The tendency of AOM from bloom-forming marine algae to adhere to membranes and its ability to enhance biofilm growth were measured using atomic force microscopy, flow cytometry, liquid chromatography and accelerated membrane biofouling experiments. Adhesion force measurements indicate that AOM tends to adhere to clean membranes and even more strongly to AOM-fouled membranes. Batch growth tests illustrate that the capacity of seawater to support bacterial growth can significantly increase with AOM concentration. Biofouling experiments with spiral wound and capillary membranes illustrate that when nutrients availability are not limited in the feed water, a high concentration of AOM – whether in suspension or attached to the membrane – can substantially accelerates biofouling. A significantly lower biofouling rate was observed on membranes exposed to feed water spiked only with AOM or easily biodegradable nutrients. The abovementioned findings indicate that AOM facilitates the onset of membrane biofouling primarily as a conditioning platform and to some extent as a nutrient source for biofilm-forming bacteria.

  12. Membrane structure in disease and drug therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmer, G

    2000-01-01

    ...) interaction with membranous transport systems (opening or closing of ion or substrate channels); (2) reaction with receptors; (3) activation or inhibition of membrane enzymes; or (4) cytosolic membranous signaling and exchange. These consequences within the membrane influence intracellular wellbeing: life is possible only if a bala...

  13. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  14. Nanomaterial-enabled membranes for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogensues, Adam Roy

    Incorporating engineered nanomaterials as components of synthetic membranes can improve their separation performance and endow membranes with additional functions. This work explores two approaches to the design of membranes modified with nanomaterials. In the first chapter, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) decorated with gold nanoparticles were embedded in a polysulfone matrix to fabricate phase inversion nanocomposite membranes. The cast membranes were evaluated as flow-through membrane reactors in experiments on the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The nanocomposite membranes were not as catalytically efficient as those fabricated by modifying anodized alumina membranes polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) containing gold nanoparticles. However, because of the facility of membrane casting by phase inversion and new opportunities enabled by the demonstrated hierarchy-based approach to nanocomposite membrane design, such membrane may hold commercial promise. In the second part of the study, the practicability of PEM-based nanofiltration was evaluated under conditions of precipitative fouling (i.e. scaling) by calcium sulfate. Polyelectrolytes were deposited onto 50 kDa polyethersulfone membranes to create PEM-based nanofiltration membranes. The prepared membranes were compared with the commercial NF270 membrane in terms of flux and rejection performance, as well as the morphology of gypsum crystals formed on the membrane surface. None of the PEM coatings tested inhibited scale formation.

  15. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  16. Inflation and Failure of Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Neergaard, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    We consider the inflation of an axisymmetric polymeric membrane.Some membranes composed of viscoelastic materialsdescribed by a Mooney-Rivlin model show a monotone increasingpressure during inflation. These materialsdevelop a homogeneous membrane thickness in agreement with the Considere...... is found to stabilize the inflated polymer membrane....

  17. VT Limited Access Highways

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — A limited-access road, known by various terms worldwide, including limited-access highway, dual carriageway, expressway, and partial controlled access highway, is a...

  18. Membrane properties for permeability testing: Skin versus synthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anika; Dorrani, Mania; Goodyear, Benjamin; Joshi, Vivek; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2018-03-25

    Synthetic membranes that are utilized in diffusion studies for topical and transdermal formulations are usually porous thin polymeric sheets for example cellulose acetate (CA) and polysulfones. In this study, the permeability of human skin was compared using two synthetic membranes: cellulose acetate and Strat-M® membrane and lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds either as saturated or formulated solutions as well as marketed dosage forms. Our data suggests that hydrophilic compounds have higher permeation in Strat-M membranes compared with lipophilic ones. High variation in permeability values, a typical property of biological membranes, was not observed with Strat-M. In addition, the permeability of Strat-M was closer to that of human skin than that of cellulose acetate (CA > Strat-M > Human skin). Our results suggest that Strat-M with little or no lot to lot variability can be applied in pilot studies of diffusion tests instead of human skin and is a better substitute than a cellulose acetate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of compression reinforcement in reinforced concrete membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Silva

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to design membrane elements of concrete with orthogonal mesh of reinforcement which are subject to compressive stress. Design methods, in general, define how to quantify the reinforcement necessary to support the tension stress and verify if the compression in concrete is within the strength limit. In case the compression in membrane is excessive, it is possible to use reinforcements subject to compression. However, there is not much information in the literature about how to design reinforcement for these cases. For that, this paper presents a procedure which uses the model based on Baumann's [1] criteria. The strength limits used herein are those recommended by CEB [3], however, a model is proposed in which this limit varies according to the tensile strain which occur perpendicular to compression. This resistance model is based on concepts proposed by Vecchio e Collins [2].

  20. Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor for Acid Gas Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiqotul Himma, Nurul; Gede Wenten, I.

    2017-07-01

    Gas-liquid membrane contactor has gained a great attention as an alternative to conventional absorption columns in acid gas removal from natural gas or post-combustion. The membrane contactor offers high mass transfer area and excellent operational flexibility. However, hydrophobic microporous membranes commonly used are still susceptible to wetting by liquid absorbents, leading to the deterioration of absorption performance in long-term operation. Therefore, many studies were recently directed to improve the membrane wetting resistant by endowing superhydrophobicity. This article then presents a review on superhydrophobic membrane development and its application for acid gas removal using membrane contactor. An overview of gas-liquid membrane contactor is firstly presented, followed by the preparation of superhydrophobic membranes. The performances of superhydrophobic membranes in acid gas absorption are then discussed, and the recommendation for future research is finally outlined. This review may provide an insight into the further development of superhydrophobic membrane contactor.