WorldWideScience

Sample records for meeting chlamydomonas annotation

  1. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual

  2. Annotating Emotions in Meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.

    We present the results of two trials testing procedures for the annotation of emotion and mental state of the AMI corpus. The first procedure is an adaptation of the FeelTrace method, focusing on a continuous labelling of emotion dimensions. The second method is centered around more discrete

  3. Annotating and measuring meeting behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; Grieco, F; Loijens, L.W.S.; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Within the AMI (Augmented Multi-party Interaction) project technologies will be developed that can facilitate human interaction in the context of instrumented meeting rooms, which includes remote participant support and the possibility to browse through past meetings. The project collects data on

  4. Annotating State of Mind in Meeting Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Reidsma, Dennis; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; Devillers, L.; Martin, J-C.; Cowie, R.; Batliner, A.

    We discuss the annotation procedure for mental state and emotion that is under development for the AMI (Augmented Multiparty Interaction) corpus. The categories that were found to be most appropriate relate not only to emotions but also to (meta-)cognitive states and interpersonal variables. The

  5. Report on the 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Iddo [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The Critical Assessment of Function Annotation meeting was held July 14-15, 2011 at the Austria Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. There were 73 registered delegates at the meeting. We thank the DOE for this award. It helped us organize and support a scientific meeting AFP 2011 as a special interest group (SIG) meeting associated with the ISMB 2011 conference. The conference was held in Vienna, Austria, in July 2011. The AFP SIG was held on July 15-16, 2011 (immediately preceding the conference). The meeting consisted of two components, the first being a series of talks (invited and contributed) and discussion sections dedicated to protein function research, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of computational methods utilized in functional annotation. The second component provided a large-scale assessment of computational methods through participation in the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA). The meeting was exciting and, based on feedback, quite successful. There were 73 registered participants. The schedule was only slightly different from the one proposed, due to two cancellations. Dr. Olga Troyanskaya has canceled and we invited Dr. David Jones instead. Similarly, instead of Dr. Richard Roberts, Dr. Simon Kasif gave a closing keynote. The remaining invited speakers were Janet Thornton (EBI) and Amos Bairoch (University of Geneva).

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Phosphoribulokinase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Keith R.; Ogren, William L.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence and kinetic properties of phosphoribulokinase purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were determined and compared with the spinach (Spinacea oleracea) enzyme. Chlamydomonas phosphoribulokinase was purified to apparent homogeneity, with a specific activity of 410 micromoles per minute per milligram. Polyclonal antibodies to the purified protein were used to isolate a Chlamydomonas cDNA clone, which, upon sequencing, was found to contain the entire coding region. The transit peptide cleavage site was determined by Edman analysis of the mature protein. The precursor protein consists of a 31 amino acid transit peptide and a 344 amino acid mature polypeptide. The mature polypeptide has a calculated molecular weight of 38.5 kilodaltons and a pl of 5.75. The Vmax of the purified enzyme was 465 micromoles per minute per milligram, with apparent Km values of 62 micromolar ATP and 56 micromolar ribulose 5-phosphate. Immunoblot analysis indicated antigenic similarity and a similar subunit size for the enzyme from five higher plant species and Chlamydomonas. Southern blot analysis of Chlamydomonas genomic DNA indicated the presence of a single phosphoribulokinase gene. Comparison of the mature proteins from Chlamydomonas and spinach revealed 86 amino acid differences in primary structure (25% of the total) without a major difference in kinetic properties. The transit peptides of the spinach and Chlamydomonas proteins possessed little sequence homology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16667433

  7. An Annotated Bibliography Concerning Children of Divorce: Meeting Their Needs in the Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Elaine M.

    Entries in this annotated bibliography are divided into three sections: (1) an overview of information about the effect of divorce on the parent and child; (2) a review of studies and literature pertaining to the impact of divorce on elementary school students; and (3) a review of literature suggesting guidelines, activities, and techniques for…

  8. Annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology, Waste Policy Institute (WPI) is conducting a five-year research project to develop a research-based approach for integrating communication products in stakeholder involvement related to innovative technology. As part of the research, WPI developed this annotated bibliography which contains almost 100 citations of articles/books/resources involving topics related to communication and public involvement aspects of deploying innovative cleanup technology. To compile the bibliography, WPI performed on-line literature searches (e.g., Dialog, International Association of Business Communicators Public Relations Society of America, Chemical Manufacturers Association, etc.), consulted past years proceedings of major environmental waste cleanup conferences (e.g., Waste Management), networked with professional colleagues and DOE sites to gather reports or case studies, and received input during the August 1996 Research Design Team meeting held to discuss the project's research methodology. Articles were selected for annotation based upon their perceived usefulness to the broad range of public involvement and communication practitioners

  9. Selenoprotein-Transgenic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazuan Ni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se deficiency is associated with the occurrence of many diseases. However, excessive Se supplementation, especially with inorganic Se, can result in toxicity. Selenoproteins are the major forms of Se in vivo to exert its biological function. Expression of those selenoproteins, especially with the application of a newly developed system, is thus very important for studying the mechanism of Se in nutrition. The use of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii as a biological vector to express an heterogeneous protein is still at the initial stages of development. In order to investigate the possibility of using this system to express selenoproteins, human 15-KDa selenoprotein (Sep15, a small but widely distributed selenoprotein in mammals, was chosen for the expression platform test. Apart from the wild-type human Sep15 gene fragment, two Sep15 recombinants were constructed containing Sep15 open reading frame (ORF and the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS element from either human Sep15 or C. reinhardtii selenoprotein W1, a highly expressed selenoprotein in this alga. Those Sep15-containing plasmids were transformed into C. reinhardtii CC-849 cells. Results showed that Sep15 fragments were successfully inserted into the nuclear genome and expressed Sep15 protein in the cells. The transgenic and wild-type algae demonstrated similar growth curves in low Se culture medium. To our knowledge, this is the first report on expressing human selenoprotein in green alga.

  10. Exploiting ''Subjective'' Annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Artstein, R.; Boleda, G.; Keller, F.; Schulte im Walde, S.

    2008-01-01

    Many interesting phenomena in conversation can only be annotated as a subjective task, requiring interpretative judgements from annotators. This leads to data which is annotated with lower levels of agreement not only due to errors in the annotation, but also due to the differences in how annotators

  11. Building Simple Annotation Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The right annotation tool does not always exist for processing a particular natural language task. In these scenarios, researchers are required to build new annotation tools to fit the tasks at hand. However, developing new annotation tools is difficult and inefficient. There has not been careful consideration of software complexity in current annotation tools. Due to the problems of complexity, new annotation tools must reimplement common annotation features despite the availability of imple...

  12. Semantic annotation in biomedicine: the current landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Jelena; Bagheri, Ebrahim

    2017-09-22

    The abundance and unstructured nature of biomedical texts, be it clinical or research content, impose significant challenges for the effective and efficient use of information and knowledge stored in such texts. Annotation of biomedical documents with machine intelligible semantics facilitates advanced, semantics-based text management, curation, indexing, and search. This paper focuses on annotation of biomedical entity mentions with concepts from relevant biomedical knowledge bases such as UMLS. As a result, the meaning of those mentions is unambiguously and explicitly defined, and thus made readily available for automated processing. This process is widely known as semantic annotation, and the tools that perform it are known as semantic annotators.Over the last dozen years, the biomedical research community has invested significant efforts in the development of biomedical semantic annotation technology. Aiming to establish grounds for further developments in this area, we review a selected set of state of the art biomedical semantic annotators, focusing particularly on general purpose annotators, that is, semantic annotation tools that can be customized to work with texts from any area of biomedicine. We also examine potential directions for further improvements of today's annotators which could make them even more capable of meeting the needs of real-world applications. To motivate and encourage further developments in this area, along the suggested and/or related directions, we review existing and potential practical applications and benefits of semantic annotators.

  13. Chlamydomonas pitschmannii Ettl, a little known species from thermoacidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Antonino; Cennamo, Paola; Ciniglia, Claudia; De Stefano, Mario; Pinto, Gabriele; Huss, Volker A R

    2005-11-01

    Three Chlamydomonas strains were isolated from the soils of a hot spring located in the Campi Flegrei Caldera (Naples, Italy). Ecophysiological, morpho-cytological and molecular features were used to characterize these isolates and to compare them with chlamydomonax acidophila strains from algal culture collections. The strains were collected from three points of the volcanic site, differing in their physico-chemical conditions. Among the examined Chlamydomonas strains, only the isolates from Campi Flegrei could grow optimally at pH values < or =3.0. These isolates also showed a high tolerance to desiccation and high temperatures, not evidenced by the other Chlamydomonas strains included in the study. 18S rDNA phylogeny indicates that the isolates from Campi Flegrei are closely related to Chlamydomonas pitschmannii and two strains isolated in Canada and Europe, that have been designated as Chlamydomonas acidophila. A Chlamydomonas acidophila strain isolated from the type locality in Japan is less closely related according to its molecular phylogeny, and can also be discerned by light and electron microscopy. Moreover, vegetative cells and sporangia of Chlamydomonas acidophila from Japan showed a median trilaminar structure not observed in the other strains. Our results show that Chlamydomonas pitschmannii could represent a hitherto unknown extremophilic Chlamydomonas species.

  14. Transformace ptDNA Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    HUSÁKOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this master thesis was to test and compare two available methods of genetic transformation (biolistics, electroporation) of the plastid genome of green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. For biolistic transformation a wide range of experimental parameters which generally influence ptDNA transformation efficiency was optimized: physiological condition of acceptor cells, type and size of microparticles, pressure of propulsion gas (helium), length of projectile trajectory, transformatio...

  15. Mining GO annotations for improving annotation consistency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Faria

    Full Text Available Despite the structure and objectivity provided by the Gene Ontology (GO, the annotation of proteins is a complex task that is subject to errors and inconsistencies. Electronically inferred annotations in particular are widely considered unreliable. However, given that manual curation of all GO annotations is unfeasible, it is imperative to improve the quality of electronically inferred annotations. In this work, we analyze the full GO molecular function annotation of UniProtKB proteins, and discuss some of the issues that affect their quality, focusing particularly on the lack of annotation consistency. Based on our analysis, we estimate that 64% of the UniProtKB proteins are incompletely annotated, and that inconsistent annotations affect 83% of the protein functions and at least 23% of the proteins. Additionally, we present and evaluate a data mining algorithm, based on the association rule learning methodology, for identifying implicit relationships between molecular function terms. The goal of this algorithm is to assist GO curators in updating GO and correcting and preventing inconsistent annotations. Our algorithm predicted 501 relationships with an estimated precision of 94%, whereas the basic association rule learning methodology predicted 12,352 relationships with a precision below 9%.

  16. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the invitation of the Physical Research. Laboratory, the 58th Annual Meeting of the. Academy was held at Ahmedabad from 6 to 9. November 1992. The meetings were held at the. Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) and the. Space Applications Centre (SAC) and were organized by PRl, in cooperation with ~AC, the.

  17. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    a method which makes it possible to associate auxiliary information, called annotations, with tokens without modifying the colour sets of the CP-net. Annotations are pieces of information that are not essential for determining the behaviour of the system being modelled, but are rather added to support...... a certain use of the CP-net. We define the semantics of annotations by describing a translation from a CP-net and the corresponding annotation layers to another CP-net where the annotations are an integrated part of the CP-net....

  18. Modeling the radiation response of Chlamydomonas reinhardi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    To pursue our goal of establishing quantitative relations between initial physical events produced by ionizing radiation and the subsequent biological effects in cells, we have been developing and testing theoretical models for two kinds of cells, the mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell and the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardi. The hamster cell studies are beginning to produce results and will be discussed below. The C. reinhardt studies have been in progress for some time and illustrate the normal scientific cycle of framing, testing, and revising hypotheses

  19. Monitoring Autophagy in the Model Green Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Pérez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic system that delivers cytoplasmic constituents and organelles in the vacuole. This degradative process is mediated by a group of proteins coded by autophagy-related (ATG genes that are widely conserved from yeasts to plants and mammals. Homologs of ATG genes have been also identified in algal genomes including the unicellular model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The development of specific tools to monitor autophagy in Chlamydomonas has expanded our current knowledge about the regulation and function of this process in algae. Recent findings indicated that autophagy is regulated by redox signals and the TOR network in Chlamydomonas and revealed that this process may play in important role in the control of lipid metabolism and ribosomal protein turnover in this alga. Here, we will describe the different techniques and approaches that have been reported to study autophagy and autophagic flux in Chlamydomonas.

  20. Ubiquitous Annotation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous annotation systems allow users to annotate physical places, objects, and persons with digital information. Especially in the field of location based information systems much work has been done to implement adaptive and context-aware systems, but few efforts have focused on the general...... requirements for linking information to objects in both physical and digital space. This paper surveys annotation techniques from open hypermedia systems, Web based annotation systems, and mobile and augmented reality systems to illustrate different approaches to four central challenges ubiquitous annotation...... systems have to deal with: anchoring, structuring, presentation, and authoring. Through a number of examples each challenge is discussed and HyCon, a context-aware hypermedia framework developed at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, is used to illustrate an integrated approach to ubiquitous annotations...

  1. Identification of an NADP/thioredoxin system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppe, H. C.; Picaud, A.; Buchanan, B. B.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.

    1991-01-01

    The protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system, NADP-thioredoxin reductase (NTR) and thioredoxin h, have been purified and characterized from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analysis of this system confirms that photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas cells resemble leaves in having both an NADP- and ferrodoxin-linked thioredoxin redox system. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin h, which is smaller on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than thioredoxin m from the same source, cross-reacted with antisera to thioredoxin h from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and wheat germ (Triticum vulgaris L.) but not with antisera to m or f thioredoxins. In these properties, the thioredoxin h resembled a thioredoxin from Chlamydomonas, designated Ch1, whose sequence was reported recently (P. Decottignies et al., 1991, Eur. J. Biochem. 198, 505-512). The differential reactivity of thioredoxin h with antisera was used to demonstrate that thioredoxin h is enriched outside the chloroplast. The NTR was purified from Chlamydomonas using thioredoxin h from the same source. Similar to its counterpart from other organisms, Chlamydomonas NTR had a subunit size of approx. 36 kDa and was specific for NADPH. Chlamydomonas NTR effectively reduced thioredoxin h from the same source but showed little activity with the other thioredoxins tested, including spinach thioredoxin h and Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Comparison of the reduction of Chlamydomonas thioredoxins m and h by each of the endogenous thioredoxin reductases, NTR and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase, revealed a differential specificity of each enzyme for thioredoxin. Thus, NTR showed increased activity with thioredoxin h and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase with thioredoxins m and f.

  2. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The organization and arrangements for the scientific meetings, cultural event and the visits to Lothal and SAC were superb. The Academy is grateful to the Physical Research Laboratory particularly R K Varma, Director, PRL, to the. Institute for Plasma Research and its Director. P K Kaw, to the Space Applications Centre and.

  3. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Defence Minister, Government of India on some of his experiences in technology development in India. A summary of his lecture appears in this issue. In the afternoon the .... of steel armour for our Light Tank which has found wide application to meet the ... basic issues: how information is encoded in the structure of DNA ...

  4. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1985-11-07

    Nov 7, 1985 ... Business Meeting of Fellows. Evening Lecture. Architecture of the universe- R Cowsik ... and technical capabilities to plan, design and build satellites for earth observations, such as. Bhaskara I and II have ... Water Resources Systems Planning-. Some case studies for India. Edited by. Mahesh C Chaturvedi ...

  5. A Novel Approach to Semantic and Coreference Annotation at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firpo, M

    2005-02-04

    A case is made for the importance of high quality semantic and coreference annotation. The challenges of providing such annotation are described. Asperger's Syndrome is introduced, and the connections are drawn between the needs of text annotation and the abilities of persons with Asperger's Syndrome to meet those needs. Finally, a pilot program is recommended wherein semantic annotation is performed by people with Asperger's Syndrome. The primary points embodied in this paper are as follows: (1) Document annotation is essential to the Natural Language Processing (NLP) projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); (2) LLNL does not currently have a system in place to meet its need for text annotation; (3) Text annotation is challenging for a variety of reasons, many related to its very rote nature; (4) Persons with Asperger's Syndrome are particularly skilled at rote verbal tasks, and behavioral experts agree that they would excel at text annotation; and (6) A pilot study is recommend in which two to three people with Asperger's Syndrome annotate documents and then the quality and throughput of their work is evaluated relative to that of their neuro-typical peers.

  6. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimogawara, K.; Muto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25 I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  7. Semantic annotation of mutable data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Morris

    Full Text Available Electronic annotation of scientific data is very similar to annotation of documents. Both types of annotation amplify the original object, add related knowledge to it, and dispute or support assertions in it. In each case, annotation is a framework for discourse about the original object, and, in each case, an annotation needs to clearly identify its scope and its own terminology. However, electronic annotation of data differs from annotation of documents: the content of the annotations, including expectations and supporting evidence, is more often shared among members of networks. Any consequent actions taken by the holders of the annotated data could be shared as well. But even those current annotation systems that admit data as their subject often make it difficult or impossible to annotate at fine-enough granularity to use the results in this way for data quality control. We address these kinds of issues by offering simple extensions to an existing annotation ontology and describe how the results support an interest-based distribution of annotations. We are using the result to design and deploy a platform that supports annotation services overlaid on networks of distributed data, with particular application to data quality control. Our initial instance supports a set of natural science collection metadata services. An important application is the support for data quality control and provision of missing data. A previous proof of concept demonstrated such use based on data annotations modeled with XML-Schema.

  8. Annotating individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A; Topol, Eric J; Schork, Nicholas J

    2011-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ANNOTATING INDIVIDUAL HUMAN GENOMES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Topol, Eric J.; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely to amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. PMID:21839162

  10. Improving the optimum yield and growth of Chlamydomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC125 (wild type) and CW15 (cell wall mutants) were feed up on solid and liquid Tris phosphate (TP) media with various concentrations of acetate, glycerol(10-100 mM) or methanol (0.01-718 mM) and cultivated under phototrophic, mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Use of 10 and 35 ...

  11. GSV Annotated Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Randy S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pope, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jiang, Ming [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trucano, Timothy G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aragon, Cecilia R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ni, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wei, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chilton, Lawrence K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bakel, Alan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-09-14

    The following annotated bibliography was developed as part of the geospatial algorithm verification and validation (GSV) project for the Simulation, Algorithms and Modeling program of NA-22. Verification and Validation of geospatial image analysis algorithms covers a wide range of technologies. Papers in the bibliography are thus organized into the following five topic areas: Image processing and analysis, usability and validation of geospatial image analysis algorithms, image distance measures, scene modeling and image rendering, and transportation simulation models. Many other papers were studied during the course of the investigation including. The annotations for these articles can be found in the paper "On the verification and validation of geospatial image analysis algorithms".

  12. Annotation of Regular Polysemy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alonso, Hector

    Regular polysemy has received a lot of attention from the theory of lexical semantics and from computational linguistics. However, there is no consensus on how to represent the sense of underspecified examples at the token level, namely when annotating or disambiguating senses of metonymic words...

  13. GSV Annotated Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Randy S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pope, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jiang, Ming [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trucano, Timothy G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aragon, Cecilia R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ni, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wei, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chilton, Lawrence K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bakel, Alan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-06-14

    The following annotated bibliography was developed as part of the Geospatial Algorithm Veri cation and Validation (GSV) project for the Simulation, Algorithms and Modeling program of NA-22. Veri cation and Validation of geospatial image analysis algorithms covers a wide range of technologies. Papers in the bibliography are thus organized into the following ve topic areas: Image processing and analysis, usability and validation of geospatial image analysis algorithms, image distance measures, scene modeling and image rendering, and transportation simulation models.

  14. Diverse Image Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2017-11-09

    In this work we study the task of image annotation, of which the goal is to describe an image using a few tags. Instead of predicting the full list of tags, here we target for providing a short list of tags under a limited number (e.g., 3), to cover as much information as possible of the image. The tags in such a short list should be representative and diverse. It means they are required to be not only corresponding to the contents of the image, but also be different to each other. To this end, we treat the image annotation as a subset selection problem based on the conditional determinantal point process (DPP) model, which formulates the representation and diversity jointly. We further explore the semantic hierarchy and synonyms among the candidate tags, and require that two tags in a semantic hierarchy or in a pair of synonyms should not be selected simultaneously. This requirement is then embedded into the sampling algorithm according to the learned conditional DPP model. Besides, we find that traditional metrics for image annotation (e.g., precision, recall and F1 score) only consider the representation, but ignore the diversity. Thus we propose new metrics to evaluate the quality of the selected subset (i.e., the tag list), based on the semantic hierarchy and synonyms. Human study through Amazon Mechanical Turk verifies that the proposed metrics are more close to the humans judgment than traditional metrics. Experiments on two benchmark datasets show that the proposed method can produce more representative and diverse tags, compared with existing image annotation methods.

  15. Salinity affects the photoacclimation of Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl UWO241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Hüner, Norman P A; Minagawa, Jun

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl UWO241, a natural variant of C. raudensis, is deficient in state transitions. Its habitat, the deepest layer of Lake Bonney in Antarctica, features low irradiance, low temperature, and high salinity. Although psychrophily and low-light acclimation of this green alga has been described, very little information is available on the effect of salinity. Here, we demonstrate that this psychrophile is halotolerant, not halophilic, and it shows energy redistribution between photosystem I and II based on energy spillover under low-salt conditions. Furthermore, we revealed that C. raudensis exhibits higher non-photochemical quenching in comparison with the mesophile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, when grown with low-salt, which is due to the lower proton conductivity across the thylakoid membrane. Significance of the C. raudensis UWO241 traits found in the low salinity culture are implicated with their natural habitats, including the high salinity and extremely stable light environments.

  16. Induction and characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    In addition to lethal minute colony mutations which correspond to loss of mitochondrial DNA, acriflavin induces in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii a low percentage of cells that grow in the light but do not divide under heterotrophic conditions. Two such obligate photoautotrophic mutants were shown to lack the cyanide-sensitive cytochrome pathway of the respiration and to have a reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity. In crosses to wild type, the mutations are transmitted almost exclusively from the mating type minus parent. A same pattern of inheritance is seen for the mitochondrial DNA in crosses between the two interfertile species C. reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii. Both mutants have a deletion in the region of the mitochondrial DNA containing the apocytochrome b gene and possibly the unidentified URFx gene. PMID:2925784

  17. New insights into eyespot placement and assembly in Chlamydomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Joseph S; Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2011-01-01

    Aspects of cellular architecture, such as cytoskeletal asymmetry cues, play critical roles in directing the placement of organelles and establishing the sites of their formation. In the model green alga Chlamydomonas, the photosensory eyespot occupies a defined position in relation to the flagella and microtubule cytoskeleton. Investigations into the cellular mechanisms of eyespot placement and assembly have aided our understanding of the interplay between cytoskeletal and plastid components ...

  18. Metabolic studies of Hg-203 on chlamydomonas reinhardi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macka, W.; Stehlik, G.; Wihlidal, H.; Washuettl, J.; Bancher, E.

    1977-09-01

    Vegetative cultures of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardi WT + in the log-phase reduce mercury(II)-nitrate to elemental mercury which is removed from the cell suspension by the stream of gas bubbling through it. Monomethyl and dimethyl mercury as intermediate metabolic compounds are to be excluded, because none of them could be found in the algae, the nutrient medium or the gas phase. (author)

  19. Impingement: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uziel, M.S.; Hannon, E.H.

    1979-04-01

    This bibliography of 655 annotated references on impingement of aquatic organisms at intake structures of thermal-power-plant cooling systems was compiled from the published and unpublished literature. The bibliography includes references from 1928 to 1978 on impingement monitoring programs; impingement impact assessment; applicable law; location and design of intake structures, screens, louvers, and other barriers; fish behavior and swim speed as related to impingement susceptibility; and the effects of light, sound, bubbles, currents, and temperature on fish behavior. References are arranged alphabetically by author or corporate author. Indexes are provided for author, keywords, subject category, geographic location, taxon, and title

  20. Predicting word sense annotation agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alonso, Hector; Johannsen, Anders Trærup; Lopez de Lacalle, Oier

    2015-01-01

    High agreement is a common objective when annotating data for word senses. However, a number of factors make perfect agreement impossible, e.g. the limitations of the sense inventories, the difficulty of the examples or the interpretation preferences of the annotations. Estimating potential...... agreement is thus a relevant task to supplement the evaluation of sense annotations. In this article we propose two methods to predict agreement on word-annotation instances. We experiment with a continuous representation and a three-way discretization of observed agreement. In spite of the difficulty...

  1. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called 'phylogenomics') is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  2. Automatic analysis of multiparty meetings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NXT tool for annotating dialogue acts in a multiparty conversation. designer, marketing expert and interface designer), and the team participated in a series of four meetings. The meetings took place over 3–4 hours: about half of this time was spent in meetings, the remainder was spent in preparation, with each participant ...

  3. The CALO Meeting Assistant system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tur, G.; Stolcke, A.; Voss, L.; Peters, S.; Hakkani-Tür, D.; Dowding, J.; Favre, B.; Fernández, R.; Frampton, M.; Frandsen, M.; Frederickson, C.; Graciarena, M.; Kintzing, D.; Leveque, K.; Mason, S.; Niekrasz, J.; Purver, M.; Riedhammer, K.; Shriberg, E.; Tien, J.; Vergyri, D.; Yang, F.

    2010-01-01

    The CALO Meeting Assistant (MA) provides for distributed meeting capture, annotation, automatic transcription and semantic analysis of multiparty meetings, and is part of the larger CALO personal assistant system. This paper presents the CALO-MA architecture and its speech recognition and

  4. Annotation in Digital Scholarly Editions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, P.; Haentjens Dekker, R.

    2016-01-01

    Annotation in digital scholarly editions (of historical documents, literary works, letters, etc.) has long been recognized as an important desideratum, but has also proven to be an elusive ideal. In so far as annotation functionality is available, it is usually developed for a single edition and

  5. Mesotext. Framing and exploring annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, P.; Boot, P.; Stronks, E.

    2007-01-01

    From the introduction: Annotation is an important item on the wish list for digital scholarly tools. It is one of John Unsworth’s primitives of scholarship (Unsworth 2000). Especially in linguistics,a number of tools have been developed that facilitate the creation of annotations to source material

  6. Experimental Definition and Validation of Protein Coding Transcripts in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani; Jason A. Papin

    2012-01-13

    Algal fuel sources promise unsurpassed yields in a carbon neutral manner that minimizes resource competition between agriculture and fuel crops. Many challenges must be addressed before algal biofuels can be accepted as a component of the fossil fuel replacement strategy. One significant challenge is that the cost of algal fuel production must become competitive with existing fuel alternatives. Algal biofuel production presents the opportunity to fine-tune microbial metabolic machinery for an optimal blend of biomass constituents and desired fuel molecules. Genome-scale model-driven algal metabolic design promises to facilitate both goals by directing the utilization of metabolites in the complex, interconnected metabolic networks to optimize production of the compounds of interest. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model, we developed a systems-level methodology bridging metabolic network reconstruction with annotation and experimental verification of enzyme encoding open reading frames. We reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic network for this alga and devised a novel light-modeling approach that enables quantitative growth prediction for a given light source, resolving wavelength and photon flux. We experimentally verified transcripts accounted for in the network and physiologically validated model function through simulation and generation of new experimental growth data, providing high confidence in network contents and predictive applications. The network offers insight into algal metabolism and potential for genetic engineering and efficient light source design, a pioneering resource for studying light-driven metabolism and quantitative systems biology. Our approach to generate a predictive metabolic model integrated with cloned open reading frames, provides a cost-effective platform to generate metabolic engineering resources. While the generated resources are specific to algal systems, the approach that we have developed is not specific to algae and

  7. Katanin localization requires triplet microtubules in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Esparza

    Full Text Available Centrioles and basal bodies are essential for a variety of cellular processes that include the recruitment of proteins to these structures for both centrosomal and ciliary function. This recruitment is compromised when centriole/basal body assembly is defective. Mutations that cause basal body assembly defects confer supersensitivity to Taxol. These include bld2, bld10, bld12, uni3, vfl1, vfl2, and vfl3. Flagellar motility mutants do not confer sensitivity with the exception of mutations in the p60 (pf19 and p80 (pf15 subunits of the microtubule severing protein katanin. We have identified additional pf15 and bld2 (ε-tubulin alleles in screens for Taxol sensitivity. Null pf15 and bld2 alleles are viable and are not essential genes in Chlamydomonas. Analysis of double mutant strains with the pf15-3 and bld2-6 null alleles suggests that basal bodies in Chlamydomonas may recruit additional proteins beyond katanin that affect spindle microtubule stability. The bld2-5 allele is a hypomorphic allele and its phenotype is modulated by nutritional cues. Basal bodies in bld2-5 cells are missing proximal ends. The basal body mutants show aberrant localization of an epitope-tagged p80 subunit of katanin. Unlike IFT proteins, katanin p80 does not localize to the transition fibers of the basal bodies based on an analysis of the uni1 mutant as well as the lack of colocalization of katanin p80 with IFT74. We suggest that the triplet microtubules are likely to play a key role in katanin p80 recruitment to the basal body of Chlamydomonas rather than the transition fibers that are needed for IFT localization.

  8. Reverse genetics in Chlamydomonas: a platform for isolating insertional mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Montaigu Amaury

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A method was developed to identify insertional mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii disrupted for selected target genes. The approach relies on the generation of thousands of transformants followed by PCR-based screenings that allow for identification of strains harboring the introduced marker gene within specific genes of interest. Our results highlight the strengths and limitations of two independent screens that differed in the nature of the marker DNA used (PCR-amplified fragment containing the plasmid-free marker versus entire linearized plasmid with the marker and in the strategies used to maintain and store transformants.

  9. Gene Ontology annotations and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J A; Dolan, M; Drabkin, H; Hill, D P; Li, Ni; Sitnikov, D; Bridges, S; Burgess, S; Buza, T; McCarthy, F; Peddinti, D; Pillai, L; Carbon, S; Dietze, H; Ireland, A; Lewis, S E; Mungall, C J; Gaudet, P; Chrisholm, R L; Fey, P; Kibbe, W A; Basu, S; Siegele, D A; McIntosh, B K; Renfro, D P; Zweifel, A E; Hu, J C; Brown, N H; Tweedie, S; Alam-Faruque, Y; Apweiler, R; Auchinchloss, A; Axelsen, K; Bely, B; Blatter, M -C; Bonilla, C; Bouguerleret, L; Boutet, E; Breuza, L; Bridge, A; Chan, W M; Chavali, G; Coudert, E; Dimmer, E; Estreicher, A; Famiglietti, L; Feuermann, M; Gos, A; Gruaz-Gumowski, N; Hieta, R; Hinz, C; Hulo, C; Huntley, R; James, J; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Laiho, K; Legge, D; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Magrane, M; Martin, M J; Masson, P; Mutowo-Muellenet, P; O'Donovan, C; Pedruzzi, I; Pichler, K; Poggioli, D; Porras Millán, P; Poux, S; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Sawford, T; Schneider, M; Stutz, A; Sundaram, S; Tognolli, M; Xenarios, I; Foulgar, R; Lomax, J; Roncaglia, P; Khodiyar, V K; Lovering, R C; Talmud, P J; Chibucos, M; Giglio, M Gwinn; Chang, H -Y; Hunter, S; McAnulla, C; Mitchell, A; Sangrador, A; Stephan, R; Harris, M A; Oliver, S G; Rutherford, K; Wood, V; Bahler, J; Lock, A; Kersey, P J; McDowall, D M; Staines, D M; Dwinell, M; Shimoyama, M; Laulederkind, S; Hayman, T; Wang, S -J; Petri, V; Lowry, T; D'Eustachio, P; Matthews, L; Balakrishnan, R; Binkley, G; Cherry, J M; Costanzo, M C; Dwight, S S; Engel, S R; Fisk, D G; Hitz, B C; Hong, E L; Karra, K; Miyasato, S R; Nash, R S; Park, J; Skrzypek, M S; Weng, S; Wong, E D; Berardini, T Z; Huala, E; Mi, H; Thomas, P D; Chan, J; Kishore, R; Sternberg, P; Van Auken, K; Howe, D; Westerfield, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new 'phylogenetic annotation' process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources.

  10. Chado controller: advanced annotation management with a community annotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignon, Valentin; Droc, Gaëtan; Alaux, Michael; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Garsmeur, Olivier; Poiron, Claire; Carver, Tim; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2012-04-01

    We developed a controller that is compliant with the Chado database schema, GBrowse and genome annotation-editing tools such as Artemis and Apollo. It enables the management of public and private data, monitors manual annotation (with controlled vocabularies, structural and functional annotation controls) and stores versions of annotation for all modified features. The Chado controller uses PostgreSQL and Perl. The Chado Controller package is available for download at http://www.gnpannot.org/content/chado-controller and runs on any Unix-like operating system, and documentation is available at http://www.gnpannot.org/content/chado-controller-doc The system can be tested using the GNPAnnot Sandbox at http://www.gnpannot.org/content/gnpannot-sandbox-form valentin.guignon@cirad.fr; stephanie.sidibe-bocs@cirad.fr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Molecular techniques to interrogate and edit the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    The success of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism is to a large extent due to the wide range of molecular techniques that are available for its characterization. Here, we review some of the techniques currently used to modify and interrogate the C. reinhardtii nuclear genome and explore several technologies under development. Nuclear mutants can be generated with ultraviolet (UV) light and chemical mutagens, or by insertional mutagenesis. Nuclear transformation methods include biolistic delivery, agitation with glass beads, and electroporation. Transforming DNA integrates into the genome at random sites, and multiple strategies exist for mapping insertion sites. A limited number of studies have demonstrated targeted modification of the nuclear genome by approaches such as zinc-finger nucleases and homologous recombination. RNA interference is widely used to knock down expression levels of nuclear genes. A wide assortment of transgenes has been successfully expressed in the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, including transformation markers, fluorescent proteins, reporter genes, epitope tagged proteins, and even therapeutic proteins. Optimized expression constructs and strains help transgene expression. Emerging technologies such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system, high-throughput mutant identification, and a whole-genome knockout library are being developed for this organism. We discuss how these advances will propel future investigations. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Metabolic modeling of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: energy requirements for photoautotrophic growth and maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kliphuis, A.M.J.; Klok, A.J.; Martens, D.E.; Lamers, P.P.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a metabolic network describing the primary metabolism of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was constructed. By performing chemostat experiments at different growth rates, energy parameters for maintenance and biomass formation were determined. The chemostats were run at low irradiances

  13. Evidences of oxidative stress during hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur-deprived cultures of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sáens, M. E.; Bišová, Kateřina; Touloupakis, E.; Faraloni, C.; Dario Di Marzio, W.; Torzillo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 30 (2015), s. 10410-10417 ISSN 0360-3199 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Oxidative stress * Chlamydomonas reinhardtii * H-2 production Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.205, year: 2015

  14. The Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Merchant, S.S.; Prochnik, S. E.; Bišová, Kateřina

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 318, - (2007), s. 245-251 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chlamydomonas reinhardtii * alga * eukaryotic cell Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 26.372, year: 2007

  15. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Beijbom

    Full Text Available Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images captured at four Pacific coral reefs. Inter- and intra- annotator variability among six human experts was quantified and compared to semi- and fully- automated annotation methods, which are made available at coralnet.ucsd.edu. Our results indicate high expert agreement for identification of coral genera, but lower agreement for algal functional groups, in particular between turf algae and crustose coralline algae. This indicates the need for unequivocal definitions of algal groups, careful training of multiple annotators, and enhanced imaging technology. Semi-automated annotation, where 50% of the annotation decisions were performed automatically, yielded cover estimate errors comparable to those of the human experts. Furthermore, fully-automated annotation yielded rapid, unbiased cover estimates but with increased variance. These results show that automated annotation can increase spatial coverage and decrease time and financial outlay for image-based reef surveys.

  16. OK, thanks! A new mutualism between Chlamydomonas and methylobacteria facilitates growth on amino acids and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatrava, Victoria; Hom, Erik F Y; Llamas, Ángel; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2018-04-01

    Nitrogen is a key nutrient for land plants and phytoplankton in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can grow efficiently on several inorganic nitrogen sources (e.g. ammonium, nitrate, nitrite) as well as many amino acids. In this study, we show that Chlamydomonas is unable to use proline, hydroxyproline and peptides that contain these amino acids. However, we discovered that algal growth on these substrates is supported in association with Methylobacterium spp., and that a mutualistic carbon-nitrogen metabolic exchange between Chlamydomonas and Methylobacterium spp. is established. Specifically, the mineralization of these amino acids and peptides by Methylobacterium spp. produces ammonium that can be assimilated by Chlamydomonas, and CO2 photosynthetically fixed by Chlamydomonas yields glycerol that can be assimilated by Methylobacterium. As Chlamydomonas is an algal ancestor to land plants and Methylobacterium is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, this new model of mutualism may facilitate insights into the ecology and evolution of plant-bacterial interactions and design principles of synthetic ecology.

  17. Objective-guided image annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qi; Tsang, Ivor Wai-Hung; Gao, Shenghua

    2013-04-01

    Automatic image annotation, which is usually formulated as a multi-label classification problem, is one of the major tools used to enhance the semantic understanding of web images. Many multimedia applications (e.g., tag-based image retrieval) can greatly benefit from image annotation. However, the insufficient performance of image annotation methods prevents these applications from being practical. On the other hand, specific measures are usually designed to evaluate how well one annotation method performs for a specific objective or application, but most image annotation methods do not consider optimization of these measures, so that they are inevitably trapped into suboptimal performance of these objective-specific measures. To address this issue, we first summarize a variety of objective-guided performance measures under a unified representation. Our analysis reveals that macro-averaging measures are very sensitive to infrequent keywords, and hamming measure is easily affected by skewed distributions. We then propose a unified multi-label learning framework, which directly optimizes a variety of objective-specific measures of multi-label learning tasks. Specifically, we first present a multilayer hierarchical structure of learning hypotheses for multi-label problems based on which a variety of loss functions with respect to objective-guided measures are defined. And then, we formulate these loss functions as relaxed surrogate functions and optimize them by structural SVMs. According to the analysis of various measures and the high time complexity of optimizing micro-averaging measures, in this paper, we focus on example-based measures that are tailor-made for image annotation tasks but are seldom explored in the literature. Experiments show consistency with the formal analysis on two widely used multi-label datasets, and demonstrate the superior performance of our proposed method over state-of-the-art baseline methods in terms of example-based measures on four

  18. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of intraflagellar transport in Chlamydomonas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L. B.; Geimer, S.; Rosenbaum, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Background The assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional microtubule (MT)-based transport system. The IFT system consists of anterograde (kinesin-2) and retrograde (cDynein1b) motor complexes and IFT particles...... comprising two complexes, A and B. In the current model for IFT, kinesin-2 carries cDynein1b, IFT particles, and axonemal precursors from the flagellar base to the tip, and cDynein1b transports kinesin-2, IFT particles, and axonemal turnover products from the tip back to the base. Most of the components...... of the IFT system have been identified and characterized, but the mechanisms by which these different components are coordinated and regulated at the flagellar base and tip are unclear. Results Using a variety of Chlamydomonas mutants, we confirm that cDynein1b requires kinesin-2 for transport toward the tip...

  19. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii cells. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlcek, D.; Podstavkova, S.; Dubovsky, J.

    1978-01-01

    The effect was investigated of single and combined actions of alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) and UV-radiation on the survival of cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation following mutagen activity. In particular, the single phases were investigated of the total lethal effect, i.e., the death of cells before division and their death after division. The most pronounced changes in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation were noted in cell death before division. In dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens, the effect of the combined action on the survival of cells changed from an additive (alkylnitrosourea + UV-radiation) to a protective effect (UV-radiation + alkylnitrosourea). (author)

  20. Image annotation under X Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, Steven

    1991-08-01

    A mechanism for attaching graphic and overlay annotation to multiple bits/pixel imagery while providing levels of performance approaching that of native mode graphics systems is presented. This mechanism isolates programming complexity from the application programmer through software encapsulation under the X Window System. It ensures display accuracy throughout operations on the imagery and annotation including zooms, pans, and modifications of the annotation. Trade-offs that affect speed of display, consumption of memory, and system functionality are explored. The use of resource files to tune the display system is discussed. The mechanism makes use of an abstraction consisting of four parts; a graphics overlay, a dithered overlay, an image overly, and a physical display window. Data structures are maintained that retain the distinction between the four parts so that they can be modified independently, providing system flexibility. A unique technique for associating user color preferences with annotation is introduced. An interface that allows interactive modification of the mapping between image value and color is discussed. A procedure that provides for the colorization of imagery on 8-bit display systems using pixel dithering is explained. Finally, the application of annotation mechanisms to various applications is discussed.

  1. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie TDT; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach. Significance Statement Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers potential as a host for the production of high value compounds for industrial biotechnology. Synthetic biology provides a mechanism to generate generic, well characterised tools for application in the rational genetic manipulation of organisms: if synthetic biology principles were adopted for manipulation of C. reinhardtii, development of this microalga as an industrial biotechnology platform would be expedited. PMID:25641561

  2. Alignment-Annotator web server: rendering and annotating sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Christoph; Fähling, Michael; Weyand, Birgit; Wieland, Thomas; Gille, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Alignment-Annotator is a novel web service designed to generate interactive views of annotated nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments (i) de novo and (ii) embedded in other software. All computations are performed at server side. Interactivity is implemented in HTML5, a language native to web browsers. The alignment is initially displayed using default settings and can be modified with the graphical user interfaces. For example, individual sequences can be reordered or deleted using drag and drop, amino acid color code schemes can be applied and annotations can be added. Annotations can be made manually or imported (BioDAS servers, the UniProt, the Catalytic Site Atlas and the PDB). Some edits take immediate effect while others require server interaction and may take a few seconds to execute. The final alignment document can be downloaded as a zip-archive containing the HTML files. Because of the use of HTML the resulting interactive alignment can be viewed on any platform including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS in any standard web browser. Importantly, no plugins nor Java are required and therefore Alignment-Anotator represents the first interactive browser-based alignment visualization. http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/aa/ and http://strap.charite.de/aa/. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark

    2011-12-22

    Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  4. An improved ARS2-derived nuclear reporter enhances the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering in Chlamydomonas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Hoang, Kevin T D

    2015-01-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to pioneer genetic engineering techniques for high-value protein and biofuel production from algae. To date, most studies of transgenic Chlamydomonas have utilized the chloroplast genome due to its ease of engineering, with a sizeable suite...

  5. Instructional Materials Centers; Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Rosario, Comp.

    An annotated bibliography lists 74 articles and reports on instructional materials centers (IMC) which appeared from 1967-70. The articles deal with such topics as the purposes of an IMC, guidelines for setting up an IMC, and the relationship of an IMC to technology. Most articles deal with use of an IMC on an elementary or secondary level, but…

  6. Designing Annotation Before It's Needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.-M. Nack (Frank); W. Putz

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper considers the automated and semi-automated annotation of audiovisual media in a new type of production framework, A4SM (Authoring System for Syntactic, Semantic and Semiotic Modelling). We present the architecture of the framework and outline the underlying XML-Schema based

  7. Image annotation using clickthrough data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsikrika (Theodora); C. Diou; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); A. Delopoulos

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractAutomatic image annotation using supervised learning is performed by concept classifiers trained on labelled example images. This work proposes the use of clickthrough data collected from search logs as a source for the automatic generation of concept training data, thus avoiding the

  8. Interactions between marine facultative epiphyte Chlamydomonas sp. (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyta) and ceramiaceaen algae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klochkova, Tatyana A; Cho, Ga Youn; Boo, Sung Min; Chung, Ki Wha; Kim, Song Ja; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2008-07-01

    Previously unrecorded marine Chlamydomonas that grew epiphytic on ceramiaceaen algae was collected from the western coast of Korea and isolated into a unialgal culture. The isolate was subjected to 18S rDNA phylogenetic analysis as well as ultrastructure and life cycle studies. It had an affinity with the marine Chlamydomonas species and was less related to freshwater/terrestrial representatives of this genus. It had flagella shorter than the cell body two-layered cell wall with striated outer surface and abundant mucilaginous material beneath the innermost layer and no contractile vacuoles. This alga grew faster in mixed cultures with ceramiaceaen algae rather than in any tested unialgal culture condition; the cells looked healthier and zoosporangia and motile flagellated vegetative cells appeared more often. These results suggested that this Chlamydomonas might be a facultative epiphyte benefiting from its hosts. Several ceramiaceaen algae were tested as host plants. Meanwhile, cell deformation or collapse of the whole thallus was caused to Aglaothamnion byssoides, and preliminary study suggested that a substance released from Chlamydomonas caused the response. This is first report on harmful epiphytic interactions between Chlamydomonas species and red ceramiaceaen algae.

  9. Learning Intelligent Dialogs for Bounding Box Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Konyushkova, Ksenia; Uijlings, Jasper; Lampert, Christoph; Ferrari, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    We introduce Intelligent Annotation Dialogs for bounding box annotation. We train an agent to automatically choose a sequence of actions for a human annotator to produce a bounding box in a minimal amount of time. Specifically, we consider two actions: box verification [37], where the annotator verifies a box generated by an object detector, and manual box drawing. We explore two kinds of agents, one based on predicting the probability that a box will be positively verified, and the other bas...

  10. Annotating images by mining image search results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.J.; Zhang, L.; Li, X.; Ma, W.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search

  11. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  12. Phase-dependent forcing and synchronization in the three-sphere model of Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Rachel R; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas swims with synchronized beating of its two flagella, and is experimentally observed to exhibit run-and-tumble behaviour similar to bacteria. Recently, we studied a simple hydrodynamic three-sphere model of Chlamydomonas with a phase-dependent driving force that can produce run-and-tumble behaviour when intrinsic noise is added, due to the nonlinear mechanics of the system. Here, we consider the noiseless case and explore numerically the parameter space in the driving force profiles, which determine whether or not the synchronized state evolves from a given initial condition, as well as the stability of the synchronized state. We find that phase-dependent forcing, or a beat pattern, is necessary for stable synchronization in the geometry we work with. The phase-dependent forcing allows this simple model of Chlamydomonas to produce a rich variety of behaviours. (paper)

  13. Dictionary-driven protein annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoutsos, Isidore; Huynh, Tien; Floratos, Aris; Parida, Laxmi; Platt, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    Computational methods seeking to automatically determine the properties (functional, structural, physicochemical, etc.) of a protein directly from the sequence have long been the focus of numerous research groups. With the advent of advanced sequencing methods and systems, the number of amino acid sequences that are being deposited in the public databases has been increasing steadily. This has in turn generated a renewed demand for automated approaches that can annotate individual sequences and complete genomes quickly, exhaustively and objectively. In this paper, we present one such approach that is centered around and exploits the Bio-Dictionary, a collection of amino acid patterns that completely covers the natural sequence space and can capture functional and structural signals that have been reused during evolution, within and across protein families. Our annotation approach also makes use of a weighted, position-specific scoring scheme that is unaffected by the over-representation of well-conserved proteins and protein fragments in the databases used. For a given query sequence, the method permits one to determine, in a single pass, the following: local and global similarities between the query and any protein already present in a public database; the likeness of the query to all available archaeal/ bacterial/eukaryotic/viral sequences in the database as a function of amino acid position within the query; the character of secondary structure of the query as a function of amino acid position within the query; the cytoplasmic, transmembrane or extracellular behavior of the query; the nature and position of binding domains, active sites, post-translationally modified sites, signal peptides, etc. In terms of performance, the proposed method is exhaustive, objective and allows for the rapid annotation of individual sequences and full genomes. Annotation examples are presented and discussed in Results, including individual queries and complete genomes that were

  14. Chloroplasts Isolation from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under Nitrogen Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerols are produced in abundance through chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum pathways in some microalgae exposed to stress, though the relative contribution of either pathway remains elusive. Characterization of these pathways requires isolation of the organelles. In this study, an efficient and reproducible approach, including homogenous batch cultures of nitrogen-deprived algal cells in photobioreactors, gentle cell disruption using a simple custom-made disruptor with mechanical shear force, optimized differential centrifugation and Percoll density gradient centrifugation, was developed to isolate chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii subjected to nitrogen stress. Using this approach, the maximum limited stress duration was 4 h and the stressed cells exhibited 19 and 32% decreases in intracellular chlorophyll and nitrogen content, respectively. Chloroplasts with 48 – 300 μg chlorophyll were successfully isolated from stressed cells containing 10 mg chlorophyll. These stressed chloroplasts appeared intact, as monitored by ultrastructure observation and a novel quality control method involving the fatty acid biomarkers. This approach can provide sufficient quantities of intact stressed chloroplasts for subcellular biochemical studies in microalgae.

  15. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Separation Options for Phosphorylated Osteopontin from Transgenic Microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Ayswarya; Guo, Shengchun; Rasala, Beth; Tran, Miller; Mayfield, Stephen; Nikolov, Zivko L

    2018-02-16

    Correct folding and post-translational modifications are vital for therapeutic proteins to elicit their biological functions. Osteopontin (OPN), a bone regenerative protein present in a range of mammalian cells, is an acidic phosphoprotein with multiple potential phosphorylation sites. In this study, the ability of unicellular microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , to produce phosphorylated recombinant OPN in its chloroplast is investigated. This study further explores the impact of phosphorylation and expression from a "plant-like" algae on separation of OPN. Chromatography resins ceramic hydroxyapatite (CHT) and Gallium-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (Ga-IMAC) were assessed for their binding specificity to phosphoproteins. Non-phosphorylated recombinant OPN expressed in E. coli was used to compare the specificity of interaction of the resins to phosphorylated OPN. We observed that CHT binds OPN by multimodal interactions and was better able to distinguish phosphorylated proteins in the presence of 250 mM NaCl. Ga-IMAC interaction with OPN was not selective to phosphorylation, irrespective of salt, as the resin bound OPN from both algal and bacterial sources. Anion exchange chromatography proved an efficient capture method to partially separate major phosphorylated host cell protein impurities such as Rubisco from OPN.

  17. Histones of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Synthesis, acetylation, and methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterborg, J.H.; Robertson, A.J.; Tatar, D.L.; Borza, C.M.; Davie, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Histones of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were prepared by a new method and fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Acid-urea-Triton gel analysis and tritiated acetate labeling demonstrated high levels of steady-state acetylation for the single histone H3 protein, in contrast to low levels on histones H4 and H2B. Twenty percent of histone H3 is subject to dynamic acetylation with, on average, three acetylated lysine residues per protein molecule. Histone synthesis in light-dark-synchronized cultures was biphasic with pattern differences between two histone H1 variants, between two H2A variants, and between H2B and ubiquitinated H2B. Automated protein sequence analysis of histone H3 demonstrated a site-specific pattern of steady-state acetylation between 7 and 17% at five of the six amino-terminal lysines and of monomethylation between 5 and 81% at five of the eight amino-terminal lysines in a pattern that may limit dynamic acetylation. An algal histone H3 sequence was confirmed by protein sequencing with a since threonine as residue 28 instead of the serine(28)-alanine(29) sequence, present in all other known plant and animal H3 histones

  18. Insecticides induced biochemical changes in freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Muthukannan Satheesh; Kabra, Akhil N; Min, Booki; El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Xiong, Jiuqiang; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of insecticides (acephate and imidacloprid) on a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana was investigated with respect to photosynthetic pigments, carbohydrate and protein contents, fatty acids composition and induction of stress indicators including proline, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). C. mexicana was cultivated with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) of acephate and imidacloprid. The microalga growth increased with increasing concentrations of both insecticides up to 15 mg L(-1), beyond which the growth declined compared to control condition (without insecticides). C. mexicana cultivated with 15 mg L(-1) of both insecticides for 12 days was used for further analysis. The accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids), carbohydrates and protein was decreased in the presence of both insecticides. Acephate and imidacloprid induced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and increased the concentration of proline in the microalga, which play a defensive role against various environmental stresses. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the fraction of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased on exposure to both insecticides. C. mexicana also promoted 25 and 21% removal of acephate and imidacloprid, respectively. The biochemical changes in C. mexicana on exposure to acephate and imidacloprid indicate that the microalga undergoes an adaptive change in response to the insecticide-induced oxidative stress.

  19. Separation Options for Phosphorylated Osteopontin from Transgenic Microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayswarya Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Correct folding and post-translational modifications are vital for therapeutic proteins to elicit their biological functions. Osteopontin (OPN, a bone regenerative protein present in a range of mammalian cells, is an acidic phosphoprotein with multiple potential phosphorylation sites. In this study, the ability of unicellular microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to produce phosphorylated recombinant OPN in its chloroplast is investigated. This study further explores the impact of phosphorylation and expression from a “plant-like” algae on separation of OPN. Chromatography resins ceramic hydroxyapatite (CHT and Gallium-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (Ga-IMAC were assessed for their binding specificity to phosphoproteins. Non-phosphorylated recombinant OPN expressed in E. coli was used to compare the specificity of interaction of the resins to phosphorylated OPN. We observed that CHT binds OPN by multimodal interactions and was better able to distinguish phosphorylated proteins in the presence of 250 mM NaCl. Ga-IMAC interaction with OPN was not selective to phosphorylation, irrespective of salt, as the resin bound OPN from both algal and bacterial sources. Anion exchange chromatography proved an efficient capture method to partially separate major phosphorylated host cell protein impurities such as Rubisco from OPN.

  20. Epigenetic and Genetic Contributions to Adaptation in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Ilkka; Bassett, Andrew; Baulcombe, David; Collins, Sinéad

    2017-09-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation or histone modifications, can be transmitted between cellular or organismal generations. However, there are no experiments measuring their role in adaptation, so here we use experimental evolution to investigate how epigenetic variation can contribute to adaptation. We manipulated DNA methylation and histone acetylation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii both genetically and chemically to change the amount of epigenetic variation generated or transmitted in adapting populations in three different environments (salt stress, phosphate starvation, and high CO2) for two hundred asexual generations. We find that reducing the amount of epigenetic variation available to populations can reduce adaptation in environments where it otherwise happens. From genomic and epigenomic sequences from a subset of the populations, we see changes in methylation patterns between the evolved populations over-represented in some functional categories of genes, which is consistent with some of these differences being adaptive. Based on whole genome sequencing of evolved clones, the majority of DNA methylation changes do not appear to be linked to cis-acting genetic mutations. Our results show that transgenerational epigenetic effects play a role in adaptive evolution, and suggest that the relationship between changes in methylation patterns and differences in evolutionary outcomes, at least for quantitative traits such as cell division rates, is complex. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Evaluating Hierarchical Structure in Music Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, Brian; Nieto, Oriol; Farbood, Morwaread M; Bello, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Music exhibits structure at multiple scales, ranging from motifs to large-scale functional components. When inferring the structure of a piece, different listeners may attend to different temporal scales, which can result in disagreements when they describe the same piece. In the field of music informatics research (MIR), it is common to use corpora annotated with structural boundaries at different levels. By quantifying disagreements between multiple annotators, previous research has yielded several insights relevant to the study of music cognition. First, annotators tend to agree when structural boundaries are ambiguous. Second, this ambiguity seems to depend on musical features, time scale, and genre. Furthermore, it is possible to tune current annotation evaluation metrics to better align with these perceptual differences. However, previous work has not directly analyzed the effects of hierarchical structure because the existing methods for comparing structural annotations are designed for "flat" descriptions, and do not readily generalize to hierarchical annotations. In this paper, we extend and generalize previous work on the evaluation of hierarchical descriptions of musical structure. We derive an evaluation metric which can compare hierarchical annotations holistically across multiple levels. sing this metric, we investigate inter-annotator agreement on the multilevel annotations of two different music corpora, investigate the influence of acoustic properties on hierarchical annotations, and evaluate existing hierarchical segmentation algorithms against the distribution of inter-annotator agreement.

  2. Marky: a tool supporting annotation consistency in multi-user and iterative document annotation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália

    2015-02-01

    Document annotation is a key task in the development of Text Mining methods and applications. High quality annotated corpora are invaluable, but their preparation requires a considerable amount of resources and time. Although the existing annotation tools offer good user interaction interfaces to domain experts, project management and quality control abilities are still limited. Therefore, the current work introduces Marky, a new Web-based document annotation tool equipped to manage multi-user and iterative projects, and to evaluate annotation quality throughout the project life cycle. At the core, Marky is a Web application based on the open source CakePHP framework. User interface relies on HTML5 and CSS3 technologies. Rangy library assists in browser-independent implementation of common DOM range and selection tasks, and Ajax and JQuery technologies are used to enhance user-system interaction. Marky grants solid management of inter- and intra-annotator work. Most notably, its annotation tracking system supports systematic and on-demand agreement analysis and annotation amendment. Each annotator may work over documents as usual, but all the annotations made are saved by the tracking system and may be further compared. So, the project administrator is able to evaluate annotation consistency among annotators and across rounds of annotation, while annotators are able to reject or amend subsets of annotations made in previous rounds. As a side effect, the tracking system minimises resource and time consumption. Marky is a novel environment for managing multi-user and iterative document annotation projects. Compared to other tools, Marky offers a similar visually intuitive annotation experience while providing unique means to minimise annotation effort and enforce annotation quality, and therefore corpus consistency. Marky is freely available for non-commercial use at http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/marky. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Werkzeuge zur Annotation diachroner Korpora

    OpenAIRE

    Burghardt, Manuel; Wolff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Wir diskutieren zunächst die Problematik der (syntaktischen) Annotation diachroner Korpora und stellen anschließend eine Evaluationsstudie vor, bei der mehr als 50 Annotationswerkzeuge und -frameworks vor dem Hintergrund eines funktionalen und software-ergonomischen Anforderungsprofils nach dem Qualitätsmodell von ISO/IEC 9126-1:2001 (Software engineering – Product quality – Part 1: Quality model) und ISO/IEC 25000:2005 (Software Engineering – Software product Quality Requirements and Evaluat...

  4. AISO: Annotation of Image Segments with Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingutla, Nikhil Tej; Preece, Justin; Todorovic, Sinisa; Cooper, Laurel; Moore, Laura; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of digital images are now generated for biological collections, including those developed in projects premised on the high-throughput screening of genome-phenome experiments. These images often carry annotations on taxonomy and observable features, such as anatomical structures and phenotype variations often recorded in response to the environmental factors under which the organisms were sampled. At present, most of these annotations are described in free text, may involve limited use of non-standard vocabularies, and rarely specify precise coordinates of features on the image plane such that a computer vision algorithm could identify, extract and annotate them. Therefore, researchers and curators need a tool that can identify and demarcate features in an image plane and allow their annotation with semantically contextual ontology terms. Such a tool would generate data useful for inter and intra-specific comparison and encourage the integration of curation standards. In the future, quality annotated image segments may provide training data sets for developing machine learning applications for automated image annotation. We developed a novel image segmentation and annotation software application, "Annotation of Image Segments with Ontologies" (AISO). The tool enables researchers and curators to delineate portions of an image into multiple highlighted segments and annotate them with an ontology-based controlled vocabulary. AISO is a freely available Java-based desktop application and runs on multiple platforms. It can be downloaded at http://www.plantontology.org/software/AISO. AISO enables curators and researchers to annotate digital images with ontology terms in a manner which ensures the future computational value of the annotated images. We foresee uses for such data-encoded image annotations in biological data mining, machine learning, predictive annotation, semantic inference, and comparative analyses.

  5. Computational algorithms to predict Gene Ontology annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinoli, Pietro; Chicco, Davide; Masseroli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Gene function annotations, which are associations between a gene and a term of a controlled vocabulary describing gene functional features, are of paramount importance in modern biology. Datasets of these annotations, such as the ones provided by the Gene Ontology Consortium, are used to design novel biological experiments and interpret their results. Despite their importance, these sources of information have some known issues. They are incomplete, since biological knowledge is far from being definitive and it rapidly evolves, and some erroneous annotations may be present. Since the curation process of novel annotations is a costly procedure, both in economical and time terms, computational tools that can reliably predict likely annotations, and thus quicken the discovery of new gene annotations, are very useful. We used a set of computational algorithms and weighting schemes to infer novel gene annotations from a set of known ones. We used the latent semantic analysis approach, implementing two popular algorithms (Latent Semantic Indexing and Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) and propose a novel method, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis, which adds a clustering step on the set of considered genes. Furthermore, we propose the improvement of these algorithms by weighting the annotations in the input set. We tested our methods and their weighted variants on the Gene Ontology annotation sets of three model organism genes (Bos taurus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster ). The methods showed their ability in predicting novel gene annotations and the weighting procedures demonstrated to lead to a valuable improvement, although the obtained results vary according to the dimension of the input annotation set and the considered algorithm. Out of the three considered methods, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis is the one that provides better results. In particular, when coupled with a proper weighting policy, it is able to predict a

  6. Bioavailability of wastewater derived dissolved organic nitrogen to green microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Chlorella vulgaris with/without presence of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyi; Simsek, Halis

    2017-07-01

    Effluent dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is problematic in nutrient sensitive surface waters and needs to be reduced to meet demanding total dissolved nitrogen discharge limits. Bioavailable DON (ABDON) is a portion of DON utilized by algae or algae+bacteria, while biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON decomposable by bacteria. ABDON and BDON in a two-stage trickling filter (TF) wastewater treatment plant was evaluated using three different microalgal species, Selenastrum capricornutum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris and mixed cultured bacteria. Results showed that up to 80% of DON was bioavailable to algae or algae+bacteria inoculum while up to 60% of DON was biodegradable in all the samples. Results showed that C. reinhardtii and C. vulgaris can be used as a test species the same as S. capricornutum since there were no significant differences among these three algae species based on their ability to remove nitrogen species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Adaptation prevents the extinction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under toxic beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Baselga-Cervera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current biodiversity crisis represents a historic challenge for natural communities: the environmental rate of change exceeds the population’s adaptation capability. Integrating both ecological and evolutionary responses is necessary to make reliable predictions regarding the loss of biodiversity. The race against extinction from an eco-evolutionary perspective is gaining importance in ecological risk assessment. Here, we performed a classical study of population dynamics—a fluctuation analysis—and evaluated the results from an adaption perspective. Fluctuation analysis, widely used with microorganisms, is an effective empirical procedure to study adaptation under strong selective pressure because it incorporates the factors that influence demographic, genetic and environmental changes. The adaptation of phytoplankton to beryllium (Be is of interest because human activities are increasing the concentration of Be in freshwater reserves; therefore, predicting the effects of human-induced pollutants is necessary for proper risk assessment. The fluctuation analysis was performed with phytoplankton, specifically, the freshwater microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, under acute Be exposure. High doses of Be led to massive microalgae death; however, by conducting a fluctuation analysis experiment, we found that C. reinhardtii was able to adapt to 33 mg/l of Be due to pre-existing genetic variability. The rescuing adapting genotype presented a mutation rate of 9.61 × 10−6 and a frequency of 10.42 resistant cells per million wild-type cells. The genetic adaptation pathway that was experimentally obtained agreed with the theoretical models of evolutionary rescue (ER. Furthermore, the rescuing genotype presented phenotypic and physiologic differences from the wild-type genotype, was 25% smaller than the Be-resistant genotype and presented a lower fitness and quantum yield performance. The abrupt distinctions between the wild-type and the Be

  8. Flagellar coordination in Chlamydomonas cells held on micropipettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüffer, U; Nultsch, W

    1998-01-01

    The two flagella of Chlamydomonas are known to beat synchronously: During breaststroke beating they are generally coordinated in a bilateral way while in shock responses during undulatory beating coordination is mostly parallel [Rüffer and Nultsch, 1995: Botanica Acta 108:169-276]. Analysis of a great number of shock responses revealed that in undulatory beats also periods of bilateral coordination are found and that the coordination type may change several times during a shock response, without concomitant changes of the beat envelope and the beat period. In normal wt cells no coordination changes are found during breaststroke beating, but only short temporary asynchronies: During 2 or 3 normal beats of the cis flagellum, the trans flagellum performs 3 or 4 flat beats with a reduced beat envelope and a smaller beat period, resulting in one additional trans beat. Long periods with flat beats of the same shape and beat period are found in both flagella of the non-phototactic mutant ptx1 and in defective wt 622E cells. During these periods, the coordination is parallel, the two flagella beat alternately. A correlation between normal asynchronous trans beats and the parallel-coordinated beats in the presumably cis defective cells and also the undulatory beats is discussed. In the cis defective cells, a perpetual spontaneous change between parallel beats with small beat periods (higher beat frequency) and bilateral beats with greater beat periods (lower beat frequency) are observed and render questionable the existence of two different intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella cis and trans. Asynchronies occur spontaneously but may also be induced by light changes, either step-up or step-down, but not by both stimuli in turn as breaststroke flagellar photoresponses (BFPRs). Asynchronies are not involved in phototaxis. They are independent of the BFPRs, which are supposed to be the basis of phototaxis. Both types of coordination must be assumed to be regulated

  9. Ultraviolet modification of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for carbon capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal NS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nikhil S Gopal,1 K Sudhakar2 1The Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ, USA; 2Bioenergy Laboratory, Malauna Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, India Purpose: Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels have been rising rapidly. Algae are single-cell organisms with highly efficient CO2 uptake mechanisms. Algae yield two to ten times more biomass versus terrestrial plants and can grow nearly anywhere. Large scale CO2 sequestration is not yet sustainable due to high amounts of nitrogen (N and phosphate (P needed to grow algae in media. Methods: Mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were created using ultraviolet light (2.2–3 K J/m2 and natural selection using media with 20%–80% lower N and P compared to standard Sueoka's high salt medium. Strains were selected based upon growth in media concentrations varying from 20% to 80% less N/P compared to control. Biomass was compared to wild-type control (CC-125 using direct counts, optical density dry weight, and mean doubling time. Results: Mean doubling time was 20 and 25 hours in the low N and N/P strains, respectively (vs 66 hours in control. Using direct counts, growth rates of mutant strains of low N and N/P cultures were not statistically different from control (P=0.37 and 0.70, respectively. Conclusion: Two new strains of algae, as well as wild-type control, were able to grow while using 20%–40% less N and P. Ultraviolet light-based modification of algae is an inexpensive and alternative option to genetic engineering techniques. This technique might make larger scale biosequestration possible. Keywords: biosequestration, ultraviolet, carbon sequestration, carbon capture, algae

  10. An open annotation ontology for science on web 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Ocana, Marco; Garcia Castro, Leyla Jael; Das, Sudeshna; Clark, Tim

    2011-05-17

    There is currently a gap between the rich and expressive collection of published biomedical ontologies, and the natural language expression of biomedical papers consumed on a daily basis by scientific researchers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an open, shareable structure for dynamic integration of biomedical domain ontologies with the scientific document, in the form of an Annotation Ontology (AO), thus closing this gap and enabling application of formal biomedical ontologies directly to the literature as it emerges. Initial requirements for AO were elicited by analysis of integration needs between biomedical web communities, and of needs for representing and integrating results of biomedical text mining. Analysis of strengths and weaknesses of previous efforts in this area was also performed. A series of increasingly refined annotation tools were then developed along with a metadata model in OWL, and deployed for feedback and additional requirements the ontology to users at a major pharmaceutical company and a major academic center. Further requirements and critiques of the model were also elicited through discussions with many colleagues and incorporated into the work. This paper presents Annotation Ontology (AO), an open ontology in OWL-DL for annotating scientific documents on the web. AO supports both human and algorithmic content annotation. It enables "stand-off" or independent metadata anchored to specific positions in a web document by any one of several methods. In AO, the document may be annotated but is not required to be under update control of the annotator. AO contains a provenance model to support versioning, and a set model for specifying groups and containers of annotation. AO is freely available under open source license at http://purl.org/ao/, and extensive documentation including screencasts is available on AO's Google Code page: http://code.google.com/p/annotation-ontology/ . The Annotation Ontology meets critical requirements for

  11. Gene silencing of stearoyl-ACP desaturase enhances the stearic acid content in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, de L.; Springer, J.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Martens, D.E.; Eggink, G.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD), the enzyme that converts stearic acid into oleic acid, is silenced by artificial microRNA in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Two different constructs, which target different positions on the mRNA of stearoyl-ACP desaturase, were tested.

  12. Modifying effect of caffeine on lethality and mutability of Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podstavkova, S.; Vlcek, D.; Miadokova, E.

    1983-01-01

    The modifying effect of caffeine was studied using two standard and two UV-sensitive strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardii Dang. Cell survival and mutation frequency was microscopically evaluated on media without caffeine and on media with 1.5 mM of caffeine. The obtained results were indicative of the stimulating effect of caffeine upon survival in all strains. (author)

  13. The cell cycle of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the role of the commitment point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oldenhof, H.; Zachleder, Vilém; van den Ende, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2007), s. 53-60 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chlamydomonas reinhardtii * cell cycle * commitment point Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  14. Triclosan-induced transcriptional and biochemical alterations in the freshwater green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Chang Gui; Peng, Feng-Jiao; Shi, Wen Jun; Hu, Li Xin; Wei, Xiao Dong; Ying, Guang Guo

    2018-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antibacterial and antifungal agent widely used in personal care products (PCPs). We investigated the effects of TCS (20 μg/L, 100 μg/L and 500 μg/L) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by measuring the algal growth, chlorophyll content, lipid peroxidation, and transcription of the

  15. Rapid induction of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris by Brefeldin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwoo Kim

    Full Text Available Algal lipids are the focus of intensive research because they are potential sources of biodiesel. However, most algae produce neutral lipids only under stress conditions. Here, we report that treatment with Brefeldin A (BFA, a chemical inducer of ER stress, rapidly triggers lipid droplet (LD formation in two different microalgal species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. LD staining using Nile red revealed that BFA-treated algal cells exhibited many more fluorescent bodies than control cells. Lipid analyses based on thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography revealed that the additional lipids formed upon BFA treatment were mainly triacylglycerols (TAGs. The increase in TAG accumulation was accompanied by a decrease in the betaine lipid diacylglyceryl N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS, a major component of the extraplastidic membrane lipids in Chlamydomonas, suggesting that at least some of the TAGs were assembled from the degradation products of membrane lipids. Interestingly, BFA induced TAG accumulation in the Chlamydomonas cells regardless of the presence or absence of an acetate or nitrogen source in the medium. This effect of BFA in Chlamydomonas cells seems to be due to BFA-induced ER stress, as supported by the induction of three homologs of ER stress marker genes by the drug. Together, these results suggest that ER stress rapidly triggers TAG accumulation in two green microalgae, C. reinhardtii and C. vulgaris. A further investigation of the link between ER stress and TAG synthesis may yield an efficient means of producing biofuel from algae.

  16. Identification of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii endogenous genic flanking sequences for improved transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Paz, Cristina; Liu, Dianyi; Geng, Sa; Umen, James G

    2017-12-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga that has attracted interest due to its potential biotechnological applications, and as a model for algal biofuel and energy metabolism. Despite all the advantages that this unicellular alga offers, poor and inconsistent expression of nuclear transgenes remains an obstacle for basic and applied research. We used a data-mining strategy to identify highly expressed genes in Chlamydomonas whose flanking sequences were tested for the ability to drive heterologous nuclear transgene expression. Candidates identified in this search included two ribosomal protein genes, RPL35a and RPL23, and ferredoxin, FDX1, whose flanking regions including promoters, terminators and untranslated sequences could drive stable luciferase transgene expression to significantly higher levels than the commonly used Hsp70A-RBCS2 (AR) hybrid promoter/terminator sequences. The RPL23 flanking sequences were further tested using the zeocin resistance gene sh-ble as a reporter in monocistronic and dicistronic constructs, and consistently yielded higher numbers of zeocin-resistant transformants and higher levels of resistance than AR- or PSAD-based vectors. Chlamydomonas RPL23 sequences also enabled transgene expression in Volvox carteri. Our study provides an additional benchmark for strong constitutive expression of transgenes in Chlamydomonas, and develops a general approach for identifying flanking sequences that can be used to drive transgene expression for any organism where transcriptome data are available. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Historical perspective on Chlamydomonas as a model for basic research: 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Ursula

    2015-05-01

    During the period 1950-1970, groundbreaking research on the genetic mapping of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the use of mutant strains to analyze photosynthesis was conducted in the laboratory of R. Paul Levine at Harvard University. An account of this era, based in part on interviews with Levine, is presented. © 2015 The Author The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Annotation of regular polysemy and underspecification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Alonso, Héctor; Pedersen, Bolette Sandford; Bel, Núria

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of an annotation task on regular polysemy for a series of seman- tic classes or dot types in English, Dan- ish and Spanish. This article describes the annotation process, the results in terms of inter-encoder agreement, and the sense distributions obtained with two methods......: majority voting with a theory-compliant backoff strategy, and MACE, an unsuper- vised system to choose the most likely sense from all the annotations....

  19. BioAnnote: a software platform for annotating biomedical documents with application in medical learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, H; Reboiro-Jato, M; Glez-Peña, D; Aparicio, F; Gachet, D; Buenaga, M; Fdez-Riverola, F

    2013-07-01

    Automatic term annotation from biomedical documents and external information linking are becoming a necessary prerequisite in modern computer-aided medical learning systems. In this context, this paper presents BioAnnote, a flexible and extensible open-source platform for automatically annotating biomedical resources. Apart from other valuable features, the software platform includes (i) a rich client enabling users to annotate multiple documents in a user friendly environment, (ii) an extensible and embeddable annotation meta-server allowing for the annotation of documents with local or remote vocabularies and (iii) a simple client/server protocol which facilitates the use of our meta-server from any other third-party application. In addition, BioAnnote implements a powerful scripting engine able to perform advanced batch annotations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Annotating temporal information in clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiyi; Rumshisky, Anna; Uzuner, Ozlem

    2013-12-01

    Temporal information in clinical narratives plays an important role in patients' diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. In order to represent narrative information accurately, medical natural language processing (MLP) systems need to correctly identify and interpret temporal information. To promote research in this area, the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) project developed a temporally annotated corpus of clinical narratives. This corpus contains 310 de-identified discharge summaries, with annotations of clinical events, temporal expressions and temporal relations. This paper describes the process followed for the development of this corpus and discusses annotation guideline development, annotation methodology, and corpus quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  2. ANNOTATION SUPPORTED OCCLUDED OBJECT TRACKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinder Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracking occluded objects at different depths has become as extremely important component of study for any video sequence having wide applications in object tracking, scene recognition, coding, editing the videos and mosaicking. The paper studies the ability of annotation to track the occluded object based on pyramids with variation in depth further establishing a threshold at which the ability of the system to track the occluded object fails. Image annotation is applied on 3 similar video sequences varying in depth. In the experiment, one bike occludes the other at a depth of 60cm, 80cm and 100cm respectively. Another experiment is performed on tracking humans with similar depth to authenticate the results. The paper also computes the frame by frame error incurred by the system, supported by detailed simulations. This system can be effectively used to analyze the error in motion tracking and further correcting the error leading to flawless tracking. This can be of great interest to computer scientists while designing surveillance systems etc.

  3. Annotating and Interpreting Linear and Cyclic Peptide Tandem Mass Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides often possess pronounced bioactivity, and thus, they are often interesting hit compounds in natural product-based drug discovery programs. Their mass spectrometric characterization is difficult due to the predominant occurrence of non-proteinogenic monomers and, especially in the case of cyclic peptides, the complex fragmentation patterns observed. This makes nonribosomal peptide tandem mass spectra annotation challenging and time-consuming. To meet this challenge, software tools for this task have been developed. In this chapter, the workflow for using the software mMass for the annotation of experimentally obtained peptide tandem mass spectra is described. mMass is freely available (http://www.mmass.org), open-source, and the most advanced and user-friendly software tool for this purpose. The software enables the analyst to concisely annotate and interpret tandem mass spectra of linear and cyclic peptides. Thus, it is highly useful for accelerating the structure confirmation and elucidation of cyclic as well as linear peptides and depsipeptides.

  4. annot8r: GO, EC and KEGG annotation of EST datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ralf; Blaxter, Mark L

    2008-04-09

    The expressed sequence tag (EST) methodology is an attractive option for the generation of sequence data for species for which no completely sequenced genome is available. The annotation and comparative analysis of such datasets poses a formidable challenge for research groups that do not have the bioinformatics infrastructure of major genome sequencing centres. Therefore, there is a need for user-friendly tools to facilitate the annotation of non-model species EST datasets with well-defined ontologies that enable meaningful cross-species comparisons. To address this, we have developed annot8r, a platform for the rapid annotation of EST datasets with GO-terms, EC-numbers and KEGG-pathways. annot8r automatically downloads all files relevant for the annotation process and generates a reference database that stores UniProt entries, their associated Gene Ontology (GO), Enzyme Commission (EC) and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotation and additional relevant data. For each of GO, EC and KEGG, annot8r extracts a specific sequence subset from the UniProt dataset based on the information stored in the reference database. These three subsets are then formatted for BLAST searches. The user provides the protein or nucleotide sequences to be annotated and annot8r runs BLAST searches against these three subsets. The BLAST results are parsed and the corresponding annotations retrieved from the reference database. The annotations are saved both as flat files and also in a relational postgreSQL results database to facilitate more advanced searches within the results. annot8r is integrated with the PartiGene suite of EST analysis tools. annot8r is a tool that assigns GO, EC and KEGG annotations for data sets resulting from EST sequencing projects both rapidly and efficiently. The benefits of an underlying relational database, flexibility and the ease of use of the program make it ideally suited for non-model species EST-sequencing projects.

  5. Black English Annotations for Elementary Reading Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sandre

    This report describes a program that uses annotations in the teacher's editions of existing reading programs to indicate the characteristics of black English that may interfere with the reading process of black children. The first part of the report provides a rationale for the annotation approach, explaining that the discrepancy between written…

  6. Ground Truth Annotation in T Analyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This video shows how to annotate the ground truth tracks in the thermal videos. The ground truth tracks are produced to be able to compare them to tracks obtained from a Computer Vision tracking approach. The program used for annotation is T-Analyst, which is developed by Aliaksei Laureshyn, Ph...

  7. Towards the Automated Annotation of Process Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, H.; Meilicke, C.; Fellmann, M.; Pittke, F.; Stuckenschmidt, H.; Mendling, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many techniques for the advanced analysis of process models build on the annotation of process models with elements from predefined vocabularies such as taxonomies. However, the manual annotation of process models is cumbersome and sometimes even hardly manageable taking the size of taxonomies into

  8. Towards Viral Genome Annotation Standards, Report from the 2010 NCBI Annotation Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, James Rodney; Bao, Yiming; Kuiken, Carla; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Le Mercier, Philippe; Leplae, Raphael; Madupu, Ramana; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schobel, Seth; Seto, Donald; Shrivastava, Susmita; Sterk, Peter; Zeng, Qiandong; Klimke, William; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in DNA sequencing technologies portend a new era in virology and could possibly lead to a giant leap in our understanding of viral evolution and ecology. Yet, as viral genome sequences begin to fill the world's biological databases, it is critically important to recognize that the scientific promise of this era is dependent on consistent and comprehensive genome annotation. With this in mind, the NCBI Genome Annotation Workshop recently hosted a study group tasked with developing sequence, function, and metadata annotation standards for viral genomes. This report describes the issues involved in viral genome annotation and reviews policy recommendations presented at the NCBI Annotation Workshop.

  9. Towards Viral Genome Annotation Standards, Report from the 2010 NCBI Annotation Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiandong Zeng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in DNA sequencing technologies portend a new era in virology and could possibly lead to a giant leap in our understanding of viral evolution and ecology. Yet, as viral genome sequences begin to fill the world’s biological databases, it is critically important to recognize that the scientific promise of this era is dependent on consistent and comprehensive genome annotation. With this in mind, the NCBI Genome Annotation Workshop recently hosted a study group tasked with developing sequence, function, and metadata annotation standards for viral genomes. This report describes the issues involved in viral genome annotation and reviews policy recommendations presented at the NCBI Annotation Workshop.

  10. Creating Gaze Annotations in Head Mounted Displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Qvarfordt, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate distributed communication in mobile settings, we developed GazeNote for creating and sharing gaze annotations in head mounted displays (HMDs). With gaze annotations it possible to point out objects of interest within an image and add a verbal description. To create an annota- tion......, the user simply captures an image using the HMD’s camera, looks at an object of interest in the image, and speaks out the information to be associated with the object. The gaze location is recorded and visualized with a marker. The voice is transcribed using speech recognition. Gaze annotations can...... be shared. Our study showed that users found that gaze annotations add precision and expressive- ness compared to annotations of the image as a whole...

  11. Ion implantation: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, R.N.; Subramanyam, K.

    1975-10-01

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing controlled amounts of dopants into target substrates, and has been successfully used for the manufacture of silicon semiconductor devices. Ion implantation is superior to other methods of doping such as thermal diffusion and epitaxy, in view of its advantages such as high degree of control, flexibility, and amenability to automation. This annotated bibliography of 416 references consists of journal articles, books, and conference papers in English and foreign languages published during 1973-74, on all aspects of ion implantation including range distribution and concentration profile, channeling, radiation damage and annealing, compound semiconductors, structural and electrical characterization, applications, equipment and ion sources. Earlier bibliographies on ion implantation, and national and international conferences in which papers on ion implantation were presented have also been listed separately

  12. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gresham Cathy R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO. However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and

  13. Concept annotation in the CRAFT corpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, Michael; Eckert, Miriam; Evans, Donald; Garcia, Kristin; Shipley, Krista; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Baumgartner, William A; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Verspoor, Karin; Blake, Judith A; Hunter, Lawrence E

    2012-07-09

    Manually annotated corpora are critical for the training and evaluation of automated methods to identify concepts in biomedical text. This paper presents the concept annotations of the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus, a collection of 97 full-length, open-access biomedical journal articles that have been annotated both semantically and syntactically to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural-language-processing (NLP) community. CRAFT identifies all mentions of nearly all concepts from nine prominent biomedical ontologies and terminologies: the Cell Type Ontology, the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest ontology, the NCBI Taxonomy, the Protein Ontology, the Sequence Ontology, the entries of the Entrez Gene database, and the three subontologies of the Gene Ontology. The first public release includes the annotations for 67 of the 97 articles, reserving two sets of 15 articles for future text-mining competitions (after which these too will be released). Concept annotations were created based on a single set of guidelines, which has enabled us to achieve consistently high interannotator agreement. As the initial 67-article release contains more than 560,000 tokens (and the full set more than 790,000 tokens), our corpus is among the largest gold-standard annotated biomedical corpora. Unlike most others, the journal articles that comprise the corpus are drawn from diverse biomedical disciplines and are marked up in their entirety. Additionally, with a concept-annotation count of nearly 100,000 in the 67-article subset (and more than 140,000 in the full collection), the scale of conceptual markup is also among the largest of comparable corpora. The concept annotations of the CRAFT Corpus have the potential to significantly advance biomedical text mining by providing a high-quality gold standard for NLP systems. The corpus, annotation guidelines, and other associated resources are freely available at http://bionlp-corpora.sourceforge.net/CRAFT/index.shtml.

  14. Teaching and Learning Communities through Online Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pluijm, B.

    2016-12-01

    What do colleagues do with your assigned textbook? What they say or think about the material? Want students to be more engaged in their learning experience? If so, online materials that complement standard lecture format provide new opportunity through managed, online group annotation that leverages the ubiquity of internet access, while personalizing learning. The concept is illustrated with the new online textbook "Processes in Structural Geology and Tectonics", by Ben van der Pluijm and Stephen Marshak, which offers a platform for sharing of experiences, supplementary materials and approaches, including readings, mathematical applications, exercises, challenge questions, quizzes, alternative explanations, and more. The annotation framework used is Hypothes.is, which offers a free, open platform markup environment for annotation of websites and PDF postings. The annotations can be public, grouped or individualized, as desired, including export access and download of annotations. A teacher group, hosted by a moderator/owner, limits access to members of a user group of teachers, so that its members can use, copy or transcribe annotations for their own lesson material. Likewise, an instructor can host a student group that encourages sharing of observations, questions and answers among students and instructor. Also, the instructor can create one or more closed groups that offers study help and hints to students. Options galore, all of which aim to engage students and to promote greater responsibility for their learning experience. Beyond new capacity, the ability to analyze student annotation supports individual learners and their needs. For example, student notes can be analyzed for key phrases and concepts, and identify misunderstandings, omissions and problems. Also, example annotations can be shared to enhance notetaking skills and to help with studying. Lastly, online annotation allows active application to lecture posted slides, supporting real-time notetaking

  15. Concept annotation in the CRAFT corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Manually annotated corpora are critical for the training and evaluation of automated methods to identify concepts in biomedical text. Results This paper presents the concept annotations of the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus, a collection of 97 full-length, open-access biomedical journal articles that have been annotated both semantically and syntactically to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural-language-processing (NLP) community. CRAFT identifies all mentions of nearly all concepts from nine prominent biomedical ontologies and terminologies: the Cell Type Ontology, the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest ontology, the NCBI Taxonomy, the Protein Ontology, the Sequence Ontology, the entries of the Entrez Gene database, and the three subontologies of the Gene Ontology. The first public release includes the annotations for 67 of the 97 articles, reserving two sets of 15 articles for future text-mining competitions (after which these too will be released). Concept annotations were created based on a single set of guidelines, which has enabled us to achieve consistently high interannotator agreement. Conclusions As the initial 67-article release contains more than 560,000 tokens (and the full set more than 790,000 tokens), our corpus is among the largest gold-standard annotated biomedical corpora. Unlike most others, the journal articles that comprise the corpus are drawn from diverse biomedical disciplines and are marked up in their entirety. Additionally, with a concept-annotation count of nearly 100,000 in the 67-article subset (and more than 140,000 in the full collection), the scale of conceptual markup is also among the largest of comparable corpora. The concept annotations of the CRAFT Corpus have the potential to significantly advance biomedical text mining by providing a high-quality gold standard for NLP systems. The corpus, annotation guidelines, and other associated resources are freely available at http

  16. Automatic annotation of head velocity and acceleration in Anvil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart

    2012-01-01

    We describe an automatic face tracker plugin for the ANVIL annotation tool. The face tracker produces data for velocity and for acceleration in two dimensions. We compare the annotations generated by the face tracking algorithm with independently made manual annotations for head movements....... The annotations are a useful supplement to manual annotations and may help human annotators to quickly and reliably determine onset of head movements and to suggest which kind of head movement is taking place....

  17. New in protein structure and function annotation: hotspots, single nucleotide polymorphisms and the 'Deep Web'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Yana; Yachdav, Guy; Ofran, Yanay; Schneider, Reinhard; Rost, Burkhard

    2009-05-01

    The rapidly increasing quantity of protein sequence data continues to widen the gap between available sequences and annotations. Comparative modeling suggests some aspects of the 3D structures of approximately half of all known proteins; homology- and network-based inferences annotate some aspect of function for a similar fraction of the proteome. For most known protein sequences, however, there is detailed knowledge about neither their function nor their structure. Comprehensive efforts towards the expert curation of sequence annotations have failed to meet the demand of the rapidly increasing number of available sequences. Only the automated prediction of protein function in the absence of homology can close the gap between available sequences and annotations in the foreseeable future. This review focuses on two novel methods for automated annotation, and briefly presents an outlook on how modern web software may revolutionize the field of protein sequence annotation. First, predictions of protein binding sites and functional hotspots, and the evolution of these into the most successful type of prediction of protein function from sequence will be discussed. Second, a new tool, comprehensive in silico mutagenesis, which contributes important novel predictions of function and at the same time prepares for the onset of the next sequencing revolution, will be described. While these two new sub-fields of protein prediction represent the breakthroughs that have been achieved methodologically, it will then be argued that a different development might further change the way biomedical researchers benefit from annotations: modern web software can connect the worldwide web in any browser with the 'Deep Web' (ie, proprietary data resources). The availability of this direct connection, and the resulting access to a wealth of data, may impact drug discovery and development more than any existing method that contributes to protein annotation.

  18. Semantic annotation of consumer health questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Ben Abacha, Asma; Mrabet, Yassine; Shooshan, Sonya E; Rodriguez, Laritza; Masterton, Kate; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2018-02-06

    Consumers increasingly use online resources for their health information needs. While current search engines can address these needs to some extent, they generally do not take into account that most health information needs are complex and can only fully be expressed in natural language. Consumer health question answering (QA) systems aim to fill this gap. A major challenge in developing consumer health QA systems is extracting relevant semantic content from the natural language questions (question understanding). To develop effective question understanding tools, question corpora semantically annotated for relevant question elements are needed. In this paper, we present a two-part consumer health question corpus annotated with several semantic categories: named entities, question triggers/types, question frames, and question topic. The first part (CHQA-email) consists of relatively long email requests received by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) customer service, while the second part (CHQA-web) consists of shorter questions posed to MedlinePlus search engine as queries. Each question has been annotated by two annotators. The annotation methodology is largely the same between the two parts of the corpus; however, we also explain and justify the differences between them. Additionally, we provide information about corpus characteristics, inter-annotator agreement, and our attempts to measure annotation confidence in the absence of adjudication of annotations. The resulting corpus consists of 2614 questions (CHQA-email: 1740, CHQA-web: 874). Problems are the most frequent named entities, while treatment and general information questions are the most common question types. Inter-annotator agreement was generally modest: question types and topics yielded highest agreement, while the agreement for more complex frame annotations was lower. Agreement in CHQA-web was consistently higher than that in CHQA-email. Pairwise inter-annotator agreement proved most

  19. Making web annotations persistent over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van De Sompel, Herbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  20. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  1. Asymmetric properties of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytoskeleton direct rhodopsin photoreceptor localization

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M.; Boyd, Joseph S.; Lamb, Mary Rose; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2011-01-01

    The eyespot of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoreceptive organelle required for phototaxis. Relative to the anterior flagella, the eyespot is asymmetrically positioned adjacent to the daughter four-membered rootlet (D4), a unique bundle of acetylated microtubules extending from the daughter basal body toward the posterior of the cell. Here, we detail the relationship between the rhodopsin eyespot photoreceptor Channelrhodopsin 1 (ChR1) and acetylated microtubule...

  2. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: duration of its cell cycle and phases at growth rates affected by temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Kawano, S.; Zachleder, Vilém; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 234, č. 2 (2011), s. 599-608 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200614; GA ČR GA525/09/0102; GA ČR GA204/09/0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell cycle phases * Cell division timing * Chlamydomonas Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2011

  3. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: duration of its cell cycle and phases at growth rates affected by light intensity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Umysová, Dáša; Hlavová, Monika; Kawano, S.; Zachleder, Vilém; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 233, č. 1 (2011), s. 75-86 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200614; GA ČR GA525/09/0102; GA ČR GA204/09/0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell division timing * Cell cycle phases * Chlamydomonas Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2011

  4. Relation between hydrogen production and photosynthesis in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The modernized world is over-consuming low-cost energy sources that strongly contributes to pollution and environmental stress. As a consequence, the interest for environmentally friendly alternatives has increased immensely. One such alternative is the use of solar energy and water as a raw material to produce biohydrogen through the process of photosynthetic water splitting. In this work, the relation between H2-production and photosynthesis in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was ...

  5. The regulatory network adjusting light-harvesting in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, control of light-harvesting is a key component of acclimation mechanisms that optimize photon conversion efficiencies. In this thesis, the interrelation of short- and long-term regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) was analyzed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This model organism is able to gain carbon and energy through photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation as well as heterotrophic feeding. A lowered inorganic or increased organic c...

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicit...

  7. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-C...

  8. Carbon acquisition and accumulation in microalgae Chlamydomonas: Insights from "omics" approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck, Flavia Vischi; Páez Melo, David Orlando; González Barrios, Andrés Fernando

    2013-12-06

    Understanding the processes and mechanisms of carbon acquisition and accumulation in microalgae is fundamental to enhance the cellular capabilities aimed to environmental and industrial applications. The "omics" approaches have greatly contributed to expanding the knowledge on these carbon-related cellular responses, reporting large data sets on microalgae transcriptome, proteome and metabolome. This review emphasizes the advances made on Chlamydomonas exploration; however, some knowledge acquired from studying this model organism, may be extrapolated to close algae species. The large data sets available for this organism revealed the identity of a vast range of genes and proteins which are integrating carbon-related mechanisms. Nevertheless, these data sets have also highlighted the need for integrative analysis in order to fully explore the information enclosed. Here, some of the main results from "omics" approaches which may contribute to the understanding of carbon acquisition and accumulation in Chlamydomonas were reviewed and possible applications were discussed. A number of important publications in the field of "omics" technologies have been published reporting studies of the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and related to microalgal biomass production. However, there are only few attempts to integrate these data. Publications showing the results from "omics" approaches, such as transcriptome, metabolome and proteome, focused in the study of mechanisms of carbon acquisition and accumulation in microalgae were reviewed. This review contributes to highlight the knowledge recently generated on such "omics" studies and it discusses how these results may be important for the advance of applied sciences, such as microalgae biotechnology. © 2013.

  9. An efficient protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheesh, P T; Vineetha, M; Kurup, G Muraleedhara

    2014-06-01

    Algal-based recombinant protein production has gained immense interest in recent years. The development of algal expression system was earlier hindered due to the lack of efficient and cost-effective transformation techniques capable of heterologous gene integration and expression. The recent development of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method is expected to be the ideal solution for these problems. We have developed an efficient protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Pre-treatment of Agrobacterium in TAP induction medium (pH 5.2) containing 100 μM acetosyringone and 1 mM glycine betaine and infection of Chlamydomonas with the induced Agrobacterium greatly improved transformation frequency. This protocol was found to double the number of transgenic events on selection media compared to that of previous reports. PCR was used successfully to amplify fragments of the hpt and GUS genes from transformed cells, while Southern blot confirmed the integration of GUS gene into the genome of C. reinhardtii. RT-PCR, Northern blot and GUS histochemical analyses confirm GUS gene expression in the transgenic cell lines of Chlamydomonas. This protocol provides a quick, efficient, economical and high-frequency transformation method for microalgae.

  10. Metabolism of xenobiotics by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Phenol degradation under conditions affecting photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazos, Theocharis T; Kokarakis, Emmanouel J; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the biodegradation of phenol by axenic cultures of the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated. Biodegradation proved to be a dynamic bioenergetic process, affected by changes in the culture conditions. Microalgae biodegraded defined amounts of phenol, as a result of the induced stress caused at high concentrations, despite the fact that this process proved to be energy demanding and thus affected growth of the culture. High levels of biodegradation were observed both in the absence of an alternative carbon source and in the presence of acetate as a carbon source. Biodegradation of phenol by Chlamydomonas proved to be an aerobic, photoregulated process. This is the first time that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used for bioremediation purposes. This study has demonstrated that the most important factor in the biodegradation of phenol is the selection of the appropriate culture conditions (presence or absence of alternative carbon source, light intensity, and oxygen availability) that provide the best bioenergetic balance among growth, induced stress, and biodegradation of phenol.

  11. Meteor showers an annotated catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kronk, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Meteor showers are among the most spectacular celestial events that may be observed by the naked eye, and have been the object of fascination throughout human history. In “Meteor Showers: An Annotated Catalog,” the interested observer can access detailed research on over 100 annual and periodic meteor streams in order to capitalize on these majestic spectacles. Each meteor shower entry includes details of their discovery, important observations and orbits, and gives a full picture of duration, location in the sky, and expected hourly rates. Armed with a fuller understanding, the amateur observer can better view and appreciate the shower of their choice. The original book, published in 1988, has been updated with over 25 years of research in this new and improved edition. Almost every meteor shower study is expanded, with some original minor showers being dropped while new ones are added. The book also includes breakthroughs in the study of meteor showers, such as accurate predictions of outbursts as well ...

  12. An Informally Annotated Bibliography of Sociolinguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    This annotated bibliography of sociolinguistics is divided into the following sections: speech events, ethnography of speaking and anthropological approaches to analysis of conversation; discourse analysis (including analysis of conversation and narrative), ethnomethodology and nonverbal communication; sociolinguistics; pragmatics (including…

  13. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  14. SASL: A Semantic Annotation System for Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pingpeng; Wang, Guoyin; Zhang, Qin; Jin, Hai

    Due to ambiguity, search engines for scientific literatures may not return right search results. One efficient solution to the problems is to automatically annotate literatures and attach the semantic information to them. Generally, semantic annotation requires identifying entities before attaching semantic information to them. However, due to abbreviation and other reasons, it is very difficult to identify entities correctly. The paper presents a Semantic Annotation System for Literature (SASL), which utilizes Wikipedia as knowledge base to annotate literatures. SASL mainly attaches semantic to terminology, academic institutions, conferences, and journals etc. Many of them are usually abbreviations, which induces ambiguity. Here, SASL uses regular expressions to extract the mapping between full name of entities and their abbreviation. Since full names of several entities may map to a single abbreviation, SASL introduces Hidden Markov Model to implement name disambiguation. Finally, the paper presents the experimental results, which confirm SASL a good performance.

  15. Temporal Annotation in the Clinical Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styler, William F.; Bethard, Steven; Finan, Sean; Palmer, Martha; Pradhan, Sameer; de Groen, Piet C; Erickson, Brad; Miller, Timothy; Lin, Chen; Savova, Guergana; Pustejovsky, James

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the requirements of a formal specification for the annotation of temporal information in clinical narratives. We discuss the implementation and extension of ISO-TimeML for annotating a corpus of clinical notes, known as the THYME corpus. To reflect the information task and the heavily inference-based reasoning demands in the domain, a new annotation guideline has been developed, “the THYME Guidelines to ISO-TimeML (THYME-TimeML)”. To clarify what relations merit annotation, we distinguish between linguistically-derived and inferentially-derived temporal orderings in the text. We also apply a top performing TempEval 2013 system against this new resource to measure the difficulty of adapting systems to the clinical domain. The corpus is available to the community and has been proposed for use in a SemEval 2015 task. PMID:29082229

  16. WormBase: Annotating many nematode genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kevin; Davis, Paul; Paulini, Michael; Tuli, Mary Ann; Williams, Gary; Yook, Karen; Durbin, Richard; Kersey, Paul; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) has been serving the scientific community for over 11 years as the central repository for genomic and genetic information for the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The resource has evolved from its beginnings as a database housing the genomic sequence and genetic and physical maps of a single species, and now represents the breadth and diversity of nematode research, currently serving genome sequence and annotation for around 20 nematodes. In this article, we focus on WormBase's role of genome sequence annotation, describing how we annotate and integrate data from a growing collection of nematode species and strains. We also review our approaches to sequence curation, and discuss the impact on annotation quality of large functional genomics projects such as modENCODE.

  17. Annotated Tsunami bibliography: 1962-1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pararas-Carayannis, G.; Dong, B.; Farmer, R.

    1982-08-01

    This compilation contains annotated citations to nearly 3000 tsunami-related publications from 1962 to 1976 in English and several other languages. The foreign-language citations have English titles and abstracts

  18. Contributions to In Silico Genome Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.

    2017-11-30

    Genome annotation is an important topic since it provides information for the foundation of downstream genomic and biological research. It is considered as a way of summarizing part of existing knowledge about the genomic characteristics of an organism. Annotating different regions of a genome sequence is known as structural annotation, while identifying functions of these regions is considered as a functional annotation. In silico approaches can facilitate both tasks that otherwise would be difficult and timeconsuming. This study contributes to genome annotation by introducing several novel bioinformatics methods, some based on machine learning (ML) approaches. First, we present Dragon PolyA Spotter (DPS), a method for accurate identification of the polyadenylation signals (PAS) within human genomic DNA sequences. For this, we derived a novel feature-set able to characterize properties of the genomic region surrounding the PAS, enabling development of high accuracy optimized ML predictive models. DPS considerably outperformed the state-of-the-art results. The second contribution concerns developing generic models for structural annotation, i.e., the recognition of different genomic signals and regions (GSR) within eukaryotic DNA. We developed DeepGSR, a systematic framework that facilitates generating ML models to predict GSR with high accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, no available generic and automated method exists for such task that could facilitate the studies of newly sequenced organisms. The prediction module of DeepGSR uses deep learning algorithms to derive highly abstract features that depend mainly on proper data representation and hyperparameters calibration. DeepGSR, which was evaluated on recognition of PAS and translation initiation sites (TIS) in different organisms, yields a simpler and more precise representation of the problem under study, compared to some other hand-tailored models, while producing high accuracy prediction results. Finally

  19. Fluid Annotations in a Open World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zellweger, Polle Trescott; Bouvin, Niels Olof; Jehøj, Henning

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Documents use animated typographical changes to provide a novel and appealing user experience for hypertext browsing and for viewing document annotations in context. This paper describes an effort to broaden the utility of Fluid Documents by using the open hypermedia Arakne Environment...... to layer fluid annotations and links on top of abitrary HTML pages on the World Wide Web. Changes to both Fluid Documents and Arakne are required....

  20. Community annotation and bioinformatics workforce development in concert--Little Skate Genome Annotation Workshops and Jamborees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Arighi, Cecilia N; King, Benjamin L; Polson, Shawn W; Vincent, James; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Kingham, Brewster F; Page, Shallee T; Rendino, Marc Farnum; Thomas, William Kelley; Udwary, Daniel W; Wu, Cathy H

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have equipped biologists with a powerful new set of tools for advancing research goals. The resulting flood of sequence data has made it critically important to train the next generation of scientists to handle the inherent bioinformatic challenges. The North East Bioinformatics Collaborative (NEBC) is undertaking the genome sequencing and annotation of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) to promote advancement of bioinformatics infrastructure in our region, with an emphasis on practical education to create a critical mass of informatically savvy life scientists. In support of the Little Skate Genome Project, the NEBC members have developed several annotation workshops and jamborees to provide training in genome sequencing, annotation and analysis. Acting as a nexus for both curation activities and dissemination of project data, a project web portal, SkateBase (http://skatebase.org) has been developed. As a case study to illustrate effective coupling of community annotation with workforce development, we report the results of the Mitochondrial Genome Annotation Jamborees organized to annotate the first completely assembled element of the Little Skate Genome Project, as a culminating experience for participants from our three prior annotation workshops. We are applying the physical/virtual infrastructure and lessons learned from these activities to enhance and streamline the genome annotation workflow, as we look toward our continuing efforts for larger-scale functional and structural community annotation of the L. erinacea genome.

  1. Community annotation and bioinformatics workforce development in concert—Little Skate Genome Annotation Workshops and Jamborees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Arighi, Cecilia N.; King, Benjamin L.; Polson, Shawn W.; Vincent, James; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Kingham, Brewster F.; Page, Shallee T.; Farnum Rendino, Marc; Thomas, William Kelley; Udwary, Daniel W.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have equipped biologists with a powerful new set of tools for advancing research goals. The resulting flood of sequence data has made it critically important to train the next generation of scientists to handle the inherent bioinformatic challenges. The North East Bioinformatics Collaborative (NEBC) is undertaking the genome sequencing and annotation of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) to promote advancement of bioinformatics infrastructure in our region, with an emphasis on practical education to create a critical mass of informatically savvy life scientists. In support of the Little Skate Genome Project, the NEBC members have developed several annotation workshops and jamborees to provide training in genome sequencing, annotation and analysis. Acting as a nexus for both curation activities and dissemination of project data, a project web portal, SkateBase (http://skatebase.org) has been developed. As a case study to illustrate effective coupling of community annotation with workforce development, we report the results of the Mitochondrial Genome Annotation Jamborees organized to annotate the first completely assembled element of the Little Skate Genome Project, as a culminating experience for participants from our three prior annotation workshops. We are applying the physical/virtual infrastructure and lessons learned from these activities to enhance and streamline the genome annotation workflow, as we look toward our continuing efforts for larger-scale functional and structural community annotation of the L. erinacea genome. PMID:22434832

  2. Annotation Method (AM): SE41_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE41_AM1 PowerGet annotation In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS ar..., predicted molecular formulas are used for the annotation. MS/MS patterns was used to suggest functional gr...-MS Fragment Viewer (http://webs2.kazusa.or.jp/msmsfragmentviewer/) are used for annotation and identification of the compounds. ...

  3. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  4. Annotation of microsporidian genomes using transcriptional signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyretaillade, Eric; Parisot, Nicolas; Polonais, Valérie; Terrat, Sébastien; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Mahul, Antoine; Rimour, Sébastien; Gonçalves, Olivier; Bornes, Stéphanie; Delbac, Frédéric; Chebance, Brigitte; Duprat, Simone; Samson, Gaëlle; Katinka, Michael; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Peyret, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    High-quality annotation of microsporidian genomes is essential for understanding the biological processes that govern the development of these parasites. Here we present an improved structural annotation method using transcriptional DNA signals. We apply this method to re-annotate four previously annotated genomes, which allow us to detect annotation errors and identify a significant number of unpredicted genes. We then annotate the newly sequenced genome of Anncaliia algerae. A comparative genomic analysis of A. algerae permits the identification of not only microsporidian core genes, but also potentially highly expressed genes encoding membrane-associated proteins, which represent good candidates involved in the spore architecture, the invasion process and the microsporidian-host relationships. Furthermore, we find that the ten-fold variation in microsporidian genome sizes is not due to gene number, size or complexity, but instead stems from the presence of transposable elements. Such elements, along with kinase regulatory pathways and specific transporters, appear to be key factors in microsporidian adaptive processes.

  5. Annotating the human genome with Disease Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, John D; Flatow, Jared; Holko, Michelle; Lin, Simon M; Kibbe, Warren A; Zhu, Lihua (Julie); Danila, Maria I; Feng, Gang; Chisholm, Rex L

    2009-01-01

    Background The human genome has been extensively annotated with Gene Ontology for biological functions, but minimally computationally annotated for diseases. Results We used the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap Transfer tool (MMTx) to discover gene-disease relationships from the GeneRIF database. We utilized a comprehensive subset of UMLS, which is disease-focused and structured as a directed acyclic graph (the Disease Ontology), to filter and interpret results from MMTx. The results were validated against the Homayouni gene collection using recall and precision measurements. We compared our results with the widely used Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) annotations. Conclusion The validation data set suggests a 91% recall rate and 97% precision rate of disease annotation using GeneRIF, in contrast with a 22% recall and 98% precision using OMIM. Our thesaurus-based approach allows for comparisons to be made between disease containing databases and allows for increased accuracy in disease identification through synonym matching. The much higher recall rate of our approach demonstrates that annotating human genome with Disease Ontology and GeneRIF for diseases dramatically increases the coverage of the disease annotation of human genome. PMID:19594883

  6. annot8r: GO, EC and KEGG annotation of EST datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Ralf

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expressed sequence tag (EST methodology is an attractive option for the generation of sequence data for species for which no completely sequenced genome is available. The annotation and comparative analysis of such datasets poses a formidable challenge for research groups that do not have the bioinformatics infrastructure of major genome sequencing centres. Therefore, there is a need for user-friendly tools to facilitate the annotation of non-model species EST datasets with well-defined ontologies that enable meaningful cross-species comparisons. To address this, we have developed annot8r, a platform for the rapid annotation of EST datasets with GO-terms, EC-numbers and KEGG-pathways. Results annot8r automatically downloads all files relevant for the annotation process and generates a reference database that stores UniProt entries, their associated Gene Ontology (GO, Enzyme Commission (EC and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG annotation and additional relevant data. For each of GO, EC and KEGG, annot8r extracts a specific sequence subset from the UniProt dataset based on the information stored in the reference database. These three subsets are then formatted for BLAST searches. The user provides the protein or nucleotide sequences to be annotated and annot8r runs BLAST searches against these three subsets. The BLAST results are parsed and the corresponding annotations retrieved from the reference database. The annotations are saved both as flat files and also in a relational postgreSQL results database to facilitate more advanced searches within the results. annot8r is integrated with the PartiGene suite of EST analysis tools. Conclusion annot8r is a tool that assigns GO, EC and KEGG annotations for data sets resulting from EST sequencing projects both rapidly and efficiently. The benefits of an underlying relational database, flexibility and the ease of use of the program make it ideally suited for non

  7. Metannogen: annotation of biological reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Christoph; Hübner, Katrin; Hoppe, Andreas; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2011-10-01

    Semantic annotations of the biochemical entities constituting a biological reaction network are indispensable to create biologically meaningful networks. They further heighten efficient exchange, reuse and merging of existing models which concern present-day systems biology research more often. Two types of tools for the reconstruction of biological networks currently exist: (i) several sophisticated programs support graphical network editing and visualization. (ii) Data management systems permit reconstruction and curation of huge networks in a team of scientists including data integration, annotation and cross-referencing. We seeked ways to combine the advantages of both approaches. Metannogen, which was previously developed for network reconstruction, has been considerably improved. From now on, Metannogen provides sbml import and annotation of networks created elsewhere. This permits users of other network reconstruction platforms or modeling software to annotate their networks using Metannogen's advanced information management. We implemented word-autocompletion, multipattern highlighting, spell check, brace-expansion and publication management, and improved annotation, cross-referencing and team work requirements. Unspecific enzymes and transporters acting on a spectrum of different substrates are efficiently handled. The network can be exported in sbml format where the annotations are embedded in line with the miriam standard. For more comfort, Metannogen may be tightly coupled with the network editor such that Metannogen becomes an additional view for the focused reaction in the network editor. Finally, Metannogen provides local single user, shared password protected multiuser or public access to the annotation data. Metannogen is available free of charge at: http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/metannogen/ or http://3d-alignment.eu/metannogen/. christoph.gille@charite.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Semi-Semantic Annotation: A guideline for the URDU.KON-TB treebank POS annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaiser ABBAS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work elaborates the semi-semantic part of speech annotation guidelines for the URDU.KON-TB treebank: an annotated corpus. A hierarchical annotation scheme was designed to label the part of speech and then applied on the corpus. This raw corpus was collected from the Urdu Wikipedia and the Jang newspaper and then annotated with the proposed semi-semantic part of speech labels. The corpus contains text of local & international news, social stories, sports, culture, finance, religion, traveling, etc. This exercise finally contributed a part of speech annotation to the URDU.KON-TB treebank. Twenty-two main part of speech categories are divided into subcategories, which conclude the morphological, and semantical information encoded in it. This article reports the annotation guidelines in major; however, it also briefs the development of the URDU.KON-TB treebank, which includes the raw corpus collection, designing & employment of annotation scheme and finally, its statistical evaluation and results. The guidelines presented as follows, will be useful for linguistic community to annotate the sentences not only for the national language Urdu but for the other indigenous languages like Punjab, Sindhi, Pashto, etc., as well.

  9. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chuan Chen

    Full Text Available The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process.

  10. Active learning reduces annotation time for clinical concept extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholghi, Mahnoosh; Sitbon, Laurianne; Zuccon, Guido; Nguyen, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    To investigate: (1) the annotation time savings by various active learning query strategies compared to supervised learning and a random sampling baseline, and (2) the benefits of active learning-assisted pre-annotations in accelerating the manual annotation process compared to de novo annotation. There are 73 and 120 discharge summary reports provided by Beth Israel institute in the train and test sets of the concept extraction task in the i2b2/VA 2010 challenge, respectively. The 73 reports were used in user study experiments for manual annotation. First, all sequences within the 73 reports were manually annotated from scratch. Next, active learning models were built to generate pre-annotations for the sequences selected by a query strategy. The annotation/reviewing time per sequence was recorded. The 120 test reports were used to measure the effectiveness of the active learning models. When annotating from scratch, active learning reduced the annotation time up to 35% and 28% compared to a fully supervised approach and a random sampling baseline, respectively. Reviewing active learning-assisted pre-annotations resulted in 20% further reduction of the annotation time when compared to de novo annotation. The number of concepts that require manual annotation is a good indicator of the annotation time for various active learning approaches as demonstrated by high correlation between time rate and concept annotation rate. Active learning has a key role in reducing the time required to manually annotate domain concepts from clinical free text, either when annotating from scratch or reviewing active learning-assisted pre-annotations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Annotating Logical Forms for EHR Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirk; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the creation of a semantically annotated corpus of questions about patient data in electronic health records (EHRs). The goal is to provide the training data necessary for semantic parsers to automatically convert EHR questions into a structured query. A layered annotation strategy is used which mirrors a typical natural language processing (NLP) pipeline. First, questions are syntactically analyzed to identify multi-part questions. Second, medical concepts are recognized and normalized to a clinical ontology. Finally, logical forms are created using a lambda calculus representation. We use a corpus of 446 questions asking for patient-specific information. From these, 468 specific questions are found containing 259 unique medical concepts and requiring 53 unique predicates to represent the logical forms. We further present detailed characteristics of the corpus, including inter-annotator agreement results, and describe the challenges automatic NLP systems will face on this task.

  12. Annotation of selection strengths in viral genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCauley, Stephen; de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    - and intergenomic regions. The presence of multiple coding regions complicates the concept of Ka/Ks ratio, and thus begs for an alternative approach when investigating selection strengths. Building on the paper by McCauley & Hein (2006), we develop a method for annotating a viral genome coding in overlapping...... may thus achieve an annotation both of coding regions as well as selection strengths, allowing us to investigate different selection patterns and hypotheses. Results: We illustrate our method by applying it to a multiple alignment of four HIV2 sequences, as well as four Hepatitis B sequences. We...... obtain an annotation of the coding regions, as well as a posterior probability for each site of the strength of selection acting on it. From this we may deduce the average posterior selection acting on the different genes. Whilst we are encouraged to see in HIV2, that the known to be conserved genes gag...

  13. Agrobacterium-mediated and electroporation-mediated transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mini, Paola; Demurtas, Olivia Costantina; Valentini, Silvia; Pallara, Patrizia; Aprea, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Paola; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2018-02-17

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an unicellular green alga used for functional genomics studies and heterologous protein expression. A major hindrance in these studies is the low level and instability of expression of nuclear transgenes, due to their rearrangement and/or silencing over time. We constructed dedicated vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation carrying, within the T-DNA borders, the Paromomycin (Paro) selectable marker and an expression cassette containing the Luciferase (Luc) reporter gene. These vectors and newly developed co-cultivation methods were used to compare the efficiency, stability and insertion sites of Agrobacterium- versus electroporation-mediated transformation. The influence of different transformation methods, of the cell wall, of the virulence of different Agrobacterium strains, and of transgene orientation with respect to T-DNA borders were assessed. False positive transformants were more frequent in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation compared to electroporation, compensating for the slightly lower proportion of silenced transformants observed in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation than in electroporation. The proportion of silenced transformants remained stable after 20 cycles of subculture in selective medium. Next generation sequencing confirmed the nuclear insertion points, which occurred in exons or untraslated regions (UTRs) for 10 out of 10 Agrobacterium-mediated and 9 out of 13 of electroporation-mediated insertions. Electroporation also resulted in higher numbers of insertions at multiple loci. Due to its labor-intensive nature, Agrobacterium transformation of Chlamydomonas does not present significant advantages over electroporation, with the possible exception of its use in insertional mutagenesis, due to the higher proportion of within-gene, single-locus insertions. Our data indirectly support the hypothesis that rearrangement of transforming DNA occurs in the Chlamydomonas cell, rather than in the

  14. Engineering the chloroplast targeted malarial vaccine antigens in Chlamydomonas starch granules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dauvillée

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, an Anopheles-borne parasitic disease, remains a major global health problem causing illness and death that disproportionately affects developing countries. Despite the incidence of malaria, which remains one of the most severe infections of human populations, there is no licensed vaccine against this life-threatening disease. In this context, we decided to explore the expression of Plasmodium vaccine antigens fused to the granule bound starch synthase (GBSS, the major protein associated to the starch matrix in all starch-accumulating plants and algae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.We describe the development of genetically engineered starch granules containing plasmodial vaccine candidate antigens produced in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that the C-terminal domains of proteins from the rodent Plasmodium species, Plasmodium berghei Apical Major Antigen AMA1, or Major Surface Protein MSP1 fused to the algal granule bound starch synthase (GBSS are efficiently expressed and bound to the polysaccharide matrix. Mice were either immunized intraperitoneally with the engineered starch particles and Freund adjuvant, or fed with the engineered particles co-delivered with the mucosal adjuvant, and challenged intraperitoneally with a lethal inoculum of P. Berghei. Both experimental strategies led to a significantly reduced parasitemia with an extension of life span including complete cure for intraperitoneal delivery as assessed by negative blood thin smears. In the case of the starch bound P. falciparum GBSS-MSP1 fusion protein, the immune sera or purified immunoglobulin G of mice immunized with the corresponding starch strongly inhibited in vitro the intra-erythrocytic asexual development of the most human deadly plasmodial species.This novel system paves the way for the production of clinically relevant plasmodial antigens as algal starch-based particles designated herein as amylosomes, demonstrating that

  15. Regulation of flagellar biogenesis by a calcium dependent protein kinase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yinwen; Pan, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a bi-flagellated green alga, is a model organism for studies of flagella or cilia related activities including cilia-based signaling, flagellar motility and flagellar biogenesis. Calcium has been shown to be a key regulator of these cellular processes whereas the signaling pathways linking calcium to these cellular functions are less understood. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are present in plants but not in animals, are also present in ciliated microorganisms which led us to examine their possible functions and mechanisms in flagellar related activities. By in silico analysis of Chlamydomonas genome we have identified 14 CDPKs and studied one of the flagellar localized CDPKs--CrCDPK3. CrCDPK3 was a protein of 485 amino acids and predicted to have a protein kinase domain at the N-terminus and four EF-hand motifs at the C-terminus. In flagella, CrCDPK3 was exclusively localized in the membrane matrix fraction and formed an unknown 20 S protein complex. Knockdown of CrCDPK3 expression by using artificial microRNA did not affect flagellar motility as well as flagellar adhesion and mating. Though flagellar shortening induced by treatment with sucrose or sodium pyrophosphate was not affected in RNAi strains, CrCDPK3 increased in the flagella, and pre-formed protein complex was disrupted. During flagellar regeneration, CrCDPK3 also increased in the flagella. When extracellular calcium was lowered to certain range by the addition of EGTA after deflagellation, flagellar regeneration was severely affected in RNAi cells compared with wild type cells. In addition, during flagellar elongation induced by LiCl, RNAi cells exhibited early onset of bulbed flagella. This work expands new functions of CDPKs in flagellar activities by showing involvement of CrCDPK3 in flagellar biogenesis in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Primary Structure of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase and Evidence for a Single Polypeptide 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Keith R.; Ogren, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii indicated the presence of a single polypeptide. This observation contrasts with the Spinacea oleracea (spinach) and Arabidopsis thaliana proteins, in which two polypeptide species are generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. A Chlamydomonas rubisco activase cDNA clone containing the entire coding region was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame encoded a 408 amino acid, 45 kilodalton polypeptide that included a chloroplast transit peptide. The presumptive mature polypeptide possessed 62% and 65% amino acid sequence identity, respectively, with the spinach and Arabidopsis mature polypeptides. The Chlamydomonas rubisco activase transit peptide possessed almost no amino acid sequence identity with the higher plant transit peptides. The nucleotide sequence of Chlamydomonas rubisco activase cDNA provided no evidence for alternative mRNA splicing, consistent with the immunoblot evidence for only one polypeptide. Genomic DNA blot analysis indicated the presence of a single Chlamydomonas rubisco activase gene. In the presence of spinach rubisco activase, a lower extent and rate of activation were obtained in vitro with Chlamydomonas rubisco than with spinach rubisco. We conclude Chlamydomonas rubisco activase comprises a single polypeptide which differs considerably from the higher plant polypeptides with respect to primary structure. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:16667924

  17. Motion lecture annotation system to learn Naginata performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a learning assistant system using motion capture data and annotation to teach "Naginata-jutsu" (a skill to practice Japanese halberd) performance. There are some video annotation tools such as YouTube. However these video based tools have only single angle of view. Our approach that uses motion-captured data allows us to view any angle. A lecturer can write annotations related to parts of body. We have made a comparison of effectiveness between the annotation tool of YouTube and the proposed system. The experimental result showed that our system triggered more annotations than the annotation tool of YouTube.

  18. Protocol: methodology for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strenkert Daniela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP protocol for the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protocol is suitable for the analysis of nucleosome occupancy, histone modifications and transcription factor binding sites at the level of mononucleosomes for targeted and genome-wide studies. We describe the optimization of conditions for crosslinking, chromatin fragmentation and antibody titer determination and provide recommendations and an example for the normalization of ChIP results as determined by real-time PCR.

  19. Chlamydomonas Outer Arm Dynein Alters Conformation in Response to Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Sakato, Miho; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; King, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that Ca2+ directly activates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein subparticle containing the β and γ heavy chains (HCs). The γ HC–associated LC4 light chain is a member of the calmodulin family and binds 1-2 Ca2+ with KCa = 3 × 10−5 M in vitro, suggesting it may act as a Ca2+ sensor for outer arm dynein. Here we investigate interactions between the LC4 light chain and γ HC. Two IQ consensus motifs for binding calmodulin-like proteins a...

  20. An Annotated Dataset of 14 Meat Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2002-01-01

    This note describes a dataset consisting of 14 annotated images of meat. Points of correspondence are placed on each image. As such, the dataset can be readily used for building statistical models of shape. Further, format specifications and terms of use are given.......This note describes a dataset consisting of 14 annotated images of meat. Points of correspondence are placed on each image. As such, the dataset can be readily used for building statistical models of shape. Further, format specifications and terms of use are given....

  1. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Michael; Huber, Wolfgang; Pagès, Hervé; Aboyoun, Patrick; Carlson, Marc; Gentleman, Robert; Morgan, Martin T; Carey, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  2. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  3. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator’s Semantic Relevancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator’s knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user’s vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large.

  4. Qcorp: an annotated classification corpus of Chinese health questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haihong; Na, Xu; Li, Jiao

    2018-03-22

    Health question-answering (QA) systems have become a typical application scenario of Artificial Intelligent (AI). An annotated question corpus is prerequisite for training machines to understand health information needs of users. Thus, we aimed to develop an annotated classification corpus of Chinese health questions (Qcorp) and make it openly accessible. We developed a two-layered classification schema and corresponding annotation rules on basis of our previous work. Using the schema, we annotated 5000 questions that were randomly selected from 5 Chinese health websites within 6 broad sections. 8 annotators participated in the annotation task, and the inter-annotator agreement was evaluated to ensure the corpus quality. Furthermore, the distribution and relationship of the annotated tags were measured by descriptive statistics and social network map. The questions were annotated using 7101 tags that covers 29 topic categories in the two-layered schema. In our released corpus, the distribution of questions on the top-layered categories was treatment of 64.22%, diagnosis of 37.14%, epidemiology of 14.96%, healthy lifestyle of 10.38%, and health provider choice of 4.54% respectively. Both the annotated health questions and annotation schema were openly accessible on the Qcorp website. Users can download the annotated Chinese questions in CSV, XML, and HTML format. We developed a Chinese health question corpus including 5000 manually annotated questions. It is openly accessible and would contribute to the intelligent health QA system development.

  5. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  6. Evaluation of Three Automated Genome Annotations for Halorhabdus utahensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Peter; Carney, Nick; DeLoache, Will

    2009-01-01

    Genome annotations are accumulating rapidly and depend heavily on automated annotation systems. Many genome centers offer annotation systems but no one has compared their output in a systematic way to determine accuracy and inherent errors. Errors in the annotations are routinely deposited...... in databases such as NCBI and used to validate subsequent annotation errors. We submitted the genome sequence of halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis to be analyzed by three genome annotation services. We have examined the output from each service in a variety of ways in order to compare the methodology...... and effectiveness of the annotations, as well as to explore the genes, pathways, and physiology of the previously unannotated genome. The annotation services differ considerably in gene calls, features, and ease of use. We had to manually identify the origin of replication and the species-specific consensus...

  7. Bibliografia de Aztlan: An Annotated Chicano Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Ernie, Ed.

    More than 300 books and articles published from 1920 to 1971 are reviewed in this annotated bibliography of literature on the Chicano. The citations and reviews are categorized by subject area and deal with contemporary Chicano history, education, health, history of Mexico, literature, native Americans, philosophy, political science, pre-Columbian…

  8. DIMA – Annotation guidelines for German intonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kügler, Frank; Smolibocki, Bernadett; Arnold, Denis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents newly developed guidelines for prosodic annotation of German as a consensus system agreed upon by German intonologists. The DIMA system is rooted in the framework of autosegmental-metrical phonology. One important goal of the consensus is to make exchanging data between groups...

  9. Structuring and presenting annotated media repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rutledge (Lloyd); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); L. Hardman (Lynda)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe Semantic Web envisions a Web that is both human readable and machine processible. In practice, however, there is still a large conceptual gap between annotated content repositories on the one hand, and coherent, human readable Web pages on the other. To bridge this conceptual gap,

  10. Canonical Processes of Semantically Annotated Media Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardman, L.; Obrenović, Ž.; Nack, F.; Troncy, R.; Huet, B.; Schenk, S.

    2011-01-01

    While many multimedia systems allow the association of semantic annotations with media assets, there is no agreed way of sharing these among systems. This chapter identifies a small number of fundamental processes of media production, which the author terms canonical processes, which can be

  11. Canonical processes of semantically annotated media production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Hardman (Lynda); Z. Obrenovic; F.-M. Nack (Frank); B. Kerhervé; K. Piersol

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWhile many multimedia systems allow the association of semantic annotations with media assets, there is no agreed-upon way of sharing these among systems. As an initial step within the multimedia community, we identify a small number of fundamental processes of media production, which we

  12. Canonical processes of semantically annotated media production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardman, L.; Obrenović, Ž.; Nack, F.; Kerhervé, B.; Piersol, K.

    2008-01-01

    While many multimedia systems allow the association of semantic annotations with media assets, there is no agreed-upon way of sharing these among systems. As an initial step within the multimedia community, we identify a small number of fundamental processes of media production, which we term

  13. Suggested Books for Children: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    NHSA Dialog, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an annotated bibliography of various children's books. It includes listings of books that illustrate the dynamic relationships within the natural environment, economic context, racial and cultural identities, cross-group similarities and differences, gender, different abilities and stories of injustice and resistance.

  14. Teaching Creative Writing: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Wendy; And Others

    Focusing on pedagogical issues in creative writing, this annotated bibliography reviews 149 books, articles, and dissertations in the fields of creative writing and composition, and, selectively, feminist and literary theory. Anthologies of original writing and reference books are not included. (MM)

  15. Statistical mechanics of ontology based annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, David C.; Brass, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanical theory of the process of annotating an object with terms selected from an ontology. The term selection process is formulated as an ideal lattice gas model, but in a highly structured inhomogeneous field. The model enables us to explain patterns recently observed in real-world annotation data sets, in terms of the underlying graph structure of the ontology. By relating the external field strengths to the information content of each node in the ontology graph, the statistical mechanical model also allows us to propose a number of practical metrics for assessing the quality of both the ontology, and the annotations that arise from its use. Using the statistical mechanical formalism we also study an ensemble of ontologies of differing size and complexity; an analysis not readily performed using real data alone. Focusing on regular tree ontology graphs we uncover a rich set of scaling laws describing the growth in the optimal ontology size as the number of objects being annotated increases. In doing so we provide a further possible measure for assessment of ontologies.

  16. An Annotated Bibliography in Financial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy B. Durband

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The following annotated bibliography contains a summary of articles and websites, as well as a list of books related to financial therapy. The resources were compiled through e-mail solicitation from members of the Financial Therapy Forum in November 2008. Members of the forum are marked with an asterisk.

  17. Just-in-time : on strategy annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. van de Pol (Jaco)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA simple kind of strategy annotations is investigated, giving rise to a class of strategies, including leftmost-innermost. It is shown that under certain restrictions, an interpreter can be written which computes the normal form of a term in a bottom-up traversal. The main contribution

  18. Automating Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-22

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  19. Multimedia Annotations on the Semantic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamou, G.; Ossenbruggen, J.R.; Pan, J.; Schreiber, A.T.

    2006-01-01

    Multimedia in all forms (images, video, graphics, music, speech) is exploding on the Web. The content needs to be annotated and indexed to enable effective search and retrieval. However, recent standards and best practices for multimedia metadata don't provide semantically rich descriptions of

  20. Multimedia Annotations on the Semantic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Stamou; J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); J.Z. Pan (Jeff); G. Schreiber (Guus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractMultimedia in all forms (images, video, graphics, music, speech) is exploding on the Web. The content needs to be annotated and indexed to enable effective search and retrieval. However, recent standards and best practices for multimedia metadata don't provide semantically rich

  1. La Mujer Chicana: An Annotated Bibliography, 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Evey, Ed.; And Others

    Intended to provide interested persons, researchers, and educators with information about "la mujer Chicana", this annotated bibliography cites 320 materials published between 1916 and 1975, with the majority being between 1960 and 1975. The 12 sections cover the following subject areas: Chicana publications; Chicana feminism and…

  2. Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-06-06

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  3. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Corrigan, G.

    2005-01-01

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables

  4. Male-Female Sexuality: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janice

    This annotated bibliography contains over 500 sources on the historical and contemporary development and expression of male and female sexuality. There are 68 topic headings which provide easy access for subject areas. A major portion of the bibliography is devoted to contemporary male-female sexuality. These materials consist of research findings…

  5. Mulligan Concept manual therapy: standardizing annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jillian Marie; Johnson, Gillian Margaret; Hetherington, Barbara Helen

    2014-10-01

    Quality technique documentation is integral to the practice of manual therapy, ensuring uniform application and reproducibility of treatment. Manual therapy techniques are described by annotations utilizing a range of acronyms, abbreviations and universal terminology based on biomechanical and anatomical concepts. The various combinations of therapist and patient generated forces utilized in a variety of weight-bearing positions, which are synonymous with Mulligan Concept, challenge practitioners existing annotational skills. An annotation framework with recording rules adapted to the Mulligan Concept is proposed in which the abbreviations incorporate established manual therapy tenets and are detailed in the following sequence of; starting position, side, joint/s, method of application, glide/s, Mulligan technique, movement (or function), whether an assistant is used, overpressure (and by whom) and numbers of repetitions or time and sets. Therapist or patient application of overpressure and utilization of treatment belts or manual techniques must be recorded to capture the complete description. The adoption of the Mulligan Concept annotation framework in this way for documentation purposes will provide uniformity and clarity of information transfer for the future purposes of teaching, clinical practice and audit for its practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Annotated Publications List on Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunjian, Beth Ann

    This annotated publications list on homelessness contains citations for 19 publications, most of which deal with problems of alcohol or drug abuse among homeless persons. Citations are listed alphabetically by author and cover the topics of homelessness and alcoholism, drug abuse, public policy, research methodologies, mental illness, alcohol- and…

  7. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Patricia

    From reading texts to annotating web pages, grade 6-8 students rely on group cooperation and individual reading and writing skills in this research project that spans six 50-minute lessons. Student objectives for this project are that they will: read, discuss, and keep a journal on a book in literature circles; understand the elements of and…

  8. Genotyping and annotation of Affymetrix SNP arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamy, Philippe; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Wikman, Friedrik

    2006-01-01

    allows us to annotate SNPs that have poor performance, either because of poor experimental conditions or because for one of the alleles the probes do not behave in a dose-response manner. Generally, our method agrees well with a method developed by Affymetrix. When both methods make a call they agree...

  9. Snap: an integrated SNP annotation platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shengting; Ma, Lijia; Li, Heng

    2007-01-01

    Snap (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Annotation Platform) is a server designed to comprehensively analyze single genes and relationships between genes basing on SNPs in the human genome. The aim of the platform is to facilitate the study of SNP finding and analysis within the framework of medical...

  10. ePNK Applications and Annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2017-01-01

    newapplicationsfor the ePNK and, in particular, visualizing the result of an application in the graphical editor of the ePNK by singannotations, and interacting with the end user using these annotations. In this paper, we give an overview of the concepts of ePNK applications by discussing the implementation...

  11. Evaluating automatically annotated treebanks for linguistic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, J.; Bański, P.; Kupietz, M.; Lüngen, H.; Witt, A.; Barbaresi, A.; Biber, H.; Breiteneder, E.; Clematide, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses evaluation methods for linguists to use when employing an automatically annotated treebank as a source of linguistic evidence. While treebanks are usually evaluated with a general measure over all the data, linguistic studies often focus on a particular construction or a group

  12. Indiana Newspaper History: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, Mark, Comp.; And Others

    The purposes of this bibliography are to bring together materials that relate to the history of newspapers in Indiana and to assess, in a general way, the value of the material. The bibliography contains 415 entries, with descriptive annotations, arranged in seven sections: books; special materials; general newspaper histories and lists of…

  13. Multiview Hessian regularization for image annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Tao, Dacheng

    2013-07-01

    The rapid development of computer hardware and Internet technology makes large scale data dependent models computationally tractable, and opens a bright avenue for annotating images through innovative machine learning algorithms. Semisupervised learning (SSL) therefore received intensive attention in recent years and was successfully deployed in image annotation. One representative work in SSL is Laplacian regularization (LR), which smoothes the conditional distribution for classification along the manifold encoded in the graph Laplacian, however, it is observed that LR biases the classification function toward a constant function that possibly results in poor generalization. In addition, LR is developed to handle uniformly distributed data (or single-view data), although instances or objects, such as images and videos, are usually represented by multiview features, such as color, shape, and texture. In this paper, we present multiview Hessian regularization (mHR) to address the above two problems in LR-based image annotation. In particular, mHR optimally combines multiple HR, each of which is obtained from a particular view of instances, and steers the classification function that varies linearly along the data manifold. We apply mHR to kernel least squares and support vector machines as two examples for image annotation. Extensive experiments on the PASCAL VOC'07 dataset validate the effectiveness of mHR by comparing it with baseline algorithms, including LR and HR.

  14. Annotated Bibliography of English for Special Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allix, Beverley, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography covers the following types of materials of use to teachers of English for Special Purposes: (1) books, monographs, reports, and conference papers; (2) periodical articles and essays in collections; (3) theses and dissertations; (4) bibliographies; (5) dictionaries; and (6) textbooks in series by publisher. Section (1)…

  15. Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Bryce A. Richardson; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original...

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited: Annotating Reaction Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykodi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Urges chemistry teachers to have students annotate the chemical reactions in aqueous-solutions that they see in their textbooks and witness in the laboratory. Suggests this will help students recognize the reaction type more readily. Examples are given for gas formation, precipitate formation, redox interaction, acid-base interaction, and…

  17. Seasonal and diel changes in photosynthetic activity of the snow algae Chlamydomonas nivalis (Chlorophyceae) from Svalbard determined by PAM fluorometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stibal, Marek; Elster, Josef; Šabacká, Marie; Kaštovská, Klára

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, - (2007), s. 265-273 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6005409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Chlamydomonas nivalis * photosynthetic activity * PAM fluorometry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.039, year: 2007

  18. Growth and reproduction of Daphnia galeata in response to changes in fatty acids, phosphorus, and nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weers, P.M.M.; Gulati, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of changes in elemental and fatty acid composition of the algal food for Daphnia galeata was investigated. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was grown under nitrogen or phosphorus limitation to modify its elemental and biochemical composition. Both N- and P-Limited algae

  19. Tracking the elusive 5' exonuclease activity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii RNase J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liponska, Anna; Jamalli, Ailar; Kuras, Richard; Suay, Loreto; Garbe, Enrico; Wollman, Francis-André; Laalami, Soumaya; Putzer, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Chlamydomonas RNase J is the first member of this enzyme family that has endo- but no intrinsic 5' exoribonucleolytic activity. This questions its proposed role in chloroplast mRNA maturation. RNA maturation and stability in the chloroplast are controlled by nuclear-encoded ribonucleases and RNA binding proteins. Notably, mRNA 5' end maturation is thought to be achieved by the combined action of a 5' exoribonuclease and specific pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR) that block the progression of the nuclease. In Arabidopsis the 5' exo- and endoribonuclease RNase J has been implicated in this process. Here, we verified the chloroplast localization of the orthologous Chlamydomonas (Cr) RNase J and studied its activity, both in vitro and in vivo in a heterologous B. subtilis system. Our data show that Cr RNase J has endo- but no significant intrinsic 5' exonuclease activity that would be compatible with its proposed role in mRNA maturation. This is the first example of an RNase J ortholog that does not possess a 5' exonuclease activity. A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed a number of potential interaction partners but three of the most promising candidates tested, failed to induce the latent exonuclease activity of Cr RNase J. We still favor the hypothesis that Cr RNase J plays an important role in RNA metabolism, but our findings suggest that it rather acts as an endoribonuclease in the chloroplast.

  20. C2 domain protein MIN1 promotes eyespot organization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Berthold, Peter; Danon, Avihai; Lamb, Mary Rose; Levitan, Alexander; Rice, Michael E; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2008-12-01

    Assembly and asymmetric localization of the photosensory eyespot in the biflagellate, unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires coordinated organization of photoreceptors in the plasma membrane and pigment granule/thylakoid membrane layers in the chloroplast. min1 (mini-eyed) mutant cells contain abnormally small, disorganized eyespots in which the chloroplast envelope and plasma membrane are no longer apposed. The MIN1 gene, identified here by phenotypic rescue, encodes a protein with an N-terminal C2 domain and a C-terminal LysM domain separated by a transmembrane sequence. This novel domain architecture led to the hypothesis that MIN1 is in the plasma membrane or the chloroplast envelope, where membrane association of the C2 domain promotes proper eyespot organization. Mutation of conserved C2 domain loop residues disrupted association of the MIN1 C2 domain with the chloroplast envelope in moss cells but did not abolish eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas. In min1 null cells, channelrhodopsin-1 (ChR1) photoreceptor levels were reduced, indicating a role for MIN1 in ChR1 expression and/or stability. However, ChR1 localization was only minimally disturbed during photoautotrophic growth of min1 cells, conditions under which the pigment granule layers are disorganized. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that neither MIN1 nor proper organization of the plastidic components of the eyespot is essential for localization of ChR1.

  1. Spontaneous mutations in the ammonium transport gene AMT4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Seo; Feild, Eithne; King, Natalie; Yaoi, Takuro; Kustu, Sydney; Inwood, William

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in several microorganisms indicates that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH(3) and CH(3)NH(2), and this has been confirmed structurally. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has at least four AMT genes, the most reported for a microorganism. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions all AMT genes are transcribed and Chlamydomonas is sensitive to methylammonium toxicity. All 16 spontaneous methylammonium-resistant mutants that we analyzed had defects in accumulation of [(14)C]methylammonium. Genetic crosses indicated that 12 had lesions in a single locus, whereas two each had lesions in other loci. Lesions in different loci were correlated with different degrees of defect in [(14)C]methylammonium uptake. One mutant in the largest class had an insert in the AMT4 gene, and the insert cosegregated with methylammonium resistance in genetic crosses. The other 11 strains in this class also had amt4 lesions, which we characterized at the molecular level. Properties of the amt4 mutants were clearly different from those of rh1 RNAi lines. They indicated that the physiological substrates for Amt and Rh proteins, the only two members of their protein superfamily, are NH(3) and CO(2), respectively.

  2. Calcium mediates the cellular response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to the emerging aquatic pollutant Triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pleiter, Miguel; Rioboo, Carmen; Reguera, María; Abreu, Isidro; Leganés, Francisco; Cid, Ángeles; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2017-05-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the role of intracellular free calcium, [Ca 2+ ] c , in the early cellular response of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to the emergent pollutant Triclosan (13.8μM; 24h of exposure). There is a growing concern about the persistence and toxicity of this antimicrobial in aquatic environments, where non-target organisms such as C. reinhardtii, a primary producer of ecological relevance, might be severely impacted. A mechanistic study was undertaken which combined flow cytometry protocols, physiological as well as gene expression analysis. As an early response, Triclosan strongly altered [Ca 2+ ] c homeostasis which could be prevented by prechelation with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. Triclosan induced ROS overproduction which ultimately leads to oxidative stress with loss of membrane integrity, membrane depolarization, photosynthesis inhibition and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; within this context, Triclosan also induced an increase in caspase 3/7 activity and altered the expression of metacaspase genes which are indicative of apoptosis. All these adverse outcomes were dependent on [Ca 2+ ] c . Interestingly, an interconnection between [Ca 2+ ] c alterations and increased ROS formation by Triclosan was found. Taken altogether these results shed light on the mechanisms behind Triclosan toxicity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and demonstrate the role of [Ca 2+ ] c in mediating the observed toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chlamydomonas IFT25 is dispensable for flagellar assembly but required to export the BBSome from flagella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Dong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Intraflagellar transport (IFT particles are composed of polyprotein complexes IFT-A and IFT-B as well as cargo adaptors such as the BBSome. Two IFT-B subunits, IFT25 and IFT27 were found to form a heterodimer, which is essential in exporting the BBSome out of the cilium but not involved in flagellar assembly and cytokinesis in vertebrates. Controversial results were, however, recorded to show that defects in IFT, flagellar assembly and even cytokinesis were caused by IFT27 knockdown in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using C. reinhardtii as a model organism, we report that depletion of IFT25 has no effect on flagellar assembly and does not affect the entry of the BBSome into the flagellum, but IFT25 depletion did impair BBSome movement out of the flagellum, clarifying the evolutionally conserved role of IFT25 in regulating the exit of the BBSome from the flagellum cross species. Interestingly, depletion of IFT25 causes dramatic reduction of IFT27 as expected, which does not cause defects in flagellar assembly and cytokinesis in C. reinhardtii. Our data thus support that Chlamydomonas IFT27, like its vertebrate homologues, is not involved in flagellar assembly and cytokinesis.

  4. Characterization of Hydrocortisone Biometabolites and 18S rRNA Gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Bagher Mosavi-Azam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A unicellular microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was isolated from rice paddy-field soil and water samples and used in the biotransformation of hydrocortisone (1. This strain has not been previously tested for steroid bioconversion. Fermentation was carried out in BG-11 medium supplemented with 0.05% substrate at 25ºC for 14 days of incubation. The products obtained were chromatographically purified and characterized using spectroscopic methods. 11b,17b-Dihydroxyandrost-4-en-3-one (2, 11b-hydroxyandrost-4-en-3,17-dione (3, 11b,17a,20b,21-tetrahydroxypregn-4-en-3-one (4 and prednisolone (5 were the main products of the bioconversion. The observed bioreaction features were the side chain degradation of the substrate to give compounds 2 and 3 and the 20-ketone reduction and 1,2-dehydrogenation affording compounds 4 and 5, respectively. A time course study showed the accumulation of product 2 from the second day of the fermentation and of compounds 3, 4 and 5 from the third day. All the metabolites reached their maximum concentration in seven days. Microalgal 18S rRNA gene was also amplified by PCR. PCR products were sequenced to confirm their authenticity as 18S rRNA gene of microalgae. The result of PCR blasted with other sequenced microalgae in NCBI showed 100% homology to the 18S small subunit rRNA of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii spp.

  5. Deletion of CGLD1 Impairs PSII and Increases Singlet Oxygen Tolerance of Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Xing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key model organism for studying photosynthesis and oxidative stress in unicellular eukaryotes. Using a forward genetics approach, we have identified and characterized a mutant x32, which lacks a predicted protein named CGLD1 (Conserved in Green Lineage and Diatom 1 in GreenCut2, under normal and stress conditions. We show that loss of CGLD1 resulted in minimal photoautotrophic growth and PSII activity in the organism. We observed reduced amount of PSII complex and core subunits in the x32 mutant based on blue-native (BN/PAGE and immunoblot analysis. Moreover, x32 exhibited increased sensitivity to high-light stress and altered tolerance to different reactive oxygenic species (ROS stress treatments, i.e., decreased resistance to H2O2/or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH and increased tolerance to neutral red (NR and rose bengal (RB that induce the formation of singlet oxygen, respectively. Further analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR indicated that the increased singlet-oxygen tolerance of x32 was largely correlated with up-regulated gene expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GST. The phenotypical and physiological implications revealed from our experiments highlight the important roles of CGLD1 in maintaining structure and function of PSII as well as in protection of Chlamydomonas under photo-oxidative stress conditions.

  6. Characterization of DNA repair deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii generated by insertional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Plecenikova

    Full Text Available While the mechanisms governing DNA damage response and repair are fundamentally conserved, cross-kingdom comparisons indicate that they differ in many aspects due to differences in life-styles and developmental strategies. In photosynthetic organisms these differences have not been fully explored because gene-discovery approaches are mainly based on homology searches with known DDR/DNA repair proteins. Here we performed a forward genetic screen in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify genes deficient in DDR/DNA repair. We isolated five insertional mutants that were sensitive to various genotoxic insults and two of them exhibited altered efficiency of transgene integration. To identify genomic regions disrupted in these mutants, we established a novel adaptor-ligation strategy for the efficient recovery of the insertion flanking sites. Four mutants harbored deletions that involved known DNA repair factors, DNA Pol zeta, DNA Pol theta, SAE2/COM1, and two neighbouring genes encoding ERCC1 and RAD17. Deletion in the last mutant spanned two Chlamydomonas-specific genes with unknown function, demonstrating the utility of this approach for discovering novel factors involved in genome maintenance.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-06-13

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms.

  8. Biofixation of Carbon dioxide by Chlamydomonas sp. in a Tubular Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biogas production from anaerobic digestion is a potential fuel for power generators application, if biogas can be upgraded to the same standards as fossil natural gas by CO2, H2S, and other non-combustible component removal. Microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. has potency to biofix the carbon dioxide and can be used as an additional food ingredient. The variations of flow rate and carbon dioxide concentration in the process resulting different value of biomass production and carbon dioxide biofixation. Biomass production at 40% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 5.685 gr/dm3 at 10% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 4.892 gr/dm3. The greatest value of carbon dioxide absorption occurs at a 40% concentration amounting to 12.09%. The rate of growth and productivity of microalgae tend to rise in 10% and 20% (%v carbon dioxide concentration, but began started a constant at 30% and 40% (%v carbon dioxide concentration. Biomass production tends to increase in light conditions while a constant in dark conditions. This study used Chlamydomonas sp. as media culture and performed on bubble column and tubular reactor with 6 litres of culture medium at a temperature of 28oC and atmospheric pressure.

  9. Automatic Semantic Annotation of Music with Harmonic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Weyde, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an annotation model for harmonic structure of a piece of music, and a rule system that supports the automatic generation of harmonic annotations. Musical structure has so far received relatively little attention in the context of musical metadata and annotation, although it is highly relevant for musicians, musicologists and indirectly for music listeners. Activities in semantic annotation of music have so far mostly concentrated on features derived from audio data and fil...

  10. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.

    2015-08-18

    Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON’s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/

  11. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkatawi, Manal; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-08-18

    Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON's utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27%, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  12. A SANE approach to annotation in the digital edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, P.; Braungart, Georg; Jannidis, Fotis; Gendolla, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Robinson and others have recently called for dynamic and collaborative digital scholarly editions. Annotation is a key component for editions that are not merely passive, read-only repositories of knowledge. Annotation facilities (both annotation creation and display), however, require complex

  13. GRaSP: A Multilayered Annotation Scheme for Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Son, C.M.; Caselli, T.; Fokkens, A.S.; Maks, E.; Morante Vallejo, R.; Aroyo, L.M.; Vossen, P.T.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a framework and methodology for the annotation of perspectives in text. In the last decade, different aspects of linguistic encoding of perspectives have been targeted as separated phenomena through different annotation initiatives. We propose an annotation scheme that integrates

  14. Annotation Method (AM): SE22_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE22_AM1 Annotation based on a grading system Collected mass spectral features, tog...ether with predicted molecular formulae and putative structures, were provided as metabolite annotations. Co...mparison with public databases was performed. A grading system was introduced to describe the evidence supporting the annotations. ...

  15. Annotation of the protein coding regions of the equine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced m...

  16. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  17. RASTtk: a modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, James A; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  18. Multi-Atlas Segmentation using Partially Annotated Data: Methods and Annotation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lisa M; Rajchl, Martin; Bai, Wenjia; Baumgartner, Christian F; Tong, Tong; Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Aljabar, Paul; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-08-22

    Multi-atlas segmentation is a widely used tool in medical image analysis, providing robust and accurate results by learning from annotated atlas datasets. However, the availability of fully annotated atlas images for training is limited due to the time required for the labelling task. Segmentation methods requiring only a proportion of each atlas image to be labelled could therefore reduce the workload on expert raters tasked with annotating atlas images. To address this issue, we first re-examine the labelling problem common in many existing approaches and formulate its solution in terms of a Markov Random Field energy minimisation problem on a graph connecting atlases and the target image. This provides a unifying framework for multi-atlas segmentation. We then show how modifications in the graph configuration of the proposed framework enable the use of partially annotated atlas images and investigate different partial annotation strategies. The proposed method was evaluated on two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) datasets for hippocampal and cardiac segmentation. Experiments were performed aimed at (1) recreating existing segmentation techniques with the proposed framework and (2) demonstrating the potential of employing sparsely annotated atlas data for multi-atlas segmentation.

  19. System-level network analysis of nitrogen starvation and recovery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals potential new targets for increased lipid accumulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, T.; Recuenco-Muňoz, L.; Wienkoop, S.; Weckwerth, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 171 (2014), s. 1-17 ISSN 1754-6834 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : chlamydomonas reinhardtii * lipid accumulation * nitrogen Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 6.044, year: 2014

  20. ePIANNO: ePIgenomics ANNOtation tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsin Liu

    Full Text Available Recently, with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS, the combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and NGS, namely ChIP-seq, has become a powerful technique to capture potential genomic binding sites of regulatory factors, histone modifications and chromatin accessible regions. For most researchers, additional information including genomic variations on the TF binding site, allele frequency of variation between different populations, variation associated disease, and other neighbour TF binding sites are essential to generate a proper hypothesis or a meaningful conclusion. Many ChIP-seq datasets had been deposited on the public domain to help researchers make new discoveries. However, researches are often intimidated by the complexity of data structure and largeness of data volume. Such information would be more useful if they could be combined or downloaded with ChIP-seq data. To meet such demands, we built a webtool: ePIgenomic ANNOtation tool (ePIANNO, http://epianno.stat.sinica.edu.tw/index.html. ePIANNO is a web server that combines SNP information of populations (1000 Genomes Project and gene-disease association information of GWAS (NHGRI with ChIP-seq (hmChIP, ENCODE, and ROADMAP epigenomics data. ePIANNO has a user-friendly website interface allowing researchers to explore, navigate, and extract data quickly. We use two examples to demonstrate how users could use functions of ePIANNO webserver to explore useful information about TF related genomic variants. Users could use our query functions to search target regions, transcription factors, or annotations. ePIANNO may help users to generate hypothesis or explore potential biological functions for their studies.

  1. Cadec: A corpus of adverse drug event annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sarvnaz; Metke-Jimenez, Alejandro; Kemp, Madonna; Wang, Chen

    2015-06-01

    CSIRO Adverse Drug Event Corpus (Cadec) is a new rich annotated corpus of medical forum posts on patient-reported Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). The corpus is sourced from posts on social media, and contains text that is largely written in colloquial language and often deviates from formal English grammar and punctuation rules. Annotations contain mentions of concepts such as drugs, adverse effects, symptoms, and diseases linked to their corresponding concepts in controlled vocabularies, i.e., SNOMED Clinical Terms and MedDRA. The quality of the annotations is ensured by annotation guidelines, multi-stage annotations, measuring inter-annotator agreement, and final review of the annotations by a clinical terminologist. This corpus is useful for studies in the area of information extraction, or more generally text mining, from social media to detect possible adverse drug reactions from direct patient reports. The corpus is publicly available at https://data.csiro.au.(1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated annotation of microbial proteomes in SWISS-PROT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattiker, Alexandre; Michoud, Karine; Rivoire, Catherine; Auchincloss, Andrea H; Coudert, Elisabeth; Lima, Tania; Kersey, Paul; Pagni, Marco; Sigrist, Christian J A; Lachaize, Corinne; Veuthey, Anne Lise; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Bairoch, Amos

    2003-02-01

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic genomes demands the automation of certain annotation tasks currently manually performed in the production of the SWISS-PROT protein knowledgebase. The HAMAP project, or 'High-quality Automated and Manual Annotation of microbial Proteomes', aims to integrate manual and automatic annotation methods in order to enhance the speed of the curation process while preserving the quality of the database annotation. Automatic annotation is only applied to entries that belong to manually defined orthologous families and to entries with no identifiable similarities (ORFans). Many checks are enforced in order to prevent the propagation of wrong annotation and to spot problematic cases, which are channelled to manual curation. The results of this annotation are integrated in SWISS-PROT, and a website is provided at http://www.expasy.org/sprot/hamap/.

  3. Annotated trajectories and the Space-Time-Cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveladze, Irma; Kraak, Menno-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Movement data is collected by nearly everyone at any time. This data is not limited the trajectories of people, today’s technology also allows the simultaneous collection of trip related annotations like photos, video’s, voice, and texts. The combination of trajectories and annotations is a rich...... source to monitor movement in a context and discover known and unknown patterns. Often the annotations are implicitly geotagged by the gps-enabled devices like phones and cameras which are used to collect the annotations. This allows a match between the track and annotation based on coordinates....... Otherwise the trajectories and annotations can be matched based on their respective time stamps. The geotagged material is often used on social media sites to exchange the whereabouts of people. The annotations are place on dedicated site such as Flickr and Panoramio. Via mash-ups it is also possible...

  4. Applied bioinformatics: Genome annotation and transcriptome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Vikas

    and dhurrin, which have not previously been characterized in blueberries. There are more than 44,500 spider species with distinct habitats and unique characteristics. Spiders are masters of producing silk webs to catch prey and using venom to neutralize. The exploration of the genetics behind these properties...... japonicus (Lotus), Vaccinium corymbosum (blueberry), Stegodyphus mimosarum (spider) and Trifolium occidentale (clover). From a bioinformatics data analysis perspective, my work can be divided into three parts; genome annotation, small RNA, and gene expression analysis. Lotus is a legume of significant...... has just started. We have assembled and annotated the first two spider genomes to facilitate our understanding of spiders at the molecular level. The need for analyzing the large and increasing amount of sequencing data has increased the demand for efficient, user friendly, and broadly applicable...

  5. Applied bioinformatics: Genome annotation and transcriptome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Vikas

    japonicus (Lotus), Vaccinium corymbosum (blueberry), Stegodyphus mimosarum (spider) and Trifolium occidentale (clover). From a bioinformatics data analysis perspective, my work can be divided into three parts; genome annotation, small RNA, and gene expression analysis. Lotus is a legume of significant...... biology and genetics studies. We present an improved Lotus genome assembly and annotation, a catalog of natural variation based on re-sequencing of 29 accessions, and describe the involvement of small RNAs in the plant-bacteria symbiosis. Blueberries contain anthocyanins, other pigments and various...... polyphenolic compounds, which have been linked to protection against diabetes, cardiovascular disease and age-related cognitive decline. We present the first genome- guided approach in blueberry to identify genes involved in the synthesis of health-protective compounds. Using RNA-Seq data from five stages...

  6. Annotating functional RNAs in genomes using Infernal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Eric P

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of functional non-coding RNAs participate in a wide range of important cellular functions but the large majority of these RNAs are not routinely annotated in published genomes. Several programs have been developed for identifying RNAs, including specific tools tailored to a particular RNA family as well as more general ones designed to work for any family. Many of these tools utilize covariance models (CMs), statistical models of the conserved sequence, and structure of an RNA family. In this chapter, as an illustrative example, the Infernal software package and CMs from the Rfam database are used to identify RNAs in the genome of the archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, uncovering some additional RNAs not present in the genome's initial annotation. Analysis of the results and comparison with family-specific methods demonstrate some important strengths and weaknesses of this general approach.

  7. Deburring: an annotated bibliography. Volume V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    An annotated summary of 204 articles and publications on burrs, burr prevention and deburring is presented. Thirty-seven deburring processes are listed. Entries cited include English, Russian, French, Japanese and German language articles. Entries are indexed by deburring processes, author, and language. Indexes also indicate which references discuss equipment and tooling, how to use a process, economics, burr properties, and how to design to minimize burr problems. Research studies are identified as are the materials deburred.

  8. Deburring: an annotated bibliography. Volume V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    An annotated summary of 204 articles and publications on burrs, burr prevention and deburring is presented. Thirty-seven deburring processes are listed. Entries cited include English, Russian, French, Japanese and German language articles. Entries are indexed by deburring processes, author, and language. Indexes also indicate which references discuss equipment and tooling, how to use a process, economics, burr properties, and how to design to minimize burr problems. Research studies are identified as are the materials deburred

  9. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones un......, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research....

  10. Automated genome sequence analysis and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, M A; Brown, N P; Leroy, C; Hoersch, S; de Daruvar, A; Reich, C; Franchini, A; Tamames, J; Valencia, A; Ouzounis, C; Sander, C

    1999-05-01

    Large-scale genome projects generate a rapidly increasing number of sequences, most of them biochemically uncharacterized. Research in bioinformatics contributes to the development of methods for the computational characterization of these sequences. However, the installation and application of these methods require experience and are time consuming. We present here an automatic system for preliminary functional annotation of protein sequences that has been applied to the analysis of sets of sequences from complete genomes, both to refine overall performance and to make new discoveries comparable to those made by human experts. The GeneQuiz system includes a Web-based browser that allows examination of the evidence leading to an automatic annotation and offers additional information, views of the results, and links to biological databases that complement the automatic analysis. System structure and operating principles concerning the use of multiple sequence databases, underlying sequence analysis tools, lexical analyses of database annotations and decision criteria for functional assignments are detailed. The system makes automatic quality assessments of results based on prior experience with the underlying sequence analysis tools; overall error rates in functional assignment are estimated at 2.5-5% for cases annotated with highest reliability ('clear' cases). Sources of over-interpretation of results are discussed with proposals for improvement. A conservative definition for reporting 'new findings' that takes account of database maturity is presented along with examples of possible kinds of discoveries (new function, family and superfamily) made by the system. System performance in relation to sequence database coverage, database dynamics and database search methods is analysed, demonstrating the inherent advantages of an integrated automatic approach using multiple databases and search methods applied in an objective and repeatable manner. The GeneQuiz system

  11. Nonlinear Deep Kernel Learning for Image Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Mingyuan; Sahbi, Hichem

    2017-02-08

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is a widely used technique for kernel design. Its principle consists in learning, for a given support vector classifier, the most suitable convex (or sparse) linear combination of standard elementary kernels. However, these combinations are shallow and often powerless to capture the actual similarity between highly semantic data, especially for challenging classification tasks such as image annotation. In this paper, we redefine multiple kernels using deep multi-layer networks. In this new contribution, a deep multiple kernel is recursively defined as a multi-layered combination of nonlinear activation functions, each one involves a combination of several elementary or intermediate kernels, and results into a positive semi-definite deep kernel. We propose four different frameworks in order to learn the weights of these networks: supervised, unsupervised, kernel-based semisupervised and Laplacian-based semi-supervised. When plugged into support vector machines (SVMs), the resulting deep kernel networks show clear gain, compared to several shallow kernels for the task of image annotation. Extensive experiments and analysis on the challenging ImageCLEF photo annotation benchmark, the COREL5k database and the Banana dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Annotating breast cancer microarray samples using ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfang; Li, Xin; Yoon, Victoria; Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    As the most common cancer among women, breast cancer results from the accumulation of mutations in essential genes. Recent advance in high-throughput gene expression microarray technology has inspired researchers to use the technology to assist breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment prediction. However, the high dimensionality of microarray experiments and public access of data from many experiments have caused inconsistencies which initiated the development of controlled terminologies and ontologies for annotating microarray experiments, such as the standard microarray Gene Expression Data (MGED) ontology (MO). In this paper, we developed BCM-CO, an ontology tailored specifically for indexing clinical annotations of breast cancer microarray samples from the NCI Thesaurus. Our research showed that the coverage of NCI Thesaurus is very limited with respect to i) terms used by researchers to describe breast cancer histology (covering 22 out of 48 histology terms); ii) breast cancer cell lines (covering one out of 12 cell lines); and iii) classes corresponding to the breast cancer grading and staging. By incorporating a wider range of those terms into BCM-CO, we were able to indexed breast cancer microarray samples from GEO using BCM-CO and MGED ontology and developed a prototype system with web interface that allows the retrieval of microarray data based on the ontology annotations. PMID:18999108

  13. Bringing Semantic Annotations to Web Services: OWL-S from the SAWSDL Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Paolucci, Massimo; Wagner, Matthias

    Recently the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) produced a standard set of "Semantic Annotations for WSDL and XML Schema" (SAWSDL). SAWSDL provides a standard means by which WSDL documents can be related to semantic descriptions, such as those provided by OWL-S (OWL for Services) and other Semantic Web services frameworks. We argue that the value of SAWSDL cannot be realized until its use is specified, and its benefits explained, in connection with a particular framework. This paper is an important first step toward meeting that need, with respect to OWL-S. We explain what OWL-S constructs are appropriate for use with the various SAWSDL annotations, and provide a rationale and guidelines for their use. In addition, we discuss some weaknesses of SAWSDL, and identify some ways in which OWL-S could evolve so as to integrate more smoothly with SAWSDL.

  14. Annotation Graphs: A Graph-Based Visualization for Meta-Analysis of Data Based on User-Authored Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Glueck, Michael; Breslav, Simon; Chevalier, Fanny; Khan, Azam

    2017-01-01

    User-authored annotations of data can support analysts in the activity of hypothesis generation and sensemaking, where it is not only critical to document key observations, but also to communicate insights between analysts. We present annotation graphs, a dynamic graph visualization that enables meta-analysis of data based on user-authored annotations. The annotation graph topology encodes annotation semantics, which describe the content of and relations between data selections, comments, and tags. We present a mixed-initiative approach to graph layout that integrates an analyst's manual manipulations with an automatic method based on similarity inferred from the annotation semantics. Various visual graph layout styles reveal different perspectives on the annotation semantics. Annotation graphs are implemented within C8, a system that supports authoring annotations during exploratory analysis of a dataset. We apply principles of Exploratory Sequential Data Analysis (ESDA) in designing C8, and further link these to an existing task typology in the visualization literature. We develop and evaluate the system through an iterative user-centered design process with three experts, situated in the domain of analyzing HCI experiment data. The results suggest that annotation graphs are effective as a method of visually extending user-authored annotations to data meta-analysis for discovery and organization of ideas.

  15. Extremely low polymerizability of a highly-divergent Chlamydomonas actin (NAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Minoura, Takako

    2011-09-09

    Novel actin-like protein (NAP) is a highly divergent actin expressed in Chlamydomonas. With its low sequence similarity, it is uncertain whether NAP can polymerize into filaments. Here I assessed it by ectopically expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged NAP (EGFP-NAP) in cultured cells. EGFP-NAP was excluded from stress fibres but partially co-localized with endogenous actin in the cell periphery. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment, turnover rate of EGFP-NAP was similar to the estimated diffusion rate of monomeric actin. Therefore, EGFP-NAP likely accumulates by diffusion. These findings suggest that NAP has extremely poor ability to polymerize. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Localization of Five Antibiotic Resistances at the Subunit Level in Chloroplast Ribosomes of Chlamydomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanger, Gladys; Sager, Ruth

    1974-01-01

    The chloroplast ribosomes from five antibiotic resistant strains of Chlamydomonas, each carrying one mutant gene mapping in chloroplast DNA, have been shown to be resistant to the corresponding antibiotic in a poly(U)-directed amino-acid incorporating assay system. The alteration conferring resistance was localized to the 30S subunit in ribosomes from streptomycin, neamine, and spectinomycin resistant strains, and to the 50S subunit in ribosomes from cleocin and carbomycin resistant strains. Spectinomycin resistant ribosomes showed no cross-resistance to any other drugs, but limited cross-resistance was noted with the other mutant ribosomes. The similarity between these findings and results reported by others with bacterial ribosomes supports our hypothesis that at least some chloroplast ribosomal proteins are coded by genes in chloroplast DNA. Images PMID:4275942

  17. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinxia; Hu, Zhangli; Wang, Chaogang; Li, Shuangfei; Lei, Anping

    2008-08-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. reinhardtii.

  18. A chloroplast pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of triacylglycerol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.; Andre, C.

    2011-06-23

    Neutral lipid metabolism has been extensively studied in yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, little information is available regarding the biochemical pathway, enzymes and regulatory factors involved in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in microalgae. In the conventional TAG biosynthetic pathway widely accepted for yeast, plants and mammals, TAG is assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from its immediate precursor diacylglycerol (DAG) made by ER-specific acyltransferases, and is deposited exclusively in lipid droplets in the cytosol. Here, we demonstrated that the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii employs a distinct pathway that uses DAG derived almost exclusively from the chloroplast to produce TAG. This unique TAG biosynthesis pathway is largely dependent on de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the TAG formed in this pathway is stored in lipid droplets in both the chloroplast and the cytosol. These findings have wide implications for understanding TAG biosynthesis and storage and other areas of lipid metabolism in microalgae and other organisms.

  19. Systems Biology of Lipid Body Formation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, Ursula [Washington University

    2017-11-10

    The project aimed to deepen our understanding of alga triacylglycerol (TAG) production to undergird explorations of using algal TAG as a source of biodiesel fuel. Our published contributions included the following: 1) Development of a rapid assay for TAG in algal cultures which was widely distributed to the algal community. 2) A comprehensive transcriptome analysis of the development of the ultra-high-TAG “obese” phenotype In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. 3) A comprehensive biochemical and ultrastructural analysis of the cell wall of Nannochloropsis gaditana, whose walls render it both growth-hardy and difficult to rupture for TAG recovery. A manuscript in preparation considers the autophagy response in C. reinhardtii and its entrance into stationary phase, both having an impact on TAG production.

  20. Phosphopantetheinylation in the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenschein, Eva; Pu, Yuan; Beld, Joris

    2016-01-01

    is responsible for holding the product. Fatty acid biosynthesis is initiated through posttranslational modification of the ACP by the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase). We identified two PPTases, PptC1 and PptC2, in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by genome analysis and phylogenetic...... and structural comparison. Both PPTases are of Sfp-type, the archetypical PPTase type for non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic pathways in bacteria and cyanobacteria. In vitro analysis revealed that PptC2 has a broader substrate range than PptC1. Both PPTases were able to activate the cognate ACP...... in microalgae shows that microalgae are already primed for biotechnological applications in contrast to other organisms. Thus, microalgae have great potential for metabolic engineering efforts in the realm of biofuel and high-value products including direct engineering of the fatty acid or secondary metabolism...

  1. A forward genetic approach in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a strategy for exploring starch catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçay, Hande; Findinier, Justin; Duchêne, Thierry; Cogez, Virginie; Cousin, Charlotte; Peltier, Gilles; Ball, Steven G; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    A screen was recently developed to study the mobilization of starch in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This screen relies on starch synthesis accumulation during nitrogen starvation followed by the supply of nitrogen and the switch to darkness. Hence multiple regulatory networks including those of nutrient starvation, cell cycle control and light to dark transitions are likely to impact the recovery of mutant candidates. In this paper we monitor the specificity of this mutant screen by characterizing the nature of the genes disrupted in the selected mutants. We show that one third of the mutants consisted of strains mutated in genes previously reported to be of paramount importance in starch catabolism such as those encoding β-amylases, the maltose export protein, and branching enzyme I. The other mutants were defective for previously uncharacterized functions some of which are likely to define novel proteins affecting starch mobilization in green algae.

  2. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume. PMID:26787679

  3. Effect of Temperature and light intensity on growth and Photosynthetic Activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonsel Jaen, M.; Fernandez Gonzalez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of five temperatures (15,20,25,30 and 35 degree centigree) and two levels of illumination on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II has been studied. The growth of the cultures was evaluated by optical density. Photosynthetic activity has been carried out studying either the assimilation rate of C0 2 labelled with C-14 or the oxygen evolution by means of polarographic measurements. The maximum photosynthetic rate has been obtained at 25 degree centigree for the lower level of illumination (2400 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher one (13200 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher ono (13200 lux). These results suggest an interaction of temperature and illumination on photosynthetic activity. (Author) 37 refs

  4. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-07-28

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity.

  5. CRISPRi mediated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase regulation to enhance the production of lipid in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Hsun; Ng, I-Son

    2017-12-01

    In this study, CRISPRi (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference) was used for the first time to regulate expression of exogenously supplied rfp gene as a proof-of-concept, and endogenous PEPC1 gene as a proof-of-function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The efficiency of 94% and stability of 7 generations via CRISPRi mediated gene regulation in C. reinhardtii have been demonstrated by RFP. Gene PEPC1 encoding proteins are essential for controlling the carbon flux that enters the TCA cycle and plays a crucial role in carbon partitioning of substrates in competition with lipid synthesis. All CrPEPC1 down-regulated strains have lower chlorophyll color, but higher biomass concentration and lipid accumulation rate. The present results revealed that CRISPRi based transcriptional silencing was applicable in C. reinhardtii and expanded the way to improve the yield, titer and productivity of microalgae-based products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a protein expression system for pharmaceutical and biotechnological proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbeck, Christoph; Kobl, Iris; Heitzer, Markus

    2006-10-01

    Recombinant proteins have become more and more important for the pharmaceutical and chemical industry. Although various systems for protein expression have been developed, there is an increasing demand for inexpensive methods of large-scale production. Eukaryotic algae could serve as a novel option for the manufacturing of recombinant proteins, as they can be cultivated in a cheap and easy manner and grown to high cell densities. Being a model organism, the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been studied intensively over the last decades and offers now a complete toolset for genetic manipulation. Recently, the successful expression of several proteins with pharmaceutical relevance has been reported from the nuclear and the chloroplastic genome of this alga, demonstrating its ability for biotechnological applications.

  7. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-11

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat.

  8. Investigating the link between fermentative metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, S.J.; Nixon, P.J. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    In the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the electrons required for hydrogen production can come from both the biophotolysis of water and from the fermentation of carbohydrate reserves. Anoxia leads to the activation of several fermentative pathways, which produce a number of end products including formic, malic and acetic acid along with ethanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It has been proposed that by switching off competing fermentative pathways hydrogen production can be increased. Therefore the aim of this study was to devise an experimental strategy to down-regulate the expression of enzymes thought to control C. reinhardtii's fermentative metabolism. We demonstrate here that it is possible to use artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology to generate knock-down mutants with reduced expression of pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), a key fermentative enzyme in C. reinhardtii. This work opens up new possibilities to improve hydrogen yields through metabolic engineering. (orig.)

  9. Separate origins of ice-binding proteins in antarctic chlamydomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, James A; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas raudensis is an important primary producer in a number of ice-covered lakes and ponds in Antarctica. A C. raudensis isolate (UWO241) from Lake Bonney in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, like many other Antarctic algae, was found to secrete ice-binding proteins (IBPs), which appear to be essential for survival in icy environments. The IBPs of several Antarctic algae (diatoms, a prymesiophyte, and a prasinophyte) are similar to each other (here designated as type I IBPs) and have been proposed to have bacterial origins. Other IBPs (type II IBPs) that bear no resemblance to type I IBPs, have been found in the Antarctic Chlamydomonas sp. CCMP681, a putative snow alga, raising the possibility that chlamydomonad IBPs developed separately from the IBPs of other algae. To test this idea, we obtained the IBP sequences of C. raudensis UWO241 by sequencing the transcriptome. A large number of transcripts revealed no sequences resembling type II IBPs. Instead, many isoforms resembling type I IBPs were found, and these most closely matched a hypothetical protein from the bacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca. The sequences were confirmed to encode IBPs by the activity of a recombinant protein and by the matching of predicted and observed isoelectric points and molecular weights. Furthermore, a mesophilic sister species, C. raudensis SAG49.72, showed no ice-binding activity or PCR products from UWO241 IBP primers. These results confirm that algal IBPs are required for survival in icy habitats and demonstrate that they have diverse origins that are unrelated to the taxonomic positions of the algae. Last, we show that the C. raudensis UWO241 IBPs can change the structure of ice in a way that could increase the survivability of cells trapped in the ice.

  10. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines.An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein.The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  11. Flocculation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with Different Phenotypic Traits by Metal Cations and High pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Concentrating algal cells by flocculation as a prelude to centrifugation could significantly reduce the energy and cost of harvesting the algae. However, how variation in phenotypic traits such as cell surface features, cell size and motility alter the efficiency of metal cation and pH-induced flocculation is not well understood. Our results demonstrate that both wild-type and cell wall-deficient strains of the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii efficiently flocculate (>90% at an elevated pH of the medium (pH 11 upon the addition of divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium (>5 mM. The trivalent ferric cation (at 10 mM proved to be essential for promoting flocculation under weak alkaline conditions (pH ∼8.5, with a maximum efficiency that exceeded 95 and 85% for wild-type CC1690 and the cell wall-deficient sta6 mutant, respectively. Near complete flocculation could be achieved using a combination of 5 mM calcium and a pH >11, while the medium recovered following cell removal could be re-cycled without affecting algal growth rates. Moreover, the absence of starch in the cell had little overall impact on flocculation efficiency. These findings contribute to our understanding of flocculation in different Chlamydomonas strains and have implications with respect to inexpensive methods for harvesting algae with different phenotypic traits. Additional research on the conditions (e.g., pH and metal ions used for efficient flocculation of diverse algal groups with diverse characteristics, at both small and large scale, will help establish inexpensive procedures for harvesting cell biomass.

  12. Gene Ontology annotation of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Jixin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of blast disease of rice, is the most destructive disease of rice worldwide. The genome of this fungal pathogen has been sequenced and an automated annotation has recently been updated to Version 6 http://www.broad.mit.edu/annotation/genome/magnaporthe_grisea/MultiDownloads.html. However, a comprehensive manual curation remains to be performed. Gene Ontology (GO annotation is a valuable means of assigning functional information using standardized vocabulary. We report an overview of the GO annotation for Version 5 of M. oryzae genome assembly. Methods A similarity-based (i.e., computational GO annotation with manual review was conducted, which was then integrated with a literature-based GO annotation with computational assistance. For similarity-based GO annotation a stringent reciprocal best hits method was used to identify similarity between predicted proteins of M. oryzae and GO proteins from multiple organisms with published associations to GO terms. Significant alignment pairs were manually reviewed. Functional assignments were further cross-validated with manually reviewed data, conserved domains, or data determined by wet lab experiments. Additionally, biological appropriateness of the functional assignments was manually checked. Results In total, 6,286 proteins received GO term assignment via the homology-based annotation, including 2,870 hypothetical proteins. Literature-based experimental evidence, such as microarray, MPSS, T-DNA insertion mutation, or gene knockout mutation, resulted in 2,810 proteins being annotated with GO terms. Of these, 1,673 proteins were annotated with new terms developed for Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO. In addition, 67 experiment-determined secreted proteins were annotated with PAMGO terms. Integration of the two data sets resulted in 7,412 proteins (57% being annotated with 1,957 distinct and specific GO terms. Unannotated proteins

  13. Photostimulation of H2 production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon photoinhibition of its O2-evolving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.; Markov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    A brief exposure (15-30 min) of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to high intensity light (100 W·m -2 ) was accompanied by rapid suppression of photosynthetic O 2 evolution. The decline in the rate of O 2 evolution was accompanied by stimulation of H 2 production. The effect was dependent on cell suspension density, culture age, and light intensity. It appears that photoinhibition of photosynthetic O 2 evolution led to anaerobiosis that is favorable for H 2 production. (author)

  14. Insights into the Survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Sulfur Starvation Based on Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression† ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Shrager, Jeff; Jain, Monica; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Vallon, Olivier; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2004-01-01

    Responses of photosynthetic organisms to sulfur starvation include (i) increasing the capacity of the cell for transporting and/or assimilating exogenous sulfate, (ii) restructuring cellular features to conserve sulfur resources, and (iii) modulating metabolic processes and rates of cell growth and division. We used microarray analyses to obtain a genome-level view of changes in mRNA abundances in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during sulfur starvation. The work confirms and extends...

  15. Plann: A command-line application for annotating plastome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Daisie I; Cronk, Quentin C B

    2015-08-01

    Plann automates the process of annotating a plastome sequence in GenBank format for either downstream processing or for GenBank submission by annotating a new plastome based on a similar, well-annotated plastome. Plann is a Perl script to be executed on the command line. Plann compares a new plastome sequence to the features annotated in a reference plastome and then shifts the intervals of any matching features to the locations in the new plastome. Plann's output can be used in the National Center for Biotechnology Information's tbl2asn to create a Sequin file for GenBank submission. Unlike Web-based annotation packages, Plann is a locally executable script that will accurately annotate a plastome sequence to a locally specified reference plastome. Because it executes from the command line, it is ready to use in other software pipelines and can be easily rerun as a draft plastome is improved.

  16. Annotated bibliography of Software Engineering Laboratory literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morusiewicz, Linda; Valett, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory is given. More than 100 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: The Software Engineering Laboratory; The Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; Software Tools; Software Models; Software Measurement; Technology Evaluations; Ada Technology; and Data Collection. Subject and author indexes further classify these documents by specific topic and individual author.

  17. High-Resolution Profiling of a Synchronized Diurnal Transcriptome from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveals Continuous Cell and Metabolic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zones, James Matt; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Umen, James G

    2015-10-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a useful model organism for investigating diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis, flagella and basal body structure/function, cell growth and division, and many others. We combined a highly synchronous photobioreactor culture system with frequent temporal sampling to characterize genome-wide diurnal gene expression in Chlamydomonas. Over 80% of the measured transcriptome was expressed with strong periodicity, forming 18 major clusters. Genes associated with complex structures and processes, including cell cycle control, flagella and basal bodies, ribosome biogenesis, and energy metabolism, all had distinct signatures of coexpression with strong predictive value for assigning and temporally ordering function. Importantly, the frequent sampling regime allowed us to discern meaningful fine-scale phase differences between and within subgroups of genes and enabled the identification of a transiently expressed cluster of light stress genes. Coexpression was further used both as a data-mining tool to classify and/or validate genes from other data sets related to the cell cycle and to flagella and basal bodies and to assign isoforms of duplicated enzymes to their cognate pathways of central carbon metabolism. Our diurnal coexpression data capture functional relationships established by dozens of prior studies and are a valuable new resource for investigating a variety of biological processes in Chlamydomonas and other eukaryotes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. GARNET – gene set analysis with exploration of annotation relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jihae

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis is a powerful method of deducing biological meaning for an a priori defined set of genes. Numerous tools have been developed to test statistical enrichment or depletion in specific pathways or gene ontology (GO terms. Major difficulties towards biological interpretation are integrating diverse types of annotation categories and exploring the relationships between annotation terms of similar information. Results GARNET (Gene Annotation Relationship NEtwork Tools is an integrative platform for gene set analysis with many novel features. It includes tools for retrieval of genes from annotation database, statistical analysis & visualization of annotation relationships, and managing gene sets. In an effort to allow access to a full spectrum of amassed biological knowledge, we have integrated a variety of annotation data that include the GO, domain, disease, drug, chromosomal location, and custom-defined annotations. Diverse types of molecular networks (pathways, transcription and microRNA regulations, protein-protein interaction are also included. The pair-wise relationship between annotation gene sets was calculated using kappa statistics. GARNET consists of three modules - gene set manager, gene set analysis and gene set retrieval, which are tightly integrated to provide virtually automatic analysis for gene sets. A dedicated viewer for annotation network has been developed to facilitate exploration of the related annotations. Conclusions GARNET (gene annotation relationship network tools is an integrative platform for diverse types of gene set analysis, where complex relationships among gene annotations can be easily explored with an intuitive network visualization tool (http://garnet.isysbio.org/ or http://ercsb.ewha.ac.kr/garnet/.

  19. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Premzl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  20. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    OpenAIRE

    Premzl, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomencla...

  1. African American Literature, 1989-94: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. Baxter; Butts, Tracy; Jones, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Contains an annotated bibliography of African American literature (published between 1989 and 1994), including anthologies, fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, cultural studies, biography, interviews, and letters. (TB)

  2. Review of actinide-sediment reactions with an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, L.L.; Rai, D.; Serne, R.J.

    1976-02-10

    The annotated bibliography is divided into sections on chemistry and geochemistry, migration and accumulation, cultural distributions, natural distributions, and bibliographies and annual reviews. (LK)

  3. Annotation Method (AM): SE40_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE40_AM1 PowerGet annotation In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS ar...can assign, predicted molecular formulas are used for the annotation. MS/MS patterns was used to suggest fun...p/) and MS-MS Fragment Viewer (http://webs2.kazusa.or.jp/msmsfragmentviewer/) are used for ann...lcone, Nicotinamide, Nicotinate, Pantothenate, Phloretin, Prunin, Rutin, S-Adenosyl-L-methionine, Tomatine, UMP, Uridine) are used for annotation and identification of the compounds. ...

  4. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Ely

    Full Text Available Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  5. Feedback Driven Annotation and Refactoring of Parallel Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per

    , some program properties are beyond reach of such analysis for theoretical and practical reasons - but can be described by programmers. Three aspects are explored. The first is annotation of the source code. Two annotations are introduced. These allow more accurate modeling of parallelism...... and communication in embedded programs. Runtime checks are developed to ensure that annotations correctly describe observable program behavior. The performance impact of runtime checking is evaluated on several benchmark kernels and is negligible in all cases. The second aspect is compilation feedback. Annotations...

  6. Annotating non-coding regions of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Roger P; Fang, Gang; Rozowsky, Joel; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-08-01

    Most of the human genome consists of non-protein-coding DNA. Recently, progress has been made in annotating these non-coding regions through the interpretation of functional genomics experiments and comparative sequence analysis. One can conceptualize functional genomics analysis as involving a sequence of steps: turning the output of an experiment into a 'signal' at each base pair of the genome; smoothing this signal and segmenting it into small blocks of initial annotation; and then clustering these small blocks into larger derived annotations and networks. Finally, one can relate functional genomics annotations to conserved units and measures of conservation derived from comparative sequence analysis.

  7. Annotated bibliography National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    The following annotated bibliography lists documents prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE), and predecessor agencies, to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for activities and facilities at Sandia National Laboratories sites. For each NEPA document summary information and a brief discussion of content is provided. This information may be used to reduce the amount of time or cost associated with NEPA compliance for future Sandia National Laboratories projects. This summary may be used to identify model documents, documents to use as sources of information, or documents from which to tier additional NEPA documents

  8. Phenex: ontological annotation of phenotypic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Balhoff

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic differences among species have long been systematically itemized and described by biologists in the process of investigating phylogenetic relationships and trait evolution. Traditionally, these descriptions have been expressed in natural language within the context of individual journal publications or monographs. As such, this rich store of phenotype data has been largely unavailable for statistical and computational comparisons across studies or integration with other biological knowledge.Here we describe Phenex, a platform-independent desktop application designed to facilitate efficient and consistent annotation of phenotypic similarities and differences using Entity-Quality syntax, drawing on terms from community ontologies for anatomical entities, phenotypic qualities, and taxonomic names. Phenex can be configured to load only those ontologies pertinent to a taxonomic group of interest. The graphical user interface was optimized for evolutionary biologists accustomed to working with lists of taxa, characters, character states, and character-by-taxon matrices.Annotation of phenotypic data using ontologies and globally unique taxonomic identifiers will allow biologists to integrate phenotypic data from different organisms and studies, leveraging decades of work in systematics and comparative morphology.

  9. Training nuclei detection algorithms with simple annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Kost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generating good training datasets is essential for machine learning-based nuclei detection methods. However, creating exhaustive nuclei contour annotations, to derive optimal training data from, is often infeasible. Methods: We compared different approaches for training nuclei detection methods solely based on nucleus center markers. Such markers contain less accurate information, especially with regard to nuclear boundaries, but can be produced much easier and in greater quantities. The approaches use different automated sample extraction methods to derive image positions and class labels from nucleus center markers. In addition, the approaches use different automated sample selection methods to improve the detection quality of the classification algorithm and reduce the run time of the training process. We evaluated the approaches based on a previously published generic nuclei detection algorithm and a set of Ki-67-stained breast cancer images. Results: A Voronoi tessellation-based sample extraction method produced the best performing training sets. However, subsampling of the extracted training samples was crucial. Even simple class balancing improved the detection quality considerably. The incorporation of active learning led to a further increase in detection quality. Conclusions: With appropriate sample extraction and selection methods, nuclei detection algorithms trained on the basis of simple center marker annotations can produce comparable quality to algorithms trained on conventionally created training sets.

  10. Annotated bibliography of the physical data of Rainier Mesa and Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been designated as the only site to undergo characterization to determine if it meets the criteria to become the Nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. During this process, care must be taken to not compromise the site's integrity through excessive testing. In order to supplement the limited data to be gathered at Yucca Mountain, analog areas are to be considered. This annotated bibliography was compiled by the Desert Research Institute to help investigate ways in which Rainier Mesa could either be used as a supplemental repository test site or where existing Rainier Mesa data can be used either to support or refute test results from Yucca Mountain. Rainier Mesa, the location of numerous underground nuclear tests on the NTS, possesses some geologic characteristics similar to those of Yucca Mountain, which makes it a likely candidate for comparison. Almost 500 references regarding geology, hydrology, meteorology, biology, and archaeology were annotated and entered alpha-numerically into the bibliography. These references were categorized into 50 topics which are defined in Section 2 and presented in Section 3. Each reference is categorized as to whether it contains Yucca Mountain data, Rainier Mesa data, or both, and a final category consists of those reports that contain Rainier Mesa data that have already been applied to Yucca Mountain research. The annotated bibliography is presented in Section 4

  11. Chlamydomonas fla mutants reveal a link between deflagellation and intraflagellar transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quarmby Lynne

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cilia and flagella are often lost in anticipation of mitosis or in response to stress. There are two ways that a cell can lose its flagella: resorption or deflagellation. Deflagellation involves active severing of the axoneme at the base of the flagellum; this process is defective in Chlamydomonas fa mutants. In contrast, resorption has been thought to occur as a consequence of constitutive disassembly at the tip in the absence of continued assembly, which requires intraflagellar transport (IFT. Chlamydomonas fla mutants are unable to build and maintain flagella due to defects in IFT. Results fla10 cells, which are defective in kinesin-II, the anterograde IFT motor, resorb their flagella at the restrictive temperature (33°C, as previously reported. We find that in standard media containing ~300 microM calcium, fla10 cells lose flagella by deflagellation at 33°C. This temperature-induced deflagellation of a fla mutant is not predicted by the IFT-based model for flagellar length control. Other fla mutants behave similarly, losing their flagella by deflagellation instead of resorption, if adequate calcium is available. These data suggest a new model whereby flagellar resorption involves active disassembly at the base of the flagellum via a mechanism with components in common with the severing machinery of deflagellation. As predicted by this model, we discovered that deflagellation stimuli induce resorption if deflagellation is blocked either by mutation in a FA gene or by lack of calcium. Further support for this model comes from our discovery that fla10-fa double mutants resorb their flagella more slowly than fla10 mutants. Conclusions Deflagellation of the fla10 mutant at the restrictive temperature is indicative of an active disassembly signal, which can manifest as either resorption or deflagellation. We propose that when IFT is halted by either an inactivating mutation or a cellular signal, active flagellar disassembly

  12. Annotation-Based Learner's Personality Modeling in Distance Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omheni, Nizar; Kalboussi, Anis; Mazhoud, Omar; Kacem, Ahmed Hadj

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in distance education are interested in observing and modeling learners' personality profiles, and adapting their learning experiences accordingly. When learners read and interact with their reading materials, they do unselfconscious activities like annotation which may be key feature of their personalities. Annotation activity…

  13. Collaborative Paper-Based Annotation of Lecture Slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Jurgen; Brdiczka, Oliver; Muhlhauser, Max

    2009-01-01

    In a study of notetaking in university courses, we found that the large majority of students prefer paper to computer-based media like Tablet PCs for taking notes and making annotations. Based on this finding, we developed CoScribe, a concept and system which supports students in making collaborative handwritten annotations on printed lecture…

  14. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In this paper we compare the predictions of two of the nonconsensus methods, namely GeneScan and GLIMMER with annotation of three completely sequenced genomes of the organisms Haemophilus influenzae, Helicobacter pylori, and Campylobacter jejuni. All these organisms have been annotated previously using the ...

  15. Propagating annotations of molecular networks using in silico fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo R; Wang, Mingxun; Nothias, Louis-Félix; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Caraballo-Rodríguez, Andrés Mauricio; Fox, Evan; Balunas, Marcy J; Klassen, Jonathan L; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2018-04-18

    The annotation of small molecules is one of the most challenging and important steps in untargeted mass spectrometry analysis, as most of our biological interpretations rely on structural annotations. Molecular networking has emerged as a structured way to organize and mine data from untargeted tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments and has been widely applied to propagate annotations. However, propagation is done through manual inspection of MS/MS spectra connected in the spectral networks and is only possible when a reference library spectrum is available. One of the alternative approaches used to annotate an unknown fragmentation mass spectrum is through the use of in silico predictions. One of the challenges of in silico annotation is the uncertainty around the correct structure among the predicted candidate lists. Here we show how molecular networking can be used to improve the accuracy of in silico predictions through propagation of structural annotations, even when there is no match to a MS/MS spectrum in spectral libraries. This is accomplished through creating a network consensus of re-ranked structural candidates using the molecular network topology and structural similarity to improve in silico annotations. The Network Annotation Propagation (NAP) tool is accessible through the GNPS web-platform https://gnps.ucsd.edu/ProteoSAFe/static/gnps-theoretical.jsp.

  16. The GATO gene annotation tool for research laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fujita

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome projects have generated a rapidly increasing number of DNA sequences. Therefore, development of computational methods to rapidly analyze these sequences is essential for progress in genomic research. Here we present an automatic annotation system for preliminary analysis of DNA sequences. The gene annotation tool (GATO is a Bioinformatics pipeline designed to facilitate routine functional annotation and easy access to annotated genes. It was designed in view of the frequent need of genomic researchers to access data pertaining to a common set of genes. In the GATO system, annotation is generated by querying some of the Web-accessible resources and the information is stored in a local database, which keeps a record of all previous annotation results. GATO may be accessed from everywhere through the internet or may be run locally if a large number of sequences are going to be annotated. It is implemented in PHP and Perl and may be run on any suitable Web server. Usually, installation and application of annotation systems require experience and are time consuming, but GATO is simple and practical, allowing anyone with basic skills in informatics to access it without any special training. GATO can be downloaded at [http://mariwork.iq.usp.br/gato/]. Minimum computer free space required is 2 MB.

  17. First generation annotations for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab initio gene prediction and evidence alignment were used to produce the first annotations for the fathead minnow SOAPdenovo genome assembly. Additionally, a genome browser hosted at genome.setac.org provides simplified access to the annotation data in context with fathead minno...

  18. A Factor Graph Approach to Automated GO Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio E Spetale

    Full Text Available As volume of genomic data grows, computational methods become essential for providing a first glimpse onto gene annotations. Automated Gene Ontology (GO annotation methods based on hierarchical ensemble classification techniques are particularly interesting when interpretability of annotation results is a main concern. In these methods, raw GO-term predictions computed by base binary classifiers are leveraged by checking the consistency of predefined GO relationships. Both formal leveraging strategies, with main focus on annotation precision, and heuristic alternatives, with main focus on scalability issues, have been described in literature. In this contribution, a factor graph approach to the hierarchical ensemble formulation of the automated GO annotation problem is presented. In this formal framework, a core factor graph is first built based on the GO structure and then enriched to take into account the noisy nature of GO-term predictions. Hence, starting from raw GO-term predictions, an iterative message passing algorithm between nodes of the factor graph is used to compute marginal probabilities of target GO-terms. Evaluations on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster protein sequences from the GO Molecular Function domain showed significant improvements over competing approaches, even when protein sequences were naively characterized by their physicochemical and secondary structure properties or when loose noisy annotation datasets were considered. Based on these promising results and using Arabidopsis thaliana annotation data, we extend our approach to the identification of most promising molecular function annotations for a set of proteins of unknown function in Solanum lycopersicum.

  19. Online Metacognitive Strategies, Hypermedia Annotations, and Motivation on Hypertext Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of online metacognitive strategies, hypermedia annotations, and motivation on reading comprehension in a Taiwanese hypertext environment. A path analysis model was proposed based on the assumption that if English as a foreign language learners frequently use online metacognitive strategies and hypermedia annotations,…

  20. Behavioral Contributions to "Teaching of Psychology": An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, A. M.; Carr, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    An annotated bibliography that summarizes behavioral contributions to the journal "Teaching of Psychology" from 1974 to 2006 is provided. A total of 116 articles of potential utility to college-level instructors of behavior analysis and related areas were identified, annotated, and organized into nine categories for ease of accessibility.…

  1. Code Generation from Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge

    using a sub-class of CPNs, called Pragmatics Annotated CPNs (PACPNs). PA-CPNs give structure to the protocol models and allows the models to be annotated with code generation pragmatics. These pragmatics are used by our code generation approach to identify and execute the appropriate code generation...

  2. Orienteering: An Annotated Bibliography = Orientierungslauf: Eine kommentierte Bibliographie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Roland, Ed.; Hartmann, Wolfgang, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Annotated bibliography of 220 books, monographs, and journal articles on orienteering published 1984-94, from SPOLIT database of the Federal Institute of Sport Science (Cologne, Germany). Annotations in English or German. Ten sections including psychological, physiological, health, sociological, and environmental aspects; training and coaching;…

  3. International Development and the Human Environment. An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974

    Most of the material in this annotated bibliography has been selected from the literature published between 1968 and 1972. Each annotation and citation is indexed by author, subject, and publisher. Entries are organized into 11 chapters: Environment, Development, and Conservation of Natural Resources; The Third World: Development and Economic…

  4. Twenty Years of "Writing Center Journal Scholarship": An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShaw, Dana; Mullin, Joan; DeCiccio, Albert C.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography tracing 20 years of "Writing Center Journal" scholarship covering a variety of issues which include teacher training, critical thinking, writing apprehension, peer tutoring, Internet sources and individual instruction. Contains annotations of all the articles and reviews published in this journal's…

  5. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...... acidocaldarius genome, and several plasmids and viruses have so far been analysed and annotated using MUTAGEN....

  6. Annotating with Propp's Morphology of the Folktale: Reproducibility and Trainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisseni, B.; Kurji, A.; Löwe, B.

    2014-01-01

    We continue the study of the reproducibility of Propp’s annotations from Bod et al. (2012). We present four experiments in which test subjects were taught Propp’s annotation system; we conclude that Propp’s system needs a significant amount of training, but that with sufficient time investment, it

  7. Developing Annotation Solutions for Online Data Driven Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Paredes, Pascual; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Although "annotation" is a widely-researched topic in Corpus Linguistics (CL), its potential role in Data Driven Learning (DDL) has not been addressed in depth by Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) practitioners. Furthermore, most of the research in the use of DDL methods pays little attention to annotation in the design and implementation…

  8. Automatic Annotation Method on Learners' Opinions in Case Method Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Masaki; Hisakane, Daichi; Komoda, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to annotate an attribute of a problem, a solution or no annotation on learners' opinions automatically for supporting the learners' discussion without a facilitator. The case method aims at discussing problems and solutions in a target case. However, the learners miss discussing some of problems and solutions.…

  9. The GATO gene annotation tool for research laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, A; Massirer, K B; Durham, A M; Ferreira, C E; Sogayar, M C

    2005-11-01

    Large-scale genome projects have generated a rapidly increasing number of DNA sequences. Therefore, development of computational methods to rapidly analyze these sequences is essential for progress in genomic research. Here we present an automatic annotation system for preliminary analysis of DNA sequences. The gene annotation tool (GATO) is a Bioinformatics pipeline designed to facilitate routine functional annotation and easy access to annotated genes. It was designed in view of the frequent need of genomic researchers to access data pertaining to a common set of genes. In the GATO system, annotation is generated by querying some of the Web-accessible resources and the information is stored in a local database, which keeps a record of all previous annotation results. GATO may be accessed from everywhere through the internet or may be run locally if a large number of sequences are going to be annotated. It is implemented in PHP and Perl and may be run on any suitable Web server. Usually, installation and application of annotation systems require experience and are time consuming, but GATO is simple and practical, allowing anyone with basic skills in informatics to access it without any special training. GATO can be downloaded at [http://mariwork.iq.usp.br/gato/]. Minimum computer free space required is 2 MB.

  10. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services).

  11. The RAST Server: Rapid Annotations using Subsystems Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Ross A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of prokaryotic genome sequences becoming available is growing steadily and is growing faster than our ability to accurately annotate them. Description We describe a fully automated service for annotating bacterial and archaeal genomes. The service identifies protein-encoding, rRNA and tRNA genes, assigns functions to the genes, predicts which subsystems are represented in the genome, uses this information to reconstruct the metabolic network and makes the output easily downloadable for the user. In addition, the annotated genome can be browsed in an environment that supports comparative analysis with the annotated genomes maintained in the SEED environment. The service normally makes the annotated genome available within 12–24 hours of submission, but ultimately the quality of such a service will be judged in terms of accuracy, consistency, and completeness of the produced annotations. We summarize our attempts to address these issues and discuss plans for incrementally enhancing the service. Conclusion By providing accurate, rapid annotation freely to the community we have created an important community resource. The service has now been utilized by over 120 external users annotating over 350 distinct genomes.

  12. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator: a mitochondrial genome database of fish with an accurate and automatic annotation pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Isagozawa, Ryota; Yamada, Koichiro; Maeda, Yasunobu; Satoh, Takashi P; Sado, Tetsuya; Mabuchi, Kohji; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-11-01

    Mitofish is a database of fish mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) that includes powerful and precise de novo annotations for mitogenome sequences. Fish occupy an important position in the evolution of vertebrates and the ecology of the hydrosphere, and mitogenomic sequence data have served as a rich source of information for resolving fish phylogenies and identifying new fish species. The importance of a mitogenomic database continues to grow at a rapid pace as massive amounts of mitogenomic data are generated with the advent of new sequencing technologies. A severe bottleneck seems likely to occur with regard to mitogenome annotation because of the overwhelming pace of data accumulation and the intrinsic difficulties in annotating sequences with degenerating transfer RNA structures, divergent start/stop codons of the coding elements, and the overlapping of adjacent elements. To ease this data backlog, we developed an annotation pipeline named MitoAnnotator. MitoAnnotator automatically annotates a fish mitogenome with a high degree of accuracy in approximately 5 min; thus, it is readily applicable to data sets of dozens of sequences. MitoFish also contains re-annotations of previously sequenced fish mitogenomes, enabling researchers to refer to them when they find annotations that are likely to be erroneous or while conducting comparative mitogenomic analyses. For users who need more information on the taxonomy, habitats, phenotypes, or life cycles of fish, MitoFish provides links to related databases. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator are freely available at http://mitofish.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (last accessed August 28, 2013); all of the data can be batch downloaded, and the annotation pipeline can be used via a web interface.

  13. Sharing Map Annotations in Small Groups: X Marks the Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congleton, Ben; Cerretani, Jacqueline; Newman, Mark W.; Ackerman, Mark S.

    Advances in location-sensing technology, coupled with an increasingly pervasive wireless Internet, have made it possible (and increasingly easy) to access and share information with context of one’s geospatial location. We conducted a four-phase study, with 27 students, to explore the practices surrounding the creation, interpretation and sharing of map annotations in specific social contexts. We found that annotation authors consider multiple factors when deciding how to annotate maps, including the perceived utility to the audience and how their contributions will reflect on the image they project to others. Consumers of annotations value the novelty of information, but must be convinced of the author’s credibility. In this paper we describe our study, present the results, and discuss implications for the design of software for sharing map annotations.

  14. Improving microbial genome annotations in an integrated database context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Min A Chen

    Full Text Available Effective comparative analysis of microbial genomes requires a consistent and complete view of biological data. Consistency regards the biological coherence of annotations, while completeness regards the extent and coverage of functional characterization for genomes. We have developed tools that allow scientists to assess and improve the consistency and completeness of microbial genome annotations in the context of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG family of systems. All publicly available microbial genomes are characterized in IMG using different functional annotation and pathway resources, thus providing a comprehensive framework for identifying and resolving annotation discrepancies. A rule based system for predicting phenotypes in IMG provides a powerful mechanism for validating functional annotations, whereby the phenotypic traits of an organism are inferred based on the presence of certain metabolic reactions and pathways and compared to experimentally observed phenotypes. The IMG family of systems are available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/.

  15. Semantator: annotating clinical narratives with semantic web ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dezhao; Chute, Christopher G; Tao, Cui

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate clinical research, clinical data needs to be stored in a machine processable and understandable way. Manual annotating clinical data is time consuming. Automatic approaches (e.g., Natural Language Processing systems) have been adopted to convert such data into structured formats; however, the quality of such automatically extracted data may not always be satisfying. In this paper, we propose Semantator, a semi-automatic tool for document annotation with Semantic Web ontologies. With a loaded free text document and an ontology, Semantator supports the creation/deletion of ontology instances for any document fragment, linking/disconnecting instances with the properties in the ontology, and also enables automatic annotation by connecting to the NCBO annotator and cTAKES. By representing annotations in Semantic Web standards, Semantator supports reasoning based upon the underlying semantics of the owl:disjointWith and owl:equivalentClass predicates. We present discussions based on user experiences of using Semantator.

  16. AUTOMATIC MUSCLE PERIMYSIUM ANNOTATION USING DEEP CONVOLUTIONAL NEURAL NETWORK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Manish; Xing, Fuyong; Su, Hai; Yang, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Diseased skeletal muscle expresses mononuclear cell infiltration in the regions of perimysium. Accurate annotation or segmentation of perimysium can help biologists and clinicians to determine individualized patient treatment and allow for reasonable prognostication. However, manual perimysium annotation is time consuming and prone to inter-observer variations. Meanwhile, the presence of ambiguous patterns in muscle images significantly challenge many traditional automatic annotation algorithms. In this paper, we propose an automatic perimysium annotation algorithm based on deep convolutional neural network (CNN). We formulate the automatic annotation of perimysium in muscle images as a pixel-wise classification problem, and the CNN is trained to label each image pixel with raw RGB values of the patch centered at the pixel. The algorithm is applied to 82 diseased skeletal muscle images. We have achieved an average precision of 94% on the test dataset.

  17. Accurate annotation of protein-coding genes in mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Arab, Marwa; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Tout, Kifah; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Stadler, Peter F; Bernt, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome sequences are available in large number and new sequences become published nowadays with increasing pace. Fast, automatic, consistent, and high quality annotations are a prerequisite for downstream analyses. Therefore, we present an automated pipeline for fast de novo annotation of mitochondrial protein-coding genes. The annotation is based on enhanced phylogeny-aware hidden Markov models (HMMs). The pipeline builds taxon-specific enhanced multiple sequence alignments (MSA) of already annotated sequences and corresponding HMMs using an approximation of the phylogeny. The MSAs are enhanced by fixing unannotated frameshifts, purging of wrong sequences, and removal of non-conserved columns from both ends. A comparison with reference annotations highlights the high quality of the results. The frameshift correction method predicts a large number of frameshifts, many of which are unknown. A detailed analysis of the frameshifts in nad3 of the Archosauria-Testudines group has been conducted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Annotated bibliography of software engineering laboratory literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, David; Bristow, John; Smith, Don

    1994-01-01

    This document is an annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory. Nearly 200 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. This document has been updated and reorganized substantially since the original version (SEL-82-006, November 1982). All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: (1) The Software Engineering Laboratory; (2) The Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; (3) Software Tools; (4) Software Models; (5) Software Measurement; (6) Technology Evaluations; (7) Ada Technology; and (8) Data Collection. This document contains an index of these publications classified by individual author.

  19. Entrainment: an annotated bibliography. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, R.F.; Hannon, E.H.

    1979-04-01

    The 604 annotated references in this bibliography on the effects of pumped entrainment of aquatic organisms through the cooling systems of thermal power plants were compiled from published and unpublished literature and cover the years 1947 through 1977. References to published literature were obtained by searching large-scale commercial data bases, ORNL in-house-generated data bases, relevant journals, and periodical bibliographies. The unpublished literature is a compilation of Sections 316(a) and 316(b) demonstrations, environmental impact statements, and environmental reports prepared by the utilities in compliance with Federal Water Pollution Control Administration regulations. The bibliography includes references on monitoring studies at power plant sites, laboratory studies of physical and biological effects on entrained organisms, engineering strategies for the mitigation of entrainment effects, and selected theoretical studies concerned with the methodology for determining entrainment effects

  20. Re-annotation of the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Omar; Shahan, Rachel; Liu, Zhongchi; Slovin, Janet P; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2015-01-27

    Fragaria vesca is a low-growing, small-fruited diploid strawberry species commonly called woodland strawberry. It is native to temperate regions of Eurasia and North America and while it produces edible fruits, it is most highly useful as an experimental perennial plant system that can serve as a model for the agriculturally important Rosaceae family. A draft of the F. vesca genome sequence was published in 2011 [Nat Genet 43:223,2011]. The first generation annotation (version 1.1) were developed using GeneMark-ES+[Nuc Acids Res 33:6494,2005]which is a self-training gene prediction tool that relies primarily on the combination of ab initio predictions with mapping high confidence ESTs in addition to mapping gene deserts from transposable elements. Based on over 25 different tissue transcriptomes, we have revised the F. vesca genome annotation, thereby providing several improvements over version 1.1. The new annotation, which was achieved using Maker, describes many more predicted protein coding genes compared to the GeneMark generated annotation that is currently hosted at the Genome Database for Rosaceae ( http://www.rosaceae.org/ ). Our new annotation also results in an increase in the overall total coding length, and the number of coding regions found. The total number of gene predictions that do not overlap with the previous annotations is 2286, most of which were found to be homologous to other plant genes. We have experimentally verified one of the new gene model predictions to validate our results. Using the RNA-Seq transcriptome sequences from 25 diverse tissue types, the re-annotation pipeline improved existing annotations by increasing the annotation accuracy based on extensive transcriptome data. It uncovered new genes, added exons to current genes, and extended or merged exons. This complete genome re-annotation will significantly benefit functional genomic studies of the strawberry and other members of the Rosaceae.

  1. The effectiveness of annotated (vs. non-annotated) digital pathology slides as a teaching tool during dermatology and pathology residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Amanda F; Espiritu, Baltazar; Groth, John; Hutchens, Kelli A

    2014-06-01

    With today's technology, paraffin-embedded, hematoxylin & eosin-stained pathology slides can be scanned to generate high quality virtual slides. Using proprietary software, digital images can also be annotated with arrows, circles and boxes to highlight certain diagnostic features. Previous studies assessing digital microscopy as a teaching tool did not involve the annotation of digital images. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of annotated digital pathology slides versus non-annotated digital pathology slides as a teaching tool during dermatology and pathology residencies. A study group composed of 31 dermatology and pathology residents was asked to complete an online pre-quiz consisting of 20 multiple choice style questions, each associated with a static digital pathology image. After completion, participants were given access to an online tutorial composed of digitally annotated pathology slides and subsequently asked to complete a post-quiz. A control group of 12 residents completed a non-annotated version of the tutorial. Nearly all participants in the study group improved their quiz score, with an average improvement of 17%, versus only 3% (P = 0.005) in the control group. These results support the notion that annotated digital pathology slides are superior to non-annotated slides for the purpose of resident education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Integration of carbon assimilation modes with photosynthetic light capture in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Hanna; Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2014-10-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of using organic and inorganic carbon sources simultaneously, which requires the adjustment of photosynthetic activity to the prevailing mode of carbon assimilation. We obtained novel insights into the regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) following altered carbon source availability. In C. reinhardtii, synthesis of PSII-associated light-harvesting proteins (LHCBMs) is controlled by the cytosolic RNA-binding protein NAB1, which represses translation of particular LHCBM isoform transcripts. This mechanism is fine-tuned via regulation of the nuclear NAB1 promoter, which is activated when linear photosynthetic electron flow is restricted by CO(2)-limitation in a photoheterotrophic context. In the wild-type, accumulation of NAB1 reduces the functional PSII antenna size, thus preventing a harmful overexcited state of PSII, as observed in a NAB1-less mutant. We further demonstrate that translation control as a newly identified long-term response to prolonged CO(2)-limitation replaces LHCII state transitions as a fast response to PSII over-excitation. Intriguingly, activation of the long-term response is perturbed in state transition mutant stt7, suggesting a regulatory link between the long- and short-term response. We depict a regulatory circuit operating on distinct timescales and in different cellular compartments to fine-tune light-harvesting in photoheterotrophic eukaryotes. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  3. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested.

  4. An omics based assessment of cadmium toxicity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamers, An; Blust, Ronny; De Coen, Wim [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Griffin, Julian L. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 2QA (United Kingdom); Jones, Oliver A.H., E-mail: oliver.jones@rmit.edu.au [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    The effects of cadmium were assessed in the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Algae were exposed to concentrations of 0, 8.1 or 114.8 {mu}M of cadmium and growth rates, gene transcription and metabolite profiles were examined after 48 and 72 h of exposure. In algae exposed to 8.1 {mu}M Cd, several genes were differentially transcribed after 48 h but no adverse growth related effects were detected. A transient effect on both gene transcription patterns and metabolite profiles could be discerned after 48 h of exposure but the majority of these changes disappeared after 72 h. In contrast, all effects were more pronounced at the 114.8 {mu}M cadmium exposure. Here growth was clearly reduced and transcription of a large number of genes involved in oxidative stress defense mechanisms was differentially increased. Metabolites involved in the glutathione synthesis pathway (an important antioxidant defense) were also affected but the effects of cadmium were found to be more pronounced at the transcript level than in the metabolome, suggesting that the former exhibits greater sensitivity toward cadmium exposure.

  5. Imaging the 3D flow around swimming Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using digital inline holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kyle; Kumar, Santosh; Hong, Jiarong; Cheng, Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the 3D flow induced by microswimmers is paramount to revealing how they interact with each other and their environment. While many studies have measured 2D projections of flow fields around single microorganisms, reliable 3D measurement remains elusive due to the difficulty in imaging fast 3D fluid flows at submicron spatial and millisecond temporal scales. Here, we present a precision measurement of the 3D flow field induced by motile planktonic algae cells, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We manually capture and hold stationary a single alga using a micropipette, while still allowing it to beat its flagella in the breastroke pattern characteristic to C. reinhardtii. The 3D flow field around the alga is then tracked by employing fast holographic imaging on 1 um tracer particles, which leads to a spatial resolution of 100 nm along the optical axis and 40 nm in the imaging plane normal to the optical axis. We image the flow around a single alga continuously through thousands of flagellar beat cycles and aggregate that data into a complete 3D flow field. Our study demonstrates the power of holography in imaging fast complex microscopic flow structures and provides crucial information for understanding the detailed locomotion of swimming microorganisms.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Manganese-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Provides Insight on the Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, Ainsley; Zvenigorodsky, Natasha; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Lindquist, Erika

    2011-08-11

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles is a vital but poorly understood process. Recent genomic advances with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have created opportunity to more closely examine the mechanisms of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway via transcriptome analysis. Manganese is a nutrient of interest for complex reactions because of its multiple stable oxidation states and role in molecular oxygen coordination. C. reinhardtii was cultured in Manganese-deplete Tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) media for 24 hours and used to create cDNA libraries for sequencing using Illumina TruSeq technology. Transcriptome analysis provided intriguing insight on possible regulatory mechanisms in the pathway. Evidence supports similarities of GTR (Glutamyl-tRNA synthase) to its Chlorella vulgaris homolog in terms of Mn requirements. Data was also suggestive of Mn-related compensatory up-regulation for pathway proteins CHLH1 (Manganese Chelatase), GUN4 (Magnesium chelatase activating protein), and POR1 (Light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase). Intriguingly, data suggests possible reciprocal expression of oxygen dependent CPX1 (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and oxygen independent CPX2. Further analysis using RT-PCR could provide compelling evidence for several novel regulatory mechanisms in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway.

  7. Chlamydomonas as a model for biofuels and bio-products production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scranton, Melissa A; Ostrand, Joseph T; Fields, Francis J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-05-01

    Developing renewable energy sources is critical to maintaining the economic growth of the planet while protecting the environment. First generation biofuels focused on food crops like corn and sugarcane for ethanol production, and soybean and palm for biodiesel production. Second generation biofuels based on cellulosic ethanol produced from terrestrial plants, has received extensive funding and recently pilot facilities have been commissioned, but to date output of fuels from these sources has fallen well short of what is needed. Recent research and pilot demonstrations have highlighted the potential of algae as one of the most promising sources of sustainable liquid transportation fuels. Algae have also been established as unique biofactories for industrial, therapeutic, and nutraceutical co-products. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii's long established role in the field of basic research in green algae has paved the way for understanding algal metabolism and developing genetic engineering protocols. These tools are now being utilized in C. reinhardtii and in other algal species for the development of strains to maximize biofuels and bio-products yields from the lab to the field. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Transcriptome for photobiological hydrogen production induced by sulfur deprivation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Vu; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Malnoë, Alizée; Timmins, Matthew; Mussgnug, Jan H; Rupprecht, Jens; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Schenk, Peer M

    2008-11-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production using microalgae is being developed into a promising clean fuel stream for the future. In this study, microarray analyses were used to obtain global expression profiles of mRNA abundance in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different time points before the onset and during the course of sulfur-depleted hydrogen production. These studies were followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and protein analyses. The present work provides new insights into photosynthesis, sulfur acquisition strategies, and carbon metabolism-related gene expression during sulfur-induced hydrogen production. A general trend toward repression of transcripts encoding photosynthetic genes was observed. In contrast to all other LHCBM genes, the abundance of the LHCBM9 transcript (encoding a major light-harvesting polypeptide) and its protein was strongly elevated throughout the experiment. This suggests a major remodeling of the photosystem II light-harvesting complex as well as an important function of LHCBM9 under sulfur starvation and photobiological hydrogen production. This paper presents the first global transcriptional analysis of C. reinhardtii before, during, and after photobiological hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation.

  9. X-Ray structure of a truncated form of cytochrome f from chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Young-In; Huang, Li-Shar; Zhang, Zhaolei; Fernando-Velasquez, Javier G.; Berry, E. A.

    2000-03-01

    A truncated form of cytochrome f from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii (an important eukaryotic model organism for photosynthetic electron transfer studies) has been crystallized (space group P212121; 3 molecules/ asymmetric unit) and its structure determined to 2.0 Angstrom by molecular replacement using the coordinates of a truncated turnip cytochrome f as a model. The structure displays the same folding and detailed features as turnip cytochrome f including: (a) an unusual heme Fe ligation by alpha-amino group of tyrosine 1, (b) a cluster of lysine residues (proposed docking site of plastocyanin), and (c) the presence of a chain of 7 water molecules bound to conserved residues and extending between the heme pocket and K58 and K66 at the lysine cluster. For this array of waters we propose a structural role. Two cytochrome f molecules are related by a non-crystallographic symmetry operator which is a distorted proper 2-fold rotation. This may represent the dimeric relation of the monomers in situ, however the heme orientation suggested by this model is not consistent with previous epr measurements on oriented membranes.

  10. The TOR Signaling Network in the Model Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Pérez-Pérez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth is tightly coupled to nutrient availability. The target of rapamycin (TOR kinase transmits nutritional and environmental cues to the cellular growth machinery. TOR functions in two distinct multiprotein complexes, termed TOR complex 1 (TORC1 and TOR complex 2 (TORC2. While the structure and functions of TORC1 are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, including algae and plants, TORC2 core proteins seem to be missing in photosynthetic organisms. TORC1 controls cell growth by promoting anabolic processes, including protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis, and inhibiting catabolic processes such as autophagy. Recent studies identified rapamycin-sensitive TORC1 signaling regulating cell growth, autophagy, lipid metabolism, and central metabolic pathways in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The central role that microalgae play in global biomass production, together with the high biotechnological potential of these organisms in biofuel production, has drawn attention to the study of proteins that regulate cell growth such as the TOR kinase. In this review we discuss the recent progress on TOR signaling in algae.

  11. Outlook in the application of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast as a platform for recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Shabnam; Ofoghi, Hamideh

    Microalgae, also called microphytes, are a vast group of microscopic photosynthetic organisms living in aquatic ecosystems. Microalgae have attracted the attention of biotechnology industry as a platform for extracting natural products with high commercial value. During last decades, microalgae have been also used as cost-effective and easily scalable platform for the production of recombinant proteins with medical and industrial applications. Most progress in this field has been made with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism mainly because of its simple life cycle, well-established genetics and ease of cultivation. However, due to the scarcity of existing infrastructure for commercial production and processing together with relatively low product yields, no recombinant products from C. reinhardtii have gained approval for commercial production and most of them are still in research and development. In this review, we focus on the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii as an algal recombinant expression platform and compare its advantages and disadvantages to other currently used expression systems. We then discuss the strategies for engineering the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii to produce recombinant cells and present a comprehensive overview of works that have used this platform for the expression of high-value products.

  12. Targeted expression of nuclear transgenes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a versatile, modular vector toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauersen, Kyle J; Kruse, Olaf; Mussgnug, Jan H

    2015-04-01

    We present a versatile vector toolkit for nuclear transgene expression in the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The vector was designed in a modular fashion which allows quick replacement of regulatory elements and genes of interest. The current toolkit comprises two antibiotic resistance markers (paromomycin and hygromycin B), five codon-optimized light emission reporters, including the Gaussia princeps luciferase, as well as bright cyan, green, yellow, and red fluorescent protein variants. The system has demonstrated robust functional flexibility with signal options to target the protein of interest to the cytoplasm, the nucleus, cellular microbodies, the chloroplast, mitochondria, or via the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi apparatus secretory pathway into the culture medium. Successful fluorescent reporter protein fusion to C. reinhardtii Rubisco small subunit 1 was accomplished with this system. Localization of the fluorescently tagged protein was observed in the chloroplast pyrenoid via live cell fluorescence microscopy, the first report of heterologous protein localization to this cellular structure. The functionalities of the vector toolkit, the individual modular elements, as well as several combinations thereof are demonstrated in this manuscript. Due to its strategic design, this vector system can quickly be adapted to individual tasks and should therefore be of great use to address specific scientific questions requiring nuclear recombinant protein expression in C. reinhardtii.

  13. The selective breeding of the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for growth in salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takouridis, Simon J; Tribe, David E; Gras, Sally L; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be utilized for biofuel production was strengthened by developing it for growth in elevated salinity via the selective breeding method of genome shuffling. A population was constructed via random mutagenesis and subjected to multiple rounds of sex and growth in increasing salinity. This sexual line was capable of growth in up to 700 mM NaCl, unlike its progenitor, which could only grow in 300 mM NaCl. An asexual control line was capable of growth in 500 mM NaCl. Palmelloid aggregations increased in size and the concentration of final biomass decreased as a function of NaCl concentration, which poses considerations for future strain development. The sexual line maintained sexual efficiencies of up to 50% over the course of selection. This investigation achieved significant strain improvement of C. reinhardtii and demonstrated the clear advantage of its ability to participate in laboratory controlled and reproducible high efficiency sex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using natural selection to explore the adaptive potential of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Mathilde Perrineau

    Full Text Available Improving feedstock is critical to facilitate the commercial utilization of algae, in particular in open pond systems where, due to the presence of competitors and pests, high algal growth rates and stress tolerance are beneficial. Here we raised laboratory cultures of the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under serial dilution to explore the potential of crop improvement using natural selection. The alga was evolved for 1,880 generations in liquid medium under continuous light (EL population. At the end of the experiment, EL cells had a growth rate that was 35% greater than the progenitor population (PL. The removal of acetate from the medium demonstrated that EL growth enhancement largely relied on efficient usage of this organic carbon source. Genome re-sequencing uncovered 1,937 polymorphic DNA regions in the EL population with 149 single nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in amino acid substitutions. Transcriptome analysis showed, in the EL population, significant up regulation of genes involved in protein synthesis, the cell cycle and cellular respiration, whereas the DNA repair pathway and photosynthesis were down regulated. Like other algae, EL cells accumulated neutral lipids under nitrogen depletion. Our work demonstrates transcriptome and genome-wide impacts of natural selection on algal cells and points to a useful strategy for strain improvement.

  15. Using natural selection to explore the adaptive potential of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Gross, Jeferson; Zelzion, Ehud; Price, Dana C; Levitan, Orly; Boyd, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Improving feedstock is critical to facilitate the commercial utilization of algae, in particular in open pond systems where, due to the presence of competitors and pests, high algal growth rates and stress tolerance are beneficial. Here we raised laboratory cultures of the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under serial dilution to explore the potential of crop improvement using natural selection. The alga was evolved for 1,880 generations in liquid medium under continuous light (EL population). At the end of the experiment, EL cells had a growth rate that was 35% greater than the progenitor population (PL). The removal of acetate from the medium demonstrated that EL growth enhancement largely relied on efficient usage of this organic carbon source. Genome re-sequencing uncovered 1,937 polymorphic DNA regions in the EL population with 149 single nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in amino acid substitutions. Transcriptome analysis showed, in the EL population, significant up regulation of genes involved in protein synthesis, the cell cycle and cellular respiration, whereas the DNA repair pathway and photosynthesis were down regulated. Like other algae, EL cells accumulated neutral lipids under nitrogen depletion. Our work demonstrates transcriptome and genome-wide impacts of natural selection on algal cells and points to a useful strategy for strain improvement.

  16. The Involvement of a Multicopper Oxidase in Iron Uptake by the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbik, Alexandra; Bölling, Christian; Buckhout, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    In the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, high-affinity uptake of iron (Fe) requires an Fe3+-chelate reductase and an Fe transporter. Neither of these proteins nor their corresponding genes have been isolated. We previously identified, by analysis of differentially expressed plasma membrane proteins, an approximately 150-kD protein whose synthesis was induced under conditions of Fe-deficient growth. Based on homology of internal peptide sequences to the multicopper oxidase hephaestin, this protein was proposed to be a ferroxidase. A nucleotide sequence to the full-length cDNA clone for this ferroxidase-like protein has been obtained. Analysis of the primary amino acid sequence revealed a putative transmembrane domain near the amino terminus of the protein and signature sequences for two multicopper oxidase I motifs and one multicopper oxidase II motif. The ferroxidase-like gene was transcribed under conditions of Fe deficiency. Consistent with the role of a copper (Cu)-containing protein in Fe homeostasis, growth of cells in Cu-depleted media eliminated high-affinity Fe uptake, and Cu-deficient cells that were grown in optimal Fe showed greatly reduced Fe accumulation compared with control, Cu-sufficient cells. Reapplication of Cu resulted in the recovery of Fe transport activity. Together, these results were consistent with the participation of a ferroxidase in high-affinity Fe uptake in C. reinhardtii. PMID:12481087

  17. The involvement of a multicopper oxidase in iron uptake by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbik, Alexandra; Bölling, Christian; Buckhout, Thomas J

    2002-12-01

    In the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, high-affinity uptake of iron (Fe) requires an Fe(3+)-chelate reductase and an Fe transporter. Neither of these proteins nor their corresponding genes have been isolated. We previously identified, by analysis of differentially expressed plasma membrane proteins, an approximately 150-kD protein whose synthesis was induced under conditions of Fe-deficient growth. Based on homology of internal peptide sequences to the multicopper oxidase hephaestin, this protein was proposed to be a ferroxidase. A nucleotide sequence to the full-length cDNA clone for this ferroxidase-like protein has been obtained. Analysis of the primary amino acid sequence revealed a putative transmembrane domain near the amino terminus of the protein and signature sequences for two multicopper oxidase I motifs and one multicopper oxidase II motif. The ferroxidase-like gene was transcribed under conditions of Fe deficiency. Consistent with the role of a copper (Cu)-containing protein in Fe homeostasis, growth of cells in Cu-depleted media eliminated high-affinity Fe uptake, and Cu-deficient cells that were grown in optimal Fe showed greatly reduced Fe accumulation compared with control, Cu-sufficient cells. Reapplication of Cu resulted in the recovery of Fe transport activity. Together, these results were consistent with the participation of a ferroxidase in high-affinity Fe uptake in C. reinhardtii.

  18. Trophic transfer of gold nanoparticles from Euglena gracilis or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Yoon, Sung-Ji; Shin, Yu-Jin; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the trophic transfer of nanoparticles (NPs) is important because NPs are small enough to easily penetrate into organisms. In this study, we evaluated the trophic transfer of gold NPs (AuNPs) within the aquatic food chain. We observed AuNPs transfer from 2 species of primary producers (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Euglena gracilis) to the primary consumer (Daphnia magna). Also, bioaccumulation of AuNPs in E. gracilis was higher than that in C. reinhardtii. The reasons for the difference in Au accumulation may be the physical structure of these organisms, and the surface area that is available for interaction with NPs. C. reinhardtii has a cell wall that may act as a barrier to the penetration of NPs. The size of E. gracilis is larger than that of C. reinhardtii. This study demonstrates the trophic transfer of AuNPs from a general producer to a consumer in an aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for phenotypic plasticity in the Antarctic extremophile Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl. UWO 241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Tessa; Vetterli, Adrien; Falk, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Life in extreme environments poses unique challenges to photosynthetic organisms. The ability for an extremophilic green alga and its genetic and mesophilic equivalent to acclimate to changes in their environment was examined to determine the extent of their phenotypic plasticities. The Antarctic extremophile Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl. UWO 241 (UWO) was isolated from an ice-covered lake in Antarctica, whereas its mesophilic counterpart C. raudensis Ettl. SAG 49.72 (SAG) was isolated from a meadow pool in the Czech Republic. The effects of changes in temperature and salinity on growth, morphology, and photochemistry were examined in the two strains. Differential acclimative responses were observed in UWO which include a wider salinity range for growth, and broader temperature- and salt-induced fluctuations in F(v)/F(m), relative to SAG. Furthermore, the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, measured as 1-q(P), was modulated in the extremophile whereas this was not observed in the mesophile. Interestingly, it is shown for the first time that SAG is similar to UWO in that it is unable to undergo state transitions. The different natural histories of these two strains exert different evolutionary pressures and, consequently, different abilities for acclimation, an important component of phenotypic plasticity. In contrast to SAG, UWO relied on a redox sensing and signalling system under the growth conditions used in this study. It is proposed that growth and adaptation of UWO under a stressful and extreme environment poises this extremophile for better success under changing environmental conditions.

  20. Effects of Light Intensity and Oxidized Nitrogen Sources on Hydrogen Production by Chlamydomonas reinhardii1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Pedro J.; Azuara, María P.; Ballesteros, Antonio; Fernández, Victor M.

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells, after a period of dark anaerobic adaptation, evolve H2 not only in the dark but also in the light. Our results show that high irradiances impair prolonged H2 evolution, while under low irradiances or darkness H2 evolution proceeds for more than 50 hours. NO3− and NO2− suppress H2 evolution both in the dark or under low irradiance. Apparently the cells prefer these oxidized nitrogen sources to protons as electron acceptors, since both NO3− and NO2− become reduced to NH4+, which is excreted to the culture medium in high amounts. H2 evolution started once these oxidized anions were largely depleted from the medium. Moreover, H2 evolution was consistently associated with NH4+ excretion even if NH4+ was already present in high amounts in the medium. This observation indicates that the cells utilize not only their carbohydrate but also their protein reserves as sources of reducing power for H2 evolution. This conclusion was supported by the observation that when nitrogen-starved cells were made anaerobic in a nitrogen-free medium, they not only evolved H2 at very high rates but excreted concomitantly NH4+ up to concentrations in the millimolar range. PMID:16664329

  1. UV-B photoreceptor-mediated protection of the photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allorent, Guillaume; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Chappuis, Richard; Kuntz, Marcel; Truong, Thuy B.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Life on earth is dependent on the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. However, absorption of excess sunlight can damage the photosynthetic machinery and limit photosynthetic activity, thereby affecting growth and productivity. Photosynthetic light harvesting can be down-regulated by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). A major component of NPQ is qE (energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching), which allows dissipation of light energy as heat. Photodamage peaks in the UV-B part of the spectrum, but whether and how UV-B induces qE are unknown. Plants are responsive to UV-B via the UVR8 photoreceptor. Here, we report in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that UVR8 induces accumulation of specific members of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) superfamily that contribute to qE, in particular LHC Stress-Related 1 (LHCSR1) and Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS). The capacity for qE is strongly induced by UV-B, although the patterns of qE-related proteins accumulating in response to UV-B or to high light are clearly different. The competence for qE induced by acclimation to UV-B markedly contributes to photoprotection upon subsequent exposure to high light. Our study reveals an anterograde link between photoreceptor-mediated signaling in the nucleocytosolic compartment and the photoprotective regulation of photosynthetic activity in the chloroplast. PMID:27930292

  2. The TOR Signaling Network in the Model Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Couso, Inmaculada; Crespo, José L

    2017-07-12

    Cell growth is tightly coupled to nutrient availability. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase transmits nutritional and environmental cues to the cellular growth machinery. TOR functions in two distinct multiprotein complexes, termed TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). While the structure and functions of TORC1 are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, including algae and plants, TORC2 core proteins seem to be missing in photosynthetic organisms. TORC1 controls cell growth by promoting anabolic processes, including protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis, and inhibiting catabolic processes such as autophagy. Recent studies identified rapamycin-sensitive TORC1 signaling regulating cell growth, autophagy, lipid metabolism, and central metabolic pathways in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii . The central role that microalgae play in global biomass production, together with the high biotechnological potential of these organisms in biofuel production, has drawn attention to the study of proteins that regulate cell growth such as the TOR kinase. In this review we discuss the recent progress on TOR signaling in algae.

  3. Alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathways during anaerobiosis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis uses light as energy source to generate an oxidant powerful enough to oxidize water into oxygen, electrons and protons. Upon linear electron transport, electrons extracted from water are used to reduce NADP(+) to NADPH. The oxygen molecule has been integrated into the cellular metabolism, both as the most efficient electron acceptor during respiratory electron transport and as oxidant and/or "substrate" in a number of biosynthetic pathways. Though photosynthesis of higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria produces oxygen, there are conditions under which this type of photosynthesis operates under hypoxic or anaerobic conditions. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this condition is induced by sulfur deficiency, and it results in the production of molecular hydrogen. Research on this biotechnologically relevant phenomenon has contributed largely to new insights into additional pathways of photosynthetic electron transport, which extend the former concept of linear electron flow by far. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about various electron sources and sinks of oxygenic photosynthesis besides water and NADP(+) in the context of their contribution to hydrogen photoproduction by C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of caffeine on repair in chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, H.; Rehn, M.M.; Johnson, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on repair was studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of UV-irradiated wild-type (UVS + ) cells with a sublethal level of caffeine caused a significant increase in survival compared to untreated UV-irradiated cells. Caffeine did not affect survival in the repair-deficient strain UVSE1, which is deficient in repair of UV-induced damage carried out by enzymes associated with recombination during meiosis. A significant increase in survival in the presence of caffeine was observed in the repair-deficient strain UVSE4 in which recombination during meiosis is not affected. Treatment of zygotes homozygous for UVS + , UVSE1, or UVSE4 with sublethal levels of caffeine caused marked increases in recombination frequency in UVS + and UVSE4 zygotes and no increase in recombination in UVSE1 zygotes. These results indicate that caffeine increases recombination in normal strains. Increased opportunity for recombination caused by caffeine would not result in increased recombination frequency in the UVSE1 strain, assuming limited-recombination enzyme activity in this strain. The observed increase in survival following UV-irradiation in the presence of caffeine in strains having normal recombination would therefore be associated with a caffeine-induced increase in opportunities for recombination repair. (orig.)

  5. Robust Microplate-Based Methods for Culturing and in Vivo Phenotypic Screening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. Haire

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr, a unicellular alga, is routinely utilized to study photosynthetic biochemistry, ciliary motility, and cellular reproduction. Its minimal culture requirements, unicellular morphology, and ease of transformation have made it a popular model system. Despite its relatively slow doubling time, compared with many bacteria, it is an ideal eukaryotic system for microplate-based studies utilizing either, or both, absorbance as well as fluorescence assays. Such microplate assays are powerful tools for researchers in the areas of toxicology, pharmacology, chemical genetics, biotechnology, and more. However, while microplate-based assays are valuable tools for screening biological systems, these methodologies can significantly alter the conditions in which the organisms are cultured and their subsequent physiology or morphology. Herein we describe a novel method for the microplate culture and in vivo phenotypic analysis of growth, viability, and photosynthetic pigments of C. reinhardtii. We evaluated the utility of our assay by screening silver nanoparticles for their effects on growth and viability. These methods are amenable to a wide assortment of studies and present a significant advancement in the methodologies available for research involving this model organism.

  6. Cell cycle dependent x-ray-induced death in Chlamydomonas reinhardi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, H.E.; Nachtwey, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    Light-dark (L-D) synchronized Chlamydomonas grow during a 12-hr light period and divide by a series of mitoses into 4 or 8 daughter cells during the early part of the following 12-hr dark period. Sensitivity to the lethal effects of 9108 R X-irradiation varies throughout the L-D cycle. Mortality rises from 20 percent at the 1st hour to 40 percent at the 9th hour, to 70 percent at the onset of the dark; it reaches a peak of about 85 percent at about the 14th hour, just before the first cytokinesis, and then returns to a level of about 45 percent when cell division has been completed (after data correction for multiplicity of targets per colony-forming unit). Most lethally affected cells complete at least one set of divisions (into 4 or 8 daughter cells) before they die; however, exposure shortly before the first nuclear division results in two sets of divisions before death, suggesting that these cells were committed in some way at the time of irradiation to divide again 24 hr later. Some single cells exposed prior to cytokinesis exhibit mixed-colony formation: About half of their progeny die and half survive, indicating that prior to cytokinesis there are perhaps two radiation-sensitive ''targets'' per cell

  7. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post-translational modificati......Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post......-translational modifications and easy recovery of products from the culture media. However, currently, the yields of secreted recombinant proteins are low, which hampers the commercial application of this strategy. This study aimed at expanding the genetic tools for enhancing secretion of recombinant proteins in Chlamydomonas...... reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. To increase the secretion...

  8. Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein alters conformation in response to Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakato, Miho; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; King, Stephen M

    2007-09-01

    We have previously shown that Ca(2+) directly activates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein subparticle containing the beta and gamma heavy chains (HCs). The gamma HC-associated LC4 light chain is a member of the calmodulin family and binds 1-2 Ca(2+) with K(Ca) = 3 x 10(-5) M in vitro, suggesting it may act as a Ca(2+) sensor for outer arm dynein. Here we investigate interactions between the LC4 light chain and gamma HC. Two IQ consensus motifs for binding calmodulin-like proteins are located within the stem domain of the gamma heavy chain. In vitro experiments indicate that LC4 undergoes a Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with the IQ motif domain while remaining tethered to the HC. LC4 also moves into close proximity of the intermediate chain IC1 in the presence of Ca(2+). The sedimentation profile of the gamma HC subunit changed subtly upon Ca(2+) addition, suggesting that the entire complex had become more compact, and electron microscopy of the isolated gamma subunit revealed a distinct alteration in conformation of the N-terminal stem in response to Ca(2+) addition. We propose that Ca(2+)-dependent conformational change of LC4 has a direct effect on the stem domain of the gamma HC, which eventually leads to alterations in mechanochemical interactions between microtubules and the motor domain(s) of the outer dynein arm.

  9. Phytotoxicity of 15 common pharmaceuticals on the germination of Lactuca sativa and photosynthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Muñiz, Selene; Val, Jonatan; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals reach terrestrial environments through the application of treated wastewaters and biosolids to agricultural soils. We have investigated the toxicity of 15 common pharmaceuticals, classified as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), blood lipid-lowering agents, β-blockers and antibiotics, in two photosynthetic organisms. Twelve pharmaceuticals caused inhibitory effects on the radicle and hypocotyl elongation of Lactuca sativa seeds. The EC 50 values obtained were in the range of 170-5656 mg L -1 in the case of the radicle and 188-4558 mg L -1 for the hypocotyl. Propranolol was the most toxic drug for both root and hypocotyl elongation, followed by the NSAIDs, then gemfibrozil and tetracycline. Other effects, such as root necrosis, inhibition of root growth and curly hairs, were detected. However, even at the highest concentrations tested (3000 mg L -1 ), seed germination was not affected. NSAIDs decreased the photosynthetic yield of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but only salicylic acid showed EC 50 values below 1000 mg L -1 . The first effects detected at low concentrations, together with the concentrations found in environmental samples, indicate that the use of biosolids and wastewaters containing pharmaceuticals should be regulated and their compositions assessed in order to prevent medium- and long-term impacts on agricultural soils and crops.

  10. Live cell imaging compatible immobilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in microfluidic platform for biodiesel research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Woo; Na, Sang Cheol; Nguyen, Thanh Qua; Paik, Sang-Min; Kang, Myeongwoo; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel surface immobilization method for live-cell imaging of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for continuous monitoring of lipid droplet accumulation. Microfluidics allows high-throughput manipulation and analysis of single cells in precisely controlled microenvironment. Fluorescence imaging based quantitative measurement of lipid droplet accumulation in microalgae had been difficult due to their intrinsic motile behavior. We present a simple surface immobilization method using gelatin coating as the "biological glue." We take advantage of hydroxyproline (Hyp)-based non-covalent interaction between gelatin and the outer cell wall of microalgae to anchor the cells inside the microfluidic device. We have continuously monitored single microalgal cells for up to 6 days. The immobilized microalgae remain viable (viability was comparable to bulk suspension cultured controls). When exposed to wall shear stress, most of the cells remain attached up to 0.1 dyne/cm(2) . Surface immobilization allowed high-resolution, live-cell imaging of mitotic process in real time-which followed previously reported stages in mitosis of suspension cultured cells. Use of gelatin coated microfluidics devices can result in better methods for microalgae strain screening and culture condition optimization that will help microalgal biodiesel become more economically viable. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Current and future trends in marine image annotation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Pereira, Jose Nuno; Auger, Vincent; Beisiegel, Kolja; Benjamin, Robert; Bergmann, Melanie; Bowden, David; Buhl-Mortensen, Pal; De Leo, Fabio C.; Dionísio, Gisela; Durden, Jennifer M.; Edwards, Luke; Friedman, Ariell; Greinert, Jens; Jacobsen-Stout, Nancy; Lerner, Steve; Leslie, Murray; Nattkemper, Tim W.; Sameoto, Jessica A.; Schoening, Timm; Schouten, Ronald; Seager, James; Singh, Hanumant; Soubigou, Olivier; Tojeira, Inês; van den Beld, Inge; Dias, Frederico; Tempera, Fernando; Santos, Ricardo S.

    2016-12-01

    Given the need to describe, analyze and index large quantities of marine imagery data for exploration and monitoring activities, a range of specialized image annotation tools have been developed worldwide. Image annotation - the process of transposing objects or events represented in a video or still image to the semantic level, may involve human interactions and computer-assisted solutions. Marine image annotation software (MIAS) have enabled over 500 publications to date. We review the functioning, application trends and developments, by comparing general and advanced features of 23 different tools utilized in underwater image analysis. MIAS requiring human input are basically a graphical user interface, with a video player or image browser that recognizes a specific time code or image code, allowing to log events in a time-stamped (and/or geo-referenced) manner. MIAS differ from similar software by the capability of integrating data associated to video collection, the most simple being the position coordinates of the video recording platform. MIAS have three main characteristics: annotating events in real time, posteriorly to annotation and interact with a database. These range from simple annotation interfaces, to full onboard data management systems, with a variety of toolboxes. Advanced packages allow to input and display data from multiple sensors or multiple annotators via intranet or internet. Posterior human-mediated annotation often include tools for data display and image analysis, e.g. length, area, image segmentation, point count; and in a few cases the possibility of browsing and editing previous dive logs or to analyze the annotations. The interaction with a database allows the automatic integration of annotations from different surveys, repeated annotation and collaborative annotation of shared datasets, browsing and querying of data. Progress in the field of automated annotation is mostly in post processing, for stable platforms or still images

  12. Logic Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Tugué, Tosiyuki; Slaman, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings include the papers presented at the logic meeting held at the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, in the summer of 1987. The meeting mainly covered the current research in various areas of mathematical logic and its applications in Japan. Several lectures were also presented by logicians from other countries, who visited Japan in the summer of 1987.

  13. Fuzzy Emotional Semantic Analysis and Automated Annotation of Scene Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianfang; Chen, Lichao

    2015-01-01

    With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP) neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance. PMID:25838818

  14. Fuzzy Emotional Semantic Analysis and Automated Annotation of Scene Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance.

  15. Annotation of the Evaluative Language in a Dependency Treebank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šindlerová Jana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we present our efforts to annotate evaluative language in the Prague Dependency Treebank 2.0. The project is a follow-up of the series of annotations of small plaintext corpora. It uses automatic identification of potentially evaluative nodes through mapping a Czech subjectivity lexicon to syntactically annotated data. These nodes are then manually checked by an annotator and either dismissed as standing in a non-evaluative context, or confirmed as evaluative. In the latter case, information about the polarity orientation, the source and target of evaluation is added by the annotator. The annotations unveiled several advantages and disadvantages of the chosen framework. The advantages involve more structured and easy-to-handle environment for the annotator, visibility of syntactic patterning of the evaluative state, effective solving of discontinuous structures or a new perspective on the influence of good/bad news. The disadvantages include little capability of treating cases with evaluation spread among more syntactically connected nodes at once, little capability of treating metaphorical expressions, or disregarding the effects of negation and intensification in the current scheme.

  16. Comparison of concept recognizers for building the Open Biomedical Annotator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO is developing a system for automated, ontology-based access to online biomedical resources (Shah NH, et al.: Ontology-driven indexing of public datasets for translational bioinformatics. BMC Bioinformatics 2009, 10(Suppl 2:S1. The system's indexing workflow processes the text metadata of diverse resources such as datasets from GEO and ArrayExpress to annotate and index them with concepts from appropriate ontologies. This indexing requires the use of a concept-recognition tool to identify ontology concepts in the resource's textual metadata. In this paper, we present a comparison of two concept recognizers – NLM's MetaMap and the University of Michigan's Mgrep. We utilize a number of data sources and dictionaries to evaluate the concept recognizers in terms of precision, recall, speed of execution, scalability and customizability. Our evaluations demonstrate that Mgrep has a clear edge over MetaMap for large-scale service oriented applications. Based on our analysis we also suggest areas of potential improvements for Mgrep. We have subsequently used Mgrep to build the Open Biomedical Annotator service. The Annotator service has access to a large dictionary of biomedical terms derived from the United Medical Language System (UMLS and NCBO ontologies. The Annotator also leverages the hierarchical structure of the ontologies and their mappings to expand annotations. The Annotator service is available to the community as a REST Web service for creating ontology-based annotations of their data.

  17. MimoSA: a system for minimotif annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundeti Vamsi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimotifs are short peptide sequences within one protein, which are recognized by other proteins or molecules. While there are now several minimotif databases, they are incomplete. There are reports of many minimotifs in the primary literature, which have yet to be annotated, while entirely novel minimotifs continue to be published on a weekly basis. Our recently proposed function and sequence syntax for minimotifs enables us to build a general tool that will facilitate structured annotation and management of minimotif data from the biomedical literature. Results We have built the MimoSA application for minimotif annotation. The application supports management of the Minimotif Miner database, literature tracking, and annotation of new minimotifs. MimoSA enables the visualization, organization, selection and editing functions of minimotifs and their attributes in the MnM database. For the literature components, Mimosa provides paper status tracking and scoring of papers for annotation through a freely available machine learning approach, which is based on word correlation. The paper scoring algorithm is also available as a separate program, TextMine. Form-driven annotation of minimotif attributes enables entry of new minimotifs into the MnM database. Several supporting features increase the efficiency of annotation. The layered architecture of MimoSA allows for extensibility by separating the functions of paper scoring, minimotif visualization, and database management. MimoSA is readily adaptable to other annotation efforts that manually curate literature into a MySQL database. Conclusions MimoSA is an extensible application that facilitates minimotif annotation and integrates with the Minimotif Miner database. We have built MimoSA as an application that integrates dynamic abstract scoring with a high performance relational model of minimotif syntax. MimoSA's TextMine, an efficient paper-scoring algorithm, can be used to

  18. Eval: A software package for analysis of genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Summary Eval is a flexible tool for analyzing the performance of gene annotation systems. It provides summaries and graphical distributions for many descriptive statistics about any set of annotations, regardless of their source. It also compares sets of predictions to standard annotations and to one another. Input is in the standard Gene Transfer Format (GTF. Eval can be run interactively or via the command line, in which case output options include easily parsable tab-delimited files. Availability To obtain the module package with documentation, go to http://genes.cse.wustl.edu/ and follow links for Resources, then Software. Please contact brent@cse.wustl.edu

  19. JAFA: a protein function annotation meta-server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Iddo; Harder, Tim; Godzik, Adam

    2006-01-01

    With the high number of sequences and structures streaming in from genomic projects, there is a need for more powerful and sophisticated annotation tools. Most problematic of the annotation efforts is predicting gene and protein function. Over the past few years there has been considerable progress...... Annotations, or JAFA server. JAFA queries several function prediction servers with a protein sequence and assembles the returned predictions in a legible, non-redundant format. In this manner, JAFA combines the predictions of several servers to provide a comprehensive view of what are the predicted functions...

  20. Roadmap for annotating transposable elements in eukaryote genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permal, Emmanuelle; Flutre, Timothée; Quesneville, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Current high-throughput techniques have made it feasible to sequence even the genomes of non-model organisms. However, the annotation process now represents a bottleneck to genome analysis, especially when dealing with transposable elements (TE). Combined approaches, using both de novo and knowledge-based methods to detect TEs, are likely to produce reasonably comprehensive and sensitive results. This chapter provides a roadmap for researchers involved in genome projects to address this issue. At each step of the TE annotation process, from the identification of TE families to the annotation of TE copies, we outline the tools and good practices to be used.

  1. Flagella-generated forces reveal gear-type motor in single cells of the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Jacinta S; Gudipati, Mohanram; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K; Kashyap, Abhishek; Sivaramakrishnan, Manaswini; Aiyer, Manaswini; Rao, Usha; Mathur, Deepak; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2009-03-06

    Optically trapped single cells of the biflagellated, green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, rotate. The rotational dynamics of trapped wild-type and mutant cells show that functional flagella play a decisive role: the entire flagellar apparatus (central microtubules, radial spokes, and dynein arms) is involved. Any aberration in this apparatus leads to non-functionality, indicating a gear-type mechanism. The translational and rotational motions of the wild-type and mutant cells do not differ significantly. Optical forces alone do not play a vital role in the rotational dynamics of this cellular motor, making them useful as probes of the internal dynamics without external influence.

  2. Control of the activity of Rubisco from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through the redox state of its cysteine residues

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhani, Hemanth P. K.

    2012-01-01

    RESUMEN de la MEMORIA de TESIS DOCTORAL titulada: CONTROL OF THE ACTIVITY OF RUBISCO FROM CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII THROUGH THE REDOX STATE OF ITS CYSTEINE RESIDUES. presentada por HEMANTH PHANI KUMAR SUDHANI para optar al título de DOCTOR dentro del Programa Oficial de Posgrado en BIOTECNOLOGÍA (D030-01) de la Universitat de València. Tema: La actividad del enzima fijador de carbono en eucariotas fotosintéticos, la ribulosa 1,5-bisfosfato carboxilas/oxigenasa (Rubisco), puede re...

  3. Uptake pf 203Hg++ and sup(115M)Cd++ by growing chlamydomonas reinhardi under different conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macka, W.; Stehlik, G.; Whilidal, H.; Washuettl, J.; Bancher, E.

    1977-09-01

    The uptake of labelled mercury and cadmium ions by living and dead cells Chlamydomonas reinhardi WT + was measured at 25 deg C in minimal and optimal conditions (dark/nitrogen or light/air, respectively). In each case incorporation was completely independent of external energy. Living and dead cells incorporate almost the same amount of the added heavy metal ions; after about 4 to 8 hours saturation was obtained. Furthermore the distribution of mercury in the system alga/culture medium/gas phase and the amount of mercury and cadmium adsorbed by cells were studied. (author)

  4. CDKA and CDKB kinases from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are able to complement cdc28 temperature-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížková, Mária; Pichová, Alena; Vítová, Milada; Hlavová, Monika; Hendrychová, Jana; Umysová, Dáša; Gálová, E.; Ševčovičová, A.; Zachleder, Vilém; Bišová, Kateřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 232, 3-4 (2008), s. 183-191 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/0102; GA ČR GA301/03/0289; GA AV ČR IAA5020403; GA AV ČR IAA500200614; GA MŠk ME 938 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cell cycle * cdc28 homolog * chlamydomonas reinhardtii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.460, year: 2008

  5. RNA-Seq Analysis of Sulfur-Deprived Chlamydomonas Cells Reveals Aspects of Acclimation Critical for Cell Survival

    OpenAIRE

    González-Ballester, David; Casero, David; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome was characterized from nutrient-replete and sulfur-depleted wild-type and snrk2.1 mutant cells. This mutant is null for the regulatory Ser-Thr kinase SNRK2.1, which is required for acclimation of the alga to sulfur deprivation. The transcriptome analyses used microarray hybridization and RNA-seq technology. Quantitative RT-PCR evaluation of the results obtained by these techniques showed that RNA-seq reports a larger dynamic range of exp...

  6. Filling Knowledge Gaps in Biological Networks: integrating global approaches to understand H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posewitz, Matthew C

    2011-06-30

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas) has numerous genes encoding enzymes that function in fermentative pathways. Among these genes, are the [FeFe]-hydrogenases, pyruvate formate lyase, pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase. We have systematically undertaken a series of targeted mutagenesis approaches to disrupt each of these key genes and omics techniques to characterize alterations in metabolic flux. Funds from DE-FG02-07ER64423 were specifically leveraged to generate mutants with disruptions in the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenases HYDA1 and HYDA2, pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), and in bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1). Additionally funds were used to conduct global transcript profiling experiments of wildtype Chlamydomonas cells, as well as of the hydEF-1 mutant, which is unable to make H2 due to a lesion in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase biosynthetic pathway. In the wildtype cells, formate, acetate and ethanol are the dominant fermentation products with traces of CO2 and H2 also being produced. In the hydEF-1 mutant, succinate production is increased to offset the loss of protons as a terminal electron acceptor. In the pfl-1 mutant, lactate offsets the loss of formate production, and in the adh1-1 mutant glycerol is made instead of ethanol. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars, and a decline in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant performs a complete rerouting of the glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Lastly, transcriptome data have been analysed for both the wildtype and hydEF-1, that correlate with our

  7. Automated annotation of mobile antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria: the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Annotator (MARA) and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Sally R; Tsafnat, Guy

    2018-04-01

    Multiresistance in Gram-negative bacteria is often due to acquisition of several different antibiotic resistance genes, each associated with a different mobile genetic element, that tend to cluster together in complex conglomerations. Accurate, consistent annotation of resistance genes, the boundaries and fragments of mobile elements, and signatures of insertion, such as DR, facilitates comparative analysis of complex multiresistance regions and plasmids to better understand their evolution and how resistance genes spread. To extend the Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes (RAC) web site, which includes a database of 'features', and the Attacca automatic DNA annotation system, to encompass additional resistance genes and all types of associated mobile elements. Antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements were added to RAC, from existing registries where possible. Attacca grammars were extended to accommodate the expanded database, to allow overlapping features to be annotated and to identify and annotate features such as composite transposons and DR. The Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Annotator (MARA) database includes antibiotic resistance genes and selected mobile elements from Gram-negative bacteria, distinguishing important variants. Sequences can be submitted to the MARA web site for annotation. A list of positions and orientations of annotated features, indicating those that are truncated, DR and potential composite transposons is provided for each sequence, as well as a diagram showing annotated features approximately to scale. The MARA web site (http://mara.spokade.com) provides a comprehensive database for mobile antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and accurately annotates resistance genes and associated mobile elements in submitted sequences to facilitate comparative analysis.

  8. Fluid inclusions in salt: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isherwood, D.J.

    1979-01-26

    An annotated bibliography is presented which was compiled while searching the literature for information on fluid inclusions in salt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's study on the deep-geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The migration of fluid inclusions in a thermal gradient is a potential hazard to the safe disposal of nuclear waste in a salt repository. At the present time, a prediction as to whether this hazard precludes the use of salt for waste disposal can not be made. Limited data from the Salt-Vault in situ heater experiments in the early 1960's (Bradshaw and McClain, 1971) leave little doubt that fluid inclusions can migrate towards a heat source. In addition to the bibliography, there is a brief summary of the physical and chemical characteristics that together with the temperature of the waste will determine the chemical composition of the brine in contact with the waste canister, the rate of fluid migration, and the brine-canister-waste interactions.

  9. Fluid inclusions in salt: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    An annotated bibliography is presented which was compiled while searching the literature for information on fluid inclusions in salt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's study on the deep-geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The migration of fluid inclusions in a thermal gradient is a potential hazard to the safe disposal of nuclear waste in a salt repository. At the present time, a prediction as to whether this hazard precludes the use of salt for waste disposal can not be made. Limited data from the Salt-Vault in situ heater experiments in the early 1960's (Bradshaw and McClain, 1971) leave little doubt that fluid inclusions can migrate towards a heat source. In addition to the bibliography, there is a brief summary of the physical and chemical characteristics that together with the temperature of the waste will determine the chemical composition of the brine in contact with the waste canister, the rate of fluid migration, and the brine-canister-waste interactions

  10. Frame on frames: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, T.; Tsao, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The success or failure of any sample survey of a finite population is largely dependent upon the condition and adequacy of the list or frame from which the probability sample is selected. Much of the published survey sampling related work has focused on the measurement of sampling errors and, more recently, on nonsampling errors to a lesser extent. Recent studies on data quality for various types of data collection systems have revealed that the extent of the nonsampling errors far exceeds that of the sampling errors in many cases. While much of this nonsampling error, which is difficult to measure, can be attributed to poor frames, relatively little effort or theoretical work has focused on this contribution to total error. The objective of this paper is to present an annotated bibliography on frames with the hope that it will bring together, for experimenters, a number of suggestions for action when sampling from imperfect frames and that more attention will be given to this area of survey methods research

  11. Annotating Human P-Glycoprotein Bioassay Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Pinto, Marta; Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Williams, Antony J; Balderud, Linda Zander; Engkvist, Ola; Chichester, Christine; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2012-08-01

    Huge amounts of small compound bioactivity data have been entering the public domain as a consequence of open innovation initiatives. It is now the time to carefully analyse existing bioassay data and give it a systematic structure. Our study aims to annotate prominent in vitro assays used for the determination of bioactivities of human P-glycoprotein inhibitors and substrates as they are represented in the ChEMBL and TP-search open source databases. Furthermore, the ability of data, determined in different assays, to be combined with each other is explored. As a result of this study, it is suggested that for inhibitors of human P-glycoprotein it is possible to combine data coming from the same assay type, if the cell lines used are also identical and the fluorescent or radiolabeled substrate have overlapping binding sites. In addition, it demonstrates that there is a need for larger chemical diverse datasets that have been measured in a panel of different assays. This would certainly alleviate the search for other inter-correlations between bioactivity data yielded by different assay setups.

  12. The Bologna Annotation Resource (BAR 3.0): improving protein functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profiti, Giuseppe; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2017-07-03

    BAR 3.0 updates our server BAR (Bologna Annotation Resource) for predicting protein structural and functional features from sequence. We increase data volume, query capabilities and information conveyed to the user. The core of BAR 3.0 is a graph-based clustering procedure of UniProtKB sequences, following strict pairwise similarity criteria (sequence identity ≥40% with alignment coverage ≥90%). Each cluster contains the available annotation downloaded from UniProtKB, GO, PFAM and PDB. After statistical validation, GO terms and PFAM domains are cluster-specific and annotate new sequences entering the cluster after satisfying similarity constraints. BAR 3.0 includes 28 869 663 sequences in 1 361 773 clusters, of which 22.2% (22 241 661 sequences) and 47.4% (24 555 055 sequences) have at least one validated GO term and one PFAM domain, respectively. 1.4% of the clusters (36% of all sequences) include PDB structures and the cluster is associated to a hidden Markov model that allows building template-target alignment suitable for structural modeling. Some other 3 399 026 sequences are singletons. BAR 3.0 offers an improved search interface, allowing queries by UniProtKB-accession, Fasta sequence, GO-term, PFAM-domain, organism, PDB and ligand/s. When evaluated on the CAFA2 targets, BAR 3.0 largely outperforms our previous version and scores among state-of-the-art methods. BAR 3.0 is publicly available and accessible at http://bar.biocomp.unibo.it/bar3. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. MitoBamAnnotator: A web-based tool for detecting and annotating heteroplasmy in human mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Nagar, Tal; Mishmar, Dan; Rubin, Eitan

    2011-11-01

    The use of Next-Generation Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA is becoming widespread in biological and clinical research. This, in turn, creates a need for a convenient tool that detects and analyzes heteroplasmy. Here we present MitoBamAnnotator, a user friendly web-based tool that allows maximum flexibility and control in heteroplasmy research. MitoBamAnnotator provides the user with a comprehensively annotated overview of mitochondrial genetic variation, allowing for an in-depth analysis with no prior knowledge in programming. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  14. Managing and Querying Image Annotation and Markup in XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Proprietary approaches for representing annotations and image markup are serious barriers for researchers to share image data and knowledge. The Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is developing a standard based information model for image annotation and markup in health care and clinical trial environments. The complex hierarchical structures of AIM data model pose new challenges for managing such data in terms of performance and support of complex queries. In this paper, we present our work on managing AIM data through a native XML approach, and supporting complex image and annotation queries through native extension of XQuery language. Through integration with xService, AIM databases can now be conveniently shared through caGrid.

  15. Responsibility in Governmental-Political Communication: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Richard L.

    This annotated bibliography lists 43 books, periodicals, and essays in the area of governmental-political communication. Topics include: social justice, lying, cheating, ethics, public duties, public policy, language, rhetorical strategies, and propaganda. (MS)

  16. Creating New Medical Ontologies for Image Annotation A Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Stanescu, Liana; Brezovan, Marius; Mihai, Cristian Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Creating New Medical Ontologies for Image Annotation focuses on the problem of the medical images automatic annotation process, which is solved in an original manner by the authors. All the steps of this process are described in detail with algorithms, experiments and results. The original algorithms proposed by authors are compared with other efficient similar algorithms. In addition, the authors treat the problem of creating ontologies in an automatic way, starting from Medical Subject Headings (MESH). They have presented some efficient and relevant annotation models and also the basics of the annotation model used by the proposed system: Cross Media Relevance Models. Based on a text query the system will retrieve the images that contain objects described by the keywords.

  17. Social organization and transportation energy: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, W. W.

    1974-07-01

    This annotated bibliography lists items organized according to the following themes: (1) fuel consumption and modal split, (2) economics, (3) public decision-making, (4) transportation planning, and (5) effectiveness of municipal services.

  18. Managing and querying image annotation and markup in XML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel

    2010-03-01

    Proprietary approaches for representing annotations and image markup are serious barriers for researchers to share image data and knowledge. The Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is developing a standard based information model for image annotation and markup in health care and clinical trial environments. The complex hierarchical structures of AIM data model pose new challenges for managing such data in terms of performance and support of complex queries. In this paper, we present our work on managing AIM data through a native XML approach, and supporting complex image and annotation queries through native extension of XQuery language. Through integration with xService, AIM databases can now be conveniently shared through caGrid.

  19. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  20. Annotated bibliography of South African indigenous evergreen forest ecology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Geldenhuys, CJ

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Annotated references to 519 publications are presented, together with keyword listings and keyword, regional, place name and taxonomic indices. This bibliography forms part of the first phase of the activities of the Forest Biome Task Group....

  1. Annotating Evidence Based Clinical Guidelines : A Lightweight Ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; de Waard, A.; Vdovjak, R.; Paschke, A.; Burger, A.; Romano, P.; Marshall, M.S.; Splendiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a lightweight ontology for representing annotations of declarative evidence based clinical guidelines. We present the motivation and requirements for this representation, based on an analysis of several guidelines. The ontology provides the means to connect clinical questions

  2. 06491 Summary -- Digital Historical Corpora- Architecture, Annotation, and Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Burnard, Lou; Dobreva, Milena; Fuhr, Norbert; Lüdeling, Anke

    2007-01-01

    The seminar "Digital Historical Corpora" brought together scholars from (historical) linguistics, (historical) philology, computational linguistics and computer science who work with collections of historical texts. The issues that were discussed include digitization, corpus design, corpus architecture, annotation, search, and retrieval.

  3. eXamine: Exploring annotated modules in networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, K.; El-Kebir, M.; Bucur, C.I.; Siderius, M.; Smit, M.J.; Westenberg, M.A.; Klau, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biological networks have a growing importance for the interpretation of high-throughput " omics" data. Integrative network analysis makes use of statistical and combinatorial methods to extract smaller subnetwork modules, and performs enrichment analysis to annotate the modules with

  4. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    You were hundreds of persons to participate in our information meetings of October 3 and 6 2014, and we thank you for your participation! The full presentation is available here. A summary of the topics is available here (in french).

  5. Inorganic polyphosphate occurs in the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and accumulates during cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freimoser Florian M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P, linear chains of phosphate residues linked by energy rich phosphoanhydride bonds, is found in every cell and organelle and is abundant in algae. Depending on its localization and concentration, poly P is involved in various biological functions. It serves, for example, as a phosphate store and buffer against alkali, is involved in energy metabolism and regulates the activity of enzymes. Bacteria defective in poly P synthesis are impaired in biofilm development, motility and pathogenicity. PolyP has also been found in fungal cell walls and bacterial envelopes, but has so far not been measured directly or stained specifically in the cell wall of any plant or alga. Results Here, we demonstrate the presence of poly P in the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by staining with specific poly P binding proteins. The specificity of the poly P signal was verified by various competition experiments, by staining with different poly P binding proteins and by correlation with biochemical quantification. Microscopical investigation at different time-points during growth revealed fluctuations of the poly P signal synchronous with the cell cycle: The poly P staining peaked during late cytokinesis and was independent of the high intracellular poly P content, which fluctuated only slightly during the cell cycle. Conclusion The presented staining method provides a specific and sensitive tool for the study of poly P in the extracellular matrices of algae and could be used to describe the dynamic behaviour of cell wall poly P during the cell cycle. We assume that cell wall poly P and intracellular poly P are regulated by distinct mechanisms and it is suggested that cell wall bound poly P might have important protective functions against toxic compounds or pathogens during cytokinesis, when cells are more vulnerable.

  6. Valorization of Spent Escherichia coli Media Using Green Microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Feedstock Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass production for nutrients removal of Escherichia coli anaerobic broth (EAB is thought to be an economically feasible option for the cultivation of microalgae. The feasibility of growing microalgae in using EAB high in nutrients for the production of more biomass was examined. EAB comprised of nutrient-abundant effluents, which can be used to produce microalgae biomass and remove environment pollutant simultaneously. In this study, C. reinhardtii 21gr (cc1690 was cultivated in different diluted E. coli anaerobic broth supplemented with trace elements under mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. The results showed that C. reinhardtii grown in 1×, 1/2×, 1/5× and 1/10×E. coli anaerobic broth under mixotrophic conditions exhibited specific growth rates of 2.71, 2.68, 1.45, and 1.13 day-1, and biomass production of 201.9, 184.2, 175.5, and 163.8 mg L-1, respectively. Under heterotrophic conditions, the specific growth rates were 1.80, 1.86, 1.75, and 1.02 day-1, and biomass production were 45.6, 29.4, 15.8, and 12.1 mg L-1, respectively. The removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand, total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus from 1×E. coli anaerobic broth was 21.51, 22.41, and 15.53%. Moreover, the dry biomass had relatively high carbohydrate (44.3% and lipid content (18.7%. Therefore, this study provides an environmentally sustainable as well economical method for biomass production in promising model microalgae and subsequently paves the way for industrial use.

  7. The biosynthesis of nitrous oxide in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouviez, Maxence; Wheeler, David; Shilton, Andy; Packer, Michael A; McLenachan, Patricia A; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Fernández, Emilio; Guieysse, Benoit

    2017-07-01

    Over the last decades, several studies have reported emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) from microalgal cultures and aquatic ecosystems characterized by a high level of algal activity (e.g. eutrophic lakes). As N 2 O is a potent greenhouse gas and an ozone-depleting pollutant, these findings suggest that large-scale cultivation of microalgae (and possibly, natural eutrophic ecosystems) could have a significant environmental impact. Using the model unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this study was conducted to investigate the molecular basis of microalgal N 2 O synthesis. We report that C. reinhardtii supplied with nitrite (NO 2 - ) under aerobic conditions can reduce NO 2 - into nitric oxide (NO) using either a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or a dual enzymatic system of nitrate reductase (NR) and amidoxime-reducing component, and that NO is subsequently reduced into N 2 O by the enzyme NO reductase (NOR). Based on experimental evidence and published literature, we hypothesize that when nitrate (NO 3 - ) is the main Nitrogen source and the intracellular concentration of NO 2 - is low (i.e. under physiological conditions), microalgal N 2 O synthesis involves the reduction of NO 3 - to NO 2 - by NR followed by the reduction of NO 2 - to NO by the dual system involving NR. This microalgal N 2 O pathway has broad implications for environmental science and algal biology because the pathway of NO 3 - assimilation is conserved among microalgae, and because its regulation may involve NO. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Flavodiiron Proteins Promote Fast and Transient O2 Photoreduction in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Frédéric; Burlacot, Adrien; Mekhalfi, Malika; Auroy, Pascaline; Blangy, Stéphanie; Richaud, Pierre; Peltier, Gilles

    2017-07-01

    During oxygenic photosynthesis, the reducing power generated by light energy conversion is mainly used to reduce carbon dioxide. In bacteria and archae, flavodiiron (Flv) proteins catalyze O 2 or NO reduction, thus protecting cells against oxidative or nitrosative stress. These proteins are found in cyanobacteria, mosses, and microalgae, but have been lost in angiosperms. Here, we used chlorophyll fluorescence and oxygen exchange measurement using [ 18 O]-labeled O 2 and a membrane inlet mass spectrometer to characterize Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flvB insertion mutants devoid of both FlvB and FlvA proteins. We show that Flv proteins are involved in a photo-dependent electron flow to oxygen, which drives most of the photosynthetic electron flow during the induction of photosynthesis. As a consequence, the chlorophyll fluorescence patterns are strongly affected in flvB mutants during a light transient, showing a lower PSII operating yield and a slower nonphotochemical quenching induction. Photoautotrophic growth of flvB mutants was indistinguishable from the wild type under constant light, but severely impaired under fluctuating light due to PSI photo damage. Remarkably, net photosynthesis of flv mutants was higher than in the wild type during the initial hour of a fluctuating light regime, but this advantage vanished under long-term exposure, and turned into PSI photo damage, thus explaining the marked growth retardation observed in these conditions. We conclude that the C. reinhardtii Flv participates in a Mehler-like reduction of O 2 , which drives a large part of the photosynthetic electron flow during a light transient and is thus critical for growth under fluctuating light regimes. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M; Gang, David R

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a target for algaecide development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Renwick C J; Girón, Irma; Hudson, André O

    2011-01-01

    In some bacterial species and photosynthetic cohorts, including algae, the enzyme L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) (E.C. 2.6.1.83) is involved in the anabolism of the essential amino acid L-lysine. DapL catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate (THDPA) to L,L-diaminopimelate (L,L-DAP), in one step bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic reactions present in the acyl DAP pathways. Here we present an in vivo and in vitro characterization of the DapL ortholog from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-DapL). The in vivo analysis illustrated that the enzyme is able to functionally complement the E. coli dap auxotrophs and was essential for plant development in Arabidopsis. In vitro, the enzyme was able to inter-convert THDPA and L,L-DAP, showing strong substrate specificity. Cr-DapL was dimeric in both solution and when crystallized. The structure of Cr-DapL was solved in its apo form, showing an overall architecture of a α/β protein with each monomer in the dimer adopting a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent transferase-like fold in a V-shaped conformation. The active site comprises residues from both monomers in the dimer and shows some rearrangement when compared to the apo-DapL structure from Arabidopsis. Since animals do not possess the enzymatic machinery necessary for the de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-lysine, enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for the development of antibiotics, herbicides and algaecides.

  11. L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a target for algaecide development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwick C J Dobson

    Full Text Available In some bacterial species and photosynthetic cohorts, including algae, the enzyme L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL (E.C. 2.6.1.83 is involved in the anabolism of the essential amino acid L-lysine. DapL catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate (THDPA to L,L-diaminopimelate (L,L-DAP, in one step bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic reactions present in the acyl DAP pathways. Here we present an in vivo and in vitro characterization of the DapL ortholog from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-DapL. The in vivo analysis illustrated that the enzyme is able to functionally complement the E. coli dap auxotrophs and was essential for plant development in Arabidopsis. In vitro, the enzyme was able to inter-convert THDPA and L,L-DAP, showing strong substrate specificity. Cr-DapL was dimeric in both solution and when crystallized. The structure of Cr-DapL was solved in its apo form, showing an overall architecture of a α/β protein with each monomer in the dimer adopting a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent transferase-like fold in a V-shaped conformation. The active site comprises residues from both monomers in the dimer and shows some rearrangement when compared to the apo-DapL structure from Arabidopsis. Since animals do not possess the enzymatic machinery necessary for the de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-lysine, enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for the development of antibiotics, herbicides and algaecides.

  12. Expanding the spectral palette of fluorescent proteins for the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasala, Beth A; Barrera, Daniel J; Ng, Jenny; Plucinak, Thomas M; Rosenberg, Julian N; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A; Peterson, Todd C; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have become essential tools for a growing number of fields in biology. However, such tools have not been widely adopted for use in microalgal research. The aim of this study was to express and compare six FPs (blue mTagBFP, cyan mCerulean, green CrGFP, yellow Venus, orange tdTomato and red mCherry) in the popular model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To circumvent the transgene silencing that often occurs in C. reinhardtii, the FPs were expressed from the nuclear genome as transcriptional fusions with the sh-ble antibiotic resistance gene, with the foot and mouth disease virus 2A self-cleaving sequence placed between the coding sequences. All ble-2A-FPs tested are well-expressed and efficiently processed to yield mature, unfused FPs that localize throughout the cytoplasm. The fluorescence signals of each FP were detectable in whole cells by fluorescence microplate reader analysis, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we report a comparative analysis of fluorescence levels relative to auto-fluorescence for the chosen FPs. Finally, we demonstrate that the ble-2A expression vector may be used to fluorescently label an endogenous protein (α-tubulin). We show that the mCerulean-α-tubulin fusion protein localizes to the cytoskeleton and flagella, as expected, and that cells containing this fusion protein had normal cellular function. Overall, our results indicate that, by use of the ble-2A nuclear expression construct, a wide array of FP tools and technologies may be applied to microalgal research, opening up many possibilities for microalgal biology and biotechnology. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martinez, Erick Miguel; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-09-01

    Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post-translational modifications and easy recovery of products from the culture media. However, currently, the yields of secreted recombinant proteins are low, which hampers the commercial application of this strategy. This study aimed at expanding the genetic tools for enhancing secretion of recombinant proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. To increase the secretion yields, Venus was C-terminally fused with synthetic glycomodules comprised of tandem serine (Ser) and proline (Pro) repeats of 10 and 20 units [hereafter (SP) n , wherein n = 10 or 20]. The yields of the (SP) n -fused Venus were higher than Venus without the glycomodule by up to 12-fold, with the maximum yield of 15 mg/L. Moreover, the presence of the glycomodules conferred an enhanced proteolytic protein stability. The Venus-(SP) n proteins were shown to be glycosylated, and a treatment of the cells with brefeldin A led to a suggestion that glycosylation of the (SP) n glycomodules starts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Taken together, the results demonstrate the utility of the gametolysin signal sequence and (SP) n glycomodule to promote a more efficient biomanufacturing of microalgae-based recombinant proteins. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii responding to high light: a role for 2-propenal (acrolein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Thomas; Baur, Theresa; Stöggl, Wolfgang; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-09-01

    High light causes photosystem II to generate singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can react with membrane lipids, releasing reactive electrophile species (RES), such as acrolein. To investigate how RES may contribute to light stress responses, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was high light-treated in photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions and also in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere to elevate ROS production. The responses were compared to exogenous acrolein. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was higher in photoautotrophic cells, as a consequence of a more de-epoxidized state of the xanthophyll cycle pool and more LHCSR3 protein, showing that photosynthesis was under more pressure than in mixotrophic cells. Photoautotrophic cells had lowered α-tocopherol and β-carotene contents and a higher level of protein carbonylation, indicators of elevated 1 O 2 production. Levels of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPX5) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST1), important antioxidants against RES, were also increased in photoautotrophic cells. In parallel to the wild-type, the LHCSR3-deficient npq4 mutant was high light-treated, which in photoautotrophic conditions exhibited particular sensitivity under elevated oxygen, the treatment that induced the highest RES levels, including acrolein. The npq4 mutant had more GPX5 and GST1 alongside higher levels of carbonylated protein and a more oxidized glutathione redox state. In wild-type cells glutathione contents doubled after 4 h treatment, either with high light under elevated oxygen or with a non-critical dose (600 ppm) of acrolein. Exogenous acrolein also increased GST1 levels, but not GPX5. Overall, RES-associated oxidative damage and glutathione metabolism are prominently associated with light stress and potentially in signaling responses of C. reinhardtii. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  15. Sensitivity of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to gamma radiation: Photosynthetic performance and ROS formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tânia; Xie, Li; Brede, Dag; Lind, Ole-Christian; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Salbu, Brit; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2017-02-01

    The aquatic environment is continuously exposed to ionizing radiation from both natural and anthropogenic sources, making the characterization of ecological and health risks associated with radiation of large importance. Microalgae represent the main source of biomass production in the aquatic ecosystem, thus becoming a highly relevant biological model to assess the impacts of gamma radiation. However, little information is available on the effects of gamma radiation on microalgal species, making environmental radioprotection of this group of species challenging. In this context, the present study aimed to improve the understanding of the effects and toxic mechanisms of gamma radiation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii focusing on the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and ROS formation. Algal cells were exposed to gamma radiation (0.49-1677mGy/h) for 6h and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters obtained by PAM fluorometry, while two fluorescent probes carboxy-H 2 DFFDA and DHR 123 were used for the quantification of ROS. The alterations seen in functional parameters of C. reinhardtii PSII after 6h of exposure to gamma radiation showed modifications of PSII energy transfer associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways, especially at the higher dose rates used. Results also showed that gamma radiation induced ROS in a dose-dependent manner under both light and dark conditions. The observed decrease in photosynthetic efficiency seems to be connected to the formation of ROS and can potentially lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage in chloroplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report on changes in several chlorophyll fluorescence parameters associated with photosynthetic performance and ROS formation in microalgae after exposure to gamma radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase with the photosynthetic apparatus modulates electron transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosebach, Laura; Heilmann, Claudia; Mutoh, Risa; Gäbelein, Philipp; Steinbeck, Janina; Happe, Thomas; Ikegami, Takahisa; Hanke, Guy; Kurisu, Genji; Hippler, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) and the FDX:NADP + oxidoreductase (FNR) represent a key junction of electron transport downstream of photosystem I (PSI). Dynamic recruitment of FNR to the thylakoid membrane has been considered as a potential mechanism to define the fate of photosynthetically derived electrons. In this study, we investigated the functional importance of the association of FNR with the photosynthetic apparatus in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In vitro assays based on NADP + photoreduction measurements as well as NMR chemical shift perturbation analyses showed that FNR preferentially interacts with FDX1 compared to FDX2. Notably, binding of FNR to a PSI supercomplex further enhanced this preference for FDX1 over FDX2, suggesting that FNR is potentially capable of channelling electrons towards distinct routes. NADP + photoreduction assays and immunoblotting revealed that the association of FNR with the thylakoid membrane including the PSI supercomplex is impaired in the absence of Proton Gradient Regulation 5 (PGR5) and/or Proton Gradient Regulation 5-Like photosynthetic phenotype 1 (PGRL1), implying that both proteins, directly or indirectly, contribute to the recruitment of FNR to the thylakoid membrane. As assessed via in vivo absorption spectroscopy and immunoblotting, PSI was the primary target of photodamage in response to high-light stress in the absence of PGR5 and/or PGRL1. Anoxia preserved the activity of PSI, pointing to enhanced electron donation to O 2 as the source of the observed PSI inactivation and degradation. These findings establish another perspective on PGR5/PGRL1 knockout-related phenotypes and potentially interconnect FNR with the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport and PSI photoprotection in C. reinhardtii.

  17. A novel screening protocol for the isolation of hydrogen producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Happe Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sealed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures evolve significant amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions of sulfur depletion. However, the eukaryotic green alga goes through drastic metabolic changes during this nutritional stress resulting in cell growth inhibition and eventually cell death. This study aimed at isolating C. reinhardtii transformants which produce hydrogen under normal growth conditions to allow a continuous hydrogen metabolism without the stressful impact of nutrient deprivation. Results To achieve a steady photobiological hydrogen production, a screening protocol was designed to identify C. reinhardtii DNA insertional mutagenesis transformants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio. The screening protocol entails a new and fast method for mutant strain selection altered in their oxygen production/consumption balance. Out of 9000 transformants, four strains with P/R ratios varying from virtually zero to three were isolated. Strain apr1 was found to have a slightly higher respiration rate and a significantly lower photosynthesis rate than the wild type. Sealed cultures of apr1 became anaerobic in normal growth medium (TAP under moderate light conditions and induced [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity, yet without significant hydrogen gas evolution. However, Calvin-Benson cycle inactivation of anaerobically adapted apr1 cells in the light led to a 2-3-fold higher in vivo hydrogen production than previously reported for the sulfur-deprived C. reinhardtii wild type. Conclusion Attenuated P/R capacity ratio in microalgal mutants constitutes a platform for achieving steady state photobiological hydrogen production. Using this platform, algal hydrogen metabolism can be analyzed without applying nutritional stress. Furthermore, these strains promise to be useful for biotechnological hydrogen generation, since high in vivo hydrogen production rates are achievable under normal growth

  18. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlory, Olivier; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2013-09-15

    Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F0/Fv. Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency ( [Formula: see text] , EC50=303 ± 64 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC50=142 ± 98 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown that parameters which stemmed from fluorescence induction kinetics are valuable indicators for evaluating the impact of uranium on PSII in green algae. PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response to uranium in microalgae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensitivity of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to gamma radiation: Photosynthetic performance and ROS formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Tânia, E-mail: tania.gomes@niva.no [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Section of Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349, Oslo (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Xie, Li [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Section of Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349, Oslo (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Brede, Dag; Lind, Ole-Christian [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Science & Technology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Postbox 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); Salbu, Brit [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Science & Technology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters affected at higher dose rates. • Changes in PSII associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways. • Dose-dependent ROS production in algae exposed to gamma radiation. • Decrease in photosynthetic efficiency connected to ROS formation. - Abstract: The aquatic environment is continuously exposed to ionizing radiation from both natural and anthropogenic sources, making the characterization of ecological and health risks associated with radiation of large importance. Microalgae represent the main source of biomass production in the aquatic ecosystem, thus becoming a highly relevant biological model to assess the impacts of gamma radiation. However, little information is available on the effects of gamma radiation on microalgal species, making environmental radioprotection of this group of species challenging. In this context, the present study aimed to improve the understanding of the effects and toxic mechanisms of gamma radiation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii focusing on the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and ROS formation. Algal cells were exposed to gamma radiation (0.49–1677 mGy/h) for 6 h and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters obtained by PAM fluorometry, while two fluorescent probes carboxy-H{sub 2}DFFDA and DHR 123 were used for the quantification of ROS. The alterations seen in functional parameters of C. reinhardtii PSII after 6 h of exposure to gamma radiation showed modifications of PSII energy transfer associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways, especially at the higher dose rates used. Results also showed that gamma radiation induced ROS in a dose-dependent manner under both light and dark conditions. The observed decrease in photosynthetic efficiency seems to be connected to the formation of ROS and can potentially lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage in chloroplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first

  20. Hydrogen production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: an elaborate interplay of electron sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemschemeier, A; Happe, T.; Fouchard, S; Cournac, L; Peltier, G.

    2008-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses a [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 (EC 1.12.7.2), which is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Large amounts of H 2 are produced in a light-dependent reaction for several days when C. reinhardtii cells are deprived of sulfur. Under these conditions, the cells drastically change their physiology from aerobic photosynthetic growth to an anaerobic resting state. The understanding of the underlying physiological processes is not only important for getting further insights into the adaptability of photosynthesis, but will help to optimize the biotechnological application of algae as H 2 producers. Two of the still most disputed questions regarding H 2 generation by C. reinhardtii concern the electron source for H 2 evolution and the competition of the hydrogenase with alternative electron sinks. We analyzed the H 2 metabolism of S-depleted C. reinhardtii cultures utilizing a special mass spectrometer setup and investigated the influence of photosystem II (PSII)- or ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)-deficiency. We show that electrons for H 2 -production are provided both by PSII activity and by a non-photochemical plastoquinone reduction pathway, which is dependent on previous PSII activity. In a Rubisco-deficient strain, which produces H 2 also in the presence of sulfur, H 2 generation seems to be the only significant electron sink for PSII activity and rescues this strain at least partially from a light-sensitive phenotype.The latter indicates that the down-regulation of assimilatory pathways in S-deprived C. reinhardtii cells is one of the important prerequisites for a sustained H 2 evolution. (authors)

  1. The involvement of carbohydrate reserves in hydrogen photoproduction by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chochois, V.

    2009-09-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen, using water as an electron donor, and sunlight as an energy source. Although this property offers interesting biotechnological perspectives, a major limitation is related to the sensitivity of hydrogenase to oxygen which is produced by photosynthesis. It had been previously shown that in conditions of sulfur deprivation, C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen during several days (Melis et an. 2000). During this process, two pathways, one direct depending on photosystem II (PSII) activity and the other involving only the PSI, are involved, starch reserves being supposed to play a role in both of these pathways. The purpose of this phD thesis was to elucidate the mechanisms linking starch catabolism to the hydrogen photoproduction process. Firstly, the analysis of mutants affected in starch biosynthesis (sta6 and sta7) showed that if starch reserves are essential to the functioning of the indirect pathway, they are not involved in the direct one. Secondly, in order to identify metabolic steps and regulatory processes involved in starch breakdown, we developed a genetic approach based on the search of mutants affected in starch reserves mobilization. Eight mutant (std1 to std8) diversely affected in their ability to degrade starch after an accumulation phase have been isolated from an insertional mutant library of 15,000 clones. One of these mutants, std1, is affected in a kinase related to the DYRK family (dual-specificity tyrosine regulated serine threonine kinase). Although the targets of this putative kinase remain to be identified, the analysis of the granule bound proteome displayed profound alterations in the expression profile of starch phosphorylases, potentially involved in starch breakdown. STD1 represents the first starch catabolism regulator identified to date in plants. (author)

  2. Over-expression of Dof-type transcription factor increases lipid production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Rocha-Uribe, Alejandro; Ramírez-Alonso, Jocelín Itzel; Lara-Hernández, Ignacio; Hernández-Torres, Araceli; Paz-Maldonado, Luz María Teresita; Silva-Ramírez, Ana Sonia; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Martínez-Salgado, José Luis; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena

    2014-08-20

    The high demand for less polluting, newer, and cheaper fuel resources has increased the search of the most innovative options for the production of the so-called biofuels. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photosynthetic unicellular algae with multiple biotechnological advantages such as easy handling in the laboratory, a simple scale-up to industrial levels, as well as a feasible genetic modification at nuclear and chloroplast levels. Besides, its fatty acids can be used to produce biofuels. Previous studies in plants have found that the over expression of DOF-type transcription factor genes increases the synthesis and the accumulation of total lipids in seeds. In this context, the over-expression of a DOF-type transcription factor in C. reinhardtii was applied as approach to increase the amount of lipids. The results indicate higher amounts (around 2-fold) of total lipids, which are mainly fatty acids, in the genetically C. reinhardtii modified strains when compared with the non-genetically modified strain. In order to elucidate the possible function of the introduced Dof-type transcription factor, we performed a transcription profile of 8 genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and 6 genes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis, by quantitative real time (qRT-PCR). Differential expression profile was observed, which can explain the increase in lipid accumulation. However, these strains did not show notable changes in the fatty acid profile. This work represents an early effort in generating a strategy to increase fatty acids production in C. reinhardtii and their use in biofuel synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium regulates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakato, Miho; King, Stephen M

    2003-10-31

    The Chlamydomonas outer dynein arm contains three distinct heavy chains (alpha, beta, and gamma) that exhibit different motor properties. The LC4 protein, which binds 1-2 Ca2+ with KCa = 3 x 10-5 m, is associated with the gamma heavy chain and has been proposed to act as a sensor to regulate dynein motor function in response to alterations in intraflagellar Ca2+ levels. Here we genetically dissect the outer arm to yield subparticles containing different motor unit combinations and assess the microtubule-binding properties of these complexes both prior to and following preincubation with tubulin and ATP, which was used to inhibit ATP-insensitive (structural) microtubule binding. We observed that the alpha heavy chain exhibits a dominant Ca2+-independent ATP-sensitive MT binding activity in vitro that is inhibited by attachment of tubulin to the structural microtubule-binding domain. Furthermore, we show that ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a dynein subparticle containing only the beta and gamma heavy chains does not occur at Ca2+ concentrations below pCa 6 but is maximally activated above pCa 5. This activity was not observed in mutant dyneins containing small deletions in the microtubule-binding region of the beta heavy chain or in dyneins that lack both the alpha heavy chain and the motor domain of the beta heavy chain. These findings strongly suggest that Ca2+ binding directly to a component of the dynein complex regulates ATP-sensitive interactions between the beta heavy chain and microtubules and lead to a model for how individual motor units are controlled within the outer dynein arm.

  4. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwal Indu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver

  5. Does a short-term exposure to atrazine provoke cellular senescence in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperanza, Marta; Houde, Magali; Seoane, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Rioboo, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts and modes of action of a chemical and nutrient deprivation on the cellular senescence process of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Several molecular and cellular parameters related to senescence phenomena were monitored in C. reinhardtii cells exposed for 24h to a sublethal concentration (0.25μM) of the herbicide atrazine and in unexposed 96h cells in an early stationary phase of growth. All endpoints showed the same pattern of response between treatments, except for the intracellular level of calcium, where a significant increase was observed in 24h-exposed cultures compared to 24h-log controls. Results also indicated that cell viability remained above 98% for all conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and caspase activity increased in all experimental cultures with respect to 24h-log controls and alterations in the nuclear morphology and cells with auto-phagosomes were observed in all treatments. However, a decrease in lipid peroxidation was detected which could be related to the observed increment of autophagic vacuoles that recycle damaged material, such as altered lipids in microalgal membranes. Furthermore, responses at the molecular level were also investigated. Gene transcription analyses, carried out by RT-qPCR technique, indicated an increase in transcripts for genes encoding glutathione S-transferase (GST) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX I) and a decrease for those encoding catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) in both experimental treatments. Overall molecular and cellular results suggest that a short-term exposure to a sublethal concentration of atrazine may induce senescence features in microalgal cells which are the base of aquatic food webs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissecting the sequential assembly and localization of intraflagellar transport particle complex B in Chlamydomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Richey

    Full Text Available Intraflagellar transport (IFT, the key mechanism for ciliogenesis, involves large protein particles moving bi-directionally along the entire ciliary length. IFT particles contain two large protein complexes, A and B, which are constructed with proteins in a core and several peripheral proteins. Prior studies have shown that in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, IFT46, IFT52, and IFT88 directly interact with each other and are in a subcomplex of the IFT B core. However, ift46, bld1, and ift88 mutants differ in phenotype as ift46 mutants are able to form short flagella, while the other two lack flagella completely. In this study, we investigated the functional differences of these individual IFT proteins contributing to complex B assembly, stability, and basal body localization. We found that complex B is completely disrupted in bld1 mutant, indicating an essential role of IFT52 for complex B core assembly. Ift46 mutant cells are capable of assembling a relatively intact complex B, but such complex is highly unstable and prone to degradation. In contrast, in ift88 mutant cells the complex B core still assembles and remains stable, but the peripheral proteins no longer attach to the B core. Moreover, in ift88 mutant cells, while complex A and the anterograde IFT motor FLA10 are localized normally to the transition fibers, complex B proteins instead are accumulated at the proximal ends of the basal bodies. In addition, in bld2 mutant, the IFT complex B proteins still localize to the proximal ends of defective centrioles which completely lack transition fibers. Taken together, these results revealed a step-wise assembly process for complex B, and showed that the complex first localizes to the proximal end of the centrioles and then translocates onto the transition fibers via an IFT88-dependent mechanism.

  7. Flexibility in Anaerobic Metabolism as Revealed in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lacking Hydrogenase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubini, A.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Grossman, A. R.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2009-03-13

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a network of fermentation pathways that become active when cells acclimate to anoxia. Hydrogenase activity is an important component of this metabolism, and we have compared metabolic and regulatory responses that accompany anaerobiosis in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and a null mutant strain for the HYDEF gene (hydEF-1 mutant), which encodes an [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation protein. This mutant has no hydrogenase activity and exhibits elevated accumulation of succinate and diminished production of CO2 relative to the parental strain during dark, anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of hydrogenase activity, increased succinate accumulation suggests that the cells activate alternative pathways for pyruvate metabolism, which contribute to NAD(P)H reoxidation, and continued glycolysis and fermentation in the absence of O2. Fermentative succinate production potentially proceeds via the formation of malate, and increases in the abundance of mRNAs encoding two malateforming enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase and malic enzyme, are observed in the mutant relative to the parental strain following transfer of cells from oxic to anoxic conditions. Although C. reinhardtii has a single gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase, it has six genes encoding putative malic enzymes. Only one of the malic enzyme genes, MME4, shows a dramatic increase in expression (mRNA abundance) in the hydEF-1 mutant during anaerobiosis. Furthermore, there are marked increases in transcripts encoding fumarase and fumarate reductase, enzymes putatively required to convert malate to succinate. These results illustrate the marked metabolic flexibility of C. reinhardtii and contribute to the development of an informed model of anaerobic metabolism in this and potentially other algae.

  8. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwal, Indu; Ranjan, Peeyush; Kateriya, Suneel; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2011-12-07

    Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution) of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro) and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro) SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP⁺ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver nanoparticles using C. reinhardtii as a model system.

  9. Hydrogen production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: an elaborate interplay of electron sources and sinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemschemeier, A; Happe, T. [Ruhr Univ Bochum, AG Photobiotechnol, Lehrstuhl Biochem Pflanzen, Fak Biol, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Fouchard, S [Univ Nantes, CNRS, Lab GEPEA, UMR 6144, F-44602 St Nazaire (France); Cournac, L; Peltier, G. [CEA Cadarache, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, Lab Bioenerget et Biotechnol Bacteries et Microalgues, CEA-CNRS-Univ Aix Marseille, UMR 6191, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses a [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 (EC 1.12.7.2), which is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Large amounts of H{sub 2} are produced in a light-dependent reaction for several days when C. reinhardtii cells are deprived of sulfur. Under these conditions, the cells drastically change their physiology from aerobic photosynthetic growth to an anaerobic resting state. The understanding of the underlying physiological processes is not only important for getting further insights into the adaptability of photosynthesis, but will help to optimize the biotechnological application of algae as H{sub 2} producers. Two of the still most disputed questions regarding H{sub 2} generation by C. reinhardtii concern the electron source for H{sub 2} evolution and the competition of the hydrogenase with alternative electron sinks. We analyzed the H{sub 2} metabolism of S-depleted C. reinhardtii cultures utilizing a special mass spectrometer setup and investigated the influence of photosystem II (PSII)- or ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)-deficiency. We show that electrons for H{sub 2}-production are provided both by PSII activity and by a non-photochemical plastoquinone reduction pathway, which is dependent on previous PSII activity. In a Rubisco-deficient strain, which produces H{sub 2} also in the presence of sulfur, H{sub 2} generation seems to be the only significant electron sink for PSII activity and rescues this strain at least partially from a light-sensitive phenotype.The latter indicates that the down-regulation of assimilatory pathways in S-deprived C. reinhardtii cells is one of the important prerequisites for a sustained H{sub 2} evolution. (authors)

  10. GIFtS: annotation landscape analysis with GeneCards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalah Irina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene annotation is a pivotal component in computational genomics, encompassing prediction of gene function, expression analysis, and sequence scrutiny. Hence, quantitative measures of the annotation landscape constitute a pertinent bioinformatics tool. GeneCards® is a gene-centric compendium of rich annotative information for over 50,000 human gene entries, building upon 68 data sources, including Gene Ontology (GO, pathways, interactions, phenotypes, publications and many more. Results We present the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score (GIFtS which allows a quantitative assessment of a gene's annotation status, by exploiting the unique wealth and diversity of GeneCards information. The GIFtS tool, linked from the GeneCards home page, facilitates browsing the human genome by searching for the annotation level of a specified gene, retrieving a list of genes within a specified range of GIFtS value, obtaining random genes with a specific GIFtS value, and experimenting with the GIFtS weighting algorithm for a variety of annotation categories. The bimodal shape of the GIFtS distribution suggests a division of the human gene repertoire into two main groups: the high-GIFtS peak consists almost entirely of protein-coding genes; the low-GIFtS peak consists of genes from all of the categories. Cluster analysis of GIFtS annotation vectors provides the classification of gene groups by detailed positioning in the annotation arena. GIFtS also provide measures which enable the evaluation of the databases that serve as GeneCards sources. An inverse correlation is found (for GIFtS>25 between the number of genes annotated by each source, and the average GIFtS value of genes associated with that source. Three typical source prototypes are revealed by their GIFtS distribution: genome-wide sources, sources comprising mainly highly annotated genes, and sources comprising mainly poorly annotated genes. The degree of accumulated knowledge for a

  11. Combined evidence annotation of transposable elements in genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Quesneville

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are mobile, repetitive sequences that make up significant fractions of metazoan genomes. Despite their near ubiquity and importance in genome and chromosome biology, most efforts to annotate TEs in genome sequences rely on the results of a single computational program, RepeatMasker. In contrast, recent advances in gene annotation indicate that high-quality gene models can be produced from combining multiple independent sources of computational evidence. To elevate the quality of TE annotations to a level comparable to that of gene models, we have developed a combined evidence-model TE annotation pipeline, analogous to systems used for gene annotation, by integrating results from multiple homology-based and de novo TE identification methods. As proof of principle, we have annotated "TE models" in Drosophila melanogaster Release 4 genomic sequences using the combined computational evidence derived from RepeatMasker, BLASTER, TBLASTX, all-by-all BLASTN, RECON, TE-HMM and the previous Release 3.1 annotation. Our system is designed for use with the Apollo genome annotation tool, allowing automatic results to be curated manually to produce reliable annotations. The euchromatic TE fraction of D. melanogaster is now estimated at 5.3% (cf. 3.86% in Release 3.1, and we found a substantially higher number of TEs (n = 6,013 than previously identified (n = 1,572. Most of the new TEs derive from small fragments of a few hundred nucleotides long and highly abundant families not previously annotated (e.g., INE-1. We also estimated that 518 TE copies (8.6% are inserted into at least one other TE, forming a nest of elements. The pipeline allows rapid and thorough annotation of even the most complex TE models, including highly deleted and/or nested elements such as those often found in heterochromatic sequences. Our pipeline can be easily adapted to other genome sequences, such as those of the D. melanogaster heterochromatin or other

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  13. A Machine Learning Based Analytical Framework for Semantic Annotation Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Hassanzadeh; MohammadReza Keyvanpour

    2011-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an extension of the current web in which information is given well-defined meaning. The perspective of Semantic Web is to promote the quality and intelligence of the current web by changing its contents into machine understandable form. Therefore, semantic level information is one of the cornerstones of the Semantic Web. The process of adding semantic metadata to web resources is called Semantic Annotation. There are many obstacles against the Semantic Annotation, such as ...

  14. MIRACLE’s Naive Approach to Medical Images Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Villena Román, Julio; González Cristóbal, José Carlos; Goñi Menoyo, José Miguel; Martínez Fernández, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    One of the proposed tasks of the ImageCLEF 2005 campaign has been an Automatic Annotation Task. The objective is to provide the classification of a given set of 1,000 previously unseen medical (radiological) images according to 57 predefined categories covering different medical pathologies. 9,000 classified training images are given which can be used in any way to train a classifier. The Automatic Annotation task uses no textual information, but image-content information only. This paper des...

  15. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  16. Genome Annotation and Transcriptomics of Oil-Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0103 GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE Sabeeha Merchant UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES Final...2010 To 12-31-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0095 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Most algae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) when they are starved for essential nutrients like N, S, P (or Si in the case of some

  17. Experimental Polish-Lithuanian Corpus with the Semantic Annotation Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Roszko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Polish-Lithuanian Corpus with the Semantic Annotation Elements In the article the authors present the experimental Polish-Lithuanian corpus (ECorpPL-LT formed for the idea of Polish-Lithuanian theoretical contrastive studies, a Polish-Lithuanian electronic dictionary, and as help for a sworn translator. The semantic annotation being brought into ECorpPL-LT is extremely useful in Polish-Lithuanian contrastive studies, and also proves helpful in translation work.

  18. Analysis of LYSA-calculus with explicit confidentiality annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Han; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased research interest in applying process calculi in the verification of cryptographic protocols due to their ability to formally model protocols. This work presents LYSA with explicit confidentiality annotations for indicating the expected behavior of target...... malicious activities performed by attackers as specified by the confidentiality annotations. The proposed analysis approach is fully automatic without the need of human intervention and has been applied successfully to a number of protocols....

  19. JAABA: interactive machine learning for automatic annotation of animal behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kabra, Mayank; Robie, Alice A; Rivera-Alba, Marta; Branson, Steven; Branson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    We present a machine learning-based system for automatically computing interpretable, quantitative measures of animal behavior. Through our interactive system, users encode their intuition about behavior by annotating a small set of video frames. These manual labels are converted into classifiers that can automatically annotate behaviors in screen-scale data sets. Our general-purpose system can create a variety of accurate individual and social behavior classifiers for different organisms, in...

  20. Annotation Method (AM): SE6_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE6_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  1. Annotation Method (AM): SE7_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE7_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  2. Annotation Method (AM): SE28_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE28_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  3. Annotation Method (AM): SE1_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE1_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  4. Annotation Method (AM): SE20_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE20_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  5. Annotation Method (AM): SE17_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE17_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  6. Annotation Method (AM): SE2_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE2_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  7. Annotation Method (AM): SE9_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE9_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  8. Annotation Method (AM): SE27_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE27_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  9. Annotation Method (AM): SE30_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE30_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  10. Annotation Method (AM): SE33_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE33_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  11. Annotation Method (AM): SE32_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE32_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  12. Annotation Method (AM): SE12_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE12_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  13. Annotation Method (AM): SE3_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE3_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  14. Annotation Method (AM): SE31_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE31_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  15. Annotation Method (AM): SE25_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE25_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  16. Annotation Method (AM): SE13_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE13_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  17. Annotation Method (AM): SE8_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE8_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  18. Annotation Method (AM): SE34_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE34_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  19. Annotation Method (AM): SE35_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE35_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  20. Annotation Method (AM): SE14_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE14_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  1. Annotation Method (AM): SE29_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE29_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  2. Annotation Method (AM): SE36_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE36_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  3. Annotation Method (AM): SE5_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE5_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  4. Annotation Method (AM): SE11_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE11_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  5. Annotation Method (AM): SE16_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE16_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  6. Annotation Method (AM): SE26_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE26_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  7. Annotation Method (AM): SE4_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available base search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary se...arch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are ma...SE4_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary data

  8. Annotation Method (AM): SE10_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE10_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  9. Annotation Method (AM): SE15_AM1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abase search. Peaks with no hit to these databases are then selected to secondary s...earch using exactMassDB and Pep1000 databases. After the database search processes, each database hits are m...SE15_AM1 PowerGet annotation A1 In annotation process, KEGG, KNApSAcK and LipidMAPS are used for primary dat

  10. Effect of red and blue light on the timing of cyclin-dependent kinase activity and the timing of cell division in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oldenhof, H.; Bišová, Kateřina; Ende, H.; Zachleder, Vilém

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2004), s. 341-348 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1438 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : blue light * chlamydomonas reingardtii * cell cycle Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.414, year: 2004

  11. Efficient expression of nuclear transgenes in the green alga Chlamydomonas: synthesis of an HIV antigen and development of a new selectable marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimipour, Rouhollah; Neupert, Juliane; Bock, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become an invaluable model system in plant biology. There is also considerable interest in developing this microalga into an efficient production platform for biofuels, pharmaceuticals, green chemicals and industrial enzymes. However, the production of foreign proteins in the nucleocytosolic compartment of Chlamydomonas is greatly hampered by the inefficiency of transgene expression from the nuclear genome. We have recently addressed this limitation by isolating mutant algal strains that permit high-level transgene expression and by determining the contributions of GC content and codon usage to gene expression efficiency. Here we have applied these new tools and explored the potential of Chlamydomonas to produce a recombinant biopharmaceutical, the HIV antigen P24. We show that a codon-optimized P24 gene variant introduced into our algal expression strains give rise to recombinant protein accumulation levels of up to 0.25% of the total cellular protein. Moreover, in combination with an expression strain, a resynthesized nptII gene becomes a highly efficient selectable marker gene that facilitates the selection of transgenic algal clones at high frequency. By establishing simple principles of successful transgene expression, our data open up new possibilities for biotechnological research in Chlamydomonas.

  12. Productivity and selective accumulation of carotenoids of the novel extremophile microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila grown with different carbon sources in batch systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuaresma, M.; Casal, C.; Forján, E.; Vílchez, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation of extremophile microorganisms has attracted interest due to their ability to accumulate highvalue compounds. Chlamydomonas acidophila is an acidophile green microalga isolated by our group from Tinto River, an acidic river that flows down from the mining area in Huelva, Spain. This

  13. LC-MS/APCI identification of glucoside esters and diesters of astaxanthin from the snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis including their optical stereoisomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Nedbalová, Linda; Kolouchová, I.; Sigler, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, APR 2013 (2013), s. 34-42 ISSN 0031-9422 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : Chlamydomonas nivalis * Snow alga * Austrian Alps Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EF - Botanics (BU-J) Impact factor: 3.350, year: 2013

  14. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fen Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxins (FDX are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC; power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC.

  15. A survey on annotation tools for the biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Mariana; Leser, Ulf

    2014-03-01

    New approaches to biomedical text mining crucially depend on the existence of comprehensive annotated corpora. Such corpora, commonly called gold standards, are important for learning patterns or models during the training phase, for evaluating and comparing the performance of algorithms and also for better understanding the information sought for by means of examples. Gold standards depend on human understanding and manual annotation of natural language text. This process is very time-consuming and expensive because it requires high intellectual effort from domain experts. Accordingly, the lack of gold standards is considered as one of the main bottlenecks for developing novel text mining methods. This situation led the development of tools that support humans in annotating texts. Such tools should be intuitive to use, should support a range of different input formats, should include visualization of annotated texts and should generate an easy-to-parse output format. Today, a range of tools which implement some of these functionalities are available. In this survey, we present a comprehensive survey of tools for supporting annotation of biomedical texts. Altogether, we considered almost 30 tools, 13 of which were selected for an in-depth comparison. The comparison was performed using predefined criteria and was accompanied by hands-on experiences whenever possible. Our survey shows that current tools can support many of the tasks in biomedical text annotation in a satisfying manner, but also that no tool can be considered as a true comprehensive solution.

  16. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers.

  17. Exploiting ontology graph for predicting sparsely annotated gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Cho, Hyunghoon; Zhai, ChengXiang; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2015-06-15

    Systematically predicting gene (or protein) function based on molecular interaction networks has become an important tool in refining and enhancing the existing annotation catalogs, such as the Gene Ontology (GO) database. However, functional labels with only a few (algorithm that independently considers each label faces a paucity of information and thus is prone to capture non-generalizable patterns in the data, resulting in poor predictive performance. There exist a variety of algorithms for function prediction, but none properly address this 'overfitting' issue of sparsely annotated functions, or do so in a manner scalable to tens of thousands of functions in the human catalog. We propose a novel function prediction algorithm, clusDCA, which transfers information between similar functional labels to alleviate the overfitting problem for sparsely annotated functions. Our method is scalable to datasets with a large number of annotations. In a cross-validation experiment in yeast, mouse and human, our method greatly outperformed previous state-of-the-art function prediction algorithms in predicting sparsely annotated functions, without sacrificing the performance on labels with sufficient information. Furthermore, we show that our method can accurately predict genes that will be assigned a functional label that has no known annotations, based only on the ontology graph structure and genes associated with other labels, which further suggests that our method effectively utilizes the similarity between gene functions. https://github.com/wangshenguiuc/clusDCA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. MetaStorm: A Public Resource for Customizable Metagenomics Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Singh, Gargi; Heath, Lenwood S.; Pruden, Amy; Xiao, Weidong; Zhang, Liqing

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics is a trending research area, calling for the need to analyze large quantities of data generated from next generation DNA sequencing technologies. The need to store, retrieve, analyze, share, and visualize such data challenges current online computational systems. Interpretation and annotation of specific information is especially a challenge for metagenomic data sets derived from environmental samples, because current annotation systems only offer broad classification of microbial diversity and function. Moreover, existing resources are not configured to readily address common questions relevant to environmental systems. Here we developed a new online user-friendly metagenomic analysis server called MetaStorm (http://bench.cs.vt.edu/MetaStorm/), which facilitates customization of computational analysis for metagenomic data sets. Users can upload their own reference databases to tailor the metagenomics annotation to focus on various taxonomic and functional gene markers of interest. MetaStorm offers two major analysis pipelines: an assembly-based annotation pipeline and the standard read annotation pipeline used by existing web servers. These pipelines can be selected individually or together. Overall, MetaStorm provides enhanced interactive visualization to allow researchers to explore and manipulate taxonomy and functional annotation at various levels of resolution. PMID:27632579

  19. GENCODE: The reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L.; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  20. A framework for annotating human genome in disease context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Huisong; Cheng, Wenqing; Fu, Dong; Xia, Tian; Kibbe, Warren A; Lin, Simon M

    2012-01-01

    Identification of gene-disease association is crucial to understanding disease mechanism. A rapid increase in biomedical literatures, led by advances of genome-scale technologies, poses challenge for manually-curated-based annotation databases to characterize gene-disease associations effectively and timely. We propose an automatic method-The Disease Ontology Annotation Framework (DOAF) to provide a comprehensive annotation of the human genome using the computable Disease Ontology (DO), the NCBO Annotator service and NCBI Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF). DOAF can keep the resulting knowledgebase current by periodically executing automatic pipeline to re-annotate the human genome using the latest DO and GeneRIF releases at any frequency such as daily or monthly. Further, DOAF provides a computable and programmable environment which enables large-scale and integrative analysis by working with external analytic software or online service platforms. A user-friendly web interface (doa.nubic.northwestern.edu) is implemented to allow users to efficiently query, download, and view disease annotations and the underlying evidences.

  1. Chlamydomonas DYX1C1/PF23 is essential for axonemal assembly and proper morphology of inner dynein arms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Yamamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic assembly of ciliary dyneins, a process known as preassembly, requires numerous non-dynein proteins, but the identities and functions of these proteins are not fully elucidated. Here, we show that the classical Chlamydomonas motility mutant pf23 is defective in the Chlamydomonas homolog of DYX1C1. The pf23 mutant has a 494 bp deletion in the DYX1C1 gene and expresses a shorter DYX1C1 protein in the cytoplasm. Structural analyses, using cryo-ET, reveal that pf23 axonemes lack most of the inner dynein arms. Spectral counting confirms that DYX1C1 is essential for the assembly of the majority of ciliary inner dynein arms (IDA as well as a fraction of the outer dynein arms (ODA. A C-terminal truncation of DYX1C1 shows a reduction in a subset of these ciliary IDAs. Sucrose gradients of cytoplasmic extracts show that preassembled ciliary dyneins are reduced compared to wild-type, which suggests an important role in dynein complex stability. The role of PF23/DYX1C1 remains unknown, but we suggest that DYX1C1 could provide a scaffold for macromolecular assembly.

  2. Using single cell cultivation system for on-chip monitoring of the interdivision timer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviev Mikhail

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulation of cell cycle progression in changing environments is vital for cell survival and maintenance, and different regulation mechanisms based on cell size and cell cycle time have been proposed. To determine the mechanism of cell cycle regulation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed an on-chip single-cell cultivation system that allows for the strict control of the extracellular environment. We divided the Chlamydomonas cell cycle into interdivision and division phases on the basis of changes in cell size and found that, regardless of the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR and the extent of illumination, the length of the interdivision phase was inversely proportional to the rate of increase of cell volume. Their product remains constant indicating the existence of an 'interdivision timer'. The length of the division phase, in contrast, remained nearly constant. Cells cultivated under light-dark-light conditions did not divide unless they had grown to twice their initial volume during the first light period. This indicates the existence of a 'commitment sizer'. The ratio of the cell volume at the beginning of the division phase to the initial cell volume determined the number of daughter cells, indicating the existence of a 'mitotic sizer'.

  3. Large-scale prokaryotic gene prediction and comparison to genome annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2005-01-01

    -annotated. These results are based on the difference between the number of annotated genes not found by EasyGene and the number of predicted genes that are not annotated in GenBank. We argue that the average performance of our standardized and fully automated method is slightly better than the annotation....... genefinder EasyGene. Comparison of the GenBank and RefSeq annotations with the EasyGene predictions reveals that in some genomes up to 60% of the genes may have been annotated with a wrong start codon, especially in the GC-rich genomes. The fractional difference between annotated and predicted confirms...

  4. Experiments with crowdsourced re-annotation of a POS tagging data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovy, Dirk; Plank, Barbara; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Crowdsourcing lets us collect multiple annotations for an item from several annotators. Typically, these are annotations for non-sequential classification tasks. While there has been some work on crowdsourcing named entity annotations, researchers have assumed that syntactic tasks such as part......-of-speech (POS) tagging cannot be crowdsourced. This paper shows that workers can actually annotate sequential data almost as well as experts. Further, we show that the models learned from crowdsourced annotations fare as well as the models learned from expert annotations in downstream tasks....

  5. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization or differentiated posttranslational maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and cerebral or peripheral neurons but others also in other cell types. The extraintestinal cells may release different bioactive fragments of the same prohormone due to cell-specific processing pathways. Moreover, endocrine cells, neurons, cancer cells and, for instance, spermatozoa secrete gut peptides in different ways, so the same peptide may act as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research.

  6. Deep Question Answering for protein annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeill, Julien; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Gaudet, Pascale; Bairoch, Amos; Ruch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical professionals have access to a huge amount of literature, but when they use a search engine, they often have to deal with too many documents to efficiently find the appropriate information in a reasonable time. In this perspective, question-answering (QA) engines are designed to display answers, which were automatically extracted from the retrieved documents. Standard QA engines in literature process a user question, then retrieve relevant documents and finally extract some possible answers out of these documents using various named-entity recognition processes. In our study, we try to answer complex genomics questions, which can be adequately answered only using Gene Ontology (GO) concepts. Such complex answers cannot be found using state-of-the-art dictionary- and redundancy-based QA engines. We compare the effectiveness of two dictionary-based classifiers for extracting correct GO answers from a large set of 100 retrieved abstracts per question. In the same way, we also investigate the power of GOCat, a GO supervised classifier. GOCat exploits the GOA database to propose GO concepts that were annotated by curators for similar abstracts. This approach is called deep QA, as it adds an original classification step, and exploits curated biological data to infer answers, which are not explicitly mentioned in the retrieved documents. We show that for complex answers such as protein functional descriptions, the redundancy phenomenon has a limited effect. Similarly usual dictionary-based approaches are relatively ineffective. In contrast, we demonstrate how existing curated data, beyond information extraction, can be exploited by a supervised classifier, such as GOCat, to massively improve both the quantity and the quality of the answers with a +100% improvement for both recall and precision. Database URL: http://eagl.unige.ch/DeepQA4PA/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Reddy, Cvsk; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations. Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER. The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide end-users the flexibility of

  8. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tungadri Bose

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations.Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER.The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide end-users the

  9. Annotated outline for the SCP conceptual design report: Office of Geologic Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) requires that site characterization plans (SCPs) be submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), affected States and Indian tribes, and the general public for review and comment prior to the sinking of shafts at a candidate repository site. The SCP is also required by the NRC licensing procedures for the disposal of high-level waste. An Annotated Outline (AO) for Site Characterization Plans (OGR/B-5) has been prepared to provide DOE's standard format and guidance for preparation of SCPs. Consistent with the AO for SCPs. Chapter 6 of the SCP is to provide the requirements and references the media-specific design data base, describe the current design concepts, and discuss design information needs. In order to develop this design information, the Office of Geologic Repositories program is planning a SCP conceptual design phase as part of the overall repository design process. This phase is the first step in the design process, and the result and design can be expected to change as the program moves through the site characterization phase. The Annotated Outline which follows provides the standard format and guidance for the preparation of the SCP Conceptual Design Reports. It is considered to meet the intent of NRC's proposed Generic Technical Position philosophy contained therein. The SCP Conceptual Design Report will be the primary basis for preparation of Chapter 6 of the SCP and will be stand-alone reference document for the SCP. Appendix 1 to this Annotated Outline provides a correlation between Chapter 6 of the SCP and SCP Conceptual Design Report for the information purposes

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department CERN Global Network An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) ...

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN The new account management system Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium ...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department The CERN Ombuds The new account management system Crèche progress + Restaurants Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Summer Student program Bringing Library services to users Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  14. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  15. Annotation-based feature extraction from sets of SBML models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Rebekka; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wolfien, Markus; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Henkel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Model repositories such as BioModels Database provide computational models of biological systems for the scientific community. These models contain rich semantic annotations that link model entities to concepts in well-established bio-ontologies such as Gene Ontology. Consequently, thematically similar models are likely to share similar annotations. Based on this assumption, we argue that semantic annotations are a suitable tool to characterize sets of models. These characteristics improve model classification, allow to identify additional features for model retrieval tasks, and enable the comparison of sets of models. In this paper we discuss four methods for annotation-based feature extraction from model sets. We tested all methods on sets of models in SBML format which were composed from BioModels Database. To characterize each of these sets, we analyzed and extracted concepts from three frequently used ontologies, namely Gene Ontology, ChEBI and SBO. We find that three out of the methods are suitable to determine characteristic features for arbitrary sets of models: The selected features vary depending on the underlying model set, and they are also specific to the chosen model set. We show that the identified features map on concepts that are higher up in the hierarchy of the ontologies than the concepts used for model annotations. Our analysis also reveals that the information content of concepts in ontologies and their usage for model annotation do not correlate. Annotation-based feature extraction enables the comparison of model sets, as opposed to existing methods for model-to-keyword comparison, or model-to-model comparison.

  16. Photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under process engineering aspects; Photobiologische Wasserstoffproduktion mit der einzelligen Gruenalge Chlamydomonas reinhardtii unter verfahrenstechnischen Aspekten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen is of high interest as a clean and environmentally friendly energy source as its combustion only emits water and energy. However, currently hydrogen is produced in energy demanding processes by the consumption of fossil fuels. An alternative way of sustainable and non-polluting hydrogen production could be provided by use of photosynthetic active microalgae. Within this work, the photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is investigated under the aspects of bioprocess-engineering and economics. Objectives are, besides the increase of the photochemical efficiency, the cultivation of the algae and subsequent hydrogen production under cost-free sunlight. It could be demonstrated that outdoor cultivation of C. reinhardtii is possible in Central Europe throughout the year by using e.g. waste heat. Similar cell numbers in the range from 1,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} to 1,7.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved in closed photobioreactors of the type Photobioreactor Screening Module under controlled laboratory conditions and both continuous illumination (200 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}) and simulated outdoor conditions according to the light intensity of idealized summer day as well as in outdoor experiments (up to 2000 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}).The use of 10 % CO{sub 2} corresponding to the CO{sub 2} content in flue gas led to a doubling of cell numbers under continuous illumination to 4,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1}, compared to the reference culture bubbled with 3 % CO{sub 2}. A significant increase of cell numbers under the light profiles of an idealized summer day could not be achieved. The cultivation under the light profile of a winter day at 25 C reduced cell growth to 54 %, compared to the summer simulation. In open 30 L outdoor ponds, only 0,26.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved under photoheterotrophic conditions during the summer months, which corresponds to 20 % of the cell

  17. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  18. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Robert Aymar

    2005-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 12 January 2006 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2005 and to present the perspectives for this coming year. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season Robert AYMAR

  19. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 18 January 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg.. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2006 and to present the perspectives for this special year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg.. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg.. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  20. Scientific meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    One of the main aims of the IAEA is to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information and one of the main ways of doing this is to convene international scientific meetings. They range from large international conferences bringing together several hundred scientists, smaller symposia attended by an average of 150 to 250 participants and seminars designed to instruct rather than inform, to smaller panels and study groups of 10 to 30 experts brought together to advise on a particular programme or to develop a set of regulations. The topics of these meetings cover every part of the Agency's activities and form a backbone of many of its programmes. (author)

  1. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  2. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  3. Combining computational models, semantic annotations and simulation experiments in a graph database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Ron; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Model repositories such as the BioModels Database, the CellML Model Repository or JWS Online are frequently accessed to retrieve computational models of biological systems. However, their storage concepts support only restricted types of queries and not all data inside the repositories can be retrieved. In this article we present a storage concept that meets this challenge. It grounds on a graph database, reflects the models’ structure, incorporates semantic annotations and simulation descriptions and ultimately connects different types of model-related data. The connections between heterogeneous model-related data and bio-ontologies enable efficient search via biological facts and grant access to new model features. The introduced concept notably improves the access of computational models and associated simulations in a model repository. This has positive effects on tasks such as model search, retrieval, ranking, matching and filtering. Furthermore, our work for the first time enables CellML- and Systems Biology Markup Language-encoded models to be effectively maintained in one database. We show how these models can be linked via annotations and queried. Database URL: https://sems.uni-rostock.de/projects/masymos/ PMID:25754863

  4. ASAP: Amplification, sequencing & annotation of plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folta Kevin M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of DNA sequence information is vital for pursuing structural, functional and comparative genomics studies in plastids. Traditionally, the first step in mining the valuable information within a chloroplast genome requires sequencing a chloroplast plasmid library or BAC clones. These activities involve complicated preparatory procedures like chloroplast DNA isolation or identification of the appropriate BAC clones to be sequenced. Rolling circle amplification (RCA is being used currently to amplify the chloroplast genome from purified chloroplast DNA and the resulting products are sheared and cloned prior to sequencing. Herein we present a universal high-throughput, rapid PCR-based technique to amplify, sequence and assemble plastid genome sequence from diverse species in a short time and at reasonable cost from total plant DNA, using the large inverted repeat region from strawberry and peach as proof of concept. The method exploits the highly conserved coding regions or intergenic regions of plastid genes. Using an informatics approach, chloroplast DNA sequence information from 5 available eudicot plastomes was aligned to identify the most conserved regions. Cognate primer pairs were then designed to generate ~1 – 1.2 kb overlapping amplicons from the inverted repeat region in 14 diverse genera. Results 100% coverage of the inverted repeat region was obtained from Arabidopsis, tobacco, orange, strawberry, peach, lettuce, tomato and Amaranthus. Over 80% coverage was obtained from distant species, including Ginkgo, loblolly pine and Equisetum. Sequence from the inverted repeat region of strawberry and peach plastome was obtained, annotated and analyzed. Additionally, a polymorphic region identified from gel electrophoresis was sequenced from tomato and Amaranthus. Sequence analysis revealed large deletions in these species relative to tobacco plastome thus exhibiting the utility of this method for structural and

  5. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of UVR acclimation and its impact on chemical toxicity in C. reinhardtii. • UVR acclimation is mediated through fast and reversible physiological defense mechanisms. • Pigment analysis suggests a role of lutein in UVR acclimation. • Co-tolerance to rose bengal suggests a role of singlet oxygen defense in UVR acclimation. • Knowledge on the toxic mechanism of chemicals needed to predict co-tolerance. - Abstract: The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the

  6. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao; Behra, Renata; Eggen, Rik I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Systematic study of UVR acclimation and its impact on chemical toxicity in C. reinhardtii. • UVR acclimation is mediated through fast and reversible physiological defense mechanisms. • Pigment analysis suggests a role of lutein in UVR acclimation. • Co-tolerance to rose bengal suggests a role of singlet oxygen defense in UVR acclimation. • Knowledge on the toxic mechanism of chemicals needed to predict co-tolerance. - Abstract: The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the

  7. Real-time monitoring of genetically modified Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during the Foton M3 space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, M.; Rea, G.; Antonacci, A.; Serafini, A.; Damasso, M.; Pastorelli, S.; Margonelli, A.; Johanningmeier, U.; Bertalan, I.; Pezzotti, G.; Giardi, M. T.

    2008-09-01

    Long-term space exploration, colonization or habitation requires biological life support systems capable to cope with the deleterious space environment. The use of oxygenic photosynthetic microrganisms is an intriguing possibility mainly for food, O2 and nutraceutical compounds production. The critical points of utilizing plants- or algae-based life support systems are the microgravity and the ionizing radiation, which can influence the performance of these organisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of space environment on the photosynthetic activity of various microrganisms and to select space stresstolerant strains. Photosystem II D1 protein sitedirected and random mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [1] were used as a model system to test and select the amino acid substitutions capable to account for space stress tolerance. We focussed our studies also on the accumulation of the Photosystem II photoprotective carotenoids (the xantophylls violaxanthin, anteraxanthin and zeaxanthin), powerful antioxidants that epidemiological studies demonstrated to be human vision protectors. For this purpose some mutants modified at the level of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls were included in the study [2]. To identify the consequences of the space environment on the photosynthetic apparatus the changes in the Photosystem II efficiency were monitored in real time during the ESA-Russian Foton- M3 mission in September 2007. For the space flight a high-tech, multicell fluorescence detector, Photo-II, was designed and built by the Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics in collaboration with Kayser-Italy, Biosensor and DAS. Photo-II is an automatic device developed to measure the chlorophyll fluorescence and to provide a living conditions for several different algae strains (Fig.1). Twelve different C. reinhardti strains were analytically selected and two replications for each strain were brought to space

  8. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlory, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.herlory@gmail.com [IRSN-Laboratoire d’Ecotoxicologie des Radionucléides, Centre de Cadarache, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bonzom, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.bonzom@irsn.fr [IRSN-Laboratoire d’Ecotoxicologie des Radionucléides, Centre de Cadarache, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Gilbin, Rodolphe, E-mail: rodolphe.gilbin@irsn.fr [IRSN-Laboratoire de Biogéochimie, Biodisponibilité et Transferts des Radionucléides, Centre de Cadarache, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Our study addressed the toxicity thresholds of uranium on microalgae using PAM fluorometry. •The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium. •Uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition. •Non-photochemical quenching was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter. •PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response. -- Abstract: Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5 h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F{sub 0}/F{sub v}. Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency (F{sup ′}{sub q}/F{sup ′}{sub m}, EC{sub 50} = 303 ± 64 μg U L{sup −1} after 5 h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC{sub 50} = 142 ± 98 μg U L{sup −1} after 5 h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown

  9. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlory, Olivier; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Our study addressed the toxicity thresholds of uranium on microalgae using PAM fluorometry. •The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium. •Uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition. •Non-photochemical quenching was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter. •PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response. -- Abstract: Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5 h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F 0 /F v . Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency (F ′ q /F ′ m , EC 50 = 303 ± 64 μg U L −1 after 5 h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC 50 = 142 ± 98 μg U L −1 after 5 h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown that parameters which stemmed from

  10. Interactive effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and light to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Marti, Elodie; Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@unige.ch

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Comparable stability of CuO-NP suspensions under different light conditions. • UVR* inhibits growth, bleaches chlorophyll fluorescence and damages membrane. • Below 1 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs do not attenuate light in algal suspension. • SNL enhances significantly the effect of 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs on microalgae. • Synergistic interactions between UVR* and CuO-NPs. - Abstract: The present study explores the effect of light with different spectral composition on the stability of CuO-nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dispersions and their effects to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that simulated natural light (SNL) and light with enhanced UVB radiation (UVR*) do not affect the dissolution of CuO-NPs as compared to light irradiation conditions typically used in laboratory incubator (INC). Comparable values of ζ-potential and hydrodynamic size during 24 h were found under all studied conditions. Concentrations of CuO-NPs below 1 mg L{sup −1} do not attenuate the light penetration in the algal suspensions in comparison with NP-free system. Exposure to a combination of 8 μg L{sup −1} or 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs and INC or SNL has no significant effect on the algal growth inhibition, algal fluorescence and membrane integrity under short-term exposure. However, an enhancement of the percentage of cells experiencing oxidative stress was observed upon exposure to 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs and SNL for 4 and 8 h. Combination of UVR* and 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs resulted in synergistic effects for all biological endpoints. Despite the photocatalytic properties of CuO-NPs no significant increase in abiotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under simulated solar radiation was observed suggesting that the synergistic effect observed might be correlated to other factors than CuO-NP-mediated ROS photoproduction. Tests performed with CuSO{sub 4} confirmed the important role of dissolution as toxicity driving force for lower

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 15 June 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) b. IT Service Review Meeting (ITSRM) c. GS User Commission Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in bra...

  12. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  13. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Re...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :   Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)...

  16. August Meeting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... exists on this new trend of Igbo women (re)venturing into the public sphere is, one would suggest or argue, ... section looks at the history, structure and dynamics of the 'August Meeting' assembly among Igbo ..... authority were divided between the sexes in a complementary fashion, was operational. In the ...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Fellows, Associates and Summer Student Programmes Particle Data Book distribution Revoking Computer accounts Equipment insurance on site Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Dates for meetings in 2003 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (74837...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria  W. Adam  (71661) Belgium  G. Wilquet  (74664) Bulgaria  R. Tzenov  (77958) Czech Republic  P. Závada&am...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) Fr...

  20. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesch Robert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara- Cyc which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation.

  1. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Robert; Lysenko, Artem; Hindle, Matthew; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Thiele, Ralf; Rawlings, Christopher; Köhler, Jacob; Taubert, Jan

    2008-08-25

    The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara-Cyc) which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation. The methods and algorithms presented in this publication are an integral part of the ONDEX system which is freely available from http://ondex.sf.net/.

  2. Dizeez: an online game for human gene-disease annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Good, Benjamin M; Su, Andrew I

    2013-01-01

    Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit), multiple sequence alignment (Phylo) and RNA structure design (EteRNA). Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org.

  3. Statistical algorithms for ontology-based annotation of scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Chayan; Jones, Thomas B; Luger, George F; Xu, Jiawei F; Turner, Matthew D; Laird, Angela R; Turner, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Ontologies encode relationships within a domain in robust data structures that can be used to annotate data objects, including scientific papers, in ways that ease tasks such as search and meta-analysis. However, the annotation process requires significant time and effort when performed by humans. Text mining algorithms can facilitate this process, but they render an analysis mainly based upon keyword, synonym and semantic matching. They do not leverage information embedded in an ontology's structure. We present a probabilistic framework that facilitates the automatic annotation of literature by indirectly modeling the restrictions among the different classes in the ontology. Our research focuses on annotating human functional neuroimaging literature within the Cognitive Paradigm Ontology (CogPO). We use an approach that combines the stochastic simplicity of naïve Bayes with the formal transparency of decision trees. Our data structure is easily modifiable to reflect changing domain knowledge. We compare our results across naïve Bayes, Bayesian Decision Trees, and Constrained Decision Tree classifiers that keep a human expert in the loop, in terms of the quality measure of the F1-mirco score. Unlike traditional text mining algorithms, our framework can model the knowledge encoded by the dependencies in an ontology, albeit indirectly. We successfully exploit the fact that CogPO has explicitly stated restrictions, and implicit dependencies in the form of patterns in the expert curated annotations.

  4. DisBlue+: A distributed annotation-based C# compiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir E. AbdelRahman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Many programming languages utilize annotations to add useful information to the program but they still result in more tokens to be compiled and hence slower compilation time. Any current distributed compiler breaks the program into scattered disjoint pieces to speed up the compilation. However, these pieces cooperate synchronously and depend highly on each other. This causes massive overhead since messages, symbols, or codes must be roamed throughout the network. This paper presents two promising compilers named annotation-based C# (Blue+ and distributed annotation-based C# (DisBlue+. The proposed Blue+ annotation is based on axiomatic semantics to replace the if/loop constructs. As the developer tends to use many (complex conditions and repeat them in the program, such annotations reduce the compilation scanning time and increases the whole code readability. Built on the top of Blue+, DisBlue+ presents its proposed distributed concept which is to divide each program class to its prototype and definition, as disjoint distributed pieces, such that each class definition is compiled with only its related compiled prototypes (interfaces. Such concept reduces the amount of code transferred over the network, minimizes the dependencies among the disjoint pieces, and removes any possible synchronization between them. To test their efficiencies, Blue+ and DisBlue+ were verified with large-size codes against some existing compilers namely Javac, DJavac, and CDjava.

  5. Automatic annotation of lecture videos for multimedia driven pedagogical platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shariq Imran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today’s eLearning websites are heavily loaded with multimedia contents, which are often unstructured, unedited, unsynchronized, and lack inter-links among different multimedia components. Hyperlinking different media modality may provide a solution for quick navigation and easy retrieval of pedagogical content in media driven eLearning websites. In addition, finding meta-data information to describe and annotate media content in eLearning platforms is challenging, laborious, prone to errors, and time-consuming task. Thus annotations for multimedia especially of lecture videos became an important part of video learning objects. To address this issue, this paper proposes three major contributions namely, automated video annotation, the 3-Dimensional (3D tag clouds, and the hyper interactive presenter (HIP eLearning platform. Combining existing state-of-the-art SIFT together with tag cloud, a novel approach for automatic lecture video annotation for the HIP is proposed. New video annotations are implemented automatically providing the needed random access in lecture videos within the platform, and a 3D tag cloud is proposed as a new way of user interaction mechanism. A preliminary study of the usefulness of the system has been carried out, and the initial results suggest that 70% of the students opted for using HIP as their preferred eLearning platform at Gjøvik University College (GUC.

  6. Annotation of nerve cord transcriptome in earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthakumar Ponesakki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In annelid worms, the nerve cord serves as a crucial organ to control the sensory and behavioral physiology. The inadequate genome resource of earthworms has prioritized the comprehensive analysis of their transcriptome dataset to monitor the genes express in the nerve cord and predict their role in the neurotransmission and sensory perception of the species. The present study focuses on identifying the potential transcripts and predicting their functional features by annotating the transcriptome dataset of nerve cord tissues prepared by Gong et al., 2010 from the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Totally 9762 transcripts were successfully annotated against the NCBI nr database using the BLASTX algorithm and among them 7680 transcripts were assigned to a total of 44,354 GO terms. The conserve domain analysis indicated the over representation of P-loop NTPase domain and calcium binding EF-hand domain. The COG functional annotation classified 5860 transcript sequences into 25 functional categories. Further, 4502 contig sequences were found to map with 124 KEGG pathways. The annotated contig dataset exhibited 22 crucial neuropeptides having considerable matches to the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, suggesting their possible role in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In addition, 108 human stem cell marker homologs were identified including the crucial epigenetic regulators, transcriptional repressors and cell cycle regulators, which may contribute to the neuronal and segmental regeneration. The complete functional annotation of this nerve cord transcriptome can be further utilized to interpret genetic and molecular mechanisms associated with neuronal development, nervous system regeneration and nerve cord function.

  7. Annotating abstract pronominal anaphora in the DAD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarretta, Costanza; Olsen, Sussi Anni

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we present an extension of the MATE/GNOME annotation scheme for anaphora (Poesio 2004) which accounts for abstract anaphora in Danish and Italian. By abstract anaphora it is here meant pronouns whose linguistic antecedents are verbal phrases, clauses and discourse segments. The exten......n this paper we present an extension of the MATE/GNOME annotation scheme for anaphora (Poesio 2004) which accounts for abstract anaphora in Danish and Italian. By abstract anaphora it is here meant pronouns whose linguistic antecedents are verbal phrases, clauses and discourse segments....... The extended scheme, which we call the DAD annotation scheme, allows to annotate information about abstract anaphora which is important to investigate their use, see Webber (1988), Gundel et al. (2003), Navarretta (2004) and which can influence their automatic treatment. Intercoder agreement scores obtained...... by applying the DAD annotation scheme on texts and dialogues in the two languages are given and show that th information proposed in the scheme can be recognised in a reliable way....

  8. Fast Arc-Annotated Subsequence Matching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2012-01-01

    An arc-annotated string is a string of characters, called bases, augmented with a set of pairs, called arcs, each connecting two bases. Given arc-annotated strings P and Q the arc-preserving subsequence problem is to determine if P can be obtained from Q by deleting bases from Q. Whenever a base...... is deleted any arc with an endpoint in that base is also deleted. Arc-annotated strings where the arcs are "nested" are a natural model of RNA molecules that captures both the primary and secondary structure of these. The arc-preserving subsequence problem for nested arc-annotated strings is basic primitive...... the previous time bound while significantly reducing the space from a quadratic term to linear. This is essential to process large RNA molecules where the space is likely to be a bottleneck. To obtain our result we introduce several novel ideas which may be of independent interest for related problems on arc-annotated...

  9. Fast Arc-Annotated Subsequence Matching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2010-01-01

    An arc-annotated string is a string of characters, called bases, augmented with a set; of pairs, called arcs, each connecting two bases. Given arc-annotated strings P and Q the arc-preserving subsequence problem is to determine if P can be obtained from Q by deleting bases from Q. Whenever a base...... is deleted any arc with an endpoint in that base is also deleted. Arc-annotated strings where the arcs are "nested" are a natural model of RNA molecules that captures both the primary and secondary structure of these. The arc-preserving subsequence problem for nested arc-annotated strings is basic primitive...... the previous time bound while significantly reducing the space from a quadratic term to linear. This is essential to process large RNA molecules where the space is a likely to be a bottleneck. To obtain our result we introduce several novel ideas which may be of independent interest for related problems on arc-annotated...

  10. An annotated corpus with nanomedicine and pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Nastassja A; Jimenez, Ivan; McInnes, Bridget T

    2017-01-01

    A vast amount of data on nanomedicines is being generated and published, and natural language processing (NLP) approaches can automate the extraction of unstructured text-based data. Annotated corpora are a key resource for NLP and information extraction methods which employ machine learning. Although corpora are available for pharmaceuticals, resources for nanomedicines and nanotechnology are still limited. To foster nanotechnology text mining (NanoNLP) efforts, we have constructed a corpus of annotated drug product inserts taken from the US Food and Drug Administration's Drugs@FDA online database. In this work, we present the development of the Engineered Nanomedicine Database corpus to support the evaluation of nanomedicine entity extraction. The data were manually annotated for 21 entity mentions consisting of nanomedicine physicochemical characterization, exposure, and biologic response information of 41 Food and Drug Administration-approved nanomedicines. We evaluate the reliability of the manual annotations and demonstrate the use of the corpus by evaluating two state-of-the-art named entity extraction systems, OpenNLP and Stanford NER. The annotated corpus is available open source and, based on these results, guidelines and suggestions for future development of additional nanomedicine corpora are provided.

  11. A cost-effective approach to produce 15N-labelled amino acids employing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC503.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás Carcelén, Jesús; Marchante-Gayón, Juan Manuel; González, Pablo Rodríguez; Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús; Alonso, José Ignacio García

    2017-08-18

    The use of enriched stable isotopes is of outstanding importance in chemical metrology as it allows the application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Primary methods based on IDMS ensure the quality of the analytical measurements and traceability of the results to the international system of units. However, the synthesis of isotopically labelled molecules from enriched stable isotopes is an expensive and a difficult task. Either chemical and biochemical methods to produce labelled molecules have been proposed, but so far, few cost-effective methods have been described. The aim of this study was to use the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce, at laboratory scale, 15 N-labelled amino acids with a high isotopic enrichment. To do that, a culture media containing 15 NH 4 Cl was used. No kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was observed. The labelled proteins biosynthesized by the microorganism were extracted from the biomass and the 15 N-labelled amino acids were obtained after a protein hydrolysis with HCl. The use of the wall deficient strain CC503 cw92 mt+ is fit for purpose, as it only assimilates ammonia as nitrogen source, avoiding isotope contamination with nitrogen from the atmosphere or the reagents used in the culture medium, and enhancing the protein extraction efficiency compared to cell-walled wild type Chlamydomonas. The isotopic enrichment of the labelled amino acids was calculated from their isotopic composition measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The average isotopic enrichment for the 16 amino acids characterized was 99.56 ± 0.05% and the concentration of the amino acids in the hydrolysate ranged from 18 to 90 µg/mL. Previously reported biochemical methods to produce isotopically labelled proteins have been applied in the fields of proteomics and fluxomics. For these approaches, low amounts of products are required and the isotopic enrichment of the molecules has never been properly determined. So far, only 13

  12. Effect of Temperature and light intensity on growth and Photosynthetic Activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II; Efecto de la temperatura e intensidad luminosa sobre el crecimiento y actividad fotosintetica del alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardt II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsel Jaen, M.; Fernandez Gonzalez, J.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of five temperatures (15,20,25,30 and 35 degree centigree) and two levels of illumination on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II has been studied. The growth of the cultures was evaluated by optical density. Photosynthetic activity has been carried out studying either the assimilation rate of C0{sub 2} labelled with C-14 or the oxygen evolution by means of polarographic measurements. The maximum photosynthetic rate has been obtained at 25 degree centigree for the lower level of illumination (2400 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher one (13200 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher ono (13200 lux). These results suggest an interaction of temperature and illumination on photosynthetic activity. (Author) 37 refs.

  13. Use of Annotations for Component and Framework Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, O.; Lloyd, W.; Carlson, J.; Leavesley, G. H.; Geter, F.

    2009-12-01

    The popular programming languages Java and C# provide annotations, a form of meta-data construct. Software frameworks for web integration, web services, database access, and unit testing now take advantage of annotations to reduce the complexity of APIs and the quantity of integration code between the application and framework infrastructure. Adopting annotation features in frameworks has been observed to lead to cleaner and leaner application code. The USDA Object Modeling System (OMS) version 3.0 fully embraces the annotation approach and additionally defines a meta-data standard for components and models. In version 3.0 framework/model integration previously accomplished using API calls is now achieved using descriptive annotations. This enables the framework to provide additional functionality non-invasively such as implicit multithreading, and auto-documenting capabilities while achieving a significant reduction in the size of the model source code. Using a non-invasive methodology leads to models and modeling components with only minimal dependencies on the modeling framework. Since models and modeling components are not directly bound to framework by the use of specific APIs and/or data types they can more easily be reused both within the framework as well as outside of it. To study the effectiveness of an annotation based framework approach with other modeling frameworks, a framework-invasiveness study was conducted to evaluate the effects of framework design on model code quality. A monthly water balance model was implemented across several modeling frameworks and several software metrics were collected. The metrics selected were measures of non-invasive design methods for modeling frameworks from a software engineering perspective. It appears that the use of annotations positively impacts several software quality measures. In a next step, the PRMS model was implemented in OMS 3.0 and is currently being implemented for water supply forecasting in the

  14. Annotation-Based Whole Genomic Prediction and Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadarmideen, Haja; Do, Duy Ngoc; Janss, Luc

    Genomic selection is widely used in both animal and plant species, however, it is performed with no input from known genomic or biological role of genetic variants and therefore is a black box approach in a genomic era. This study investigated the role of different genomic regions and detected QTLs...... in their contribution to estimated genomic variances and in prediction of genomic breeding values by applying SNP annotation approaches to feed efficiency. Ensembl Variant Predictor (EVP) and Pig QTL database were used as the source of genomic annotation for 60K chip. Genomic prediction was performed using the Bayes...... classes. Predictive accuracy was 0.531, 0.532, 0.302, and 0.344 for DFI, RFI, ADG and BF, respectively. The contribution per SNP to total genomic variance was similar among annotated classes across different traits. Predictive performance of SNP classes did not significantly differ from randomized SNP...

  15. Annotating abstract pronominal anaphora in the DAD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarretta, Costanza; Olsen, Sussi Anni

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we present an extension of the MATE/GNOME annotation scheme for anaphora (Poesio 2004) which accounts for abstract anaphora in Danish and Italian. By abstract anaphora it is here meant pronouns whose linguistic antecedents are verbal phrases, clauses and discourse segments. The exten......n this paper we present an extension of the MATE/GNOME annotation scheme for anaphora (Poesio 2004) which accounts for abstract anaphora in Danish and Italian. By abstract anaphora it is here meant pronouns whose linguistic antecedents are verbal phrases, clauses and discourse segments...... by applying the DAD annotation scheme on texts and dialogues in the two languages are given and show that th information proposed in the scheme can be recognised in a reliable way....

  16. META2: Intercellular DNA Methylation Pairwise Annotation and Integrative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhua Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide deciphering intercellular differential DNA methylation as well as its roles in transcriptional regulation remains elusive in cancer epigenetics. Here we developed a toolkit META2 for DNA methylation annotation and analysis, which aims to perform integrative analysis on differentially methylated loci and regions through deep mining and statistical comparison methods. META2 contains multiple versatile functions for investigating and annotating DNA methylation profiles. Benchmarked with T-47D cell, we interrogated the association within differentially methylated CpG (DMC and region (DMR candidate count and region length and identified major transition zones as clues for inferring statistically significant DMRs; together we validated those DMRs with the functional annotation. Thus META2 can provide a comprehensive analysis approach for epigenetic research and clinical study.

  17. Code Generation for Protocols from CPN models Annotated with Pragmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael; Kindler, Ekkart

    of the same model and sufficiently detailed to serve as a basis for automated code generation when annotated with code generation pragmatics. Pragmatics are syntactical annotations designed to make the CPN models descriptive and to address the problem that models with enough details for generating code from...... them tend to be verbose and cluttered. Our code generation approach consists of three main steps, starting from a CPN model that the modeller has annotated with a set of pragmatics that make the protocol structure and the control-flow explicit. The first step is to compute for the CPN model, a set...... of derived pragmatics that identify control-flow structures and operations, e. g., for sending and receiving packets, and for manipulating the state. In the second step, an abstract template tree (ATT) is constructed providing an association between pragmatics and code generation templates. The ATT...

  18. Processing sequence annotation data using the Lua programming language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yutaka; Arita, Masanori; Kumagai, Toshitaka; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The data processing language in a graphical software tool that manages sequence annotation data from genome databases should provide flexible functions for the tasks in molecular biology research. Among currently available languages we adopted the Lua programming language. It fulfills our requirements to perform computational tasks for sequence map layouts, i.e. the handling of data containers, symbolic reference to data, and a simple programming syntax. Upon importing a foreign file, the original data are first decomposed in the Lua language while maintaining the original data schema. The converted data are parsed by the Lua interpreter and the contents are stored in our data warehouse. Then, portions of annotations are selected and arranged into our catalog format to be depicted on the sequence map. Our sequence visualization program was successfully implemented, embedding the Lua language for processing of annotation data and layout script. The program is available at http://staff.aist.go.jp/yutaka.ueno/guppy/.

  19. An Atlas of annotations of Hydra vulgaris transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Daniela; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2016-09-22

    RNA sequencing takes advantage of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies for analyzing RNA transcript counts with an excellent accuracy. Trying to interpret this huge amount of data in biological information is still a key issue, reason for which the creation of web-resources useful for their analysis is highly desiderable. Starting from a previous work, Transcriptator, we present the Atlas of Hydra's vulgaris, an extensible web tool in which its complete transcriptome is annotated. In order to provide to the users an advantageous resource that include the whole functional annotated transcriptome of Hydra vulgaris water polyp, we implemented the Atlas web-tool contains 31.988 accesible and downloadable transcripts of this non-reference model organism. Atlas, as a freely available resource, can be considered a valuable tool to rapidly retrieve functional annotation for transcripts differentially expressed in Hydra vulgaris exposed to the distinct experimental treatments. WEB RESOURCE URL: http://www-labgtp.na.icar.cnr.it/Atlas .

  20. Rfam: annotating families of non-coding RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Jennifer; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Tate, John G; Burge, Sarah W

    2015-01-01

    The primary task of the Rfam database is to collate experimentally validated noncoding RNA (ncRNA) sequences from the published literature and facilitate the prediction and annotation of new homologues in novel nucleotide sequences. We group homologous ncRNA sequences into "families" and related families are further grouped into "clans." We collate and manually curate data cross-references for these families from other databases and external resources. Our Web site offers researchers a simple interface to Rfam and provides tools with which to annotate their own sequences using our covariance models (CMs), through our tools for searching, browsing, and downloading information on Rfam families. In this chapter, we will work through examples of annotating a query sequence, collating family information, and searching for data.