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Sample records for mediterranean diet adequacy

  1. The Mediterranean Diet and Nutritional Adequacy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itandehui Castro-Quezada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean dietary pattern, through a healthy profile of fat intake, low proportion of carbohydrate, low glycemic index, high content of dietary fiber, antioxidant compounds, and anti-inflammatory effects, reduces the risk of certain pathologies, such as cancer or Cardiovascular Disease (CVD. Nutritional adequacy is the comparison between the nutrient requirement and the intake of a certain individual or population. In population groups, the prevalence of nutrient inadequacy can be assessed by the probability approach or using the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR cut-point method. However, dietary patterns can also be used as they have moderate to good validity to assess adequate intakes of some nutrients. The objective of this study was to review the available evidence on the Nutritional Adequacy of the Mediterranean Diet. The inclusion of foods typical of the Mediterranean diet and greater adherence to this healthy pattern was related to a better nutrient profile, both in children and adults, with a lower prevalence of individuals showing inadequate intakes of micronutrients. Therefore, the Mediterranean diet could be used in public health nutrition policies in order to prevent micronutrient deficiencies in the most vulnerable population groups.

  2. The Mediterranean Diet and Nutritional Adequacy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Román-Viñas, Blanca; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean dietary pattern, through a healthy profile of fat intake, low proportion of carbohydrate, low glycemic index, high content of dietary fiber, antioxidant compounds, and anti-inflammatory effects, reduces the risk of certain pathologies, such as cancer or Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). Nutritional adequacy is the comparison between the nutrient requirement and the intake of a certain individual or population. In population groups, the prevalence of nutrient inadequacy can be assessed by the probability approach or using the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) cut-point method. However, dietary patterns can also be used as they have moderate to good validity to assess adequate intakes of some nutrients. The objective of this study was to review the available evidence on the Nutritional Adequacy of the Mediterranean Diet. The inclusion of foods typical of the Mediterranean diet and greater adherence to this healthy pattern was related to a better nutrient profile, both in children and adults, with a lower prevalence of individuals showing inadequate intakes of micronutrients. Therefore, the Mediterranean diet could be used in public health nutrition policies in order to prevent micronutrient deficiencies in the most vulnerable population groups. PMID:24394536

  3. Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000110.htm Mediterranean diet To use the sharing features on this page, ... and other health problems. How to Follow the Diet The Mediterranean diet is based on: Plant-based ...

  4. Transferability of the Mediterranean Diet to Non-Mediterranean Countries. What Is and What Is Not the Mediterranean Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Hershey, Maria Soledad; Zazpe, Itziar; Trichopoulou, Antonia

    2017-11-08

    Substantial evidence has verified the Mediterranean diet's (MedDiet) nutritional adequacy, long-term sustainability, and effectiveness for preventing hard clinical events from cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as increasing longevity. This article includes a cumulative meta-analysis of prospective studies supporting a strong inverse association between closer adherence to the MedDiet and the incidence of hard clinical events of CVD. The MedDiet has become an increasingly popular topic of interest when focusing on overall food patterns rather than single nutrient intake, not only in Mediterranean countries, but also globally. However, several myths and misconceptions associated with the traditional Mediterranean diet should be clearly addressed and dispelled, particularly those that label as "Mediterranean" an eating pattern that is not in line with the traditional Mediterranean diet. The transferability of the traditional MedDiet to the non-Mediterranean populations is possible, but it requires a multitude of changes in dietary habits. New approaches for promoting healthy dietary behavior consistent with the MedDiet will offer healthful, sustainable, and practical strategies at all levels of public health. The following article presents practical resources and knowledge necessary for accomplishing these changes.

  5. Transferability of the Mediterranean Diet to Non-Mediterranean Countries. What Is and What Is Not the Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Martínez-González

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence has verified the Mediterranean diet’s (MedDiet nutritional adequacy, long-term sustainability, and effectiveness for preventing hard clinical events from cardiovascular disease (CVD, as well as increasing longevity. This article includes a cumulative meta-analysis of prospective studies supporting a strong inverse association between closer adherence to the MedDiet and the incidence of hard clinical events of CVD. The MedDiet has become an increasingly popular topic of interest when focusing on overall food patterns rather than single nutrient intake, not only in Mediterranean countries, but also globally. However, several myths and misconceptions associated with the traditional Mediterranean diet should be clearly addressed and dispelled, particularly those that label as “Mediterranean” an eating pattern that is not in line with the traditional Mediterranean diet. The transferability of the traditional MedDiet to the non-Mediterranean populations is possible, but it requires a multitude of changes in dietary habits. New approaches for promoting healthy dietary behavior consistent with the MedDiet will offer healthful, sustainable, and practical strategies at all levels of public health. The following article presents practical resources and knowledge necessary for accomplishing these changes.

  6. Transferability of the Mediterranean Diet to Non-Mediterranean Countries. What Is and What Is Not the Mediterranean Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Hershey, Maria Soledad; Zazpe, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    Substantial evidence has verified the Mediterranean diet’s (MedDiet) nutritional adequacy, long-term sustainability, and effectiveness for preventing hard clinical events from cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as increasing longevity. This article includes a cumulative meta-analysis of prospective studies supporting a strong inverse association between closer adherence to the MedDiet and the incidence of hard clinical events of CVD. The MedDiet has become an increasingly popular topic of interest when focusing on overall food patterns rather than single nutrient intake, not only in Mediterranean countries, but also globally. However, several myths and misconceptions associated with the traditional Mediterranean diet should be clearly addressed and dispelled, particularly those that label as “Mediterranean” an eating pattern that is not in line with the traditional Mediterranean diet. The transferability of the traditional MedDiet to the non-Mediterranean populations is possible, but it requires a multitude of changes in dietary habits. New approaches for promoting healthy dietary behavior consistent with the MedDiet will offer healthful, sustainable, and practical strategies at all levels of public health. The following article presents practical resources and knowledge necessary for accomplishing these changes. PMID:29117146

  7. Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Georgoulis, Michael; Kontogianni, Meropi D.; Yiannakouris, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventi...

  8. Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, Michael; Kontogianni, Meropi D.; Yiannakouris, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. PMID:24714352

  9. PON1 and Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Lou-Bonafonte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1 has been implicated in the development of those conditions, especially atherosclerosis. The present work describes a systematic review of current evidence supporting the influence of Mediterranean diet and its constituents on this enzyme. Despite the differential response of some genetic polymorphisms, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to exert a protective action on this enzyme. Extra virgin olive oil, the main source of fat, has been particularly effective in increasing PON1 activity, an action that could be due to low saturated fatty acid intake, oleic acid enrichment of phospholipids present in high-density lipoproteins that favor the activity, and increasing hepatic PON1 mRNA and protein expressions induced by minor components present in this oil. Other Mediterranean diet constituents, such as nuts, fruits and vegetables, have been effective in modulating the activity of the enzyme, pomegranate and its compounds being the best characterized items. Ongoing research on compounds isolated from all these natural products, mainly phenolic compounds and carotenoids, indicates that some of them are particularly effective, and this may enhance the use of nutraceuticals and functional foods capable of potentiating PON1 activity.

  10. PON1 and Mediterranean Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M.; Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Navarro, María A.; Osada, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been implicated in the development of those conditions, especially atherosclerosis. The present work describes a systematic review of current evidence supporting the influence of Mediterranean diet and its constituents on this enzyme. Despite the differential response of some genetic polymorphisms, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to exert a protective action on this enzyme. Extra virgin olive oil, the main source of fat, has been particularly effective in increasing PON1 activity, an action that could be due to low saturated fatty acid intake, oleic acid enrichment of phospholipids present in high-density lipoproteins that favor the activity, and increasing hepatic PON1 mRNA and protein expressions induced by minor components present in this oil. Other Mediterranean diet constituents, such as nuts, fruits and vegetables, have been effective in modulating the activity of the enzyme, pomegranate and its compounds being the best characterized items. Ongoing research on compounds isolated from all these natural products, mainly phenolic compounds and carotenoids, indicates that some of them are particularly effective, and this may enhance the use of nutraceuticals and functional foods capable of potentiating PON1 activity. PMID:26024295

  11. [Mediterranean diet: not only food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Vico, Letizia; Agostini, Susanna; Brazzo, Silvia; Biffi, Barbara; Masini, Maria Luisa

    2012-09-01

    The proposal of a Mediterranean way of life is much more than advise how to eat. The Mediterranean Diet, a model of Sustainable Diet, is an example of how to combine personal choices, economic, social and cultural rights, protective of human health and the ecosystem. There is in fact fundamental interdependence between dietary requirements, nutritional recommendations, production and consumption of food. In literature studies and nutritional and epidemiological monitoring activities at national and international level have found a lack of adherence to this lifestyle, due to the spread of the economy, lifestyles of the Western type and globalization of the production and consumption. To encourage the spread of a culture and a constant practice of the Mediterranean Diet, there are some tools that are presented in this article. The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid in addition to the recommendations on the frequency and portions of food, focuses on the choice of how to cook and eat food. The "Double Food Pyramid" encourages conscious food choices based on "healthy eating and sustainability. All the nutrition professionals and dietitians in particular should be constantly striving to encourage the adoption of a sustainable and balanced nutrition.

  12. Prototypical versus contemporary Mediterranean Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, W; De Gara, L; Antonelli Incalzi, R; Pedone, C

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the evolution of the Mediterranean Diet (MD) in a delimited area of Southern Italy, by comparing the diet adopted 60-70 years ago (Prototypical Mediterranean Diet, PMD) with the contemporary one (Contemporary Mediterranean Diet, CMD), and to verify to what extent they fitted the recommendations of the Italian and the USDA dietary guidelines. We recruited a total of 106 participants, divided in two groups. PMD group included 52 women aged >80 years, with a good cognitive function and full independence in basic and instrumental activities of daily living. CMD group included 20 men and 34 women aged 50-60 years. Food intake was assessed by administering the EPIC food frequency questionnaire to each participant, and an additional survey to the PMD subjects only. Both PMD and CMD showed adequate intakes of macronutrients, although some deficiencies related to micronutrient requirements were evident. CMD showed a slightly greater use of animal products, processed and sugary foods, and higher intakes of simple sugars, animal proteins (49.6 vs 28.3 g/day), animal lipids (37.8 vs 20.1 g/day), saturated fats (25.0 vs 15.8 g/day) and cholesterol (305.0 vs 258.5 g/day). PMD showed many similarities to the original version of the MD in terms of macronutrients distribution and food choices. The documented evolution of the dietary habits over a 70 years timespan suggests that nowadays Mediterranean regions adhere less strictly to the original MD, although nutrients intakes are adequate to LARN and USDA recommendations. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nutrient adequacy of a very low-fat vegan diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Emke, Stacey R; Weidner, Gerdi; Pettengill, Elaine B; Marlin, Ruth O; Chi, Christine; Ornish, Dean M

    2005-09-01

    This study assessed the nutrient adequacy of a very low-fat vegan diet. Thirty-nine men (mean age=65 years) with early stage prostate cancer who chose the "watchful waiting" approach to disease management, were instructed by a registered dietitian and a chef on following a very low-fat (10%) vegan diet with the addition of a fortified soy protein powdered beverage. Three-day food diaries, excluding vitamin and mineral supplements, were analyzed and nutrient values were compared against Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Mean dietary intake met the recommended DRIs. On the basis of the Adequate Intake standard, a less than adequate intake was observed for vitamin D. This demonstrates that a very low-fat vegan diet with comprehensive nutrition education emphasizing nutrient-fortified plant foods is nutritionally adequate, with the exception of vitamin D. Vitamin D supplementation, especially for those with limited sun exposure, can help assure nutritional adequacy.

  14. The Mediterranean diet: health and science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Richard; Gerber, Mariette

    2012-01-01

    .... It discusses the Mediterranean diet in the light of recent developments in nutritional biochemistry, disease mechanisms and epidemiological studies, and also provides advice on nutrition policies...

  15. Is the Chilean Diet a Mediterranean-type Diet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME ROZOWSKI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Food intake in Chile has changed markedly in the last decades, showing an increase in fat consumption and presently a small fruit and vegetables intake. A parallel is made between the Chilean and Mediterranean diet (mainly the one from Spain, Italy, and Greece, both currently and from 50 years ago. The main differences and similarities are based on food availability. Although Chilean diet seems to be approaching the traditional Mediterranean diet of the 60's, there is concern about changes that are moving away from Chilean traditional diet and towards a western one. A new food pyramid for Chile is proposed based on the traditional Mediterranean-type diet

  16. Is the Chilean Diet a Mediterranean-type Diet?

    OpenAIRE

    JAIME ROZOWSKI; ÓSCAR CASTILLO

    2004-01-01

    Food intake in Chile has changed markedly in the last decades, showing an increase in fat consumption and presently a small fruit and vegetables intake. A parallel is made between the Chilean and Mediterranean diet (mainly the one from Spain, Italy, and Greece), both currently and from 50 years ago. The main differences and similarities are based on food availability. Although Chilean diet seems to be approaching the traditional Mediterranean diet of the 60's, there is concern about changes t...

  17. Mediterranean Diet and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Carioli, Greta; Bravi, Francesca; Ferraroni, Monica; Serraino, Diego; Montella, Maurizio; Giacosa, Attilio; Toffolutti, Federica; Negri, Eva; Levi, Fabio; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2018-03-08

    The Mediterranean diet has been related to a reduced risk of several common cancers but its role on breast cancer has not been quantified yet. We investigated the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and breast cancer risk by means of a hospital-based case-control study conducted in Italy and Switzerland. 3034 breast cancer cases and 3392 controls admitted to the same network of hospitals for acute, non-neoplastic and non-gynaecologic diseases were studied. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was quantitatively measured through a Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), summarizing the major characteristics of the Mediterranean dietary pattern and ranging from 0 (lowest adherence) to 9 (highest adherence). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) of breast cancer for the MDS using multiple logistic regression models, adjusting for several covariates. Compared to a MDS of 0-3, the ORs for breast cancer were 0.86 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.76-0.98) for a MDS of 4-5 and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.71-0.95) for a MDS of 6-9 ( p for trend = 0.008). The exclusion of the ethanol component from the MDS did not materially modify the ORs (e.g., OR = 0.81, 95% CI, 0.70-0.95, for MDS ≥ 6). Results were similar in pre- and post-menopausal women. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced breast cancer risk.

  18. Mediterranean Diet in Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Meryem

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bad eating habits lead to the emergence of chronic health problems such as coronary artery diseases, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cancer and obesity and the relationship between diet and diseases is emphasized and the relationship between them is clearly revealed in studies conducted over many years. The Mediterranean diet, which is first described by Angel Keys at the beginning of the 1960’s, is not a specific diet but a natural way of eating in olive-growing region. With the properties such as the use of vegetable oils such as olive oil in particular, and the consumption of fish instead of red meat, the diet constitutes a health-protective nutrition. So, this review conducted the relationship between Mediterranean diet and chronic diseases.

  19. The Mediterranean diet in a world context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandratos, Nikos

    2006-02-01

    To put the debate on the Mediterranean diet in context by highlighting historical and prospective changes in the level and composition of food consumption in the world and key Mediterranean countries. Data from FAO's food balance sheets are used to illustrate historical evolution. Projections to 2030 are presented from FAO's recent and ongoing work on exploring world food and agriculture futures. International. Many developing countries are undergoing diet transitions bringing them closer to the diets prevalent in the richer countries, i.e. with more energy-dense foods. There follows an increase in the incidence of diet-related non-communicable diseases, which are superimposed on the health problems related to undernutrition that still afflict them. In parallel, many low-income countries are making little progress towards raising food consumption levels necessary for good nutrition and food security. Wider adoption of food consumption patterns akin to those of the Mediterranean diet hold promise of contributing to mitigate adverse effects of such diet transitions. However, the evolution of food consumption in the Mediterranean countries themselves is not encouraging, as these countries have also followed the trend towards higher shares of energy-dense foods. Possible policy responses to these problems include measures to raise awareness of the benefits of healthier diets and/or to change relative food prices in favour of such diets (by taxing fattening foods) or, at the extreme, making individuals who follow 'bad' diets, and thus are prone to associated diseases, bear a higher part of the consequent costs borne by the public health systems (tax fat people).

  20. Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    Background: The metabolic syndrome refers to a clustering of risk factors including
    abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia,
    and hypertension and it is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus type

  1. Mediterranean diet, culture and heritage: challenges for a new conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Medina, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present article is to discuss the role of the Mediterranean diet as a part of Human Culture and Intangible Cultural Heritage. Until the present, Mediterranean diet has been observed as a healthy model of medical behaviour. After its proposal as a Cultural Heritage of the Humanity at UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), Mediterranean diet is actually being observed as a part of Mediterranean culture and starting its concept as an equivalent of Mediterranean Cultural Food System or Mediterranean Culinary System. At the candidacy of Mediterranean diet as a World Cultural Intangible Heritage to be presented at UNESCO in 2008, this new conception is making sense. A new point of view that will be capital in the future discussions about the Mediterranean diet, their challenges and their future perspectives.

  2. Food Processing and the Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hoffman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of the Mediterranean diet (MD for protecting against chronic disorders such as cardiovascular disease are usually attributed to high consumption of certain food groups such as vegetables, and low consumption of other food groups such as meat. The influence of food processing techniques such as food preparation and cooking on the nutrient composition and nutritional value of these foods is not generally taken into consideration. In this narrative review, we consider the mechanistic and epidemiological evidence that food processing influences phytochemicals in selected food groups in the MD (olives, olive oil, vegetables and nuts, and that this influences the protective effects of these foods against chronic diseases associated with inflammation. We also examine how the pro-inflammatory properties of meat consumption can be modified by Mediterranean cuisine. We conclude by discussing whether food processing should be given greater consideration, both when recommending a MD to the consumer and when evaluating its health properties.

  3. Mediterranean Diet Effect: an Italian picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzini Elena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the overall diet quality effects, mainly on antioxidant nutritional status and some cytokines related to the cellular immune response as well as oxidative stress in a healthy Italian population group. Methods An observational study was conducted on 131 healthy free-living subjects. Dietary intake was assessed by dietary diary. Standardised procedures were used to make anthropometric measurements. On blood samples (serum, plasma and whole blood were evaluated: antioxidant status by vitamin A, vitamin E, carotenoids, vitamin C, uric acid, SH groups, SOD and GPx activities; lipid blood profile by total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides; total antioxidant capacity by FRAP and TRAP; the immune status by TNF-α, and IL-10 cytokines; the levels of malondialdehyde in the erythrocytes as marker of lipid peroxidation. Results The daily macronutrients intake (g/day have shown a high lipids consumption and significant differences between the sexes with regard to daily micronutrients intake. On total sample mean Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS was 4.5 ± 1.6 and no significant differences between the sexes were present. A greater adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern increases the circulating plasma levels of carotenoids (lutein plus zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, α and β-carotene, vitamin A and vitamin E. The levels of endogenous antioxidants were also improved. We observed higher levels in anti-inflammatory effect cytokines (IL-10 in subjects with MDS ≥ 6, by contrast, subjects with MDS ≤ 3 show higher levels in sense of proinflammatory (TNF α P 4. Our data suggest a protective role of vitamin A against chronic inflammatory conditions especially in subjects with the highest adherence to the Mediterranean-type dietary pattern. Conclusions Mediterranean dietary pattern is associated with significant amelioration of multiple risk factors, including a better

  4. Mediterranean Diet and cancer risk: an open issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni; Silvestris, Franco

    2016-09-01

    The traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s meets the characteristics of an anticancer diet defined by the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AIRC). A diet rich of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits, limited in high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat), red meat and foods high in salt, without sugary drinks and processed meat is recommended by the WCRF/AIRC experts to reduce the risk of cancer. The aim of this review was to examine whether Mediterranean Diet is protective or not against cancer risk. Three meta-analyses of cohort studies reported that a high adherence to the Mediterranean Diet significantly reduces the risk of cancer incidence and/or mortality. Nevertheless, the Mediterranean dietary pattern defined in the studies' part of the meta-analyses has qualitative and/or quantitative differences compared to the Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s. Therefore, the protective role of the Mediterranean Diet against cancer has not definitely been established. In epidemiological studies, a universal definition of the Mediterranean Diet, possibly the traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s, could be useful to understand the role of this dietary pattern in cancer prevention.

  5. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiodiabesity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Elena; Rico-Cabanas, Laura; Rosgaard, Nanna; Estruch, Ramón; Bach-Faig, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Cardiodiabesity has been used to define and describe the well-known relationship between type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this study was to perform a scientific literature review with a systematic search to examine all the cardiovascular risk factors combined and their relationship with adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) pattern as primary prevention against cardiodiabesity in a holistic approach. Research was conducted using the PubMed database including clinical trials, cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies. Thirty-seven studies were reviewed: fourteen related to obesity, ten to CVD, nine to MetS, and four to T2DM. Indeed 33 provided strong evidence on the association between adherence to a MedDiet and a reduced incidence of collective cardiodiabesity risk in epidemiological studies. This scientific evidence makes the MedDiet pattern very useful for preventive strategies directed at the general population and also highlights the need to consider all these diet-related risk factors and health outcomes together in daily primary care. PMID:25192027

  6. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiodiabesity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiodiabesity has been used to define and describe the well-known relationship between type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MetS and cardiovascular disease (CVD. The objective of this study was to perform a scientific literature review with a systematic search to examine all the cardiovascular risk factors combined and their relationship with adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet pattern as primary prevention against cardiodiabesity in a holistic approach. Research was conducted using the PubMed database including clinical trials, cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies. Thirty-seven studies were reviewed: fourteen related to obesity, ten to CVD, nine to MetS, and four to T2DM. Indeed 33 provided strong evidence on the association between adherence to a MedDiet and a reduced incidence of collective cardiodiabesity risk in epidemiological studies. This scientific evidence makes the MedDiet pattern very useful for preventive strategies directed at the general population and also highlights the need to consider all these diet-related risk factors and health outcomes together in daily primary care.

  7. Med Diet 4.0: the Mediterranean diet with four sustainable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernini, S; Berry, E M; Serra-Majem, L; La Vecchia, C; Capone, R; Medina, F X; Aranceta-Bartrina, J; Belahsen, R; Burlingame, B; Calabrese, G; Corella, D; Donini, L M; Lairon, D; Meybeck, A; Pekcan, A G; Piscopo, S; Yngve, A; Trichopoulou, A

    2017-05-01

    To characterize the multiple dimensions and benefits of the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet, in order to revitalize this intangible food heritage at the country level; and to develop a multidimensional framework - the Med Diet 4.0 - in which four sustainability benefits of the Mediterranean diet are presented in parallel: major health and nutrition benefits, low environmental impacts and richness in biodiversity, high sociocultural food values, and positive local economic returns. A narrative review was applied at the country level to highlight the multiple sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet into a single multidimensional framework: the Med Diet 4.0. Setting/subjects We included studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals that contained data on the characterization of sustainable diets and of the Mediterranean diet. The methodological framework approach was finalized through a series of meetings, workshops and conferences where the framework was presented, discussed and ultimately refined. The Med Diet 4.0 provides a conceptual multidimensional framework to characterize the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model, by applying principles of sustainability to the Mediterranean diet. By providing a broader understanding of the many sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet, the Med Diet 4.0 can contribute to the revitalization of the Mediterranean diet by improving its current perception not only as a healthy diet but also a sustainable lifestyle model, with country-specific and culturally appropriate variations. It also takes into account the identity and diversity of food cultures and systems, expressed within the notion of the Mediterranean diet, across the Mediterranean region and in other parts of the world. Further multidisciplinary studies are needed for the assessment of the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet to include these new dimensions.

  8. Mediterranean Diet: From a Healthy Diet to a Sustainable Dietary Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Dernini, Sandro; Berry, Elliot M.

    2015-01-01

    The notion of the Mediterranean diet has undergone a progressive evolution over the past 60 years, from a healthy dietary pattern to a sustainable dietary pattern, in which nutrition, food, cultures, people, environment, and sustainability all interact into a new model of a sustainable diet. An overview of the historical antecedents and recent increased interest in the Mediterranean diet is presented and challenges related to how to improve the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet are ide...

  9. Mediterranean Diet and Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Selmin, Ornella I.

    2017-01-01

    A large body of research data suggests that traditional dietary habits and lifestyle unique to the Mediterranean region (Mediterranean diet, MD) lower the incidence of chronic diseases and improve longevity. These data contrast with troubling statistics in the United States and other high income countries pointing to an increase in the incidence of chronic diseases and the projected explosion in cost of medical care associated with an aging population. In 2013, the MD was inscribed by UNESCO in the “Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.” The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans included the MD as a healthy dietary pattern. Therefore, specific objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the nutritional basis of this healthful diet, its metabolic benefits, and its role in multiple aspects of disease prevention and healthy aging. Whereas recommendations about the MD often focus on specific foods or bioactive compounds, we suggest that the eating pattern as a whole likely contributes to the health promoting effects of the MD. PMID:29051674

  10. The Mediterranean and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets and colorectal cancer123

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Kana; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although the Mediterranean diet has been studied for cancer mortality and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet shares similarities with the Mediterranean diet, few studies have specifically examined these 2 diets and incident colorectal cancer.

  11. A study on the prevalence of adequacy of iron and vitamin C in children's diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Roseane Moreira Sampaio; Peixoto, Natasha Gabrille de Araujo; Pereira, Alessandra da Silva; Vieira, Cristiane Bastos Leta; Soares, Eliane Abreu; Lanzillotti, Haydée Serrão

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply methodological procedures to determine the prevalence of adequacy of Iron and vitamin C in children's diets. It was included 238 children aged 2 to 3 years enrolled in 2009 in 25 day care centers in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. Dietary intake was assessed by weighing the food and food record. Assessing the prevalence of nutrient adequacy took into consideration the individual and the group. The best estimate of the needs of the individual is given by the estimated average requirement (EAR), since we do not know the true needs of the individual who is being evaluated. To estimate the need of the group method was used EAR as the cutoff. The prevalence of adequacy of iron and vitamin C in children's diets was 91.2 and 62.2%, respectively. All necessary to achieve the method EAR as the cutoff were used, but became unviable the adjustment of the observed consumption data to estimate the distribution of usual intake in this group. We conclude that the study of probability of adequacy of habitual diet in iron and vitamin C in the age group in question was only possible with the use of procedures for the individual.

  12. A study on the prevalence of adequacy of Iron and Vitamin C in children's diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseane Moreira Sampaio Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to apply methodological procedures to determine the prevalence of adequacy of Iron and vitamin C in children's diets. It was included 238 children aged 2 to 3 years enrolled in 2009 in 25 day care centers in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. Dietary intake was assessed by weighing the food and food record. Assessing the prevalence of nutrient adequacy took into consideration the individual and the group. The best estimate of the needs of the individual is given by the estimated average requirement (EAR, since we do not know the true needs of the individual who is being evaluated. To estimate the need of the group method was used EAR as the cutoff. The prevalence of adequacy of iron and vitamin C in children's diets was 91.2 and 62.2%, respectively. All necessary to achieve the method EAR as the cutoff were used, but became unviable the adjustment of the observed consumption data to estimate the distribution of usual intake in this group. We conclude that the study of probability of adequacy of habitual diet in iron and vitamin C in the age group in question was only possible with the use of procedures for the individual.

  13. Globalisation and income growth promote the Mediterranean diet.

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    Regmi, Anita; Ballenger, Nicole; Putnam, Judy

    2004-10-01

    To examine global food demand patterns and how changing diets may stimulate demand for and trade of Mediterranean diet products. Literature review. Trends in global and US food consumption patterns are examined and trade data are reviewed to evaluate the impact of changing diets on trade of Mediterranean diet products. Market access issues are also addressed briefly to highlight the role of policy in the trade of Mediterranean diet products. Diets are shifting towards higher-value products such as meats, fruits and vegetables, and a wider array of packaged food products. Trade in these products has also grown in the past two decades, with several non-traditional importers and exporters becoming increasingly active in the global market. Income-driven demands for quality and variety are likely to increase the demand for Mediterranean diet products globally. While the middle-income countries appear to be the best growth prospects, the USA remains a potential growth market if these products can meet the growing consumer demand for variety, quality and convenience. Although consumer trends globally indicate growth in demand for Mediterranean diet products, the additional demand may not be reflected by a corresponding growth in trade. Trade in Mediterranean diet products continues to be hampered by higher than average trade barriers and high transportation costs for perishables.

  14. Effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Roman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Blanca Roman1, Laura Carta2, Miguel Ángel Martínez-González3, Lluís Serra-Majem41Mediterranean Diet Foundation, University of Barcelona Science Park, Spain; 2Department of Biosystems and Applied Sciences, Unit of Physiology and Human Nutrition, University of Cagliari, Italy; 3Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Navarra, Spain; 4Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, SpainAbstract: The Mediterranean diet is known to be one of the healthiest dietary patterns in the world due to its relation with a low morbidity and mortality for some chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to review literature regarding the relationship between Mediterranean diet and healthy aging. A MEDLINE search was conducted looking for literature regarding the relationship between Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular disease (or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental health and longevity and quality of life in the elderly population (65 years or older. A selection of 36 articles met the criteria of selection. Twenty of the studies were about Mediterranean diets and cardiovascular disease, 2 about Mediterranean diets and cancer, 3 about Mediterranean diets and mental health and 11 about longevity (overall survival or mental health. The results showed that Mediterranean diets had benefits on risks factors for cardiovascular disease such as lipoprotein levels, endothelium vasodilatation, insulin resistance, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, antioxidant capacity, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular mortality. Some positive associations with quality of life and inverse associations with the risk of certain cancers and with overall mortality were also reported.Keywords: Mediterranean diet, elderly, health, review

  15. The Mediterranean Diet and ADHD in Children and Adolescents.

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    Ríos-Hernández, Alejandra; Alda, José A; Farran-Codina, Andreu; Ferreira-García, Estrella; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been related to nutrient deficiencies and "unhealthy" diets, to date there are no studies that examined the relationship between the Mediterranean diet and ADHD. We hypothesized that a low adherence to a Mediterranean diet would be positively associated with an increase in ADHD diagnosis. A total of 120 children and adolescents (60 with newly diagnosed ADHD and 60 controls) were studied in a sex- and age-matched case-control study. ADHD diagnosis was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Energy, dietary intake, adherence to a Mediterranean diet, and familial background were measured. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between the adherence to a Mediterranean diet and ADHD. Lower adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with ADHD diagnosis (odds ratio: 7.07; 95% confidence interval: 2.65-18.84; relative risk: 2.80; 95% confidence interval: 1.54-5.25). Both remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders. Lower frequency of consuming fruit, vegetables, pasta, and rice and higher frequency of skipping breakfast and eating at fast-food restaurants were associated with ADHD diagnosis (P Mediterranean diet might play a role in ADHD development. Our data support the notion that not only "specific nutrients" but also the "whole diet" should be considered in ADHD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet.

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    Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Covas, Maria-Isabel; Corella, Dolores; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa Maria; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Basora, Josep; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Sorlí, José V; Martínez, José Alfredo; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel

    2013-04-04

    Observational cohort studies and a secondary prevention trial have shown an inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk. We conducted a randomized trial of this diet pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. In a multicenter trial in Spain, we randomly assigned participants who were at high cardiovascular risk, but with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment, to one of three diets: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Participants received quarterly individual and group educational sessions and, depending on group assignment, free provision of extra-virgin olive oil, mixed nuts, or small nonfood gifts. The primary end point was the rate of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes). On the basis of the results of an interim analysis, the trial was stopped after a median follow-up of 4.8 years. A total of 7447 persons were enrolled (age range, 55 to 80 years); 57% were women. The two Mediterranean-diet groups had good adherence to the intervention, according to self-reported intake and biomarker analyses. A primary end-point event occurred in 288 participants. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.92) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96) for the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil (96 events) and the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with nuts (83 events), respectively, versus the control group (109 events). No diet-related adverse effects were reported. Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events. (Funded by the Spanish government's Instituto de Salud Carlos III and others; Controlled-Trials.com number, ISRCTN35739639.).

  17. Mediterranean diet and cognitive function in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Féart, Catherine; Samieri, Cécilia; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    International audience; PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing the prevalence of cardiovascular and chronic diseases has been largely evidenced. Although nutrition constitutes an interesting approach in preventing age-related brain disorders, the association between the Mediterranean-style diet and cognitive functions has been very occasionally explored. RECENT FINDINGS: Results are provided from only two recent prospective cohorts of older Americans and Fr...

  18. Mediterranean diet adherence in the Mediterranean healthy eating, aging and lifestyle (MEAL) study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marventano, Stefano; Godos, Justyna; Platania, Alessio; Galvano, Fabio; Mistretta, Antonio; Grosso, Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    A decline in adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern has been observed over the last years. The aim of this study was to assess the level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and possible determinants in the Mediterranean healthy Eating, Aging and Lifestyle (MEAL) study cohort. Demographic and dietary data of 1937 individuals were collected in 2014-2015 from the general population of Catania, Sicily (Italy). Food frequency questionnaires and the MEDI-LITE score were used to assess adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The score well characterised consumption of major food groups, micro- and macro-nutrients. The cohort had a general good adherence, but only a minority was highly adherent. High adherence was directly associated with education, non-smoking and physical activity and inversely with high occupational status. In conclusions, Mediterranean diet is still followed in Sicily; however, nutrition education campaigns should promote healthy traditional dietary patterns in certain groups of individuals.

  19. Household food security and adequacy of child diet in the food insecure region north in Ghana.

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    Pascal Agbadi

    Full Text Available Adequate diet is of crucial importance for healthy child development. In food insecure areas of the world, the provision of adequate child diet is threatened in the many households that sometimes experience having no food at all to eat (household food insecurity. In the context of food insecure northern Ghana, this study investigated the relationship between level of household food security and achievement of recommended child diet as measured by WHO Infant and Young Child Feeding Indicators.Using data from households and 6-23 month old children in the 2012 Feed the Future baseline survey (n = 871, descriptive analyses assessed the prevalence of minimum meal frequency; minimum dietary diversity, and minimum acceptable diet. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of minimum acceptable diet with household food security, while accounting for the effects of child sex and age, maternal -age, -dietary diversity, -literacy and -education, household size, region, and urban-rural setting. Household food security was assessed with the Household Hunger Scale developed by USAID's Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project.Forty-nine percent of children received minimum recommended meal frequency, 31% received minimum dietary diversity, and 17% of the children received minimum acceptable diet. Sixty-four percent of the children lived in food secure households, and they were significantly more likely than children in food insecure households to receive recommended minimum acceptable diet [O.R = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.82]. However, in 80% of food secure households, children did not receive a minimal acceptable diet by WHO standards.Children living in food secure households were more likely than others to receive a minimum acceptable diet. Yet living in a food secure household was no guarantee of child dietary adequacy, since eight of 10 children in food secure households received less than a minimum acceptable diet. The results

  20. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality

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    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. Objectives To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. Methods A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. Results Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (±3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence fertile, those at the middle fertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years’ longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest fertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years’ longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusion Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose–response effect. PMID:17846408

  1. [Role of Mediterranean diet on the prevention of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Arnoldo; Gómez-Gaete, Carolina; Mennickent, Sigrid

    2017-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity are possible risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and these can be modified by physical activity and changes in dietary patterns, such as switching to a Mediterranean diet. This diet includes fruits, vegetables, olive oil, fish and moderate wine intake. These foods provide vitamins, polyphenols and unsaturated fatty acids. This diet should be able to reduce oxidative stress. The inflammatory response is also reduced by unsaturated fatty acids, resulting in a lower expression and a lower production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The Cardiovascular protection is related to the actions of polyphenols and unsaturated fatty acids on the vascular endothelium. The Mediterranean diet also can improve cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. These beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet should have a role in Alzheimer’s disease prevention.

  2. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Micah G; Selmin, Ornella I; Doetschman, Tom C; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern.

  3. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micah G. Donovan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern.

  4. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Micah G.; Selmin, Ornella I.; Doetschman, Tom C.; Romagnolo, Donato F.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern. PMID:29259973

  5. Mediterranean diet: from a healthy diet to a sustainable dietary pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eDernini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion of the Mediterranean Diet has undergone a progressive evolution over the past 60 years, from a healthy dietary pattern to a sustainable dietary pattern, in which nutrition, food, cultures, people, environment and sustainability all interact into a new model of a sustainable diet. An overview of the historical antecedents and recent increased interest in the Mediterranean diet is presented and challenges related how to improve the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet are identified. Despite its increasing popularity worldwide, adherence to the Mediterranean diet model is decreasing for multifactorial influences – life styles changes, food globalization, economic and socio-cultural factors. These changes pose serious threats to the preservation and transmission of the Mediterranean diet heritage to present and future generations. Today’s challenge is to reverse such trends. A greater focus on the Mediterranean diet's potential as a sustainable dietary pattern, instead than just on its well documented healthy benefits, can contribute to its enhancement. More cross-disciplinary studies on environmental, economic and socio-cultural, sustainability dimensions of the Mediterranean diet are foreseen as a critical need.

  6. Mediterranean Diet: From a Healthy Diet to a Sustainable Dietary Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernini, Sandro; Berry, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    The notion of the Mediterranean diet has undergone a progressive evolution over the past 60 years, from a healthy dietary pattern to a sustainable dietary pattern, in which nutrition, food, cultures, people, environment, and sustainability all interact into a new model of a sustainable diet. An overview of the historical antecedents and recent increased interest in the Mediterranean diet is presented and challenges related to how to improve the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet are identified. Despite its increasing popularity worldwide, adherence to the Mediterranean diet model is decreasing for multifactorial influences - life styles changes, food globalization, economic, and socio-cultural factors. These changes pose serious threats to the preservation and transmission of the Mediterranean diet heritage to present and future generations. Today's challenge is to reverse such trends. A greater focus on the Mediterranean diet's potential as a sustainable dietary pattern, instead than just on its well-documented healthy benefits, can contribute to its enhancement. More cross-disciplinary studies on environmental, economic and socio-cultural, and sustainability dimensions of the Mediterranean diet are foreseen as a critical need.

  7. The Mediterranean diet, its components, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, R Jay; Flammer, Andreas J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-03-01

    One of the best-studied diets for cardiovascular health is the Mediterranean diet. This consists of fish, monounsaturated fats from olive oil, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes/nuts, and moderate alcohol consumption. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce the burden, or even prevent the development, of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, depression, colorectal cancer, diabetes, obesity, asthma, erectile dysfunction, and cognitive decline. This diet is also known to improve surrogates of cardiovascular disease, such as waist-to-hip ratio, lipids, and markers of inflammation, as well as primary cardiovascular disease outcomes such as death and events in both observational and randomized controlled trial data. These enhancements easily rival those seen with more established tools used to fight cardiovascular disease such as aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and exercise. However, it is unclear if the Mediterranean diet offers cardiovascular disease benefit from its individual constituents or in aggregate. Furthermore, the potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet or its components is not yet validated by concrete cardiovascular disease endpoints in randomized trials or observational studies. This review will focus on the effects of the whole and parts of the Mediterranean diet with regard to both population-based and experimental data highlighting cardiovascular disease morbidity or mortality and cardiovascular disease surrogates when hard outcomes are not available. Our synthesis will highlight the potential for the Mediterranean diet to act as a key player in cardiovascular disease prevention, and attempt to identify certain aspects of the diet that are particularly beneficial for cardioprotection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and Mediterranean diet: Impact on depression outcome.

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    García-Toro, M; Vicens-Pons, E; Gili, M; Roca, M; Serrano-Ripoll, M J; Vives, M; Leiva, A; Yáñez, A M; Bennasar-Veny, M; Oliván-Blázquez, B

    2016-04-01

    Obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and low adherence to Mediterranean diet are frequent in major depression patients and have been separately related with prognosis. The aim of this study is to analyse their predictive power on major depression outcome, at 6 and 12 months. 273 Major depressive patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory for depressive symptoms and the 14-item Mediterranean diet adherence score. MetS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). At the baseline Mediterranean diet adherence was inversely associated with depressive symptoms (p=0.007). Depression response was more likely in those patients with normal weight (p=0.006) and not MetS (p=0.013) but it was not associated with Mediterranean diet adherence (p=0.625). Those patients with MetS and obesity were less likely to improve symptoms of depression than patients with obesity but not MetS. Obesity and MetS, but not low adherence to the Mediterranean diet at baseline, predicted a poor outcome of depression at 12 months. Our study suggests that MetS is the key factor that impacts negatively in depression prognosis, rather than obesity or diet. If this finding is confirmed, clinicians should be aware about MetS diagnosis and treatment in overweight depressed patients, especially if outcome is not being satisfactory enough. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mediterranean diet in the southern Croatia - does it still exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolčić, Ivana; Relja, Ajka; Gelemanović, Andrea; Miljković, Ana; Boban, Kristina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Polašek, Ozren

    2016-10-31

    To assess the adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the population of Dalmatia in southern Croatia. A cross-sectional study was performed within the 10001 Dalmatians cohort, encompassing 2768 participants from Korčula and Vis islands and the City of Split, who were recruited during 2011-2014. Using the data obtained from food frequency questionnaire we calculated the Mediterranean Diet Serving Score (MDSS). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the characteristics associated with the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, with age, sex, place of residence, education attainment, smoking, and physical activity as covariates. The median MDSS score was 11 out of maximum 24 points (interquartile range 8-13), with the highest score recorded on the island of Vis. Participants reported a dietary pattern that had high compliance with the Mediterranean diet guidelines for consumption of cereals (87% met the criteria), potatoes (73%), olive oil (69%), and fish (61%), moderate for consumption of fruit (54%) and vegetables (31%), and low for consumption of nuts (6%). Overall, only 23% of the participants were classified as being adherent to the Mediterranean diet, with a particularly low percentage among younger participants (12%) compared to the older ones (34%). Men were less likely to show good adherence (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.42-0.65). This study revealed rather poor compliance with the current recommendations on the Mediterranean diet composition in the population of Dalmatia. Public health intervention is especially needed in younger age groups and in men, who show the greatest departure from traditional Mediterranean diet and lifestyle.

  10. Adherence to Mediterranean diet in a sample of Tuscan adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santomauro, Francesca; Lorini, Chiara; Tanini, Tommaso; Indiani, Laura; Lastrucci, Vieri; Comodo, Nicola; Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet in a group of Italian high school students, in relation to their lifestyles and social and family contexts, and to compare the nutrition habits of the sample with other similar groups. The KIDMED index and an ad hoc questionnaire were administered to 1127 students (mean age 16.8 ± 1.6 y) in the province of Florence. Any significant associations between the level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the aforementioned variables were assessed by the χ(2) test and by logistic regression analysis. The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was good in 16.5%, average in 60.5%, and poor in 23% of the students. The students attending technical high schools, those who played sports less than "almost every day", those who spent >3 h/d in sedentary activities, those who defined their school performance as worse than "more than sufficient," and those who referred to use of a car/moped as the most frequent mode of transportation, had significantly higher odds of poor rather than average or good adherence to Mediterranean diet. Moreover, being normal weight or overweight/obese, and referring to health workers as source of information on diet, seem to be protective factors against poor adherence to Mediterranean diet. Our sample presents a departure from the Mediterranean dietary pattern. It is certainly necessary to implement public health policies targeting teenagers to promote healthier lifestyle choices; the nutritional patterns of the Mediterranean diet should be among these choices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The anticancer and antiobesity effects of Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiuqiong; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-02

    Cancers have been the leading cause of death worldwide and the prevalence of obesity is also increasing in these few decades. Interestingly, there is a direct association between cancer and obesity. Each year, more than 90,000 cancer deaths are caused by obesity or overweight. The dietary pattern in Crete, referred as the traditional Mediterranean diet, is believed to confer Crete people the low mortality rates from cancers. Nevertheless, the antiobesity effect of the Mediterranean diet is less studied. Given the causal relationship between obesity and cancer, the antiobesity effect of traditional Mediterranean diet might contribute to its anticancer effects. In this regard, we will critically review the anticancer and antiobesity effects of this diet and its dietary factors. The possible mechanisms underlying these effects will also be discussed.

  12. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Inflammatory Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Julibert, Alicia; Bouzas, Cristina; Argelich, Emma; Llompart, Isabel; Pons, Antoni; Tur, Josep A

    2018-01-10

    The aim was to assess inflammatory markers among adults and adolescents in relation to the adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A random sample (219 males and 379 females) of the Balearic Islands population (12-65 years) was anthropometrically measured and provided a blood sample to determine biomarkers of inflammation. Dietary habits were assessed and the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern calculated. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased with age in both sexes. The adherence to the Mediterranean diet in adolescent males was 51.3% and 45.7% in adults, whereas in females 53.1% and 44.3%, respectively. In males, higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with higher levels of adiponectin and lower levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in adults, but not in young subjects. In females, higher adherence was associated with lower levels of leptin in the young group, PAI-1 in adults and hs-CRP in both groups. With increasing age in both sexes, metabolic syndrome increases, but the adherence to the Mediterranean diet decreases. Low adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP) is directly associated with a worse profile of plasmatic inflammation markers.

  13. Mediterranean Diet: From a Healthy Diet to a Sustainable Dietary Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernini, Sandro; Berry, Elliot M.

    2015-01-01

    The notion of the Mediterranean diet has undergone a progressive evolution over the past 60 years, from a healthy dietary pattern to a sustainable dietary pattern, in which nutrition, food, cultures, people, environment, and sustainability all interact into a new model of a sustainable diet. An overview of the historical antecedents and recent increased interest in the Mediterranean diet is presented and challenges related to how to improve the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet are identified. Despite its increasing popularity worldwide, adherence to the Mediterranean diet model is decreasing for multifactorial influences – life styles changes, food globalization, economic, and socio-cultural factors. These changes pose serious threats to the preservation and transmission of the Mediterranean diet heritage to present and future generations. Today’s challenge is to reverse such trends. A greater focus on the Mediterranean diet’s potential as a sustainable dietary pattern, instead than just on its well-documented healthy benefits, can contribute to its enhancement. More cross-disciplinary studies on environmental, economic and socio-cultural, and sustainability dimensions of the Mediterranean diet are foreseen as a critical need. PMID:26284249

  14. Evaluating the Water Footprint of the Mediterranean and American Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Blas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Global food demand is increasing rapidly as a result of multiple drivers including population growth, dietary shifts and economic development. Meeting the rising global food demand will require expanding agricultural production and promoting healthier and more sustainable diets. The goal of this paper is to assess and compare the water footprint (WF of two recommended diets (Mediterranean and American, and evaluate the water savings of possible dietary shifts in two countries: Spain and the United States (US. Our results show that the American diet has a 29% higher WF in comparison with the Mediterranean, regardless of products’ origin. In the US, a shift to a Mediterranean diet would decrease the WF by 1629 L/person/day. Meanwhile, a shift towards an American diet in Spain will increase the WF by 1504 L/person/day. The largest share of the WF of both diets is always linked to green water (62%–75%. Grey water in the US is 67% higher in comparison with Spain. Only five products account for 36%–46% of the total WF of the two dietary options in both countries, being meat, oil and dairy products the food items with the largest WFs. Our study demonstrates that adopting diets based on a greater consumption of vegetables, fruits and fish, like the Mediterranean one, leads to major water savings.

  15. Water consumption related to different diets in Mediterranean cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, D; Del Pozo, S; Pekcan, A G; Keinan-Boker, L; Trichopoulou, A; Gawlik, B M

    2016-12-15

    Providing the sustainable development goals (SDGs) water, food and energy security to cities relies strongly on resource use outside city borders. Many modern cities have recently invested in a sustainable urban water system, and score high in international city rankings regarding water management and direct urban water use. However, these rankings generally neglect external resource use for cities. Here we quantify the water resources related to food consumption in thirteen cities located in Mediterranean countries, by means of the water footprint (WF) concept. These WFs amount from 3277l per capita per day (l/cap/d) to 5789l/cap/d. These amounts are about thirty times higher than their direct urban water use. We additionally analyse the WF of three diet scenarios, based upon a Mediterranean dietary pattern. Many authors identify the Mediterranean diet as cultural heritage, being beneficial for human health and a model for a sustainable food system. The first diet scenario, a healthy Mediterranean diet including meat, leads to WF reductions of -19% to -43%. The second diet scenario (pesco-vegetarian), leads to WF reductions of -28% to -52%. The third diet scenario (vegetarian), leads to WF reductions of -30% to -53%. In other words, if urban citizens want to save water, they need to look at their diets. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritional Adequacy and Diet Quality in Colorectal Cancer Patients Postsurgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria-Lertxundi, Iker; Alvarez, Maider; Rocandio, Ana M; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Arroyo-Izaga, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that an unhealthy diet is associated with a higher risk of tumor recurrence, metastasis, and death among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The aims of this study were to assess nutritional adequacy and diet quality in a group of CRC patients postsurgery and to identify possible associations between dietary and nutritional aspects and environmental factors and weight status. This was an observational study conducted on a random sample of 74 patients, aged 50-69 years. Dietary intake was evaluated utilizing a validated frequency questionnaire, and diet quality was evaluated utilizing the Healthy Eating Index for Spanish Diet and the MedDietScore. Data regarding socioeconomic, demographic, lifestyles, dietary supplements use, and body mass index were collected. Subjects followed a diet characterized by a low carbohydrate intake (94% of the cases), excessive protein (48%), high fat intake (67%), and some micronutrient deficiencies. The inadequacy of some nutrients was associated with male gender, overweight/obesity, smoking, and low educational level; and low adherence to the MedDiet was identified in those with a low educational level (adjusted odds ratio = 4.16, P nutritional advice to improve their quality of life.

  17. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country

    OpenAIRE

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-01

    Background Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Discussion Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expen...

  18. Mediterranean diet of Crete: foods and nutrient content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, A; Verhagen, H; Moschandreas, J; Apostolaki, I; Van Westerop, J J

    2000-12-01

    To describe the traditional diet of Crete and evaluate the nutrient composition of 3 types of diet common in Crete by means of chemical analyses of composite food samples. To compare results with dietary analyses from a nutrient database developed at the University of Crete, Greece. Three composite diet samples were obtained based on 7-day weighed food records representing the traditional Cretan Mediterranean diet (diet A), typical diet of present-day Greek adolescents (diet B), and fasting diet of the Eastern Orthodox church (diet C). Analyses were performed chemically and using a nutrient database. Chemical analyses provided a definitive measure, for the first time, of the nutrient composition of the complete Greek diet as it was in the early 1960s. In comparing chemical analyses with nutrient database analyses, differences greater than 15% of the analyzed value were found in all 3 diets for cholesterol and some vitamins. The differences between analyzed and calculated values in total fat and saturated fat content were less than 15% in all diets. The present study provides 2 practical examples of the Mediterranean diet, which although widely publicized has rarely been analyzed chemically. Diet A has been shown to be related to the lowest rates for coronary heart disease and cancer mortality compared with the diets of the other populations of the Seven Countries study. As such, it could be recommended for health promotion and prevention of disease. Diet C contains even lower amounts of saturated fatty acids and would be excellent for patients with hypercholesterolemia. The high antioxidants in diet C probably maintain very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Dietary analyses of the Greek diet could be based on an operational database such as ours if further chemical analyses are performed on specific foods. These would result in improved precision of the database and possible extension into national food composition tables and a national dietary

  19. Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: The Viva La Familia Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of diet quality and nutrient adequacy in the etiology of childhood obesity is poorly understood. The specific aims of these analyses were to assess overall diet quality and nutrient adequacy, and test for association between weight status and diet in children from low socioeconomic status (...

  20. Mediterranean diet and inflammaging within the hormesis paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Morena; Ostan, Rita; Biondi, Fiammetta; Bellavista, Elena; Fabbri, Cristina; Bertarelli, Claudia; Salvioli, Stefano; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Santoro, Aurelia

    2017-06-01

    A coherent set of epidemiological data shows that the Mediterranean diet has beneficial effects capable of preventing a variety of age-related diseases in which low-grade, chronic inflammation/inflammaging plays a major role, but the underpinning mechanism(s) is/are still unclear. It is suggested here that the Mediterranean diet can be conceptualized as a form of chronic hormetic stress, similar to what has been proposed regarding calorie restriction, the most thoroughly studied nutritional intervention. Data on the presence in key Mediterranean foods of a variety of compounds capable of exerting hormetic effects are summarized, and the mechanistic role of the nuclear factor erythroid 2 pathway is highlighted. Within this conceptual framework, particular attention has been devoted to the neurohormetic and neuroprotective properties of the Mediterranean diet, as well as to its ability to maintain an optimal balance between pro- and anti-inflammaging. Finally, the European Commission-funded project NU-AGE is discussed because it addresses a number of variables not commonly taken into consideration, such as age, sex, and ethnicity/genetics, that can modulate the hormetic effect of the Mediterranean diet. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  1. Does the MIND diet decrease depression risk? A comparison with Mediterranean diet in the SUN cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresán, Ujué; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Segovia-Siapco, Gina; Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Lahortiga, Francisca; de la Rosa, Pedro-Antonio; Martínez-Gonzalez, Miguel-Angel

    2018-03-07

    To prospectively evaluate the association of the Mediterranean-DASH diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet and the Mediterranean diet (and their components), and depression risk. We followed-up (median 10.4 years) 15,980 adults initially free of depression at baseline or in the first 2 years of follow-up. Food consumption was measured at baseline through a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and was used to compute adherence to the MIND and the Mediterranean diets. Relationships between these two diets and incident depression were assessed through Cox regression models. We identified 666 cases of incident depression. Comparing the highest versus the lowest quartiles of adherence, we found no association of the MIND diet and incident depression. This relation was statistically significant for the Mediterranean diet {hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61, 0.94]; p Mediterranean diet was associated with reduced depression risk, but we found no evidence of such an association for the MIND diet.

  2. The diet quality index evaluates the adequacy of energy provided by dietary macronutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline MENDES

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between macronutrient intake adequacy and the national diet quality index score. Methods The study analyzed a representative sample of 1,662 individuals from the municipality of São Paulo who participated in a cross-sectional study called Health Survey-Capital (2008/2009. Two 24-hour recalls were collected. Habitual intake was determined by the Multiple Source Method. The Brazilian index was calculated as suggested, and macronutrient adequacy was given by the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization recommendations. A generalized linear model verified the relationship between the Brazilian index and macronutrient adequacy. All analyses with a descriptive level below 0.05 were considered significant. The analyses were performed by the software Stata 12.0, survey mode. Results The vast majority (91% of the population had inappropriate macronutrient intakes, and the total median Brazilian index score was 61.3 points (interquartile range=10.1. The total Brazilian index score of individuals with high lipid intake was worse than that of individuals with proper lipid intake (β=0,96; p=0,004, while those with high protein intake had a better score (β=1,10; p=0,003 than those with proper protein intake. Conclusion The revised Brazilian Healthy Eating Index assesses diet quality properly regarding high lipid intake, but it has some limitations regarding high protein intake according to the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization recommendations. New studies should investigate the possibility of adapting this index to the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization recommendations.

  3. Use of quality control indices in moderately hypocaloric Mediterranean diet for treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, A; Petroni, M L; De Luca, P P; Andreoli, A; Morini, P; Iacopino, L; Innocente, I; Perriello, G

    2001-08-01

    A large number of studies have been published on very-low calorie diets and markedly hypocaloric dietary regimens for treatment of obesity. However, scanty data are available on moderately hypocaloric diets based on the Mediterranean diet model. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a moderately hypocaloric Mediterranean diet (MHMD) by assessing changes in body composition and in metabolic profile in 19 obese women, aged 32+/-4 years, body weight 84.7+/-9.6 kg, body mass index (BMI) 33.67+/-2.61 kg/m2. The energy content of the diet (mean 6.5 MJ/day) matched the resting metabolic rate and its content in macronutrients (55% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 20% protein, 30 g fibre) was based on the Italian Recommended Dietary Allowances (LARN). Based on the Mediterranean diet model, available nutritional indices like the animal/vegetable protein ratio, the Cholesterol/Saturated Fat Index, the Glycaemic Index, the Atherogenic Index, the Thrombogenic Index and the Mediterranean Adequacy Index were taken into account in elaborating diets. At baseline and after 2 months, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, metabolic profile, uric acid, fibrinogen and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were assessed. Following MHMD, body weight decreased to 78.1+/-10.5 kg and BMI to 31.18+/-2.74 kg/m2. Total (-4.9+/-0.9 kg) and segmental fat mass decreased, no significant loss of total and segmental lean body mass was observed. No decrease of fasting blood glucose (5.05+/-0.45 vs 4.98+/-0.43 mmol/l, NS), of the area under the curve (AUC) for glucose (29.50+/-6.24 vs 28.07+/-5.29, NS) as well as of HDL-cholesterol (1.30+/-0.30 vs 1.33+/-0.33 mmol/l, NS) and of triglycerides (1.70+/-1.00 vs 1.46+/-0.66 mmol/l, NS) was observed. However, a significant decrease of basal insulin (11.48+/-6.77 vs 8.07+/-4.17 mU/ml, ploss of fat-free mass and improves metabolic parameters in obese people. We advocate a wider use of nutritional indices and body composition assessment as tools for

  4. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between polyphenol intake and adherence to the Mediterranean diet in Sicily, southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Godos

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Mean polyphenol intake was higher in individuals more adherent to the Mediterranean diet compared to less adherent. However, dietary sources of polyphenols not included in the traditional foods comprised in the Mediterranean diet may contribute to total and specific classes of polyphenols irrespectively of their inclusion within the context of the Mediterranean diet.

  6. Mediterranean diet and colorectal cancer risk: results from a European cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bamia, C.; Lagiou, P.; Buckland, G.; Grioni, S.; Agnoli, C.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the association of adherence to Mediterranean diet with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition study. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was expressed through two 10-unit scales, the Modified Mediterranean diet score

  7. Mediterranean diet adherence and body composition among Southern Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Antonio; Marventano, Stefano; Antoci, Mariagrazia; Cagnetti, Antonella; Giogianni, Gabriele; Nolfo, Francesca; Rametta, Stefania; Pecora, Giulia; Marranzano, Marina

    Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet has been associated with health benefits in young populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardio-metabolic parameters in adolescents living in Sicily, Southern Italy. A cross-sectional study was conducted during two school years (2012-2013 and 2013-2014) on 1643 adolescents of 11-16 years attending 15 secondary schools. Socio-demographic, dietary, lifestyle, and anthropometric data were collected. The KIDMED score was used to evaluate the adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test the association between the variable of interest and the outcomes. A higher percentage of boys compared with girls was overweight (30.8% vs. 25.4%) and obese (28.7% vs. 18.5%) and only 9.1% had high adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Vegetable intake was negatively associated with being overweight/obese whereas higher intake of sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and fast foods was associated with overweight and obesity. A good adherence to the Mediterranean diet resulted in 30% decreased odds of being overweight or obese (odd ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval: 0.56-0.87) in both boys and girls. An inverse correlation was found between KIDMED score and BMI, waist circumference and fat mass. No relation with blood pressure was found. Mediterranean dietary pattern resulted significantly associated with weight status in adolescents. These results underline the importance of providing lifestyle and dietary habits education to prevent overweight and obesity in adolescent. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Benefits of the Mediterranean diet beyond the Mediterranean Sea and beyond food patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2016-10-14

    Abundant and growing evidence has accrued to demonstrate that the traditional Mediterranean diet is likely to be the ideal dietary pattern for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. A landmark randomized trial (PREDIMED) together with many well-conducted long-term observational prospective cohort studies support this causal effect.A new, large British cohort study by Tong et al. assessing the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular disease was recently published in BMC Medicine. Using a superb methodology, they followed-up 23,902 participants for 12.2 years on average and observed several thousand incident cases.The results of this cohort study showed a significant beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet on cardiovascular events. These findings support the transferability of this dietary pattern beyond the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. The authors provided measures of population impact in cardiovascular prevention and estimated that 19,375 cases of cardiovascular death would be prevented each year in the UK by promoting the Mediterranean Diet.Please see related article: http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0677-4 .

  9. The Middle Eastern and biblical origins of the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elliot M; Arnoni, Yardena; Aviram, Michael

    2011-12-01

    To place the Mediterranean diet (MedDi) in the context of the cultural history of the Middle East and emphasise the health effects of some of the biblical seven species - wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives and date honey. Review of the literature concerning the benefits of these foods. Middle East and Mediterranean Basin. Mediterranean populations and clinical studies utilising the MedDi. The MedDi has been associated with lower rates of CVD, and epidemiological evidence promotes the benefits of consuming fruit and vegetables. Recommended foods for optimal health include whole grain, fish, wine, pomegranates, figs, walnuts and extra virgin olive oil. The biblical traditional diet, including the seven species and additional Mediterranean fruits, has great health advantages, especially for CVD. In addition to the diet, lifestyle adaptation that involves increasing physical activity and organised meals, together with healthy food choices, is consistent with the traditional MedDi. The MedDi is a manageable, lifestyle-friendly diet that, when fortified with its biblical antecedent attributes, may prove to be even more enjoyable and considerably healthier in combating the obesogenic environment and in decreasing the risks of the non-communicable diseases of modern life than conventional, modern dietary recommendations. The biblical seven species, together with other indigenous foods from the Middle East, are now scientifically recognised as healthy foods, and further improve the many beneficial effects of the MedDi.

  10. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D'Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-31

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or "sick fat" formation.The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity.

  11. The Mediterranean diet: the reasons for a success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Iacoviello, Licia; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Moli-Sani Investigators

    2012-03-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence linking Mediterranean Diet to cardiovascular risk reduction and prevention of the major chronic diseases. Nevertheless Mediterranean societies are rapidly withdrawing from this eating pattern orienting their food choices toward products typical of the Western diet pattern, which is rich in refined grains, animal fats, sugars, processed meat but are quite poor in legumes, cereals, fruits and vegetables. The reasons people keep on shifting from healthy to unhealthy dietary habits remain open to several interpretations. Social changes appear to have consistently contributed to radical reversal in dietary habits in European Mediterranean societies even though developing Countries are somewhat turning into westernized diets as well. Among possible causes, increasing prices of some of the major food items of Mediterranean pyramid seem to have led people to give up this eating pattern in favor of less expensive products which allow to save money but are definitively unhealthy. Many studies suggest that diet quality follows a socio-economic gradient highlighting how disadvantaged people present higher rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer. Recent studies have shown a linear relationship between food cost and adherence to eating patterns and obesity. In addition to financial crisis, during the last decades the Mediterranean Diet has been put on the spot because of its alcohol -in- moderation component. Does it make any sense to blame a whole philosophy, which turned out to have beneficial effects on human health, just because, in some Countries, there is a misuse of alcoholic beverages? Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mediterranean diet for type 2 diabetes: cardiometabolic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Giugliano, Dario

    2017-04-01

    Dietary patterns influence various cardiometabolic risk factors, including body weight, lipoprotein concentrations, and function, blood pressure, glucose-insulin homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial health. The Mediterranean diet can be described as a dietary pattern characterized by the high consumption of plant-based foods, olive oil as the main source of fat, low-to-moderate consumption of fish, dairy products and poultry, low consumption of red and processed meat, and low-to-moderate consumption of wine with meals. The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while the results of randomized controlled trials show that Mediterranean diet reduces glycosylated hemoglobin levels by 0.30-0.47 %, and is also associated with a 28-30 % reduced risk for cardiovascular events. The mechanisms by which Mediterranean diet produces its cardiometabolic benefits in type 2 diabetes are, for the most, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative: increased consumption of high-quality foods may cool down the activation of the innate immune system, by reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing that of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may favor the generation of an anti-inflammatory milieu, which in turn may improve insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and endothelial function at the vascular level and ultimately act as a barrier to the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and development of atherosclerosis.

  13. Diets based on soybean protein for Mediterranean fruit fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrinho, Raimundo Braga [Embrapa Agroindustria Tropical, Rua Dra. Sara Mesquita, 2270, CEP 60511-110 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)]. E-mail: braga@cnpat.embrapa.br; Caceres, Carlos; Islam, Amirul; Wornoayporn, Vivat [Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)]. E-mail: C.Caceres@iaea.org; Enkerlin, Walter [Insect Pest Control Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: W.Enkerlin@iaea.org

    2006-04-15

    The objective of this work was to develop suitable and economic diets for mass rearing Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae). Diets containing sugar beet bagasse, wheat bran, brewer yeast, and others with wheat bran and palletized soybean protein from Brazil were tested. Diets based on soybean protein have shown promising results regarding pupal recovery, pupal weight and adult emergence. Soybean bagasse in the form of pellets with 60% of protein can be a very important substitute for other expensive sources of protein. (author)

  14. Adherence to Mediterranean diet in a Spanish university population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Meseguer, María José; Burriel, Faustino Cervera; García, Cruz Vico; Serrano-Urrea, Ramón

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize food habits of Spanish University students and to assess the quality of their diet and some possible determinant factors according to Mediterranean food pattern among other indices. Two hundred eighty-four enrolled students during the academic year 2012-2013 participated in this survey. For each individual a questionnaire involving anthropometric measurements, types of housing, smoking habits and levels of physical activity were self-reported. Food consumption was gathered by two nonconsecutive 24 hour recalls including one weekend day. BMI within the normal range was showed by 72.5% of students and 75% of the sample reflected a sedentary lifestyle or low physical activity. The percentage of total energy from each macronutrient was approximately 17% proteins, 40% carbohydrates and 40% lipids. The ratio of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated fat only reached 0.32. Cholesterol consumption in men exceeded the intake in women by 70 mg/day but nutritional objectives were exceeded in both genders. The main source of protein had an animal origin from meat (38.1%), followed by cereals (19.4%) and dairy products (15.6%). The assessment of diet quality conducted by Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) revealed a low-intermediate score in both (51.2 ± 12.8 and 4.0 ± 1.5, respectively). The main deviations from Mediterranean pattern were a low intake of vegetables and fruit and a high consumption of meat and dairy products. According to HEI classification, 96.1% of subjects scored "poor" or "needs improvement" about the quality of their diet and only 5.3% of students achieved a high adherence to Mediterranean diet. It is necessary to foster changes toward a healthier diet pattern according to cultural context in this population for preventing cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mediterranean diet and colorectal cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinetti, Alberto; Zurlo, Valeria; Manenti, Antonio; Coppi, Francesca; Mattioli, Anna Vittoria

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, especially in developed countries where an estimated 60% of all cases occur. There is evidence of a higher risk for CRC in Western society, where people tend to eat more red and processed meat than those living along the Mediterranean coast, who have a decreased overall cancer mortality, which is correlated to their eating habits, such as Mediterranean diet. The aim of this review was to evaluate the correlation between three components of the Mediterranean diet (olive oil, red wine, and tomatoes) and incidence and progression of colorectal cancer. As such, we conducted a literature search using keywords "colorectal cancer," "dietary pattern," "Mediterranean diet," "olive oil," "protective effects," "resveratrol," and "lycopene." Olive oil polyphenols, red wine resveratrol, and tomato lycopene showed several characteristics in vitro that interfere with molecular cancer pathways. At the same time, many clinical studies have reported an association of these components with a reduction in cancer initiation and progression. More clinical studies are needed to identify the precise dose and administration of single agents or their combination to produce a coadjutant treatment to those already applied in chemoprevention and oncologic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CITRUS AS A COMPONENT OF THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilcar Duarte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus are native to southeastern Asia, but are present in the Mediterranean basin for centuries. This group of species has reached great importance in some of the Mediterranean countries and, in the case of orange, mandarin and lemon trees, they found here soil and climatic conditions which allows them to achieve a high level of fruit quality, even better than in the regions where they came from. Citrus fruits are present in the diet of the peoples living on the Mediterranean basin, at least since the time of the Roman Empire. In the 20th century they became the main crop in various agricultural areas of the Mediterranean, playing an important role in the landscape, in the diet of the overall population, and also in international trade. They are present in the gardens of palaces and monasteries, but also in the courtyards and orchards of the poorest families. Their fruits are not only a refreshing dessert, but also a condiment, or even a major component of many dishes. Citrus fruits have well-documented nutritional and health benefits. They can actually help prevent and cure some diseases and, above all, they are essential in a balanced and tasty diet.

  17. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-23

    Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expenditures. In order to limit dialysis cost, primary and secondary prevention of chronic renal disease are of paramount importance. In addition to drugs, secondary prevention includes diet measures (e.g. salt diet, protein diet). The aims of diet practice in chronic kidney disease are to slow chronic renal failure progression and to prevent its complications like hyperphosphatemia and hyperkaliemiae. A few decades ago, a Tunisian diet was exclusively Mediterranean, and protein consumption was not excessive. However, today, protein consumption is more comparable to western countries. Salt consumption is also excessive. Some Tunisian diets still include food with high potassium intake, which are not suitable for patients with chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the role of the dietician is extremely important to help calculate and create a dietary regimen tailored to each of our patients. Advice about diets should be adapted to both the patient and population habits to improve adherence rate. As such, the purpose of this article is to provide our own experience regarding medical nutrition therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease in Tunisia, with some changes in food habits. Prevention is far better than treatment. In this perspective, dietary measures must be at the core of our intervention.

  18. Reaching Nutritional Adequacy Does Not Necessarily Increase Exposure to Food Contaminants: Evidence from a Whole-Diet Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Tangui; Vieux, Florent; Perignon, Marlène; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Micard, Valérie; Darmon, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Dietary guidelines are designed to help meet nutritional requirements, but they do not explicitly or quantitatively account for food contaminant exposures. In this study, we aimed to test whether dietary changes needed to achieve nutritional adequacy were compatible with acceptable exposure to food contaminants. Data from the French national dietary survey were linked with food contaminant data from the French Total Diet Study to estimate the mean intake of 204 representative food items and mean exposure to 27 contaminants, including pesticides, heavy metals, mycotoxins, nondioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) and dioxin-like compounds. For each sex, 2 modeled diets that departed the least from the observed diet were designed: 1) a diet respecting only nutritional recommendations (NUT model), and 2) a diet that met nutritional recommendations without exceeding Toxicological Reference Values (TRVs) and observed contaminant exposures (NUTOX model). Food, nutrient, and contaminant contents in observed diets and NUT and NUTOX diets were compared with the use of paired t tests. Mean observed diets did not meet all nutritional recommendations, but no contaminant was over 48% of its TRV. Achieving all the nutrient recommendations through the NUT model mainly required increases in fruit, vegetable, and fish intake and decreases in meat, cheese, and animal fat intake. These changes were associated with significantly increased dietary exposure to some contaminants, but without exceeding 57% of TRVs. The highest increases were found for NDL-PCBs (from 26% to 57% of TRV for women). Reaching nutritional adequacy without exceeding observed contaminant exposure (NUTOX model) was possible but required further departure from observed food quantities. Based on a broad range of nutrients and contaminants, this first assessment of compatibility between nutritional adequacy and toxicological exposure showed that reaching nutritional adequacy might increase exposure to food

  19. Definition of the Mediterranean diet based on bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio; Goñi, Isabel

    2009-02-01

    Antioxidant (polyphenols and carotenoids) and nonantioxidant (phytosterols) bioactive compounds and dietary fiber may have a significant role in health. The intake of these compounds is strongly linked with the high consumption of fruits, vegetables, and unrefined cereals. A whole-diet approach to these food constituents is intended to render the current definition of Mediterranean diet based on food consumption more comprehensive. The Mediterranean dietary pattern can be characterized by the following four essential dietary indicators: 1) Monounsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (range: 1.6 to 2.0); 2) Intake of dietary fiber (41 to 62 g/person/day); 3) Antioxidant capacity of the whole diet (3500 to 5300 trolox equivalent/person/day); 4) Phytosterols intake (370 to 555 mg/person/day). The contribution of foods and beverages to these parameters is described. Spanish National Food Consumption Data for the years 2000 and 1964 were used to quantify the lowest and highest range values. The occurrence of these indicators in the Mediterranean diet has specific characteristics and there is sufficient scientific evidence to support the beneficial health effects.

  20. Non-communicable diseases and adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretto, Antonio; Lagattolla, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) also known as chronic diseases last for a long time and progress generally slow. Major non-communicable diseases are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours play an important role for determining such diseases. The change in unhealthy behaviours or the maintenance of healthy lifestyles has enormous value in the reduction of diseases and longer life expectancy not only on an individual level but for the community as a whole. Recent meta-analyses reported Mediterranean diet to be an optimal diet when adopted as a whole, in order to preserve and maintain a good health status. A greater adherence score to the Mediterranean diet (2-point increase) was related to induce an 8% reduction in overall mortality, a 10% reduced risk of CVD and a 4% reduction in neoplastic diseases. However, there is no direct method in quantifying and evaluating adherence, therefore a large number of indirect indices in several studies have been proposed, with a last unifying score. Recently more and more e-health techniques such as web communication or desktop publishing (DVDs and so on) are being used, obtaining good results in the Mediterranean diet adherence. For successfully changing the unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours of the population, interventions at all levels are needed with the cooperation of Institutions, mass media, agricultural and food industry and healthcare professionals guided by expert scientific societies.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome and the Components of the Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Fernandez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities known to increase heart disease risk by two-fold and type 2 diabetes risk by five-fold. These disturbances include dyslipidemias, hypertension, hyperglycemia and central adiposity in addition to insulin resistance and low grade inflammation. The prevalence of MetS is about 34% in the United States with variations according to ethnicity and race. Lfestyle factors including smoking, lack of exercise, poor dietary habits as well as low socioeconomic status are associated with the development of MetS. Diet is considered one of the major contributors to MetS. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (high intake of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, olive oil, fish, low-fat dairy products, and moderate wine consumption has been associated with lower prevalence of MetS. Interventions utilizing this dietary approach have proven to be successful in reducing some of the associated metabolic abnormalities. In this review, evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies showing the benefits of the Mediterranean diet is presented. The effect of the specific components of the Mediterranean diet is also discussed.

  2. The Mediterranean Diet: its definition and evaluation of a priori dietary indexes in primary cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2018-01-18

    We have analysed the definition of Mediterranean Diet in 28 studies included in six meta-analyses evaluating the relation between the Mediterranean Diet and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Some typical food of this dietary pattern like whole cereals, olive oil and red wine were taken into account only in a few a priori indexes, and the dietary pattern defined as Mediterranean showed many differences among the studies and compared to traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s. Altogether, the analysed studies show a protective effect of the Mediterranean Diet against cardiovascular disease but present different effects against specific conditions as cerebrovascular disease and coronary heart disease. These different effects might depend on the definition of Mediterranean Diet and the indexes of the adhesion to the same one used. To compare the effects of the Mediterranean Diet against cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and stroke a univocal model of Mediterranean Diet should be established as a reference, and it might be represented by the Modern Mediterranean Diet Pyramid. The a priori index to evaluate the adhesion to Mediterranean Diet might be the Mediterranean-Style Dietary Pattern Score that has some advantages in comparison to the others a priori indexes.

  3. Comparison of Mediterranean diet compliance between European and non-European populations in the Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhammou, Samira; Heras-González, Leticia; Ibáñez-Peinado, Diana; Barceló, Carla; Hamdan, May; Rivas, Ana; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Olea-Serrano, Fatima; Monteagudo, Celia

    2016-12-01

    Fruit, vegetables, cereals, and olive oil are common elements of the Mediterranean diet (MD), but each country in the Mediterranean basin has its own gastronomic customs influenced by socio-cultural, religious, and economic factors. This study compared the dietary habits of three Mediterranean populations with different cultures and lifestyles, a total of 600 adults (61.9% females) between 25 and 70 yrs from Spain, Morocco, and Palestine. All participants completed a self administered questionnaire, including sociodemographic and anthropometric items, a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire adapted to the foods consumed in each country, and three 24-h recalls. MD adherence was estimated with the MD Serving Score (MDSS). All populations showed a moderate adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern. In comparison to the Palestine population, MDSS-assessed adherence to the MD was 6.36-fold higher in the Spanish population and 3.88-fold higher in the Moroccan population. Besides the country of origin, age was another predictive factor of MD adherence, which was greater (higher MDSS) in participants aged over 50 yrs than in those aged 30 yrs or younger. This preliminary study contributes initial data on dietary differences between European and non-European countries in the Mediterranean basin. The Spanish diet was shown to be closer to MD recommendations than the diet of Morocco or Palestine. Given the impact of good dietary habits on the prevention of chronic non-transmittable diseases, health policies should focus on adherence to a healthy diet, supporting traditional dietary patterns in an era of intense commercial pressures for change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza-Salvat, Noelia; Pascual-Geler, Manrique; Lopez-Guarnido, Olga; Rodrigo, Lourdes; Martinez-Burgos, Alba; Cozar, Jose Manuel; Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco Manuel; Álvarez-Cubero, Maria Jesus; Rivas, Ana

    2018-03-15

    In Europe, countries following the traditional Mediterranean Diet (MeDi), particularly Southern European countries, have lower prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality compared to other European regions. In the present study, we investigated the association between the MeDi and the relative risk of PCa and tumor aggressiveness in a Spanish population. Among individual score components, it has been found that subjects with PCa were less likely to consume olive oil as the main culinary fat, vegetables, fruits and fish than those without. However, these differences were not statistically significative. A high intake of fruit, vegetables and cooked tomato sauce Mediterranean style (sofrito) was related to less PCa aggressiveness. Results showed that there are no differences in the score of adherence to the Mediterranean dietary patterns between cases and controls, with mean values of 8.37 ± 1.80 and 8.25 ± 2.48, respectively. However, MeDi was associated with lower PCa agressiveness according to Gleason score. Hence, relations between Mediterranean dietary patterns and PCa are still inconclusive and merit further investigations. Further large-scale studies are required to clarify the effect of MeDi on prostate health, in order to establish the role of this diet in the prevention of PCa.

  5. Mediterranean diet pyramid: a proposal for Italian people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-10-16

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  6. Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: A Proposal for Italian People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata D'Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  7. [Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Béjar-Lío, Graciela Ivette; Vázquez-Mendoza, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools. Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7. The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg. There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.

  8. Mediterranean Diet and Its Correlates among Adolescents in Non-Mediterranean European Countries: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Dario; Štefan, Lovro; Prosoli, Rebeka; Emeljanovas, Arunas; Mieziene, Brigita; Milanović, Ivana; Radisavljević-Janić, Snežana

    2017-02-22

    Little is known about the factors which might influence the adherence to a Mediterranean diet in non-Mediterranean European countries. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to determine the associations between socioeconomic, psychological, and physical factors on a Mediterranean diet. In this cross-sectional study, participants were 14-18-year-old adolescents ( N = 3071) from two non-Mediterranean countries: Lithuania ( N = 1863) and Serbia ( N = 1208). The dependent variable was Mediterranean diet, and was assessed with the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index for children and adolescents questionnaire. Independent variables were gender, body-mass index, self-rated health, socioeconomic status, psychological distress, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. The associations between dependent and independent variables were analyzed by using logistic regression. Results showed that higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher self-rated health, socioeconomic status, and physical activity, yet low adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with being female, having higher body-mass index, psychological distress, and sedentary behavior. Our findings suggest that future studies need to explore associations between lifestyle habits-especially in target populations, such as primary and secondary school students.

  9. Definition of the Mediterranean Diet; A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Davis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies over several decades suggest that following the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, and improve cognitive health. However, there are inconsistencies among methods used for evaluating and defining the MedDiet. Through a review of the literature, we aimed to quantitatively define the MedDiet by food groups and nutrients. Databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, Academic Search Premier and the University of South Australia Library Catalogue were searched. Articles were included if they defined the MedDiet in at least two of the following ways: (1 general descriptive definitions; (2 diet pyramids/numbers of servings of key foods; (3 grams of key foods/food groups; and (4 nutrient and flavonoid content. Quantity of key foods and nutrient content was recorded and the mean was calculated. The MedDiet contained three to nine serves of vegetables, half to two serves of fruit, one to 13 serves of cereals and up to eight serves of olive oil daily. It contained approximately 9300 kJ, 37% as total fat, 18% as monounsaturated and 9% as saturated, and 33 g of fibre per day. Our results provide a defined nutrient content and range of servings for the MedDiet based on past and current literature. More detailed reporting amongst studies could refine the definition further.

  10. Definition of the Mediterranean Diet: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Courtney; Bryan, Janet; Hodgson, Jonathan; Murphy, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies over several decades suggest that following the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, and improve cognitive health. However, there are inconsistencies among methods used for evaluating and defining the MedDiet. Through a review of the literature, we aimed to quantitatively define the MedDiet by food groups and nutrients. Databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, Academic Search Premier and the University of South Australia Library Catalogue were searched. Articles were included if they defined the MedDiet in at least two of the following ways: (1) general descriptive definitions; (2) diet pyramids/numbers of servings of key foods; (3) grams of key foods/food groups; and (4) nutrient and flavonoid content. Quantity of key foods and nutrient content was recorded and the mean was calculated. The MedDiet contained three to nine serves of vegetables, half to two serves of fruit, one to 13 serves of cereals and up to eight serves of olive oil daily. It contained approximately 9300 kJ, 37% as total fat, 18% as monounsaturated and 9% as saturated, and 33 g of fibre per day. Our results provide a defined nutrient content and range of servings for the MedDiet based on past and current literature. More detailed reporting amongst studies could refine the definition further. PMID:26556369

  11. Association between Mediterranean and Nordic diet scores and changes in weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roswall, Nina; Ängquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that adherence to the Mediterranean Diet measured by using the Mediterranean diet score (MDS) is associated with lower obesity risk. The newly proposed Nordic Diet could hold similar beneficial effects. Because of the increasing focus on the interaction...

  12. THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET AS A SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Lopes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Central theme in society these days, the diet went through several phases during the evolution of the human being. Currently human’s advanced civilizational, deplete resources, develops forms of reproduction and rapid growth of animals, genetically alter plants to make them more resilient and artificially prolongs life. All these factors lead to an overload in nature and revolve to a group of environmentalists and animal rights. Sustainability is part of everyday life of political and social discourse as the fundamental way to our relationship with the environment. Sustainable food systems are those that are able to survive over time, promoting sustainable use of resources and a balance in the economic, social and environmental aspects. Changing diet to the Mediterranean Diet would bring benefits: on the health level, with better nutrition and increased use of some processed products; economic, by encouraging the consumption of local and national production of products; social, with the creation of jobs in agriculture; and environmental, using organic production and the reduction of transportation needs. The Mediterranean Diet encourages a more balanced and healthy eating style, with great positive impact on the environment. With the globalization phenomena is was gradually lost, but is now being revived due to the awakening to health and ecological problems.

  13. Comparison between Sardinia and Malta: the Mediterranean diet revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Sophie; Gerber, Mariette

    2005-10-01

    The Mediterranean diet is often characterized in terms of food items only. In this paper, the comparison of meals, in-between meals snack consumption and total daily food intake is presented between Sardinia and Malta in terms of structure, social environment and hours, together with their changes. Data were collected in 2001 in Sardinia and 2002 in Malta. A structured qualitative questionnaire, articulated around four main themes: food supply, transformation, preparation and consumption habits, was administered by face-to-face interviews with the help of a local person. Inquiries were carried out over two generations with 30 'mother-daughter' couples in each island. We highlighted some Mediterranean characteristics in Sardinia by showing striking contrasts between Sardinian and Maltese food habits such as meal preparation times, both breakfast and main meal structures, total daily food intake profiles, mealtimes and commensality in the mothers' generation. Some of these characteristics were also maintained in the daughters' generation. This investigation has presented evidence that beyond foods, meal pattern, structure and commensal rituals appeared as fundamental aspects of Sardo-Mediterranean food habits, which are important to consider when trying to maintain or implement the Mediterranean dietary model.

  14. Mediterranean diet pyramid today. Science and cultural updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach-Faig, Anna; Berry, Elliot M; Lairon, Denis; Reguant, Joan; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dernini, Sandro; Medina, F Xavier; Battino, Maurizio; Belahsen, Rekia; Miranda, Gemma; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2011-12-01

    To present the Mediterranean diet (MD) pyramid: a lifestyle for today. A new graphic representation has been conceived as a simplified main frame to be adapted to the different nutritional and socio-economic contexts of the Mediterranean region. This review gathers updated recommendations considering the lifestyle, dietary, sociocultural, environmental and health challenges that the current Mediterranean populations are facing. Mediterranean region and its populations. Many innovations have arisen since previous graphical representations of the MD. First, the concept of composition of the 'main meals' is introduced to reinforce the plant-based core of the dietary pattern. Second, frugality and moderation is emphasised because of the major public health challenge of obesity. Third, qualitative cultural and lifestyle elements are taken into account, such as conviviality, culinary activities, physical activity and adequate rest, along with proportion and frequency recommendations of food consumption. These innovations are made without omitting other items associated with the production, selection, processing and consumption of foods, such as seasonality, biodiversity, and traditional, local and eco-friendly products. Adopting a healthy lifestyle and preserving cultural elements should be considered in order to acquire all the benefits from the MD and preserve this cultural heritage. Considering the acknowledgment of the MD as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO (2010), and taking into account its contribution to health and general well-being, we hope to contribute to a much better adherence to this healthy dietary pattern and its way of life with this new graphic representation.

  15. Prenatal and childhood Mediterranean diet and the development of asthma and allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, Leda; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2009-09-01

    To discuss current evidence about the relation between prenatal and childhood Mediterranean diet, and the development of asthma and allergies in children. Review of the literature. Four recent studies conducted in Mediterranean countries (Spain, Greece) and one conducted in Mexico evaluated the association between childhood Mediterranean diet and asthma outcomes in children. All of the studies reported beneficial associations between a high level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet during childhood and symptoms of asthma or allergic rhinitis. Individual foods or food groups contributing to the protective effect of Mediterranean diet included fish, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and cereals, while detrimental components included red meat, margarine and junk food intake. Two studies focused on prenatal Mediterranean diet: the first is a birth cohort in Spain that showed a protective effect of a high adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy on persistent wheeze, atopic wheeze and atopy at the age of 6.5 years; while the second is a cross-sectional study in Mexico, collecting information more than 6 years after pregnancy, that showed no associations between maternal Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and allergic symptoms in childhood except for current sneezing. Findings from recent studies suggest that a high level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet early in life protects against the development of asthma and atopy in children. Further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms of this protective effect, to evaluate the most relevant window of exposure, and to address specific components of diet in relation to disease.

  16. Central obesity and the Mediterranean diet: A systematic review of intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, C L; Mayr, H L; Opie, R S; Bes-Rastrollo, M; Itsiopoulos, C; Thomas, C J

    2017-10-17

    Central obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, and is a risk factor for cardiometabolic syndrome. The Mediterranean diet pattern has a convincing evidence-base for improving cardiometabolic health. This review investigated the impact of Mediterranean diet interventions on central obesity, specifically. A systematic literature search was conducted in the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases. Search terms included: 'Mediterranean Diet', 'Mediterranean dietary pattern', 'central obesity' and 'visceral fat'. The search was limited to English language and humans ≥18 years. Eighteen articles met the eligibility criteria and reported at least one outcome measure of central obesity with Mediterranean diet intervention. Central obesity measures included waist circumference (16 studies), waist-hip ratio (5 studies) and visceral fat (2 studies). Thirteen (72%) of the studies, totaling 7186 subjects (5168 subjects assigned to a Mediterranean Diet), reported a significant reduction in central obesity with a Mediterranean-type diet. However, seven out of these 13 interventions employed energy restriction, and only three showed a statistically significant favorable effect of the Mediterranean diet relative to a control group. This systematic review highlights the potential for a Mediterranean diet intervention to reduce central obesity and in turn reduce obesity-related chronic disease risk and associated public health burden.

  17. Beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Mistretta, Antonio; Marventano, Stefano; Purrello, Agata; Vitaglione, Paola; Calabrese, Giorgio; Drago, Filippo; Galvano, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of medical disorders, such as hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and abdominal obesity that, when occurring together, increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The role of food and nutrients in the aetiology of chronic diseases has become clearer over the last 15 years. In this review we collected evidence on the beneficial impact of the Mediterranean diet on MetS by analyzing epidemiological reports documenting its prevalence in subjects who have adopted this dietary pattern. We also explored the role of the individual components of the diet on the specific aspects characterizing the MetS (i.e. metabolic indices, body weight and blood pressure). There is ample evidence showing that subjects adherent to the Mediterranean diet have lower prevalence and incidence rates of MetS than non-adherent. Moreover, it has been widely documented that specific components of this dietary pattern play a role in the prevention of several morbid conditions related to the MetS.

  18. Transcriptomics and the Mediterranean Diet: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Marcos, Luis V.; Lou-Bonafonte, José M.; Arnal, Carmen; Navarro, María A.; Osada, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancer and in decreasing overall mortality. Nowadays, transcriptomics is gaining particular relevance due to the existence of non-coding RNAs capable of regulating many biological processes. The present work describes a systematic review of current evidence supporting the influence of the Mediterranean diet on transcriptomes of different tissues in various experimental models. While information on regulatory RNA is very limited, they seem to contribute to the effect. Special attention has been given to the oily matrix of virgin olive oil. In this regard, monounsaturated fatty acid-rich diets prevented the expression of inflammatory genes in different tissues, an action also observed after the administration of olive oil phenolic compounds. Among these, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and secoiridoids have been found to be particularly effective in cell cycle expression. Less explored terpenes, such as oleanolic acid, are important modulators of circadian clock genes. The wide range of studied tissues and organisms indicate that response to these compounds is universal and poses an important level of complexity considering the different genes expressed in each tissue and the number of different tissues in an organism. PMID:28486416

  19. A modified Mediterranean diet score is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngyo; Je, Youjin

    2018-03-21

    Findings from studies in Western countries showed that Mediterranean diet is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome, but little is known about this association in Asian countries. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome in Korean population, this study was conducted. A total of 8387 adults 19-64 years of age from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2012-2015 were assessed. A 112-item dish-based semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intakes. Mediterranean diet was assessed by a modified Mediterranean diet score, which was based on the alternate Mediterranean diet score of Fung et al. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for other dietary and lifestyle variables. Participants with 5-6 and 7 or higher modified Mediterranean diet scores had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome by 27% (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56-0.96) and 36% (OR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.46-0.89; P-trend = 0.0031), compared with those with 2 or lower modified Mediterranean diet scores, respectively. Higher modified Mediterranean diet scores were associated with a lower prevalence of abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridemia, which are components of metabolic syndrome CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that diet rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, peanuts and fish is associated with a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults.

  20. Mediterranean diet, folic acid, and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Stronati, Mauro; Lanari, Marcello

    2017-08-17

    The Mediterranean diet has been for a very long time the basis of food habits all over the countries of the Mediterranean basin, originally founded on rural models and low consumption of meat products and high-fat/high-processed foods. However, in the modern era, the traditional Mediterranean diet pattern is now progressively eroding due to the widespread dissemination of the Western-type economy, life-style, technology-driven culture, as well as the globalisation of food production, availability and consumption, with consequent homogenisation of food culture and behaviours. This transition process may affect many situations, including pregnancy and offspring's health. The problem of the diet during pregnancy and the proper intake of nutrients are nowadays a very current topic, arousing much debate. The Mediterranean dietary pattern, in particular, has been associated with the highest risk reduction of major congenital anomalies, like the heterogeneous class of neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide) and still remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal and infant death, or significant lifelong disabilities. Many studies support the finding that appropriate folate levels during pregnancy may confer protection against these diseases. In 1991 one randomised controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated for the first time that periconceptional supplementation of folic acid is able to prevent the recurrence of NTDs, finding confirmed by many other subsequent studies. Anyway, the high rate of unplanned/unintended pregnancies and births and other issues hindering the achievement of adequate folate levels in women in childbearing age, induced the US government and many other countries to institute mandatory food fortification with folic acid. The actual strategy adopted by European Countries (including Italy) suggests that women take 0,4 mg folic acid/die before conception. The main question is which intervention

  1. Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byberg, Liisa; Bellavia, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2016-12-01

    A Mediterranean diet, known to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, may also influence the risk of hip fracture although previous studies present discrepant results. We therefore aimed to determine whether the rate of hip fracture was associated with degree of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. We combined two Swedish cohort studies consisting of 37,903 men and 33,403 women (total n = 71,333, mean age 60 years) free of previous cardiovascular disease and cancer who answered a medical and a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED; range, 0 to 8 points) was created based on high consumption of fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish, and olive/rapeseed oil, moderate intake of alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. Incident hip fractures between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were retrieved from the National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for potential confounders were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in age at hip fracture were calculated using multivariable Laplace regression. During follow-up, 3175 hip fractures occurred at a median age of 73.3 years. One unit increase in the mMED was associated with 6% lower hip fracture rate (adjusted HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96) and with a 3-month higher median age at hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 2.8 months; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2). Comparing the highest quintile of adherence to the mMED (6 to 8 points) with the lowest (0 to 2 points) conferred an adjusted HR of hip fracture of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.89) and a 12-month higher median age of hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 11.6 months; 95% CI, 4.2 to 19.0). Results were similar in men and women. We conclude that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet is associated with lower risk of future hip fracture. © 2016 American Society for

  2. Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Costas A; Yannakoulia, Mary; Kosmidis, Mary H; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hadjigeorgiou, Giorgos M; Sakka, Paraskevi; Arampatzi, Xanthi; Bougea, Anastasia; Labropoulos, Ioannis; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean dietary pattern has been associated with a decreased risk of many degenerative diseases and cognitive function in particular; however, relevant information from Mediterranean regions, where the prototype Mediterranean diet is typically adhered to, have been very limited. Additionally, predefined Mediterranean diet (MeDi) scores with use of a priori cut-offs have been used very rarely, limiting comparisons between different populations and thus external validity of the associations. Finally, associations between individual components of MeDi (i.e., food groups, macronutrients) and particular aspects of cognitive performance have rarely been explored. We evaluated the association of adherence to an a priori defined Mediterranean dietary pattern and its components with dementia and specific aspects of cognitive function in a representative population cohort in Greece. Participants from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet (HELIAD), an on-going population-based study, exploring potential associations between diet and cognitive performance in a representative sample from Greek regions, were included in this analysis. Diagnosis of dementia was made by a full clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, while cognitive performance was assessed according to five cognitive domains (memory, language, attention-speed, executive functioning, visuospatial perception) and a composite cognitive score. Adherence to MeDi was evaluated by an a priori score (range 0-55), derived from a detailed food frequency questionnaire. Among 1,865 individuals (mean age 73±6 years, 41% male), 90 were diagnosed with dementia and 223 with mild cognitive impairment. Each unit increase in the Mediterranean dietary score (MedDietScore) was associated with a 10% decrease in the odds for dementia. Adherence to the MeDi was also associated with better performance in memory, language, visuospatial perception and the composite cognitive score; the associations were

  3. A systematic review of the nutritional adequacy of the diet in the Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. Berti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To examine dietary adequacy in the Andean area, including macro- and micronutrient intakes, with a particular focus on rural communities; to highlight nutrition priorities in the Andes; and to identify opportunities for improvement. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted, identifying published and grey literature in English and Spanish related to diet in the central Andean countries of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Articles reporting data from dietary surveys or nutrition interventions were included. Thirty-four papers or reports published in 1969-2011 were included in the final review. The mean and variation in intakes by sex and age group of all presented nutrients were collated and the mean of means were calculated. RESULTS: Thiamin, niacin, and vitamin C intakes were usually adequate. Intakes of most other micronutrients, including iron, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B12, folate, and zinc were low, likely resulting in high levels of inadequacy. Energy intakes were lower than requirements, but it is unlikely to be a common problem, rather, this result was probably due to the known tendency of most dietary survey tools to underreport intake. However, energy from fat intakes was very low, usually less than 20% of the total, and in some settings, less than 10%. CONCLUSIONS: The inadequate intake of some micronutrients is common in many developing countries, but the extremely low intake of dietary fat found in the central Andes is not. Increased consumption of animal-source foods would increase fat intakes, while addressing micronutrient deficiencies; however, the impact on the fragile ecosystem of the Andes needs considering. Indigenous crops, such as lupine bean, quinoa, and amaranth are also rich in fat or micronutrients.

  4. A systematic review of the nutritional adequacy of the diet in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Peter R; Fallu, Cynthia; Cruz Agudo, Yesmina

    2014-11-01

    To examine dietary adequacy in the Andean area, including macro- and micronutrient intakes, with a particular focus on rural communities; to highlight nutrition priorities in the Andes; and to identify opportunities for improvement. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, identifying published and grey literature in English and Spanish related to diet in the central Andean countries of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Articles reporting data from dietary surveys or nutrition interventions were included. Thirty-four papers or reports published in 1969-2011 were included in the final review. The mean and variation in intakes by sex and age group of all presented nutrients were collated and the mean of means were calculated. Thiamin, niacin, and vitamin C intakes were usually adequate. Intakes of most other micronutrients, including iron, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B12, folate, and zinc were low, likely resulting in high levels of inadequacy. Energy intakes were lower than requirements, but it is unlikely to be a common problem, rather, this result was probably due to the known tendency of most dietary survey tools to underreport intake. However, energy from fat intakes was very low, usually less than 20% of the total, and in some settings, less than 10%. The inadequate intake of some micronutrients is common in many developing countries, but the extremely low intake of dietary fat found in the central Andes is not. Increased consumption of animal-source foods would increase fat intakes, while addressing micronutrient deficiencies; however, the impact on the fragile ecosystem of the Andes needs considering. Indigenous crops, such as lupine bean, quinoa, and amaranth are also rich in fat or micronutrients.

  5. Atheroslerosis Epidemiological studies on the health effects of a Mediterranean diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, F.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2004-01-01

    Mediterranean diets are characterized by olive oil, as the dominant fat source and a high to moderate consumption of fruit and vegetables, cereal products, fish, legumes, in combination with little meat and wine with meals. The 'reference' Mediterranean diet seems to differ according to country, but

  6. Environmental footprints of Mediterranean versus Western dietary patterns: beyond the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Almendros, Sara; Obrador, Biel; Bach-Faig, Anna; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2013-12-30

    Dietary patterns can substantially vary the resource consumption and environmental impact of a given population. Dietary changes such as the increased consumption of vegetables and reduced consumption of animal products reduce the environmental footprint and thus the use of natural resources. The adherence of a given population to the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern (MDP) through the consumption of the food proportions and composition defined in the new Mediterranean Diet pyramid can thus not only influence human health but also the environment. The aim of the study was to analyze the sustainability of the MDP in the context of the Spanish population in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural land use, energy consumption and water consumption. Furthermore, we aimed to compare the current Spanish diet with the Mediterranean Diet and in comparison with the western dietary pattern, exemplified by the U.S.A. food pattern, in terms of their corresponding environmental footprints. The environmental footprints of the dietary patterns studied were calculated from the dietary make-up of each dietary pattern, and specific environmental footprints of each food group. The dietary compositions were obtained from different sources, including food balance sheets and household consumption surveys. The specific environmental footprints of food groups were obtained from different available life-cycle assessments. The adherence of the Spanish population to the MDP has a marked impact on all the environmental footprints studied. Increasing adherence to the MDP pattern in Spain will reduce greenhouse gas emissions (72%), land use (58%) and energy consumption (52%), and to a lower extent water consumption (33%). On the other hand, the adherence to a western dietary pattern implies an increase in all these descriptors of between 12% and 72%. The MDP is presented as not only a cultural model but also as a healthy and environmentally-friendly model, adherence to which, in Spain would

  7. Traditional food consumption is associated with better diet quality and adequacy among Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Tony; Kolahdooz, Fariba; Roache, Cindy; Sharma, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    The Inuit population is undergoing a rapid nutrition transition as a result of reduced consumption of traditional foods. This study aims to describe the differences in dietary adequacy between non-traditional and traditional eaters among Inuit populations in Nunavut, Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a culturally appropriate quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Participants included 208 Inuit adults from three isolated communities in Nunavut. Traditional eaters consumed a more nutrient-dense diet and achieved better dietary adequacy than non-traditional eaters. Traditional foods accounted for 7 and 27% of energy intake among non-traditional and traditional eaters, respectively. Non-nutrient-dense foods accounted for a greater proportion of energy intake in non-traditional eaters; however, these were consumed in significant amounts by both the groups (36 and 27% of total energy). Consumption of traditional foods is associated with greater diet quality and dietary adequacy. Efforts should be made to promote traditional and non-traditional foods of high-nutritional quality.

  8. [Adherence to the Mediterranean diet of future teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeda Manzanera, José Manuel; Rodrigo Vega, Maximiliano

    2014-08-01

    The Spanish university population is vulnerable in their eating habits for various reasons. This would in many cases the abandonment of a traditional Mediterranean diet. To determine the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (adm) of a university population of future Teachers and analyze various factos that may condition its nutritional quality. Distribution Kidmed test to a sample of 212 university aged between 21 and 24. The Kidmed index (0-12) indicate whether the ADM was low (0 to 3), medium (4-7) or high (8 to 12). Each respondent was recorded age, weight, height and body mass index, and weekly physical activity. For comparison of the data was used Chi square test, the Mann Whitney test and ANOVA factor using SPSS 15. 15.1% had a low Kidmed index, 60.4% intermediate and 24.5% higher. The difference between the different levels of ADM is due to the consumption of fruits and vegetables (p Teachers needed improved ADM. In general, enhance a quality breakfast and minimum daily physical activity would be two core aspects in improving habits. It would be appropriate to provide nutritional education campaigns for this population and especially considering their future social role as educators. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Paediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease on a Gluten-Free Diet: Nutritional Adequacy and Macro- and Micronutrient Imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Alison; Dehlsen, Kate; Ooi, Chee Y

    2018-01-22

    A strict, lifelong gluten-free diet is the cornerstone for management of coeliac disease. Elimination of gluten from the diet may be associated with nutritional imbalance; however, the completeness of this diet in energy and macro- and micronutrients in children is not well described. Understanding the nutritional adequacy of the gluten-free diet in children during this critical period of growth and development when dietary intake is strongly influential is important. Children, regardless of whether they have eliminated gluten from their diet, have a tendency to consume excess fat and insufficient fibre, iron, vitamin D and calcium, compared to recommendations. In the context of a gluten-free diet, these imbalances may be worsened or have more significant consequences. Paediatric studies have demonstrated that intakes of folate, magnesium, zinc and selenium may decrease on a gluten-free diet. Nutritional inadequacies may be risks of a gluten-free diet in a paediatric population. The potential implications of these inadequacies, both short and long term, remain unclear and warrant further investigation and clarification.

  10. Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean diet: a healthy cardiovascular diet for weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Moraga Ángeles

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ketogenic diets are an effective healthy way of losing weight since they promote a non-atherogenic lipid profile, lower blood pressure and decrease resistance to insulin with an improvement in blood levels of glucose and insulin. On the other hand, Mediterranean diet is well known to be one of the healthiest diets, being the basic ingredients of such diet the olive oil, red wine and vegetables. In Spain the fish is an important component of such diet. The objective of this study was to determine the dietary effects of a protein ketogenic diet rich in olive oil, salad, fish and red wine. Methods A prospective study was carried out in 31 obese subjects (22 male and 19 female with the inclusion criteria whose body mass index and age was 36.46 ± 2.22 and 38.48 ± 2.27, respectively. This Ketogenic diet was called "Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet" (SKMD due to the incorporation of virgin olive oil as the principal source of fat (≥30 ml/day, moderate red wine intake (200–400 ml/day, green vegetables and salads as the main source of carbohydrates and fish as the main source of proteins. It was an unlimited calorie diet. Statistical differences between the parameters studied before and after the administration of the "Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean diet" (week 0 and 12 were analyzed by paired Student's t test. Results There was an extremely significant (p 2→31.76 kg/m2, systolic blood pressure (125.71 mmHg→109.05 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (84.52 mmHg→ 75.24 mmHg, total cholesterol (208.24 mg/dl→186.62 mg/dl, triacylglicerols (218.67 mg/dl→113.90 mg/dl and glucose (109.81 mg/dl→ 93.33 mg/dl. There was a significant (p = 0.0167 reduction in LDLc (114.52 mg/dl→105.95 mg/dl and an extremely significant increase in HDLc (50.10 mg/dl→54.57 mg/dl. The most affected parameter was the triacylglicerols (47.91% of reduction. Conclusion The SKMD is safe, an effective way of losing weight, promoting non

  11. Prevention of diabetes with Mediterranean diets: a subgroup analysis of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bulló, Mònica; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Covas, Maria-Isabel; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Corella, Dolores; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Romaguera, Dora; Lapetra, José; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Basora, Josep; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Sorlí, José V; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2014-01-07

    Interventions promoting weight loss can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whether dietary changes without calorie restriction also protect from diabetes has not been evaluated. To assess the efficacy of Mediterranean diets for the primary prevention of diabetes in the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea trial, from October 2003 to December 2010 (median follow-up, 4.1 years). Subgroup analysis of a multicenter, randomized trial. (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN35739639) SETTING: Primary care centers in Spain. Men and women without diabetes (3541 patients aged 55 to 80 years) at high cardiovascular risk. Participants were randomly assigned and stratified by site, sex, and age but not diabetes status to receive 1 of 3 diets: Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, or a control diet (advice on a low-fat diet). No intervention to increase physical activity or lose weight was included. Incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (prespecified secondary outcome). During follow-up, 80, 92, and 101 new-onset cases of diabetes occurred in the Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO, Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, and control diet groups, respectively, corresponding to rates of 16.0, 18.7, and 23.6 cases per 1000 person-years. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.60 (95% CI, 0.43 to 0.85) for the Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO and 0.82 (CI, 0.61 to 1.10) for the Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts compared with the control diet. Randomization was not stratified by diabetes status. Withdrawals were greater in the control group. A Mediterranean diet enriched with EVOO but without energy restrictions reduced diabetes risk among persons with high cardiovascular risk. Instituto de Salud Carlos III.

  12. Latest evidence of the effects of the Mediterranean diet in prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva-Blanch, G; Badimon, L; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-10-01

    The first step in the prevention of cardiovascular disease is healthy lifestyle and diet. Recent systematic reviews of observational studies ranked Mediterranean diet as the most likely dietary model to provide cardiovascular protection. This review updates the knowledge on the effects of Mediterranean diet from observational and randomized trials published in the last year. The results of the PREDIMED study, a randomized trial providing a higher level of scientific evidence than cohort studies, confirmed that the Mediterranean diet reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events. This effect may be exerted by reducing blood pressure; improving glucose metabolism, lipid profile, and lipoprotein particle characteristics; and decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress. It may also stem from a favorable interaction between diet and gene polymorphisms related to cardiovascular risk factors and events. These recent results allow us to recommend Mediterranean diet to subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease with the highest level of scientific evidence.

  13. [Variations of the diet of Galician university students (Ourense Campus) in relation to the pattern of the cardioprotective Mediterranean diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez Bernárdez, Montserrat; Castro Sobrino, Laura; Collins Greene, Ashleigh; de la Montaña Miguélez, Julia

    2013-11-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have observed that adherence to Mediterranean Diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk, but also evident in literature are the changes in the dietary habits of the Mediterranean countries which show a departure from Mediterranean patterns. The objective of this work was to estimate the variations of the diet of Galician university students (Ourense Campus), between 2011 and 2013, in relation to the pattern of the cardioprotective Mediterranean diet. A total of 726 university students participated (344 at 2011 and 382 at 2013). A short questionnaire of adherence to a cardioprotective Mediterranean diet was used and the height and weight of each participant was recorded and BMI (Body Mass Index) was calculated. The majority of participants were normal weight. In 2013 there was an increase in low weight and obesity in women and a decrease in the prevalence of normal and overweight. In men an increase of a low weight and normal weight was observed and a decrease in the prevalence of overweight/obesity in men. In the two years studied, it was observed that there is low to intermediate adherence of students to the cardioprotective Mediterranean diet, with less adherence observed in 2013 to the Mediterranean diet, for both sexes. The dietary habits observed in 2013 have shown that the population is distancing its diet from the cardioprotective pattern of the Mediterranean diet, a decrease in the consumption of vegetables, fish, wholegrain cereals and olive oil and an increase consumption of meat. 90% of these university students need to modify their eating habits to conform to a heart-healthy diet. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Systematic Review of the Mediterranean Diet for Long-Term Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joseph G; Filion, Kristian B; Atallah, Renée; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Although the long-term health benefits of the Mediterranean diet are well established, its efficacy for weight loss at ≥12 months in overweight or obese individuals is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the effect of the Mediterranean diet on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor levels after ≥12 months. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials for RCTs published in English or French and with follow-up ≥12 months that examined the effect of the Mediterranean diet on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor levels in overweight or obese individuals trying to lose weight. Five RCTs (n = 998) met our inclusion criteria. Trials compared the Mediterranean diet to a low-fat diet (4 treatment arms), a low-carbohydrate diet (2 treatment arms), and the American Diabetes Association diet (1 treatment arm). The Mediterranean diet resulted in greater weight loss than the low-fat diet at ≥12 months (range of mean values: -4.1 to -10.1 kg vs 2.9 to -5.0 kg), but produced similar weight loss as other comparator diets (range of mean values: -4.1 to -10.1 kg vs -4.7 to -7.7 kg). Moreover, the Mediterranean diet was generally similar to comparator diets at improving other cardiovascular risk factor levels, including blood pressure and lipid levels. Our findings suggest that the Mediterranean diet results in similar weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor level reduction as comparator diets in overweight or obese individuals trying to lose weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and academic performance in youth: the UP&DOWN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Izquierdo-Gomez, Rocio; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Padilla-Moledo, Carmen; Castro-Piñero, Jose; Marcos, Ascensión; Veiga, Oscar L

    2016-04-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and academic performance in children and adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 1371 youth aged 12.04 ± 2.50 years (685 girls) in Spain during 2011-2012. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the KIDMED index (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index in children and adolescents), which includes 16 questions on specific dietary patterns. Levels of adherence were classified into three groups: poor adherence (0-3), average adherence (4-7), and good adherence (8-12). Academic performance was assessed through school records using four indicators: math, language, an average of math and language, and grade point average score. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was related to academic performance (β ranging from 0.107 to 0.148; all P diet had significantly higher scores in all of the academic indicators compared with the poor group (ranging from +0.429 to 0.464; all P ≤ 0.001); as well as the group of average adherence to the Mediterranean diet had significantly higher scores in all of the academic indicators compared with the poor group (ranging from +0.292 to 0.344; all P ≤ 0.06). There were no differences between the groups of good and average adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet may have a beneficial influence on academic performance in youth. Importantly, the benefits of adherence to the Mediterranean diet on academic performance may be stronger as youth adhered to the optimal Mediterranean diet levels.

  16. A Consensus Proposal for Nutritional Indicators to Assess the Sustainability of a Healthy Diet: The Mediterranean Diet as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Lorenzo M; Dernini, Sandro; Lairon, Denis; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Del Balzo, Valeria; Giusti, Anna-Maria; Burlingame, Barbara; Belahsen, Rekia; Maiani, Giuseppe; Polito, Angela; Turrini, Aida; Intorre, Federica; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Berry, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the multiple effects of diets on public health nutrition, society, and environment. Sustainability and food security are closely interrelated. The traditional Mediterranean Diet (MD) is recognized as a healthier dietary pattern with a lower environmental impact. As a case study, the MD may guide innovative inter-sectorial efforts to counteract the degradation of ecosystems, loss of biodiversity, and homogeneity of diets due to globalization through the improvement of sustainable healthy dietary patterns. This consensus position paper defines a suite of the most appropriate nutrition and health indicators for assessing the sustainability of diets based on the MD. In 2011, an informal International Working Group from different national and international institutions was convened. Through online and face-to-face brainstorming meetings over 4 years, a set of nutrition and health indicators for sustainability was identified and refined. Thirteen nutrition indicators of sustainability relating were identified in five areas. Biochemical characteristics of food (A1. Vegetable/animal protein consumption ratios; A2. Average dietary energy adequacy; A3. Dietary Energy Density Score; A4. Nutrient density of diet), Food Quality (A5. Fruit and vegetable consumption/intakes; A6. Dietary Diversity Score), Environment (A7. Food biodiversity composition and consumption; A8. Rate of Local/regional foods and seasonality; A9. Rate of eco-friendly food production and/or consumption), Lifestyle (A10. Physical activity/physical inactivity prevalence; A11. Adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern), Clinical Aspects (A12. Diet-related morbidity/mortality statistics; A13. Nutritional Anthropometry). A standardized set of information was provided for each indicator: definition, methodology, background, data sources, limitations of the indicator, and references. The selection and analysis of these indicators has been performed (where possible) with

  17. Metabarcoding analysis of European hake diet in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Riccioni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available European hake (EH, Merluccius merluccius, is a demersal fish distributed from the North Sea and Atlantic to the Levantine Sea in the Mediterranean. EH is an important predator of deep Mediterranean upper shelf slope communities and it is currently characterised by growth overexploitation. EH adults feed mainly on fish and squids whereas the young (<16 cm feed on crustaceans. All current EH diet studies relied on the morphological identification of prey remains in stomach content, however this method is labour intensive and it precludes the identification of strongly digested food. The development of High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS approaches provide more accurate methods for dietary studies revealing many consumed species simultaneously (DNA metabarcoding. The aim of this study is to use a HTS approach based on COI amplification, contextually to classic microscopic morphological identification, to analyse EH stomach content and to evaluate the efficiency of the molecular method. HTS sequencing has been carried out on the amplicons obtained by PCR amplification (Leray et al. 2013 of stomach remains and all the Miseq Illumina paired-end reads have been analysed by using bioinformatic tools (Boyer et al. 2015 for taxonomic assignment. The selected sequences clustered in OCTUs (Operational Clustered Taxonomic Units and taxonomically assigned, will be used in diversity analyses to compute distance matrices among samples, to compare taxa summaries from different samples, to create networks and perform PCA and PcoA analysis. Classic microscopic morphological analyses on stomach content remains have been carried out contextually to compare the results of the two methods. The molecular approach has proven a promising method to study marine fish dietary habits. All the data will be summarized to reconstruct EH trophic dynamics in the Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Dietary changes needed to reach nutritional adequacy without increasing diet cost according to income: An analysis among French adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Matthieu; Vieux, Florent; Delaere, Fabien; Lluch, Anne; Darmon, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    To explore the dietary changes needed to achieve nutritional adequacy across income levels at constant energy and diet cost. Individual diet modelling was used to design iso-caloric, nutritionally adequate optimised diets for each observed diet in a sample of adult normo-reporters aged ≥20 years (n = 1,719) from the Individual and National Dietary Survey (INCA2), 2006-2007. Diet cost was estimated from mean national food prices (2006-2007). A first set of free-cost models explored the impact of optimisation on the variation of diet cost. A second set of iso-cost models explored the dietary changes induced by the optimisation with cost set equal to the observed one. Analyses of dietary changes were conducted by income quintiles, adjusting for energy intake, sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables, and smoking status. The cost of observed diets increased with increasing income quintiles. In free-cost models, the optimisation increased diet cost on average (+0.22 ± 1.03 euros/d) and within each income quintile, with no significant difference between quintiles, but with systematic increases for observed costs lower than 3.85 euros/d. In iso-cost models, it was possible to design nutritionally adequate diets whatever the initial observed cost. On average, the optimisation at iso-cost increased fruits and vegetables (+171 g/day), starchy foods (+121 g/d), water and beverages (+91 g/d), and dairy products (+20 g/d), and decreased the other food groups (e.g. mixed dishes and salted snacks), leading to increased total diet weight (+300 g/d). Those changes were mostly similar across income quintiles, but lower-income individuals needed to introduce significantly more fruit and vegetables than higher-income ones. In France, the dietary changes needed to reach nutritional adequacy without increasing cost are similar regardless of income, but may be more difficult to implement when the budget for food is lower than 3.85 euros/d.

  19. Dietary changes needed to reach nutritional adequacy without increasing diet cost according to income: An analysis among French adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Maillot

    Full Text Available To explore the dietary changes needed to achieve nutritional adequacy across income levels at constant energy and diet cost.Individual diet modelling was used to design iso-caloric, nutritionally adequate optimised diets for each observed diet in a sample of adult normo-reporters aged ≥20 years (n = 1,719 from the Individual and National Dietary Survey (INCA2, 2006-2007. Diet cost was estimated from mean national food prices (2006-2007. A first set of free-cost models explored the impact of optimisation on the variation of diet cost. A second set of iso-cost models explored the dietary changes induced by the optimisation with cost set equal to the observed one. Analyses of dietary changes were conducted by income quintiles, adjusting for energy intake, sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables, and smoking status.The cost of observed diets increased with increasing income quintiles. In free-cost models, the optimisation increased diet cost on average (+0.22 ± 1.03 euros/d and within each income quintile, with no significant difference between quintiles, but with systematic increases for observed costs lower than 3.85 euros/d. In iso-cost models, it was possible to design nutritionally adequate diets whatever the initial observed cost. On average, the optimisation at iso-cost increased fruits and vegetables (+171 g/day, starchy foods (+121 g/d, water and beverages (+91 g/d, and dairy products (+20 g/d, and decreased the other food groups (e.g. mixed dishes and salted snacks, leading to increased total diet weight (+300 g/d. Those changes were mostly similar across income quintiles, but lower-income individuals needed to introduce significantly more fruit and vegetables than higher-income ones.In France, the dietary changes needed to reach nutritional adequacy without increasing cost are similar regardless of income, but may be more difficult to implement when the budget for food is lower than 3.85 euros/d.

  20. Effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on cardiovascular risk factors: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Ramon; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Covas, María Isabel; Fiol, Miguel; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; López-Sabater, Mari Carmen; Vinyoles, Ernest; Arós, Fernando; Conde, Manuel; Lahoz, Carlos; Lapetra, José; Sáez, Guillermo; Ros, Emilio

    2006-07-04

    The Mediterranean diet has been shown to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. To compare the short-term effects of 2 Mediterranean diets versus those of a low-fat diet on intermediate markers of cardiovascular risk. Substudy of a multicenter, randomized, primary prevention trial of cardiovascular disease (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea [PREDIMED] Study). Primary care centers affiliated with 10 teaching hospitals. 772 asymptomatic persons 55 to 80 years of age at high cardiovascular risk who were recruited from October 2003 to March 2004. Participants were assigned to a low-fat diet (n = 257) or to 1 of 2 Mediterranean diets. Those allocated to Mediterranean diets received nutritional education and either free virgin olive oil, 1 liter per week (n = 257), or free nuts, 30 g/d (n = 258). The authors evaluated outcome changes at 3 months. Body weight, blood pressure, lipid profile, glucose levels, and inflammatory molecules. The completion rate was 99.6%. Compared with the low-fat diet, the 2 Mediterranean diets produced beneficial changes in most outcomes. Compared with the low-fat diet, the mean changes in the Mediterranean diet with olive oil group and the Mediterranean diet with nuts group were -0.39 mmol/L (95% CI, -0.70 to -0.07 mmol/L) and -0.30 mmol/L (CI, -0.58 to -0.01 mmol/L), respectively, for plasma glucose levels; -5.9 mm Hg (CI, -8.7 to -3.1 mm Hg) and -7.1 mm Hg (CI, -10.0 to -4.1 mm Hg), respectively, for systolic blood pressure; and -0.38 (CI, -0.55 to -0.22) and - 0.26 (CI, -0.42 to -0.10), respectively, for the cholesterol-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. The Mediterranean diet with olive oil reduced C-reactive protein levels by 0.54 mg/L (CI, 1.04 to 0.03 mg/L) compared with the low-fat diet. This short-term study did not focus on clinical outcomes. Nutritional education about low-fat diet was less intense than education about Mediterranean diets. Compared with a low-fat diet, Mediterranean diets supplemented

  1. Scientific evidence of interventions using the Mediterranean diet: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Majem, Lluís; Roman, Blanca; Estruch, Ramón

    2006-02-01

    The Mediterranean Diet has been associated with greater longevity and quality of life in epidemiological studies, the majority being observational. The application of evidence-based medicine to the area of public health nutrition involves the necessity of developing clinical trials and systematic reviews to develop sound recommendations. The purpose of this study was to analyze and review the experimental studies on Mediterranean diet and disease prevention. A systematic review was made and a total of 43 articles corresponding to 35 different experimental studies were selected. Results were analyzed for the effects of the Mediterranean diet on lipoproteins, endothelial resistance, diabetes and antioxidative capacity, cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, cancer, body composition, and psychological function. The Mediterranean diet showed favorable effects on lipoprotein levels, endothelium vasodilatation, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, antioxidant capacity, myocardial and cardiovascular mortality, and cancer incidence in obese patients and in those with previous myocardial infarction. Results disclose the mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet in disease prevention, particularly in cardiovascular disease secondary prevention, but also emphasize the need to undertake experimental research and systematic reviews in the areas of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, infectious diseases, age-related cognitive impairment, and cancer, among others. Interventions should use food scores or patterns to ascertain adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Further experimental research is needed to corroborate the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and the underlying mechanisms, and in this sense the methodology of the ongoing PREDIMED study is explained.

  2. The Mediterranean diet in relation to mortality and CVD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, G.; Lissner, L.; Saebye, D.

    2014-01-01

    trends and determinants of Cardiovascular disease) population study, whose diet was assessed by means of a validated 7d food record. The adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was calculated by three different scores: one based on a classification excluding ingredients from mixed dishes and recipes...... (score 1); another based on a classification including ingredients (score 2); the last one based on a variant of the latter including wine instead of alcohol intake (score 3). The association between these scores and, respectively, total mortality, cardiovascular incidence and mortality was tested...... related to potential CVD pathways, such as blood lipids, blood pressure and weight change after 11 years of follow-up. In a Danish cohort, the MDS was inversely associated with total mortality and with cardiovascular and MI incidence and mortality, but not with stroke incidence or mortality....

  3. Stress, anger and Mediterranean diet as predictors of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silva, Jaqueline; Navarrete Navarrete, Nuria; Ruano Rodríguez, Ana; Peralta-Ramírez, María Isabel; Mediavilla García, Juan Diego; Caballo, Vicente E

    2017-10-30

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic conditions that include abdominal obesity, reduction in cholesterol concentrations linked to high density lipoproteins (HLDc), elevated triglycerides, increased blood pressure and hyperglycaemia. Given that this is a multicausal disease, the aim of this study is to identify the psychological, emotional and lifestyle variables that can have an influence on the different MetS components. A cross-sectional study with 103 patients with diagnostic criteria for MetS (47 male and 56 female). Anthropometric, clinical and analytical measurements were collected to assess the variables associated with MetS. The main psychological and emotional variables were also assessed. Different multiple linear regression tests were performed to identify which variables were predictive of MetS. The dependent variables were body mass index (BMI), abdominal circumference, HDLc, and quality of life, and the predictive variables were psychological stress, anger and adherence to a Mediterranean diet. The results showed that psychological stress was a predictor of quality of life (β=-0.55, P≤0). Similarly, anger was a predictor of BMI (β=0.23, P=.047) and abdominal circumference (β=0.27, P=.021). As expected, adherence to a Mediterranean diet was a predictor of HDLc (β=0.2, P=.045) and of quality of life (β=-0.18, P=.031). The results confirm a link between adherence to certain dietary habits and lifestyle, however they go one step further and show the importance of psychological and emotional factors like psychological stress and anger in some MetS components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental footprints of Mediterranean versus Western dietary patterns: beyond the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary patterns can substantially vary the resource consumption and environmental impact of a given population. Dietary changes such as the increased consumption of vegetables and reduced consumption of animal products reduce the environmental footprint and thus the use of natural resources. The adherence of a given population to the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern (MDP) through the consumption of the food proportions and composition defined in the new Mediterranean Diet pyramid can thus not only influence human health but also the environment. The aim of the study was to analyze the sustainability of the MDP in the context of the Spanish population in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural land use, energy consumption and water consumption. Furthermore, we aimed to compare the current Spanish diet with the Mediterranean Diet and in comparison with the western dietary pattern, exemplified by the U.S.A. food pattern, in terms of their corresponding environmental footprints. Methods The environmental footprints of the dietary patterns studied were calculated from the dietary make-up of each dietary pattern, and specific environmental footprints of each food group. The dietary compositions were obtained from different sources, including food balance sheets and household consumption surveys. The specific environmental footprints of food groups were obtained from different available life-cycle assessments. Results The adherence of the Spanish population to the MDP has a marked impact on all the environmental footprints studied. Increasing adherence to the MDP pattern in Spain will reduce greenhouse gas emissions (72%), land use (58%) and energy consumption (52%), and to a lower extent water consumption (33%). On the other hand, the adherence to a western dietary pattern implies an increase in all these descriptors of between 12% and 72%. Conclusions The MDP is presented as not only a cultural model but also as a healthy and environmentally

  5. A consensus proposal for nutritional indicators to assess the sustainability of a healthy diet: the Mediterranean diet as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo M Donini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is increasing evidence of the multiple effects of diets on public health nutrition, society and environment. Sustainability and food security are closely inter-related. The traditional Mediterranean Diet (MD is recognized as a healthier dietary pattern with a lower environmental impact. As a case study, the MD may guide innovative inter-sectorial efforts to counteract the degradation of ecosystems, loss of biodiversity and homogeneity of diets due to globalization, through the improvement of sustainable healthy dietary patterns.This consensus position paper defines a suite of the most appropriate nutrition and health indicators for assessing the sustainability of diets based on the MD.Methods: In 2011, an informal International Working Group from different national and international institutions was convened. Through online and face-to-face brainstorming meetings over four years, a set of nutrition and health indicators for sustainability was identified and refined.Results: Thirteen nutrition indicators of sustainability relating were identified in five areas: •Biochemical characteristics of food (A1. Vegetable/animal protein consumption ratios; (A2. Average dietary energy adequacy; (A3. Dietary energy density score; (A4. Nutrient density of diet: •Food Quality (A5. Fruit and vegetable consumption/intakes; (A6. Dietary diversity score: •Environment (A7. Food biodiversity composition and consumption; (A8. Rate of Local/regional foods and seasonality; (A9. Rate of eco-friendly food production and/or consumption: •Lifestyle (A10. Physical activity/Physical inactivity prevalence; (A11. Adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern•Clinical Aspects; (A12. Diet-related morbidity/mortality statistics; (A13. Nutritional Anthropometry. A standardized set of information was provided for each indicator: definition, methodology, background, data sources, limitations of the indicator and references.Conclusions: The selection and

  6. Fertility parameters in lactating Mediterranean buffaloes fed two different diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Terzano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different diets on fertility rate in 64 Mediterranean buffalo cows. The animals were divided in two groups: Group S (n=32 received a total mixed ration based on haysilage of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, hay and concentrates, whereas group H (n=32 was fed only hay and concentrates. Both diets consisted of 50-55 % forages and 45-50 % concentrates and contained 0.91 MFU/kg dry matter (DM and 16% crude protein/DM. From February until September the cows were located together with bulls and pregnancy diagnosis was performed monthly. Furthermore, blood and milk samples were monthly collected on 20 animals in each group. Statistical analysis was performed by χ2 and t Student tests. A higher fertility rate was recorded in group H vs. group S (100 vs. 78.1%, respectively; P<0.05. Furthermore, higher blood and milk urea levels were recorded in group S during the first months of the trial (respectively 10.8 vs. 9.6 mmol L-1; P<0.01 and 55.4 vs. 50.6 mg/dl; P<0.05. It can be hypothesized that the higher levels of urea in group S may have affected the reproductive performances of the animals, increasing the nitrogen concentration in the uterus.

  7. How low can dietary greenhouse gas emissions be reduced without impairing nutritional adequacy, affordability and acceptability of the diet? A modelling study to guide sustainable food choices

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gaël; Barré, Tangui; Vieux, Florent; Maillot, Matthieu; Amiot-Carlin, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the compatibility between reduction of diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) and nutritional adequacy, acceptability and affordability dimensions of diet sustainability. [br/] Design: Dietary intake, nutritional composition, GHGE and prices were combined for 402 foods selected among those most consumed by participants of the Individual National Study on Food Consumption. Linear programming was used to model diets with stepwise GHGE reductions, minimized departur...

  8. Dietary habits of the hypertensive population of Spain: accordance with the DASH diet and the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Muñoz, Luz M; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Graciani, Auxiliadora; López-García, Esther; Mesas, Arthur E; Taboada, José M; Banegas, José R; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Dietary treatment is appropriate for all patients with hypertension. However, only a few population-based studies have evaluated the diet of hypertensive individuals, and none of them has been conducted in Europe. This study examined accordance with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Mediterranean diet in the hypertensive population of Spain. A cross-sectional study conducted in 2008-2010 among 12 948 individuals representative of the Spanish population aged at least 18 years. Blood pressure was measured with validated devices under standardized conditions. Habitual food consumption was assessed with a computerized diet history. DASH accordance was defined as at least 4.5 points on a score using nine nutrient targets, and Mediterranean diet accordance as at least 9 points on the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener score. Among the diagnosed hypertensive individuals, 17.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 15.4-19.2%] had a DASH-accordant diet, and 17.2% (95% CI 15.4-19.1%) had a Mediterranean-accordant diet. The frequency of DASH accordance increased with age, was higher among women and hypercholesterolaemic individuals, and lower in current smokers. Similar results were found for Mediterranean diet accordance. Only 60% of the diagnosed hypertensive individuals reported receiving and following a diet prescribed to control hypertension; this group showed a better accordance with the DASH diet [age and sex-adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.43; 95% CI 1.08-1.88]. As compared with the 1518 hypertensive individuals unaware of their condition, those who were diagnosed showed a similar frequency of accordance with the DASH diet (aOR 1.08; 95% CI 0.87-1.34) and the Mediterranean diet (aOR 0.98; 95% CI 0.79-1.20). The diet of hypertensive individuals in Spain has a low accordance with the DASH and Mediterranean dietary patterns. The similarity in healthy-diets accordance between the diagnosed and undiagnosed hypertensive individuals suggests that

  9. Modified Mediterranean Diet Score and Cardiovascular Risk in a North American Working Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Justin; Farioli, Andrea; Korre, Maria; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is linked to lower risk for cardiovascular morbidity/mortality in studies of Mediterranean cohorts, older subjects, and/or those with existing health conditions. No studies have examined the effects of this dietary pattern in younger working populations in the United States. We investigated the effects of Mediterranean diet adherence on cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, metabolic syndrome and body composition in an occupationally active, non-Mediterranean cohort. Methods A cross-sectional study in a cohort of 780 career male firefighters, ages 18 years or older, from the United States Midwest. No dietary intervention was performed. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMDS) was developed for assessment of adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern from a previously administered life-style questionnaire that examined pre-existing dietary habits. Clinical data from fire department medical examinations were extracted and analyzed. Results Obese subjects had significantly lower mMDS, and they reported greater fast/take-out food consumption (pMediterranean-style dietary pattern had significant inverse associations with metabolic syndrome, LDL-cholesterol and reported weight gain, and was significantly and independently associated with higher HDL-cholesterol. Our results support the potential effectiveness of this diet in young, non-Mediterranean working cohorts, and justify future intervention studies. PMID:24503596

  10. Comparison of the Effects of the 1975 Japanese Diet and the Modern Mediterranean Diet on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizowaki, Yui; Sugawara, Saeko; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Sakamoto, Yu; Iwagaki, Yui; Kawakami, Yuki; Igarashi, Miki; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The Japanese diet and the Mediterranean diet are both known to be good for health, but there had been no direct comparison of their health benefits. In this study, we compared the 1975 Japanese diet, which has been found to have high health benefits, with the 2010 Italian diet, which contributes to the longest life expectancy in Mediterranean countries. Diets were created using one-week menus of the two diets based on FAOSTAT Food Balance Sheets. The diets were prepared, freeze-dried, powdered and fed to mice for 4 weeks to examine their effects on lipid metabolism. In mice fed the Japanese diet, the visceral fat weight was lower, adipocytes were smaller, the liver weight was lower and liver TG tended to be lower than those fed the Italian diet, and little lipid accumulation was observed in hepatocytes of mice fed the Japanese diet. In addition, in mice fed the Japanese diet, the expression levels of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were lower, whereas those of genes related to catabolism of fatty acids and cholesterol were higher than those fed the Italian diet. Therefore, the Japanese diet reduced accumulation of lipids in the white adipose tissue and liver by suppressing fatty acid synthesis and promoting catabolism of fatty acids and cholesterol in the liver, compared to the Italian diet.

  11. Factors associated with low adherence to a Mediterranean diet in healthy children in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriscado, Daniel; Muros, José J; Zabala, Mikel; Dalmau, José M

    2014-09-01

    There is a tendency in Mediterranean countries to abandon the characteristic Mediterranean diet. This is especially apparent within younger populations. This could have negative consequences for health such as, cardiovascular diseases, obesity or metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe adherence to the Mediterranean diet within a population of school children and to examine the influence of different socio-demographic factors and lifestyle habits. The study was conducted on a representative sample of 321 school children aged 11-12 years from 31 schools in the city of Logroño (La Rioja). Socio-demographic variables, anthropometric variables, blood pressure, level of development, aerobic fitness, lifestyle, physical activity habits and adherence to the Mediterranean diet were recorded. High adherence to the Mediterranean diet was reported by 46.7% of school children, with low adherence being reported by 4.7% of them. Children attending state schools, immigrants and families from low-to-medium socio-economic strata reported significantly lower adherence to the Mediterranean diet (p = .039), but the results did not reveal any significant differences in terms of body composition. Correlations were found between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and other lifestyle habits, especially level of physical activity (r = .38) and screen time (r = -.18). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet differs according to the type of school attended by children, and the child's nationality and socio-economic status. Children who attended state schools, immigrants and those from families with a medium-to-low socio-economic status were less likely to follow healthy diets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mediterranean-type diets and inflammatory markers in patients with coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hannah L; Tierney, Audrey C; Thomas, Colleen J; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Radcliffe, Jessica; Itsiopoulos, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    The health benefits of a Mediterranean diet are thought to be mediated via its anti-inflammatory effects; however, the anti-inflammatory effect of this diet is unclear in patients who have already developed coronary heart disease (CHD). This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effect of Mediterranean-type diets on cytokines and adipokines in patients with CHD. An electronic search of the literature was conducted up to October 2016 using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library. Eleven of the 435 articles identified met eligibility criteria. Four observational studies reported significant inverse associations between Mediterranean-type diet scores and inflammatory cytokines. Five clinical trials (4 in non-Mediterranean countries) demonstrated nonsignificant reductions, and 2 trials conducted in Spain demonstrated significant reductions in C-reactive protein with a Mediterranean-type diet. Random effects meta-analysis of 4 controlled trials detected a nonsignificant difference in final mean value of C-reactive protein with Mediterranean-type diet vs low-fat diet. Despite promising findings from observational studies, this review demonstrated mostly nonsignificant effects of Mediterranean-type diet interventions on inflammatory cytokines and no effect in comparison to low-fat diets in controlled trials conducted primarily in Mediterranean populations. Therefore, randomized controlled trials of a traditional Mediterranean diet in non-Mediterranean populations and with multiple inflammatory biomarkers are needed in the high-risk CHD patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrea, Luigi; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Di Somma, Carolina; Falco, Andrea; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2017-02-17

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA) is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern). In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively ( p Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity.

  14. Association between Mediterranean diet adherence and dyslipidaemia in a cohort of adults living in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platania, Armando; Zappala, Gaetano; Mirabella, Maria Ugo; Gullo, Carmelo; Mellini, Giulio; Beneventano, Guglielmo; Maugeri, Giuseppe; Marranzano, Marina

    2017-10-24

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between Mediterranean diet adherence and dyslipidaemia in a cohort of adults living in the Mediterranean area. The cross-sectional study comprised a total sample of 2044 men and women, aged >18 years old from southern Italy. The Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed using a validated score (MEDI-LITE score). Clinical data were investigated and anthropometric examinations were collected using standardised methods. Among included individuals, 18.4% had dyslipidaemia. The percentage of females with dyslipidaemia was higher than males (21.2% vs. 14.6%). Higher adherence to Mediterranean diet was inversely associated with dyslipidaemia (OR: 0.56, 95% Cl: 0.36, 0.86). Similar association was observed in men, but not in women. On the contrary, a positive association was found between dyslipidaemia and current smoking and higher occupational status. Our results support the potential effectiveness of this diet in the prevention of dyslipidaemia and justify future intervention studies.

  15. Effect of a high monounsaturated fatty acids diet and a Mediterranean diet on serum lipids and insulin sensitivity in adults with mild abdominal obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Dijk, van S.J.; Hoelen, D.; Siebelink, E.; Heijligenberg, R.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims - Diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) such as a Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases by improving insulin sensitivity and serum lipids. Besides being high in MUFA, a Mediterranean diet also contains abundant plant foods, moderate wine and

  16. The development of the Mediterranean-Style Dietary Pattern Score and its application to the American diet in the Framingham Offspring Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous Mediterranean diet scores were simple to apply but may not be appropriate for non-Mediterranean populations. We developed a Mediterranean-Style Dietary Pattern Score (MSDPS) to assess the conformity of an individual’s diet to a traditional Mediterranean-style diet. The MSDPS is based on the...

  17. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Mattei, Josiemer

    2018-03-14

    The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been recommended to the general population by many scientific organizations as a healthy dietary pattern, based on strong evidence of association with improved cardiometabolic health, including lower risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. However, most studies have been conducted in Mediterranean or European countries or among white populations in the United States (US), while few exist for non-Mediterranean countries or racial/ethnic minority populations in the US. Because most existing studies evaluating adherence to the MedDiet use population-specific definitions or scores, the reported associations may not necessarily apply to other racial/ethnic populations that may have different distributions of intake. Moreover, racial/ethnic groups may have diets that do not comprise the typical Mediterranean foods captured by these scores. Thus, there is a need to determine if similar positive effects from following a MedDiet are observed in diverse populations, as well as to identify culturally-relevant foods reflected within Mediterranean-like patterns, that can facilitate implementation and promotion of such among broader racial/ethnic groups. In this narrative review, we summarize and discuss the evidence from observational and intervention studies on the MedDiet and cardiometabolic diseases in racial/ethnic minority populations in the US, and offer recommendations to enhance research on MedDiet for such populations.

  18. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Mattei, Josiemer

    2018-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been recommended to the general population by many scientific organizations as a healthy dietary pattern, based on strong evidence of association with improved cardiometabolic health, including lower risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. However, most studies have been conducted in Mediterranean or European countries or among white populations in the United States (US), while few exist for non-Mediterranean countries or racial/ethnic minority populations in the US. Because most existing studies evaluating adherence to the MedDiet use population-specific definitions or scores, the reported associations may not necessarily apply to other racial/ethnic populations that may have different distributions of intake. Moreover, racial/ethnic groups may have diets that do not comprise the typical Mediterranean foods captured by these scores. Thus, there is a need to determine if similar positive effects from following a MedDiet are observed in diverse populations, as well as to identify culturally-relevant foods reflected within Mediterranean-like patterns, that can facilitate implementation and promotion of such among broader racial/ethnic groups. In this narrative review, we summarize and discuss the evidence from observational and intervention studies on the MedDiet and cardiometabolic diseases in racial/ethnic minority populations in the US, and offer recommendations to enhance research on MedDiet for such populations. PMID:29538339

  19. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet by the Greek and Cypriot population: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, Alexis; Evans, Josie M M; Economides, Nicholas; Kyriacou, Angelos

    2015-12-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet is defined as the dietary pattern in the countries of the Mediterranean basin between the 1950s and 1960s, and it is now widely accepted that has a beneficial effect on health. A debate exists from empirical and research data if the traditional Mediterranean diet remains the main dietary pattern of the region or if it has changed overtime. This systematic review addresses whether the people of Cyprus and Greece still follow the traditional Mediterranean diet or whether the diet has become more 'Westernised'. The MEDLINE database was searched using relevant free terms and independently reviewed by two authors. In addition, all reference lists of identified studies were hand-searched to identify additional, relevant studies. The review resulted in 18 research papers that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and represented 15 independent studies. The main outcome was consistent between studies and indicated moderate adherence of the Greek, and (probably) of the Cypriot, population to the Mediterranean diet. The majority of studies found no statistically significant differences by gender. There was an observed inter-study lower adherence to the Mediterranean diet by the younger population. Few studies addressed intra-study variations by age. This review shows that adherence to the Mediterranean diet is moderate in Greece (and probably also in Cyprus).This suggests a continuing transition from dietary patterns in the 50 s-60 s towards a more Westernized diet. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. The nutritional adequacy of a limited vegan diet for a controlled ecological life-support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.

    Purdue University, as well as the Johnson and Kennedy Space Centers and NASA Ames Research Center, are investigating approximately 5-10 plants that will be grown hydroponically to provide not only the energy and nutrients, but also the oxygen for humans habitating in Mars and lunar bases. The growth and nutritional status of rats fed either a control diet (adequate in all macro- and micronutrients) or a strict vegetarian diet consisting of 5 (vegan-5) or 10 (vegan-10) candidate crop species were investigated. In addition, vegan-10 diets were supplemented with mineral and/or vitamin mix at a level similar to the control diets to assess the effect of supplementation on nutrient status. The assessment of inedible plant material as an alternative food source was also investigated. Results of this study demonstrated that consumption of the vegan-10 diet significantly improved weight gain of rats compared to that for rats fed the vegan-5 diet. Mineral supplementation, at a level present in the control diet, to the vegan-10 diet improved growth and nutrient status, but growth was significantly lower compared to the control-fed rats. Inclusion of inedible plant material, high in ash content, improved some indices of nutrient status, without improving growth.

  1. The nutritional adequacy of a limited vegan diet for a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Purdue University, as well as the Johnson and Kennedy Space Centers and NASA Ames Research Center, are investigating approximately 5-10 plants that will be grown hydroponically to provide not only the energy and nutrients, but also the oxygen for humans habitating in Mars and lunar bases. The growth and nutritional status of rats fed either a control diet (adequate in all macro- and micronutrients) or a strict vegetarian diet consisting of 5 (vegan-5) or 10 (vegan-10) candidate crop species were investigated. In addition, vegan-10 diets were supplemented with mineral and/or vitamin mix at a level similar to the control diets to assess the effect of supplementation on nutrient status. The assessment of inedible plant material as an alternative food source was also investigated. Results of this study demonstrated that consumption of the vegan-10 diet significantly improved weight gain of rats compared to that for rats fed the vegan-5 diet. Mineral supplementation, at a level present in the control diet, to the vegan-10 diet improved growth and nutrient status, but growth was significantly lower compared to the control-fed rats. Inclusion of inedible plant material, high in ash content, improved some indices of nutrient status, without improving growth.

  2. How low can dietary greenhouse gas emissions be reduced without impairing nutritional adequacy, affordability and acceptability of the diet? A modelling study to guide sustainable food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perignon, Marlène; Masset, Gabriel; Ferrari, Gaël; Barré, Tangui; Vieux, Florent; Maillot, Matthieu; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Darmon, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    To assess the compatibility between reduction of diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) and nutritional adequacy, acceptability and affordability dimensions of diet sustainability. Dietary intake, nutritional composition, GHGE and prices were combined for 402 foods selected among those most consumed by participants of the Individual National Study on Food Consumption. Linear programming was used to model diets with stepwise GHGE reductions, minimized departure from observed diet and three scenarios of nutritional constraints: none (FREE), on macronutrients (MACRO) and for all nutrient recommendations (ADEQ). Nutritional quality was assessed using the mean adequacy ratio (MAR) and solid energy density (SED). France. Adults (n 1899). In FREE and MACRO scenarios, imposing up to 30 % GHGE reduction did not affect the MAR, SED and food group pattern of the observed diet, but required substitutions within food groups; higher GHGE reductions decreased diet cost, but also nutritional quality, even with constraints on macronutrients. Imposing all nutritional recommendations (ADEQ) increased the fruits and vegetables quantity, reduced SED and slightly increased diet cost without additional modifications induced by the GHGE constraint up to 30 % reduction; higher GHGE reductions decreased diet cost but required non-trivial dietary shifts from the observed diet. Not all the nutritional recommendations could be met for GHGE reductions ≥70 %. Moderate GHGE reductions (≤30 %) were compatible with nutritional adequacy and affordability without adding major food group shifts to those induced by nutritional recommendations. Higher GHGE reductions either impaired nutritional quality, even when macronutrient recommendations were imposed, or required non-trivial dietary shifts compromising acceptability to reach nutritional adequacy.

  3. Alimentation méditerranéenne et cancers [Mediterranean diet and cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette GERBER

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer prevention through food habits is an important matter of public health, given that everybody is exposed to food. The Mediterranean diet model is briefly reported, together with the way to evaluate the adherence to this diet. However, the original score, made for Mediterranean populations, had to be adapted to Western populations. These modifications pinpoint the peculiar aspects of the Mediterranean diet related to health. The studies reporting on the relationship between Mediterranean diet and cancer mortality, colorectal, breast, prostate and other cancers incidence are described. A risk reduction is generally evoked for these outcomes in Mediterranean countries, but it is more difficult to show in US or North-European country. Enough subjects with sane food habits, capable to reveal an inverse association of a Mediterranean-style diet and cancers, might only be found in large cohorts. In addition, the group of “negative” foods in the score needs to include “junk food”, known to be deleterious, and often part of the habits in these occidental countries. In conclusion, it can be said that a high and diverse consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grain cereals is a must, be underlined the importance of olive oil, be mentioned the advantage of eating sea-food at least twice-a-week. Consumption of red and processed meat, dairy foods, and alcohol should be kept low and it is important to avoid sugars, saturated fats, all junk-foods, providing empty calories.

  4. The effects of the Mediterranean diet on rheumatoid arthritis prevention and treatment: a systematic review of human prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Casuarina; Kouvari, Matina; D'Cunha, Nathan M; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Mellor, Duane D; Kellett, Jane; Naumovski, Nenad

    2017-12-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive autoimmune disease characterised by severely swollen and painful joints. To compliment pharmacotherapy, people living with rheumatoid arthritis often turn to dietary interventions such as the Mediterranean diet. The aim of the present systematic review is to discuss the effects of the Mediterranean diet on the management and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis in human prospective studies. Four studies met the inclusion criteria, including two intervention studies reporting improvement in the pain visual analogue scale (p Mediterranean diet groups. Only one study reported a reduction in the 28 joint count disease activity score for rheumatoid arthritis for the Mediterranean diet group (p Mediterranean diet in reducing pain and increasing physical function in people living with rheumatoid arthritis. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to support widespread recommendation of the Mediterranean diet for prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Effect of a Low Glycemic Index Mediterranean Diet on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. A Randomized Controlled Clinici Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misciagna, G; Del Pilar Díaz, M; Caramia, D V; Bonfiglio, C; Franco, I; Noviello, M R; Chiloiro, M; Abbrescia, D I; Mirizzi, A; Tanzi, M; Caruso, M G; Correale, M; Reddavide, R; Inguaggiato, R; Cisternino, A M; Osella, A R

    2017-01-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of liver disease worldwide affecting all ages and ethnic groups and it has become a consistent threat even in young people. Our aim was to estimate the effect of a Low Glycemic Index Mediterranean Diet (LGIMD) on the NAFLD score as measured by a Liver Ultrasonography (LUS). NUTRIzione in EPAtologia (NUTRIEPA) is a population-based Double-Blind RCT. Data were collected in 2011 and analyzed in 2013-14. 98 men and women coming from Putignano (Puglia, Southern Italy) were drawn from a previous randomly sampled population-based study and identified as having moderate or severe NAFLD. The intervention strategy was the assignment of a LGIMD or a control diet. The main outcome measure was NAFLD score, defined by LUS. After randomization, 50 subjects were assigned to a LGIMD and 48 to a control diet. The study lasted six months and all participants were subject to monthly controls/checks. Adherence to the LGIMD as measured by Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI) showed a median of 10.1. A negative interaction between time and LGIMD on the NAFLD score (-4.14, 95% CI -6.78,-1.49) was observed, and became more evident at the sixth month (-4.43, 95%CI -7.15, -1.71). A positive effect of the interaction among LGIMD, time and age (Third month: 0.07, 95% CI 0.02, 0.12; Sixth month: 0.08, 95% CI 0.03,0.13) was also observed. LGIMD was found to decrease the NAFLD score in a relatively short time. Encouraging those subjects who do not seek medical attention but still have NAFLD to follow a LGIMD and other life-style interventions, may reduce the degree of severity of the disease. Dietary intervention of this kind, could also form the cornerstone of primary prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease.

  6. 100% Orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% orange juice ...

  7. Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality using a cross-sectional design. The setting was The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. The sub...

  8. Modified Mediterranean diet and survival after myocardial infarction : the EPIC-Elderly study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trichopoulou, A.; Bamia, C.; Norat, T.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Halkjaer, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Vercambre, M. -N.; Boutron-Ruault, M. -C.; Linseisen, J.; Rohrmann, S.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Benetou, V.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Orfanos, P.; Boffetta, P.; Masala, G.; Pala, V.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Sacerdote, C.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Ocke, M. C.; Peeters, P. H.; Van der Schouw, Y. T.; Gonzalez, C.; Sanchez, M. J.; Schmidt, E.B.; Chirlaque, M. D.; Moreno, C.; Larranaga, N.; Van Guelpen, B.; Jansson, J. -H.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K. -T.; Spencer, E. A.; Key, T.; Riboli, E.; Trichopoulos, D.

    2007-01-01

    Mediterranean diet is associated with lower incidence of coronary heart disease, and two randomised trials indicated that it improves prognosis of coronary patients. These trials, however, relied on a total of 100 deaths and evaluated designer diets in the clinical context. We have evaluated the

  9. Physical Activity and Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Increase Total Antioxidant Capacity: The ATTICA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros A. Kavouras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the association of physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, in total antioxidant capacity (TAC. A random sample of 1514 men and 1528 women was selected from Attica region. Physical activity was assessed with a translated version of the validated “International Physical Activity Questionnaire” (iPAQ, and dietary intake through a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed by the MedDietScore that incorporated the inherent characteristics of this diet. TAC was positively correlated with the degree of physical activity (P<.05. TAC was also positively correlated with MedDietScore (r=0.24, P<.001. Stratified analysis by diet status revealed that the most beneficial results were observed to highly active people as compared to inactive, who also followed the Mediterranean diet (288  ±  70 μmol/L, 230  ±  50 μmol/L, resp., after adjusting for various confounders. Increased physical activity and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet were associated with increased total antioxidant capacity.

  10. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T.; Davis, Courtney R.; Dyer, Kathryn A.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.; Woodman, Richard J.; Keage, Hannah A. D.; Murphy, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines. PMID:28212320

  11. Factors associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino-Alonso, Maria C; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Belio, Jose Felix Magdalena; Colominas-Garrido, Ruben; Lema-Bartolomé, Jorge; Arranz, Amparo Gómez; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to analyze the variables associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the adult population. We conducted a cross-sectional study in an established cohort of 1,553 healthy study participants (mean age=55 ± 14 years; 60.3% women). Mediterranean diet adherence was evaluated based on a 14-item questionnaire and the Mediterranean diet adherence screener, which defines adequate adherence as a score of ≥ 9. Physical activity was evaluated using the 7-day physical activity record. Sociodemographic, biological, and anthropometric variables were also evaluated. The differences between Mediterranean diet compliers and noncompliers are defined by the consumption of fruit, red meats, carbonated beverages, wine, fish/shellfish, legumes, pasta, and rice (PMediterranean diet adherence: more physical exercise (odds ratio=1.588), older age (odds ratio=2.162), and moderate alcohol consumption (odds ratio=1.342). The factors associated with improved Mediterranean diet adherence included female sex, age older than 62 years, moderate alcohol consumption, and more than 17 metabolic equivalents (METs)/h/wk of physical exercise. Poorer adherence was associated with males and obesity. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adherence to the "Mediterranean Diet" in Spain and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk (DIMERICA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Alemán, José; Zafrilla Rentero, María Pilar; Montoro-García, Silvia; Mulero, Juana; Pérez Garrido, Alfonso; Leal, Mariano; Guerrero, Lucía; Ramos, Elena; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2016-10-28

    Nutritional studies focus on traditional cultural models and lifestyles in different countries. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, life habits, and risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases among people living in different geographical regions in Spain. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in each region. The sampling scheme consisted of a random three-stage stratified sampling program according to geographic region, age, and gender. A total of 1732 subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess their nutrient intake, dietary habits, and exercise. A diet score that assesses the adherence of participants to the Mediterranean diet (range 0-10) was also applied. Southeastern Spain had the lowest score for adherence to the Mediterranean diet because of the low consumption of fish and plant products. A lower adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was strongly associated with the prevalence of hypertension ( p = 0.018). A low level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet is accompanied by a high prevalence of hypertension and, therefore, a raised cardiovascular risk in the country. The adherence score could help identify individuals at greater cardiovascular risk.

  13. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T; Davis, Courtney R; Dyer, Kathryn A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard J; Keage, Hannah A D; Murphy, Karen J

    2017-02-16

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines.

  14. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower incidence of frailty: A longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Stubbs, Brendon; Noale, Marianna; Solmi, Marco; Rizzoli, Renè; Vaona, Alberto; Demurtas, Jacopo; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Maggi, Stefania

    2017-09-04

    There is a paucity of data investigating the relationship between the Mediterranean diet and frailty, with no data among North American people. We aimed to investigate if adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of frailty in a large cohort of North American people. This study included subjects at higher risk or having knee osteoarthritis. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED) as proposed by Panagiotakos and classified into five categories. Frailty was defined using the Study of Osteoporotic Fracture (SOF) index as the presence of ≥2 out of: (i) weight loss ≥5% between baseline and the subsequent follow-up visit; (ii) inability to do five chair stands; (iii) low energy level. During the 8 years follow-up, of the 4421 participants initially included (mean age: 61.2 years, % of females = 58.0), the incidence of frailty was approximately half in those with a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (8 for 1000 person years) vs. those with a lower adherence (15 for 1000 persons-years). After adjusting for 10 potential confounders (age, sex, race, body mass index, education, smoking habits, yearly income, physical activity level, Charlson co-morbidity index and daily energy intake), participants with the highest aMED scores were found to have a significant reduction in incident frailty (hazard ratio = 0.71; 95% CIs: 0.50-0.99, p = 0.047) with respect to those in a lower category. Regarding individual components of the Mediterranean diet, low consumption of poultry was found to be associated with higher risk of frailty. A higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower incidence of frailty over an 8-year follow-up period, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Mediterranean diet in the southern Croatia – does it still exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolčić, Ivana; Relja, Ajka; Gelemanović, Andrea; Miljković, Ana; Boban, Kristina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Polašek, Ozren

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the population of Dalmatia in southern Croatia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed within the 10 001 Dalmatians cohort, encompassing 2768 participants from Korčula and Vis islands and the City of Split, who were recruited during 2011-2014. Using the data obtained from food frequency questionnaire we calculated the Mediterranean Diet Serving Score (MDSS). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the characteristics associated with the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, with age, sex, place of residence, education attainment, smoking, and physical activity as covariates. Results The median MDSS score was 11 out of 24 points (interquartile range 8-13), with the highest score recorded on the island of Vis. Participants reported a dietary pattern that had high compliance with the Mediterranean diet guidelines for consumption of cereals (87% met the criteria), potatoes (73%), olive oil (69%), and fish (61%), moderate for consumption of fruit (54%) and vegetables (31%), and low for consumption of nuts (6%). Overall, only 23% of the participants were classified as being adherent to the Mediterranean diet, with a particularly low percentage among younger participants (12%) compared to the older ones (34%). Men were less likely to show good adherence (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.42-0.65). Conclusion This study revealed rather poor compliance with the current recommendations on the Mediterranean diet composition in the population of Dalmatia. Public health intervention is especially needed in younger age groups and in men, who show the greatest departure from traditional Mediterranean diet and lifestyle. PMID:27815932

  16. Mediterranean diet and cognitive function in older age: results from the Women’s Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samieri, Cécilia; Grodstein, Francine; Rosner, Bernard A.; Kang, Jae H.; Cook, Nancy R.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Buring, Julie E.; Willett, Walter C.; Okereke, Olivia I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to a Mediterranean diet may help prevent cognitive decline in older age, but studies are limited. We examined the association of adherence to the Mediterranean diet with cognitive function and decline. Methods We included 6,174 participants, aged 65+ years, from the cognitive sub-study of the Women’s Health Study. Women provided dietary information in 1998 and completed a cognitive battery 5 years later, followed by two assessments at 2-year intervals. The primary outcomes were composite scores of global cognition and verbal memory. The alternate Mediterranean diet adherence 9-point-score was constructed based on intakes of: vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, nuts, fish, red and processed meats, moderate alcohol, and the ratio of monounsaturated-to-saturated fats. Results After multivariable adjustment, the alternate Mediterranean diet score was not associated with trajectories of repeated cognitive scores (P-trend across quintiles=0.26 and 0.40 for global cognition and verbal memory, respectively), nor with overall global cognition and verbal memory at older ages, assessed by averaging the three cognitive measures (P-trend=0.63 and 0.44, respectively). Among alternate Mediterranean diet components, higher monounsaturated-to-saturated fats ratio was associated with more favorable cognitive trajectories (P-trend=0.03 and 0.05 for global cognition and verbal memory, respectively). Greater whole grain intake was not associated with cognitive trajectories, but was related to better average global cognition (P-trend=0.02). Conclusions In this large study of older women, we observed no association of the Mediterranean diet with cognitive decline. Relations between individual Mediterranean diet components, particularly whole grains, and cognitive function merit further study. PMID:23676264

  17. Validation of a literature-based adherence score to Mediterranean diet: the MEDI-LITE score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, Francesco; Dinu, Monica; Pagliai, Giuditta; Marcucci, Rossella; Casini, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between adherence to Mediterranean diet and prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to validate a novel instrument to measure adherence to Mediterranean diet based on the literature (the MEDI-LITE score). Two-hundred-and-four clinically healthy subjects completed both the MEDI-LITE score and the validated MedDietScore (MDS). Significant positive correlation between the MEDI-LITE and the MDS scores was found in the study population (R = .70; p MEDI-LITE evidenced a significant discriminative capacity between adherents and non-adherents to the Mediterranean diet pattern (optimal cut-off point = 8.50; sensitivity = 96%; specificity = 38%). In conclusion, our findings show that the MEDI-LITE score well correlate with MDS in both global score and in most of the items related to the specific food categories.

  18. Effect of Mediterranean Diet in Diabetes Control and Cardiovascular Risk Modification: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana eSleiman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past few years, there has been a worldwide significant increase in the incidence of type II diabetes (T2DM with both increase in morbidity and mortality. Controlling diabetes through life style modifications, including diet and exercise has always been the cornerstone in diabetes management. As a matter of fact, a number of studies addressed the potential protective role of Mediterranean diet in diabetic patients. Increasing evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet could be of benefit in diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity as well as atherosclerosis, cancer, pulmonary diseases, and cognition disorders. Methods: A systematic review was conducted on the effect of Mediterranean diet in diabetes control and cardiovascular risk modification as well as the possible mechanism through which this diet might exhibit its beneficial role. We did a comprehensive search of multiple electronic databases such as Medline, Google Scholars, PubMed, and the Cochrane central register data until May 2014. We included cross-sectional, prospective and controlled clinical trials that looked at the associations between Mediterranean diet and indices of diabetes control such HbA1c, fasting glucose, and HOMA, in addition to cardiovascular and peripheral vascular outcomes.Outcome/Conclusion: Most of the studies showed favorable effects of Mediterranean diet on glycemic control and CVD, although a certain degree of controversy remains regarding some issues, such as obesity. Important methodological differences and limitations in the studies make it difficult to compare results, thus further longer term studies are needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the Mediterranean diet along with the possibility of explaining its mechanism.

  19. Dietary habits in Parkinson's disease: Adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Barichella, Michela; Ferri, Valentina; Pinelli, Giovanna; Iorio, Laura; Bolliri, Carlotta; Caronni, Serena; Faierman, Samanta A; Mottolese, Antonia; Pusani, Chiara; Monajemi, Fatemeh; Pasqua, Marianna; Lubisco, Alessandro; Cereda, Emanuele; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Petroni, Maria L; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-09-01

    Our objective is to describe the dietary habits, food preferences and adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeDi) of a large sample of Italian Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients compared to a group of controls. Dietary habits of 600 PD patients from throughout Italy and 600 controls matched by gender, age, education, physical activity level and geographical residence, were collected using the ON-GP Food Frequency Questionnaire. Then, we compared patients by disease duration and the presence of swallowing disturbances. Overall, adherence of PD patients (males, 53.8%; mean disease duration, 9.2 ± 7.0 years) to MeDi was similar to controls (score, 4.8 ± 1.7 vs. 4.9 ± 1.6; P = 0.294). Patients consumed less alcohol and fish and drank significantly less water, coffee, and milk which resulted also in lower total fluids intake. On the contrary, they ate more fruit, cooked vegetables, cereals and baked items, more dressings and more sweets in general. Disease duration was associated with increased intake of several food groups but it was not associated with changes in MeDi score (P = 0.721). Patients with swallowing disturbances (n = 72) preferred softer and more viscous food but preferences did not result in differences in dietary pattern. However, patients with dysphagia drank less fluids (P = 0.043). PD patients presented different dietary habits and food preferences compared to the general population and adherence to MeDi was not associated with disease duration. Self-reported dysphagia was associated with reduced intake of fluids. These aspects may be amenable to change in order to improve the management of nutritional issues in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mediterranean diet and brain structure in a multiethnic elderly cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yian; Brickman, Adam M; Stern, Yaakov; Habeck, Christian G; Razlighi, Qolamreza R; Luchsinger, José A; Manly, Jennifer J; Schupf, Nicole; Mayeux, Richard; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2015-11-17

    To determine whether higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet (MeDi) is related with larger MRI-measured brain volume or cortical thickness. In this cross-sectional study, high-resolution structural MRI was collected on 674 elderly (mean age 80.1 years) adults without dementia who participated in a community-based, multiethnic cohort. Dietary information was collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Total brain volume (TBV), total gray matter volume (TGMV), total white matter volume (TWMV), mean cortical thickness (mCT), and regional volume or CT were derived from MRI scans using FreeSurfer program. We examined the association of MeDi (scored as 0-9) and individual food groups with brain volume and thickness using regression models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, education, body mass index, diabetes, and cognition. Compared to lower MeDi adherence (0-4), higher adherence (5-9) was associated with 13.11 (p = 0.007), 5.00 (p = 0.05), and 6.41 (p = 0.05) milliliter larger TBV, TGMV, and TWMV, respectively. Higher fish (b = 7.06, p = 0.006) and lower meat (b = 8.42, p = 0.002) intakes were associated with larger TGMV. Lower meat intake was also associated with larger TBV (b = 12.20, p = 0.02). Higher fish intake was associated with 0.019 mm (p = 0.03) larger mCT. Volumes of cingulate cortex, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, and hippocampus and CT of the superior-frontal region were associated with the dietary factors. Among older adults, MeDi adherence was associated with less brain atrophy, with an effect similar to 5 years of aging. Higher fish and lower meat intake might be the 2 key food elements that contribute to the benefits of MeDi on brain structure. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Factors associated with Mediterranean diet adherence in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadeneyra, Jéssica; Cubo, Esther; Gil, Cecilia; Calvo, Sara; Mariscal, Natividad; Martínez, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the importance of the Mediterranean Diet (MeDi) and dietary intake as environmental neuroprotective factors in Huntington's disease (HD); so, we evaluated and analyzed the prevalence and factors associated with MeDi adherence, and dietary intake in HD. Spanish participants of the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN) Registry study diagnosed with HD or premanifest HD gene carriers were included from June 2012 to August 2013. Self-reported dietary intake was collected by 3-day dietary record, MeDi adherence was assessed by 0-9 range (proposed by Trichopoulou et al.) and, other contributing factors related to nutrition were collected by telephone. Demographics and clinical variables were obtained from the EHDN Registry study database. Association of HD with MeDi adherence and nutritional characteristics were performed using logistic regression models. Ninety eight participants were included in the study, median age of 48 years (38-60 range), and median total functional capacity (TFC) 9 (5-13 range). HD severity was similar between participants with low vs moderate/high MeDi; however, quality of life (P = 0.009) was significantly higher among participants with moderate/high MeDi adherence. In terms of nutrients, higher MUFA/SFA intake was moderately correlated with better TFC and Unified HD Rating Scale (UHDRS) cognitive. Better TFC was associated with having a caregiver (OR = 11.86, P the moderate MeDi adherence is associated with better quality of life, lower comorbidity, lower motor impairment and lower risk for abdominal obesity compared to those participants with low MeDi adherence. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Reduces Incident Frailty Risk: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro; Avgerinou, Christina; Iliffe, Steve; Walters, Kate

    2018-01-11

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature on prospective cohort studies examining associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and incident frailty and to perform a meta-analysis to synthesize the pooled risk estimates. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library were systematically searched on September 14, 2017. We reviewed references of included studies and relevant review papers and performed forward citation tracking for additional studies. Corresponding authors were contacted for additional data necessary for a meta-analysis. Community-dwelling older adults (mean age ≥60). Incident frailty risk according to adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Two reviewers independently screened the title, abstract, and full text to ascertain the eligibility of 125 studies that the systematic search of the literature identified, and four studies were included (5,789 older people with mean follow-up of 3.9 years). Two reviewers extracted data from the studies independently. All four studies provided adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of incident frailty risk according to three Mediterranean diet score (MDS) groups (0-3, 4-5, and 6-9). Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with significantly lower incident frailty risk (pooled OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.47-0.82, P = .001 for MDS 4-5; pooled OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.31-0.64, P Mediterranean diet is associated with significantly lower risk of incident frailty in community-dwelling older people. Future studies should confirm these findings and evaluate whether adherence to a Mediterranean diet can reduce the risk of frailty, including in non-Mediterranean populations. © 2018, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2018, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome prevalence in type 2 diabetes patients in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veissi, Masoud; Anari, Razieh; Amani, Reza; Shahbazian, Hajieh; Latifi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome as a cardiovascular disease predictor, is proposed to be reduced by following a Mediterranean diet. This study was aimed to explore the relationships between metabolic syndrome and Mediterranean diet in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A cross-sectional study was performed on 158 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients 28-75 years old (mean age: 54.3±9.6 yrs). Fasting glucose and lipid profile were measured. Blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics of each participant were recorded. Food frequency questionnaires were evaluated using an 11-item score to determine the adherence to Mediterranean diet. Totally, 55.4% of participants had a good adherence to Mediterranean diet. The risk of metabolic syndrome in women was significantly higher than in men (OR=8.65, CI 95%=2.88-25.99; pdiet (p=0.167). Results demonstrated no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. However, nuts, legumes and seeds might have greater benefits for diabetics. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mediterranean diet and life expectancy; beyond olive oil, fruits and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Martín-Calvo, Nerea

    2018-01-01

    Purpose to review the recent relevant evidence of the effects of the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle on health (2015 and first months of 2016). Recent findings Large observational prospective epidemiological studies with adequate control of confounding and two large randomized trials support the benefits of the Mediterranean dietary pattern to increase life expectancy, reduce the risk of major chronic disease, and improve quality of life and well-being. Recently, 19 new reports from large prospective studies showed –with nearly perfect consistency– strong benefits of the Mediterranean diet to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, total mortality, heart failure and disability. Interestingly, two large and well-conducted cohorts reported significant cardiovascular benefits after using repeated measurements of diet during a long follow-up period. Besides, PREDIMED, the largest randomized trial with Mediterranean diet, recently reported benefits of this dietary pattern to prevent cognitive decline and breast cancer. Summary In the era of evidence-based medicine, the Mediterranean diet represents the gold standard in preventive medicine, probably due to the harmonic combination of many elements with antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, which overwhelm any single nutrient or food item. The whole seems more important than the sum of its parts. PMID:27552476

  5. Mediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babio, Nancy; Toledo, Estefanía; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Castañer, Olga; Bulló, Mònica; Corella, Dolores; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M.; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Basora, Josep; Sorlí, José V.; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial — a multicentre, randomized trial done between October 2003 and December 2010 that involved men and women (age 55–80 yr) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary interventions: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts or advice on following a low-fat diet (the control group). The interventions did not include increased physical activity or weight loss as a goal. We analyzed available data from 5801 participants. We determined the effect of diet on incidence and reversion of metabolic syndrome using Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Over 4.8 years of follow-up, metabolic syndrome developed in 960 (50.0%) of the 1919 participants who did not have the condition at baseline. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome did not differ between participants assigned to the control diet and those assigned to either of the Mediterranean diets (control v. olive oil HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94–1.30, p = 0.231; control v. nuts HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92–1.27, p = 0.3). Reversion occurred in 958 (28.2%) of the 3392 participants who had metabolic syndrome at baseline. Compared with the control group, participants on either Mediterranean diet were more likely to undergo reversion (control v. olive oil HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15–1.58, p < 0.001; control v. nuts HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08–1.51, p < 0.001). Participants in the group receiving olive oil supplementation showed significant decreases in both central obesity and high fasting glucose (p = 0.02); participants in the group supplemented with nuts showed a

  6. Mediterranean diet and risk of heart failure:Results from the PREDIMED randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Alonso-Gómez, Angel; Rekondo, Javier; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Ros, Emilio; Fitó, Montse; Estruch, Ramon; Lapetra, José; García-Rodriguez, Antonio; Fiol, Miquel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) on the incidence of heart failure (HF), a pre-specified secondary outcome in the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) primary nutrition-intervention prevention trial. Methods and results: Participants at high risk of cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to one of three diets: MedDiet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), MedDiet supplemented with nuts, or a low-fat control di...

  7. A paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Ahrén, Bo; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background We found marked improvement of glucose tolerance and lower dietary energy intake in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients after advice to follow a Paleolithic diet, as compared to a Mediterranean-like diet. We now report findings on subjective ratings of satiety at meals and data on the satiety hormone leptin and the soluble leptin receptor from the same study. Methods Twenty-nine male IHD patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes type 2, and waist circumference...

  8. Switching to a 10-day Mediterranean-style diet improves mood and cardiovascular function in a controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaime; Pase, Matthew; Pipingas, Andrew; Raubenheimer, Jessica; Thurgood, Madeline; Villalon, Lorena; Macpherson, Helen; Gibbs, Amy; Scholey, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Even short-term adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet may benefit aspects of psychological functioning. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of switching to a 10-d Mediterranean-style diet on mood, cognition, and cardiovascular measures. Using a crossover design, 24 women were randomly assigned to either the diet change (where they switched to a Mediterranean-style diet) or no diet change (normal diet) condition for 10 days before switching to the other condition for the same duration. Mood, cognition, and cardiovascular measures of blood pressure, blood flow velocity, and arterial stiffness were assessed at baseline and at the completion of the two diets (days 11 and 22). Independent of whether the Mediterranean-style diet was undertaken before or after the crossover, it was associated with significantly elevated contentment and alertness, and significantly reduced confusion. Additionally, aspects of cognition, such as memory recall, improved significantly as a result of switching to the Mediterranean-style diet. Regarding cardiovascular measures, there was a significant reduction in augmentation pressure associated with the Mediterranean-style diet intervention, but blood flow velocity through the common carotid artery did not change. This Mediterranean-style diet has the potential to enhance aspects of mood, cognition, and cardiovascular function in a young, healthy adult sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges to the Mediterranean diet at a time of economic crisis.

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    Bonaccio, M; Bes-Rastrollo, M; de Gaetano, G; Iacoviello, L

    2016-12-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is reportedly associated with lower risk of major chronic diseases and long considered to contribute to the reduced rates of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and to the highest life expectancy in adults who lived near the Mediterranean Sea. But despite its widely documented health benefits, adherence to this dietary pattern has been rapidly declining over the last decades due to a clear socioeconomic influence. The present review provides an overview of the evidence on the current major determinants of adherence to the Mediterranean diet, with a particular emphasis on Mediterranean Countries at a time of economic crisis; second it explores emerging socioeconomic inequalities in other domains of healthy dietary behaviours such as dietary variety, access to organic foods and food purchasing behaviour. According to ecological evidence, the Mediterranean Countries that used to have the highest adherence to the Mediterranean pattern in the Sixties, more recently experienced the greatest decrease, while Countries in Northern Europe and some other Countries around the world are currently embracing a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern. A potential cause of this downward trend could be the increasing prices of some food items of the Mediterranean diet pyramid. Recent evidence has shown a possible involvement of the economic crisis, material resources becoming strong determinants of the adherence to the MD just after the recession started in 2007-2008. Beyond intake, the MD also encourages increasing dietary diversity, while international dietary recommendations suggest replacing regular foods with healthier ones. Socioeconomic factors appear to be major determinants of the adherence to MD and disparities also hold for other indices of diet quality closely related to this dietary pattern. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human

  10. Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: the Viva la Familia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Theresa A; Adolph, Anne L; Butte, Nancy F

    2009-06-01

    The role of diet quality and nutrient adequacy in the etiology of childhood obesity is poorly understood. The specific aims of these analyses were to assess overall diet quality and nutrient adequacy, and test for association between weight status and diet in children from low socioeconomic status (SES) Hispanic families at high risk for obesity. A cross-sectional study design was used to assess dietary intake in low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight who were enrolled in the Viva la Familia Study. Multiple-pass 24-hour dietary recalls were recorded on two random, weekday occasions. Diet quality was evaluated according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using z scores based on estimated average requirement or adequate intake. The study included 1,030 Hispanic children and adolescents, aged 4 to 19 years, in Houston, TX, who participated between November 2000 and August 2004. STATA software (version 9.1, 2006, STATA Corp, College Station, TX) was used for generalized estimating equations and random effects regression. Diet quality did not adhere to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar, and sodium. Although energy intake was significantly higher in children with overweight, food sources, diet quality, macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight children. Relative to estimated average requirements or adequate intake levels, mean nutrient intakes were adequate (70% to 98% probability) in the children without and with overweight, except for vitamins D and E, pantothenic acid, calcium, and potassium, for which z scores cannot be interpreted given the uncertainty of their adequate intake levels. Whereas the diets of low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight were adequate in most essential nutrients, other components of a healthful diet, which promote long-term health, were suboptimal. Knowledge of the

  11. Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status - the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Theresa A.; Adolph, Anne L.; Butte, Nancy F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The role of diet quality and nutrient adequacy in the etiology of childhood obesity is poorly understood. The specific aims of these analyses were to 1) assess overall diet quality and nutrient adequacy, and 2) test for association between weight status and diet in children from low socioeconomic status (SES) Hispanic families at high risk for obesity. Design A cross-sectional study design was used to assess dietary intake in low-SES non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children enrolled in the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study. Multiple-pass 24-h dietary recalls were recorded on two random, weekday occasions. Diet quality was evaluated according to United States (US) Dietary Guidelines. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using z-scores based on estimated average requirement (EAR) or adequate intake (AI). Subjects/Setting The study included 1030 Hispanic children and adolescents, ages 4-19 y, in Houston, Texas who participated between November 2000 and August 2004. Statistical analysis STATA was used for generalized estimating equations and random effects regression. Results Diet quality did not adhere to US dietary guidelines for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar and sodium. Although energy intake was significantly higher in overweight children, food sources, diet quality, macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight children. Relative to EAR or AI, mean nutrient intakes were adequate (70-98% probability) in the non-overweight and overweight children, except for vitamins D and E, pantothenic acid, calcium and potassium for which z-scores cannot be interpreted given the uncertainty of their AI's. Conclusion While the diets of low-SES, non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children were adequate in most essential nutrients, other components of a healthy diet, which promote long-term health, were suboptimal. Knowledge of the diet of high risk Hispanic children will inform nutritional interventions and

  12. The Mediterranean diet and risk of colorectal cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

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    Jones, Petra; Cade, Janet E; Evans, Charlotte E L; Hancock, Neil; Greenwood, Darren C

    2017-12-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies investigating associations between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and colorectal cancer is inconsistent. The aim of this study is to assess in the UK Women's Cohort Study whether adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern is associated with reduced incidence of cancers of the colon and rectum. A total of 35 372 women were followed for a median of 17.4 years. A 10-component score indicating adherence to the Mediterranean diet was generated for each cohort participant, using a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. The Mediterranean diet score ranged from 0 for minimal adherence to 10 for maximal adherence. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to provide adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for colon and rectal cancer risk. A total of 465 incident colorectal cancer cases were documented. In the multivariable adjusted model, the test for trend was positive (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.78 to 0.99; Ptrend = 0.03) for a 2-point increment in the Mediterranean diet score. For rectal cancer, a 2-point increment in the Mediterranean diet score resulted in an HR (95% CI) of 0.69 (0.56 to 0.86), whereas a 62% linear reduced risk (HR 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.74; Ptrend cancer were weak (Ptrend = 0.41). Findings suggest that women adhering to a Mediterranean dietary pattern may have a lower risk of colorectal cancer, especially rectal cancer. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  13. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Disease: A Critical Evaluation of A Priori Dietary Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the a priori dietary indexes used in the studies that have evaluated the role of the Mediterranean Diet in influencing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. All the studies show that this dietary pattern protects against cardiovascular disease, but studies show quite different effects on specific conditions such as coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. A priori dietary indexes used to measure dietary exposure imply quantitative and/or qualitative divergences from the traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s, and, therefore, it is very difficult to compare the results of different studies. Based on real cultural heritage and traditions, we believe that the a priori indexes used to evaluate adherence to the Mediterranean Diet should consider classifying whole grains and refined grains, olive oil and monounsaturated fats, and wine and alcohol differently. PMID:26389950

  14. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Disease: A Critical Evaluation of A Priori Dietary Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata D'Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the a priori dietary indexes used in the studies that have evaluated the role of the Mediterranean Diet in influencing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. All the studies show that this dietary pattern protects against cardiovascular disease, but studies show quite different effects on specific conditions such as coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. A priori dietary indexes used to measure dietary exposure imply quantitative and/or qualitative divergences from the traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s, and, therefore, it is very difficult to compare the results of different studies. Based on real cultural heritage and traditions, we believe that the a priori indexes used to evaluate adherence to the Mediterranean Diet should consider classifying whole grains and refined grains, olive oil and monounsaturated fats, and wine and alcohol differently.

  15. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Barrea

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI. The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern. In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively (p < 0.001. A novel association was reported between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity.

  16. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prediction of incident stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Wadley, Virginia G; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Howard, George; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Moy, Claudia; Howard, Virginia J; Kissela, Brett; Judd, Suzanne E

    2015-03-01

    There are limited data on the potential association of adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeD) with incident stroke. We sought to assess the longitudinal association between greater adherence to MeD and risk of incident stroke. We prospectively evaluated a population-based cohort of 30 239 individuals enrolled in REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, after excluding participants with stroke history, missing demographic data or food frequency questionnaires, and unavailable follow-up information. Adherence to MeD was categorized using MeD score. Incident stroke was adjudicated by expert panel review of medical records during a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years. Incident stroke was identified in 565 participants (2.8%; 497 and 68 cases of ischemic stroke [IS] and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively) of 20 197 individuals fulfilling the inclusion criteria. High adherence to MeD (MeD score, 5-9) was associated with lower risk of incident IS in unadjusted analyses (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-1.00; P=0.046). The former association retained its significance (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.96; P=0.016) after adjustment for demographics, vascular risk factors, blood pressure levels, and antihypertensive medications. When MeD was evaluated as a continuous variable, a 1-point increase in MeD score was independently associated with a 5% reduction in the risk of incident IS (95% confidence interval, 0-11%). We documented no association of adherence to MeD with incident hemorrhagic stroke. There was no interaction of race (P=0.37) on the association of adherence to MeD with incident IS. High adherence to MeD seems to be associated with a lower risk of incident IS independent of potential confounders. Adherence to MeD is not related to the risk of incident hemorrhagic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Adherence rates to the Mediterranean diet are low in a representative sample of Greek children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontogianni, Meropi D; Vidra, Nikoletta; Farmaki, Anastasia-Eleni; Koinaki, Stella; Belogianni, Katerina; Sofrona, Stavroula; Magkanari, Flora; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Data from studies in pediatric samples exploring adherence to the Mediterranean diet are scarce. The aim of the present work was to explore adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern in a representative sample of Greek children and adolescents. The study sample (n = 1305, 3-18 y) was representative

  18. Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shai, Iris; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Henkin, Yaakov; Shahar, Danit R; Witkow, Shula; Greenberg, Ilana; Golan, Rachel; Fraser, Drora; Bolotin, Arkady; Vardi, Hilel; Tangi-Rozental, Osnat; Zuk-Ramot, Rachel; Sarusi, Benjamin; Brickner, Dov; Schwartz, Ziva; Sheiner, Einat; Marko, Rachel; Katorza, Esther; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Stampfer, Meir J

    2008-07-17

    Trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of weight-loss diets are frequently limited by short follow-up times and high dropout rates. In this 2-year trial, we randomly assigned 322 moderately obese subjects (mean age, 52 years; mean body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 31; male sex, 86%) to one of three diets: low-fat, restricted-calorie; Mediterranean, restricted-calorie; or low-carbohydrate, non-restricted-calorie. The rate of adherence to a study diet was 95.4% at 1 year and 84.6% at 2 years. The Mediterranean-diet group consumed the largest amounts of dietary fiber and had the highest ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fat (Plow-carbohydrate group consumed the smallest amount of carbohydrates and the largest amounts of fat, protein, and cholesterol and had the highest percentage of participants with detectable urinary ketones (Pweight loss was 2.9 kg for the low-fat group, 4.4 kg for the Mediterranean-diet group, and 4.7 kg for the low-carbohydrate group (Pweight losses were 3.3 kg, 4.6 kg, and 5.5 kg, respectively. The relative reduction in the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was 20% in the low-carbohydrate group and 12% in the low-fat group (P=0.01). Among the 36 subjects with diabetes, changes in fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels were more favorable among those assigned to the Mediterranean diet than among those assigned to the low-fat diet (PMediterranean diet and time with respect to fasting glucose levels). Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate diets may be effective alternatives to low-fat diets. The more favorable effects on lipids (with the low-carbohydrate diet) and on glycemic control (with the Mediterranean diet) suggest that personal preferences and metabolic considerations might inform individualized tailoring of dietary interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00160108.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  19. Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower prevalence of colorectal adenomas in men of all races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Alyson; Robb, Sara Wagner; Hébert, James R; Huang, Hanwen; Ebell, Mark H

    2017-12-01

    To examine potential racial differences in Mediterranean diet scores and whether these differences are associated with the prevalence of colorectal adenoma (CRA), a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial was performed. The authors hypothesize that people consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet have lower odds of CRA. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to determine the presence of colorectal adenoma. Mediterranean diet scores were calculated from food frequency questionnaire responses. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between Mediterranean diet scores and the odds of prevalent CRA, as well as the joint effects of race and diet. Asians, followed by blacks, had higher Mediterranean diet scores than whites. Generally, men with better Mediterranean diet scores (altMED) had lower odds of CRA, but black and Asian men had even lower odds of prevalent CRA with better altMED diet scores than did white men with higher altMED diet scores. In this study population, all men had lower odds of prevalent CRA, but black and Asian men, who had higher (more favorable) altMED diet scores than whites, had even lower odds of prevalent CRA compared with white men. An altMED diet prescription may be especially beneficial for certain subpopulations who may be at higher risk of CRA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mediterranean diet cools down the inflammatory milieu in type 2 diabetes: the MÉDITA randomized controlled trial.

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    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Petrizzo, Michela; Scappaticcio, Lorenzo; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2016-12-01

    Mediterranean-style diets provide cardiovascular benefits and increase insulin sensitivity. There is little evidence that adherence to Mediterranean diet may influence the levels of the inflammatory milieu in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess whether Mediterranean diet influences both C-reactive protein (CRP) and adiponectin in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, and whether adherence to Mediterranean diet affects their circulating levels. In a two-arm, single-center trial, 215 men and women with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were randomized to a Mediterranean diet (n = 108, 54 males and 54 females) or a low-fat diet (n = 107, 52 males and 55 females), with a total follow-up of 8.1 years. At baseline visit and at 1 year, body weight, HOMA index, CRP, and adiponectin and its fractions were assessed. Adherence to the diets was assessed by calculating the Mediterranean-diet score. At 1 year, CPR fell by 37 % and adiponectin rose by 43 % in the Mediterranean diet group, while remaining unchanged in the low-fat diet group. The pattern of adiponectin fractions (high and non-high molecular weight) showed a response similar to that of total adiponectin. Diabetic patients with the highest scores (6-9 points) of adherence to Mediterranean diet had lower circulating CRP level and higher circulating total adiponectin levels than the diabetic patients who scored Mediterranean diet cools down the inflammatory milieu of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Mediterranean diet and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: New therapeutic option around the corner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, Francesco; Casini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, being considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. NAFLD has a common pathogenic background to that of metabolic syndrome, and shares many risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Although there is no currently available evidence-based established treatment for NAFLD, all the recommendations from the medical associations indicate that the most effective treatment is to reduce weight through lifestyle modifications. Diet, indeed, plays a key role in the management of NAFLD patients, as both the quantity and quality of the diet have been reported to have a beneficial role in the onset and severity of the liver disease. Among all the diets that have been proposed, a Mediterranean diet was the most effective dietary option for inducing weight loss together with beneficial effects on all the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. Over the last few years, research has demonstrated a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet in NAFLD. In this review, we will examine all the available data on the association between diet, nutrients and the Mediterranean diet in association with onset and severity of NAFLD. PMID:24966604

  2. Mediterranean Diet and Age-Related Cognitive Decline: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Serra-Mir, Mercè; Corella, Dolores; de la Torre, Rafael; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fitó, Montserrat; Pérez-Heras, Ana; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and vascular impairment are believed to partly mediate age-related cognitive decline, a strong risk factor for development of dementia. Epidemiologic studies suggest that a Mediterranean diet, an antioxidant-rich cardioprotective dietary pattern, delays cognitive decline, but clinical trial evidence is lacking. To investigate whether a Mediterranean diet supplemented with antioxidant-rich foods influences cognitive function compared with a control diet. Parallel-group randomized clinical trial of 447 cognitively healthy volunteers from Barcelona, Spain (233 women [52.1%]; mean age, 66.9 years), at high cardiovascular risk were enrolled into the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea nutrition intervention trial from October 1, 2003, through December 31, 2009. All patients underwent neuropsychological assessment at inclusion and were offered retesting at the end of the study. Participants were randomly assigned to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extravirgin olive oil (1 L/wk), a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts (30 g/d), or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Rates of cognitive change over time based on a neuropsychological test battery: Mini-Mental State Examination, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), Animals Semantic Fluency, Digit Span subtest from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Verbal Paired Associates from the Wechsler Memory Scale, and the Color Trail Test. We used mean z scores of change in each test to construct 3 cognitive composites: memory, frontal (attention and executive function), and global. Follow-up cognitive tests were available in 334 participants after intervention (median, 4.1 years). In multivariate analyses adjusted for confounders, participants allocated to a Mediterranean diet plus olive oil scored better on the RAVLT (P = .049) and Color Trail Test part 2 (P = .04) compared with controls; no between-group differences were observed for the other cognitive tests

  3. The Health Benefits of Selected Culinary Herbs and Spices Found in the Traditional Mediterranean Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Allyson; Marquez, Susan; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2016-12-09

    The Mediterranean diet is considered one of the healthiest diets in the world. This is often attributed to low saturated fat consumption, moderate wine consumption, and high vegetable consumption. However, herbs and spices associated with these diets may also play an important role in the quality of this diet. This review summarizes the most recent research regarding the anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-hypertensive properties of this collection of culinary species. Additionally, this review briefly summarizes studies performed on lesser known herbs from around the world, with the goal of identifying new culinary species that may be useful in the treatment or prevention of diseases.

  4. Mediterranean diet and mortality risk in metabolically healthy obese and metabolically unhealthy obese phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y-M; Steck, S E; Fung, T T; Zhang, J; Hazlett, L J; Han, K; Merchant, A T

    2016-10-01

    The Mediterranean diet has been consistently associated with reduced mortality risk. Few prospective studies have examined whether the benefits from a Mediterranean diet are equally shared by obese individuals with varying metabolic health. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between Mediterranean diet, metabolic phenotypes and mortality risk in a representative obese US population. Data from 1739 adults aged 20-88 years were analyzed from participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994 followed up for deaths until 31 December 2011 in a prospective cohort analysis. Mediterranean Diet Scores (MDS) were created to assess the adherence to Mediterranean diet. Participants were classified as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype (0 or 1 metabolic abnormality) or metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) phenotype (two or more metabolic abnormalities), based on high glucose, insulin resistance, blood pressure, triglycerides, C-reactive protein and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The MHO phenotype (n=598) was observed in 34.8% (s.e., 1.7%) of those who were obese (mean body mass index was 33.4 and 34.8 in MHO and MUO phenotypes, respectively). During a median follow-up of 18.5 years, there were 77 (12.9%) and 309 (27.1%) deaths in MHO and MUO individuals, respectively. In MHO individuals, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality in the highest tertile compared with the first tertile of MDS was 0.44 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26-0.75; P for trend Mediterranean dietary pattern appears to reduce mortality in the MHO phenotype, but not among the MUO phenotype in an obese population.

  5. Metabolic syndrome, adherence to the Mediterranean diet and 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Chrysohoou, Christina; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Pitaraki, Evangelia; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    To better understand the metabolic syndrome (MS) spectrum through principal components analysis and further evaluate the role of the Mediterranean diet on MS presence. During 2001-2002, 1514 men and 1528 women (>18 y) without any clinical evidence of CVD or any other chronic disease, at baseline, living in greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. In 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2583 participants (15% of the participants were lost to follow-up). Incidence of fatal or non-fatal CVD was defined according to WHO-ICD-10 criteria. MS was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment panel III (revised NCEP ATP III) definition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). Five principal components were derived, explaining 73.8% of the total variation, characterized by the: a) body weight and lipid profile, b) blood pressure, c) lipid profile, d) glucose profile, e) inflammatory factors. All components were associated with higher likelihood of CVD incidence. After adjusting for various potential confounding factors, adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern for each 10% increase in the MedDietScore, was associated with 15% lower odds of CVD incidence (95%CI: 0.71-1.06). For the participants with low adherence to the Mediterranean diet all five components were significantly associated with increased likelihood of CVD incidence. However, for the ones following closely the Mediterranean pattern positive, yet not significant associations were observed. Results of the present work propose a wider MS definition, while highlighting the beneficial role of the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction of fatty acid genotype and diet on changes in colonic fatty acids in a Mediterranean diet intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porenta, Shannon R; Ko, Yi-An; Gruber, Stephen B; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Baylin, Ana; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora

    2013-11-01

    A Mediterranean diet increases intakes of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids and lowers intake of n-6 fatty acids. This can impact colon cancer risk as n-6 fatty acids are metabolized to proinflammatory eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interactions of polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes, FADS1 and FADS2, and changes in diet on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. A total of 108 individuals at increased risk of colon cancer were randomized to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet. Fatty acids were measured in both serum and colonic mucosa at baseline and after six months. Each individual was genotyped for four single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the FADS gene cluster. Linear regression was used to evaluate the effects of diet, genotype, and the diet by genotype interaction on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. Genetic variation in the FADS genes was strongly associated with baseline serum arachidonic acid (n-6) but serum eicosapentaenoic acid (n-3) and colonic fatty acid concentrations were not significantly associated with genotype. After intervention, there was a significant diet by genotype interaction for arachidonic acid concentrations in colon. Subjects who had all major alleles for FADS1/2 and were following a Mediterranean diet had 16% lower arachidonic acid concentrations in the colon after six months of intervention than subjects following the Healthy Eating diet. These results indicate that FADS genotype could modify the effects of changes in dietary fat intakes on arachidonic acid concentrations in the colon. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Nutritional adequacy of diets containing growing up milks or unfortified cow's milk in Irish children (aged 12–24 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Walton

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Growing up milks (GUM are milk-based drinks with added vitamins and minerals intended for children aged 12–36 months. Few data are available on the consumption of GUM and their role in the diets of young children. Objective : To determine the nutritional adequacy of two groups of 12–24-month-old Irish children by type of milk consumption (consumers or non-consumers of GUM. Design : Using data from a cross-sectional study of Irish children, the National Pre-School Nutrition Survey (2010–2011, two groups of children were defined. The groups included children aged 12–24 months with an average daily total milk intake of at least 300 g and consuming GUM (≥100 g/day together with cow's milk (n=29 or cow's milk only (n=56. Results : While average total daily energy intakes were similar in both consumers and non-consumers of GUM, intakes of protein, saturated fat, and vitamin B12 were lower and intakes of carbohydrate, dietary fibre, iron, zinc, vitamins C and D were higher in consumers of GUM. These differences in nutrient intakes are largely attributable to the differences in composition between GUM and cow's milk. For both consumers and non-consumers of GUM, intakes of carbohydrate and fat were generally in line with recommendations while intakes of protein, dietary fibre and most micronutrients were adequate. For children consuming cow's milk only, high proportions had inadequate intakes of iron and vitamin D; however, these proportions were much lower in consumers of GUM. Conclusions : Consumption of GUM reduced the risk of inadequacies of iron and vitamin D, two nutrients frequently lacking in the diets of young children consuming unfortified cow's milk only.

  8. Traditional healthy Mediterranean diet: estrogenic activity of plants used as food and flavoring agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agradi, Elisabetta; Vegeto, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Andrea; Fico, Gelsomina; Regondi, Simona; Tomè, Franca

    2006-08-01

    The Italian-style Mediterranean diet has been defined as healthy by epidemiologists and nutritionists. Besides being low fat, the Mediterranean diet is rich in biologically active minor compounds. Among these, phytoestrogens seem to have an impact on the prevention of chronic degenerative disease. It is important to understand how this occurs. The in vitro estrogenic activity of crude extracts from typical Mediterranean foods was tested using a yeast estrogen screen (YES), containing human estrogen receptor. Species belonging to Leguminosae, Apiaceae, Graminaceae, Iridaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Cruciferae and Solanaceae showed the greatest number of positive responses. These species include some foods which are traditionally widely consumed, such as beans and other legumes, tomatoes, cabbage, carrots and some cereals. The highest activity was found in the more polar extracts (aqueous, methanol and chloroform: methanol) indicating that polar compounds are mainly responsible for the estrogenic activity. This is also supported by the traditional cooking practices. According to data from in vitro tests, the estrogenic activity is present in numerous plants which are commonly used as food in the Mediterranean diet. Vegetable foods rich in phytoestrogens, as in the Mediterranean tradition, may contribute to the maintenance of health status.

  9. Cost and Cost-Effectiveness of the Mediterranean Diet: Results of a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Rosella; Semyonov, Leda; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The growing impact of chronic degenerative pathologies (such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease) requires and pushes towards the development of new preventive strategies to reduce the incidence and prevalence of these diseases. Lifestyle changes, especially related to the Mediterranean diet, have the potential to modify disease outcomes and ultimately costs related to their management. The objective of the study was to perform a systematic review of the scientific literature, to gauge the economic performance and the cost-effectiveness of the adherence to the Mediterranean diet as a prevention strategy against degenerative pathologies. We investigated the monetary costs of adopting Mediterranean dietary patterns by determining cost differences between low and high adherence. Research was conducted using the PubMed and Scopus databases. Eight articles met the pre-determined inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Quality assessment and data extraction was performed. The adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been extensively reported to be associated with a favorable health outcome and a better quality of life. The implementation of a Mediterranean dietary pattern may lead to the prevention of degenerative pathologies and to an improvement in life expectancy, a net gain in health and a reduction in total lifetime costs. PMID:24253053

  10. A journey into a Mediterranean diet and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Chiodini, Paolo; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Giugliano, Dario

    2015-08-10

    To summarise the evidence about the efficacy of a Mediterranean diet on the management of type 2 diabetes and prediabetic states. A systematic review of all meta-analyses and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the Mediterranean diet with a control diet on the treatment of type 2 diabetes and prediabetic states was conducted. Electronic searches were carried out up to January 2015. Trials were included for meta-analyses if they had a control group treated with another diet, if they were of sufficient duration (at least 6 months), and if they had at least 30 participants in each arm. A random-effect model was used to pool data. Adults with or at risk for type 2 diabetes. Dietary patterns that described themselves as using a 'Mediterranean' dietary pattern. The outcomes were glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and remission from the metabolic syndrome. From 2824 studies, 8 meta-analyses and 5 RCTs were eligible. A 'de novo' meta-analysis of 3 long-term (>6 months) RCTs of the Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control of diabetes favoured the Mediterranean diet as compared with lower fat diets. Another 'de novo' meta-analysis of two long-term RCTs showed a 49% increased probability of remission from the metabolic syndrome. 5 meta-analyses showed a favourable effect of the Mediterranean diet, as compared with other diets, on body weight, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. 2 meta-analyses demonstrated that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet reduced the risk of future diabetes by 19-23%. The Mediterranean diet was associated with better glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors than control diets, including a lower fat diet, suggesting that it is suitable for the overall management of type 2 diabetes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Consumption of oral hospital diets and percent adequacy of minerals in oncology patients as an indicative for the use of oral supplements.

    OpenAIRE

    Sá, Júlia Sommerlatte Manzoli de; Moreira, Daniele Caroline Faria; Silva, Karine Aparecida Louvera; Morgano, Marcelo Antonio; Quintaes, Késia Diego

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: Deficiencies in the consumption of foods and nutrients favor malnutrition in patients. Considering the recommendations for the ingestion of minerals, the content, consumption and percent adequacy of the minerals (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, K, P, Na, Zn and Se) were evaluated amongst oncology patients who received oral diets isolated or associated with an oral food complement (OFC), evaluating the need and composition of an oral supplement. Methods: The mineral composition as deter...

  12. Do statins increase and Mediterranean diet decrease the risk of breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical exercise and healthy dietary habits are recommended to prevent breast cancer. Discussion Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids associated with decreased omega-6 - resulting in higher omega-3 to omega-6 ratio compared with Western-type diet - is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. The modernized Mediterranean diet with high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio, high fiber and polyphenol intake, and consumption of low-glycemic index foods reduces overall cancer risk and spec...

  13. Are 6-8 year old Italian children moving away from the Mediterranean diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, C; Ceretti, E; Grioni, S; Viola, G C V; Donato, F; Feretti, D; Festa, A; Bonizzoni, S; Bonetti, A; Monarca, S; Villarini, M; Levorato, S; Carducci, A; Verani, M; Casini, B; De Donno, A; Grassi, T; Bagordo, F; Carraro, E; Bonetta, Si; Bonetta, Sa; Gelatti, U

    2016-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MD) is considered one of the healthiest dietary models, as it decreases the risk of chronic diseases and may modulate the organism's early response to environmental pollution. In recent decades, Mediterranean countries have been replacing their traditional diet with other less healthy eating habits, especially among children and teenagers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MD and the level of adherence to it in 6-8 year old Italian children, in relation to residence, lifestyle, and social and family contexts. A questionnaire was administered to the children's parents in two seasons in 5 Italian towns. The diet section contained 116 questions investigating the frequency of consumption of different types of food. The Italian Mediterranean Index (IMI) was calculated according to the intake of 6 typical Mediterranean and 4 non-Mediterranean foods. On the basis of IMI score, MD adherence was classified as low (≤ 3 IMI score), medium (4-5) and high (≥ 6). Total energy load and diet composition in micro- and macronutrients were calculated from consumption frequency. Diet analysis was computed on 1164 subjects with two complete questionnaires. Body mass index, calculated for each subject, showed that 28.9% of the children were overweight, the figure varying slightly with area of residence. Our findings showed that 59.0% of the children had a low score for MD adherence. The results of this study showed that most Italian children did not follow the MD and socio-economic characteristics appeared not to be associated with type of diet.

  14. A paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahrén Bo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We found marked improvement of glucose tolerance and lower dietary energy intake in ischemic heart disease (IHD patients after advice to follow a Paleolithic diet, as compared to a Mediterranean-like diet. We now report findings on subjective ratings of satiety at meals and data on the satiety hormone leptin and the soluble leptin receptor from the same study. Methods Twenty-nine male IHD patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes type 2, and waist circumference > 94 cm, were randomized to ad libitum consumption of a Paleolithic diet (n = 14 based on lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs, and nuts, or a Mediterranean-like diet (n = 15 based on whole grains, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, fruit, fish, and oils and margarines during 12 weeks. In parallel with a four day weighed food record the participants recorded their subjective rating of satiety. Satiety Quotients were calculated, as the intra-meal quotient of change in satiety during meal and consumed energy or weight of food and drink for that specific meal. Leptin and leptin receptor was measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Free leptin index was calculated as the ratio leptin/leptin receptor. Results The Paleolithic group were as satiated as the Mediterranean group but consumed less energy per day (5.8 MJ/day vs. 7.6 MJ/day, Paleolithic vs. Mediterranean, p = 0.04. Consequently, the quotients of mean change in satiety during meal and mean consumed energy from food and drink were higher in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.03. Also, there was a strong trend for greater Satiety Quotient for energy in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.057. Leptin decreased by 31% in the Paleolithic group and by 18% in the Mediterranean group with a trend for greater relative decrease of leptin in the Paleolithic group. Relative changes in leptin and changes in weight and waist circumference correlated significantly in the Paleolithic group (p Conclusions A

  15. A paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Ahrén, Bo; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2010-11-30

    We found marked improvement of glucose tolerance and lower dietary energy intake in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients after advice to follow a Paleolithic diet, as compared to a Mediterranean-like diet. We now report findings on subjective ratings of satiety at meals and data on the satiety hormone leptin and the soluble leptin receptor from the same study. Twenty-nine male IHD patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes type 2, and waist circumference > 94 cm, were randomized to ad libitum consumption of a Paleolithic diet (n = 14) based on lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs, and nuts, or a Mediterranean-like diet (n = 15) based on whole grains, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, fruit, fish, and oils and margarines during 12 weeks. In parallel with a four day weighed food record the participants recorded their subjective rating of satiety. Satiety Quotients were calculated, as the intra-meal quotient of change in satiety during meal and consumed energy or weight of food and drink for that specific meal. Leptin and leptin receptor was measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Free leptin index was calculated as the ratio leptin/leptin receptor. The Paleolithic group were as satiated as the Mediterranean group but consumed less energy per day (5.8 MJ/day vs. 7.6 MJ/day, Paleolithic vs. Mediterranean, p = 0.04). Consequently, the quotients of mean change in satiety during meal and mean consumed energy from food and drink were higher in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.03). Also, there was a strong trend for greater Satiety Quotient for energy in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.057). Leptin decreased by 31% in the Paleolithic group and by 18% in the Mediterranean group with a trend for greater relative decrease of leptin in the Paleolithic group. Relative changes in leptin and changes in weight and waist circumference correlated significantly in the Paleolithic group (p Paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a

  16. DIET MICRONUTRIENT ADEQUACY OF WOMEN AFTER 1 YEAR OF GASTRIC BYPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEIRO, Larissa Silveira; Melendez-ARAÚJO, Mariana Silva

    2014-01-01

    Background The more effective treatment for severe obesity is bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass is a surgical technique used worldwide; however, as well as other techniques; it has postoperative risks, including nutrient deficiency. Aim To determine the amounts of dietary iron, calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B12 ingested by patients of a public hospital one year after gastric bypass, and compare with the recommendations of the Recommended Dietary Allowances. Methods This was a transverse descriptive study and the sample consisted of 36 women, with at least one year of gastric bypass. Data collected included sociodemographic, anthropometric and diet variables. Dietetic information was collected through a validated food frequency questionnaire. Ingestion of iron, calcium, vitamin D and vitamina B12 was evaluated in comparison with the Recommended Dietary Allowances, as well as correlation of micronutrient ingestion with time of surgery. Results There was inadequate consumption of iron, calcium and vitamin D. The vitamin B12 intake was considered adequate. There was statistically significant positive correlation between the time of surgery and the ingestion of iron, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. Conclusion The intake of iron, calcium and vitamin D of women one year after gastric bypass was inadequate, emphasizing the importance of multiprofessional monitoring postoperatively to prevent nutrient deficiencies. PMID:25409960

  17. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration : The European Eye Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. PARTICIPANTS: Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged

  18. Mediterranean style diet is associated with low risk of new-onset diabetes after renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osté, Maryse C J; Corpeleijn, Eva; Navis, Gerjan J; Keyzer, Charlotte A; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Van Den Berg, Else; Postmus, Douwe; De Borst, Martin H; Kromhout, Daan; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2017-01-01

    Objective The incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and premature mortality is high in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We hypothesized that a Mediterranean Style diet protects against NODAT and premature mortality in RTR. Research design and methods A prospective cohort

  19. Mediterranean style diet is associated with low risk of new-onset diabetes after renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osté, Maryse C J; Corpeleijn, Eva; Navis, Gerjan J; Keyzer, Charlotte A; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; van den Berg, Else; Postmus, Douwe; de Borst, Martin H; Kromhout, Daan; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and premature mortality is high in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We hypothesized that a Mediterranean Style diet protects against NODAT and premature mortality in RTR. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A prospective cohort

  20. Process Evaluation of an Innovative Healthy Eating Website Promoting the Mediterranean Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, A.; Scott, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Internet offers a promising medium for delivering nutrition education. This study aimed to evaluate user perceptions and usage patterns of an innovative healthy eating website promoting the Mediterranean diet. The website was evaluated over a 6-month period by female employees of University of Glasgow, aged 25-55 years. User satisfaction with…

  1. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seconda, Louise; Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Hamza, Oualid; Boizot-Szantai, Christine; Soler, Louis-Georges; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-12

    Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv) and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed). Conv-NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv-Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org-NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org-Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org-Med and Conv-Med groups compared to the Conv-NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points): 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.23-9.36) and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24-9.35) versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17-8.22)) respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01-1.74) for the Org-Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28-0.60) for the Conv-NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org-Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34-11.52). This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain.

  2. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet and mortality in subjects with diabetes. Prospective results from the MOLI-SANI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; De Curtis, Amalia; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2016-03-01

    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower mortality in a general population but limited evidence exists on the effect of a Mediterranean diet on mortality in subjects with diabetes. We aim to examine the association between the Mediterranean diet and mortality in diabetic individuals. Prospective cohort study on 1995 type 2 diabetic subjects recruited within the MOLI-SANI study. Food intake was recorded by the European Project Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition food frequency questionnaire. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was appraised by the Greek Mediterranean diet score. Hazard ratios were calculated using multivariable Cox-proportional hazard models. During follow-up (median 4.0 years), 109 all-cause including 51 cardiovascular deaths occurred. A 2-unit increase in Mediterranean diet score was associated with 37% (19%-51%) lower overall mortality. Data remained unchanged when restricted to those being on a hypoglycaemic diet or on antidiabetic drug treatment. A similar reduction was observed when cardiovascular mortality only was considered (hazard ratio = 0.66; 0.46-0.95). A Mediterranean diet-like pattern, originated from principal factor analysis, indicated a reduced risk of overall death (hazard ratio = 0.81; 0.62-1.07). The effect of Mediterranean diet score was mainly contributed by moderate alcohol drinking (14.7% in the reduction of the effect), high intake of cereals (12.2%), vegetables (5.8%) and reduced consumption of dairy and meat products (13.4% and 3.4% respectively). The traditional Mediterranean diet was associated with reduced risk of both total and cardiovascular mortality in diabetic subjects, independently of the severity of the disease. Major contributions were offered by moderate alcohol intake, high consumption of cereals, fruits and nuts and reduced intake of dairy and meat products. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  3. Mediterranean and DASH diet scores and mortality in women with heart failure: The Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Emily B; Lewis, Cora E; Tinker, Lesley F; Eaton, Charles B; Ahmed, Ali; Manson, JoAnn E; Snetselaar, Linda G; Martin, Lisa W; Trevisan, Maurizio; Howard, Barbara V; Shikany, James M

    2013-11-01

    Current dietary recommendations for patients with heart failure (HF) are largely based on data from non-HF populations; evidence on associations of dietary patterns with outcomes in HF is limited. We therefore evaluated associations of Mediterranean and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet scores with mortality among postmenopausal women with HF. Women's Health Initiative participants were followed up from the date of HF hospitalization through the date of death or last participant contact before August 2009. Mediterranean and DASH diet scores were calculated from food-frequency questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics, health behaviors, and health status were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). For a median of 4.6 years of follow-up, 1385 of 3215 (43.1%) participants who experienced a HF hospitalization died. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 1 (reference), 1.05 (95% CI, 0.89-1.24), 0.97 (95% CI, 0.81-1.17), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.70-1.02) across quartiles of the Mediterranean diet score (P trend=0.08) and 1 (reference), 1.04 (95% CI, 0.89-1.21), 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-0.98), and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.70-1.00) across quartiles of the DASH diet score (P trend=0.01). Diet score components, vegetables, nuts, and whole grain intake, were inversely associated with mortality. Higher DASH diet scores were associated with modestly lower mortality in women with HF, and there was a nonsignificant trend toward an inverse association with Mediterranean diet scores. These data provide support for the concept that dietary recommendations developed for other cardiovascular conditions or general populations may also be appropriate in patients with HF. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000611.

  4. Effects of Mediterranean diet on sexual function in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: The MÈDITA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Caputo, Mariangela; Castaldo, Filomena; Improta, Maria Rosaria; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    To assess the long-term effect of Mediterranean diet, as compared with low-fat diet, on sexual function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. In a randomized clinical trial, with a total follow-up of 8.1years, 215 men and women with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were assigned to Mediterranean diet (n=108) or a low-fat diet (n=107). The primary outcome measures were changes of erectile function (IIEF) in diabetic men and of female sexual function (FSFI) in diabetic women. There was no difference in baseline sexual function in men (n=54 vs 52) or women (n=54 vs 55) randomized to Mediterranean diet or low-fat diet, respectively (P=0.287, P=0.815). Over the entire follow-up, the changes of the primary outcomes were significantly lower in the Mediterranean diet group compared with the low-fat group: IIEF and FSFI showed a significantly lesser decrease (1.22 and 1.18, respectively, P=0.024 and 0.019) with the Mediterranean diet. Baseline C-reactive protein levels predicted erectile dysfunction in men but not female sexual dysfunction in women. Among persons with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, a Mediterranean diet reduced the deterioration of sexual function over time in both sexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower prevalence of osteoarthritis: Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Stubbs, Brendon; Noale, Marianna; Solmi, Marco; Luchini, Claudio; Smith, Toby O; Cooper, Cyrus; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, Renè; Maggi, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be beneficial for several medical conditions, but data regarding osteoarthritis (OA) are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate if adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower prevalence of OA of the knee in a large cohort from North America. 4358 community-dwelling participants (2527 females; mean age: 61.2 years) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were included. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated through a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED) categorized into quartiles (Q). Knee OA was diagnosed both clinically and radiologically. The strength of the association between aMED (divided in quartiles) and knee OA was investigated through a logistic regression analysis and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders. Participants with a higher adherence to Mediterranean diet had a significantly lower prevalence of knee OA compared to those with lower adherence (Q4: 25.2% vs. Q1: 33.8%; p Mediterranean diet, only higher use of cereals was associated with lower odds of having knee OA (OR: 0.76; 95%CI: 0.60-0.98; p = 0.03). Higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower prevalence of knee OA. This remained when adjusting for potential confounders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is not Related to Beta-Amyloid Deposition: Data from the Women's Healthy Ageing Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E; Szoeke, C; Dennerstein, L; Campbell, S; Clifton, P

    2018-01-01

    Research has indicated the neuroprotective potential of the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has shown preventative potential for Alzheimer's disease incidence and prevalence, yet few studies have investigated the impact of Mediterranean diet adherence on the hallmark protein; beta-amyloid. To investigate the association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy older Australian women. This study was a cross-sectional investigation of participants from the longitudinal, epidemiologically sourced Women's Healthy Ageing Project which is a follow-up of the Melbourne Women's Midlife Health Project. Assessments were conducted at the Centre for Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. F-18 Florbetaben positron emission tomography scanning was conducted at the Austin Centre for PET in Victoria, Australia. One hundred and eleven Women's Healthy Ageing Project participants were included in the study. Mediterranean diet adherence scores for all participants were calculated from the administration of a validated food frequency questionnaire constructed by the Cancer Council of Victoria. Beta-amyloid deposition was measured using positron emission tomography standardised uptake value ratios. Gamma regression analysis displayed no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition. This result was consistent across APOE-ε4 +/- cohorts and with the inclusion of covariates such as age, education, body mass index and cognition. This study found no association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy Australian women.

  7. [Habit based consumptions in the mediterranean diet and the relationship with anthropometric parameters in young female kayakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacid, Fernando; Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; Sánchez-Pato, Antonio; Muyor, José María; López-Miñarro, Pedro Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Dietary habits and body composition are possibly two of the most modifiable aspects that influence athletic performance in competition and training, especially in individual sports. To determine Mediterranean diet adherence in a group of elite women paddlers and the relationship between these variables with anthropometric parameters and somatotype of the athlete. A 90 women cadets who belonged to the national elite canoeing underwent a complete anthropometry according to ISAK instructions; and they selfcompleted KIDMED test to know their adherence to the Mediterranean diet. After that, anthropometric characteristics were compared based on their adherence to the Mediterranean diet. One kayaker had a low adherence to the Mediterranean diet, 38 a medium adherence and 51 an excellent adherence. However, one in every three not eats nuts and one in every five makes sweets more than once a day or industrial pastries for breakfast. When it was dividing paddlers based on their Mediterranean diet adherence it was found that the two groups (low and medium adherence and excellent adherence) did not show differences in most of the anthropometric variables, composition body percentages, somatotype and body mass index. The paddlers show a medium or excellent Mediterranean diet adherence. There was not clear relationship between anthropometric parameters and the degree of Mediterranean diet adherence in these athletes. It is necessary to continue researching the interaction between these fields in order to indentify possible relationships with health and sport performance in elite kayakers.

  8. Effect of fast-food Mediterranean-type diet on human plasma oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronis, Pantelis; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Phenekos, Costas; Tsoukatos, Demokritos C

    2007-09-01

    Oxidation of lipoproteins, particularly of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), is of prime importance in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The Mediterranean diet has been associated with an unexpectedly low rate of cardiovascular events. Type 2 diabetic patients are at high risk of developing atherosclerosis. Functional alterations in the endothelium, which lead to atherosclerosis, are stimulated by oxidized lipoproteins, particularly oxidized LDL. The present study investigated the effect of Greek quick casual Mediterranean-type diet (fast food Mediterranean-type diet) consumption on the resistance to oxidation in plasma from type 2 diabetic patients and healthy human subjects. Lipids from fast food Mediterranean-type foodstuffs were extracted and tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit copper (Cu2+)-induced LDL oxidation. Foodstuffs that exerted the most potent in vitro antioxidative activity were chosen for the diet of study groups. Eighteen type 2 diabetic patients (group A) and 10 healthy subjects (group B) were fed a 4-week diet contained the chosen foodstuffs, while 17 type 2 diabetic patients (group C) were kept on their regular diet that they were following before the study. Type 2 diabetic patients were treated with sulfonylureas or metformin and were under good glycemic control (hemoglobin A1C type 2 diabetic patients (groups A and C) and healthy human subjects (group B), as this was detected at a time before the oxidation products become detectable, namely, lag time. After the 4-week period on the chosen diet the lag time in groups A and B significantly increased, while it was not changed in group C. In type 2 diabetic patients lag time was increased from 57.3 +/- 13.3 minutes (mean +/- SD) to 103.8 +/- 21.8 minutes (mean +/- SD) (P Fast food Mediterranean foodstuffs exerted antioxidant activities both in vitro and in vivo after consumption in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy human subjects. Therefore consumption of a fast food

  9. Traditional food patterns are associated with better diet quality and improved dietary adequacy in Aboriginal peoples in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, T; Kolahdooz, F; Schaefer, S E; Douglas, D N; Corriveau, A; Sharma, S

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, the Arctic diet has been derived entirely from locally harvested animal and plant species; however, in recent decades, imported foods purchased from grocery stores have become widely available. The present study aimed to examine Inuvialuit, traditional or nontraditional dietary patterns; nutrient density of the diet; dietary adequacy; and main food sources of energy and selected nutrient intakes. This cross-sectional study used a culturally appropriate quantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess diet. Traditional and nontraditional eaters were classified as those consuming more or less than 300 g of traditional food daily. Nutrient densities per 4184 kJ (1000 kcal) were determined. Dietary adequacy was determined by comparing participants' nutrient intakes with the Dietary Reference Intakes. The diet of nontraditional eaters contained, on average, a lower density of protein, niacin, vitamin B12 , iron, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids (P ≤ 0.0001), vitamin B6 , potassium, thiamin, pantothenic acid (P ≤ 0.001), riboflavin and magnesium (P ≤ 0.05). Inadequate nutrient intake was more common among nontraditional eaters for calcium, folate, vitamin C, zinc, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin K, magnesium, potassium and sodium. Non-nutrient-dense foods (i.e. high fat and high sugar foods) contributed to energy intake in both groups, more so among nontraditional eaters (45% versus 33%). Traditional foods accounted for 3.3% and 20.7% of total energy intake among nontraditional and traditional eaters, respectively. Diet quality and dietary adequacy were better among Inuvialuit who consumed more traditional foods. The promotion of traditional foods should be incorporated in dietary interventions for this population. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Interaction of Fatty Acid Genotype and Diet on Changes in Colonic Fatty Acids in a Mediterranean Diet Intervention Study

    OpenAIRE

    Porenta, Shannon R.; Ko, Yi-An; Gruber, Stephen B.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Baylin, Ana; Raskin, Leonid; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora

    2013-01-01

    A Mediterranean diet increases intakes of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids and lowers intake of n-6 fatty acids. This can impact colon cancer risk since n-6 fatty acids are metabolized to pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interactions of polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase genes, FADS1 and FADS2, and changes in diet on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. A total of 108 individuals at increased risk of colon cancer were randomized to either a Medit...

  11. Nutrient intake adequacy in schoolchildren from a Mediterranean area (southern Spain). Influence of the use of the school canteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Frías, Magdalena; Nestares, Teresa; Iañez, Isabel; de la Higuera, Magdalena; Mataix, José; Llopis, Juan

    2005-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare dietary adequacy in 521 schoolchildren in Granada (Spain) with national recommendations and to determine possible differences regarding gender or the use of the school canteen. A food record was used for four consecutive days to evaluate the intake of nutrients and foods. With regard to boys' and girls' intake of the main groups of foods, we observed a tendency for the boys to consume greater quantities of dairy products, cereals, potatoes, and fruit, although the differences were not statistically significant. The children who lunched at school consumed fish, eggs, dairy products, vegetables, and cereals more frequently than those who did so at home. The mean daily intake of energy and nutrients indicates that the studied population exceeded the recommended limits in the proportion of energy derived from protein and fat, while carbohydrate intake was slightly deficient. The children who lunched at school showed a more favorable profile for energy and nutrient intake, with a significantly higher intake of energy, carbohydrates, total fat, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), vitamins B, and E, and calcium, with respect to the children who had lunch at home.

  12. Mediterranean diet score and total and cardiovascular mortality in Eastern Europe: the HAPIEE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefler, Denes; Malyutina, Sofia; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Peasey, Anne; Pikhart, Hynek; Brunner, Eric J; Bobak, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Mediterranean-type dietary pattern has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular (CVD) and other chronic diseases, primarily in Southern European populations. We examined whether Mediterranean diet score (MDS) is associated with total, CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke mortality in a prospective cohort study in three Eastern European populations. A total of 19,333 male and female participants of the Health Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) study in the Czech Republic, Poland and the Russian Federation were included in the analysis. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and MDS was derived from consumption of nine groups of food using absolute cut-offs. Mortality was ascertained by linkage with death registers. Over the median follow-up time of 7 years, 1314 participants died. The proportion of participants with high adherence to Mediterranean diet was low (25 %). One standard deviation (SD) increase in the MDS (equivalent to 2.2 point increase in the score) was found to be inversely associated with death from all causes (HR, 95 % CI 0.93, 0.88-0.98) and CVD (0.90, 0.81-0.99) even after multivariable adjustment. Inverse but statistically not significant link was found for CHD (0.90, 0.78-1.03) and stroke (0.87, 0.71-1.07). The MDS effects were similar in each country cohort. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with reduced risk of total and CVD deaths in these large Eastern European urban populations. The application of MDS with absolute cut-offs appears suitable for non-Mediterranean populations.

  13. Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) style diet, and metabolic health in U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Moon Mark; Steck, Susan E; Fung, Teresa T; Zhang, Jiajia; Hazlett, Linda J; Han, Kyungdo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Merchant, Anwar T

    2017-10-01

    There is sparse evidence on the relationship between the Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) style diet, and metabolic health, especially comparing cardiometabolic phenotypes among in normal weight and obese populations. We aimed to investigate the association of the Mediterranean diet scores (MDS) and DASH index with metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) phenotypes in a representative U.S. MDS and DASH index were calculated using dietary data from 2767 adults aged 20-90 years without any prior diagnosis of cancer or cardiovascular disease from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. MHO and MONW individuals were identified using fasting glucose, insulin resistance, blood pressure, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Higher MDS was associated with higher odds of MHO phenotype (odds ratio (OR) T3 vs T1 , 2.57 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-6.35]; P trend = 0.04), and higher DASH index was associated with lower odds of MONW phenotype (OR T3 vs T1, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.38-0.93]; P trend = 0.03) only in the younger age group (DASH index with MHO and MONW phenotypes were observed in the older age group (≥45 years for men or postmenopausal women). Adherence to Mediterranean diet or DASH style diet was favorably associated with MHO and MONW phenotypes only in the younger age group, suggesting that potential dietary intervention to prevent cardiometabolic disease differ by age group. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome. The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24–62 years) was first standardized to a North America...

  15. Effect of an isoenergetic traditional Mediterranean diet on apolipoprotein A-I kinetic in men with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) kinetics has not been studied to date. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of the MedDiet in the absence of changes in body weight on apolipoprotein (apo) A-I kinetic in men with metaboli...

  16. High adherence to Mediterranean diet, but not individual foods or nutrients, is associated with lower likelihood of being obese in a Mediterranean cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappalà, Gaetano; Buscemi, Silvio; Mulè, Serena; La Verde, Melania; D'Urso, Maurizio; Corleo, Davide; Marranzano, Marina

    2017-11-09

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the Mediterranean diet and obesity in a Mediterranean cohort. The study population of MEAL (Mediterranean Healthy Eating, Ageing, and Lifestyle) study comprised 1814 men and women (18 + years) recruited in the city of Catania, southern Italy. Food intake was evaluated through a validated food frequency questionnaire and the Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed through the MEDI-LITE score. Individuals highly adherent to the Mediterranean diet (highest quartile of the score) were less likely to be obese (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32, 0.89) despite there was no significant associations when considering men and women separately. The dietary profile of obese and non-obese individuals did not significantly differ, except for vitamin E, processed meat, and alcohol more consumed among non-obese ones. Among the food groups characterizing this dietary pattern, only satisfaction of the criterion for dairy products (Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than its individual components, is associated with less likelihood of being obese. Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.

  17. [A lower adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with a poorer self-rated health in university population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-Vicedo, Ricardo; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria; García de la Hera, Manuela; González-Palacios, Sandra; Valera-Gran, Desirée; Checa-Sevilla, José Francisco; Gimenez-Monzo, Daniel; Vioque, Jesús

    2014-09-15

    A higher adherence to Mediterranean diet is considered as a protective factor against the large number of deaths attributable to the main chronic degenerative diseases in developed countries. Self-rated health is established as a good indicator of population health status and as a predictor of mortality. Studies exploring the relationship between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and self-rated health are scarce, especially, in young adults. Our aim was to explore the factors related, specially the adherence to a priori-defined Mediterranean diet with self-rated health in a cohort of Spanish university students. We analyzed data from 1110 participants of Spanish DiSA-UMH (Dieta, Salud y Antropometría en universitarios de la Universidad Miguel Hernández) study. Diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and the adherence to Mediterranean diet was calculated using the relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-18) according to the consumption of 9 dietary components. Self-rated health was gathered from the question: "In general, how do you consider your health to be? (Excellent, good, fair, poor, very poor). Information on sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics was also collected. Multinomial logistic regression (using relative risk ratio, RRR) was used to analyze the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet (low rMED: 0-6 points; medium: 7-10 points; high: 11-18 points) and self-rated health (Excellent (reference), good and fair/ poor/very poor). A low, medium or high adherence to Mediterranean diet conformed to 26.8%, 58.7% and 14.4% of participants, which of them reported an excellent (23.1%), good (65.1%) and fair/poor or very poor health, respectively. In multivariate analysis, a lower adherence to Mediterranean diet was significantly (p. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. A short screener is valid for assessing Mediterranean diet adherence among older Spanish men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Helmut; Fitó, Montserrat; Estruch, Ramón; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa; Ros, Emilio; Salaverría, Itziar; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Vinyoles, Ernest; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lahoz, Carlos; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Covas, María-Isabel

    2011-06-01

    Ensuring the accuracy of dietary assessment instruments is paramount for interpreting diet-disease relationships. The present study assessed the relative and construct validity of the 14-point Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS) used in the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study, a primary prevention nutrition-intervention trial. A validated FFQ and the MEDAS were administered to 7146 participants of the PREDIMED study. The MEDAS-derived PREDIMED score correlated significantly with the corresponding FFQ PREDIMED score (r = 0.52; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.51) and in the anticipated directions with the dietary intakes reported on the FFQ. Using Bland Altman's analysis, the average MEDAS Mediterranean diet score estimate was 105% of the FFQ PREDIMED score estimate. Limits of agreement ranged between 57 and 153%. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that a higher PREDIMED score related directly (P < 0.001) to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and inversely (P < 0.038) to BMI, waist circumference, TG, the TG:HDL-C ratio, fasting glucose, and the cholesterol:HDL-C ratio. The 10-y estimated coronary artery disease risk decreased as the PREDIMED score increased (P < 0.001). The MEDAS is a valid instrument for rapid estimation of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and may be useful in clinical practice.

  19. Prospective association of the Mediterranean diet with cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality and its population impact in a non-Mediterranean population: the EPIC-Norfolk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tammy Y N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Imamura, Fumiaki; Forouhi, Nita G

    2016-09-29

    Despite convincing evidence in the Mediterranean region, the cardiovascular benefit of the Mediterranean diet is not well established in non-Mediterranean countries and the optimal criteria for defining adherence are unclear. The population attributable fraction (PAF) of adherence to this diet is also unknown. In the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk prospective cohort, we evaluated habitual diets assessed at baseline (1993-1997) and during follow-up (1998-2000) using food-frequency questionnaires (n = 23,902). We estimated a Mediterranean diet score (MDS) using cut-points projected from the Mediterranean dietary pyramid, and also three other pre-existing MDSs. Using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression with repeated measures of MDS and covariates, we examined prospective associations between each MDS with incident cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by 2009 and mortality by 2013, and estimated PAF for each outcome attributable to low MDS. We observed 7606 incident CVD events (2818/100,000 person-years) and 1714 CVD deaths (448/100,000). The MDS based on the Mediterranean dietary pyramid was significantly associated with lower incidence of the cardiovascular outcomes, with hazard ratios (95 % confidence intervals) of 0.95 (0.92-0.97) per one standard deviation for incident CVD and 0.91 (0.87-0.96) for CVD mortality. Associations were similar for composite incident ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality. Other pre-existing MDSs showed similar, but more modest associations. PAF due to low dietary pyramid based MDS (Mediterranean diet was associated with lower CVD incidence and mortality in the UK. This diet has an important population health impact for the prevention of CVD.

  20. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and offspring adiposity and cardiometabolic traits in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, L; Rifas-Shiman, S L; Georgiou, V; Joung, K E; Koinaki, S; Chalkiadaki, G; Margioris, A; Sarri, K; Vassilaki, M; Vafeiadi, M; Kogevinas, M; Mantzoros, C; Gillman, M W; Oken, E

    2017-08-01

    In adults, adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been inversely associated with cardiovascular risk, but the extent to which diet in pregnancy is associated with offspring adiposity is unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between adherence to Mediterranean diet in pregnancy and offspring cardiometabolic traits in two pregnancy cohorts. We studied 997 mother-child pairs from Project Viva in Massachusetts, USA, and 569 pairs from the Rhea study in Crete, Greece. We estimated adherence to the Mediterranean diet with an a priori defined score (MDS) of nine foods and nutrients (0 to 9). We measured child weight, height, waist circumference, skin-fold thicknesses, blood pressure, and blood levels of lipids, c-reactive protein and adipokines in mid-childhood (median 7.7 years) in Viva, and in early childhood (median 4.2 years) in Rhea. We calculated cohort-specific effects and pooled effects estimates with random-effects models for cohort and child age. In Project Viva, the mean (SD, standard deviation) MDS was 2.7 (1.6); in Rhea it was 3.8 (1.7). In the pooled analysis, for each 3-point increment in the MDS, offspring BMI z-score was lower by 0.14 units (95% CI, -0.15 to -0.13), waist circumference by 0.39 cm (95% CI, -0.64 to -0.14), and the sum of skin-fold thicknesses by 0.63 mm (95% CI, -0.98 to -0.28). We also observed lower offspring systolic (-1.03 mmHg; 95% CI, -1.65 to -0.42) and diastolic blood pressure (-0.57 mmHg; 95% CI, -0.98 to -0.16). Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet during pregnancy may protect against excess offspring cardiometabolic risk. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  1. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and nasopharyngeal cancer risk in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Bravi, Francesca; Polesel, Jerry; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; Garavello, Werner; Taborelli, Martina; Serraino, Diego; Libra, Massimo; Montella, Maurizio; Decarli, Adriano; Ferraroni, Monica; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    Few studies investigated the role of diet on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) risk in non-endemic areas. The aim of this study was to assess the association between adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet and NPC risk in a southern European low-risk population. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Italy, including 198 histologically confirmed NPC cases and 594 matched controls. Dietary habits were collected by means of a validated food-frequency questionnaire, including 83 foods, food groups, or beverages. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet was assessed through a Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), based on nine dietary components characterizing this dietary profile, i.e., high intake of vegetables, fruits and nuts, cereals, legumes, and fish; low intake of dairy products and meat; high monounsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio; and moderate alcohol intake. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) of NPC, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for increasing MDS (i.e., increasing adherence) using multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for major confounding factors. As compared to MDS ≤ 4, the ORs of NPC were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.54-1.25) for MDS of 5 and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44-0.99) for MDS ≥ 6, with a significant trend of decreasing risk (p 0.043). The corresponding population attributable fraction was 22%, indicating that 22% of NPC cases in this population would be avoided by shifting all subjects to a score ≥6. Our study supports a favorable role of the Mediterranean diet on NPC risk.

  2. Employees' Expectations of Internet-Based, Workplace Interventions Promoting the Mediterranean Diet: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Thanasoulias, Andreas; Pound, Rachael; Sebire, Simon J; Jago, Russell

    Explore employees' perceptions of ability to follow the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), preferences for setting goals if asked to follow the MedDiet, and expectations of an Internet-based, workplace MedDiet intervention. Seven focus groups to guide intervention development. Four workplaces (business/professional services, government branches) in Southwest England. Employees (n = 29, 51.7% women), ages 24-58 years. Ability to follow the MedDiet; preferences for goal-setting if asked to follow the MedDiet; intervention content. Data were analyzed with the use of thematic analysis. Participants perceived that adhering to some MedDiet recommendations would be challenging and highlighted cost, taste, and cooking skills as adherence barriers. Behavior change preferences included a tailored approach to goal-setting, reviewing goal progress via a website/smartphone app, and receiving expert feedback via an app/website/text/face-to-face session. Desirable features of an Internet-based MedDiet application included recipes, interactivity, nutritional information, shopping tips, cost-saving information, and a companion smartphone app. Engaging in social support was deemed important to facilitate adherence. An Internet-based, workplace MedDiet intervention should address adherence barriers, utilize a tailored approach to setting and reviewing goals, and activate social support to facilitate adherence. These findings provide insights to planning to promote the MedDiet in non-Mediterranean regions. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutrition in the genomics era: cardiovascular disease risk and the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovas, Jose M; Kaput, Jim; Corella, Dolores

    2007-10-01

    The effect of dietary changes on phenotypes (i.e., plasma lipid measures, body weight and blood pressure) differs significantly between individuals. This phenomenon has been more extensively researched in relation to changes in dietary fat and plasma lipid concentrations for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to other pathological conditions. Although common knowledge associates low fat diets with reductions in total and plasma LDL cholesterol, the clinical evidence shows dramatic inter-individual differences in response that are partially due to genetic factors. The discovery of the cardioprotective and other healthy properties of the Mediterranean diet has popularized the consumption of Mediterranean products such as olive oil. Molecular, clinical, and epidemiological studies have begun to shed some light about how various components of this diet may protect the cardiovascular system and to decrease the risk of other diseases such as cancer. However, it is also possible that the right combination of genetic, cultural, socioeconomic factors is needed to achieve full benefit. It has been proposed that the Mediterranean diet may be closer to the ancestral foods that were part of human development and our metabolism may have evolved to work optimally on such a diet rather than with the current diets richer in saturated fat and highly refined and processed foods. Therefore, it is possible that alleles that are associated with increase disease risk may be silenced in the presence of that more ancestral and traditional diet and lifestyle. This knowledge may provide the basis for successful public health as well individual approaches for disease prevention.

  4. The Mediterranean and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Kana; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2010-12-01

    Although the Mediterranean diet has been studied for cancer mortality and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet shares similarities with the Mediterranean diet, few studies have specifically examined these 2 diets and incident colorectal cancer. The objective was to prospectively assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMed) and the DASH-style diet scores and risk of colorectal cancer in middle-aged men and women. A total of 87,256 women and 45,490 men (age 30-55 y for women and 40-75 y for men at baseline) without a history of cancer were followed for ≤ 26 y. The aMed and DASH scores were calculated for each participant by using dietary information that was assessed ≤ 7 times during follow-up. Relative risks (RRs) for colorectal cancer were computed with adjustment for potential confounders. We documented 1432 cases of incident colorectal cancer among women and 1032 cases in men. Comparing top with bottom quintiles of the DASH score, the pooled RR for total colorectal cancer was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.91; P for trend = 0.0001). The corresponding RR for DASH score and colon cancer was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.95; P for trend = 0.002). There was a suggestion of an inverse association with rectal cancer with a pooled RR of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.98; P for trend = 0.31) when comparing top with bottom quintiles of DASH score. No association was observed with aMed score. Adherence to the DASH diet (which involves higher intakes of whole grains, fruit, and vegetables; moderate amounts of low-fat dairy; and lower amounts of red or processed meats, desserts, and sweetened beverages) was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.

  5. Mediterranean diet and life expectancy; beyond olive oil, fruits, and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Martin-Calvo, Nerea

    2016-11-01

    The recent relevant evidence of the effects of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and lifestyle on health (2015 and first months of 2016). Large observational prospective epidemiological studies with adequate control of confounding and two large randomized trials support the benefits of the Mediterranean dietary pattern to increase life expectancy, reduce the risk of major chronic disease, and improve quality of life and well-being. Recently, 19 new studies from large prospective studies showed - with nearly perfect consistency - strong benefits of the MedDiet to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, total mortality, heart failure, and disability. Interestingly, two large and well conducted cohorts reported significant cardiovascular benefits after using repeated measurements of diet during a long follow-up period. In addition, Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea, the largest randomized trial with MedDiet, recently reported benefits of this dietary pattern to prevent cognitive decline and breast cancer. In the era of evidence-based medicine, the MedDiet represents the gold standard in preventive medicine, probably because of the harmonic combination of many elements with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which overwhelm any single nutrient or food item. The whole seems more important than the sum of its parts.

  6. Inhibition of circulating immune cell activation: a molecular antiinflammatory effect of the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Mari-Pau; Sacanella, Emilio; Vazquez-Agell, Mónica; Morales, Mercedes; Fitó, Montserrat; Escoda, Rosa; Serrano-Martínez, Manuel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Benages, Neus; Casas, Rosa; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Masanes, Ferran; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med-Diet) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The objective was to compare the effects of 2 Med-Diets with those of a low-fat diet on immune cell activation and soluble inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high risk of CVD. In a controlled study, we randomly assigned 112 older subjects with diabetes or > or =3 CVD risk factors to 3 dietary intervention groups: Med-Diet with supplemental virgin olive oil (VOO), Med-Diet with supplemental nuts, and low-fat diet. Changes from baseline in cellular and serum inflammatory biomarkers were assessed at 3 mo. One hundred six participants (43% women; average age: 68 y) completed the study. At 3 mo, monocyte expression of CD49d, an adhesion molecule crucial for leukocyte homing, and of CD40, a proinflammatory ligand, decreased (P < 0.05) after both Med-Diets but not after the low-fat diet. Serum interleukin-6 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, inflammatory mediators crucial in firm adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial surfaces, decreased (P < 0.05) in both Med-Diet groups. Soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 and C-reactive protein decreased only after the Med-Diet with VOO (P < 0.05), whereas interleukin-6, soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 increased (P < 0.05) after the low-fat diet. Med-Diets supplemented with VOO or nuts down-regulate cellular and circulating inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high risk of CVD. The results support the recommendation of the Med-Diet as a useful tool against CVD.

  7. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern, cognitive status and depressive symptoms in an elderly non-institutionalized population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Galiot, Ana; Goñi, Isabel

    2017-03-30

    Scientific evidence indicates that adherence to the Mediterranean diet protects against the deterioration of cognitive status and depressive symptoms during aging. However, few studies have been conducted in elderly non-institutionalized subjects. This study evaluated the relation between the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern and cognitive status and depressive symptoms in an elderly population over 75 years. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a Mediterranean city (Garrucha, Spain) in 79 elderly people over 75 (36 men and 41 women). Adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern was determined using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Cognitive function was determined by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and depressive symptoms were assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Most of population showed a very high adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern and optimal cognitive and affective status. They consumed olive oil as their main source of fat, high levels of fish and fruit, low levels of foods with added sugars, and a low consumption of red meat. A significant relation between the MEDAS and MMSE scores was found. However, no relationship was observed between the MEDAS and GDS. The Mediterranean diet pattern was positively related with the cognitive function, although the infl uence of a healthy dietary pattern on the symptomatology of depression was unclear. However, an effective strategy against cognitive function and depression would be to improve physical activity rates, establish lifelong healthy eating habits, and consume a nutritionally-rich diet in order to enhance quality of life of the elderly.

  8. Mediterranean diet score and left ventricular structure and function: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Emily B; Ahmed, Ali; Arnett, Donna K; Polak, Joseph F; Hundley, W Gregory; Bluemke, David A; Heckbert, Susan R; Jacobs, David R; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Data are limited on the relation between dietary patterns and left ventricular (LV) structure and function. We examined cross-sectional associations of a diet-score assessment of a Mediterranean dietary pattern with LV mass, volume, mass-to-volume ratio, stroke volume, and ejection fraction. We measured LV variables with the use of cardiac MRI in 4497 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study who were aged 45-84 y and without clinical cardiovascular disease. We calculated a Mediterranean diet score from intakes of fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes, whole grains, fish, red meat, the monounsaturated fat:saturated fat ratio, and alcohol that were self-reported with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire. We used linear regression with adjustment for body size, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease risk factors to model associations and assess the shape of these associations (linear or quadratic). The Mediterranean diet score had a slight U-shaped association with LV mass (adjusted means: 146, 145, 146, and 147 g across quartiles of diet score, respectively; P-quadratic trend = 0.04). The score was linearly associated with LV volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction: for each +1-U difference in score, LV volume was 0.4 mL higher (95% CI: 0.0, 0.8 mL higher), the stroke volume was 0.5 mL higher (95% CI: 0.2, 0.8 mL higher), and the ejection fraction was 0.2 percentage points higher (95% CI: 0.1, 0.3 percentage points higher). The score was not associated with the mass-to-volume ratio. A higher Mediterranean diet score is cross-sectionally associated with a higher LV mass, which is balanced by a higher LV volume as well as a higher ejection fraction and stroke volume. Participants in this healthy, multiethnic sample whose dietary patterns most closely conformed to a Mediterranean-type pattern had a modestly better LV structure and function than did participants with less-Mediterranean-like dietary patterns. This trial was registered at

  9. Adherence to Mediterranean diet in HIV infected patients: Relation with nutritional status and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policarpo, Sara; Rodrigues, Teresa; Moreira, Ana Catarina; Valadas, Emília

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been associated to a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and a lower cardiovascular risk (CVR). Our aim was to assess HIV infected individual's adherence to the MedDiet and its relationship with nutritional status and CVR. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected and a nutritional assessment was performed. Adherence to the MedDiet was assessed using the questionnaire MedDietScore, ranging from 0 to 55, where higher scores indicated a higher adherence. CVR was estimated for each patient using the Framingham Risk Score (FRSs-CVD). We included 571 individuals, mostly males (67.1%; n = 383). MedDiet adherence score was 27.5 ± 5.5 points. The proportion of overweight/obese individuals was 40.3% (n = 230) and MS 33.9% (n = 179); CVD estimation showed that 53.2% (n = 304), 30.1% (n = 172) and 16.6% (n = 95) of patients had a low, moderate and very high CVR, respectively. The group with BMI below 25 kg/m 2 presented lower adherence to MedDiet and patients within moderate CVR category and with MS presented a higher adherence to MedDiet. Overall we found a moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A higher adherence was associated to individuals with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 , those with MS and to patients with moderate to high cardiovascular risk, suggesting the adoption of this food pattern in the presence of comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adherence to the DASH and Mediterranean diets is associated with decreased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Vajihe; Tehrani, Hatav; Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh; Dehghan, Atefeh; Surkan, Pamela J; Azadbakht, Leila

    2016-10-01

    Few studies have examined the association between adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) or Mediterranean (MED) diets and prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the two diets and GDM. In a case-control hospital-based study, pregnant women with (n = 200) and without (n = 260) GMD were recruited. An average of three 24-h dietary records were used to assess participants' dietary intakes. DASH scores were calculated based on the Fung method and MED scores were calculated using the Trichopoulou method. GDM was defined as fasting glucose >95 mg/dL or 1-h postprandial glucose >140 mg/dL for the first time in the pregnancy. The risk for GDM was assessed across tertiles of DASH and MED scores. DASH and MED diets were negatively related to fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and serum triacylglycerol concentrations. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly higher for those in the top tertile of the DASH diet but not the MED diet in comparison with the lowest tertile. Total serum cholesterol level was lower in the third tertile of the MED diet but not in the DASH diet. Participants in the highest tertile of the MED diet had 80% lower risk for GDM compared with those in the lowest tertile (Ptrend = 0.006). Greater adherence to the DASH eating plan was associated with 71% reduced risk for GDM (Ptrend = 0.006) after adjustment for potential confounders. Adherence to either the DASH or Mediterranean diet is associated with decreased risk for GDM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alimentary regimen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Peta, Valentina; Alfieri, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are awaiting clarification. Insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation status, among other possible genetic, dietary, and lifestyle factors, are thought to play the key role. There is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. However, the dietary nutritional management to achieve weight loss is an essential component of any treatment strategy. On the basis of its components, the literature reports on the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular risk and in preventing major chronic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. New evidence supports the idea that the Mediterranean diet, associated with physical activity and cognitive behaviour therapy, may have an important role in the prevention and the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:25492997

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of the Mediterranean diet: the experience of the PREDIMED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Ramon

    2010-08-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical studies have evaluated the effects of a Mediterranean diet (Med-Diet) on total cardiovascular mortality, and all concluded that adherence to the traditional Med-Diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Since atherosclerosis is nowadays considered a low-grade inflammatory disease, recent studies have explored the anti-inflammatory effects of a Med-Diet intervention on serum and cellular biomarkers related to atherosclerosis. In a pilot study of the PREvencion con DIeta MEDiterranea (PREDIMED) trial, we analysed the short-term effects of two Med-Diet interventions, one supplemented with virgin olive oil and another with nuts, on vascular risk factors in 772 subjects at high risk for CVD, and in a second study we evaluated the effects of these interventions on cellular and serum inflammatory biomarkers in 106 high-risk subjects. Compared to a low-fat diet, the Med-Diet produced favourable changes in all risk factors. Thus, participants in both Med-Diet groups reduced blood pressure, improved lipid profile and diminished insulin resistance compared to those allocated a low-fat diet. In addition, the Med-Diet supplemented with virgin olive oil or nuts showed an anti-inflammatory effect reducing serum C-reactive protein, IL-6 and endothelial and monocytary adhesion molecules and chemokines, whereas these parameters increased after the low-fat diet intervention. In conclusion, Med-Diets down-regulate cellular and circulating inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high cardiovascular risk. These results support the recommendation of the Med-Diet as a useful tool against CVD.

  13. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Disease: A Critical Evaluation of A Priori Dietary Indexes

    OpenAIRE

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the a priori dietary indexes used in the studies that have evaluated the role of the Mediterranean Diet in influencing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. All the studies show that this dietary pattern protects against cardiovascular disease, but studies show quite different effects on specific conditions such as coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. A priori dietary indexes used to measure dietary exposure imply quantitative and/or ...

  14. The Diet of Preschool Children in the Mediterranean Countries of the European Union: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-da-Silva, Luís; Rêgo, Carla; Pietrobelli, Angelo

    2016-06-08

    This systematic review discusses data on the dietary intake of preschool children living in the Mediterranean countries of the European Union, including the comparison with a Mediterranean-like diet and the association with nutritional status. Specifically, data from the multinational European Identification and Prevention on Dietary and life style induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study and national studies, such as the Estudo do Padrão Alimentar e de Crescimento Infantil (EPACI) study and Geração XXI cohort in Portugal, ALimentando la SAlud del MAñana (ALSALMA) study in Spain, Étude des Déterminants pré-et postnatals précoces du développement et de la santé de l'ENfant (EDEN) cohort in France, Nutrintake 636 study in Italy, and Growth, Exercise and Nutrition Epidemiological Study in preSchoolers (GENESIS) cohort in Greece, were analyzed. In the majority of countries, young children consumed fruit and vegetables quite frequently, but also consumed sugared beverages and snacks. High energy and high protein intakes mainly from dairy products were found in the majority of countries. The majority of children also consumed excessive sodium intake. Early high prevalence of overweight and obesity was found, and both early consumption of energy-dense foods and overweight seemed to track across toddler and preschool ages. Most children living in the analyzed countries showed low adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet, which in turn was associated with being overweight/obese. Unhealthier diets were associated with lower maternal educational level and parental unemployment. Programs promoting adherence of young children to the traditional Mediterranean diet should be part of a multi-intervention strategy for the prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity.

  15. The Diet of Preschool Children in the Mediterranean Countries of the European Union: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Pereira-da-Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review discusses data on the dietary intake of preschool children living in the Mediterranean countries of the European Union, including the comparison with a Mediterranean-like diet and the association with nutritional status. Specifically, data from the multinational European Identification and Prevention on Dietary and life style induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS study and national studies, such as the Estudo do Padrão Alimentar e de Crescimento Infantil (EPACI study and Geração XXI cohort in Portugal, ALimentando la SAlud del MAñana (ALSALMA study in Spain, Étude des Déterminants pré-et postnatals précoces du développement et de la santé de l’ENfant (EDEN cohort in France, Nutrintake 636 study in Italy, and Growth, Exercise and Nutrition Epidemiological Study in preSchoolers (GENESIS cohort in Greece, were analyzed. In the majority of countries, young children consumed fruit and vegetables quite frequently, but also consumed sugared beverages and snacks. High energy and high protein intakes mainly from dairy products were found in the majority of countries. The majority of children also consumed excessive sodium intake. Early high prevalence of overweight and obesity was found, and both early consumption of energy-dense foods and overweight seemed to track across toddler and preschool ages. Most children living in the analyzed countries showed low adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet, which in turn was associated with being overweight/obese. Unhealthier diets were associated with lower maternal educational level and parental unemployment. Programs promoting adherence of young children to the traditional Mediterranean diet should be part of a multi-intervention strategy for the prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity.

  16. Evaluation of adherence to Mediterranean diet in medical students at Kocaeli University, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydemir, Canan; Ozgur, Emrah Gokay; Balci, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Introduction This study was conducted to evaluate the eating habits of medical students at Kocaeli University in northwest Turkey in terms of their ability to apply their academic knowledge regarding healthy lifestyles to their own lives using the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED). Methods In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire including demographic information and the KIDMED index was administered to 354 medical school students (206 first-year and 148 third-year students). The students' sex, body mass index, KIDMED score, place of residence, smoking habit, media screen time, and regular exercising variables were evaluated. Results The KIDMED score was -2 to 8 (3.8 ± 1.9) among all students, -1 to 8 (3.9 ± 2.0) among first-year students, and -1 to 8 (3.6 ± 1.9) among third-year students. In total, 59.1% of females and 40.9% of males among first-year students showed moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet, and female students showed better adherence to the Mediterranean diet than males among third-year students. Conclusion Medical students at Kocaeli University in Turkey showed inadequate application of their academic knowledge about healthy living to their own lives.

  17. Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced asthma and rhinitis in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Batlle, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Barraza-Villarreal, A; Antó, J M; Romieu, I

    2008-10-01

    Diet during pregnancy and childhood has been suggested to play an important role in children's asthma risk. We assessed whether the adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern, for children in the last 12 months and their mothers during pregnancy, was associated with both childhood asthma and allergic rhinitis. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004 using a random sample of 1476 children (6- to 7-year old) from the Mexicali region, Mexico. Dietary data of children's intake in the last 12 months and their mothers' intake during pregnancy was collected, through a parental food frequency questionnaire. A Mediterranean diet score was computed [Trichopoulou et al., N Engl J Med 348 (2003), 2599]. Data on seven asthma and rhinitis-related outcomes were obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was inversely associated with asthma ever (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.40-0.91), wheezing ever (0.64, 0.47-0.87), rhinitis ever (0.41, 0.22-0.77), sneezing ever (0.79, 0.59-1.07), current sneezing (0.71, 0.52-0.96) and current itchy-watery eyes (0.63, 0.42-0.95). No associations were found using the mothers' pregnancy diet score, except for current sneezing (0.71, 0.53-0.97). Our findings suggest a protective effect of following a healthy dietary pattern on asthma and allergic rhinitis in Mexican children.

  18. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Metabolic Syndrome in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Eleonora; Manoukian, Siranoush; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Oliverio, Andreina; Rovera, Francesca; Iula, Giovanna; Morelli, Daniele; Peissel, Bernard; Azzolini, Jacopo; Roveda, Eliana; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2018-03-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with higher breast cancer (BC) penetrance in BRCA mutation carriers. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), an insulin resistance syndrome, can be reversed by adhering to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). In a dietary intervention trial on BRCA mutation carriers, we evaluated adherence to the MedDiet, and the association with the MetS, by analyzing data from the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). BRCA mutation carriers, with or without BC, aged 18 to 70 years, were eligible for the trial. After the baseline examinations, women were randomized to a dietary intervention or to a control group. Both groups completed the MEDAS at baseline and at the end of the dietary intervention. A total of 163 women completed the 6 months of dietary intervention. Compared with controls, the women in the intervention group significantly reduced their consumption of red meat ( P BRCA mutation carriers in the intervention group experienced greater improvement in their MedDiet and MetS parameters.

  19. Dietary flavonoids of Spanish youth: intakes, sources, and association with the Mediterranean diet

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    Rowaedh Ahmed Bawaked

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Plant-based diets have been linked to high diet quality and reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. The health impact of plant-based diets might be partially explained by the concomitant intake of flavonoids. Estimation of flavonoids intake in adults has been important for the development of dietary recommendations and interventions for the prevention of weight gain and its consequences. However, estimation of flavonoids intake in children and adolescents is limited. Methods Average daily intake and sources of flavonoids were estimated for a representative national sample of 3,534 children and young people in Spain, aged 2–24 years. The data was collected between 1998 and 2000 by 24-h recalls. The Phenol-Explorer database and the USDA database on flavonoids content were used. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was measured by the KIDMED index. Results The mean and median intakes of total flavonoids were 70.7 and 48.1 mg/day, respectively. The most abundant flavonoid class was flavan-3-ols (35.7%, with fruit being the top food source of flavonoids intake (42.8%. Total flavonoids intake was positively associated with the KIDMED index (p < 0.001. Conclusion The results of this study provide primary information about flavonoids intake and main food sources in Spanish children, adolescents and young adults. Participants with high daily mean intake of flavonoids have higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet.

  20. Effect of the Mediterranean diet on cognition and brain morphology and function: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radd-Vagenas, Sue; Duffy, Shantel L; Naismith, Sharon L; Brew, Bruce J; Flood, Victoria M; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2018-03-01

    Observational studies of the Mediterranean diet suggest cognitive benefits, potentially reducing dementia risk. We performed the first published review to our knowledge of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating Mediterranean diet effects on cognition or brain morphology and function, with an additional focus on intervention diet quality and its relation to "traditional" Mediterranean dietary patterns. We searched 9 databases from inception (final update December 2017) for RCTs testing a Mediterranean compared with alternate diet for cognitive or brain morphology and function outcomes. Analyses were based on 66 cognitive tests and 1 brain function outcome from 5 included studies (n = 1888 participants). The prescribed Mediterranean diets varied considerably between studies, particularly with regards to quantitative food advice. Only 8/66 (12.1%) of individual cognitive outcomes at trial level significantly favored a Mediterranean diet for cognitive performance, with effect sizes (ESs) ranging from small (0.32) to large (1.66), whereas 2 outcomes favored controls. Data limitations precluded a meta-analysis. Of 8 domain composite cognitive scores from 2 studies, the 3 (Memory, Frontal, and Global function) from PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) were significant, with ESs ranging from 0.39 to 1.29. A posttest comparison at a second PREDIMED site found that the Mediterranean diet modulates the effect of several genotypes associated with dementia risk for some cognitive outcomes, with mixed results. Finally, the risk of low-plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor was reduced by 78% (OR = 0.22; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.90) in those who consumed a Mediterranean diet compared to control diet at 3 y in this trial. There was no benefit of the Mediterranean diet for incident cognitive impairment or dementia. Five RCTs of the Mediterranean diet and cognition have been published to date. The data are mostly nonsignificant, with small ESs. However, the

  1. Mediterranean diet and risk of heart failure: results from the PREDIMED randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Alonso-Gómez, Angel; Rekondo, Javier; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Ros, Emilio; Fitó, Montse; Estruch, Ramon; Lapetra, José; García-Rodriguez, Antonio; Fiol, Miquel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bulló, Monica; Serra-Mir, Mercè; Sorlí, Jose V; Arós, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) on the incidence of heart failure (HF), a pre-specified secondary outcome in the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) primary nutrition-intervention prevention trial. Participants at high risk of cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to one of three diets: MedDiet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), MedDiet supplemented with nuts, or a low-fat control diet. Incident HF was ascertained by a Committee for Adjudication of events blinded to group allocation. Among 7403 participants without prevalent HF followed for a median of 4.8 years, we observed 29 new HF cases in the MedDiet with EVOO group, 33 in the MedDiet with nuts group, and 32 in the control group. No significant association with HF incidence was found for the MedDiet with EVOO and MedDiet with nuts, compared with the control group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-1.13, and HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.56-1.49, respectively]. In this sample of adults at high cardiovascular risk, the MedDiet did not result in lower HF incidence. However, this pre-specified secondary analysis may have been underpowered to provide valid conclusions. Further randomized controlled trials with HF as a primary outcome are needed to better assess the effect of the MedDiet on HF risk. ISRCTN35739639. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. What Are the Effects of a Mediterranean Diet on Allergies and Asthma in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Castro-Rodriguez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This review updates the relationship between the adherence to Mediterranean diet (MedDiet assessed by questionnaire and asthma, allergic rhinitis, or atopic eczema in childhood. It deals with the effect of MedDiet in children on asthma/wheeze, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis/eczema, and also with the effect of MedDiet consumption by the mother during pregnancy on the inception of asthma/wheeze and allergic diseases in the offspring. Adherence to MedDiet by children themselves seems to have a protective effect on asthma/wheezing symptoms after adjustment for confounders, although the effect is doubtful on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. By contrast, the vast majority of the studies showed no significant effect of MedDiet on preventing atopic eczema, rhinitis, or atopy. Finally, studies on adherence to MedDiet by the mother during pregnancy showed some protective effect on asthma/wheeze symptoms in the offspring only during the first year of life, but not afterward. Very few studies have shown a protective effect on wheezing, current sneeze, and atopy, and none on eczema. Randomized control trials on the effect of the adherence to MedDiet to prevent (by maternal consumption during pregnancy or improve (by child consumption the clinical control of asthma/wheezing, allergic rhinitis, or atopic dermatitis are needed.

  3. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and sexual function in women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Francesco; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Di Palo, Carmen; Autorino, Riccardo; De Sio, Marco; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2010-05-01

    There are no reported studies assessing the relation between diet and sexual function in women with diabetes. In the present study, we explored the relation between consumption of a Mediterranean-type diet and sexual function in a population of type 2 diabetic women. Patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled if they had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for at least six months but less than 10 years, age 35-70 years, body mass index (BMI) of 24 or higher, HbA1c of 6.5% or higher, treatment with diet or oral drugs. All diabetic patients were invited to complete a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report measures of sexual function. A total of 595 (90.2%) of the 659 women completed both questionnaires and were analyzed in the present study. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a 9-point scale that incorporated the salient characteristics of this diet (range of scores, 0-9, with higher scores indicating greater adherence). The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for assessing the key dimensions of female sexual function. Diabetic women with the highest scores (6-9) had lower BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio, a lower prevalence of depression, obesity and metabolic syndrome, a higher level of physical activity, and better glucose and lipid profiles than the diabetic women who scored sexually active women showed a significant increase across tertiles of adherence to Mediterranean diet (from 54.2% to 65.1%, P = 0.01). Based on the FSFI cutoff score for female sexual dysfunction (FSD) of 23, women with the highest score of adherence had a lower prevalence of sexual dysfunction as compared with women of lower tertiles (47.6%, 53.9%, and 57.8%, higher, middle, and lower tertile, respectively, P = 0.01). These associations remained significant after adjustment for many potential confounders. In women with type 2 diabetes, greater adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower prevalence of FSD.

  4. Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet pattern scores and risk of incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kristine A; McCullough, Marji; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M

    2014-12-01

    The Western dietary pattern is associated with higher risk of colorectal neoplasms. Evolutionary discordance could explain this association. We investigated associations of scores for 2 proposed diet patterns, the "Paleolithic" and the Mediterranean, with incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas in a case-control study of colorectal polyps conducted in Minnesota (1991-1994). Persons with no prior history of colorectal neoplasms completed comprehensive questionnaires prior to elective, outpatient endoscopy; of these individuals, 564 were identified as cases and 1,202 as endoscopy-negative controls. An additional group of community controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n = 535) was also recruited. Both diet scores were calculated for each participant and categorized into quintiles, and associations were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios comparing persons in the highest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores relative to the lowest quintiles were, respectively, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 1.02; Ptrend = 0.02) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.54, 1.03; Ptrend = 0.05) when comparing cases with endoscopy-negative controls and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.26; Ptrend = 0.14) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.11; Ptrend = 0.13) when comparing cases with community controls. These findings suggest that greater adherence to the Paleolithic diet pattern and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern may be similarly associated with lower risk of incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effects of a diet high in monounsaturated fat and a full Mediterranean diet on PBMC whole genome gene expression and plasma proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Susan; Feskens, Edith; Bos, M.B.; Groot, de Lisette; Vries, de Jeanne; Muller, Michael; Afman, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the effects of replacement of saturated fat (SFA) by monunsaturated fat (MUFA) in a western-type diet and the effects of a full Mediterranean (MED) diet on whole genome PBMC gene expression and plasma protein profiles. Abdominally overweight subjects were randomized to a

  6. The RS4939827 polymorphism in the SMAD7 GENE and its association with Mediterranean diet in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Molero, Jéssica; González-Donquiles, Carmen; Palazuelos, Camilo; Fernández-Villa, Tania; Ramos, Elena; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria; Llorca, Javier; Henar Alonso, M; Tardón, Adonina; Amiano, Pilar; Moleon, José Juan Jiménez; Pérez, Rosana Peiró; Capelo, Rocío; Molina, Antonio J; Acebo, Inés Gómez; Guevara, Marcela; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Lope, Virginia; Huerta, José María; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Kogevinas, Manolis; Moreno, Victor; Martín, Vicente

    2017-10-30

    The objective of our investigation is to study the relationship between the rs4939827 SNP in the SMAD7 gene, Mediterranean diet pattern and the risk of colorectal cancer. We examined 1087 cases of colorectal cancer and 2409 population controls with available DNA samples from the MCC-Spain study, 2008-2012. Descriptive statistical analyses, and multivariate logistic mixed models were performed. The potential synergistic effect of rs4939827 and the Mediterranean diet pattern was evaluated with logistic regression in different strata of of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the genotype. High adherence to Mediterrenean diet was statistically significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. A decreased risk for CRC cancer was observed for the CC compared to the TT genotype (OR = 0.65 and 95% CI = 0.51-0.81) of the rs4939827 SNP Also, we could show an association between the Mediterranean diet pattern (protective factor) and rs4939827. Although the decreased risk for the CC genotype was slightly more pronounced in subjects with high adherence to Mediterrenean diet, there was no statistically significant synergistic effect between genotype CC and adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern factors. The SMAD7 gene and specifically the allele C could be protective for colorectal cancer. An independent protective association was also observed between high adherence Mediterranean diet pattern and CRC risk. Findings form this study indicate that high adherence to Mediterranean diet pattern has a protective role for CRC cancer probably involving the Tumor Growth Factor- β pathway in this cancer.

  7. Higher adherence to Mediterranean diet prior to pregnancy is associated with decreased risk for deviation from the maternal recommended gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutelidakis, Antonios E; Alexatou, Olga; Kousaiti, Savvina; Gkretsi, Elisavet; Vasios, George; Sampani, Anastasia; Tolia, Maria; Kiortsis, Dimitrios N; Giaginis, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    The present retrospective study was conducted on 1482 women in order to evaluate whether their pre-pregnancy adherence to the Mediterranean diet may affect maternal gestational weight gain (GWG). For this purpose, the study population was classified according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations concerning GWG. Pre-pregnancy adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed with 11 food patterns groups based on their contribution in the Mediterranean diet pyramid. Women with high adherence to the Mediterranean diet were more frequently characterised by GWG inside the IOM recommendations. In multivariate analysis, women with low Mediterranean diet adherence were almost twice at risk in presenting deflection from recommended GWG regardless of various confounding factors. These findings suggested that high pre-pregnancy adherence to the Mediterranean diet may be associated with reduced risk for GWG outside the IOM recommendations. However, larger prospective studies are strongly recommended in order for more precise conclusions to be drawn.

  8. The Mediterranean diet adoption improves metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory abnormalities in Algerian metabolic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkouche, L; Bouchenak, M; Malaisse, W J; Yahia, D Ait

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effects of Mediterranean diet (MD) adoption on insulin resistance, oxidative, and inflammatory status in metabolic syndrome (MS) patients. Eighty four patients with MS were randomly recruited in the medical centers of Oran, Algeria. Eighteen healthy participants were selected as a control group. Among these 84 patients, only 36 patients completed the nutritional advices for 3 months. Patients were instructed to follow a Mediterranean-style diet and received some other selected nutritional and physical activity instructions. Anthropometric measurements were performed and a questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and after 3 months of nutritional intervention from all subjects. At baseline, the MS patients were obese and had altered anthropometric parameters, higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, urea, creatinine, uric acid, and lower albumin compared to healthy subjects. A decrease in plasma, erythrocyte, and platelet antioxidant enzymes, and a rise in lipid and protein oxidation, plasma CRP, and fibrinogen were noted in the MS patients. Moreover, they had an unbalanced dietary pattern when compared to Mediterranean recommendations. Patients following the Mediterranean-style diet had significantly reduced weight, BMI, waist circumference, waist/hip circumference ratio, decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, cholesterol, triacylglycerols, CRP, urea, creatinine, creatinine clearance, lipid and protein oxidation, and higher plasma, erythrocyte, and platelet antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, a lifestyle intervention based mainly on nutritional advices improves metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory abnormalities of metabolic syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. n-3 Fatty acids, Mediterranean diet and cognitive function in normal aging: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masana, Maria F; Koyanagi, Ai; Haro, Josep Maria; Tyrovolas, Stefanos

    2017-05-01

    Intake of n-3 fatty acids and adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) have been shown to slow the progression of age-related cognitive decline, but the results are mixed. We summarized and evaluated the effect of n-3 fatty acids and MedDiet on cognitive outcomes in a cognitively healthy aged population. Relevant published studies from January 2000 to May 2015 were identified by searching three electronic databases: Pubmed, Web of Science/MEDLINE, and CINHAL. Observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered. Twenty-four studies were included for the systematic review. n-3 fatty acids were associated with better global cognition and some specific cognitive domains though some results were conflicting. Adherence to the MedDiet was also significantly associated with better cognitive performance and less cognitive decline. Finally, better cognitive performance was observed in men compared to women and mixed results were also found for the influence of APOE4 genotype on the association between n-3 fatty acids or MedDiet and cognition. Studies suggest that n-3 fatty acids in the diet and adherence to the MedDiet are beneficial in slowing age-related cognitive decline. However, more high-quality RCTs would be useful to clarify the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplements on cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Alcohol consumption and Mediterranean Diet adherence among health science students in Spain: the DiSA-UMH Study

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    Alexander Scholz

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: The overall alcohol consumption among the students in our study was low-to-moderate. Exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers differed regarding the Mediterranean diet pattern from non-drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcohol. These results show the need to properly adjust for diet in studies of the effects of alcohol consumption.

  11. The Effect of a Mediterranean Diet on the Incidence of Cataract Surgery

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    Alfredo García-Layana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cataract is a leading cause of vision impairment worldwide, and surgery is the only available treatment. The process that initiates lens opacification is dependent on the oxidative stress experienced by the lens components. A healthy overall dietary pattern, with the potential to reduce oxidative stress, has been suggested as a means to decrease the risk of developing cataract. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis that an intervention with a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet rather than a low-fat diet could decrease the incidence of cataract surgery in elderly subjects. Methods: We included 5802 men and women (age range: 55–80 years from the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea study (multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled clinical trial who had not undergone cataract surgery. They were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: (1 a MedDiet enriched with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO (n = 1998; (2 a MedDiet enriched with nuts (n = 1914, and a control group recommended to follow a low-fat diet (n = 1890. The incidence of cataract surgery was recorded yearly during follow-up clinical evaluations. Primary analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between the nutritional intervention and the incidence of cataract surgery. Results: During a follow-up period of 7.0 years (mean follow-up period: 5.7 years; median: 5.9 years, 559 subjects underwent cataract surgery. Two hundred and six participants from the MedDiet + EVOO group, 174 from the MedDiet + Nuts group, and 179 from the control group underwent cataract surgery. We did not observe a reduction in the incidence of cataract surgery in the MedDiet groups compared to the control group. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84–1.26, p = 0.79 for the control group versus the MedDiet + EVOO group and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.86–1.31, p = 0.58 for the

  12. The Effect of a Mediterranean Diet on the Incidence of Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Ciufo, Gianfranco; Toledo, Estefania; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Corella, Dolores; Fitó, Montse; Estruch, Ramon; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miguel; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Portillo, Maria P.; Sorli, José V.; Bulló, Mónica; Vinyoles, Ernest; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Ros, Emilio; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Arós, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cataract is a leading cause of vision impairment worldwide, and surgery is the only available treatment. The process that initiates lens opacification is dependent on the oxidative stress experienced by the lens components. A healthy overall dietary pattern, with the potential to reduce oxidative stress, has been suggested as a means to decrease the risk of developing cataract. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis that an intervention with a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) rather than a low-fat diet could decrease the incidence of cataract surgery in elderly subjects. Methods: We included 5802 men and women (age range: 55–80 years) from the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea study (multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled clinical trial) who had not undergone cataract surgery. They were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: (1) a MedDiet enriched with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) (n = 1998); (2) a MedDiet enriched with nuts (n = 1914), and a control group recommended to follow a low-fat diet (n = 1890). The incidence of cataract surgery was recorded yearly during follow-up clinical evaluations. Primary analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between the nutritional intervention and the incidence of cataract surgery. Results: During a follow-up period of 7.0 years (mean follow-up period: 5.7 years; median: 5.9 years), 559 subjects underwent cataract surgery. Two hundred and six participants from the MedDiet + EVOO group, 174 from the MedDiet + Nuts group, and 179 from the control group underwent cataract surgery. We did not observe a reduction in the incidence of cataract surgery in the MedDiet groups compared to the control group. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84–1.26, p = 0.79) for the control group versus the MedDiet + EVOO group and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.86–1.31, p = 0.58) for the control group

  13. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach

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    Louise Seconda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed. Conv–NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv–Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org–NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org–Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org–Med and Conv–Med groups compared to the Conv–NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points: 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI = 9.23–9.36 and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24–9.35 versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17–8.22 respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01–1.74 for the Org–Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28–0.60 for the Conv–NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org–Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34–11.52. This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain.

  14. Early Effects of a Hypocaloric, Mediterranean Diet on Laboratory Parameters in Obese Individuals

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    Marta Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction is a common strategy for weight loss in obese individuals. However, little is known about the impact of moderate hypocaloric diets on obesity-related laboratory parameters in a short-term period. Aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of laboratory biomarkers in obese individuals following a Mediterranean, hypocaloric (1400–1600 Kcal/die diet. 23 obese, pharmacologically untreated patients were enrolled and subjected to the determination of anthropometric variables and blood collection at baseline, 1 and 4 months after diet initiation. After 4 months of calorie restriction, we observed a significant decrease in body weight and BMI (both P5% weight loss. Collectively, our data support a precocious improvement of insulin and leptin sensitivity after a modest calorie restriction and weight reduction. Moreover, EGF and LDH may represent novel markers of obesity, which deserve further investigations.

  15. Dietary Calcium Intake and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Spanish Children: The ANIVA Study

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    Nuria Rubio-López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of dietary calcium intake with anthropometric measures, physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet in 1176 Spanish children aged 6–9 years. Data were obtained from “Antropometría y Nutrición Infantil de Valencia” (ANIVA, a cross-sectional study of a representative sample. Dietary calcium intake assessed from three-day food records was compared to recommended daily intakes in Spain. Anthropometric measures (weight and height were measured according to international standards and adherence to the MedDiet was evaluated using the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED test. For the total sample of children, 25.8% had inadequate calcium intake, a significantly higher prevalence in girls (p = 0.006 and inadequate calcium intake was associated with lower height z-score (p = 0.001 for both sexes. In girls, there was an inverse relationship between calcium intake and body mass index (p = 0.001 and waist/hip ratio (p = 0.018. Boys presented a polarization in physical activity, reporting a greater level of both physical and sedentary activity in comparison with girls (p = 0.001. Children with poor adherence to MedDiet, even if they consume two yogurts or cheese (40 g daily, adjusted by gender, age, total energy intake, physical activity and father’s level of education, are at risk of inadequate total calcium intake (odds ratio adjusted [ORa]: 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13–9.94, p = 0.001. The intake of these dairy products was insufficient to cover calcium intake recommendations in this age group (6–9 years. It is important to prioritize health strategies that promote the MedDiet and to increase calcium intake in this age group.

  16. KIDMED TEST; PREVALENCE OF LOW ADHERENCE TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG; A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

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    García Cabrera, S; Herrera Fernández, N; Rodríguez Hernández, C; Nissensohn, M; Román-Viñas, B; Serra-Majem, L

    2015-12-01

    during the last decades, a quick and important modification of the dietary habits has been observed in the Mediterranean countries, especially among young people. Several authors have evaluated the pattern of adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in this group of population, by using the KIDMED test. the purpose of this study was to evaluate the adherence to the Mediterranean Diet among children and adolescents by using the KIDMED test through a systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed database was accessed until January 2014. Only cross-sectional studies evaluating children and young people were included. A random effects model was considered. eighteen cross-sectional studies were included. The population age ranged from 2 to 25 years. The total sample included 24 067 people. The overall percentage of high adherence to the Mediterranean Diet was 10% (95% CI 0.07-0.13), while the low adhesion was 21% (IC 95% 0.14 to 0.27). In the low adherence group, further analyses were performed by defined subgroups, finding differences for the age of the population and the geographical area. the results obtained showed important differences between high and low adherence to the Mediterranean Diet levels, although successive subgroup analyzes were performed. There is a clear trend towards the abandonment of the Mediterranean lifestyle. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with the gut microbiota pattern and gastrointestinal characteristics in an adult population.

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    Mitsou, Evdokia K; Kakali, Aimilia; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Yannakoulia, Mary; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Kyriacou, Adamantini

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential associations of adherence to the Mediterranean diet with gut microbiota characteristics and gastrointestinal symptomatology in an adult population. Other long-term dietary habits (e.g. consumption of snacks and junk food or stimulant intake) were also evaluated in terms of the gut microbiota profile. Participants (n 120) underwent anthropometric, dietary, physical activity and lifestyle evaluation. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using a Mediterranean diet score, the MedDietScore, and subjects were classified into three tertiles according to individual adherence scoring. Gut microbiota composition was determined using quantitative PCR and plate-count techniques, and faecal SCFA were analysed using GC. Gastrointestinal symptoms were also evaluated. Participants with a high adherence to the Mediterranean diet had lower Escherichia coli counts (P=0·022), a higher bifidobacteria:E. coli ratio (P=0·025), increased levels and prevalence of Candida albicans (P=0·039 and P=0·050, respectively), greater molar ratio of acetate (P=0·009), higher defaecation frequency (P=0·028) and a more pronounced gastrointestinal symptomatology compared with those reporting low adherence. A lower molar ratio of valerate was also observed in the case of high adherence to the Mediterranean diet compared with the other two tertiles (P for trend=0·005). Positive correlations of MedDietScore with gastrointestinal symptoms, faecal moisture, total bacteria, bifidobacteria:E. coli ratio, relative share of Bacteroides, C. albicans and total SCFA, as well as negative associations with cultivable E. coli levels and valerate were indicated. Fast food consumption was characterised by suppressed representation of lactobacilli and butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, our findings support a link between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and gut microbiota characteristics.

  18. Mediterranean Diet and Health-Related Quality of Life in Two Cohorts of Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

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    Pérez-Tasigchana, Raúl F; León-Muñoz, Luz M; López-García, Esther; Banegas, José R; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In older adults, the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower risk of chronic diseases, but its association with health-related quality of life (HRQL) is still uncertain. This study assessed the association between the Mediterranean diet and HRQL in 2 prospective cohorts of individuals aged ≥60 years in Spain. The UAM-cohort (n = 2376) was selected in 2000/2001 and followed-up through 2003. At baseline, diet was collected with a food frequency questionnaire, which was used to develop an 8-item index of Mediterranean diet (UAM-MDP). The Seniors-ENRICA cohort (n = 1911) was recruited in 2008/2010 and followed-up through 2012. At baseline, a diet history was used to obtain food consumption. Mediterranean diet adherence was measured with the PREDIMED score and the Trichopoulou's Mediterranean Diet Score (MSD). HRQL was assessed, at baseline and at the end of follow-up, with the physical and mental component summaries (PCS and MCS) of the SF-36 questionnaire in the UAM-cohort, and the SF-12v.2 questionnaire in the Seniors-ENRICA cohort. Analyses were conducted with linear regression, and adjusted for the main confounders including baseline HRQL. In the UAM-cohort, no significant associations between the UAM-MDP and the PCS or the MCS were found. In the Seniors-ENRICA cohort, a higher PREDIMED score was associated with a slightly better PCS; when compared with the lowest tertile of PREDIMED score, the beta coefficient (95% confidence interval) for PCS was 0.55 (-0.48 to 1.59) in the second tertile, and 1.34 (0.21 to 2.47) in the highest tertile. However, the PREDIMED score was non-significantly associated with a better MCS score. The MSD did not show an association with either the PCS or the MCS. No clinically relevant association was found between the Mediterranean diet and HRQL in older adults in Spain.

  19. Consumption of oral hospital diets and percent adequacy of minerals in oncology patients as an indicative for the use of oral supplements.

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    de Sá, Júlia S M; Moreira, Daniele C F; Louvera Silva, Karine A; Morgano, Marcelo A; Quintaes, Késia D

    2014-08-01

    Deficiencies in the consumption of foods and nutrients favor malnutrition in patients. Considering the recommendations for the ingestion of minerals, the content, consumption and percent adequacy of the minerals (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, K, P, Na, Zn and Se) were evaluated amongst oncology patients who received oral diets isolated or associated with an oral food complement (OFC), evaluating the need and composition of an oral supplement. The mineral composition as determined by ICP-OES, and the food consumption of the patients served regular, bland and soft diets, were evaluated on six non-consecutive weekdays. Patients with increased nutritional needs received OFC. The consumptions were calculated by deducting the weight of the leftovers from the value served. A total of 163 patients took part of which 59.5% were men, the mean age was 57 ± 15 years old, and 126 (77.3%), 27 (16.6%) and 10 (6.1%) were served the regular, bland and soft diets, respectively, with (23.0%), 8 (30.7%) and 4 (40.0%) receiving the OFC. Patient consumption was lower when the regular (74.2 vs 79.7%) and soft (68.9 vs 74.2%) diets were combined with OFC. For all diets, less was consumed at the lunch (61.2%-65.7%) and dinner (39.9%-62.8%) meals. Patients that received the OFC showed reduced meal consumption and higher Ca ingestion. The mineral contents of the diets were inadequate, with 66.8% of the patients ingesting Na above the UL and K below the nutritional recommendation (100%). The diet consumption, isolated or associated with OFC was insufficient, and hence the exclusion of OFC and the inclusion of a mineral supplement (without P and Na) was indicated to adequate ingestion to the nutritional recommendations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Relationship of the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and Its Main Components with CRP Levels in the Spanish Population.

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    Lahoz, Carlos; Castillo, Elisa; Mostaza, Jose M; de Dios, Olaya; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A; González-Alegre, Teresa; García-Iglesias, Francisca; Estirado, Eva; Laguna, Fernando; Sanchez, Vanesa; Sabín, Concesa; López, Silvia; Cornejo, Victor; de Burgos, Carmen; Garcés, Carmen

    2018-03-20

    Background: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet seems to be inversely associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. A 14-point Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS) has been developed to assess dietary compliance. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether each of the MEDAS questions as well as their final score were associated with the levels of CRP in general Spanish population. Cross-sectional analysis of 1411 subjects (mean age 61 years, 43.0% males) randomly selected from the general population. CRP levels were determined by a commercial ELISA kit. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was measured by the 14-point MEDAS. Results: There was an inverse correlation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the CRP concentration, even after adjusting by age, gender, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, body mass index, statin treatment and hypertension treatment ( p = 0.041). Subjects who consume ≥2 servings of vegetables per day ( p = 0.003), ≥3 pieces of fruit per day ( p = 0.003), ≥1 serving of butter, margarine, or cream per day ( p = 0.041) or ≥3 servings of fish/seafood per week ( p = 0.058) had significantly lower levels of CRP. Conclusions : Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet measured by a simple questionnaire is associated with lower CRP concentration. However, this association seems to be particularly related to a higher consumption of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, and fish.

  1. Relationship of the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and Its Main Components with CRP Levels in the Spanish Population

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    Carlos Lahoz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet seems to be inversely associated with C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. A 14-point Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS has been developed to assess dietary compliance. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether each of the MEDAS questions as well as their final score were associated with the levels of CRP in general Spanish population. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 1411 subjects (mean age 61 years, 43.0% males randomly selected from the general population. CRP levels were determined by a commercial ELISA kit. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was measured by the 14-point MEDAS. Results: There was an inverse correlation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the CRP concentration, even after adjusting by age, gender, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, body mass index, statin treatment and hypertension treatment (p = 0.041. Subjects who consume ≥2 servings of vegetables per day (p = 0.003, ≥3 pieces of fruit per day (p = 0.003, ≥1 serving of butter, margarine, or cream per day (p = 0.041 or ≥3 servings of fish/seafood per week (p = 0.058 had significantly lower levels of CRP. Conclusions: Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet measured by a simple questionnaire is associated with lower CRP concentration. However, this association seems to be particularly related to a higher consumption of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, and fish.

  2. Relationship of the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and Its Main Components with CRP Levels in the Spanish Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, Carlos; Castillo, Elisa; Mostaza, Jose M.; de Dios, Olaya; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; González-Alegre, Teresa; García-Iglesias, Francisca; Estirado, Eva; Laguna, Fernando; Sanchez, Vanesa; Sabín, Concesa; López, Silvia; Cornejo, Victor; de Burgos, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Background: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet seems to be inversely associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. A 14-point Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS) has been developed to assess dietary compliance. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether each of the MEDAS questions as well as their final score were associated with the levels of CRP in general Spanish population. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 1411 subjects (mean age 61 years, 43.0% males) randomly selected from the general population. CRP levels were determined by a commercial ELISA kit. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was measured by the 14-point MEDAS. Results: There was an inverse correlation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the CRP concentration, even after adjusting by age, gender, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, body mass index, statin treatment and hypertension treatment (p = 0.041). Subjects who consume ≥2 servings of vegetables per day (p = 0.003), ≥3 pieces of fruit per day (p = 0.003), ≥1 serving of butter, margarine, or cream per day (p = 0.041) or ≥3 servings of fish/seafood per week (p = 0.058) had significantly lower levels of CRP. Conclusions: Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet measured by a simple questionnaire is associated with lower CRP concentration. However, this association seems to be particularly related to a higher consumption of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, and fish. PMID:29558396

  3. Prevention of Alzheimer's disease: The role of the Mediterranean diet

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    Maria João Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Alzheimer tem vindo a aumentar exponencialmente, sendo atualmente considerada uma das epidemias do século XXI e contribuindo significativamente para a morbilidade e mortalidade observadas na população idosa. Assim, é um importante problema de saúde pública, com um impacto socioeconômico crescente. Os fármacos usados atualmente apenas contribuem para o alívio sintomático e não atuam no nível do processo neurodegenerativo nem curam a doença. Desse modo, desenvolver medidas preventivas e terapêuticas que sejam eficazes em atrasar ou em reverter o curso da doença é de extrema importância. Vários estudos têm demonstrado que fatores relacionados com o estilo de vida desempenham um papel central em reduzir o risco de desenvolver doença de Alzheimer ou, pelo menos, em atrasar o aparecimento dos sintomas. Um desses fatores é a nutrição, que influencia significativamente o risco de declínio cognitivo, demência e doença de Alzheimer. Um desses padrões dietéticos é a dieta Mediterrânica, que desempenha papel protetor nas alterações da função cognitiva, síndromes pré-demenciais e demência, e, portanto, poderá representar uma estratégia preventiva eficaz para a doença de Alzheimer, com baixos custos e escassos efeitos colaterais. Essas medidas preventivas promissoras poderão resultar em dados epidemiológicos importantes, o que poderá traduzir-se num progresso significativo na saúde pública. Foi efetuada uma pesquisa na PubMed de artigos acerca da associação entre alimentação e demência e, especificamente, acerca da associação entre uma maior adesão à dieta Mediterrânica e o menor risco de desenvolver doença de Alzheimer assim como a verificação de quais os potenciais mecanismos que explicam essa associação.

  4. Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh-Taskar, Priya R; Radcliffe, John D; Liu, Yan; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2010-08-01

    To assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality. Cross-sectional. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. Young adults (20-39 years, n = 2615). A 24-hour dietary recall was used, with breakfast defined as self-reported. Covariate-adjusted sample-weighted means for the entire day's energy/nutrient intakes, mean adequacy ratio (MAR) for nutrient intakes, and diet quality (i.e., Healthy Eating Index [HEI]-2005) scores were compared using analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction (p young adults were BS, 16.5% were RTECC, and 58.4% were OBC. Intakes of total energy, percent energy from carbohydrate, and dietary fiber were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Percent energy intake from added sugars was higher in BS than in RTECC and OBC. Compared with BS and RTECC, OBC consumed a lower percent energy from carbohydrates and total sugars, but consumed a higher percent energy from total fat and discretionary solid fats and had a higher cholesterol intake. Intakes of several micronutrients were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Both MAR and total HEI scores were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. The HEI scores for intakes of whole fruits, total/whole grains, milk, and percent energy from solid fat/alcohol/added sugar were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. Compared with OBC, RTECC had a higher HEI score for the intake of saturated fat. At breakfast, RTECC consumed higher intakes of total fruits, whole grains, dairy products, carbohydrates and total sugars, dietary fiber, and several micronutrients than OBC, who consumed higher intakes of meat/poultry/fish, eggs, total fat, discretionary oils/solid fats, cholesterol, and sodium than RTECC. Thus, RTECC had more favorable nutrient intakes and better diet quality than BS and OBC.

  5. Inverse Associations between a Locally Validated Mediterranean Diet Index, Overweight/Obesity, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chilean Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Guadalupe; Urquiaga, Inés; Jiménez, Paulina; D’Acuña, Sonia; Villarroel, Luis; Leighton, Federico; Rigotti, Attilio

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are key risk factors for chronic disease. Dietary patterns are critical in the incidence and persistence of obesity and MetS, yet there is few data linking diet to obesity and MetS in Chile. Our objective was to use a locally validated diet index to evaluate adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and its correlations with overweight/obesity (OW/O) and MetS prevalence in Chilean adults. We conducted a nationwide, cross-sectional online survey of Chilean adults with complete self-reported diet and body mass index data (n = 24,882). A subsample of 4348 users (17.5%) had valid MetS data. An inverse association was observed between adherence to Mediterranean diet and OW/O and MetS prevalence. As diet quality decreased from healthy, to moderately-healthy, to unhealthy, prevalence increased from 44.8, 51.1, to 60.9% for OW/O and from 13.4, 18.5, to 28.9% for MetS (p-values < 0.001). Adjusted odds ratios for OW/O and MetS were significantly higher in moderately-healthy (OR = 1.58 and 1.54) and unhealthy (OR = 2.20 and 2.49, respectively) diet groups in comparison to the healthy diet group. This study represents the first report on the relationship between Mediterranean diet and chronic disease risk in Chile. It suggests that the Mediterranean diet may be applied to manage chronic disease risk beyond the Mediterranean basin. PMID:28800091

  6. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet by nursing students of Murcia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Inmaculada; López-Nicolás, Rubén; Rodríguez-Tadeo, Alejandra; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar; Martínez-Marín, Mariano; Doménech-Asensi, Guillermo

    2014-07-01

    The Mediterranean diet is recognized as one with the healthiest dietary patterns; however, this diet is deteriorating and being abandoned even in the Mediterranean countries themselves. Generally speaking, dietary habits get fixed during adolescence although during the college phase, students may experience important changes in their lifestyles. The KIDMED index is recognized as a good tool to assess adherence to the Mediterranean diet (AMD). The aim of this study was to assess AMD in college students and to evidence possible variations throughout the college period assessing differences between the college years. A cross-sectional study with 213 alumni in first grade and 105 in fourth grade was carried out. The students were classified by gender, type of residence (parents' home or out of the parents' house) and body mass index (BMI) ( 25). The BMI for the whole sample was 24.35 ± 2.71 in men and 22.54 ± 3.25 in women (p students showing good adherence. In general, a low intake of fruits, vegetables, rice or pasta was observed, foods that are included in the base of the dietary pyramid. Consumption of olive oil and legumes was very high and a direct relationship was observed between overweighed people (BMI > 25) and the habit of not having breakfast usually. No significant differences were observed between the student of first and fourth grades although those students in the fourth grade living away from the parental house had higher AMD level than the other students (p breakfast. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. The immune protective effect of the Mediterranean diet against chronic low-grade inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rosa; Sacanella, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Dietary patterns high in refined starches, sugar, and saturated and trans-fatty acids, poor in natural antioxidants and fiber from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and poor in omega-3 fatty acids may cause an activation of the innate immune system, most likely by excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with a reduced production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is a nutritional model inspired by the traditional dietary pattern of some of the countries of the Mediterranean basin. This dietary pattern is characterized by the abundant consumption of olive oil, high consumption of plant foods (fruits, vegetables, pulses, cereals, nuts and seeds); frequent and moderate intake of wine (mainly with meals); moderate consumption of fish, seafood, yogurt, cheese, poultry and eggs; and low consumption of red meat, processed meat products and seeds. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the effects of a Mediterranean pattern as protective against several diseases associated with chronic low-grade inflammation such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and cognition disorders. The adoption of this dietary pattern could counter the effects of several inflammatory markers, decreasing, for example, the secretion of circulating and cellular biomarkers involved in the atherosclerotic process. Thus, the aim of this review was to consider the current evidence about the effectiveness of the MedDiet in these chronic inflammatory diseases due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may not only act on classical risk factors but also on inflammatory biomarkers such as adhesion molecules, cytokines or molecules related to the stability of atheromatic plaque.

  8. Mediterranean Diet, Retinopathy, Nephropathy, and Microvascular Diabetes Complications: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-López, Andrés; Babio, Nancy; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Corella, Dolores; Amor, Antonio J; Fitó, Montse; Estruch, Ramon; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Basora, Josep; Basterra-Gortari, F Javier; Zanon-Moreno, Vicente; Muñoz, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    To date no clinical trials have evaluated the role of dietary patterns on the incidence of microvascular diabetes complications. We hypothesized that a nutritional intervention based on the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) would have greater protective effect on diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy than a low-fat control diet. This was a post hoc analysis of a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes participating in the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) study, a multicenter randomized nutritional intervention trial conducted in a population at high cardiovascular risk. Individuals with type 2 diabetes who were free of microvascular complications at enrollment (n = 3,614, aged 55-80 years) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary interventions: MedDiet supplemented with extravirgin olive oil (MedDiet+EVOO), MedDiet supplemented with mixed nuts (MedDiet+Nuts), or a low-fat control diet. Two independent outcomes were considered: new onset of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression. During a median follow-up of 6.0 years, we identified 74 new cases of retinopathy and 168 of nephropathy. Compared with the control diet, multivariable-adjusted HRs for diabetic retinopathy were 0.56 (95% CI 0.32-0.97) for the MedDiet+EVOO and 0.63 (0.35-1.11) for the MedDiet+Nuts. No between-group differences were found for nephropathy. When the yearly updated information on adherence to the MedDiet was considered, the HR for retinopathy in the highest versus the lowest quintile was 0.34 (0.13-0.89; P = 0.001 for trend). No significant associations were found for nephropathy. A MedDiet enriched with EVOO may protect against diabetic retinopathy but not diabetic nephropathy. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Sex Differences in the Impact of the Mediterranean Diet on LDL Particle Size Distribution and Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Bédard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences have been previously highlighted in the cardioprotective effects of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet. The objective of this study was to investigate whether sex differences also exist with regard to LDL particle size distribution and oxidation. Participants were 37 men and 32 premenopausal women (24–53 years with slightly elevated LDL-C concentrations (3.4–4.9 mmol/L or total cholesterol/HDL-C ≥5.0. Variables were measured before and after a four-week isoenergetic MedDiet. Sex differences were found in response to the MedDiet for the proportion of medium LDL (255–260 Å (p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.01 and small, dense LDL (sdLDL; <255 Å (trend; p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.06, men experiencing an increase in the proportion of medium LDL with a concomitant reduction in the proportion of sdLDL, while an opposite trend was observed in women. A sex difference was also noted for estimated cholesterol concentrations among sdLDL (p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.03, with only men experiencing a reduction in response to the MedDiet. The MedDiet marginally reduced oxidized LDL (oxLDL concentrations (p = 0.07, with no sex difference. Results suggest that short-term consumption of the MedDiet leads to a favorable redistribution of LDL subclasses from smaller to larger LDL only in men. These results highlight the importance of considering sex issues in cardiovascular benefits of the MedDiet.

  10. Effects of a nutritional intervention program based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Vicky; Bégin, Catherine; Hudon, Anne-Marie; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Corneau, Louise; Dodin, Sylvie; Lemieux, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine gender differences in the impact of a nutritional intervention based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet on changes in eating-related self-determined motivation and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were larger in men than in women in response to the intervention and at follow-up, but the magnitude of change decreased with time in both genders. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were positively associated with changes in the Mediterranean diet adherence in response to the intervention and at follow-up in men only, suggesting that the nutritional program seems to fit better men than women. PMID:28070382

  11. Modeling the adequacy of dietary fiber in dairy cows based on the responses of ruminal pH and milk fat production to composition of the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebeli, Q; Dijkstra, J; Tafaj, M; Steingass, H; Ametaj, B N; Drochner, W

    2008-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop practical models to assess and predict the adequacy of dietary fiber in high-yielding dairy cows. We used quantitative methods to analyze relevant research data and critically evaluate and determine the responses of ruminal pH and production performance to different variables including physical, chemical, and starch-degrading characteristics of the diet. Further, extensive data were used to model the magnitude of ruminal pH fluctuations and determine the threshold for the development of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Results of this study showed that to minimize the risk of SARA, the following events should be avoided: 1) a daily mean ruminal pH lower than 6.16, and 2) a time period in which ruminal pH is fiber (peNDF) or the ratio between peNDF and rumen-degradable starch from grains in the diet increased up to 31.2 +/- 1.6% [dry matter (DM) basis] or 1.45 +/- 0.22, respectively, so did the daily mean ruminal pH, for which a asymptotic plateau was reached at a pH of 6.20 to 6.27. This study also showed that digestibility of fiber in the total tract depends on ruminal pH and outflow rate of digesta from reticulorumen; thereby both variables explained 62% of the variation of fiber digestibility. Feeding diets with peNDF content up to 31.9 +/- 1.97% (DM basis) slightly decreased DM intake and actual milk yield; however, 3.5% fat-corrected milk and milk fat yield were increased, resulting in greater milk energy efficiency. In conclusion, a level of about 30 to 33% peNDF in the diet may be considered generally optimal for minimizing the risk of SARA without impairing important production responses in high-yielding dairy cows. In terms of improvement of the accuracy to assessing dietary fiber adequacy, it is suggested that the content of peNDF required to stabilize ruminal pH and maintain milk fat content without compromising milk energy efficiency can be arranged based on grain or starch sources included in the diet

  12. A pilot study to investigate if New Zealand men with prostate cancer benefit from a Mediterranean-style diet

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    Sharon Erdrich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the prostate is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the third leading cause of mortality in New Zealand men, making it a significant health issue in this country. Global distribution patterns suggest that diet and lifestyle factors may be linked to the development and progression of this cancer. Twenty men with diagnosed prostate cancer adhered to a Mediterranean diet, with specific adaptations, for three months. Prostate-specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were evaluated at baseline and after three months of following the diet. Dietary data were collated from diet diaries and an adaptation of a validated Mediterranean diet questionnaire. A significant reduction in DNA damage compared to baseline was apparent, with particular benefit noted for overall adherence to the diet (p = 0.013, increased intake of folate (p = 0.023, vitamin C (p = 0.007, legumes (p = 0.004 and green tea (p = 0.002. Higher intakes of red meat and dairy products were inversely associated with DNA damage (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008 respectively. The results from this small feasibility study suggest that a high-antioxidant diet, modelled on Mediterranean traditions, may be of benefit for men with prostate cancer. Protection against DNA damage appears to be associated with the diet implemented, ostensibly due to reduction in reactive oxidant species. These findings warrant further exploration in a longer trial, with a larger cohort.

  13. Adolescents in southern regions of Italy adhere to the Mediterranean diet more than those in the northern regions.

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    Noale, Marianna; Nardi, Mariateresa; Limongi, Federica; Siviero, Paola; Caregaro, Lorenza; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Maggi, Stefania

    2014-09-01

    There is a large amount of literature regarding the benefits of the Mediterranean diet in the adult population; however, there is growing curiosity about the individuals who naturally adhere to those principles early in life. The "Evaluation of Dietary Habits in Adolescents," carried out by the National Research Council of Italy in 2009, is a survey that aimed to assess the dietary habits and lifestyles of Italian adolescents and their adherence to the Mediterranean diet. We hypothesized that there would be differences across regions, with a higher adherence in Southern Italy compared with Northern Italy based on geography. The survey was conducted in 3 different geographic locations in Italy and included a convenience sample of adolescents who attended either a middle or high school. The participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning demographic data, lifestyle factors, and eating patterns, and scores were assigned according to adherence to the Mediterranean diet, as calculated using Trichopoulou's Mediterranean diet scale. The final sample included 565 adolescents, between 12 and 19 years old, who attended school in the northeastern, northwestern, or southern regions of Italy in 2009. According to the findings, 38.6% of the respondents had scores indicating a low adherence to the Mediterranean diet, whereas only 14% had scores showing a high adherence. Teenagers from the Southern region showed the highest adherence. Those with a high adherence to the Mediterranean diet consumed higher quantities of fiber, iron, vitamin B6, vitamin C, folic acid, vitamin A, vitamin D, and monounsaturated fats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the path of Mediterranean diet on 10-year incidence of cardiovascular disease: the ATTICA study (2002-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakos, D B; Georgousopoulou, E N; Pitsavos, C; Chrysohoou, C; Skoumas, I; Pitaraki, E; Georgiopoulos, G A; Ntertimani, M; Christou, A; Stefanadis, C

    2015-03-01

    A Mediterranean diet has been associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, but the clinical and behavioral pathway has not been well understood and appreciated. The aim of this work was to explore the path between adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet, lifestyle behaviors, clinical status, and a 10-year incidence of CVD. The ATTICA study was carried out in the Athens area during 2001-2002 and included 3042 participants free of CVD at baseline (49.8% men, aged 18-89). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). During 2011-2012, 2583 out of the 3042 participants were found during the 10-year follow-up (15% lost to follow-up). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet decreased CVD risk (relative Risk (RR) per 1/55 unit = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.00), independently of various sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Subgroup analyses revealed that participants with an unhealthy lifestyle (i.e., smokers, and obese and sedentary persons) remained protected from CVD through a greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet (RR for smokers = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.88, 0.97; RR for obese participants = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.82, 0.979; and RR for sedentary participants = 0.95, 95%CI: 0.90, 0.99). Path analysis revealed that adherence to a Mediterranean diet not only decreases the levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 but also has an independent protective role against CVD risk per se (total effect of the MedDietScore on CVD = -0.003, 95%CI: -0.005 to 0.000). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet confers a considerable reduction on CVD risk, independent of various factors. Therefore, even subjects with unhealthy lifestyle behaviors may benefit from adherence to this diet, suggesting another dimension to prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England: Formative research to inform a web-based, work-place nutrition intervention

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    Angeliki Papadaki

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Improvement in the consumption of several Mediterranean diet components is needed to increase adherence in this sample of adults. The findings have the potential to inform the development of a web-based intervention that will focus on these foods to promote the Mediterranean diet in work-place settings in South West England.

  16. Relevance of Mediterranean diet and glucose metabolism for nephrolithiasis in obese subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nephrolithiasis is more frequent and severe in obese patients from different western nations. This may be supported by higher calcium, urate, oxalate excretion in obese stone formers. Except these parameters, clinical characteristics of obese stone formers were not extensively explored. Aims In the present paper we studied the relationship between obesity and its metabolic correlates and nephrolithiasis. Materials and methods We studied 478 Caucasian subjects having BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. The presence of nephrolithiasis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were noted. They underwent measurements of anthropometry (BMI and waist circumference, body composition), serum variables (fasting glucose, serum lipids and serum enzymes) and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) nutritional questionnaire. Results 45 (9.4%) participants were stone formers. Subjects with high serum concentrations of triglycerides (≥150 mg/dl), fasting glucose (> 100 mg/dl) and AST (>30 U/I in F or >40 U/I in M) were more frequent among stone formers than non-stone formers. Multinomial logistic regression confirmed that kidney stone production was associated with high fasting glucose (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.2, P = 0.011), AST (OR = 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-16.7, P = 0.033) and triglycerides (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7, P = 0.01). MedDiet score was not different in stone formers and non-stone formers. However, stone formers had a lower consumption frequency of olive oil and nuts, and higher consumption frequency of wine compared with non-stone formers. Conclusions Overweight and obese stone formers may have a defect in glucose metabolism and a potential liver damage. Some foods typical of Mediterranean diet may protect against nephrolithiasis. PMID:24502605

  17. Mediterranean diet and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: the need of extended and comprehensive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Martines, G Fabio; Pace, Patrizia; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is mostly related to increased BMI and sedentary life, even if it not directly attributable only to these or to single specific factors. Unhealthy lifestyle and obesity are the most probable causes, also in non-diabetic and without alcohol abuse patients, even if lean individuals can be involved. NAFLD treatment is currently warranted and driven by comprehensive lifestyle intervention, a valuable objective that is more often wished for than actually achieved. The aim is to re-assess the effectiveness of an intervention focused to increase the Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Score (AMDS) and the level of physical exercise, investigating the factors associated with failure and reporting the time that must elapse before such intervention becomes effective. The study included 90 (F 46, M 44) non-alcoholic non-diabetic patients, aged 50.13 ± 13.68 years, BMI 31.01 ± 5.18 with evidence of fatty liver by ultrasound. A significant decrease of Bright Liver Score (BLS) was observed only after 6 months of intervention: differently, at the first and third month of monitoring fatty liver changes were still not significant. By a multiple linear regression model Adherence to Mediterranean Diet change (p:0.015) and body mass index changes (p:Diet is a significant predictor of changes in the fat content of the liver in overweight patients with NAFLD. The effect of the diet is gradual and favorable and it is independent of other lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Western and Mediterranean Diets and Vitamin D on Muscle Fibers of Sedentary Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Francesca Maria; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Purrello, Francesco; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2018-02-17

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with sarcopenia. Decreased serum levels of Vitamin D (VitD) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and their mutual relationship were also reported. We aimed to evaluate whether different dietary profiles, containing or not VitD, may exert different effects on muscle molecular morphology. Twenty-eight male rats were fed for 10 weeks in order to detect early defects induced by different dietary regimens: regular diet (R); regular diet with vitamin D supplementation (R-DS) and regular diet with vitamin D restriction (R-DR); high-fat butter-based diets (HFB-DS and HFB-DR) with 41% energy from fat; high-fat extra-virgin olive oil-based diets (HFEVO-DS and HFEVO-DR) with 41% energy from fat. IL-1β, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), and VitD-receptor (VDR) expressions were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Muscle fiber perimeter was measured by histology and morphometric analysis. The muscle fibers of the HEVO-DS rats were hypertrophic, comparable to those of the R-DS rats. An inverse correlation existed between the dietary fat content and the perimeter of the muscle fibers ( p < 0.01). In the HFB-DR rats, the muscle fibers appeared hypotrophic with an increase of IL-1β and a dramatic decrease of IGF-1 expression. High-fat western diet could impair muscle metabolism and lay the ground for subsequent muscle damage. VitD associated with a Mediterranean diet showed trophic action on the muscle fibers.

  19. Relationship between sleep pattern and efficacy of calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet in overweight/obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliai, Giuditta; Dinu, Monica; Casini, Alessandro; Sofi, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The association between the sleep pattern and the effectiveness of a calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet in people with overweight/obesity has been investigated in this study. Four hundred and three subjects were provided with a calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet and followed for 9 months. Personal information, including sleep pattern, was obtained at the baseline. Body weight and composition were measured every 3 months. Poor sleepers reported to have significantly (p sleeping 6-8 or >8 h/day had an increased probability of losing fat mass than women who reported sleeping sleep pattern is necessary to maintain body weight and optimal body composition.

  20. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The European Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged 65 years or older from 7 study centers across Europe (Norway, Estonia, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Greece, and Spain), full dietary data were available in 4753. The mean age of participants was 73.2 years (standard deviation, 5.6), and 55% were women. Participants underwent an eye examination and digital retinal color photography. The images were graded at a single center. Dietary intake during the previous 12 months was assessed by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). A previously published Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was used to classify participants according to their responses on the FFQ. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of the MDS score and AMD, taking account of potential confounders and the multicenter study design. Images were graded according to the International Classification System for age-related maculopathy and stratified using the Rotterdam staging system into 5 exclusive stages (AMD 0-4) and a separate category of large drusen (≥125 μm). Age-related macular degeneration 4 included neovascular AMD (nvAMD) and geographic atrophy (GA). Increasing MDS was associated with reduced odds of nvAMD in unadjusted and confounder-adjusted analysis. Compared with the lowest MDS adherence (≤4 score), those in the highest category MDS adherence (>6 score) showed lower odds of nvAMD (odds ratio, 0.53; 0.27-1.04; P trend = 0.01). The association with MDS did not differ by Y204H risk allele (P = 0.89). For all early AMD (grade 1-3), there was no relationship with MDS (P trend = 0.9). There was a weak trend (P = 0.1) between MDS and large drusen; those in the highest category of MDS had 20% reduced odds compared with those in

  1. Is there any mediterranean diet not affecting bilitec assessment of bile reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharioudakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel; Athanasakis, Elias; Tsiaoussis, John; Karmoiris, Konstandinos; Xynos, Evaghelos

    2004-01-01

    Colored food substances may interfere with Bilitec system that uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux, causing false positive results. Therefore, diets have been suggested for consumption during Bilitec studies that contain minimal amounts of pigments. To enrich the list of suitable foods for Bilitec measurements with dishes common in Mediterranean diets, and improve subject's compliance. Ninety substances were in vivo tested for 'bilirubin absorbance'. 'Dry' substances were blended after being diluted in water, while 'floppy' substances and cooked foods were blended undiluted. Blended mixtures and 'liquids' were tested for bilirubin without further dilution and after being mixed with hydrochloric acid. The procedure was repeated to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Measurements are highly reproducible. Thirty five foods exhibited 'bilirubin absorbance' values safely below the threshold, and are considered to be suitable for Bilitec studies. On the contrary some vegetables and fruits, legumes, tomato sauce preparations, red wine, coffee, tea and jams showed high absorbance values, and are not recommended. Menus containing part of the variety of Mediterranean food preparations are safely recommended for consumption during Bilitec studies, enriching food lists available at present. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. From nutrients to foods: The alimentary imaginary of the Mediterranean diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona STANO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Together with clothing, urban artefacts and other aspects of daily life, nutrition is not only one of the basic human needs, but also a system of communication (Barthes, 1961 and expression of sociocultural identity (Levi-Strauss, 1965; Montanari, 2006; Stano, 2015. Undoubtedly food habits, preferences and taboos are partially regulated by ecological and material factors (Harris, 1975. By contrast, all food systems are structured and given particular functioning mechanisms by specific societies—or, better, cultures (Volli, 2015. Although several scholars have remarked this fact, most present-day texts, discourses, and practices concerning food seem to particularly stress a sort of supposed “naturalness” inherent to food systems. Such “naturalness” is generally conceived as both the praise of everything that opposes artificiality (Marrone, 2011 and a return to an original and idyllic past, namely a “tradition” crystallised in “authentic” recipes, “typical” restaurants, etc. Responding to the urgency of enhancing the academic debate on these issues, this paper analyses a specific case study that, albeit being particularly significant, has not been sufficiently investigated yet: the so-called “Mediterranean diet”. The idea of such a diet originated from the scientific field, in the wake of medical research (Keys & Keys, 1975; Keys, 1980 correlating the low incidence of cardiovascular diseases among the inhabitants of specific areas (i.e. the Cilento region in Italy and a particular nutritional regime, mainly defined by the use of certain ingredients and specific techniques of preparation of food. The interest in this topic has then increasingly grown, extending beyond the simple definition of healthy rules regulating nutrition, and embracing the social and cultural implications of the particular “lifestyle” that has come to be identified with the Mediterranean diet. In this sense, the genealogy of the inclusion of such

  3. Stable isotopes confirm a coastal diet for critically endangered Mediterranean monk seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanlidis, Alexandros A; Curtis, P Jeff; Hirons, Amy C; Psaradellis, Marianna; Dendrinos, Panagiotis; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the ecology and behaviour of endangered species is essential for developing effective management and conservation strategies. We used stable isotope analysis to investigate the foraging behaviour of critically endangered Mediterranean monk seals (Monachus monachus) in Greece. We measured carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (expressed as δ(13)C and δ(15)N values, respectively) derived from the hair of deceased adult and juvenile seals and the muscle of their known prey to quantify their diets. We tested the hypothesis that monk seals primarily foraged for prey that occupy coastal habitats in Greece. We compared isotope values from seal hair to their coastal and pelagic prey (after correcting all prey for isotopic discrimination) and used these isotopic data and a stable isotope mixing model to estimate the proportion of coastal and pelagic resources consumed by seals. As predicted, we found that seals had similar δ(13)C values as many coastal prey species and higher δ(13)C values than pelagic species; these results, in conjunction with mean dietary estimates (coastal=61 % vs. pelagic=39 %), suggest that seals have a diverse diet comprising prey from multiple trophic levels that primarily occupy the coast. Marine resource managers should consider using the results from this study to inform the future management of coastal habitats in Greece to protect Mediterranean monk seals.

  4. Dietary Polyphenols, Mediterranean Diet, Prediabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes: A Narrative Review of the Evidence

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    Marta Guasch-Ferré

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary polyphenols come mainly from plant-based foods including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, coffee, tea, and nuts. Polyphenols may influence glycemia and type 2 diabetes (T2D through different mechanisms, such as promoting the uptake of glucose in tissues, and therefore improving insulin sensitivity. This review aims to summarize the evidence from clinical trials and observational prospective studies linking dietary polyphenols to prediabetes and T2D, with a focus on polyphenol-rich foods characteristic of the Mediterranean diet. We aimed to describe the metabolic biomarkers related to polyphenol intake and genotype-polyphenol interactions modulating the effects on T2D. Intakes of polyphenols, especially flavan-3-ols, and their food sources have demonstrated beneficial effects on insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Several prospective studies have shown inverse associations between polyphenol intake and T2D. The Mediterranean diet and its key components, olive oil, nuts, and red wine, have been inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2D. To some extent, these associations may be attributed to the high amount of polyphenols and bioactive compounds in typical foods conforming this traditional dietary pattern. Few studies have suggested that genetic predisposition can modulate the relationship between polyphenols and T2D risk. In conclusion, the intake of polyphenols may be beneficial for both insulin resistance and T2D risk.

  5. Can rapeseed oil replace olive oil as part of a Mediterranean-style diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard; Gerber, Mariette

    2014-12-14

    The present narrative review compares evidence from experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies of the health benefits of rapeseed oil (RO) (known as canola oil) and olive oil (OO) in order to assess whether rapeseed oil is suitable as a sustainable alternative to OO as part of a Mediterranean-style diet in countries where olive trees do not grow. From epidemiological studies, the evidence for cardiovascular protection afforded by extra-virgin OO is 'convincing', and for cancers 'limited-suggestive', especially oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, but more studies are required in relation to cognitive impairment. Evidence for RO is limited to short-term studies on the biomarkers of risk factors for CVD. Any benefits of RO are likely to be due to α-linolenic acid; however, it is prone to oxidation during frying. We conclude that due to a lack of evidence from observational or intervention studies indicating that RO has comparable health benefits to extra-virgin OO, RO cannot currently be recommended as a suitable substitute for extra-virgin OO as part of a Mediterranean-style diet.

  6. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (SESAMeD): A scale construction and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Esther; Gutiérrez-Domingo, Tamara; Castillo-Mayen, Rosario; Luque, Bárbara; Arenas, Alicia; Taberneroa, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has several beneficial impacts on health. Self-efficacy may be crucial for adhering to the diet. This study set out to develop a reliable and valid instrument that would enable measurement of the extent to which people are confident about their ability to adhere to the Mediterranean diet: the Self-Efficacy Scale for Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (SESAMeD). The study was carried out in two stages. In Stage 1, a pilot questionnaire was administrated to 170 students to reduce and refine items. In Stage 2, the validity and reliability of the scale were evaluated among a sample of 348 patients who have suffered from cardiovascular disease. After items reduction, the scale consisted of 22 items. The factor structure of SESAMeD was tested across exploratory factorial analysis and confirmatory factorial analysis, with both analyses confirming a robust adjustment for the bi-factorial structure. The two factors identified were (a) self-efficacy for the avoidance of determined unhealthy foods not recommended in the Mediterranean diet and (b) self-efficacy for the consumption of determined healthy foods recommended in this diet. The pattern of relations between the SESAMeD and the SESAMeD subscales and other different psychological variables (outcome expectancies, motivation, affective balance, and life satisfaction) supported the validity of the bi-factorial structure and provided strong evidence of construct validity. The instrument can help health professionals and researchers to assess patients' confidence of their ability to adhere to the Mediterranean diet, a psychological variable that may affect adherence to this healthy food consumption pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mediterranean Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search By Zipcode Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar and Diabetes Teaching Gardens Teaching Gardens Recognition Teaching Gardens-See Our ...

  8. Contribution of Macromolecular Antioxidants to Dietary Antioxidant Capacity: A Study in the Spanish Mediterranean Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Díaz-Rubio, M Elena; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies show that diets with a high antioxidant capacity, such us those rich in plant food and beverages, are associated with significant decreases in the overall risk of cardiovascular disease or colorectal cancer. Current studies on dietary antioxidants and dietary antioxidant capacity focus exclusively on low molecular weight or soluble antioxidants (vitamins C and E, phenolic compounds and carotenoids), ignoring macromolecular antioxidants. These are polymeric phenolic compounds or polyphenols and carotenoids linked to plant food macromolecules that yield bioavailable metabolites by the action of the microbiota with significant effects either local and/or systemic after absorption. This study determined the antioxidant capacity of the Spanish Mediterranean diet including for the first time both soluble and macromolecular antioxidants. Antioxidant capacity and consumption data of the 54 most consumed plant foods and beverages were used. Results showed that macromolecular antioxidants are the major dietary antioxidants, contributing a 61% to the diet antioxidant capacity (8000 μmol Trolox, determined by ABTS method). The antioxidant capacity data for foods and beverages provided here may be used to estimate the dietary antioxidant capacity in different populations, where similar contributions of macromolecular antioxidants may be expected, and also to design antioxidant-rich diets. Including macromolecular antioxidants in mechanistic, intervention and observational studies on dietary antioxidants may contribute to a better understanding of the role of antioxidants in nutrition and health.

  9. The Mediterranean Diet decreases LDL atherogenicity in high cardiovascular risk individuals: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáez, Álvaro; Castañer, Olga; Goday, Alberto; Ros, Emilio; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramón; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Arós, Fernando; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; de la Torre, Rafael; López-Sabater, M Carmen; Fitó, Montserrat

    2017-09-01

    Traditional Mediterranean diet (TMD) protects against cardiovascular disease through several mechanisms such as decreasing LDL cholesterol levels. However, evidence regarding TMD effects on LDL atherogenic traits (resistance against oxidation, size, composition, cytotoxicity) is scarce. We assessed the effects of a 1-year intervention with a TMD on LDL atherogenic traits in a random sub-sample of individuals from the PREDIMED study (N = 210). We compared two TMDs: one enriched with virgin olive oil (TMD-VOO, N = 71) and another with nuts (TMD-Nuts, N = 68), versus a low-fat control diet (N = 71). After the TMD-VOO intervention, LDL resistance against oxidation increased (+6.46%, p = 0.007), the degree of LDL oxidative modifications decreased (-36.3%, p<0.05), estimated LDL particle size augmented (+3.06%, p = 0.021), and LDL particles became cholesterol-rich (+2.41% p = 0.013) relative to the low-fat control diet. LDL lipoproteins became less cytotoxic for macrophages only relative to baseline (-13.4%, p = 0.019). No significant effects of the TMD-Nuts intervention on LDL traits were observed versus the control diet. Adherence to a TMD, particularly when enriched with virgin olive oil, decreased LDL atherogenicity in high cardiovascular risk individuals. The development of less atherogenic LDLs could contribute to explaining some of the cardioprotective benefits of this dietary pattern. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Adherence to Mediterranean and low-fat diets among heart and lung transplant recipients: a randomized feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Timothy R; Green, Adèle C; Fildes, James E; Miura, Kyoko

    2018-02-14

    Heart and lung transplant recipients are at a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since both low-fat and Mediterranean diets can reduce CVD in immunocompetent people at high risk, we assessed adherence among thoracic transplant recipients allocated to one or other of these diets for 12 months. Forty-one transplant recipients (20 heart; 21 lung) randomized to a Mediterranean or a low-fat diet for 12 months received diet-specific education at baseline. Adherence was primarily assessed by questionnaire: 14-point Mediterranean diet (score 0-14) and 9-point low-fat diet (score 0-16) respectively, high scores indicating greater adherence. Median scores at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 6-weeks post-intervention were compared by dietary group. We further assessed changes in weight, body mass index (BMI) and serum triglycerides from baseline to 12 months as an additional indicator of adherence. In those randomized to a Mediterranean diet, median scores increased from 4 (range 1-9) at baseline, to 10 (range 6-14) at 6-months and were maintained at 12 months, and also at 6-weeks post-intervention (median 10, range 6-14). Body weight, BMI and serum triglycerides decreased over the 12-month intervention period (mean weight - 1.8 kg, BMI -0.5 kg/m 2 , triglycerides - 0.17 mmol/L). In the low-fat diet group, median scores were 11 (range 9-14) at baseline; slightly increased to 12 (range 9-16) at 6 months, and maintained at 12 months and 6 weeks post-intervention (median 12, range 8-15). Mean changes in weight, BMI and triglycerides were - 0.2 kg, 0.0 kg/m 2 and - 0.44 mmol/L, respectively. Thoracic transplant recipients adhered to Mediterranean and low-fat dietary interventions. The change from baseline eating habits was notable at 6 months; and this change was maintained at 12 months and 6 weeks post-intervention in both Mediterranean diet and low-fat diet groups. Dietary interventions based on comprehensive, well

  11. [Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and its relation to nutritional status in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza Martí, Ana; Ferrer Cascales, Rosario; Cabañero Martínez, María José; Hurtado Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Laguna Pérez, Ana

    2015-04-01

    the Mediterranean diet (MD) and model quality diet is associated with a reduction in mortality and an improvement in quality of life in elderly. To evaluate the relationship between nutritional status and lifestyles with the degree of adherence to the DM in elderly Methods: Sample consists of 60 subjects who attended the nursing consultation of a scepter health of Alicante with an index greater than 24.9 body mass. The frequency questionnaire food consumption MEDIS-FFQ questionnaire PREDIMED adherence to the Mediterranean diet and anthropometric assessment was used. 83.3% of the population were overweight compared to 16.7% obesity, no significant differences between sexes. The percentage of body fat was 40.3% in women and 29.5% in men (p = 0.001). 65.2% of the women had cardiovascular risk compared with 81.8% of men (p = 0.001). It was observed under compliance with dietary recommendations in whole grains, fruits and nuts. Subjects with low adherence to the DM had higher rates of obesity (OR = 1.46; 95% CI, 0.89-2.40), increased consumption of snuff (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.05-2.60) and alcohol (OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 0.91-2.55), increased waist-hip ratio (OR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.3-4.9) and higher percentage of body fat (OR = 5.3; 95% CI, 1.02-6.48). Subjects with good adherence (DM) had a lower waist-hip ratio and a lower percentage of body fat. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. The Mediterranean Diet Reduces the Risk and Mortality of the Prostate Cancer: A Narrative Review

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    Cristiano Capurso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in the world among men, and is the fifth most common cause of cancer death among men. The aim of our review was to analyze observational and case–control studies to point out the effects of overweight and diets components on the cancer risk, particularly on risk of prostate cancer, and the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD on the reduction of risk and mortality of prostate cancer. It is known that incidence and progression of cancer is multifactorial. Cancer of the large bowel, breast, endometrium, and prostate are due also to a high body mass index and to high consumption of high carcinogenic dietary factors, as red and processed meat or saturated fats rich foods, and to a low consumption of vegetables and fruits. Previous meta-analysis suggested that high adherence to diet model based on the traditional MD pattern gives a significant protection from incidence and mortality of cancer of all types. The main component of the MD is olive oil, consumed in high amount by Mediterranean basin populations. In addition, phenolic compounds exert some strong chemo-preventive effects, which are due to several mechanisms, including both antioxidant effects and actions on cancer cell signaling and cell cycle progression and proliferation. The protective effect of the MD against the prostate cancer is also due to the high consumption of tomato sauce. Lycopene is the most relevant functional component in tomatoes; after activating by the cooking of tomato sauce, it exerts antioxidant properties by acting in the modulation of downregulation mechanisms of the inflammatory response. MD, therefore, represents a healthy dietary pattern in the context of a healthy lifestyle habits. In conclusion, our narrative review allows us to reaffirm how nutritional factors play an important role in cancer initiation and development, and how a healthy dietary pattern represented by MD and its components, especially olive oil

  13. The association between the Mediterranean diet and magnetic resonance parameters for knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

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    Veronese, Nicola; La Tegola, Luciana; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Maggi, Stefania; Rogoli, Domenico; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2018-04-03

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be beneficial for osteoarthritis (OA), but the few data available regarding the association between the diet and the condition are limited to X-ray and clinical findings. The current study aimed to investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and knee cartilage morphology, assessed using magnetic resonance (MRI) in a cohort of North American participants. Seven hundred eighty-three participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (59.8% females; mean age 62.3 years) in possession of a MRI assessment (a coronal 3D FLASH with Water Excitation MR sequence of the right knee) were enrolled in our cross-sectional study. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED). The strength of the association between aMED and knee MRI parameters was gauged using an adjusted linear regression analysis, expressed as standardized betas with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Using an adjusted linear regression analysis, each increase of one standard deviation (SD) in the aMED corresponded to a significant increase in the central medial femoral cartilage volume (beta = 0.12; 95%CI 0.09 to 0.15), in the mean central medial femoral cartilage thickness (beta = 0.13; 95%CI 0.01 to 0.17), in the cartilage thickness of the mean central medial tibiofemoral compartment (beta = 0.12; 95%CI 0.09 to 0.15), and in the cartilage volume of the medial tibiofemoral compartment (beta = 0.09; 95%CI 0.06 to 0.12). Higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet was found to be associated with a significant improvement in knee cartilage as assessed by MRI, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors.

  14. A Mediterranean diet and risk of myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke: A population-based cohort study.

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    Tektonidis, Thanasis G; Åkesson, Agneta; Gigante, Bruna; Wolk, Alicja; Larsson, Susanna C

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean diet, which is palatable and easily achievable, has been associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality. Data on heart failure (HF) and stroke types are lacking. The aim was to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), HF and stroke types in a Swedish prospective cohort. In a population-based cohort of 32,921 women, diet was assessed through a self-administered questionnaire. The modified Mediterranean diet (mMED) score was created based on high consumption of vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish and monounsaturated fat, moderate intakes of alcohol and low consumption of red meat, on a 0-8 scale. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 10 y of follow-up (1998-2008), 1109 MIs, 1648 HFs, 1270 ischemic strokes and 262 total hemorrhagic strokes were ascertained. A high adherence to the mMED score (6-8), compared to low, was associated with a lower risk of MI (RR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.61-0.90, p = 0.003), HF (RR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.68-0.93, p = 0.004) and ischemic stroke (RR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.93, p = 0.007), but not hemorrhagic stroke (RR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.61-1.29, p = 0.53). Better adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with lower risk of MI, HF and ischemic stroke. The Mediterranean diet is most likely to be beneficial in primary prevention of all major types of atherosclerosis-related CVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An observational study of sequential protein-sparing, very low-calorie ketogenic diet (Oloproteic diet) and hypocaloric Mediterranean-like diet for the treatment of obesity.

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    Castaldo, Giuseppe; Monaco, Luigi; Castaldo, Laura; Galdo, Giovanna; Cereda, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    The impact of a rehabilitative multi-step dietary program consisting in different diets has been scantily investigated. In an open-label study, 73 obese patients underwent a two-phase weight loss (WL) program: a 3-week protein-sparing, very low-calorie, ketogenic diet (Diet) and a 6-week hypocaloric (25-30 kcal/kg of ideal body weight/day), low glycemic index, Mediterranean-like diet (hypo-MD). Both phases improved visceral adiposity, liver enzymes, GH levels, blood pressure and glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the hypo-MD was responsible for a re-increase in blood lipids and glucose tolerance parameters. Changes in visceral adiposity and glucose control-related variables were more consistent in patients with metabolic syndrome. However, in these patients the hypo-MD did not result in a consistent re-increase in glucose control-related variables. A dietary program consisting in a ketogenic regimen followed by a balanced MD appeared to be feasible and efficacious in reducing cardiovascular risk, particularly in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  16. Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores Are Inversely Associated with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kristine A; Judd, Suzanne; McCullough, Marjorie L; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Bostick, Roberd M

    2017-04-01

    Background: Poor diet quality is associated with a higher risk of many chronic diseases that are among the leading causes of death in the United States. It has been hypothesized that evolutionary discordance may account for some of the higher incidence and mortality from these diseases. Objective: We investigated associations of 2 diet pattern scores, the Paleolithic and the Mediterranean, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the REGARDS (REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) study, a longitudinal cohort of black and white men and women ≥45 y of age. Methods: Participants completed questionnaires, including a Block food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ), at baseline and were contacted every 6 mo to determine their health status. Of the analytic cohort ( n = 21,423), a total of 2513 participants died during a median follow-up of 6.25 y. We created diet scores from FFQ responses and assessed their associations with mortality using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusting for major risk factors. Results: For those in the highest relative to the lowest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores, the multivariable adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were, respectively, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.89; P- trend diets closer to Paleolithic or Mediterranean diet patterns may be inversely associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Caroline; Couture, Patrick; Ooi, Esther M M; Tremblay, André J; Desroches, Sophie; Charest, Amélie; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Lamarche, Benoît

    2014-02-01

    To assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome. The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24-62 years) was first standardized to a North American isoenergetic control diet for 5 weeks, followed by an isoenergetic MedDiet for an additional 5 weeks under full-feeding conditions (MedDiet-WL). Participants next underwent a 20-week supervised WL program under free-living conditions (-10.2 ± 2.9% body weight; Pthe MedDiet (5 weeks) under weight-stabilizing feeding conditions (MedDiet+WL). In vivo kinetic of apoB100 was assessed in the fasted state at the end of the 3 controlled diets using a bolus of D3-leucine. Compared with the control diet, MedDiet-WL reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB100 pool size (-14.2%, Pthe control diet primarily through an increase in VLDL-apoB100 fractional catabolic rate (+30.7%; Pthe catabolism of LDL even in the absence of WL in men with metabolic syndrome. MedDiet seems to have a trivial effect on VLDL concentrations and kinetics unless accompanied by significant WL. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00988650.

  18. Food Labels Use Is Associated with Higher Adherence to Mediterranean Diet: Results from the Moli-Sani Study

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    Maria Benedetta Donati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean diet (MD has been associated with lower risk of ischemic cerebro- and cardio-vascular disease, neurological degenerative disease, and breast and colonrectal cancers. Nevertheless, adherence to this pattern has decreased. Food labels are a potentially valid means to encourage towards healthier dietary behavior. This study, conducted on a subsample of 883 subjects enrolled in the Moli-sani Project, evaluated whether food labels reading (LR is associated with MD adherence. Participants completed a questionnaire on nutrition knowledge, information, and attitudes, with a specific question on food labels reading. Biometric measurements, socio-economic status, education, physical activity, and smoking habits were collected. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary habits, and subsequently evaluated by both the Mediterranean diet score (MDS and Italian Mediterranean index (IMI, a priori dietary patterns. Food consumption patterns were generated by Principal Components Analysis (PCA, an a posteriori approach. Multivariable odds ratios were calculated to quantify the association of LR categories with dietary habits. LR was significantly associated with greater adherence to both MDS (p = 0.0004 and IMI (p = 0.0019 in a multivariable model. LR participants had 74% (MDS or 68% (IMI higher probability to be in the highest level of adherence to Mediterranean diet-like patterns. Moreover, they showed greater adherence to Mediterranean-like food consumption patterns (0.1 vs. −0.2, p < 0.0001 and lower adherence to two Western-like patterns (0.01 vs. 0.2, p = 0.009 and 0.1 vs. 0.2, p = 0.02. These findings support an association between food label use and consuming a Mediterranean-type diet.

  19. Food labels use is associated with higher adherence to Mediterranean diet: results from the Moli-sani study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Americo E; Bonaccio, Marialaura; di Castelnuovo, Augusto; de Lucia, Francesca; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2013-11-04

    Mediterranean diet (MD) has been associated with lower risk of ischemic cerebro- and cardio-vascular disease, neurological degenerative disease, and breast and colonrectal cancers. Nevertheless, adherence to this pattern has decreased. Food labels are a potentially valid means to encourage towards healthier dietary behavior. This study, conducted on a subsample of 883 subjects enrolled in the Moli-sani Project, evaluated whether food labels reading (LR) is associated with MD adherence. Participants completed a questionnaire on nutrition knowledge, information, and attitudes, with a specific question on food labels reading. Biometric measurements, socio-economic status, education, physical activity, and smoking habits were collected. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary habits, and subsequently evaluated by both the Mediterranean diet score (MDS) and Italian Mediterranean index (IMI), a priori dietary patterns. Food consumption patterns were generated by Principal Components Analysis (PCA), an a posteriori approach. Multivariable odds ratios were calculated to quantify the association of LR categories with dietary habits. LR was significantly associated with greater adherence to both MDS (p = 0.0004) and IMI (p = 0.0019) in a multivariable model. LR participants had 74% (MDS) or 68% (IMI) higher probability to be in the highest level of adherence to Mediterranean diet-like patterns. Moreover, they showed greater adherence to Mediterranean-like food consumption patterns (0.1 vs. -0.2, p < 0.0001) and lower adherence to two Western-like patterns (0.01 vs. 0.2, p = 0.009 and 0.1 vs. 0.2, p = 0.02). These findings support an association between food label use and consuming a Mediterranean-type diet.

  20. A pilot study of the Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: an effective therapy for the metabolic syndrome.

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    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    The "Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet" (SKMD) has been shown to promote potential therapeutic properties for the metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic properties under free-living conditions of the SKMD in patients with metabolic syndrome (following the International Diabetes Federation consensus guidelines) over a 12-week period. A prospective study was carried out in 22 obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (12 men and 10 women) with the inclusion criteria whose body mass index of 36.58 ± 0.54 kg/m² and age was 41.18 ± 2.28 years. Statistical differences between the parameters studied before and after the administration of the SKMD (week 0 and 12, respectively) were analyzed by paired Student's t test. There was an extremely significant (P diet all the subjects were free of metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation definition, and 100% of them had normal triacylglycerols and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, in spite of the fact that 77.27% of them still had a body mass index of > 30 kg/m². We conclude that the SKMD could be an effective and safe way to cure patients suffering from metabolic syndrome. Future research should include a larger sample size, a longer-term use, and a comparison with other ketogenic diets.

  1. [Mediterranean diet, micronutrients and prostate carcinoma: a rationale approach to primary prevention of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Lucio

    2003-09-01

    Cancer of the prostate is one of the most commonly diagnosed solid malignancies and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men living in Italy. With an ageing population, the number of men living with early stages of prostate cancer is expected to increase. There is an impelling need to prevent the onset of the cancer or delay the progression of carcinogenesis in this organ. The chemoprevention of cancer is a relatively new concept defined as the administration of pharmacological agents (drug or diet-derived supplements) to prevent, delay or reverse the carcinogenesis. Epidemiological data showing ethnic and geographic variations in the incidence of, and mortality from, prostate cancer have suggested that the consumption of dietary factors may be protective. There is increasing evidence that diet (particularly dietary fat intake) may play a significant role in early prostate carcinogenesis. Dietary micronutrients and antioxidants are under intense scrutiny. These factors include the vitamin D and E, lycopene, selenium, zinc, poliphenols, isoflavonoids, and phytoestrogens (especially soy products and green tea). The old Mediterranean diet (based on cereals, vegetables, polyunsaturated fats, fruits, fish and low quantities of dairy products and meat) is now sparingly adopted because of the globalisation of the food chain which now involves also our country. Nevertheless, our traditional dietary habits are considered of great value in the prevention of cardiovascular or cancerous diseases and particularly of prostate cancer.

  2. Mediterranean diet in a Sicilian student population. Second part: breakfast and its nutritional profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metro, Daniela; Papa, Mattia; Manasseri, Luigi; Gervasi, Teresa; Campone, Luca; Pellizzeri, Vito; Tardugno, Roberta; Dugo, Giacomo

    2018-03-19

    Breakfast habits affect the nutritional status and health of people, in particular children and adolescents. This is the second part a previous study about the adherence to the Mediterranean diet in a Sicilian (Italy) student population. The investigation analysed both normal weight and overweight subjects in order to understand how eating habits, number of meals and daily calorie intakes could affect their body mass indexes (BMI). The aim of this second part was to analyse the breakfast nutritional profiles of this student population. The results highlighted that breakfast was regularly consumed by a percentage ranging from a maximum of 84% (in normal subjects) to a minimum value of 57.4% (in overweight/obese students). Milk, yoghurt, sugar, bread/rusk and tea contributed as main foods to the breakfast composition. The results highlighted that subjects who consumed breakfast showed lower BMI values with significant differences between normal and overweight/obese students.

  3. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carrión

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes.

  4. Impact of boiling on phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of green vegetables consumed in the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinha, Ana F; Alves, Rita C; Barreira, Sérgio V P; Costa, Anabela S G; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-04-01

    The effect of boiling (10 minutes) on eleven green vegetables frequently consumed in the Mediterranean diet was evaluated. For that, some physicochemical parameters and the contents of vitamin C, phenolics and carotenoids, as well as the antioxidant activity, were determined in raw and boiled samples. The raw vegetables analysed in this study were good sources of vitamin C, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, with contents ranging from 10.6 to 255.1 mg/100 g, 0.03 to 3.29 mg/100 g and 202.9 to 1010.7 mg/100 g, respectively. Boiling promoted losses in different extensions considering both the different bioactive compounds and the distinct vegetables analysed. Contrary to phenolics (more resistant), vitamin C was the most affected compound. Boiling also originated significant losses in the antioxidant activity of the vegetables. Considering all the parameters analysed, the vegetables most affected by boiling were broccoli and lettuce. The least affected ones were collard and tronchuda cabbage.

  5. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrion, S.; Torres, L.; Castañer, O.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes. [es

  6. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and risk of lung cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulpen, Maya; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2018-03-01

    The evidence on a cancer-protective effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD) is still limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between MD adherence and lung cancer risk. Data were used from 120 852 participants of the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS), aged 55-69 years. Dietary habits were assessed at baseline (1986) using a validated FFQ and alternate and modified Mediterranean diet scores (aMED and mMED, respectively), including and excluding alcohol, were calculated. After 20·3 years of follow-up, 2861 lung cancer cases and 3720 subcohort members (case-cohort design) could be included in multivariable Cox regression analyses. High (6-8) v. low (0-3) aMED excluding alcohol was associated with non-significantly reduced lung cancer risks in men and women with hazard ratios of 0·91 (95 % CI 0·72, 1·15) and 0·73 (95 % CI 0·49, 1·09), respectively. aMED-containing models generally fitted better than mMED-containing models. In never smokers, a borderline significant decreasing trend in lung cancer risk was observed with increasing aMED excluding alcohol. Analyses stratified by the histological lung cancer subtypes did not identify subtypes with a particularly strong inverse relation with MD adherence. Generally, the performance of aMED and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research dietary score variants without alcohol was comparable. In conclusion, MD adherence was non-significantly inversely associated with lung cancer risk in the NLCS. Future studies should focus on differences in associations across the sexes and histological subtypes. Furthermore, exclusion of alcohol from MD scores should be investigated more extensively, primarily with respect to a potential role of the MD in cancer prevention.

  7. Plasma lipidomic profiles and cardiovascular events in a randomized intervention trial with the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Estefanía; Wang, Dong D; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Clish, Clary B; Razquin, Cristina; Zheng, Yan; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Hruby, Adela; Corella, Dolores; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Lapetra, José; Fito, Montserrat; Aros, Fernando; Serra-Majem, Luis; Liang, Liming; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Hu, Frank B; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2017-10-01

    Background: Lipid metabolites may partially explain the inverse association between the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Objective: We evaluated the associations between 1 ) lipid species and the risk of CVD (myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death); 2 ) a MedDiet intervention [supplemented with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) or nuts] and 1-y changes in these molecules; and 3 ) 1-y changes in lipid species and subsequent CVD. Design: With the use of a case-cohort design, we profiled 202 lipid species at baseline and after 1 y of intervention in the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) trial in 983 participants [230 cases and a random subcohort of 790 participants (37 overlapping cases)]. Results: Baseline concentrations of cholesterol esters (CEs) were inversely associated with CVD. A shorter chain length and higher saturation of some lipids were directly associated with CVD. After adjusting for multiple testing, direct associations remained significant for 20 lipids, and inverse associations remained significant for 6 lipids. When lipid species were weighted by the number of carbon atoms and double bonds, the strongest inverse association was found for CEs [HR: 0.39 (95% CI: 0.22, 0.68)] between extreme quintiles ( P -trend = 0.002). Participants in the MedDiet + EVOO and MedDiet + nut groups experienced significant ( P < 0.05) 1-y changes in 20 and 17 lipids, respectively, compared with the control group. Of these changes, only those in CE(20:3) in the MedDiet + nuts group remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. None of the 1-y changes was significantly associated with CVD risk after correcting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: Although the MedDiet interventions induced some significant 1-y changes in the lipidome, they were not significantly associated with subsequent CVD risk. Lipid metabolites with a longer acyl chain and higher number of double bonds at baseline were significantly

  8. Sex-Related Differences in the Effects of the Mediterranean Diet on Glucose and Insulin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Bédard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To document sex differences in the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet on glucose/insulin homeostasis and to verify whether these sex-related effects were associated with changes in nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA. Methods. All foods were provided to 38 men and 32 premenopausal women (24–53 y during 4 weeks. Variables were measured during a 180 min OGTT before and after the MedDiet. Results. A sex-by-time interaction for plasma insulin iAUC was found (men: −17.8%, P=0.02; women: +9.4%, P=0.63; P for sex-by-time interaction = 0.005. A sex-by-time interaction was also observed for insulin sensitivity (Cederholm index, P=0.03, for which only men experienced improvements (men: +8.1%, P=0.047; women: −5.9%, P=0.94. No sex difference was observed for glucose and C-peptide responses. Trends toward a decrease in NEFA AUC (P=0.06 and an increase in NEFA suppression rate (P=0.06 were noted, with no sex difference. Changes in NEFA were not associated with change in insulin sensitivity. Conclusions. Results suggest that the more favorable changes in glucose/insulin homeostasis observed in men compared to women in response to the MedDiet are not explained by sex differences in NEFA response. This clinical trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01293344.

  9. Multiple sclerosis and cancers in Croatia--a possible protective role of the "Mediterranean diet".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materljan, Eris; Materljan, Mauro; Materljan, Branka; Vlacić, Helena; Barićev-Novaković, Zdenka; Sepcić, Juraj

    2009-06-01

    -05), whilst colon cancer alone (20.4 vs. 15.7; p = 9.44E-05) or colorectal cancer (38.3 vs. 31.6; p = 8.18E-05) had a significantly higher incidence in the coastal area. The geographic distribution of MS expressed by incidence was significantly correlated with pancreatic (r = 0.62024, df=23, p = 0.00094) and lung cancer (r = 0.46380, df=23, p = 0.01953). This research adds further malignant neoplasms, possibly exposure-related, to the list of diseases with geographic distribution like MS. The similarity of MS distribution with the named malignancies is unlikely to be incidental. MS in Gorski Kotar and Slavonia seems to be associated with a diet rich in meat and fat. A diet rich in fat and meat and poor in vegetables is a risk factor for stomach, colorectum, pancreatic as well as lung cancers. Some authors have documented a possible protective role of the "Mediterranean diet" for the named cancers. Olive oil is the main source of fat in the "Mediterranean diet". Oleocanthal, aphenolic compound of the extra-virgin olive oil was found to inhibit the cyclooxigenase enzymes which are involved in demyelination and tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that the "Mediterranean diet", olive oil and particularly oleocanthal, to have a protective role in MS too.

  10. Effect of a Mediterranean diet on endothelial progenitor cells and carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes: Follow-up of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Petrizzo, Michela; Gicchino, Maurizio; Caputo, Mariangela; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    Background We assessed the long-term effects of a Mediterranean diet on circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design This was a parallel, two-arm, single-centre trial. Methods Two hundred and fifteen men and women with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were randomized to a Mediterranean diet ( n = 108) or a low-fat diet ( n = 107). The primary outcome measures were changes in the EPC count and the CIMT of the common carotid artery after the treatment period defined as the end of trial (EOT). Results At the EOT, both the CD34 + KDR + and CD34 + KDR + CD133 + counts had increased with the Mediterranean diet compared with the low-fat diet ( p Mediterranean diet. Compared with the low-fat diet, the rate of regression in the CIMT was higher in the Mediterranean diet group (51 vs. 26%), whereas the rate of progression was lower (25 vs. 50%) ( p = 0.032 for both). Changes in the CIMT were inversely correlated with the changes in EPC levels (CD34 + KDR + , r = -0.24, p = 0.020; CD34 + KDR + CD133 + , r = -0.28, p = 0.014). At the EOT, changes in levels of HbA1c, HOMA, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure were significantly greater with the Mediterranean diet than with the low-fat diet. Conclusion Compared with a low-fat diet, a long-term trial with Mediterranean diet was associated with an increase in circulating EPCs levels and prevention of the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  11. The association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and fasting indices of glucose homoeostasis: the ATTICA Study.

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    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Tzima, Natalia; Pitsavos, Christos; Chrysohoou, Christina; Zampelas, Antonis; Toussoulis, Dimitris; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the association between adherence to Mediterranean diet and fasting indices of glucose homoeostasis, in a Greek adult population. During 2001-2002 we randomly enrolled 1514 men and 1528 women (18-89 years old) without history of CVD, from the Attica area. Diabetes mellitus (type 2) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were defined according to the established ADA criteria. Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA-IR. Dietary habits were assessed through a validated food frequency questionnaire and a diet score (range 0-55) was developed (higher values means greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet). The overall prevalence of diabetes type 2 was 7.9% in men and 6.0% in women (P = 0.05). Mean diet score was 26.3 +/- 6.8 in normoglycemic, 25.7 +/- 6.4 in IFG and 22.2 +/- 5.8 in diabetic subjects (p < 0.001). In normoglycemic subjects who were in the upper tertile of the diet score we observed 7% lower glucose (p < 0.05), 5% lower insulin (p < 0.05) and 15% lower HOMA-IR (p < 0.01) levels compared to subjects in the lower tertile of the diet score. Additionally, in diabetic/IFG participants who where in the upper tertile of the diet score we observed 15% lower glucose (p < 0.05), 15% lower insulin (p < 0.05) and 27% lower HOMA-IR (p < 0.01) levels compared to those in the lower tertile. However, multiple regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, physical activity, smoking status, and presence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, confirmed the previous associations in normoglycemic, but not in diabetic/IFG people. An inverse association was observed between adherence to Mediterranean diet and indices of glucose homeostasis, only in normoglycemic people.

  12. Diet and feeding strategies of mesopelagic fishes in the western Mediterranean

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    Bernal, Ainhoa; Olivar, M. Pilar; Maynou, Francesc; Fernández de Puelles, M. Luz

    2015-06-01

    Myctophids, gonostomatids and sternoptychids are the most abundant teleosteans worldwide and constitute an important assemblage of the mesopelagic ecosystem, functioning as vehicles of energy and matter through trophic webs. This study concentrates on the trophic ecology of the most abundant mesopelagic fishes of the western Mediterranean (WM) based on stomach content analysis. The myctophids (in this study: Benthosema glaciale, Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lobianchia dofleini, Myctophum punctatum, Hygophum benoiti, Hygophum hygomii, Lampanyctus crocodilus, Lampanyctus pusillus and Notoscopelus elongatus) perform extensive diel migrations across the water column, between the surface to as deep as 1000 m, interacting with plankton and micronekton at multiple depths, and generally feeding in the epipelagic layers at night. In contrast, the gonostomatids Cyclothone braueri, Cyclothone pygmaea, and the sternoptychid Argyropelecus hemigymnus remain below epipelagic layers, feeding at different times throughout the day and night. The diet composition, trophic niche breadth and prey selectivity of 11 of these fish species were determined for juvenile and adult individuals from two surveys performed in December 2009 and July 2010 in the western Mediterranean Sea. The number of prey items varied among species, e.g. Myctophum punctatum was the species with the highest feeding intensity, reaching ca. 700 prey items in a stomach, whereas the mean number of prey in Cyclothone braueri was low (usually 1 or 2 prey per stomach). A dietary shift towards larger prey was evident from juveniles to the largest and oldest adult individuals, despite trophic niche breadths did not increase with body length for any of these mesopelagic species. The diets of the small gonostomatids, sternoptychid and early juveniles of myctophids were dominated by non-calanoid copepods, ostracods, and other small zooplankton, whereas medium-sized myctophids, e.g. L. dofleini or H. benoiti, preyed mainly on

  13. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle Characteristics of University Students in Cyprus: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

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    Hadjimbei, Elena; Botsaris, George; Gekas, Vassilis; Panayiotou, Andrie G

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess dietary-related habits among young adults. Design and Setting. Dietary habits were assessed cross-sectionally, using a self-completed questionnaire in 193 students enrolled in public and private universities in Cyprus. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the validated KIDMED index. BMI was estimated based on weight and height measurements. Results. The mean BMI was 23.31 (±3.98). The mean adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was 6.0 (IQR 4 to 8), with 26.9% of students being classified as high adherers and 21.8% as low adherers to the Mediterranean diet. About 32% of students consumed a second serving of fruit and vegetables more than once a day, whereas 26% reported going more than once a week to a fast-food restaurant and 31% consumed sweets and candy several times a day. On the other hand, 76% of participants reported consumption of at least two dairy products daily and 88% use olive oil at home. The majority consume coffee 2-3 times per day. Conclusions. Results support a shift from traditional healthy diets to more unhealthy eating patterns. However, we also report a high dairy intake and use of olive oil. Tailored-made strategies targeting the young adult population could be warranted.

  14. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle Characteristics of University Students in Cyprus: A Cross-Sectional Survey

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    Elena Hadjimbei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess dietary-related habits among young adults. Design and Setting. Dietary habits were assessed cross-sectionally, using a self-completed questionnaire in 193 students enrolled in public and private universities in Cyprus. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the validated KIDMED index. BMI was estimated based on weight and height measurements. Results. The mean BMI was 23.31 (±3.98. The mean adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was 6.0 (IQR 4 to 8, with 26.9% of students being classified as high adherers and 21.8% as low adherers to the Mediterranean diet. About 32% of students consumed a second serving of fruit and vegetables more than once a day, whereas 26% reported going more than once a week to a fast-food restaurant and 31% consumed sweets and candy several times a day. On the other hand, 76% of participants reported consumption of at least two dairy products daily and 88% use olive oil at home. The majority consume coffee 2-3 times per day. Conclusions. Results support a shift from traditional healthy diets to more unhealthy eating patterns. However, we also report a high dairy intake and use of olive oil. Tailored-made strategies targeting the young adult population could be warranted.

  15. Current Insights Into Inositol Isoforms, Mediterranean and Ketogenic Diets for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside.

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    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Orio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex syndrome characterized by reproductive and metabolic implications. Lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise, are considered first-line treatment for women affected by PCOS. Pharmacologic treatments target the hormonal and metabolic dysregulations associated to the disease such as insulin resistance, anovulation, hirsutism and menstrual irregularities. To focus on the role of inositol isoforms, as well as Mediterranean and ketogenic diets, as possible therapeutic strategies in PCOS women. Narrative overview, synthesizing the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerized databases. Accumulating evidence suggests that two inositol isoforms, myo- and D-chiro-, may play a pivotal role in re-addressing both hormonal and metabolic parameters toward homeostasis, counteracting the symptoms and signs typical of this syndrome. In addition, studies focused on Mediterranean and ketogenic diet provided positive results in patients affected by obesity and type 2 diabetes, so these dietetic regimens could represent a fascinating dietetic treatment for the management of PCOS. Both the isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS. In spite of accumulating evidence, it is currently not possible to draw firm conclusion(s) about the efficacy of these interventions considering the severe bias due to different samples size, dose, and duration of intervention among the published studies on this topic. Furthermore, future longitudinal cohort studies along with prospective interventional trials may contribute to better clarify the role of Mediterranean and ketogenic diets in the treatment of PCOS.

  16. Alcohol consumption and Mediterranean Diet adherence among health science students in Spain: the DiSA-UMH Study.

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    Scholz, Alexander; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria; Garcia de la Hera, Manuela; Gimenez-Monzo, Daniel; Gonzalez-Palacios, Sandra; Valera-Gran, Desirée; Torres-Collado, Laura; Vioque, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    To describe the association between consumption of different alcoholic beverages and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the baseline data of the DiSA-UMH study, an ongoing cohort study with Spanish health science students (n=1098) aged 17-35 years. Dietary information was collected by a validated 84-item food frequency questionnaire. Participants were grouped into non-drinkers, exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages. Mediterranean diet adherence was determined by using a modification of the relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-16) according to consumption of 8 dietary components. We performed multiple linear and multinomial regression analyses. The mean alcohol consumption was 4.3g/day (SD: 6.1). A total of 19.5%, 18.9% and 61.6% of the participants were non-drinkers, exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages, respectively. Participants who consumed beer and/or wine exclusively had higher rMED scores than non-drinkers (β: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.25-1.27). Drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages had similar rMED scores to non-drinkers. Non-drinkers consumed less fish and more meat, whereas drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages consumed fewer fruits, vegetables and more meat than exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers. The overall alcohol consumption among the students in our study was low-to-moderate. Exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers differed regarding the Mediterranean diet pattern from non-drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcohol. These results show the need to properly adjust for diet in studies of the effects of alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. A Mediterranean-type diet is associated with better metabolic profile in urban Polish adults: Results from the HAPIEE study

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    Grosso, Giuseppe; Stepaniak, Urszula; Micek, Agnieszka; Topor-Mądry, Roman; Stefler, Denes; Szafraniec, Krystyna; Bobak, Martin; Pająk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Polish arm of the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) cohort study. Materials/methods A cross-sectional survey including 8821 adults was conducted in Krakow, Poland. Food intake was evaluated through a validated food frequency questionnaire and adherence to the dietary pattern was assessed using a score specifically developed for non-Mediterranean countries (MedTypeDiet score). Linear and logistic regression models were performed to estimate beta and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), respectively. Results Significant associations between the MedTypeDiet score and waist circumference (β = − 0.307 ± 0.239 cm), systolic blood pressure (β = − 0.440 ± 0.428 mmHg), and triglycerides (β = − 0.021 ± 0.016 mmol/L) were observed. After multivariable adjustment, individuals in the highest quartile of the score were less likely to have MetS, central obesity, high triglycerides, and hypertension. Increase of one standard deviation of the score was associated with 7% less odds of having MetS (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.97). When analyzing the relation of single components of the MedTypeDiet score, wine, dairy products, and the total unsaturated:saturated fatty acids ratio were associated with MetS. Conclusions Adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet may decrease the risk of MetS also among non-Mediterranean populations. PMID:25752843

  18. Mediterranean Diet and 10-year (2002-2012) Incidence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Participants with Prediabetes: The ATTICA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N; Pitaraki, Evangelia; Kouli, Georgia-Maria; Chrysohoou, Christina; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Prediabetes has been related to an increased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes and CVD risk in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG, i.e. fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dl). During 2001-2002, 3042 men and women (>18y) were enrolled for the study. The participants showed no clinical evidence of CVD or any other chronic disease, and were living in the greater Athens (Greece) area. In 2011 and 2012, the 10-year follow-up examinations were performed, including a working sample of n = 1875 participants without diabetes at baseline. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet at baseline evaluation was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). The prediabetic subjects (n = 343) had a significantly higher incidence of diabetes (25% vs. 10%, p Mediterranean diet compared with low adherence (p Mediterranean diet (>35/55 score) was associated with lower 10-year incidence of diabetes and CVD. In multiple logistic regression models, participants with high levels of adherence to the Mediterranean diet were significantly less affected by diabetes and CVD than those with low adherence levels. High adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a low risk of developing diabetes and CVD in prediabetic subjects.

  19. Mediterranean diet and insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and blood pressure levels, in overweight and obese people; The Attica study

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    Zampelas Antonis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate if overweight and obese adults "close" to Mediterranean diet present better insulin, lipids profile and better pressure levels, compared to individuals close to a more Westernized diet. Methods The ATTICA study is a population-based cohort that has randomly enrolled 3042 adult men and women, stratified by age – gender, from the greater area of Athens, during 2001–2002. Of them, in this work were have studied 1762 participants with excess body weight, meaning overweight (BMI: 25–29.9 kg/m2 and obese (BMI>30 kg/m2. 1064 were men and 698 women (20–89 years old. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed through a diet-score that was based on a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured and also fasting glucose, insulin and blood lipids. Insulin sensitivity was also assessed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA approach (glucose × insulin/22.5. Results Individuals with excess bodyweight in the highest tertile of diet score, were more insulin sensitive than those in the lowest tertile (11.4% lower HOMA, p = 0.06, had 13% lower levels of total cholesterol (p = 0.001 and 3 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure levels (p Conclusion Adherence to Mediterranean diet is modeslty associated with a better insulin sensitivity, lower levels of total cholesterol and lower levels of systolic blood pressure in overweight and obese subjects. This may suggest that compared to general population, the beneficial effect of this diet in cardiovascular system of excess body weight people is limited.

  20. Mediterranean diet, dietary polyphenols and low grade inflammation: results from the MOLI-SANI study.

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    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Pounis, George; Cerletti, Chiara; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Iacoviello, Licia; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Low grade inflammation is characterized by raised concentrations of inflammatory markers in the absence of any overt symptoms and is recognized as a risk factor for a number of chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Many studies suggest that low grade inflammation is mitigated by health promoting behaviours such as healthy eating patterns, physical activity, body weight maintenance and tobacco cessation. To date, large scale studies were mainly focused on circulating markers and little evidence is available on cellular biomarkers. The MOLI-SANI study is a prospective cohort study that has recruited 24 325 men and women aged ≥35 years from the general population of the Molise Region, a Southern Italian area, with the purpose of investigating genetic and environmental risk/protection factors for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and cancer. Within this cohort, a composite score of low grade inflammation based on the use of plasmatic (C-reactive protein) and cellular (leukocyte and platelet counts and granulocyte : lymphocyte ratio) biomarkers has been proposed and validated. This score accounts for all possible synergistic effects of such inflammatory markers, thus overcoming any potential bias linked to the multi-collinearity of these variables. Of notice, the MOLI-SANI study was the first to address the relationship between the traditional Mediterranean diet and platelet and leucocyte counts as emerging cellular biomarkers of low grade inflammation. The present review paper will discuss the main findings derived from the MOLI-SANI study on the association of low grade inflammation with a Mediterranean eating pattern, with a particular emphasis on the associated dietary polyphenols. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and consumption of functional foods among the Balearic Islands' adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Asli Emine; Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Murcia, María Antonia; Pons, Antoni; Tur, Josep A

    2015-03-01

    To assess differences in adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) between consumers and non-consumers of functional foods among the Balearic Islands' adolescent population. Cross-sectional nutritional survey carried out (2007-2008) in the Balearic Islands, a Mediterranean region. Dietary assessment was based on a semi-quantitative FFQ and two non-consecutive 24 h recalls. Anthropometric measurements and questions related to socio-economic status, physical activity and adherence to the MD were assessed. Data obtained from a representative sample of all inhabitants living in the Balearic Islands aged 12-17 years. A random sample (n 1961) of the adolescent population was interviewed. The mean adherence to the MD among consumers of functional foods was 56.42 (sd 6.05) % and 55.76 (sd 5.41) % among non-consumers. Consumption of fruit juice, fibre-rich bread/cookies, cereal bars, fish and soya milk was higher among adolescents with high MD adherence, and consumption of modified milk, probiotics, breakfast cereals and infusions was higher among adolescents with low MD adherence. Daily intakes of functional dietary components from plant foods (dietary fibre, vitamins C and E, carotene, folic acid) were higher among adolescents with high MD adherence. The Balearic Islands' adolescent population had moderate adherence to the MD; higher adherence was observed among consumers of functional foods. Average daily intakes of functional foods and functional dietary components were higher among adolescents with high adherence to the MD. Gender, age and low parental education were risk factors for low adherence to the MD, mainly among non-consumers of functional foods.

  2. A Mediterranean diet pattern with low consumption of liquid sweets and refined cereals is negatively associated with adiposity in adults from rural Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, C; Darmon, N; Salameh, P; Maillot, M; Batal, M; Lairon, D

    2011-02-01

    The beneficial impact of the traditional Mediterranean diet pattern on adiposity is still under debate, and this has never been assessed in a developing Mediterranean country. To assess the relationships between adherence to a traditional Mediterranean diet and adiposity indexes, that is, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), in a sample from rural Lebanon. A sample of 798 adults, aged 40-60 years, was selected in continental rural areas of Lebanon for a cross-sectional study. The questionnaire included socio-demographic, anthropometric and dietary sections. The daily consumption frequencies of selected food groups, categorized as positive or negative components, were calculated based on a food frequency questionnaire. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using six a priori scores; including the widely used Mediterranean diet score (MDS). Associations between diet scores and BMI and WC were assessed. Overall, the diet of the study sample only partially matched the traditional Mediterranean diet. A total of 17.0% of men and 33.7% women were obese. The MDS was negatively associated (Pcereals, vegetables, legumes and fruit, olive oil and fish) and negative components adapted to this sample (refined cereals and pastries, and liquid sweets) was consistently and negatively associated with both BMI and WC for men and women in multivariate models. A 2-point increase in that score was associated with a decrease in BMI of 0.51 and 0.78 kg m(-2) and a decrease in WC of 2.77 and 4.76 cm in men and women, respectively. The results demonstrate that a Mediterranean diet is negatively associated with obesity and visceral adiposity in a rural population of a developing Mediterranean country.

  3. Mediterranean diet score and left ventricular structure and function: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Emily B; Ahmed, Ali; Arnett, Donna K; Polak, Joseph F; Hundley, W Gregory; Bluemke, David A; Heckbert, Susan R; Jacobs, David R; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are limited on the relation between dietary patterns and left ventricular (LV) structure and function. Objective: We examined cross-sectional associations of a diet-score assessment of a Mediterranean dietary pattern with LV mass, volume, mass-to-volume ratio, stroke volume, and ejection fraction. Design: We measured LV variables with the use of cardiac MRI in 4497 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study who were aged 45–84 y and without clinical cardiovascular disease. We calculated a Mediterranean diet score from intakes of fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes, whole grains, fish, red meat, the monounsaturated fat:saturated fat ratio, and alcohol that were self-reported with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire. We used linear regression with adjustment for body size, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease risk factors to model associations and assess the shape of these associations (linear or quadratic). Results: The Mediterranean diet score had a slight U-shaped association with LV mass (adjusted means: 146, 145, 146, and 147 g across quartiles of diet score, respectively; P-quadratic trend = 0.04). The score was linearly associated with LV volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction: for each +1-U difference in score, LV volume was 0.4 mL higher (95% CI: 0.0, 0.8 mL higher), the stroke volume was 0.5 mL higher (95% CI: 0.2, 0.8 mL higher), and the ejection fraction was 0.2 percentage points higher (95% CI: 0.1, 0.3 percentage points higher). The score was not associated with the mass-to-volume ratio. Conclusions: A higher Mediterranean diet score is cross-sectionally associated with a higher LV mass, which is balanced by a higher LV volume as well as a higher ejection fraction and stroke volume. Participants in this healthy, multiethnic sample whose dietary patterns most closely conformed to a Mediterranean-type pattern had a modestly better LV structure and function than did participants with less–Mediterranean

  4. Relationship of physical activity and sedentarism with tobacco and alcohol consumption, and Mediterranean diet in Spanish teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Nuviala, Alberto; Fernández-Martínez, Antonio; Martínez-López, Emilio-José

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the association of physical activity and sedentarism with tobacco and alcohol consumption, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet in teenagers of both genders. A total number of 1897 Spanish teenagers (12-16 year-olds) took part in the present cross-sectional study. The variables were measured by means of questionnaires previously validated for these ages. Physical activity was positively associated to the degree of adherence to the Mediterranean diet for both genders (ß = .144, P smoking for boys (ß = -.135, P = teenagers. Also, higher levels of physical activity in boys can lead to reduced tobacco use, while watching TV and PC leisure can lead to increased alcohol consumption in girls. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating the associations between Mediterranean diet, physical activity and living environment with childhood asthma using path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphantonogeorgos, George; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Grigoropoulou, Dimitra; Yfanti, Konstantina; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Papadimitriou, Anastasios; Anthracopoulos, Michael B; Bakoula, Chryssa; Priftis, Kostas N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Mediterranean diet and physical activity with relation to living environment and childhood asthma. 1125 children (529 boys), 10 to 12 years old were recruited either in an urban environment (Athens, n = 700) or rural environment (n = 425) in Greece. A path analytic model was developed to assess the causal relation between urban environment and asthma prevalence (standardized ISAAC questionnaire), through the mediation of the Mediterranean diet (evaluated by the KIDMED food frequency questionnaire) and physical activity (evaluated by the PALQ physical activity questionnaire). The proposed model had a very good fit (χ2/df ratio =1.05, RMSEA=0.007, 90% confidence interval: 0.01 to 0.046, p=0.97, CFI = 0.98). A significant total positive effect was found between urban environment and asthma symptoms (standardized beta= 0.09, penvironment - asthma relation (standardized beta=-0.029, penvironment on childhood asthma.

  6. The historical development and nutritional importance of olive and olive oil constituted an important part of the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uylaşer, Vildan; Yildiz, Gökçen

    2014-01-01

    The olive tree (Olea europaea) is widely cultivated for the production of both oil and table olives and very significant because of its economic value. Olive and olive oil, a traditional food product with thousands of years of history, are the essential components of the Mediterranean diet and are largely consumed in the world. Beside of their economical contribution to national economy, these are an important food in terms of their nutritional value. Olive and olive oil may have a role in the prevention of coronary heart disease and certain cancers because of their high levels of monosaturated fatty acids and phenolic compounds. In addition, olives (Olea europaea L.) and olive oils provide a rich source of natural antioxidants. These make them both fairly stable against auto-oxidation and suitable for human health. The aim of this paper is to define the historical development and nutritional importance of olive and olive oil constituted an important part of the Mediterranean diet.

  7. Adequacy of the dietary intake of total and added sugars in the Spanish diet to the recommendations: ANIBES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Enma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2017-10-15

    The WHO published in 2015 its recommendations for added sugars intake: sugar intake, mainly focused on added, and food and beverage sources. To analize fulfillment with WHO recommendations. The ANIBES Study of a representative sample of the Spanish population (9-75 yr) was used. Food and beverage records were obtained by a three-day dietary record by using a tablet device. The median total sugar intake was 17% Total TE: 7.3% for added, and 9.6% for the intrinsic sugar intake. Differences were observed for added sugar which was much higher in children and adolescents. For the intrinsic sugar, however, a higher contribution to TE was observed in the elderly. A 58.2% of children fullfill WHO recommndations (sugar were milk and dairy products (23.2%), non-alcoholic beverages (18.6%), fruits (16.8%) and sugars and sweets (15.1%) and grains (12.0%). The major sources of intrinsic sugars were fruits (31.8%), milks (19.6%), juices and nectars (11.1%), vegetables (9.89%), yogurt and fermented milk (7.18%), low-alcohol-content beverages (4.94%), bread (2.91%), and sugar soft drinks (2.24%). As for free sugars, sources were sugars and sweets (34.1%), non-alcoholic beverages (30.8%, mainly as sugar soft drinks, 25.5%) and grains (19.1%, principally as bakery and pastry, 15.2%). The present study demonstrates that only a moderate percentage of the Spanish population adhered to the present recommendations for total and added sugar intake, and urgent efforts are needed to improve diet quality in the youngest populations.

  8. Mediterranean Diet and Changes in Sleep Duration and Indicators of Sleep Quality in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanini, Marcela Z; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Lopez-Garcia, Esther

    2017-03-01

    To examine the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MD) and changes in sleep duration and sleep quality in older adults. We used data from 1596 participants in the Seniors-ENRICA cohort aged ≥ 60 years. MD was evaluated in 2012 with the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS) score. Sleep duration (h) and indicators of poor sleep quality were assessed both in 2012 and 2015. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle and morbidity variables, and for sleep duration and the number of poor sleep indicators at baseline. Over a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 12.2% of individuals increased and 8.8% decreased their sleep duration by ≥2 h/night. Compared with those in the lowest tertile of adherence to the MD in 2012, those in the highest tertile showed both a lower risk of a ≥2 h/night increase in sleep duration (odds ratio [OR]: 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.85, p-trend = .01) and of a ≥2 h/night decrease (OR: 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.95, p-trend = 0.02) from 2012 to 2015. Being in the highest tertile of MD in 2012 was also associated with lower risk of poor sleep quality at follow-up, the OR (95% CI) for having 2-3 indicators of poor sleep was 0.70 (0.51-0.97) and for ≥4 indicators was 0.68 (0.47-0.99, p-trend = .04). High adherence to the MD was also associated with 56% lower odds of having large changes in sleep duration and ≥2 indicators of poor sleep quality simultaneously (OR: 0.44, 95% CI 0.29-0.68, p trend sleep duration and with better sleep quality in older adults. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and risk of developing cognitive disorders: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Sun, Dali

    2017-01-01

    Recent articles have presented inconsistent findings on the impact of Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of cognitive disorders; therefore, we performed an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the potential association and dose-response pattern with accumulating evidence. We searched the PubMed and the Embase for the records relevant to this topic. A generic inverse-variance method was used to pool the outcome data for continuous variable, and categories of high vs. low, median vs. low of Mediterranean diet score with a random-effects model. Generalized least-squares trend estimation model was used to estimate the potential dose-response patterns of Mediterranean diet score on incident cognitive disorders. We identified 9 cohort studies involving 34,168 participants. Compared with the lowest category, the pooled analysis showed that the highest Mediterranean diet score was inversely associated with the developing of cognitive disorders, and the pooled RR (95% CI) was 0.79 (0.70, 0.90). Mediterranean diet score of the median category was not significantly associated with cognitive disorders. Dose-response analysis indicated a trend of an approximately linear relationship of the Mediterranean diet score with the incident risk of cognitive disorders. Further studies of randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm the observed association in different populations. PMID:28112268

  10. Mediterranean diet improves high-density lipoprotein function in high-cardiovascular-risk Individuals: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hernáez , Álvaro; Castañer, Olga; Elosua, Roberto; Pintó Sala, Xavier; Estruch, Ramón; Salas Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Arós, Fernando; Serra Majem, Lluís; Fiol, Miquel; Ortega Calvo, Manuel; Ros, Emilio; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Torre Fornell, Rafael de la; López-Sabater, M. Carmen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The biological functions of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) contribute to explaining the cardioprotective role of the lipoprotein beyond quantitative HDL cholesterol levels. A few small-scale interventions with a single antioxidant have improved some HDL functions. However, to date, no long-term, large-scale, randomized controlled trial has been conducted to assess the effects of an antioxidant-rich dietary pattern (such as a traditional Mediterranean diet [TMD]) on HDL function ...

  11. Influence of the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy in the development of wheezing and eczema in infants in Pamplona, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Zallo, N; Aguinaga-Ontoso, I; Alvarez-Alvarez, I; Marin-Fernandez, B; Guillén-Grima, F; Azcona-San Julián, C

    This study examined the relationship between different food groups and the adherence to a Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and the risk of wheezing and eczema in children aged 12-15 months. The study involves 1087 Spanish infants from the International Study of Wheezing in Infants (Estudio Internacional de Sibilancias en Lactantes, EISL). The study of the association of the different food consumption and Mediterranean diet with wheezing, recurrent wheezing and eczema was performed using different models of unconditional logistic regression to obtain adjusted prevalence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). No association was found between a good adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and the development of wheezing (p=0.372), recurrent wheezing (p=0.118) and eczema (p=0.315). The consumption once or twice a week of white fish (OR: 1.95[1.01-3.75]), cooked potatoes (OR: 1.75[1.22-2.51]) and industrial pastry (OR: 1.59[1.13-2.24]), and the consumption more than three times a week of industrial pastry (OR: 1.47 [1.01-2.13]) during pregnancy increases the risk of "wheezing" at 12 months. Instead, high fruit consumption during the pregnancy has a protective effect against "wheezing" in 12-month-old infants (OR: 0.44 [0.20-0.99]). No statistically significant differences were observed between food intake during pregnancy and "recurrent wheezing". No statistically significant differences were observed between the consumption of any food during pregnancy and the presence of eczema at 12 months. The present study showed that the consumption of Mediterranean diet during pregnancy did not have a protective effect for wheezing, recurrent wheezing or eczema. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better quality of life: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

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    Veronese, Nicola; Stubbs, Brendon; Noale, Marianna; Solmi, Marco; Luchini, Claudio; Maggi, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    The Mediterranean diet has positively influenced various medical conditions, but only a paucity of studies has considered the relation between the Mediterranean diet and quality of life (QOL) among people living in North America. We investigated whether a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (aMED) was associated with better QOL and decreased pain, stiffness, disability, and depression in a large cohort of North Americans from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. aMED was evaluated through a validated Mediterranean diet score categorized into quintiles. Outcomes of interest were QOL [assessed with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Outcome Survey (SF-12)]; disability, pain, and stiffness [assessed in both knees with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC)]; and depressive symptoms [assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)]. Of the 4470 participants (2605 women; mean age: 61.3 y), those with a higher aMED had significantly more favorable scores on all outcomes investigated (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). After adjustment for potential confounders in linear regression analyses, a higher aMED was significantly associated with a higher SF-12 physical composite scale value (β: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.15; P < 0.0001), lower WOMAC scores (except for stiffness), and lower CES-D scores (β: -0.05; 95% CI: -0.09, -0.01; P = 0.01). An adjusted logistic regression analysis, taking as reference those in the 2 highest quintiles of the aMED score, confirmed these findings. Higher aMED is associated with better QOL and decreased pain, disability, and depressive symptoms. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00080171. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores Are Inversely Associated with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Balance in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kristine A; McCullough, Marjorie L; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M

    2016-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and oxidative balance are associated with poor diet quality and risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. A diet-inflammation/oxidative balance association may relate to evolutionary discordance. We investigated associations between 2 diet pattern scores, the Paleolithic and the Mediterranean, and circulating concentrations of 2 related biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an acute inflammatory protein, and F2-isoprostane, a reliable marker of in vivo lipid peroxidation. In a pooled cross-sectional study of 30- to 74-y-old men and women in an elective outpatient colonoscopy population (n = 646), we created diet scores from responses on Willett food-frequency questionnaires and measured plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations by ELISA and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Both diet scores were calculated and categorized into quintiles, and their associations with biomarker concentrations were estimated with the use of general linear models to calculate and compare adjusted geometric means, and via unconditional ordinal logistic regression. There were statistically significant trends for decreasing geometric mean plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations with increasing quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores. The multivariable-adjusted ORs comparing those in the highest with those in the lowest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores were 0.61 (95% CI: 0.36, 1.05; P-trend = 0.06) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.20; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher hsCRP concentration, and 0.51 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.95; P-trend 0.01) and 0.39 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.73; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher F2-isoprostane concentration. These findings suggest that diets that are more Paleolithic- or Mediterranean-like may be associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in humans. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Eguaras

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou’s Mediterranean Diet Score. We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD. An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs: 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93–2.25 for ≥25 – <30 kg/m2 of BMI and 2.00 (1.04–3.83 for ≥30 kg/m2 of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m2. In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35–1.67 and 1.15 (0.39–3.43 with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029. Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity.

  15. Components of a Mediterranean diet and their impact on cognitive functions in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eHuhn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhering to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi is known to be beneficial with regard to age-associated diseases including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies also suggest an impact on cognition and brain structure, and increasing effort is made to track effects down to single nutrients.Aims: To review whether two MeDi components, i.e. long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (LC-n3-FA derived from sea-fish, and plant polyphenols including resveratrol (RSV, exert positive effects on brain health in aging. Content: We summarized health benefits associated with the MeDi and evaluated available studies on the effect of (1 fish-consumption and LC-n3-FA supplementation as well as (2 diet-derived or supplementary polyphenols such as RSV, on cognitive performance and brain structure in animal models and human studies. Also, we discussed possible underlying mechanisms.Conclusion: A majority of available studies suggest that consumption of LC-n3-FA with fish or fishoil-supplements exerts positive effects on brain health and cognition in older humans. However, more large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to draw definite recommendations. Considering polyphenols and RSV, only a few controlled studies are available to date, yet the evidence based on animal research and first interventional human trials is promising and warrants further investigation. In addition, the concept of food synergy within the MeDi encourages future trials that evaluate the impact of comprehensive lifestyle patterns to help maintaining cognitive functions into old age.

  16. Dietary Supplements as Surrogate of Mediterranean Diet in Healthy Smoking Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasto, Sonya; Accardi, Giulia; Aiello, Anna; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Barera, Annalisa; Indelicato, Serena; Galimberti, Damiano; Italiano, Emilio; Monastero, Roberto; Rizzo, Claudia; Caruso, Calogero; Candore, Giuseppina

    2018-02-01

    The interventions to slow aging, favoring active life expectancy, represent the new perspectives in ageing investigation. Some mechanisms that delay or prevent the onset of aging pathologies have been identified. Between them, a healthy lifestyle seems to reduce many risk factors. In particular, eating habits represent the most concrete, low-cost way to act on aging process. Mediterranean diet has received much attention since its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects have been consistently demonstrated. Unfortunately, many people follow a Western diet, poor in phytochemicals that represent the main source of beneficial effects of this dietary pattern. So, supplements administration should be considered, especially in subjects exposed to high level of oxidative stress and inflammation. So, we tested the properties of a commercial food supplement containing a series of plant polyphenols in combination with caffeine, bioperine (black pepper extract), and selenium in smoking healthy volunteers. Fifty participants have been recruited and hematochemical analyses and biochemistry tests have been performed, before and after 60 days of supplement intake. Thirteen subjects dropped out of the study. At the end of the intervention, the variation of inflammatory and oxidant markers has been evaluated, measuring urinary isoprostanes, serum advanced glycation end products, and oxidized low-density lipoproteins. The results showed that this supplement exhibits promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses, especially in women, highlighting the role of supplementation in certain groups of subjects, for the control of oxidative stress as well as inflammatory status. So, its intake should be useful in delaying the onset of age-related diseases.

  17. Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagfors Linda

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Several investigators have reported that clinical improvements of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, from participating in therapeutic diet intervention studies, have been accompanied by loss of body weight. This has raised the question whether weight reduction per se can improve RA. In order to test this hypothesis, three previously conducted diet intervention studies, comprising 95 patients with RA, were pooled. Together with Age, Gender, and Disease Duration, change during the test period in body weight, characterised dichotomously as reduction or no reduction (dichoΔBody Weight, as well as Diet (dichotomously as ordinary diet or test diet, were the independent variables. Dependent variables were the difference (Δ from baseline to conclusion of the study in five different disease outcome measures. ΔESR and ΔPain Score were both characterised numerically and dichotomously (improvement or no improvement. ΔAcute Phase Response, ΔPhysical Function, and ΔTender Joint Count were characterised dichotomously only. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse associations between the independent and the disease outcome variables. Results Statistically significant correlations were found between Diet and three disease outcome variables i.e. ΔAcute-Phase Response, ΔPain Score, and ΔPhysical Function. Δ Body Weight was univariately only correlated to ΔAcute-Phase Response but not significant when diet was taken into account. Conclusion Body weight reduction did not significantly contribute to the improvement in rheumatoid arthritis when eating lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Mediterranean Diet in the Early and Late Stages of Atheroma Plaque Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rosa; Urpi-Sardà, Mireia; Sacanella, Emilio; Arranz, Sara; Corella, Dolores; Castañer, Olga; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa-María; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Lapetra, José; Portillo, Maria P; Estruch, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the long-term effects of a Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) intervention on the plasma concentrations of inflammatory and plaque stability-related molecules in elderly people at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Design and Setting . 66 participants from primary care centers affiliated with the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona were randomized into 3 groups: MeDiet plus extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) or nuts and a low-fat diet (LFD). At baseline and at 3 and 5 years, we evaluated the changes in the plasma concentrations of 24 inflammatory biomarkers related to the different stages of the atherosclerotic process by Luminex®. Results. At 3 and 5 years, both MeDiet groups showed a significant reduction of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1 β ( P < 0.05; all) compared to LFD. IL-1 β , IL-5, IL-7, IL-12p70, IL-18, TNF- α , IFN- γ , GCSF, GMCSF, and ENA78 ( P < 0.05; all) only decreased in the MeDiet+EVOO group and E-selectin and sVCAM-1 ( P < 0.05; both) in the MeDiet+nuts group. Conclusions . Long-term adherence to MeDiet decreases the plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers related to different steps of atheroma plaque development in elderly persons at high cardiovascular risk.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Mediterranean Diet in the Early and Late Stages of Atheroma Plaque Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Casas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the long-term effects of a Mediterranean diet (MeDiet intervention on the plasma concentrations of inflammatory and plaque stability-related molecules in elderly people at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Design and Setting. 66 participants from primary care centers affiliated with the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona were randomized into 3 groups: MeDiet plus extra virgin olive oil (EVOO or nuts and a low-fat diet (LFD. At baseline and at 3 and 5 years, we evaluated the changes in the plasma concentrations of 24 inflammatory biomarkers related to the different stages of the atherosclerotic process by Luminex®. Results. At 3 and 5 years, both MeDiet groups showed a significant reduction of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1β (P<0.05; all compared to LFD. IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12p70, IL-18, TNF-α, IFN-γ, GCSF, GMCSF, and ENA78 (P<0.05; all only decreased in the MeDiet+EVOO group and E-selectin and sVCAM-1 (P<0.05; both in the MeDiet+nuts group. Conclusions. Long-term adherence to MeDiet decreases the plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers related to different steps of atheroma plaque development in elderly persons at high cardiovascular risk.

  20. Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköldstam, Lars; Brudin, Lars; Hagfors, Linda; Johansson, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Several investigators have reported that clinical improvements of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), from participating in therapeutic diet intervention studies, have been accompanied by loss of body weight. This has raised the question whether weight reduction per se can improve RA. In order to test this hypothesis, three previously conducted diet intervention studies, comprising 95 patients with RA, were pooled. Together with Age, Gender, and Disease Duration, change during the test period in body weight, characterised dichotomously as reduction or no reduction (dichoΔBody Weight), as well as Diet (dichotomously as ordinary diet or test diet), were the independent variables. Dependent variables were the difference (Δ) from baseline to conclusion of the study in five different disease outcome measures. ΔESR and ΔPain Score were both characterised numerically and dichotomously (improvement or no improvement). ΔAcute Phase Response, ΔPhysical Function, and ΔTender Joint Count were characterised dichotomously only. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse associations between the independent and the disease outcome variables. Results Statistically significant correlations were found between Diet and three disease outcome variables i.e. ΔAcute-Phase Response, ΔPain Score, and ΔPhysical Function. Δ Body Weight was univariately only correlated to ΔAcute-Phase Response but not significant when diet was taken into account. Conclusion Body weight reduction did not significantly contribute to the improvement in rheumatoid arthritis when eating lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets. PMID:15871736

  1. [Nutricional adequacy of students of compulsory secondary education in Badajoz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Caro, L G; Luego Pérez, L M; García Preciado, V

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate nutricional adequacy of students of compulsory secondary education (ESO) in Badajoz, Spain. We included 1197 students of ESO from 12 to 18 years old, 49.9% male and 50.1% female, which is a representative sample of this population. They filled in a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) self-administered and previously validated in a pilot study. Nutrients were quantified from FFQ with a food composition table (Novartis, 2004) and nutritional Adequacy Index (AI) was calculated according to Spanish Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA). Nutritional adequacy of a nutrient was measured by the following relation: mean daily intake of the nutrient / RDA of that nutrient * 100. Average caloric intake of secondary education students is not very high, protein AI is over 200%, and cholesterol over 150%, being appropriate the intake of carbohydrates and lipids. The intake of fiber, vitamin E and iodine was lower than 50% in both genders; the one of iron less than 90% in females and there were no other differences between both genders. Only 1% to 3% of students reach RDA of fiber, iodine and vitamin E, and 37.3% of female reach RDA of iron. Cholesterol dietary intake of 17.2% males and 25.3% females is high, and saturated fatty acids intake is high in 46.1% males and 50.0% females. Diet of students of secondary education in Badajoz is normocaloric, hyperproteic, appropriate in carbohydrates and lipids, without differences between genders; it is very deficient in fiber, iodine and vitamin E in both genders and deficient in iron in females. We can see their diet is far from Mediterranean diet, and this is why education plans about food intake are advised to the students and their families.

  2. Monetary Value of Diet Is Associated with Dietary Quality and Nutrient Adequacy among Urban Adults, Differentially by Sex, Race and Poverty Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May A Beydoun

    Full Text Available The association between monetary value of the diet (MVD, $/day with dietary quality was examined using a large sample of urban US adults, differentially by socio-demographic factors.This was a cross-sectional study of 2,111 participants, aged 30-64y, using data from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span Study. Dietary quality indices included Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010 and Mean Adequacy Ratio (MAR, (two 24-hr recalls. A national food price database was used to estimate MVD. Multiple linear/logistic regression analyses were conducted stratifying separately by sex, race and poverty status.Women had significantly higher HEI-2010 scores than men (43.35 vs 41.57 out of 100, respectively, whereas MAR scores were higher for men (76.8 vs 69.9, out of 100, reflecting energy intake gender differentials. Importantly, a $3/day higher MVD (IQR: $3.70/d (Q1 to $6.62/d (Q4 was associated with a 4.98±0.35 higher total HEI-2010 and a 3.88±0.37 higher MAR score, after energy-adjustment and control for key confounders. For HEI-2010 and MAR, stronger associations were observed among participants above poverty and among women, whilethe MVD vs. HEI-2010 association was additionally stronger among Whites. Sex and poverty status differentials were observed for many MAR and some HEI-2010 components.Despite positive associations between measures of dietary quality and MVD, particularly above poverty and among women, approaching compliance with the Dietary Guidelines (80 or more for HEI-2010 requires a substantially higher MVD. Thus, nutrition education may further improve people's decision-making regarding food venues and dietary choices.

  3. Factors associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet among adolescents living in Sicily, Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Marventano, Stefano; Buscemi, Silvio; Scuderi, Alessandro; Matalone, Margherita; Platania, Alessio; Giorgianni, Gabriele; Rametta, Stefania; Nolfo, Francesca; Galvano, Fabio; Mistretta, Antonio

    2013-12-04

    The present study aimed to examine the factors associated with increased Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence among a sample of Italian adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1135 students (13-16 years) attending 13 secondary schools of Sicily, southern Italy. Validated instruments were used for dietary assessment and the KIDMED score to assess adolescents' adherence to the MD. A higher adherence to the MD was associated with high socioeconomic status (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03-2.26) and high physical activity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.70), whereas lower adherence was associated with living in an urban environment (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.97) and being obese (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37-0.94). The adolescents' KIDMED scores were inversely associated with adolescents' intake of sweets, fast foods, fried foods, and sugary drinks, and directly with fruit, vegetables, pasta, fish, and cheese intakes. Urban-living adolescents were less likely to eat fruit and more prone to consume meat, sugary drinks, and fast food than rural-living adolescents. The latter were more likely to eat sweets and snacks. A general poor quality of food consumption in Italian adolescents away from the MD was reported, especially among those living in urban areas.

  4. Mediterranean diet and 3-year Alzheimer brain biomarker changes in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Valentina; Walters, Michelle; Sterling, Joanna; Quinn, Crystal G; Logue, Michelle; Andrews, Randolph; Matthews, Dawn C; Osorio, Ricardo S; Pupi, Alberto; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Isaacson, Richard S; de Leon, Mony J; Mosconi, Lisa

    2018-04-13

    To examine in a 3-year brain imaging study the effects of higher vs lower adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (MeDi) on Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarker changes (brain β-amyloid load via 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B [PiB] PET and neurodegeneration via 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG] PET and structural MRI) in midlife. Seventy 30- to 60-year-old cognitively normal participants with clinical, neuropsychological, and dietary examinations and imaging biomarkers at least 2 years apart were examined. These included 34 participants with higher (MeDi+) and 36 with lower (MeDi-) MeDi adherence. Statistical parametric mapping and volumes of interest were used to compare AD biomarkers between groups at cross section and longitudinally. MeDi groups were comparable for clinical and neuropsychological measures. At baseline, compared to the MeDi+ group, the MeDi- group showed reduced FDG-PET glucose metabolism (CMRglc) and higher PiB-PET deposition in AD-affected regions ( p brain aging and AD. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Factors Associated with Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet among Adolescents Living in Sicily, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Grosso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the factors associated with increased Mediterranean diet (MD adherence among a sample of Italian adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1135 students (13–16 years attending 13 secondary schools of Sicily, southern Italy. Validated instruments were used for dietary assessment and the KIDMED score to assess adolescents’ adherence to the MD. A higher adherence to the MD was associated with high socioeconomic status (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03–2.26 and high physical activity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02–1.70, whereas lower adherence was associated with living in an urban environment (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44–0.97 and being obese (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37–0.94. The adolescents’ KIDMED scores were inversely associated with adolescents’ intake of sweets, fast foods, fried foods, and sugary drinks, and directly with fruit, vegetables, pasta, fish, and cheese intakes. Urban-living adolescents were less likely to eat fruit and more prone to consume meat, sugary drinks, and fast food than rural-living adolescents. The latter were more likely to eat sweets and snacks. A general poor quality of food consumption in Italian adolescents away from the MD was reported, especially among those living in urban areas.

  6. The effect of the Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    The "Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet" (SKMD) has been shown to be an effective and safe way to cure patients suffering from metabolic syndrome (MS). Keeping in mind that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with MS, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic properties under free living conditions of the SKMD in patients with MS (following the International Diabetes Federation [IDF] consensus guidelines) and NAFLD (suspected by using a cutoff value of alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels of >40 U/L and confirmed by abdominal ultrasonography) over a 12-week period. A prospective study was carried out in 14 obese men meeting the inclusion criteria and whose body mass index (BMI) and age were 36.58±0.54 kg/m² and 41.18±2.28 years, respectively. Statistical differences between the parameters studied before and after administration of the SKMD (week 0 and 12) were analyzed by paired Student's t test (continuous variables) and the χ² test (discontinuous variables). Pdiet all the subjects were free of MS according to the IDF definition, and 100% of them had normal triacylglycerols and HDLc levels, in spite of the fact that 100% of them still had a BMI of >30 kg/m². We conclude that the SKMD could be an effective and safe way to treat patients suffering from MS and the associated NAFLD.

  7. Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores Are Inversely Associated with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Balance in Adults123

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Marjorie L; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammation and oxidative balance are associated with poor diet quality and risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. A diet–inflammation/oxidative balance association may relate to evolutionary discordance. Objective: We investigated associations between 2 diet pattern scores, the Paleolithic and the Mediterranean, and circulating concentrations of 2 related biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an acute inflammatory protein, and F2-isoprostane, a reliable marker of in vivo lipid peroxidation. Methods: In a pooled cross-sectional study of 30- to 74-y-old men and women in an elective outpatient colonoscopy population (n = 646), we created diet scores from responses on Willett food-frequency questionnaires and measured plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations by ELISA and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, respectively. Both diet scores were calculated and categorized into quintiles, and their associations with biomarker concentrations were estimated with the use of general linear models to calculate and compare adjusted geometric means, and via unconditional ordinal logistic regression. Results: There were statistically significant trends for decreasing geometric mean plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations with increasing quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores. The multivariable-adjusted ORs comparing those in the highest with those in the lowest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores were 0.61 (95% CI: 0.36, 1.05; P-trend = 0.06) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.20; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher hsCRP concentration, and 0.51 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.95; P-trend 0.01) and 0.39 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.73; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher F2-isoprostane concentration. Conclusion: These findings suggest that diets that are more Paleolithic- or Mediterranean-like may be associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in humans. PMID

  8. [Food and nutrient consumption in Spain in the period 1940-1988. Analysis of its consistency with the Mediterranean diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Banegas, J R; Graciani, M A; Hernández Vecino, R; Rey Calero, J

    1996-02-10

    Not enough information is available regarding Spanish alimentation from the Civil War up to the present. Furthermore, there are some evidence that the Spaniards are leaving behind their traditional, healthy Mediterranean diet. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the food and nutrient intake trends of the Spanish population from 1940-1988 and establish to what extent the pattern of the Mediterranean diet has been maintained. New food balance sheets for the Spanish population have been elaborated using all the information available and consistently applying the methodology of the European Union over the period from 1940-1988. Total caloric intake and that of all the macronutrients increased over the study period although this increase was greater after 1960. The contribution of lipids to total caloric intake has increased (30% in 1960-1968 and 42% from 1980-1988), protein contribution has remained the same (13% 1960-1968 and 13% 1980-1988) and carbohydrate intake has decreased (58% from 1960-1968 to 45% from 1980-1988). These changes are the result of an important increase in the consumption of meat, eggs, milk and derivatives. Nonetheless the high intake of fruit and vegetables, fish and olive and seed oils has been maintained. Thus, from 1980-1988 the ingestion of monounsaturated/saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids was 1.3 and 0.5, respectively. The first systematic reconstruction of the alimentary and nutritional history of the Spanish population over the last fifty years has been carried out. The Spanish diet has undergone typical changes associated with economic development but continues to be consistent with the pattern of the Mediterranean diet. These changes in diet are, however, of worry because of their deviation from optimum nutritional patterns.

  9. Mediterranean-type diet is associated with higher psychological resilience in a general adult population: findings from the Moli-sani study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Costanzo, S; Pounis, G; Persichillo, M; Cerletti, C; Donati, M B; de Gaetano, G; Iacoviello, L

    2018-01-01

    Psychological resilience is a measure of stress coping ability and has been associated with favourable health outcomes. While evidence on the relationship of dietary habits with a number of psychosocial conditions is available, there is lack of studies on their association with psychological resilience in a general adult population. Cross-sectional analysis on 10 812 subjects recruited within the cohort of the Moli-sani study (2005-2010). Psychological resilience was measured by the 25-item Connor-Davidson Psychological Resilience Scale. Food intake was recorded by the EPIC food frequency questionnaire and adherence to Mediterranean diet was appraised by both a Greek Mediterranean diet score and an Italian Mediterranean Index. Empirically derived dietary patterns were obtained by principal factor analysis. Multivariable linear regression analysis (95%CI) was used to test the association between dietary scores and psychological resilience. Higher adherence to Mediterranean-type diets or consumption of a vegetable-based dietary pattern (obtained from principal factor analysis) were positively associated with psychological resilience (β=0.43; 95%CI: 0.19-0.66, β=0.92; 0.69-1.16, and β=1.18; 0.93-1.44, for Greek Mediterranean diet score, Italian Mediterranean Index and the 'Olive oil and vegetables pattern', respectively). Dietary polyphenol or antioxidant intakes and greater variety in fruit and vegetable consumption were also positively associated with psychological resilience, while the associations with Western-like diets were weak. In conclusion, Mediterranean diet, vegetable-based dietary patterns and better diet quality were all positively associated with higher psychological resilience, whereas Western-type diets were not.

  10. Does the Mediterranean dietary pattern or the Healthy Diet Index influence the risk of breast cancer in a large British cohort of women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, J E; Taylor, E F; Burley, V J; Greenwood, D C

    2011-08-01

    To assess the risk of developing breast cancer associated with consumption of two common dietary patterns: a Mediterranean dietary pattern and a dietary pattern, which conforms to the World Health Organization Healthy Diet Index (WHO HDI). Dietary data from a 217-item food frequency questionnaire were used to generate two dietary patterns according to pre-defined criteria in women from the UK Women's Cohort Study. Survival analysis using Cox regression was used to estimate hazards ratios for risk of breast cancer adjusted for known confounders. This analysis included 828 incident cases of breast cancer in 33,731 women with a mean follow-up of 9 years. There were no statistically significant associations between either the Mediterranean dietary pattern or the WHO HDI and risk of breast cancer. In premenopausal women, there was a nonsignificant trend suggesting that increasing compliance with the Mediterranean diet was associated with lower risk of breast cancer. Maximal adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with hazards ratio=0.65 (95% confidence interval: 0.42-1.02, P trend=0.09) compared with minimal adherence. In postmenopausal women, no clear trends were observed. In this study, no strong association between the risk of breast cancer and the consumption of either a Mediterranean-type diet or one characterized by adherence to the WHO HDI was observed. In premenopausal, but not postmenopausal women, there was a nonsignificant inverse association with increasing adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern.

  11. Barriers to adopting a Mediterranean diet in Northern European adults at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S E; McEvoy, C T; Prior, L; Lawton, J; Patterson, C C; Kee, F; Cupples, M; Young, I S; Appleton, K; McKinley, M C; Woodside, J V

    2017-11-21

    Strong evidence links the consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MD) with a reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk; however, there is uncertainty as to whether non-Mediterranean regions will adopt this diet. The present qualitative research aimed to investigate attitudes towards a MD in individuals at high CVD risk in a Northern European population. This information is needed to inform development of MD interventions in non-Mediterranean high-risk populations. Focus groups (n = 12) were held with individuals at high CVD risk from Northern Europe (≥2 CVD risk factors, aged ≥50 years, no established CVD/type 2 diabetes). Attitudes to dietary change towards a MD were explored. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Sixty-seven adults participated (60% female, mean age 64 years). There was some awareness of the term MD but limited knowledge of its composition. Barriers to general dietary change were evident, including perception of expense, concern over availability, expectation of time commitment, limited knowledge, lack of cooking skills, amount and conflicting nature of media information on diets, changing established eating habits and resistance to dietary change. Barriers specific to MD adoption were also identified, including perceived difficulty living in a colder climate, perceived impact on body weight, acceptability of a MD and cultural differences. Knowledge of a MD was limited in this Northern European sample at high CVD risk. In addition to general barriers to dietary change, barriers specific to a MD were identified. These findings have implications for the development of interventions aiming to promote MD adoption in non-Mediterranean populations. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. Residential radon exposure, diet and lung cancer: a case-control study in a Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Francesco; Forastiere, Francesco; Farchi, Sara; Quarto, Maria; Axelson, Olav

    2005-05-10

    We performed a case-control study in Lazio, a region in central Italy characterized by high levels of indoor radon, Mediterranean climate and diet. Cases (384) and controls (404) aged 35-90 years were recruited in the hospital. Detailed information regarding smoking, diet and other risk factors were collected by direct interview. Residential history during the 30-year period ending 5 years before enrollment was ascertained. In each dwelling, radon detectors were placed in both the main bedroom and the living room for 2 consecutive 6-month periods. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for time-weighted radon concentrations using both categorical and continuous unconditional logistic regression analysis and adjusting for smoking, diet and other variables. Radon measurements were available from 89% and 91% of the time period for cases and controls, respectively. The adjusted ORs were 1.30 (1.03-1.64), 1.48 (1.08-2.02), 1.49 (0.82-2.71) and 2.89 (0.45-18.6) for 50-99, 100-199, 200-399 and 400+ Bq/m(3), respectively, compared with 0-49 Bq/m(3) (OR = 1; 0.56-1.79). The excess odds ratio (EOR) per 100 Bq/m(3) was 0.14 (-0.11, 0.46) for all subjects, 0.24 (-0.09, 0.70) for subjects with complete radon measurements and 0.30 (-0.08, 0.82) for subjects who had lived in 1 or 2 dwellings. There was a tendency of higher risk estimates among subjects with low-medium consumption of dietary antioxidants (EOR = 0.32; -0.19, 1.16) and for adenocarcinoma, small cell and epidermoid cancers. This study indicates an association, although generally not statistically significant, between residential radon and lung cancer with both categorical and continuous analyses. Subjects with presumably lower uncertainty in the exposure assessment showed a higher risk. Dietary antioxidants may act as an effect modifier.

  13. Relationship of Mediterranean diet and caloric intake to phenoconversion in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Karen; Gu, Yian; Eberly, Shirley; Tanner, Caroline M; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira

    2013-11-01

    Adherence to Mediterranean-type diet (MeDi) may delay onset of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Whether adherence to MeDi affects time to phenoconversion in Huntington disease (HD), a highly penetrant, single-gene disorder, is unknown. To determine if MeDi modifies the time to clinical onset of HD (phenoconversion) in premanifest carriers participating in Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS), and to examine the effects of body mass index and caloric intake on time to phenoconversion. A prospective cohort study of 41 Huntington study group sites in the United States and Canada involving 1001 participants enrolled in PHAROS between July 1999 and January 2004 who were followed up every 9 months until 2010. A total of 211 participants aged 26 to 57 years had an expanded CAG repeat length (≥ 37). A semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered 33 months after baseline. We calculated daily gram intake for dairy, meat, fruit, vegetables, legumes, cereals, fish, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, and alcohol and constructed MeDi scores (0-9); higher scores indicate higher adherence. Demographics, medical history, body mass index, and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) score were collected. Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine the association of MeDi and phenoconversion. RESULTS Age, sex, caloric intake, education status, and UHDRS motor scores did not differ among MeDi tertiles (0-3, 4-5, and 6-9). The highest body mass index was associated with the lowest adherence to MeDi. Thirty-one participants phenoconverted. In a model adjusted for age, CAG repeat length, and caloric intake, MeDi was not associated with phenoconversion (P for trend = 0.14 for tertile of MeDi, and P = .22 for continuous MeDi). When individual components of MeDi were analyzed, higher dairy consumption (hazard ratio, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.0-5.57; P = .05) and higher caloric intake (P = .04) were associated with risk of

  14. Mediterranean diet reduces 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipids: one-year randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech, Mónica; Roman, Pilar; Lapetra, José; García de la Corte, Francisco J; Sala-Vila, Aleix; de la Torre, Rafael; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa-María; Toledo, Estefania; Estruch, Ramón; Coca, Antonio; Ros, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    The PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) trial showed that Mediterranean diets (MedDiets) supplemented with either extravirgin olive oil or nuts reduced cardiovascular events, particularly stroke, compared with a control, lower fat diet. The mechanisms of cardiovascular protection remain unclear. We evaluated the 1-year effects of supplemented MedDiets on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, and lipids. Randomized, parallel-design, controlled trial was conducted in 2 PREDIMED sites. Diets were ad libitum, and no advice on increasing physical activity or reducing sodium intake was given. Participants were 235 subjects (56.5% women; mean age, 66.5 years) at high cardiovascular risk (85.4% with hypertension). Adjusted changes from baseline in mean systolic BP were -2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], -4.0 to -0.5) mm Hg and -2.6 (95% CI, -4.3 to -0.9) mm Hg in the MedDiets with olive oil and the MedDiets with nuts, respectively, and 1.7 (95% CI, -0.1 to 3.5) mm Hg in the control group (Pthe MedDiets with olive oil, MedDiets with nuts, and control diet, respectively; those of total cholesterol were -11.3, -13.6, and -4.4 mg/dL (P=0.043), respectively. In high-risk individuals, most with treated hypertension, MedDiets supplemented with extravirgin olive oil or nuts reduced 24-hour ambulatory BP, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: ISRCTN35739639. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Mediterranean Diet and Invasive Breast Cancer Risk Among Women at High Cardiovascular Risk in the PREDIMED Trial: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Estefanía; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Donat-Vargas, Carolina; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Corella, Dolores; Fitó, Montserrat; Hu, Frank B; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Romaguera, Dora; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Schröder, Helmut; Basora, Josep; Sorlí, José Vicente; Bulló, Mònica; Serra-Mir, Merce; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of female cancer burden, and its incidence has increased by more than 20% worldwide since 2008. Some observational studies have suggested that the Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of breast cancer. To evaluate the effect of 2 interventions with Mediterranean diet vs the advice to follow a low-fat diet (control) on breast cancer incidence. The PREDIMED study is a 1:1:1 randomized, single-blind, controlled field trial conducted at primary health care centers in Spain. From 2003 to 2009, 4282 women aged 60 to 80 years and at high cardiovascular disease risk were recruited after invitation by their primary care physicians. Participants were randomly allocated to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Breast cancer incidence was a prespecified secondary outcome of the trial for women without a prior history of breast cancer (n = 4152). After a median follow-up of 4.8 years, we identified 35 confirmed incident cases of breast cancer. Observed rates (per 1000 person-years) were 1.1 for the Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil group, 1.8 for the Mediterranean diet with nuts group, and 2.9 for the control group. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios vs the control group were 0.32 (95% CI, 0.13-0.79) for the Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil group and 0.59 (95% CI, 0.26-1.35) for the Mediterranean diet with nuts group. In analyses with yearly cumulative updated dietary exposures, the hazard ratio for each additional 5% of calories from extra-virgin olive oil was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.57-0.90). This is the first randomized trial finding an effect of a long-term dietary intervention on breast cancer incidence. Our results suggest a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil in the primary prevention of breast cancer. These results come from a secondary

  16. Associations between physical fitness and adherence to the Mediterranean diet with health-related quality of life in adolescents: results from the LabMed Physical Activity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaristo, Olga Sofia; Moreira, Carla; Lopes, Luís; Abreu, Sandra; Agostinis-Sobrinho, César; Oliveira-Santos, José; Póvoas, Susana; Oliveira, André; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge

    2018-03-26

    Physical fitness (PF) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet are important indicators of healthy lifestyles. The purpose of this study is to analyze the independent and combined associations between PF and adherence to Mediterranean diet with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adolescents. This is a cross-sectional analysis with 956 Portuguese adolescents aged 12-18 years. HRQoL was measured with the Kidscreen-10 questionnaire. PF was assessed with the ALPHA health-related fitness battery. The 20-m shuttle run test was used for the estimation of cardiorespiratory fitness; handgrip strength and standing long jump tests were applied for the assessment of muscular fitness and the 4 × 10 m shuttle run test for the assessment of motor fitness (speed and agility). The results of the PF tests (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness and motor fitness) were transformed into standardized values (Z-scores) by age and sex. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed with the KIDMED index. Regression analysis and analysis of covariance were performed. PF (B = 0.228; P < 0.05) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet (B = 0.259; P < 0.05) were positively associated with HRQoL, after controlling for several variables. Participants classified as high PF and high adherence to Mediterranean diet had on average the highest HRQoL score compared with those with low PF and low adherence to Mediterranean diet (F(3, 939) = 4.270; P = 0.005), after adjustments for potential confounders. The combination of high PF levels and optimal adherence to Mediterranean diet is positively associated with HRQoL.

  17. Effect of ketogenic Mediterranean diet with phytoextracts and low carbohydrates/high-protein meals on weight, cardiovascular risk factors, body composition and diet compliance in Italian council employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio; Cenci, Lorenzo; Grimaldi, Keith A

    2011-10-12

    There has been increased interest in recent years in very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets (VLCKD) that, even though they are much discussed and often opposed, have undoubtedly been shown to be effective, at least in the short to medium term, as a tool to tackle obesity, hyperlipidemia and some cardiovascular risk factors. For this reason the ketogenic diet represents an interesting option but unfortunately suffers from a low compliance. The aim of this pilot study is to ascertain the safety and effects of a modified ketogenic diet that utilizes ingredients which are low in carbohydrates but are formulated to simulate its aspect and taste and also contain phytoextracts to add beneficial effects of important vegetable components. The study group consisted of 106 Rome council employees with a body mass index of ≥ 25, age between 18 and 65 years (19 male and 87 female; mean age 48.49 ± 10.3). We investigated the effects of a modified ketogenic diet based on green vegetables, olive oil, fish and meat plus dishes composed of high quality protein and virtually zero carbohydrate but which mimic their taste, with the addition of some herbal extracts (KEMEPHY ketogenic Mediterranean with phytoextracts). Calories in the diet were unlimited. Measurements were taken before and after 6 weeks of diet. There were no significant changes in BUN, ALT, AST, GGT and blood creatinine. We detected a significant (p good compliance.

  18. The mediating effect of Mediterranean diet on the relation between smoking and colorectal cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontou, Niki; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Soupos, Nick; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Linos, Athena; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2013-10-01

    The protective role of Mediterranean diet (MD) and the detrimental effect of smoking on colorectal cancer (CRC) have already been shown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential mediating effect of MD on the association between the aforementioned factor (smoking) and CRC. It is a case-control study. Two hundred fifty consecutive patients with CRC (63 ± 12 years, 59% males) and 250 age-sex group-matched controls, both from the area of Attica, were studied. Various socio-demographic, clinical, lifestyle (including detailed smoking habits) and dietary characteristics were measured. Adherence to the MD was evaluated using the MedDietScore (theoretical range 0-55). Each unit increase in the MedDietScore was associated with 13% lower likelihood of CRC (P dietary pattern with regards to CRC morbidity and mortality.

  19. Mediterranean Diet Adherence and Genetic Background Roles within a Web-Based Nutritional Intervention: The Food4Me Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo San-Cristobal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet adherence has been proven to produce numerous health benefits. In addition, nutrigenetic studies have explained some individual variations in the response to specific dietary patterns. The present research aimed to explore associations and potential interactions between MedDiet adherence and genetic background throughout the Food4Me web-based nutritional intervention. Dietary, anthropometrical and biochemical data from volunteers of the Food4Me study were collected at baseline and after 6 months. Several genetic variants related to metabolic risk features were also analysed. A Genetic Risk Score (GRS was derived from risk alleles and a Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS, based on validated food intake data, was estimated. At baseline, there were no interactions between GRS and MDS categories for metabolic traits. Linear mixed model repeated measures analyses showed a significantly greater decrease in total cholesterol in participants with a low GRS after a 6-month period, compared to those with a high GRS. Meanwhile, a high baseline MDS was associated with greater decreases in Body Mass Index (BMI, waist circumference and glucose. There also was a significant interaction between GRS and the MedDiet after the follow-up period. Among subjects with a high GRS, those with a high MDS evidenced a highly significant reduction in total carotenoids, while among those with a low GRS, there was no difference associated with MDS levels. These results suggest that a higher MedDiet adherence induces beneficial effects on metabolic outcomes, which can be affected by the genetic background in some specific markers.

  20. Including pork in the Mediterranean diet for an Australian population: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial assessing cardiovascular risk and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T; Davis, Courtney R; Dyer, Kathryn A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard J; Keage, Hannah A D; Murphy, Karen J

    2017-12-22

    The Mediterranean diet is characterised by the high consumption of extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes and nuts; moderate consumption of fish, poultry, eggs and dairy; and low consumption of red meat and sweets. Cross sectional, longitudinal and intervention studies indicate that a Mediterranean diet may be effective for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and dementia. However, previous research suggests that an Australian population may find red meat restrictions difficult, which could affect long term sustainability of the diet. This paper outlines the protocol for a randomised controlled trial that will assess the cardiovascular and cognitive benefits of a Mediterranean diet modified to include 2-3 weekly serves of fresh, lean pork. A 24-week cross-over design trial will compare a modified Mediterranean diet with a low-fat control diet in at-risk men and women. Participants will follow each of the two diets for 8 weeks, with an 8-week washout period separating interventions. Home measured systolic blood pressure will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes will include body mass index, body composition, fasting blood lipids, C-reactive protein, fasting plasma glucose, fasting serum insulin, erythrocyte fatty acids, cognitive function, psychological health and well-being, and dementia risk. To our knowledge this research is the first to investigate whether an alternate source of protein can be included in the Mediterranean diet to increase sustainability and feasibility for a non-Mediterranean population. Findings will be significant for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and age-related decline, and may inform individuals, clinicians and public health policy. ACTRN12616001046493 . Registered 5 August 2016.

  1. Low maternal adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with increase in methylation at the MEG3-IG differentially methylated region in female infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Nahm, Sarah; Mendez, Michelle; Robinson, Whitney; Murphy, Susan K.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Hogan, Vijaya; Rowley, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Diet is dictated by the surrounding environment, as food access and availability may change depending on where one lives. Maternal diet during pregnancy is an important part of the in utero environment, and may affect the epigenome. Studies looking at overall diet pattern in relation to DNA methylation have been lacking. The Mediterranean diet is known for its health benefits, including decreased inflammation, weight loss, and management of chronic diseases. This study assesses the association between maternal adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern during pregnancy and infant DNA methylation at birth. Mediterranean diet adherence in early pregnancy was measured in 390 women enrolled in the Newborn Epigenetic Study, and DNA methylation was assessed in their infants at birth. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and infant methylation at the MEG3, MEG3-IG, pleiomorphic adenoma gene-like 1, insulin-like growth factor 2 gene, H19, mesoderm-specific transcript, neuronatin, paternally expressed gene 3, sarcoglycan and paternally expressed gene 10 regions, measured by pyrosequencing. Infants of mothers with a low adherence to a Mediterranean diet had a greater odds of hypo-methylation at the MEG3-IG differentially methylated region (DMR). Sex-stratified models showed that this association was present in girls only. This study provides early evidence on the association between overall diet pattern and methylation at the 9 DMRs included in this study, and suggests that maternal diet can have a sex-specific impact on infant DNA methylation at specific imprinted DMRs. PMID:29492309

  2. Greek Orthodox fasting rituals: a hidden characteristic of the Mediterranean diet of Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, Katerina O; Linardakis, Manolis K; Bervanaki, Frosso N; Tzanakis, Nikolaos E; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2004-08-01

    The longevity and excellent health status of the population of Crete has been attributed to its lifestyle and dietary habits. The impact of Greek Orthodox Christian Church fasting on these dietary habits has never been studied. One hundred and twenty Greek Orthodox Christians living in Crete participated in a 1-year prospective study. One half of the subjects, who fasted regularly (fasters), and sixty non-faster controls were followed longitudinally for the three main fasting periods over 1 year; Christmas (40 d), Lent (48 d) and the Assumption (15 d). Pre- and end-holy days measurements were performed in each fasting period including: 24 h dietary recall, blood collection and anthropometric measurements. Based on the 24 h recall, fasters as compared with controls had lower intakes of end-holy days dietary cholesterol, total fat, saturated fatty acids, trans-fatty acids and protein (P < 0.001). Fasters presented a decrease of 753 kJ (180 kcal) in end-holy days energy intake (P < 0.05) compared with an increase of 573 kJ (137 kcal) in the controls (P < 0.05). Fasters had a decrease in end-holy days Ca intake (P < 0.001) and an increase in end-holy days total dietary fibre (P < 0.001) and folate (P < 0.05), attributed to their higher consumption of fruit and vegetables in end-holy periods (P < 0.001). There were no differences for other vitamins or minerals between pre- and end-holy periods in both groups except for vitamin B2. The Orthodox Christian dietary regulations are an important component of the Mediterranean diet of Crete characterised by low levels of dietary saturated fatty acids, high levels of fibre and folate, and a high consumption of fruit, vegetables and legumes.

  3. Virgin olive oil and nuts as key foods of the Mediterranean diet effects on inflammatory biomakers related to atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Casas, Rosa; Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Romero-Mamani, Edwin Saúl; Valderas-Martínez, Palmira; Arranz, Sara; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Llorach, Rafael; Medina-Remón, Alex; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramon

    2012-06-01

    Previous epidemiological and feeding studies have observed that adherence to Mediterranean diet (Med-Diet) is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Since atherosclerosis is nowadays considered a low-grade inflammatory disease, recent studies have explored the anti-inflammatory effects of a Med-Diet intervention on serum and cellular biomarkers related to atherosclerosis. In two sub-studies of the PREDIMED (PREvencion con DIeta MEDiterranea) trial, we analyzed the effects at 3 months of two Med-Diet interventions supplemented with either virgin olive oil (VOO) or nuts compared with a control low-fat diet (LFD). Both Med-Diets showed an anti-inflammatory effect reducing serum C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL6) and endothelial and monocytary adhesion molecules and chemokines (P<0.05; all), whereas these parameters increased after the LFD intervention (P<0.05; all). In another substudy, we evaluated the long-term (1 year) effects of these interventions on vascular risk factors in 516 high-risk subjects, as well as the effect of different Med-Diet components in the reduction of these biomarkers. At 1 year, the Med-Diet groups had significant decreases in the plasma concentrations of IL6, tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 60 and TNFR80 (P<0.05), while intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), TNFR60 and TNFR80 concentrations increased in the LFD group (P<0.002). In addition, those allocated in the highest tertile of VOO and vegetables consumption had a significant diminution of plasma TNFR60 concentration compared with those in tertile 1 (P<0.02). In conclusion, Med-Diet exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on cardiovascular system since it down-regulates cellular and circulating inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of the Mediterranean Diet before and after Weight Loss on Eating Behavioral Traits in Men with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Carbonneau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet consumed before and after weight loss on eating behavioral traits as measured by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ in men with metabolic syndrome (MetS. In this fixed sequence study, 19 men with MetS (National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII criteria, aged between 24 and 62 years, first consumed a five-week standardized North American control diet followed by a five-week MedDiet, both under weight-maintaining controlled-feeding conditions. This was followed by a 20-week caloric restriction weight loss period in free-living conditions, without specific recommendations towards adhering to the principles of the MedDiet. Participants were finally subjected to a final five-week MedDiet phase under isoenergetic controlled-feeding conditions. The MedDiet before weight loss had no impact on eating behavioral traits. Body weight reduction by caloric restriction (−10.2% of initial weight was associated with increased cognitive restraint (p < 0.0001 and with reduced disinhibition (p = 0.02 and susceptibility to hunger (p = 0.01. Feeding the MedDiet for five weeks under isoenergetic conditions after the weight loss phase had no further impact on eating behavioral traits. Results of this controlled-feeding study suggest that consumption of the MedDiet per se has no effect on eating behavioral traits as measured by TFEQ, unless it is combined with significant weight loss.

  5. Effects of the Mediterranean Diet before and after Weight Loss on Eating Behavioral Traits in Men with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Élise; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Richard, Caroline; Couture, Patrick; Desroches, Sophie; Lemieux, Simone; Lamarche, Benoît

    2017-03-19

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consumed before and after weight loss on eating behavioral traits as measured by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) in men with metabolic syndrome (MetS). In this fixed sequence study, 19 men with MetS (National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria), aged between 24 and 62 years, first consumed a five-week standardized North American control diet followed by a five-week MedDiet, both under weight-maintaining controlled-feeding conditions. This was followed by a 20-week caloric restriction weight loss period in free-living conditions, without specific recommendations towards adhering to the principles of the MedDiet. Participants were finally subjected to a final five-week MedDiet phase under isoenergetic controlled-feeding conditions. The MedDiet before weight loss had no impact on eating behavioral traits. Body weight reduction by caloric restriction (-10.2% of initial weight) was associated with increased cognitive restraint ( p < 0.0001) and with reduced disinhibition ( p = 0.02) and susceptibility to hunger ( p = 0.01). Feeding the MedDiet for five weeks under isoenergetic conditions after the weight loss phase had no further impact on eating behavioral traits. Results of this controlled-feeding study suggest that consumption of the MedDiet per se has no effect on eating behavioral traits as measured by TFEQ, unless it is combined with significant weight loss.

  6. Chicory, a typical vegetable in Mediterranean diet, exerts a therapeutic role in established atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiqun; Liu, Chaoqun; Yang, Hai; Wang, Wenting; Ling, Wenhua; Wang, Dongliang

    2015-09-01

    Since protocatechuic acid exerts an atheroprotective role, we investigated how chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var. foliosum, Belgian endive) rich in protocatechuic acid, a typical vegetable in Mediterranean diet, affects preestablished atherosclerosis progression. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed AIN diets containing 0.5% freeze-dried chicory for 10 weeks displayed a reduction in lesion size with a concomitant improvement in lesion stability indicated by fewer macrophages and more collagen content. Chicory consumption suppressed aortic cholesterol accumulation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression, whereas it increased aortic ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1) expression. Furthermore, chicory consumption improved peritoneal macrophage phenotype with less cellular cholesterol associated with an enhancement of cholesterol efflux capacity through upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1, less cellular oxidative stress associated with an inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity, and weaker inflammatory responses associated with an inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation. Interestingly, ABCA1 and ABCG1 silencing tended to completely block beneficial effects of chicory in peritoneal macrophages. Chicory exerts an atheroprotective role in mice possibly by regulating lesional macrophage content and phenotype, suggesting that chicory is one underrated contributor to Mediterranean Diet-induced atheroprotection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Factors associated with colorectal cancer in the context of the Mediterranean diet: a case-control study.

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    Grosso, Giuseppe; Biondi, Antonio; Galvano, Fabio; Mistretta, Antonio; Marventano, Stefano; Buscemi, Silvio; Drago, Filippo; Basile, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that increased adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) may prevent colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between health-related characteristics and CRC in the context of the MD. This was a case-control study conducted on a sample of 338 consecutive patients with a first diagnosis of CRC recruited in an urban facility in the city of Catania, southern Italy, and matched with 676 apparently healthy subjects without clinical symptoms or signs of any type of cancer. Data regarding sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle characteristics were collected, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern was assessed using the MedDietScore. A significant association between a greater adherence to the MD and lower odds of having cancer (odds ratio = 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.28-0.75) was found. Also, smoking status, family history of CRC, obesity, diabetes, physical activity, and high intake of alcohol were significantly associated with CRC, but only among subjects less adherent to the MD. MD was associated with a less detrimental effects of several health-related characteristics associated with CRC, suggesting potential benefits of adherence to this dietary pattern with regards to CRC risk factors.

  8. A nutritional intervention programme at a worksite canteen to promote a healthful lifestyle inspired by the traditional Mediterranean diet.

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    Vitale, Marilena; Bianchi, Marta A; Rapetti, Valeria; Pepe, Josè M; Giacco, Angela; Giacco, Rosalba; Riccardi, Gabriele

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness and long-term impact on the composition of the habitual diet of a nutritional intervention programme - undertaken through panels, totems, and table mats or handout leaflets - based on the promotion at a worksite canteen of healthy food-choices resembling the traditional Mediterranean diet. A significantly higher choice of dishes based on wholegrain cereals, legumes, white meat and fish, and a lower choice of dishes based on refined cereals, red and processed meat, eggs and cheese was observed at the end of the intervention and after six months and three years of follow-ups. A significantly better adherence to the nutritional recommendations for saturated-fat, cholesterol, sugars and fibre was observed. This study reveals that a nutritional intervention programme promoting the traditional Mediterranean diet and utilising a minimally intensive approach is feasible and effective to modify in a beneficial way the dietary habits of a working population and keep these changes in the long-term.

  9. Short-term effects of Mediterranean-type diet intervention on soluble cellular adhesion molecules in subjects with abdominal obesity.

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    Rallidis, Loukianos S; Kolomvotsou, Anastasia; Lekakis, John; Farajian, Paul; Vamvakou, Georgia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Zolindaki, Maria; Efstathiou, Stamatis; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Zampelas, Antonis

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal obesity (AO) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and with increased production of adhesion molecules. The present work examined the effect of a Mediterranean-style diet on soluble cellular adhesion molecules in individuals with AO. Ninety subjects with AO without cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus were randomly allocated to the intervention or control group and were instructed to follow a Mediterranean-style diet for two months. Intervention group followed a specific relevant food plan with close dietetic supervision and provision of basic foods. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), sP and sE-selectin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Subjects in the intervention group increased their intake of total fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and alcohol compared to controls, while decreased their intake of saturated fat. Although there was a significant decrease in CRP, sP-selectin and in sE-selectin in the intervention group, and an increase in sVCAM-1 in the control group, between-group analysis showed no statistically significant differences. There were also no significant changes in sICAM-1, and IL-6 levels after intervention. Mediterranean-type diet for two months combined with close dietetic supervision showed a beneficial tendency towards the down-regulation of some markers of vascular inflammation, although the comparison between groups after the intervention did not reach statistical significance. A longer period of dietary intervention may be required to further support these changes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire focused on the Mediterranean diet for the Quebec population.

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    Cantin, J; Latour, E; Ferland-Verry, R; Morales Salgado, S; Lambert, J; Faraj, M; Nigam, A

    2016-02-01

    Validated dietary assessment methods specific to population and food habits are needed to conduct randomized clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the reproducibility and the relative validity of a French language semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) focused on the Mediterranean diet within the population of Quebec. Fifty-three participants aged 19-86 years with and without coronary heart disease were recruited, and randomized in 3 groups in a crossover design where the sequence of administration of two FFQs and a dietary record (DR) differed in each group. The FFQ includes 157 food items and was designed to measure food intake over one month. It was administered twice 3-5 weeks apart to assess reproducibility and was compared to a 12-day DR to assess validity. For reproducibility (n = 47), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for energy and 33 nutrients ranged from 0.38 to 0.91 (mean 0.63). For validity, the Pearson's correlation coefficients between the DR and the FFQ pre-DR ranged from 0.26 to 0.84 (mean 0.55) and ICCs ranged from 0.25 to 0.84 (mean 0.54). As for the DR and the FFQ post-DR, the Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.36 to 0.83 (mean 0.55) and the ICCs ranged from 0.36 to 0.83 (mean 0.53). This FFQ demonstrates good reproducibility and validity for most key nutrients of the Mediterranean diet for the Quebec population. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Comparison of Alkaline Water and Mediterranean Diet vs Proton Pump Inhibition for Treatment of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

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    Zalvan, Craig H; Hu, Shirley; Greenberg, Barbara; Geliebter, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a common disorder with protean manifestations in the head and neck. In this retrospective study, we report the efficacy of a wholly dietary approach using alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions compared with that of the traditional treatment approach of proton pump inhibition (PPI) and standard reflux precautions. To determine whether treatment with a diet-based approach with standard reflux precautions alone can improve symptoms of LPR compared with treatment with PPI and standard reflux precautions. This was a retrospective medical chart review of 2 treatment cohorts. From 2010 to 2012, 85 patients with LPR that were treated with PPI and standard reflux precautions (PS) were identified. From 2013 to 2015, 99 patients treated with alkaline water (pH >8.0), 90% plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions (AMS) were identified. The outcome was based on change in Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Recorded change in the RSI after 6 weeks of treatment. Of the 184 patients identified in the PS and AMS cohorts, the median age of participants in each cohort was 60 years (95% CI, 18-82) and 57 years (95% CI, 18-93), respectively (47 [56.3%] and 61 [61.7%] were women, respectively). The percentage of patients achieving a clinically meaningful (≥6 points) reduction in RSI was 54.1% in PS-treated patients and 62.6% in AMS-treated patients (difference between the groups, 8.05; 95% CI, -5.74 to 22.76). The mean reduction in RSI was 27.2% for the PS group and 39.8% in the AMS group (difference, 12.10; 95% CI, 1.53 to 22.68). Our data suggest that the effect of PPI on the RSI based on proportion reaching a 6-point reduction in RSI is not significantly better than that of alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions, although the difference in the 2 treatments could be clinically meaningful in favor of the dietary approach. The

  12. Advances in Integrating Traditional and Omic Biomarkers When Analyzing the Effects of the Mediterranean Diet Intervention in Cardiovascular Prevention

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    Fitó, Montserrat; Melander, Olle; Martínez, José Alfredo; Toledo, Estefanía; Carpéné, Christian; Corella, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Intervention with Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has provided a high level of evidence in primary prevention of cardiovascular events. Besides enhancing protection from classical risk factors, an improvement has also been described in a number of non-classical ones. Benefits have been reported on biomarkers of oxidation, inflammation, cellular adhesion, adipokine production, and pro-thrombotic state. Although the benefits of the MedDiet have been attributed to its richness in antioxidants, the mechanisms by which it exercises its beneficial effects are not well known. It is thought that the integration of omics including genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, and metabolomics, into studies analyzing nutrition and cardiovascular diseases will provide new clues regarding these mechanisms. However, omics integration is still in its infancy. Currently, some single-omics analyses have provided valuable data, mostly in the field of genomics. Thus, several gene-diet interactions in determining both intermediate (plasma lipids, etc.) and final cardiovascular phenotypes (stroke, myocardial infarction, etc.) have been reported. However, few studies have analyzed changes in gene expression and, moreover very few have focused on epigenomic or metabolomic biomarkers related to the MedDiet. Nevertheless, these preliminary results can help to better understand the inter-individual differences in cardiovascular risk and dietary response for further applications in personalized nutrition. PMID:27598147

  13. Vascular effects of the Mediterranean diet-part II: role of omega-3 fatty acids and olive oil polyphenols.

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    Scoditti, Egeria; Capurso, Cristiano; Capurso, Antonio; Massaro, Marika

    2014-12-01

    The lower occurrence of cardiovascular disease and cancer in populations around the Mediterranean basin as detected in the 1950s was correctly attributed to the peculiar dietary habits of those populations. Essentially, until the mid-20th century, typical Mediterranean diets were rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole-wheat bread, nuts, fish, and, as a common culinary trait, the routine use of extra-virgin olive oil. Nowadays, the regular adoption of such dietary patterns is still thought to result in healthful benefits. Such patterns ensure the assumption of molecules with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, among which ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), ω-9 monounsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), and phenolic compounds. The aim of this review is to provide an update of the vasculo-protective pathways mediated by ω-3 PUFAs and polyphenols in the context of the modern Mediterranean dietary habits, including the possible cross-talk and synergy between these typical components. This review complements a parallel one focusing on the role of dietary nitrates and alimentary fats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and effects on cognition in adults: A qualitative evaluation of the systematic review of longitudinal and prospective trials

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    Roy J Hardman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet involves substantial intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish, and a lower consumption of dairy, red meat, and sugars. Over the past 15 years much empirical evidence supports the suggestion that a MedDiet may be beneficial with respect to reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. A number of cross-sectional studies that have examined the impact of MedDiet on cognition have yielded largely positive results. The objective of this review is to evaluate longitudinal and prospective trials to gain an understanding of how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. The included studies were aimed at improving cognition or minimizing of cognitive decline. Studies reviewed included assessments of dietary status using either a food frequency questionnaire or a food diary assessment. Eighteen articles meeting our inclusion criteria were subjected to systematic review. These revealed that higher adherence to a MedDiet is associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, reduced conversion to Alzheimer’s disease (AD and improvements in cognitive function. The specific cognitive domains that were found to benefit with improved Mediterranean Diet Score (MedDietS were memory (delayed recognition, long-term and working memory executive function, and visual constructs. The current review has also considered a number of methodological issues in making recommendations for future research. The utilisation of a dietary pattern such as the Mediterranean style diet will be essential as part of the armamentarium to maintain quality of life and reduce the potential social and economic burden of dementia. Key Words: Nutrition, cognition, Mediterranean diet, clinical trials

  15. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and risk of incident cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne; Letter, Abraham J.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Howard, George; Nahab, Fadi; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Moy, Claudia; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett; Wadley, Virginia G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the relationship of greater adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeD) and likelihood of incident cognitive impairment (ICI) and evaluate the interaction of race and vascular risk factors. Methods: A prospective, population-based, cohort of individuals enrolled in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study 2003–2007, excluding participants with history of stroke, impaired cognitive status at baseline, and missing data on Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ), was evaluated. Adherence to a MeD (scored as 0–9) was computed from FFQ. Cognitive status was evaluated at baseline and annually during a mean follow-up period of 4.0 ± 1.5 years using Six-item-Screener. Results: ICI was identified in 1,248 (7%) out of 17,478 individuals fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Higher adherence to MeD was associated with lower likelihood of ICI before (odds ratio [lsqb]OR[rsqb] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [lsqb]CI[rsqb] 0.79–1.00) and after adjustment for potential confounders (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76–1.00) including demographic characteristics, environmental factors, vascular risk factors, depressive symptoms, and self-reported health status. There was no interaction between race (p = 0.2928) and association of adherence to MeD with cognitive status. However, we identified a strong interaction of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.0134) on the relationship of adherence to MeD with ICI; high adherence to MeD was associated with a lower likelihood of ICI in nondiabetic participants (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.70–0.94; p = 0.0066) but not in diabetic individuals (OR 1.27; 95% CI 0.95–1.71; p = 0.1063). Conclusions: Higher adherence to MeD was associated with a lower likelihood of ICI independent of potential confounders. This association was moderated by presence of diabetes mellitus. PMID:23628929

  16. Effects of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (ω-3 Supplementation on Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors with a Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet

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    Antonio Paoli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: the ketogenic diet (KD has become a widely used nutritional approach for weight loss. Some of the KD’s positive effects on metabolism and cardiovascular risk factors are similar to those seen after n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 supplementation. We hypothesized that a ketogenic Mediterranean diet with phytoextracts combined with ω-3 supplementation may have increased positive effects on cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation. Methods: We analyzed 34 male overweight subjects; aged between 25 and 65 years who were overall healthy apart from overweight. The subjects followed a ketogenic diet protocol for four weeks; with (KDO3 or without (KD ω-3 supplementation. Results: All subjects experienced a significant loss of body weight and body fat and there was no significant differences between treatment (body weight: KD—4.7 kg, KDO3—4.03 kg, body fat KD—5.41 kg, KDO3—5.86 kg. There were also significant decreases in total cholesterol, LDL-c, and glucose levels. Triglycerides and insulin levels decreased more in KDO3 vs. KD subjects, with a significant difference. All the investigated inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α decreased significantly in KDO3 subjects whilst only TNF-α showed a significant decrease in KD subjects over the 12 month study period. No significant changes were observed in anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1Ra, creatinine, urea and uric acid. Adiponectin increased significantly only in the KDO3 group. Conclusions: ω-3 supplementation improved the positive effects of a ketogenic Mediterranean diet with phytoextracts on some cardiovascular/metabolic risk factors and inflammatory state.

  17. Breakfast intake is associated with nutritional status, Mediterranean diet adherence, serum iron and fasting glucose: the CYFamilies study.

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    Lazarou, Chrystalleni; Matalas, Antonia-Leda

    2015-05-01

    To assess the association of breakfast intake with Mediterranean diet adherence, physical activity levels, obesity, selected cardiovascular risk markers and Fe status. Cross-sectional study. BMI, body fat percentage and waist circumference were assessed. Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer and diet quality was evaluated by applying the KIDMED index. Blood tests to assess blood lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, serum Fe and ferritin, as well as Hb, were performed. Primary-school children of the Troodos mountainous area in Cyprus. Eighty-three Cypriot children (mean age 9·2 (sd 1·7) years). Compared with breakfast skippers, regular breakfast eaters were 40 % more likely to have a KIDMED score higher by one point on average (OR=1·41; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·84) after accounting for obesity levels and other confounders. Breakfast skippers, on the other hand, were by about 14 % more likely to have a body fat percentage value higher by one unit, as well as higher values for both BMI and waist circumference. The relationship was significantly strengthened when combining body fat percentage and waist circumference into a composite variable (OR=0·20; 95 % CI 0·06, 0·69). Fasting glucose was inversely correlated to breakfast intake in descriptive analyses, whereas serum Fe was positively correlated to breakfast intake after considering age, gender and diet quality. The latter relationship disappeared, however, after considering physical activity levels. Cypriot children who take breakfast regularly exhibit a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet and have higher serum Fe concentrations and lower BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage and fasting glucose levels, compared with children who skip breakfast. Public health professionals, educators and parents should prioritize on actions that will motivate children to regularly eat breakfast.

  18. The Mediterranean diet improves hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

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    Ryan, Marno C; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Thodis, Tania; Ward, Glenn; Trost, Nicholas; Hofferberth, Sophie; O'Dea, Kerin; Desmond, Paul V; Johnson, Nathan A; Wilson, Andrew M

    2013-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to 30% of the population and signifies increased risk of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Therapies are limited. Weight loss is of benefit but is difficult to maintain. We aimed at examining the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD), a diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids, on steatosis and insulin sensitivity, using gold standard techniques. Twelve non-diabetic subjects (6 Females/6 Males) with biopsy-proven NAFLD were recruited for a randomised, cross-over 6-week dietary intervention study. All subjects undertook both the MD and a control diet, a low fat-high carbohydrate diet (LF/HCD), in random order with a 6-week wash-out period in- between. Insulin sensitivity was determined with a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and hepatic steatosis was assessed with localized magnetic resonance (1)H spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). At baseline, subjects were abdominally obese with elevated fasting concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, ALT, and GGT. Insulin sensitivity at baseline was low (M=2.7 ± 1.0 mg/kg/min(-1)). Mean weight loss was not different between the two diets (p=0.22). There was a significant relative reduction in hepatic steatosis after the MD compared with the LF/HCD: 39 ± 4% versus 7 ± 3%, as measured by (1)H-MRS (p=0.012). Insulin sensitivity improved with the MD, whereas after the LF/HCD there was no change (p=0.03 between diets). Even without weight loss, MD reduces liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in an insulin-resistant population with NAFLD, compared to current dietary advice. This diet should be further investigated in subjects with NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with methylation changes in inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpón, A; Riezu-Boj, J I; Milagro, F I; Marti, A; Razquin, C; Martínez-González, M A; Corella, D; Estruch, R; Casas, R; Fitó, M; Ros, E; Salas-Salvadó, J; Martínez, J A

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, might be modulated by environmental factors such as the diet, which in turn have been associated with the onset of several diseases such as obesity or cardiovascular events. Meanwhile, Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has demonstrated favourable effects on cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, inflammation and other complications related to excessive adiposity. Some of these effects could be mediated by epigenetic modifications. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether the adherence to MedDiet is associated with changes in the methylation status from peripheral blood cells. A subset of 36 individuals was selected within the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED)-Navarra study, a randomised, controlled, parallel trial with three groups of intervention in high cardiovascular risk volunteers, two with a MedDiet and one low-fat control group. Changes in methylation between baseline and 5 years were studied. DNA methylation arrays were analysed by several robust statistical tests and functional classifications. Eight genes related to inflammation and immunocompetence (EEF2, COL18A1, IL4I1, LEPR, PLAGL1, IFRD1, MAPKAPK2, PPARGC1B) were finally selected as changes in their methylation levels correlated with adherence to MedDiet and because they presented sensitivity related to a high variability in methylation changes. Additionally, EEF2 methylation levels positively correlated with concentrations of TNF-α and CRP. This report is apparently the first showing that adherence to MedDiet is associated with the methylation of the reported genes related to inflammation with a potential regulatory impact.

  20. Plasma Metabolites From Choline Pathway and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the PREDIMED (Prevention With Mediterranean Diet) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Hu, Frank B; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bulló, Mònica; Toledo, Estefanía; Wang, Dong D; Corella, Dolores; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Estruch, Ramon; Lapetra, José; Fitó, Montserrat; Arós, Fernando; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Ros, Emilio; Dennis, Courtney; Liang, Liming; Clish, Clary B; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2017-10-28

    The relationship between plasma concentrations of betaine and choline metabolism and major cardiovascular disease (CVD) end points remains unclear. We have evaluated the association between metabolites from the choline pathway and risk of incident CVD and the potential modifying effect of Mediterranean diet interventions. We designed a case-cohort study nested within the PREDIMED (Prevention With Mediterranean Diet) trial, including 229 incident CVD cases and 751 randomly selected participants at baseline, followed up for 4.8 years. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure, at baseline and at 1 year of follow-up, plasma concentrations of 5 metabolites in the choline pathway: trimethylamine N-oxide, betaine, choline, phosphocholine, and α-glycerophosphocholine. We have calculated a choline metabolite score using a weighted sum of these 5 metabolites. We used weighted Cox regression models to estimate CVD risk. The multivariable hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) per 1-SD increase in choline and α-glycerophosphocholine metabolites were 1.24 (1.05-1.46) and 1.24 (1.03-1.50), respectively. The baseline betaine/choline ratio was inversely associated with CVD. The baseline choline metabolite score was associated with a 2.21-fold higher risk of CVD across extreme quartiles (95% confidence interval, 1.36-3.59; P <0.001 for trend) and a 2.27-fold higher risk of stroke (95% confidence interval, 1.24-4.16; P <0.001 for trend). Participants in the higher quartiles of the score who were randomly assigned to the control group had a higher risk of CVD compared with participants in the lower quartile and assigned to the Mediterranean diet groups ( P =0.05 for interaction). No significant associations were observed for 1-year changes in individual plasma metabolites and CVD. A metabolite score combining plasma metabolites from the choline pathway was associated with an increased risk of CVD in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk

  1. Contributions of allochthonous inputs of food to the diets of benthopelagic fish over the northwest Mediterranean slope (to 2300 m)

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    Cartes, Joan E.; Soler-Membrives, A.; Stefanescu, C.; Lombarte, A.; Carrassón, M.

    2016-03-01

    The contributions of allochthonous inputs of food (food falls, plastics and other anthropogenic remains) in the diets of large fish (6 teleosteans, 3 sharks) were analyzed for depths between 500 and 2300 m in the deep Balearic basin (western Mediterranean). The analyses were based on gut contents. The identification was based on a multi-analytic approach, comprising morphological features (including morphometric analysis) and molecular genetics (DNA barcoding method). Remains of a number of anthropogenic, inorganic materials (microplastic fibres, plastic bags and cartons) appeared regularly in the guts of deep-sea fish (e.g., in Trachyrhynchus scabrus and Mora moro), though always at low occurrence (9.1% of fish at most) and negligible weights (beef flesh, goat ribs and vertebrae) was shown by molecular analyses to contributed to deep-sea shark diets (ca. 5.5%W) comparably to natural food falls. These remains, which originate from human activity, may locally alter the food webs of oligotrophic environments like that of the deep Mediterranean. Food falls of both natural and anthropogenic origin were mainly found in fish collected close to canyon axes. The only cetacean fall documented in the deep Balearic Basin was also near a canyon, the carcass of a small (ca. 1.2 m) striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, collected in a haul at 1750 m off Barcelona.

  2. Alternate Mediterranean diet score is positively associated with skeletal muscle mass index in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui-Yuan; Qiu, Rui; Jing, Li-Peng; Chen, Zhan-Yong; Chen, Geng-Dong; Chen, Yu-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Researches have suggested Mediterranean diet might lower the risk of chronic diseases, but data on skeletal muscle mass (SMM) are limited. This community-based cross-sectional study examined the association between the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMDS) and SMM in 2230 females and 1059 males aged 40-75 years in Guangzhou, China. General information and habitual dietary information were assessed in face-to-face interviews conducted during 2008-2010 and 3 years later. The aMDS was calculated by summing the dichotomous points for the items of higher intakes of whole grain, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, fish and ratio of MUFA:SFA, lower red meat and moderate ethanol consumption. The SMM of the whole body, limbs, arms and legs were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry during 2011-2013. After adjusting for potential covariates, higher aMDS was positively associated with skeletal muscle mass index (SMI, SMM/height2, kg/m2) at all of the studied sites in males (all P trend0·05). Age-stratified analyses showed that the favourable associations tended to be more pronounced in the younger subjects aged less than the medians of 59·2 and 62·2 years in females and males (P interaction>0·10). In conclusion, the aMDS shows protective associations with SMM in Chinese adults, particularly in male and younger subjects.

  3. 100% Orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006

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    O’Neil Carol E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% OJ consumption with nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS in a nationally representative sample of adults. Methods Data from adults 19+ years of age (n = 8,861 participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 were used. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake (UI of 100% OJ consumption, selected nutrients, and food groups. Percentages of the population below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR or above the Adequate Intake (AI were determined. Diet quality was measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005. Covariate adjusted logistic regression was used to determine if consumers had a lower odds ratio of being overweight or obese or having risk factors of MetS or MetS. Results Usual per capita intake of 100% OJ was 50.3 ml/d. Among consumers (n = 2,310; 23.8%, UI was 210.0 ml/d. Compared to non-consumers, consumers had a higher (p  Conclusion The results suggest that moderate consumption of 100% OJ should be encouraged to help individuals meet the USDA daily recommendation for fruit intake and as a component of a healthy diet.

  4. Long-Term Effect of Mediterranean-Style Diet and Calorie Restriction on Biomarkers of Longevity and Oxidative Stress in Overweight Men

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    Katherine Esposito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the effects of a Mediterranean-style diet, with or without calorie restriction, on biomarkers of aging and oxidative stress in overweight men. 192 men were randomly assigned to either a Mediterranean-style diet or a conventional diet. The intervention program was based on implementation of a Mediterranean dietary pattern in the overweight group (MED diet group, associated with calorie restriction and increased physical activity in the obese group (lifestyle group. Both groups were compared with participants in two matched control groups (advice groups. After 2 years, there was a significant difference in weight loss between groups, which was −14 kg (95% CI −20 to −8 in lifestyle groups and −2.0 kg (−4.4 to 0 in the advice groups, with a difference of −11.9 kg (CI −19 to −4.7 kg, <.001; moreover, there was a significant difference between groups at 2 years for insulin (=.04, 8-iso-PGF2α (=.037, glucose (=.04, and adiponectin (=.01. Prolonged adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet, with or without caloric restriction, in overweight or obese men is associated with significant amelioration of multiple risk factors, including a better cardiovascular risk profile, reduced oxidative stress, and improved insulin sensitivity.

  5. A 14-item Mediterranean diet assessment tool and obesity indexes among high-risk subjects: the PREDIMED trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Martínez-González

    Full Text Available Independently of total caloric intake, a better quality of the diet (for example, conformity to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower obesity risk. It is unclear whether a brief dietary assessment tool, instead of full-length comprehensive methods, can also capture this association. In addition to reduced costs, a brief tool has the interesting advantage of allowing immediate feedback to participants in interventional studies. Another relevant question is which individual items of such a brief tool are responsible for this association. We examined these associations using a 14-item tool of adherence to the Mediterranean diet as exposure and body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR as outcomes.Cross-sectional assessment of all participants in the "PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea" (PREDIMED trial.7,447 participants (55-80 years, 57% women free of cardiovascular disease, but with either type 2 diabetes or ≥ 3 cardiovascular risk factors. Trained dietitians used both a validated 14-item questionnaire and a full-length validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary habits. Trained nurses measured weight, height and waist circumference.Strong inverse linear associations between the 14-item tool and all adiposity indexes were found. For a two-point increment in the 14-item score, the multivariable-adjusted differences in WHtR were -0.0066 (95% confidence interval, -0.0088 to -0.0049 for women and -0.0059 (-0.0079 to -0.0038 for men. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for a WHtR>0.6 in participants scoring ≥ 10 points versus ≤ 7 points was 0.68 (0.57 to 0.80 for women and 0.66 (0.54 to 0.80 for men. High consumption of nuts and low consumption of sweetened/carbonated beverages presented the strongest inverse associations with abdominal obesity.A brief 14-item tool was able to capture a strong monotonic inverse association between adherence to a good quality dietary pattern

  6. A 14-item Mediterranean diet assessment tool and obesity indexes among high-risk subjects: the PREDIMED trial.

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    Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Corella, Dolores; Covas, Maria Isabel; Schröder, Helmut; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Lapetra, José; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa Maria; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Wärnberg, Julia; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Independently of total caloric intake, a better quality of the diet (for example, conformity to the Mediterranean diet) is associated with lower obesity risk. It is unclear whether a brief dietary assessment tool, instead of full-length comprehensive methods, can also capture this association. In addition to reduced costs, a brief tool has the interesting advantage of allowing immediate feedback to participants in interventional studies. Another relevant question is which individual items of such a brief tool are responsible for this association. We examined these associations using a 14-item tool of adherence to the Mediterranean diet as exposure and body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) as outcomes. Cross-sectional assessment of all participants in the "PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea" (PREDIMED) trial. 7,447 participants (55-80 years, 57% women) free of cardiovascular disease, but with either type 2 diabetes or ≥ 3 cardiovascular risk factors. Trained dietitians used both a validated 14-item questionnaire and a full-length validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary habits. Trained nurses measured weight, height and waist circumference. Strong inverse linear associations between the 14-item tool and all adiposity indexes were found. For a two-point increment in the 14-item score, the multivariable-adjusted differences in WHtR were -0.0066 (95% confidence interval, -0.0088 to -0.0049) for women and -0.0059 (-0.0079 to -0.0038) for men. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for a WHtR>0.6 in participants scoring ≥ 10 points versus ≤ 7 points was 0.68 (0.57 to 0.80) for women and 0.66 (0.54 to 0.80) for men. High consumption of nuts and low consumption of sweetened/carbonated beverages presented the strongest inverse associations with abdominal obesity. A brief 14-item tool was able to capture a strong monotonic inverse association between adherence to a good quality dietary pattern (Mediterranean diet

  7. A 14-Item Mediterranean Diet Assessment Tool and Obesity Indexes among High-Risk Subjects: The PREDIMED Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Corella, Dolores; Covas, Maria Isabel; Schröder, Helmut; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Lapetra, José; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa Maria; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Wärnberg, Julia; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Objective Independently of total caloric intake, a better quality of the diet (for example, conformity to the Mediterranean diet) is associated with lower obesity risk. It is unclear whether a brief dietary assessment tool, instead of full-length comprehensive methods, can also capture this association. In addition to reduced costs, a brief tool has the interesting advantage of allowing immediate feedback to participants in interventional studies. Another relevant question is which individual items of such a brief tool are responsible for this association. We examined these associations using a 14-item tool of adherence to the Mediterranean diet as exposure and body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) as outcomes. Design Cross-sectional assessment of all participants in the “PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea” (PREDIMED) trial. Subjects 7,447 participants (55–80 years, 57% women) free of cardiovascular disease, but with either type 2 diabetes or ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors. Trained dietitians used both a validated 14-item questionnaire and a full-length validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary habits. Trained nurses measured weight, height and waist circumference. Results Strong inverse linear associations between the 14-item tool and all adiposity indexes were found. For a two-point increment in the 14-item score, the multivariable-adjusted differences in WHtR were −0.0066 (95% confidence interval, –0.0088 to −0.0049) for women and –0.0059 (–0.0079 to –0.0038) for men. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for a WHtR>0.6 in participants scoring ≥10 points versus ≤7 points was 0.68 (0.57 to 0.80) for women and 0.66 (0.54 to 0.80) for men. High consumption of nuts and low consumption of sweetened/carbonated beverages presented the strongest inverse associations with abdominal obesity. Conclusions A brief 14-item tool was able to capture a strong monotonic inverse association between

  8. Age-Associated Decline in Dendritic Cell Function and the Impact of Mediterranean Diet Intervention in Elderly Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clements

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAging is accompanied by increased susceptibility to infection and age-associated chronic diseases. It is also associated with reduced vaccine responses, which is often attributed to immunosenescence and the functional decline of the immune system. Immunosenescence is characterized by a chronic, low-grade, inflammatory state termed inflammaging. Habitants of Mediterranean (MED regions maintain good health into old age; often attributed to MED diets.HypothesisAdoption of a MED-diet by elderly subjects, in Norfolk (UK, may improve immune responses of these individuals and in particular, dendritic cell (DC function.Experimental approachA total of 120 elderly subjects (65–79 years old recruited onto the Nu-AGE study, a multicenter European dietary study specifically addressing the needs of the elderly, across five countries, and were randomized to the control or MED-diet groups, for one year. Blood samples were taken pre- and post-intervention for DC analysis and were compared with each other, and to samples obtained from 45 young (18–40 years old subjects. MED-diet compliance was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography-with tandem mass spectrometry analysis of urine samples. Immune cell and DC subset numbers and concentrations of secreted proteins were determined by flow cytometric analysis.ResultsAs expected, reduced myeloid DC numbers were observed in blood samples from elderly subjects compared with young. The elevated secretion of the adipokine, resistin, after ex vivo stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from elderly subjects, was significantly reduced after MED-diet intervention.ConclusionThis study provides further evidence of numerical and functional effects of aging on DCs. The MED-diet showed potential to impact on the aging immune cells investigated and could provide an economical approach to address problems associated with our aging population.

  9. Effects on Health Outcomes of a Mediterranean Diet With No Restriction on Fat Intake: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

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    Bloomfield, Hanna E; Koeller, Eva; Greer, Nancy; MacDonald, Roderick; Kane, Robert; Wilt, Timothy J

    2016-10-04

    Mediterranean diets may be healthier than typical Western diets. To summarize the literature comparing a Mediterranean diet with unrestricted fat intake with other diets regarding their effects on health outcomes in adults. Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1990 through April 2016. Controlled trials of 100 or more persons followed for at least 1 year for mortality, cardiovascular, hypertension, diabetes, and adherence outcomes, as well as cohort studies for cancer outcomes. Data extracted by 1 investigator was verified by another. Two reviewers assessed risk of bias and strength of evidence. Two primary prevention trials found no difference in all-cause mortality between diet groups. One large primary prevention trial found that a Mediterranean diet resulted in a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [HR], 0.71 [95% CI, 0.56 to 0.90]), breast cancer (HR, 0.43 [CI, 0.21 to 0.88]), and diabetes (HR, 0.70 [CI, 0.54 to 0.92]). Pooled analyses of primary prevention cohort studies showed that compared with the lowest quantile, the highest quantile of adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduction in total cancer mortality (risk ratio [RR], 0.86 [CI, 0.82 to 0.91]; 13 studies) and in the incidence of total (RR, 0.96 [CI, 0.95 to 0.97]; 3 studies) and colorectal (RR, 0.91 [CI, 0.84 to 0.98; 9 studies]) cancer. Of 3 secondary prevention studies reporting cardiovascular outcomes, 1 found a lower risk for recurrent myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death with the Mediterranean diet. There was inconsistent, minimal, or no evidence pertaining to any other outcome, including adherence, hypertension, cognitive function, kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and quality of life. Few trials; medium risk-of-bias ratings for many studies; low or insufficient strength of evidence for outcomes; heterogeneous diet definitions and components. Limited evidence suggests that a Mediterranean diet with no restriction on fat

  10. Role of Mediterranean diet, tropical vegetables rich in antioxidants, and sunlight exposure in blindness, cataract and glaucoma among African type 2 diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moïse, Mvitu Muaka; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza; Doris, Tulomba Mona; Dalida, Kibokela Ndembe; Augustin, Nge Okwe

    2012-01-01

    AIM To assess whether regular Mediterranean diet and regular intake of vegetables may reduce the risk of blindness, cataract, and glaucoma in these type 2 diabetics. METHODS A cross-sectional design was carried out among known black diabetics admitted at the diabetic clinics of Kinshasa, between October 2008 and March 2009. The Mediterranean-style dietary score (MSDPS) was used to characterize a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in the study population using the Harvard semi quantitative FFQ adapted for Africa. RESULTS Five hundred Type 2 diabetic patients were included in this study (48% of males; 40% aged ≥60 years). There was a significant association between blindness, cataract and aging; between blindness (P<0.05), cataract (P<0.05), glaucoma (P<0.05), and physical inactivity; between blindness (P<0.05), cataract (P<0.0001), glaucoma (P<0.01) and high SES, and a very significant association between blindness (P<0.0001), cataract (P<0.0001), glaucoma (P<0.0001) and exposure to sunlight. There was also a significant association between blindness, glaucoma, and male sex. Regular intake of Mediterranean diet, Brassica Rapa, beans, Abelmoschus, Musa acuminata reduced significantly the risk of blindness, cataract and glaucoma. CONCLUSION Regular intake of Mediterranean diet, Brassica Rapa, beans, Abelmoschus, and Musa acuminata may significantly reduce the risk of blindness or its major causes among type 2 diabetes mellitus in Africa. PMID:22762057

  11. Polyphenol intake from a Mediterranean diet decreases inflammatory biomarkers related to atherosclerosis: a substudy of the PREDIMED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Remón, Alexander; Casas, Rosa; Tressserra-Rimbau, Anna; Ros, Emilio; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Fitó, Montserrat; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    High dietary polyphenol intake is associated with reduced all-cause mortality and a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. However, the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The aim of the present substudy of the PREvención con DIetaMEDiterránea (Prevention with Mediterranean diet; PREDIMED) trial was to analyse the relationship between polyphenol intake measured by total urinary polyphenol excretion (TPE), and circulating inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly individuals. A substudy of 1139 high-risk participants was carried out within the PREDIMED trial. The subjects were randomly assigned to a low-fat control diet or to two Mediterranean diets, supplemented with either extra-virgin olive oil or nuts. Dietary intake, anthropometric data, clinical and laboratory assessments, including inflammatory biomarkers, and urinary TPE were measured at baseline and after the one-year intervention. Participants in the highest tertile of changes in urinary TPE (T3) showed significantly lower plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers [vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) (-9.47 ng ml -1 ), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (-14.71 ng ml -1 ), interleukin 6 (-1.21 pg ml -1 ), tumour necrosis factor alpha (-7.05 pg ml -1 ) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (-3.36 pg ml -1 )] than those inthe lowest tertile (T1, P polyphenol intake measured as urinary TPE are associated with decreased inflammatory biomarkers, suggesting a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect of polyphenols. In addition, high polyphenol intake improves cardiovascular risk factors- mainly BP and the lipid profile. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Effects of 1-year intervention with a Mediterranean diet on plasma fatty acid composition and metabolic syndrome in a population at high cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Mayneris-Perxachs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS has become an important public concern due to its increasing prevalence. An altered fatty acid composition has been associated with MetS, but the Mediterranean diet has been shown to have a protective effect. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of a Mediterranean dietary pattern, as assessed by the biomarkers of food supplied, on the plasma fatty acid composition and its relation with MetS after 1 year of intervention. METHODS: A total of 424 subjects were randomly selected from the PREDIMED randomized dietary trial after completing a 1-year intervention program. Participants aged 55 to 80 years and at high risk of cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to three dietary interventions: Mediterranean diet supplemented with virgin olive oil or nuts, or a low-fat diet. RESULTS: After 1 year of intervention participants in the virgin olive oil group showed significantly increased plasma concentrations of palmitic and oleic acids, but reduced proportions of margaric, stearic, and linoleic acids. In turn, subjects in the nut group showed significantly increased levels of palmitic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids, but reduced proportions of myristic, margaric, palmitoleic, and dihommo-γ-linoleic acids. Increases in the biomarkers of foods supplied to the Mediterranean diet groups, i.e., oleic and α-linolenic acids, were beneficially associated with the incidence, reversion and prevalence of MetS. No weight changes were observed among participants. CONCLUSIONS: The nut and olive oil diets induced a fatty acid composition that has been shown to be beneficial in the face of MetS. Therefore, a Mediterranean diet rich in fats of vegetable origin may be a useful tool for the management of MetS without the need for concerns over weight gain due to its high fat content. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639.

  13. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and 10-year incidence (2002-2012) of diabetes: correlations with inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers in the ATTICA cohort study.

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    Koloverou, E; Panagiotakos, D B; Pitsavos, C; Chrysohoou, C; Georgousopoulou, E N; Grekas, A; Christou, A; Chatzigeorgiou, M; Skoumas, I; Tousoulis, D; Stefanadis, C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the links between oxidative stress, inflammation and coagulation and their effect on Mediterranean diet-diabetes relationship. In 2001-2002, a random sample of 1514 men (18-87 years old) and 1528 women (18-89 years old) was selected to participate in the ATTICA study, where Athens is the major metropolis. A validated questionnaire was used to assess lifestyle and dietary factors. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was recorded using MedDietScore. Among others, oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers were recorded. During 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed. Diabetes incidence was defined according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. A total of 191 incident cases of diabetes were documented, yielding an incidence of 12.9% (13.4% in men and 12.4% in women). Medium and high adherence was found to decrease diabetes risk by 49% (95% CI: 0.30, 0.88) and 62% (95% CI: 0.16, 0.88), respectively, compared with low adherence. A logarithmic trend between Mediterranean diet and diabetes incidence was also revealed (p for trend = 0.042). Individuals with abnormal waist circumference (>94 for men, >80 for women) were benefited the most. Wholegrain cereals, fruits and legumes had the greatest predictive ability. The anti-diabetic effect of Mediterranean diet correlated with measurements of tumour necrosis factor-α, homocysteine and total antioxidant capacity. The reported results support the role of Mediterranean diet as a promising dietary tool for the primary prevention of diabetes, by attenuating inflammation and fostering total antioxidant capacity. This dietary pattern may have therapeutic potential for many cardiometabolic disorders associated with inflammation and/or oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Risk of Cancer: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Schwedhelm, Carolina; Galbete, Cecilia; Hoffmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to gain further insight into the effects of adherence to Mediterranean Diet (MedD) on risk of overall cancer mortality, risk of different types of cancer, and cancer mortality and recurrence risk in cancer survivors. Literature search was performed using the electronic databases PubMed, and Scopus until 25 August 2017. We included randomized trials (RCTs), cohort (for specific tumors only incidence cases were used) studies, and case-control studies. Study-specific risk ratios, hazard ratios, and odds ratios (RR/HR/OR) were pooled using a random effects model. Observational studies (cohort and case-control studies), and intervention trials were meta-analyzed separately. The updated review process showed 27 studies that were not included in the previous meta-analysis (total number of studies evaluated: 83 studies). An overall population of 2,130,753 subjects was included in the present update. The highest adherence score to a MedD was inversely associated with a lower risk of cancer mortality (RRcohort: 0.86, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.91, I2 = 82%; n = 14 studies), colorectal cancer (RRobservational: 0.82, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.88, I2 = 73%; n = 11 studies), breast cancer (RRRCT: 0.43, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.88, n = 1 study) (RRobservational: 0.92, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.96, I2 = 22%, n = 16 studies), gastric cancer (RRobservational: 0.72, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.86, I2 = 55%; n = 4 studies), liver cancer (RRobservational: 0.58, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.73, I2 = 0%; n = 2 studies), head and neck cancer (RRobservational: 0.49, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.66, I2 = 87%; n = 7 studies), and prostate cancer (RRobservational: 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, I2 = 0%; n = 6 studies). Among cancer survivors, the association between the adherence to the highest MedD category and risk of cancer mortality, and cancer recurrence was not statistically significant. Pooled analyses of individual components of the MedD revealed that the protective effects appear to be most

  15. Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores Are Inversely Associated with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Adults123

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    Whalen, Kristine A; Judd, Suzanne; McCullough, Marjorie L; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Bostick, Roberd M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Poor diet quality is associated with a higher risk of many chronic diseases that are among the leading causes of death in the United States. It has been hypothesized that evolutionary discordance may account for some of the higher incidence and mortality from these diseases. Objective: We investigated associations of 2 diet pattern scores, the Paleolithic and the Mediterranean, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the REGARDS (REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) study, a longitudinal cohort of black and white men and women ≥45 y of age. Methods: Participants completed questionnaires, including a Block food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ), at baseline and were contacted every 6 mo to determine their health status. Of the analytic cohort (n = 21,423), a total of 2513 participants died during a median follow-up of 6.25 y. We created diet scores from FFQ responses and assessed their associations with mortality using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusting for major risk factors. Results: For those in the highest relative to the lowest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores, the multivariable adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were, respectively, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.89; P-trend diets closer to Paleolithic or Mediterranean diet patterns may be inversely associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. PMID:28179490

  16. Association Between the Mediterranean Diet and Cancer Risk: A Review of Observational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, L.D.M.; Bach-Faig, A.; Buckland, G.; Serra-Majem, L.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article was to summarize the evidence concerning the association between Mediterranean dietary pattern and cancer risk in observational epidemiological studies. All the studies that met the following criteria were reviewed: human cohort and case-control studies that examined the

  17. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet can slow the rate of cognitive decline and decrease the risk of dementia; a systematic review: DARE critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Almendra-Pegueros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available CRD summary The authors concluded that there was strong evidence that a Mediterranean-style diet could protect against cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer's disease. This appears to be overly optimistic in view of the potential for publication bias, the limited evidence from studies with poor designs, and the often conflicting results from these studies.

  18. Effect on using repeated measurements of a Mediterranean style diet on the strength of the association with cadiovascular disease during 12 years: the Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.; Spijkerman, A.M.W.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Boer, J.M.A.; Kromhout, D.; Verschuren, W.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    In cohort studies, often only one baseline measurement of dietary intake is available. This may underestimate the strength of the association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The main objective is to compare the strength of the association of a Mediterranean style diet with CVD using one baseline

  19. Mediterranean-style diet effect on the structural properties of the erythrocyte cell membrane of hypertensive patients: the Prevencion con Dieta Mediterranea Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Francisca; Perona, Javier S; Prades, Jesús; Funari, Sérgio S; Gomez-Gracia, Enrique; Conde, Manuel; Estruch, Ramon; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2009-11-01

    A currently ongoing randomized trial has revealed that the Mediterranean diet, rich in virgin olive oil or nuts, reduces systolic blood pressure in high-risk cardiovascular patients. Here, we present a structural substudy to assess the effect of a Mediterranean-style diet supplemented with nuts or virgin olive oil on erythrocyte membrane properties in 36 hypertensive participants after 1 year of intervention. Erythrocyte membrane lipid composition, structural properties of reconstituted erythrocyte membranes, and serum concentrations of inflammatory markers are reported. After the intervention, the membrane cholesterol content decreased, whereas that of phospholipids increased in all of the dietary groups; the diminishing cholesterol:phospholipid ratio could be associated with an increase in the membrane fluidity. Moreover, reconstituted membranes from the nuts and virgin olive oil groups showed a higher propensity to form a nonlamellar inverted hexagonal phase structure that was related to an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine lipid class. These data suggest that the Mediterranean-style diet affects the lipid metabolism that is altered in hypertensive patients, influencing the structural membrane properties. The erythrocyte membrane modulation described provides insight in the structural bases underlying the beneficial effect of a Mediterranean-style diet in hypertensive subjects.

  20. Impact of Mediterranean diet education versus posted leaflet on dietary habits and serum cholesterol in a high risk population for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, W.J.E.; Broer, J.; Vries, J.H.M. de; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; May, J.F.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of intensive group education on the Mediterranean diet on dietary intake and serum total cholesterol after 16 and 52 weeks, compared to a posted leaflet with the Dutch nutritional guidelines, in the context of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

  1. Impact of Mediterranean diet education versus posted leaflet on dietary habits and serum cholesterol in a high risk population for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, Wanda J. E.; Broer, Jan; de Vries, Jeanne H. M.; Hulshof, Karin F. A. M.; May, Jo F.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    Objective: To investigate the impact of intensive group education on the Mediterranean diet on dietary intake and serum total cholesterol after 16 and 52 weeks, compared to a posted leaflet with the Dutch nutritional guidelines, in the context of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

  2. Effect of a high-fat Mediterranean diet on bodyweight and waist circumference: a prespecified secondary outcomes analysis of the PREDIMED randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Ramon; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Fitó, Montserrat; Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Fiol, Miquel; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Sorlí, José V; Muñoz, Miguel A; Basora-Gallisá, Josep; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Serra-Mir, Mercè; Ros, Emilio

    2016-08-01

    Because of the high density of fat, high-fat diets are perceived as likely to lead to increased bodyweight, hence health-care providers are reluctant to recommend them to overweight or obese individuals. We assessed the long-term effects of ad libitum, high-fat, high-vegetable-fat Mediterranean diets on bodyweight and waist circumference in older people at risk of cardiovascular disease, most of whom were overweight or obese. PREDIMED was a 5 year parallel-group, multicentre, randomised, controlled clinical trial done in primary care centres affiliated to 11 hospitals in Spain. 7447 asymptomatic men (aged 55-80 years) and women (aged 60-80 years) who had type 2 diabetes or three or more cardiovascular risk factors were randomly assigned (1:1:1) with a computer-generated number sequence to one of three interventions: Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (n=2543); Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts (n=2454); or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat; n=2450). Energy restriction was not advised, nor was physical activity promoted. In this analysis of the trial, we measured bodyweight and waist circumference at baseline and yearly for 5 years in the intention-to-treat population. The PREDIMED trial is registered with ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN35739639. After a median 4·8 years (IQR 2·8-5·8) of follow-up, participants in all three groups had marginally reduced bodyweight and increased waist circumference. The adjusted difference in 5 year changes in bodyweight in the Mediterranean diet with olive oil group was -0·43 kg (95% CI -0·86 to -0·01; p=0·044) and in the nut group was -0·08 kg (-0·50 to 0·35; p=0·730), compared with the control group. The adjusted difference in 5 year changes in waist circumference was -0·55 cm (-1·16 to -0·06; p=0·048) in the Mediterranean diet with olive oil group and -0·94 cm (-1·60 to -0·27; p=0·006) in the nut group, compared with the control group. A long-term intervention with an

  3. Composition of Mediterranean fruit fly third instar larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and diet: Nutrient balance studies on amino acids, minerals and nutrient composition in fresh and spent mass rearing diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Harvey T. Jr.; Jang, Eric B.; Ako, Harry; Niino-Duponte, Ruth Y.; Carpenter, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Mass production of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) larvae, Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann, requires a rearing diet (Tanaka et al. 1969 1970) of which the nutrient requirements and digestibility have not been established. Setbacks in rearing productivity from the expected 100% yield to as low as 3% yield may occasionally be directly attributed to insecticide contamination or a variety of possible cause(s) (Kobayashi, 1993). These causes include inadequate nutrition, poor diet formulation, overcrowding of either microorganisms or Drosophila, or to the inherent processes of oxidative or microbial deterioration of nutrients. The purpose of this study was to establish the nutritional status of the Mediterranean fruit fly diet through a material balance study for changes in proximate composition (i.e., moisture, protein, fat, ash, carbohydrates), amino acids, minerals between fresh and spent diets, and in the fruit fly larvae themselves

  4. The Mediterranean Diet Score Is More Strongly Associated with Favorable Cardiometabolic Risk Factors over 2 Years Than Other Diet Quality Indexes in Puerto Rican Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Josiemer; Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bigornia, Sherman J; Noel, Sabrina E; Tucker, Katherine L

    2017-04-01

    Background: Multiple diet quality scores have been used to evaluate adherence to specific dietary recommendations or to consumption of healthful foods and nutrients. It remains unknown which score can more strongly predict longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. Objective: We aimed to determine associations of 5 diet quality scores [AHA diet score (AHA-DS), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2005, Mediterranean diet score (MeDS), and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)] with 2-y changes in cardiometabolic risk factors in adults 45-75 y old. Methods: Data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study were analyzed ( n = 1194). Diet quality scores were calculated from a baseline-validated food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted, repeated-subjects, mixed-effects models, adjusted for baseline measures, estimated associations between each z score and 14 individual cardiometabolic factors measured at 2 y. Results: MeDS was significantly associated with lower 2-y waist circumference (β coefficient ± SE: -0.52 ± 0.26, P = 0.048); body mass index (BMI; -0.23 ± 0.08, P = 0.005); log-insulin (-0.06 ± 0.02, P = 0.005); log-homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; -0.05 ± 0.02, P = 0.030), and log-C-reactive protein (-0.13 ± 0.03, P = 0.0002). Similar but weaker associations were observed for the AHEI with BMI, insulin, and HOMA-IR. The AHA-DS was inversely associated with BMI (-0.17 ± 0.08, P = 0.033). Neither the HEI-2005 nor DASH was significantly associated with any variable. Traditional Puerto Rican foods consumed by individuals with high MeDSs included vegetables and meats in homemade soups, orange juice, oatmeal, beans and legumes, fish, whole milk, corn oil, and beer. Conclusions: The MeDS comprises food components and scores associated with a favorable cardiometabolic profile over 2 y in Puerto Rican adults. An overall healthy diet may be particularly beneficial for

  5. Effect of ketogenic mediterranean diet with phytoextracts and low carbohydrates/high-protein meals on weight, cardiovascular risk factors, body composition and diet compliance in Italian council employees

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    Grimaldi Keith A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increased interest in recent years in very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets (VLCKD that, even though they are much discussed and often opposed, have undoubtedly been shown to be effective, at least in the short to medium term, as a tool to tackle obesity, hyperlipidemia and some cardiovascular risk factors. For this reason the ketogenic diet represents an interesting option but unfortunately suffers from a low compliance. The aim of this pilot study is to ascertain the safety and effects of a modified ketogenic diet that utilizes ingredients which are low in carbohydrates but are formulated to simulate its aspect and taste and also contain phytoextracts to add beneficial effects of important vegetable components. Methods The study group consisted of 106 Rome council employees with a body mass index of ≥ 25, age between 18 and 65 years (19 male and 87 female; mean age 48.49 ± 10.3. We investigated the effects of a modified ketogenic diet based on green vegetables, olive oil, fish and meat plus dishes composed of high quality protein and virtually zero carbohydrate but which mimic their taste, with the addition of some herbal extracts (KEMEPHY ketogenic Mediterranean with phytoextracts. Calories in the diet were unlimited. Measurements were taken before and after 6 weeks of diet. Results There were no significant changes in BUN, ALT, AST, GGT and blood creatinine. We detected a significant (p 2 to 29.01 Kg/m2, body weight (86.15 kg to 79.43 Kg, percentage of fat mass (41.24% to 34.99%, waist circumference (106.56 cm to 97.10 cm, total cholesterol (204 mg/dl to 181 mg/dl, LDLc (150 mg/dl to 136 mg/dl, triglycerides (119 mg/dl to 93 mg/dl and blood glucose (96 mg/dl to 91 mg/dl. There was a significant (p Conclusions The KEMEPHY diet lead to weight reduction, improvements in cardiovascular risk markers, reduction in waist circumference and showed good compliance.

  6. Effect of foods and Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and first years of life on wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Ramirez-Hernandez, M; Padilla, O; Pacheco-Gonzalez, R M; Pérez-Fernández, V; Garcia-Marcos, L

    2016-01-01

    There is a conflictive position if some foods and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consumed by the mother during pregnancy and by the child during the first years of life can be protective for current wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis at preschool age. Questionnaires of epidemiological factors and food intake by the mother during pregnancy and later by the child were filled in by parents in two surveys at two different time points (1.5 yrs and 4 yrs of life) in 1000 preschoolers. The prevalences of current wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis were 18.8%, 10.4%, and 17.2%, respectively. After multiple logistic analysis children who were low fruit consumers (never/occasionally) and high fast-food consumers (≥3 times/week) had a higher risk for current wheezing; while intermediate consumption of meat (1 or 2 times/week) and low of pasta by mothers in pregnancy were protected. For current rhinitis, low fruit consumer children were at higher risk; while those consuming meat 1 times/week were protected for dermatitis. MedDiet adherence by mother and child did not remain a protective factor for any outcome. Low consumption of fruits and high of meat by the child, and high consumption of potatoes and pasta by the mother had a negative effect on wheezing, rhinitis or dermatitis; while fast food consumption was inconsistent. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Pattern among Spanish Adults Attending a Medical Centre: Nondiabetic Subjects and Type 1 and 2 Diabetic Patients.

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    Vidal-Peracho, Concepción; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Lucha-López, Ana Carmen; Lucha-López, Maria Orosia; Camuñas-Pescador, Ana Cristina; Caverni-Muñoz, Alberto; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    To identify adherence to Mediterranean diet among two groups of Spanish adults: diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was measured by a 14-item screener (scale: 0-14; ≤5: low, 6-9: moderate, and ≥10: high) in 351 volunteers. Mean age was 50.97 ± 12.58 in nondiabetics ( n = 154) and 59.50 ± 13.34 in diabetics ( n = 197). The whole sample scored 8.77 ± 1.82. Score was 9.19 ± 1.84 in nondiabetic females ( n = 58) and 8.15 ± 1.79 in diabetic females ( n = 85) ( p = 0.003), due to lower consumption of olive oil ( p = 0.005) and nuts ( p = 0.000). Type 2 diabetic males ( n = 79; 8.76 ± 1.88) consumed less olive oil than healthy males ( n = 28; 9.36 ± 1.59) ( p = 0.046). Up to 30-year-old nondiabetics scored lower than more than 60-year-old nondiabetics (8.40 ± 1.5 versus 9.74 ± 2.03; p = 0.047). The youngest ate less olive oil ( p = 0.002) and more pastries ( p = 0.007). The sample presented moderate adherence to Mediterranean diet in all subgroups. Scientific evidence about the benefits of Mediterranean diet, olive oil, and nuts supports the recommendation to increase consumption of olive oil and nuts in diabetic women and of daily olive oil in type 2 diabetic men, reducing consumption of red meat, butter, and pastries, and to promote Mediterranean diet among the youngest of the sample studied.

  8. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Pattern among Spanish Adults Attending a Medical Centre: Nondiabetic Subjects and Type 1 and 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Vidal-Peracho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify adherence to Mediterranean diet among two groups of Spanish adults: diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Methods. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was measured by a 14-item screener (scale: 0–14; ≤5: low, 6–9: moderate, and ≥10: high in 351 volunteers. Results. Mean age was 50.97 ± 12.58 in nondiabetics (n=154 and 59.50 ± 13.34 in diabetics (n=197. The whole sample scored 8.77 ± 1.82. Score was 9.19 ± 1.84 in nondiabetic females (n=58 and 8.15 ± 1.79 in diabetic females (n=85 (p=0.003, due to lower consumption of olive oil (p=0.005 and nuts (p=0.000. Type 2 diabetic males (n=79; 8.76 ± 1.88 consumed less olive oil than healthy males (n=28; 9.36 ± 1.59 (p=0.046. Up to 30-year-old nondiabetics scored lower than more than 60-year-old nondiabetics (8.40 ± 1.5 versus 9.74 ± 2.03; p=0.047. The youngest ate less olive oil (p=0.002 and more pastries (p=0.007. Conclusions. The sample presented moderate adherence to Mediterranean diet in all subgroups. Scientific evidence about the benefits of Mediterranean diet, olive oil, and nuts supports the recommendation to increase consumption of olive oil and nuts in diabetic women and of daily olive oil in type 2 diabetic men, reducing consumption of red meat, butter, and pastries, and to promote Mediterranean diet among the youngest of the sample studied.

  9. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Pattern among Spanish Adults Attending a Medical Centre: Nondiabetic Subjects and Type 1 and 2 Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Peracho, Concepción; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Lucha-López, Ana Carmen; Camuñas-Pescador, Ana Cristina; Caverni-Muñoz, Alberto; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify adherence to Mediterranean diet among two groups of Spanish adults: diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Methods Adherence to Mediterranean diet was measured by a 14-item screener (scale: 0–14; ≤5: low, 6–9: moderate, and ≥10: high) in 351 volunteers. Results Mean age was 50.97 ± 12.58 in nondiabetics (n = 154) and 59.50 ± 13.34 in diabetics (n = 197). The whole sample scored 8.77 ± 1.82. Score was 9.19 ± 1.84 in nondiabetic females (n = 58) and 8.15 ± 1.79 in diabetic females (n = 85) (p = 0.003), due to lower consumption of olive oil (p = 0.005) and nuts (p = 0.000). Type 2 diabetic males (n = 79; 8.76 ± 1.88) consumed less olive oil than healthy males (n = 28; 9.36 ± 1.59) (p = 0.046). Up to 30-year-old nondiabetics scored lower than more than 60-year-old nondiabetics (8.40 ± 1.5 versus 9.74 ± 2.03; p = 0.047). The youngest ate less olive oil (p = 0.002) and more pastries (p = 0.007). Conclusions The sample presented moderate adherence to Mediterranean diet in all subgroups. Scientific evidence about the benefits of Mediterranean diet, olive oil, and nuts supports the recommendation to increase consumption of olive oil and nuts in diabetic women and of daily olive oil in type 2 diabetic men, reducing consumption of red meat, butter, and pastries, and to promote Mediterranean diet among the youngest of the sample studied. PMID:29527536

  10. Decline of the Mediterranean diet at a time of economic crisis. Results from the Moli-sani study.

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    Bonaccio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Bonanni, A; Costanzo, S; De Lucia, F; Persichillo, M; Zito, F; Donati, M B; de Gaetano, G; Iacoviello, L

    2014-08-01

    Adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) is reportedly declining in the last decades. We aimed to investigate the adherence to MD over the period 2005-2010 and exploring the possible role of the global economic crisis in accounting for the changing in the dietary habits in Italy. Cross-sectional analysis in a population-based cohort study which randomly recruited 21,001 southern Italian citizens enrolled within the Moli-sani study. Food intake was determined by the Italian EPIC food frequency questionnaire. Adherence to MD was appraised by the Italian Mediterranean Index (IMI). A wealth score was derived to evaluate the economic position and used together with other socioeconomic indicators. Highest prevalence of adherence to MD was observed during the years 2005-2006 (31.3%) while the prevalence dramatically fell down in the years 2007-2010 (18.3%; Peconomic crisis began; both wealth score and education were major determinants of high adherence to MD with 31% (95%CI: 18-46%) higher adherence to this pattern within the wealthier group compared to the less affluent category. Adherence to MD has considerably decreased over the last few years. In 2007-2010 socioeconomic indicators have become major determinants of adherence to MD, a fact likely linked to the economic downturn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Short-term Exposure to a Mediterranean Environment Influences Attitudes and Dietary Profile in U.S. College Students: The MEDiterranean Diet in AMEricans (A-MED-AME) Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroka, Katherine; Dinu, Monica; Hoover, Chelsea; Casini, Alessandro; Sofi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term exposure to a Mediterranean diet during a structured abroad experience could influence dietary habits and attitudes. This study used a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted on the Florence University of the Arts (FUA) campus, Italy. Fifty-four (47 females, 7 males; mean age 21.1 ± 1.9 years) college students from 12 different states, mainly located in the central United States, were enrolled in this study. Outcome measures included adherence score to Mediterranean diet and self-reported perceptions of diet and food availability. A demographic survey was used to collect data regarding personal characteristics, anthropometrics, duration of stay, and residency status. Chi-square test, independent T-test, and Mann-Whitney test were used to perform analyses. At 3 weeks' follow-up, 94% of the population reported that availability of foods affected their food choices. Interestingly, students reported that they consumed less meat with respect to their usual dietary habits in the United States (p < 0.0001) and they reported significantly increased the consumption of olive oil, cereals, fruit, and alcohol (p < 0.05). The adherence score to a Mediterranean diet significantly increased by about 1 point, going from 9.9 ± 2.4 to 10.9 ± 2.0 (p < 0.05). After a 3-week stay in Italy, an increase in the adherence score to a Mediterranean diet was observed. Future research should explore the relationship between length of time spent in a foreign country and dietary adherence in a cultural context.

  12. Effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Ciotola, Miryam; Di Palo, Carmen; Scognamiglio, Paola; Gicchino, Maurizio; Petrizzo, Michela; Saccomanno, Franco; Beneduce, Flora; Ceriello, Antonio; Giugliano, Dario

    2009-09-01

    Low-carbohydrate and low-fat calorie-restricted diets are recommended for weight loss in overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes. To compare the effects of a low-carbohydrate Mediterranean-style or a low-fat diet on the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Single-center, randomized trial. Randomization was computer-generated and unstratified. Allocation was concealed in sealed study folders held in a central, secure location until participants gave informed consent. Participants and investigators were aware of treatment assignment, and assessors of the primary outcome were blinded. Teaching hospital in Naples, Italy. 215 overweight people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes who were never treated with antihyperglycemic drugs and had hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) levels less than 11%. Mediterranean-style diet (carbohydrates) (n = 108) or a low-fat diet (fat) (n = 107). Start of antihyperglycemic drug therapy, defined by protocol as indicated for follow-up HbA(1c) level greater than 7% (primary outcome), and changes in weight, glycemic control, and coronary risk factors (secondary outcomes). After 4 years, 44% of patients in the Mediterranean-style diet group and 70% in the low-fat diet group required treatment (absolute difference, -26.0 percentage points [95% CI, -31.1 to -20.1 percentage points]; hazard ratio, 0.63 [CI, 0.51 to 0.86]; hazard ratio adjusted for weight change, 0.70 [CI, 0.59 to 0.90]; P Mediterranean-style diet lost more weight and experienced greater improvements in some glycemic control and coronary risk measures than did those assigned to the low-fat diet. Investigators responsible for initiating drug therapy were not blinded to treatment assignment. Dietary intake was self-reported. Compared with a low-fat diet, a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet led to more favorable changes in glycemic control and coronary risk factors and delayed the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy

  13. Role of vegetables and fruits in Mediterranean diets to prevent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Cordoba, J M; Alonso, A; Beunza, J J; Palma, S; Gomez-Gracia, E; Martinez-Gonzalez, M A

    2009-05-01

    Several studies support the effectiveness of increasing the consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) to prevent hypertension. However, none of them have been conducted in a Mediterranean setting. The aim of this study was to assess the association between F&V consumption and the risk of hypertension. A prospective Mediterranean study (the SUN cohort), including 8594 participants aged 20-95 years (mean, 41.1) with median follow-up of 49 months. Analyses according to the joint classification by olive oil and F&V consumption showed a significant inverse relation between F&V consumption and the risk of hypertension only among participants with a low olive oil consumption (oil intake stratum. We found a statistically significant interaction (P=0.01) between olive oil intake and F&V consumption. These data suggest a sub-additive effect of both food items.

  14. Mediterranean Diet and Other Dietary Patterns in Primary Prevention of Heart Failure and Changes in Cardiac Function Markers: A Systematic Review

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    Karina Sanches Machado d’Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is a complex syndrome and is recognized as the ultimate pathway of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Studies using nutritional strategies based on dietary patterns have proved to be effective for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Although there are studies that support the protective effect of these diets, their effects on the prevention of HF are not clear yet. Methods: We searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies that examined dietary patterns, such as dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH diet, paleolithic, vegetarian, low-carb and low-fat diets and prevention of HF. No limitations were used during the search in the databases. Results: A total of 1119 studies were identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria. Studies regarding the Mediterranean, DASH, vegetarian, and Paleolithic diets were found. The Mediterranean and DASH diets showed a protective effect on the incidence of HF and/or worsening of cardiac function parameters, with a significant difference in relation to patients who did not adhere to these dietary patterns. Conclusions: It is observed that the adoption of Mediterranean or DASH-type dietary patterns may contribute to the prevention of HF, but these results need to be analyzed with caution due to the low quality of evidence.

  15. Mediterranean Diet and Other Dietary Patterns in Primary Prevention of Heart Failure and Changes in Cardiac Function Markers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches Machado d'Almeida, Karina; Ronchi Spillere, Stefanny; Zuchinali, Priccila; Corrêa Souza, Gabriela

    2018-01-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome and is recognized as the ultimate pathway of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies using nutritional strategies based on dietary patterns have proved to be effective for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Although there are studies that support the protective effect of these diets, their effects on the prevention of HF are not clear yet. We searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies that examined dietary patterns, such as dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH diet), paleolithic, vegetarian, low-carb and low-fat diets and prevention of HF. No limitations were used during the search in the databases. A total of 1119 studies were identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria. Studies regarding the Mediterranean, DASH, vegetarian, and Paleolithic diets were found. The Mediterranean and DASH diets showed a protective effect on the incidence of HF and/or worsening of cardiac function parameters, with a significant difference in relation to patients who did not adhere to these dietary patterns. It is observed that the adoption of Mediterranean or DASH-type dietary patterns may contribute to the prevention of HF, but these results need to be analyzed with caution due to the low quality of evidence.

  16. Effects of 3-month Mediterranean-type diet on postprandial TAG and apolipoprotein B48 in the Medi-RIVAGE cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Defoort, Catherine; Vincent-Baudry, Stéphanie; Lairon, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the postprandial lipaemia response before and after intervention with healthy diets in the Medi-RIVAGE cohort of subjects with moderate risk factors of CVD. Design: One hundred and thirty-five adults (fifty-two men and eighty-three women) followed either a Mediterranean-type (MED) diet or a low-fat American Heart Association-type diet in a parallel design for 3 months. At entry and after 3 months, lipids, glucose and insulin were measured in the fasting samples; TAG an...

  17. Lifestyles and risk factors associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet: a baseline assessment of the PREDIMED trial.

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    Emily A Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern (MedDiet is associated with longevity and low rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, there is little information on who is more likely to follow this food pattern. AIM: To evaluate how different factors are associated with lower MedDiet adherence in older Spanish subjects. METHODS: We included 7305 participants (men aged 55-80 y, women 60-80 y at high-risk of CVD recruited into the PREDIMED trial (ISRCTN35739639. Socioeconomic, anthropometric, lifestyle characteristics and CVD risk factors were recorded. A validated 14-item questionnaire was used to evaluate MedDiet adherence at baseline. Multivariate models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals for lower adherence to the MedDiet (<9 points out of 14 and ascertain factors independently associated with it. RESULTS: Former smoking (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98, physical activity (OR for the 3(rd vs. the 1(sttertile: 0.69; 0.62-0.78, and higher educational level (OR for university vs. less than primary school: 0.54; 0.38-0.77 were associated with higher MedDiet adherence. Conversely, having a larger waist-to-height ratio (OR for 0.1 units, 1.35; 1.22-1.49, being diabetic (OR = 1.13; 1.03-1.24, being single (OR = 1.27; 1.01-1.61 or divorced or separated (OR = 1.44; 1.09-1.89, and current smoking (OR = 1.28; 1.11-1.47 were associated with lower adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Participants with little education, a larger waist-to-height ratio, or diabetes and those who were less physically active, single, divorced or separated, or smokers were less likely to adhere to the MedDiet, an ideal model for food choices. Stronger efforts of health promotion are needed in these groups to foster adoption of the MedDiet.

  18. Adherence to a predominantly Mediterranean diet decreases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a cross-sectional study in a South Eastern European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mone, I; Kraja, B; Bregu, A; Duraj, V; Sadiku, E; Hyska, J; Burazeri, G

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to assess the association of a Mediterranean diet and gastroesophageal reflux disease among adult men and women in Albania, a former communist country in South Eastern Europe with a predominantly Muslim population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012, which included a population-based sample of 817 individuals (≥18 years) residing in Tirana, the Albanian capital (333 men; overall mean age: 50.2 ± 18.7 years; overall response rate: 82%). Assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease was based on Montreal definition. Participants were interviewed about their dietary patterns, which in the analysis was dichotomized into: predominantly Mediterranean (frequent consumption of composite/traditional dishes, fresh fruit and vegetables, olive oil, and fish) versus largely non-Mediterranean (frequent consumption of red meat, fried food, sweets, and junk/fast food). Logistic regression was used to assess the association of gastroesophageal reflux disease with the dietary patterns. Irrespective of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle factors including eating habits (meal regularity, eating rate, and meal-to-sleep interval), employment of a non-Mediterranean diet was positively related to gastroesophageal reflux disease risk (fully adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-4.5). Our findings point to a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in transitional Albania. Findings from this study should be confirmed and expanded further in prospective studies in Albania and in other Mediterranean countries. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.