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Sample records for medicine surgery dietetics

  1. The Next Generation of Dietitians: Implementing Dietetics Education and Practice in Integrative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Leigh E; Evans, Randall G; Noland, Diana; Barkley, Rachel; Sullivan, Debra K; Drisko, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Integrative medicine is a quickly expanding field of health care that emphasizes nutrition as a key component. Dietitians and nutritionists have an opportunity to meet workforce demands by practicing dietetics and integrative medicine (DIM). The purpose of this article is to describe a DIM education program and practicum. We report the results of an interprofessional nutrition education and practicum program between the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) Department of Dietetics and Nutrition and KU Integrative Medicine. This partnered program provides training that builds on the strong foundation of the Nutrition Care Process and adds graduate-level educational and practicum experiences in foundational integrative medicine knowledge, including nutritional approaches from a systems biology perspective, nutrigenomics, and biochemistry as the core knowledge to understand the root cause of a chronic disorder and to choose appropriate nutritional tools for interventions. This interprofessional KUMC program provides a dietetic internship, master's degree, and graduate certificate in DIM and fulfills a need for dietitians and nutritionists who seek careers practicing in an integrative medicine setting. The program fulfills expanding workforce needs to provide quality health care for patients with chronic illnesses.

  2. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nancy R; DiMarco, Nancy M; Langley, Susie

    2009-03-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of foods and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This updated position paper couples a rigorous, systematic, evidence-based analysis of nutrition and performance-specific literature with current scientific data related to energy needs, assessment of body composition, strategies for weight change, nutrient and fluid needs, special nutrient needs during training and competition, the use of supplements and ergogenic aids, nutrition recommendations for vegetarian athletes, and the roles and responsibilities of sports dietitians. Energy and macronutrient needs, especially carbohydrate and protein, must be met during times of high physical activity to maintain body weight, replenish glycogen stores, and provide adequate protein to build and repair tissue. Fat intake should be sufficient to provide the essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins, as well as contribute energy for weight maintenance. Although exercise performance can be affected by body weight and composition, these physical measures should not be a criterion for sports performance and daily weigh-ins are discouraged. Adequate food and fluid should be consumed before, during, and after exercise to help maintain blood glucose concentration during exercise, maximize exercise performance, and improve recovery time. Athletes should be well hydrated before exercise and drink enough fluid during and after exercise to balance fluid losses. Sports beverages containing carbohydrates and electrolytes may be consumed before, during, and after exercise to help maintain blood glucose concentration, provide fuel for muscles, and decrease risk of dehydration and hyponatremia. Vitamin

  3. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that the performance of, and recovery from, sporting activities are enhanced by well-chosen nutrition strategies. These organizations provide guidelines for the appropriate type, amount, and timing of intake of food, fluids, and supplements to promote optimal health and performance across different scenarios of training and competitive sport. This position paper was prepared for members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada (DC), and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), other professional associations, government agencies, industry, and the public. It outlines the Academy's, DC's and ACSM's stance on nutrition factors that have been determined to influence athletic performance and emerging trends in the field of sports nutrition. Athletes should be referred to a registered dietitian/nutritionist for a personalized nutrition plan. In the United States and in Canada, the Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD) is a registered dietitian/nutritionist and a credentialed sports nutrition expert.

  4. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D Travis; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Burke, Louise M

    2016-03-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy), Dietitians of Canada (DC), and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) that the performance of, and recovery from, sporting activities are enhanced by well-chosen nutrition strategies. These organizations provide guidelines for the appropriate type, amount, and timing of intake of food, fluids, and supplements to promote optimal health and performance across different scenarios of training and competitive sport. This position paper was prepared for members of the Academy, DC, and ACSM, other professional associations, government agencies, industry, and the public. It outlines the Academy's, DC's, and ACSM's stance on nutrition factors that have been determined to influence athletic performance and emerging trends in the field of sports nutrition. Athletes should be referred to a registered dietitian nutritionist for a personalized nutrition plan. In the United States and in Canada, the Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a credentialed sports nutrition expert. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, American College of Sports Medicine, and Dietitians of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Position of Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    It is the position of Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of food and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to athletes' energy needs, assessment of body composition, strategies for weight change, athletes' nutrient and fluid needs, special nutrient needs during training, the use of supplements and nutritional ergogenic aids, and nutrition recommendations for vegetarian athletes. During times of high physical activity, energy and macronutrient needs - especially carbohydrate and protein intake - must be met in order to maintain body weight, replenish glycogen stores, and provide adequate protein for building and repairing tissue. Fat intake should be adequate to provide essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins, as well as to help provide adequate energy for weight maintenance. Overall, diets should provide moderate amounts of energy from fat (20-25% of energy); there appears to be no health or performance benefit to consuming a diet containing less than 15% of energy from fat. Body weight and composition can affect exercise performance, but should not be used as the sole criterion for sports performance; daily weigh-ins are discouraged. Consuming adequate food and fluid before, during, and after exercise can help maintain blood glucose levels during exercise, maximize exercise performance, and improve recovery time. Athletes should be well hydrated before beginning exercise; they should also drink enough fluid during and after exercise to balance fluid losses. Consumption of sport drinks containing carbohydrates and electrolytes during exercise will provide fuel for the muscles, help maintain blood glucose levels and the

  6. Joint Position Statement: nutrition and athletic performance. American College of Sports Medicine, American Dietetic Association, and Dietitians of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of food and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to the energy needs of athletes, assessment of body composition, strategies for weight change, the nutrient and fluid needs of athletes, special nutrient needs during training, the use of supplements and nutritional ergogenic aids, and the nutrition recommendations for vegetarian athletes. During times of high physical activity, energy and macronutrient needs-especially carbohydrate and protein intake-must be met in order to maintain body weight, replenish glycogen stores, and provide adequate protein for building and repair of tissue. Fat intake should be adequate to provide the essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins, as well as to help provide adequate energy for weight maintenance. Overall, diets should provide moderate amounts of energy from fat (20% to 25% of energy); however, there appears to be no health or performance benefit to consuming a diet containing less than 15% of energy from fat. Body weight and composition can affect exercise performance, but should not be used as the sole criterion for sports performance; daily weigh-ins are discouraged. Consuming adequate food and fluid before, during, and after exercise can help maintain blood glucose during exercise, maximize exercise performance, and improve recovery time. Athletes should be well-hydrated before beginning to exercise; athletes should also drink enough fluid during and after exercise to balance fluid losses. Consumption of sport drinks containing carbohydrates and electrolytes during exercise will provide fuel for the muscles, help maintain

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of food and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to the energy needs of athletes, assessment of body composition, strategies for weight change, the nutrient and fluid needs of athletes, special nutrient needs during training, the use of supplements and nutritional ergogenic aids, and the nutrition recommendations for vegetarian athletes. During times of high physical activity, energy and macronutrient needs--especially carbohydrate and protein intake--must be met in order to maintain body weight, replenish glycogen stores, and provide adequate protein for building and repair of tissue. Fat intake should be adequate to provide the essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins, as well as to help provide adequate energy for weight maintenance. Overall, diets should provide moderate amounts of energy from fat (20% to 25% of energy); however, there appears to be no health or performance benefit to consuming a diet containing less than 15% of energy from fat. Body weight and composition can affect exercise performance, but should not be used as the sole criterion for sports performance; daily weigh-ins are discouraged. Consuming adequate food and fluid before, during, and after exercise can help maintain blood glucose during exercise, maximize exercise performance, and improve recovery time. Athletes should be well-hydrated before beginning to exercise; athletes should also drink enough fluid during and after exercise to balance fluid losses. Consumption of sport drinks containing carbohydrates and electrolytes during exercise will provide fuel for the muscles, help

  8. Performing surgery: commonalities with performers outside medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Lister Kneebone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues for the inclusion of surgery within the canon of performance science. The world of medicine presents rich, complex but relatively under-researched sites of performance. Performative aspects of clinical practice are overshadowed by a focus on the processes and outcomes of medical care, such as diagnostic accuracy and the results of treatment. The primacy of this ‘clinical’ viewpoint - framed by clinical professionals as the application of medical knowledge - hides resonances with performance in other domains. Yet the language of performance is embedded in the culture of surgery - surgeons ‘perform’ operations, work in an operating ‘theatre’ and use ‘instruments’. This paper asks what might come into view if we take this performative language at face value and interrogate surgery from the perspective of performance science. It addresses the following questions: 1.To what extent and in what ways can surgical practice (both consultation and operation be considered as performance?2.How does comparison with two domains domains of non-surgical performance (close-up magic and puppetry illuminate understanding of surgical practice as performance?3.In what ways might including surgery within the canon of performance studies enrich the field of performance science?Two detailed case studies over 5 years with magicians (71.5 hours contact time and puppeteers (50.5 hours contact time identified performative aspects of surgical practice from the perspectives of professionals (as individuals or in groups and audiences. Physical simulation provided a means for non-clinicians to access and experience elements of the surgical world, acting as a prompt for discussion. Thematic analysis was used to establish themes and sub-themes.Key themes were: 1 clinical consultation can be viewed as ‘close-up live performance with a very small audience’ and 2 operative surgery can be viewed as ‘reading bodies within a dextrous team

  9. An Advocacy for the Integration of Bloodless Medicine and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    increasingly difficult in recent times in these populations. It has thus become imperative for clinicians to begin to .... bloodless medicine and surgery. Today the practice of bloodless medicine and surgery is accepted and consolidated ..... J Bone Joint Surg Am 1989; 71:823-. 827. 15. Ward WF. The development of a hospital ...

  10. Virtual reality in surgery and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnock, C

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the state of development of enhanced and virtual reality-based systems in medicine. Virtual reality systems seek to simulate a surgical procedure in a computer-generated world in order to improve training. Enhanced reality systems seek to augment or enhance reality by providing improved imaging alternatives for specific patient data. Virtual reality represents a paradigm shift in the way we teach and evaluate the skills of medical personnel. Driving the development of virtual reality-based simulators is laparoscopic abdominal surgery, where there is a perceived need for better training techniques; within a year, systems will be fielded for second-year residency students. Further refinements over perhaps the next five years should allow surgeons to evaluate and practice new techniques in a simulator before using them on patients. Technical developments are rapidly improving the realism of these machines to an amazing degree, as well as bringing the price down to affordable levels. In the next five years, many new anatomical models, procedures, and skills are likely to become available on simulators. Enhanced reality systems are generally being developed to improve visualization of specific patient data. Three-dimensional (3-D) stereovision systems for endoscopic applications, head-mounted displays, and stereotactic image navigation systems are being fielded now, with neurosurgery and laparoscopic surgery being major driving influences. Over perhaps the next five years, enhanced and virtual reality systems are likely to merge. This will permit patient-specific images to be used on virtual reality simulators or computer-generated landscapes to be input into surgical visualization instruments. Percolating all around these activities are developments in robotics and telesurgery. An advanced information infrastructure eventually will permit remote physicians to share video, audio, medical records, and imaging data with local physicians in real time

  11. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII.

  12. American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back Specialty Laser and Energy-Based Device Use Dentistry Dermatology General Surgery Neurosurgery Obstetrics/Gynecology Oncology Ophthalmology ... About ASLMS Code of Ethics Standards of Practice History Governance Back Governance Board of Directors Committees Membership ...

  13. Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from practice educators in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy and physiotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.; Hills, C.; MacDonald-Wicks, L.; Johnston, C.; James, D.; Surjan, Y.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of students. Practice educator characteristics may positively or negatively affect student learning in practice settings. This study aimed to identify characteristics of the ideal practice educator that lead to successful practical experiences as perceived by current practice educators working in the Australian context of diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods: All practice educators (n = 1063) on the University of Newcastle Practice Educator Database were invited to participate in this prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study via online link or paper format. Results: There was a 52% response rate. The five most valued characteristics were feedback skills, non-judgemental, professionalism, clarity and listening skills. The five least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, respect for students' autonomy, well-prepared, availability and being a role model. Comparisons between disciplines, genders, ages, years in practice and levels of supervisory experience indicated some statistically significant differences, though actual differences were small. Discussion: Overall there was a high degree of agreement within and between disciplines on the characteristics of the ideal practice educator. The top five skills could be classed as generic skills and not specific clinical and practice skills, thus formal training and certification schemes may enhance practice educator competence. - Highlights: • The most important characteristics were feedback skills and non-judgmental. • The least important characteristics were scholarly activity and respects student autonomy. • Female educators valued all characteristics except scholarly activities as being more important. • Older participants valued availability, and

  14. Cosmetic Surgery and the Practice of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rising ethical issues in this article. The first is the ... of business. The idea that consumers are sovereign is fundamental to a market economy. This is because personal preference and capital largely determine access to a product or service. ... to business success.3 Is the practice of cosmetic surgery the same? Certainly, to ...

  15. Opinion leaders and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby D; Papay, Frank A; Moores, Neal; Meisler, Eileen; Zins, James E

    2014-01-01

    In health care, it is widely known that evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a significant impact on clinical practice, and opinion leaders can enhance the clinician's application of EBM in various disciplines. In this article, we examine the existence and impact of opinion leaders in craniofacial surgery as well as barriers to evidence-based practice. We compiled the answers of an Internet questionnaire, which was sent to 102 craniofacial surgeons. Our results demonstrate that opinion leaders most definitely can be identified in craniofacial surgery. They are tightly connected to their field's social network and promote EBM. In this survey, 44% of craniofacial surgeons reported that their greatest obstacle to clinical decision making in the management of nonsyndromic synostosis was lack of surgical consensus. In addition, craniofacial surgeons stated that EBM and opinion leaders are the most influential factors that caused them to change their management of craniosynostosis. We expect that the use of opinion leaders can further enhance the uptake of EBM in craniofacial surgery.

  16. Quality Assurance in Dietetic Services Workshop for the Dietetic Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workshop guide is a unit of study for teaching dietetic assistants to work with quality control in a nursing home or hospital. The objective of the unit is to enable the students to develop and expand a dietetic services administrative and clinical quality assurance program in his or her own institution. Following the unit objective, the unit…

  17. Mapping the literature of dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M

    1999-01-01

    Research on the literature of dietetics, apart from the broader field of nutrition, has not been reported in the literature. The purpose of this bibliometric study was to identify the core journals of dietetics and to determine the extent of indexing coverage for these journals. The study was conducted as part of a larger project, the Project for Mapping the Literature of Allied Health, sponsored by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Citations appearing in three journals between 1995 and 1997 were analyzed by the methodology common to studies in the project. Results revealed that dietetic literature relies heavily on journal literature and on those journals that are from associated health sciences fields. Of the indexing services examined, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica and MEDLINE provided the most complete coverage of the literature. The study's findings have implications for those involved with the literature of dietetics. PMID:10427430

  18. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services furnished by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine... performed by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy. 1 1 For services furnished before July 1, 1981, Medicare...

  19. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surgeries become linked to other medical procedures with perceived greater medical necessity, health and aesthetics become entangled. One consequence is that medical needs are magnified while perceptions of the risks of surgery are minimized. Drawing on ethnographic work on plastic surgery, as well as other studies of obstetrics and cosmetic surgery, I illustrate this entanglement of health and aesthetics within the field of women's reproductive health care in Brazil. I argue that while it would be difficult to wholly disentangle aesthetics and health, analysis of how risk-benefit calculations are made in clinical practice offers a useful critical strategy for illuminating ethical problems posed by aesthetic medicine. © 2013 by the American Anthropological Association.

  20. Hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, K.

    2000-01-01

    There have been a few articles published in Chinese and English on hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine. They are brief and some of them are inaccurate, although two recent English articles on this subject have presented an adequate picture on some aspects.' This article offers unreported information and evidence of both congenital and traumatic hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine and also clarifies and corrects some of the...

  1. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic

  2. Collaboration Between Dietetics and Dentistry: Dietetic Internship in Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Frederick G.; Sasson, Lisa M.; Godfrey, Emilie M.; Sehl, Rima B.

    2006-01-01

    The American Dietetic Association and the American Dental Association share a common interest in improving the health and quality of life of the population. Dental visits present an opportunity to identify nutrition-related issues for both the pediatric and adult population. Traditionally, dental and nutrition students have had little opportunity to learn and work together since little time was spent on nutrition in the dental curriculum. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a new collaborative training experience for dietetic interns and pediatric dentistry residents. The oral health rotation for dietetic interns also has several objectives, including experience interacting with a culturally diverse population and participating in community nutrition education (Head Start). In its first 18 months, the collaborative program has been viewed as a success by the pediatric dentistry faculty and residents and the nutrition faculty and interns. PMID:16639470

  3. Dietetics in China at the crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingxia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    A dietetics profession that conforms to the international standards for dietetics exists in many countries but not in the Peoples' Republic of China (China). Might China benefit from the presence of the dietetics profession? The article reviews the current dietetic situation in China, summarizes the gaps between current realities in China with respect to meeting needs for nutritional care, and recommends improvements. Gaps and barriers exist between current practice in dietetics and a more optimal system for meeting China's nutritional care needs. Recommendations for actions over the near term that would lead to fuller development of the field of dietetics in China are summarized, following the model suggested by the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations. Alternative personnel deployment strategies over the next decade are also discussed. Whether there is a role for the profession of dietetics in China today or in the near future will depend on the attitudes and political will of Chinese government authorities, health professionals, educators, and consumers.

  4. Increasing medical student exposure to musculoskeletal medicine: the initial impact of the Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Interest Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickelson DT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dayne T Mickelson,1 Philip K Louie,2 Kenneth R Gundle,3 Alex W Farnand,4 Douglas P Hanel5 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 4Department of General Surgery, Presence Saint Joseph Hospital – Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Purpose: To investigate the impact of the Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Interest Group (OSSMIG on medical student interest and confidence in core musculoskeletal (MSK concepts through supplemental education and experiences at a single tertiary, academic institution.Methods: Medical student OSSMIG members at various levels of training were anonymously surveyed at the beginning and end of the 2014–2015 academic year.Results: Eighteen (N=18 medical student interest group members completed the survey. Significant improvement in their level of training was observed with regard to respondents’ self-assessed competence and confidence in MSK medicine (p<0.05. Additionally, respondents’ attitudes toward exposure and support from the interest group were significantly higher than those provided by the institution (p<0.05. Members believed OSSMIG increased interest in MSK medicine, improved confidence in their ability to perform orthopedics-related physical exams, strengthened mentorship with residents and attendings, and developed a connection with the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and its residents (median “Strongly Agree”, interquartile range one and two scale items.Conclusion: Since its inception 8 years ago, OSSMIG has been well received and has positively impacted University of Washington School of Medicine students through various interventions

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Cardiac Surgery: Prevalence and Modality of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmayrac, Emilie; Quignon, Anne; Baufreton, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines are developing at a growing rate but their use in the hospital setting is little known, ignoring risk or benefit in practice. The objectives of the study were to quantify the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicines used by patients admitted to a cardiac surgery department. Patients and staff at the Cardiac Surgery unit of Angers University Hospital (France) were surveyed regarding their modality of complementary and alternative medicines use, between April 01, 2013, and April 18, 2014, by means of an anonymous questionnaire. Of 154 patients included in the study, 58% used a complementary and alternative medicine at least once in their lifetime, 38% during the preceding year, and 14% between the consultation and surgery. In all, 71% used them as a complement to their conventional medical treatment. Of those who used a complementary and alternative medicine during the year of their surgery procedure, only 29% informed their physicians and paramedical staff about it. Complementary and alternative medicines use among patients admitted to cardiac surgery units is common. Yet there is a real lack of knowledge regarding these health practices among physicians and paramedical staff. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrative Medicine as an Adjunct to Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficke, James R; Moroski, Nathan M; Ross, Steven D; Gupta, Ranjan

    2018-01-15

    Patients often seek nontraditional forms of treatment, including alternative/complementary medical options, such as chiropractic care and acupuncture, to meet their personal needs. In the United States, interest has grown in methods to reduce pain and improve function through Ayurvedic medicine, which uses plant-based supplements, such as turmeric. Traditional allopathic medicine attempts to provide patients with evidence-based therapeutic regimens for their musculoskeletal conditions. Integrative medicine often is used to prevent and manage the sequelae associated with injuries and illnesses; however, competitive athletes and military personnel use complementary medicine for performance enhancement. Thus, physicians should be aware of the evolving field of integrative medicine, including the reported benefits as well as any potential drawbacks, to facilitate an educated discussion with their patients.

  7. Nourishing Professional Practice: Continuing Education in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinneer, James W.

    The literature on continuing education (CE) in dietetics was reviewed. The review focused on the following: motivators and barriers for participation in continuing dietetic education, formats for CE in dietetics, and approaches to assessing learner needs. The role of professional associations, the existence of voluntary credentialing programs, the…

  8. The development of laser surgery and medicine in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingzhe

    2005-07-01

    The first Chinese ruby laser was created in 1961 and it was adopted for the retina coagulation experiment in 1965. Since 1970's, lasers had been widely applied clinically including the diseases suitable to physical therapy or acupuncture. The Chinese HpD was first produced in 1981 and first case of PDT was treated using Chinese HpD and Chinese lasers in the same year. Its success brought attention establishing a research group supported by the government in 1982. A nationwide systemic research project on PDT was then carried out. The step taken for PDT also accelerated the development of various fields of laser medicine and surgery. Laser treatments had been commonly adopted in the clinics and hospitals for the diseases of the superficial lesions and the lesions can be reached by the endoscopes non-invasively in 1980's. Since 1990's, the interventional laser therapies adopted mainly were percutaneous laser angioplasty, laser treatments through laparoscope, thoracoscope, arthroscope, neuro-endoscope etc. Ultrasound guided percutaneous laser heat coagulation for small hepatic cancer revealed good results and ultrasound guided percutaneous PDT for advanced large liver cancer revealed unexpected results after five years follow-up. At present: There are more long-term follow-up patients in the clinical trial; more advanced commercial available lasers and new techniques are adopted. Since the popularization of scanning electron microscope, laser scanning confocal microscope, laser induced auto-fluorescence system, high sensitivity fluorescence microscopic imaging system etc. in the laboratories, the basic studies can be more advanced and some times, the sub-cellular level can be reached; ultra-structure histo-morphology and gene studies are involved. In dermatology, Q-switched Alexandrite laser and other Q-switched lasers are used mainly for the treatment of skin pigmentation and vascular diseases; pulsed dye laser, ultra-pulsed CO2 laser are used in resurfacing, facial

  9. Dietetic Aide. [Teacher's Copy]. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The curriculum guide, one of a series prepared to assist teacher-coordinators in promoting and teaching home economics cooperative education programs, provides a course of study for the dietetic aide occupation. In addition to a brief overview, job description, and job analysis of the occupation, the guide's four main sections are: instructional…

  10. Evidence based medicine and the plastic surgery literature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: All articles described as case reports and published in the Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery from January 2008 to December 2012 were evaluated to investigate their impact on evidence-based practice. Result: There were 28 case reports representing 44% of all articles published. Most articles ...

  11. History and Highlights of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coselli, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    The history of cardiothoracic surgery at Baylor College of Medicine begins in 1948, when Michael E. DeBakey was recruited as chair of the Department of Surgery. With the addition of Denton A. Cooley, E. Stanley Crawford, and other surgical legends, Baylor College of Medicine quickly rose to the forefront of cardiothoracic surgery. Highlights in its history include treatment of aortic aneurysm and dissection, development of synthetic aortic substitutes, early experience with cardiac replacement valves, the first successful use of coronary artery bypass grafts to revascularize the heart, and the cardiac transplantation and total artificial heart program, which led to the creation of the left ventricular assist device. Baylor's Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery continues to build on its history and legacy to remain a vital contributor to the specialty in the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietetics supply and demand: 2010-2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Roderick S; Williams, James H; Papneja, Jesleen; Sen, Namrata; Hogan, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, in conjunction with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), invited The Lewin Group to undertake an analysis of the dietetics workforce. The purpose of the workforce study was to develop a model that can project the supply and demand for both registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) (collectively referred to as CDR-credentialed dietetics practitioners) as the result of various key drivers of change. The research team was asked to quantify key market factors where possible and to project likely paths for the evolution of workforce supply and demand, as well as to assess the implications of the findings. This article drew on the survey research conducted by Readex Research and futurist organizations such as Signature i and Trend Spot Consulting. Furthermore, members of the Dietetics Workforce Demand Task Force were a source of institutional and clinical information relevant to the credentialed dietetics workforce--including their opinions and judgment of the current state of the health care market for dietetic services, its future state, and factors affecting it, which were useful and were integrated with the objective sources of data. The model is flexible and accommodates the variation in how RDs and DTRs function in diverse practice areas. For purposes of this study and model, the dietetics workforce is composed of RDs and DTRs. This report presents the results of this workforce study and the methodology used to calculate the projected dietetics workforce supply and demand. The projections are based on historical trends and estimated future changes. Key findings of the study included the following: • The average age of all CDR-credentialed dietetics practitioners in baseline supply (2010) is 44 years; approximately 96% are women. • Approximately 55% of CDR-credentialed dietetics practitioners work in clinical dietetics. • The annual growth rate of supply of CDR

  13. State of dietetics practice in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryeetey, R N O; Boateng, L; Sackey, D

    2014-12-01

    Prevalence of obesity and related diseases has increased in Ghana. Dietitians have essential skills to prevent and manage dietary diseases. However, little is known about dietetic practice in Ghana. This paper describes the history and current state of dietetics practice in Ghana. A questionnaire was administered to 13 dietitians and six dietetic interns in February 2012. The questionnaire collected data on perceptions about dietetics practice, career progression, and challenges in dietetics practice in Ghana. Key informant interviews (KII) on history of dietetics in Ghana were also held with four retired dietitians, and two dietetics educators. Additional KII were conducted with the Chief dietitian, two officers of the Ghana Dietetic Association, and three other dietitians. Most KII were conducted face-to-face but a few were only possible via telephone. Some of the KII were audio-recorded, in addition to handwritten notes. Following transcription of audiorecorded interviews, all data were subjected to content analysis. Dietetic practice in Ghana has evolved from low-skilled cadre (catering officers) offering hospital-based meal services to the current era of available trained dietitians providing diet therapy in diverse settings. However, 80% of the 35 dietitians identified are working in Accra. In three regions of Ghana, there are no dietitians. There remain limited opportunities for continuous learning and professional career advancement. Additionally, there are many unqualified dietitians in practice. A huge unmet need for dietitians exists in all regions of Ghana, except Greater Accra. Bridging this gap is essential to increase access to dietetic care throughout Ghana.

  14. Application of dietetics in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Michal; Wdowiak, Artur; Marzec, Agnieszka

    2017-12-23

    In the light of up-to-date epidemiological data concerning the prevalence of infertility, and also considering the scale of the problem of obesity and proven cause-effect relationship between abnormal body weight and infertility, it is justifiable to undertake the task of systematization of the state of knowledge concerning nutritional correlates of infertility, in order to create a scientific basis for the formulation of the assumptions of a fertility diet. The study is an attempt to systematize the current state of knowledge concerning the importance of energy and structural (qualitative) aspects of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of infertility.

  15. Application of dietetics in reproductive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Skrzypek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the light of up-to-date epidemiological data concerning the prevalence of infertility, and also considering the scale of the problem of obesity and proven cause-effect relationship between abnormal body weight and infertility, it is justifiable to undertake the task of systematization of the state of knowledge concerning nutritional correlates of infertility, in order to create a scientific basis for the formulation of the assumptions of a fertility diet. The study is an attempt to systematize the current state of knowledge concerning the importance of energy and structural (qualitative aspects of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of infertility.

  16. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable

  17. Entrepreneurship of dietetic program graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Linda L; Blum, Ilya

    2004-01-01

    Successful dietetic program graduates must have an entrepreneurial mindset and skills to respond to environmental changes and consumer trends. The purpose of this study was to determine current or intended entrepreneurship by graduates of a Dietitians of Canada accredited university program, as influenced by self-efficacy stemming from entrepreneurial experiences in education or early career, as well as by internal and external factors. This study employed an exploratory descriptive methodology with a questionnaire mailed to a discrete sample. Ninety graduates completed and returned the questionnaire for a response rate of 55%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, two-way table analysis, the chi-square test for independence, and Fisher's exact test. Significant relationships were found between self-efficacy scores and entrepreneurial action, specific entrepreneurial experiences and entrepreneurial intent and action, dietetic internship and intent, and belief in the importance of business skills and intent. Those with entrepreneurial intent and/or action identified creativity, dietetic education/internship, persistence, business skills, and family/friend support as helping factors. These results suggest that undergraduate, internship, and continuing education programs for dietitians should incorporate activities that develop entrepreneurial skills and contribute toward an entrepreneurial mindset.

  18. [History of the split between medicine and surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez S, Hernán; Parada R, Jerónimo; Cortés S, Cristián; Zúñigar, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    This paper summarizes historical and philosophical aspects, from Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages, concerning the split between physicians and surgeons that began to take place in Alexandria. When exploring the changes in classical medical thought and its influence on philosophy, we conclude that this historical moment was marked by a dual distinction between an essential being and a body subjected to becoming. From a unified mind in Hippocrates, in which medicine is based in knowledge of the relations, subjected to laws, of the organism exposed to natural forces Φνσις (physis among the Jonics), a rift amongst body and soul is conceived, specifically in Platonic thought, from which the surgical intervention of the body is considered improper of the medical art.

  19. Abstracts from Dietetic Research Event: June 8 and 9, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Board), Misty Rossiter (University of Prince Edward Island), Lee Rysdale (Northern Ontario School of Medicine), Pat Vanderkooy (DC), and Heather Wile (CFDR Board), who kept our research presentation sessions on time during the conference. Finally, a special thank you to Janis Randall Simpson and Michelle Naraine at CFDR for their assistance and support throughout the review process. I enjoyed interacting with many of you at the oral research presentations as we highlighted the findings from our dietetic colleagues across our country! Christina Lengyel, PhD, RD Chair, 2017 Abstracts Review Committee Associate Professor Director of the Dietetics Program Foods & Human Nutritional Sciences University of Manitoba.

  20. Establishing the subspecialty of female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery in the United States of America

    OpenAIRE

    Steers, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this review I describe the history leading to the creation of the subspecialty of female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery and its fellowships, the process involved in the current requirements for subspecialty certification and fellowship applications, and the implications for urological training. Results and conclusions The route to subspecialty certification and fellowships for female urology in the USA is a lesson in politics, education, medical rivalries and persever...

  1. Surgery or general medicine: a study of the reasons underlying the choice of medical specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lacerda Bellodi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The reality of medical services in Brazil points towards expansion and diversification of medical knowledge. However, there are few Brazilian studies on choosing a medical specialty. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and characterize the process of choosing the medical specialty among Brazilian resident doctors, with a comparison of the choice between general medicine and surgery. TYPE OF STUDY: Stratified survey. SETTING: Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP. METHODS: A randomized sample of resident doctors in general medicine (30 and surgery (30 was interviewed. Data on sociodemographic characteristics and the moment, stability and reasons for the choice of specialty were obtained. RESULTS: The moment of choice between the two specialties differed. Surgeons (30% choose the specialty earlier, while general doctors decided progressively, mainly during the internship (43%. Most residents in both fields (73% general medicine, 70% surgery said they had considered another specialty before the current choice. The main reasons for general doctors' choice were contact with patients (50%, intellectual activities (30% and knowledge of the field (27%. For surgeons the main reasons were practical intervention (43%, manual activities (43% and the results obtained (40%. Personality was important in the choice for 20% of general doctors and for 27% of surgeons. DISCUSSION: The reasons found for the choice between general medicine and surgery were consistent with the literature. The concepts of wanting to be a general doctor or a surgeon are similar throughout the world. Personality characteristics were an important influencing factor for all residents, without statistical difference between the specialties, as was lifestyle. Remuneration did not appear as a determinant. CONCLUSION: The results from this group of Brazilian resident doctors corroborated data on choosing a medical specialty from other countries

  2. Causes of Ocular Surgery Cancellation and the Need of Anesthesia Preoperative Medicine Clinic (APMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Rehan Moinuddin; Al-Yafi, A.; Malak, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the causes of cancellation rate of elective ocular surgeries in our tertiary care center and to analyze the need of Anesthesia Preoperative Medicine Clinic (APMC). We conducted a prospective study from January 21, 2006 till 30 June, 2006 at King Fahd Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The selected patients for the surgery have gone through pre operative investigations including CBC, Random blood sugar, coagulation profile, renal function tests, urea and electrolytes, IOL calculation and their medical condition assessment for the chronic disease. Study was conducted on 240 patients from whom 180 were adults and 60 were pediatrics. Out of 240 patients, 45 patients were cancelled in which 40 were adults and 5 were pediatric patients. In 45 patients 23 were male and 22 were female having a ratio of 1:1. Age was ranging from one year to 60+ an average of 58 years. Surgeries include was anterior segment, pediatric, retinal and oculoplastic. All these patients 45/240 were postponed at a percentage of 19%. The causes of cancellation were, improper control of diabetes, poor control of hypertension, cardiac problem, chest infection or influenza in children, overburden list and miscellaneous. All these patients were cancelled by anesthesia (28 patients), by surgeon (9 patients) and medical team (8 patients) in the ward as the patients were at high risk for the surgeries. So the reason in maximum patient was lack of anesthesia preoperative medicine clinic. The number of cancellation of ocular surgery can be minimized by proper assessment of the patient at anesthesia pre-operative medicine clinic (APMC). (author)

  3. [Spanish medicine and surgery in the eighteenth century: the Royal College of Cadiz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Afonso, Juan Rafael

    2008-01-01

    We revise the condition of Spanish Surgery and Medicine, at first half of XVIII century, to appraise the labour of Seniors Surgeons of the Navy, Juan Lacomba first and Pedro Virgili after, both creators of The Royal College of Surgery of Cádiz in 1748. This Institution making the renewal of medical and surgical knowledge in the second half of the eighteenth century. In base to original documentation, summarizes the methods and conditions of teaching, pupils, teachers of subjects, from "Clinical Sessions" (sensu lato), the Library, etc. We valued innovative creations of the Botanical Garden of Medicinal Plants, the Cabinet of Natural History and the first shipment of Collegiate Scholars abroad, the edition of new books on various medical, surgical, and other topics, and so on. This led, in 1791, the constitution of the "Miracle of Cádiz" which is just in a single "Carrera", in only one title and one professional to Medicine and Surgery being held in the College of Cádiz and is exported rapidly to the rest of the West. Which expresses the relation what José Celestino Mutis had with the Royal College, where he was to then develop their skills in New Granada, in Colombia today. The College published in Cádiz and in 1792, his Instruccion ... relativa de las especies y virtudes de la Quina [Instructions ... on the species and the virtues of Quina], which is the only publication during his life in Spanish peninsular territory.

  4. SPECIAL ARTICLE STATE OF DIETETICS PRACTICE IN GHANA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    titians and six dietetic interns in February 2012. The questionnaire collected data on perceptions about die- tetics practice, career progression, and challenges in dietetics practice in Ghana. Key informant interviews. (KII) on history of dietetics in Ghana were also held with four retired dietitians, and two dietetics educators.

  5. Diet and dietetics in al-Andalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Huetos-Solano, Maria D; García-Lorda, Pilar; Bulló, Mònica

    2006-08-01

    Al-Andalus society (711-1492) based its idea of health on the wisdom of Classical Greece, the Hippocratic-Galenic theories, as well as the Persian and Hindu cultures. The twelfth century in al-Andalus is considered to be the most prolific period for works of a scientific and technical nature. At the time, the main treatises on dietetics were written and this science reached its widest expression with such leading figures as Ibn Wāfīd, Avenzoar, Averroes and Maimonides, whose works revealed the first scientific knowledge on the nutritional processes of the human body. Diet was regarded as being essential for health and the prevention of disease. Dietary guidelines were written for different age groups, different body types and different seasons of the year. The amount of food to be ingested, the number of meals recommended and the order in which the food should be consumed were all issues that were discussed. A variety of foods were thought to have medicinal properties, some of which are known today. The diet in al-Andalus was varied and very probably made a substantial contribution to the origin of the present-day Mediterranean diet, rich in olive oil, wholemeal cereals, fruit and vegetables, fish, lamb, poultry, nuts and spices. We also find that many of the terms in current use in diet and agriculture are a living testimony to the Arabic influence, as are many of the dishes of our varied Mediterranean gastronomy.

  6. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, Riva; Mobley, Connie

    2013-05-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that nutrition is an integral component of oral health. The Academy supports integration of oral health with nutrition services, education, and research. Collaboration between dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention. Scientific and epidemiological data suggest a lifelong synergy between diet, nutrition, and integrity of the oral cavity in health and disease. Oral health and nutrition have a multifaceted relationship. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic, and systemic diseases with oral manifestations, impact an individual's functional ability to eat and their nutrition status. Likewise, nutrition and diet can affect the development and integrity of the oral cavity and progression of oral diseases. As knowledge of the link between oral and nutrition health increases, dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals must learn to provide screening, education, and referrals as part of comprehensive client/patient care. The provision of medical nutrition therapy, including oral and overall health, is incorporated into the Standards of Practice for registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered. Inclusion of didactic and clinical practice concepts that illustrate the role of nutrition in oral health is essential in education programs for both professional groups. Collaborative endeavors between dietetics, dentistry, medicine, and allied health professionals in research, education, and delineation of practice roles are needed to ensure comprehensive health care. The multifaceted interactions between diet, nutrition, and oral health in practice, education, and research in both dietetics and dentistry merit continued, detailed delineation. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diet, dietetics and flora of the Holy Bible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhaktha, P K J P; Narayana, Ala; Sharma, Bhuvnesh Kumar; Rao, M Mruthyumjaya

    2006-01-01

    The study of history of medical science from non-medical sources needs no apology. At first the discussion of what was thought in the past rather than what is known now appears to be of merely antiquarian value. The knowledge of Diet, Dietetics, medicinal plants dates back to the remote antiquity of mankind. The Hebrews can be proud of having preserved in the Old Testament many old medical practices and traditions, which throw light on ancient medicine. The Bible is genuinely documented book representing the wisdom, medical knowledge and the culture, of a nomadic race. This article contains information of some medicinal plants, which are useful for treating different kinds of ailments and some with nutritious qualities.

  8. Crossover Designs in Nutrition and Dietetics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey E; Raynor, Hollie A

    2017-07-01

    This article is the 12th installment in a statistical series exploring the importance of research design, epidemiologic methods, and statistical analysis as applied to nutrition and dietetics research. The purpose of this series is to assist registered dietitian nutritionists in interpreting nutrition research and aid nutrition researchers in applying scientific principles to produce high-quality nutrition research. This article focuses on the use of crossover designs in nutrition and dietetics research. The purpose is to distinguish the crossover design from the randomized clinical trial, define important terms, illustrate a 2×2 crossover design, discuss potential confounding variables in the crossover design, describe the analysis and interpretation of crossover data, present sample size considerations, provide examples of the use of the crossover design in nutrition and dietetics, and discuss additional considerations when the independent variable has more than two levels. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gorilla endoscopic sinus surgery: a life-saving collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Greg E; Baik, Fred M; Liddell, Robert M; Ayars, Andrew G; Branch, Kelley R; Pottinger, Paul S; Hillel, Allen D; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin

    2018-03-23

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is a common disease process in humans; however, in the primate population of gorillas, it has rarely been described. This case describes lifesaving sinus surgery on a critically ill gorilla performed by a human otolaryngology team in collaboration with the gorilla's veterinary medicine team. The 35-year-old western silverback gorilla was treated for 3 months with aggressive medical therapy for a worsening sinus infection. When his condition became severe, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed showing advanced chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps vs other masses and some bone erosion. As his condition deteriorated further, a tertiary otolaryngology team performed sinus surgery using the latest technology available, including image guidance, steroid-eluting sinus stents, and balloon sinus dilation. The postoperative course was complicated by subcutaneous infection and eventual fistulization. Fortunately, with culture-directed antibiotic therapy his condition gradually improved. One year later he required revision sinus surgery. At that point allergy testing was performed followed by appropriate allergy medical therapy. Now, 3 years out from his initial surgery, he continues to do well and has fathered a young female gorilla. This case represents a unique collaboration between human physicians and veterinarians. The combined medical approach was critical to heal this ailing gorilla. This case discusses many of the challenges and offers recommendations for physicians who may be involved with similar care of animals in the future. The success of the surgical and medical treatment of this gorilla's life-threatening sinus infection required many experts, careful planning, and corporate generosity. The interaction between human and animal medicine would not have been successful without the close and trusting collaborations between human and veterinary health providers. We encourage human healthcare providers to seek volunteer

  10. New Help from cellular medicine to surgery; Nuevas ayudas de la medicina nuclear a la cirugia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras Delgado, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    New Nuclear Medicine techniques to help the surgeon in the operation room are now being introduced. They aim to get a better location of the objective or a shorter duration of the surgical process. The selective radio guided biopsy of the sentinel node included in the clinical practise guidelines for the surgery of tumours as breast cancer and malignant melanoma is the paradigm of this new techniques. Other techniques are intraoperatory detection with probes or portable gamma cameras of tumour lesions as parathyroid adenomas, metastatic neuroendocrine tumours and other tumours. (Author) 16 refs.

  11. The Profession of Dietetics. The Report of the Study Commission on Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, John S.

    This publication is a report in response to the request of the American Dietetic Association and its foundation to study all aspects of dietetic practice, education, and professional organization. A brief summary of the major findings and recommendations is presented. Emphasis is placed on who and what are dietitians. The educational programs,…

  12. Use of psychoactive substances in three medical specialties: anaesthesia, medicine and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsky, I; Hopwood, M; Abram, S E; Cerletty, J M; Hoffman, R G; Kampine, J P

    1994-07-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of psychoactive substance use in three specialty groupings, 1,624 questionnaires were sent to physicians in medicine, surgery and anaesthesia; all had trained at the same academic institution. A response rate of 57.8% was achieved. Comparison of prevalence of impairment rates showed no differences between Surgery (14.4%), Medicine (19.9%) and Anaesthesia (16.8%). Substance abuse was clearly associated with a family history of abuse; 32.1% of the abusers had a family history of such abuse compared with 11.7% of the non-abusers. Increased stress at various career stages did not appear to increase substance abuse; problem areas during medical life times were similar for each specialty. Substances most frequently used were marijuana (54.7%), amphetamines (32.9%); and benzodiazepines (25.1%). Seventy-three used psychoactive drugs which were non-prescribed. Drug counselling programmes were judged inadequate by most. Use of alcohol and drugs by faculty members was reported by a number of respondents.

  13. Evidence-Based Medicine in Plastic Surgery: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Daniel G; Rodrigues, Maria Amelia; Tedesco, Ana Carolina B; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Roxo, Ana C W; de Castro, Claudio Cardoso; Aboudib, Jose Horacio

    2018-01-01

    The practice of evidence-based medicine in plastic surgery is no longer a trend but a reality, with a growing number of studies published in recent years using evidence-based medicine as an assessment tool. The aim of this study was to verify whether the number of citations to articles with a high level of evidence is greater than articles with low level of evidence. A search was conducted in the 4 main international journals of plastic surgery. All original articles published in 2011 were analyzed, selected, and classified based on the study design. The articles were then divided into 2 groups: group 1, high level of evidence; and group 2, low level of evidence. Next, Scopus was searched for the number of citations of each article in the 2 subsequent years. The proportion of the number of citations received by articles in groups 1 and 2 was statistically compared. The articles with the highest level of evidence were the most cited among original articles, with 48.6% of them being cited more than 10 times over 2 years, whereas only 18.4% of articles in group 2 were cited with the same frequency. The mean number of citations was 12.6 citations per article in group 1 and 6.56 citations in group 2, with a significant difference between groups (P < 0.0001). The articles with a higher level of evidence are, on average, cited more often than those with low levels of evidence in the leading journals of plastic surgery.

  14. [Security of the medicinal therapy: Cartography of risks a priori within service of orthopaedic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razurel, A; Bertrand, É; Deranlot, J; Benhamou, F; Tritz, T; Le Mercier, F; Hardy, P

    2015-11-01

    Security and quality of the Medicinal Therapy are one of the most important objectives of the April 6th, 2011 order. The objective is to realize this study of the risks incurred by patients related to management and security of medicinal therapy in order to establish a plan to reduce the risks of drug's dispensation. The method of the Preliminary Risk Analysis (PRA) has been implemented by a multidisciplinary group in a hospital service of orthopaedic surgery. The study focused on the dispensation phase of medicinal circuit. This analysis revealed 148 scenarii, 35 were criticality unacceptable. Fifty-four initial risk control actions were proposed and their stress levels to put them in place were evaluated. The main measures of risk management are: training, information, communication, computerization, automation, dual control, updating the documentation system, drug reconciliation and respect for Best Practices Hospitallers (BPH). Risk management requires a significant human and financial investment as well as, material resources and multidisciplinary expertise in order to offer the best solutions. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Twenty years history and the future of Asian-Pacific Association of Laser Medicine and Surgery (APLMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazuhiko

    2005-07-01

    In 1986, APLMS was established to promote the various activities of Laser Medicine Surgery in the Asia-pacific regions. The purpose of APLMS is not only to deliver academic information but also technological, industrial and social ones. Until now, the 9 congresses had been taken place in the different countries in Asia-Pacific regions. As the results of the 18years" efforts, the organizations of each country on laser medicine and surgery have been established, and the network of researchers and clinicians has been completed. The next challenges are proposed such as education, training, and standardization of methods. To establish guidelines and regulation for laser medicine and surgery, and to transfer technology are also important issues.

  16. Position of the American Dietetic Association: weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, Helen M; Strain, Gladys Witt; Makris, Angela; Reeves, Rebecca S

    2009-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that successful weight management to improve overall health for adults requires a lifelong commitment to healthful lifestyle behaviors emphasizing sustainable and enjoyable eating practices and daily physical activity. Given the increasing incidence of overweight and obesity along with the escalating health care costs associated with weight-related illnesses, health care providers must discover how to effectively treat this complex condition. Food and nutrition professionals should stay current and skilled in weight management to assist clients in preventing weight gain, optimizing individual weight loss interventions, and achieving long-term weight loss maintenance. Using the American Dietetic Association's Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for weight management. The evidence supporting the value of portion control, eating frequency, meal replacements, and very-low-energy diets are discussed as well as physical activity, behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Public policy changes to create environments that can assist all populations to achieve and sustain healthful lifestyle behaviors are also reviewed.

  17. Risk of Abnormal Eating Attitudes among Turkish Dietetic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziltan, Gul; Karabudak, Efsun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among Turkish dietetic students and the relations between nutrition education and eating attitudes. The study population was 568 female university students (248 dietetic students, 320 non-dietetic students). Two scales were used: Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)…

  18. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the DTR's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the DTR's education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered reflects the Academy's position on the DTR scope of practice and the essential technical assistance role of the DTR in providing safe timely person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  19. Online Physician Reviews in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery: What Do Patients Really Want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanad, Kian; Parameshwar, Pooja S; Houman, Justin; Spiegel, Brennan M; Daskivich, Timothy J; Anger, Jennifer T

    This study aimed to qualitatively analyze online reviews of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) specialists to better understand patients' experiences and improve patient satisfaction. Fifty urologists and urogynecologists were randomly sampled from the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction membership website. We evaluated patient ratings and reviews of physicians from 4 websites: Yelp, Healthgrades, Vitals, and UCompareHealthCare. Qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology, as described by Charmaz (Constructing Grounded Theory, 2014). Across the four websites, the mean number of stars per physician ranged from 3.6 to 4.1 and the mean number of reviews per physician ranged from 1.3 to 7.6. Qualitative analysis revealed several preliminary themes: patient-physician experience, medical and surgical treatment, office staff, and analysis of worth. Physicians who developed strong connections with patients through empathetic communication were likely to receive a positive review, regardless of wait times. Bedside manner was found to be multidimensional and included physician competence and understanding patients' concerns. Failure to meet several expectations led to dissatisfaction of care and negative patient reviews. Patients' perspectives of quality of care in FPMRS are weighted heavily toward establishing personal connections with physicians. Accurate diagnosis and effective management of urological conditions, especially after negative experiences with previous providers, were associated with satisfaction of care. It seems that the concept of good bedside manner is multifactorial and requires the provider to demonstrate not one but several different sets of communication skills.

  20. A comparison of medical litigation filed against obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Tomoko; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-10-24

    The aim of this study was to review the typical factors related to physician's liability in obstetrics and gynecology departments, as compared to those in internal medicine and surgery, regarding a breach of the duty to explain. This study involved analyzing 366 medical litigation case reports from 1990 through 2008 where the duty to explain was disputed. We examined relationships between patients, physicians, variables related to physician's explanations, and physician's breach of the duty to explain by comparing mean values and percentages in obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgical departments with the t-test and χ(2) test. When we compared the reasons for decisions in cases where the patient won, we found that the percentage of cases in which the patient's claim was recognized was the highest for both physician negligence, including errors of judgment and procedural mistakes, and breach of the duty to explain, in obstetrics and gynecology departments; breach of the duty to explain alone in internal medicine departments; and mistakes in medical procedures alone in surgical departments (p = 0.008). When comparing patients, the rate of death was significantly higher than that of other outcomes in precedents where a breach of the duty to explain was acknowledged (p = 0.046). The proportion of cases involving obstetrics and gynecology departments, in which care was claimed to be substandard at the time of treatment, and that were not argued as breach of a duty to explain, was significantly higher than those of other evaluated departments (p obstetrics and gynecology departments, the proportion of cases in which it had been conceded that the duty to explain had been breached when seeking patient approval (or not) was significantly higher than in other departments (p = 0.002). It is important for physicians working in obstetrics and gynecology departments to carefully explain the risk of death associated with any planned procedure, and to obtain

  1. Geriatric Nutrition Workshop for the Dietetic Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workshop guide is a unit of study for teaching dietetic assistants to work with elderly persons. The objective of the unit is to enable the students to apply knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of aging in providing nutritional care to the elderly in independent living and nursing home situations. Following the unit…

  2. [Optimization of formulations for dietetic pastry products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, M; Uquiche, E; Brito, G; Cancino, M

    2000-03-01

    Optimized formulations of dietetic pastry products such as cake and sponge cake premixes were formulated using the surface response methodology. % Emulsifier agent and baking time were the selected independent variables for cake, as well as % emulsifier agent % chlorinated flour the variables selected for sponge cake. Three different level of each variable summing up thirteen experimental formulae of each product were assessed to optimize the variables that could have some influence in the sensory characteristics of these dietetic products. The total sensory quality was determined for both dietetic products using the composite scoring test and a panel of 18 trained judges. Looking at the contour graphic and considering economic aspects the best combination of variables for cake formulation was 2% emulsifier agent and 48 minutes for baking time, With respect to sponge cake, the best combination was 6% emulsifier agent and 48% chlorinated flour. Shelf life studies showed that both dietetic formulations remained stable during storage conditions of 75 days at 30 degrees C. During this period, significant differences in sensory characteristics were not found (p pastry products had good acceptability, and open up marketing opportunities for new products with potential health benefits to consumers.

  3. The effect of community based-academic partnerships on student knowledge about plastic surgery and interest in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillah, Nyama M; Miller, Hannah J; Weis Sadoski, Tahlia L; Larson, Jeffrey D; Bentz, Michael L; King, Timothy W

    2015-06-01

    Programs specific to plastic surgery are necessary to dispel common myths and increase interest in the field. In a previous publication by the authors, a community outreach program was developed for these reasons for middle school students. In the current study, we expanded on the previous research and collected objective data to assess students' initial interest in medicine and knowledge about plastic surgery, compared to their interest and knowledge afterward. The program previously developed by the authors was modified and performed for the students at various community outreach events and included a PowerPoint presentation, case didactics, and hands-on activities. A test about plastic surgery and questionnaire about interest in the medical field and becoming a doctor was given to each student before and after the program. One hundred seventy-nine students participated in the program from 2009 to 2013. The pretest mean score was 6.50 of 12 questions whereas the posttest mean score was 9.72 (P = plastic surgery community outreach program is beneficial in increasing students' interest in the field of medicine as a whole, and more specifically in the field of plastic surgery.

  4. Augmenting Surgery via Multi-scale Modeling and Translational Systems Biology in the Era of Precision Medicine: A Multidisciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Ghassan S; An, Gary; Sander, Edward A; Miga, Michael I; Guccione, Julius M; Ji, Songbai; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    In this era of tremendous technological capabilities and increased focus on improving clinical outcomes, decreasing costs, and increasing precision, there is a need for a more quantitative approach to the field of surgery. Multiscale computational modeling has the potential to bridge the gap to the emerging paradigms of Precision Medicine and Translational Systems Biology, in which quantitative metrics and data guide patient care through improved stratification, diagnosis, and therapy. Achievements by multiple groups have demonstrated the potential for (1) multiscale computational modeling, at a biological level, of diseases treated with surgery and the surgical procedure process at the level of the individual and the population; along with (2) patient-specific, computationally-enabled surgical planning, delivery, and guidance and robotically-augmented manipulation. In this perspective article, we discuss these concepts, and cite emerging examples from the fields of trauma, wound healing, and cardiac surgery.

  5. Stress urinary incontinence surgery trends in academic female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery urology practice in the setting of the food and drug administration public health notifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rac, Goran; Younger, Austin; Clemens, James Q; Kobashi, Kathleen; Khan, Aqsa; Nitti, Victor; Jacobs, Ilana; Lemack, Gary E; Brown, Elizabeth T; Dmochowski, Roger; MacLachlan, Lara; Mourtzinos, Arthur; Ginsberg, David; Koski, Michelle; Rames, Ross; Rovner, Eric S

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the possible effects of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Public Health Notifications in 2008 and 2011 regarding surgical trends in transvaginal mesh (TVM) placement for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and related mesh revision surgery in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) practice in tertiary care academic medical centers in the United States. Surgical volume for procedures performed primarily by FPMRS surgeons at eight academic institutions across the US was collected using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for stress urinary incontinence repair and revision surgeries from 2007 to 2013. SAS statistical software was used to assess for trends in the data. There was a decrease in the use of synthetic mesh sling for the treatment of SUI at academic tertiary care centers over the past 7 years; however, this was not statistically significant. While the total number of surgical interventions for SUI remained stable, there was an increase in the utilization of autologous fascia pubovaginal slings (AFPVS). The number of mesh sling revision surgeries, including urethrolysis and removal or revision of slings, increased almost three-fold at these centers. These observed trends suggest a possible effect of the FDA Public Health Notifications regarding TVM on surgical practice for SUI in academic centers, even though they did not specifically warn against the use of synthetic mesh for this indication. Indications for surgery, complications, and outcomes were not evaluated during this retrospective study. However, such data may provide alternative insights into reasons for the observed trends. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1155-1160, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The goal of credentialed dietetics practitioners(RDs and DTRs) is to provide safe,culturally competent, quality care. Within the flexible and broad boundaries of the profession of nutrition and dietetics, RDs and DTRs assume accountability and responsibility for safe, ethical, and competent practice that achieves desirable outcomes. RDs and DTRs engage in continuing education and training to maintain currency,demonstrate competence, and advance their careers. The Academy developed this Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics overview document, as well as other resources, such as the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian and the Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered to aid RDs and DTRs in assessing their individual scope of practice and, if applicable, statutory scope of practice,and to support RDs and DTRs in providing safe, quality food and nutrition services.The Scope of Practice Decision Tool,which is an online, interactive tool, assists RDs and DTRs in examining his or her individual scope of practice activities to meet the needs of quality food and nutrition services.

  7. What do dietetics students think professionalism entails? | Marais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Members of a profession are committed to codes of ethics and professionalism. The aim was to determine which professionalism attributes dietetics students deem important and relevant to their profession. Methods. A total of 109 dietetics students from two universities in the Western Cape, South Africa, ...

  8. Communication in the Disciplines: Interpersonal Communication in Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrchota, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes to expand the scope of oral communication across the curriculum research by exploring oral genres in a dietetics curriculum from the perspective of the dietetics faculty. The goals of this qualitative study, couched within the communication in the disciplines framework, are to identify the oral genres integral to the study and…

  9. Biochemistry for Nutrition/Dietetics Students: Course Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Lorraine Handler

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed dietetics directors (N=186) and biochemistry instructors (N=153) on topics emphasized in biochemistry courses for dietetics and nutrition students. Results indicate a consistent pattern of variation in topics emphasized and that this variation is influenced by whether students in other major fields are also in a course. (JN)

  10. The Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group collecting outcomes mentoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The is a newsletter article for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group (WM DPG). The article presents the ‘Collecting Outcomes Mentoring Program’ for 2017 that is managed by the Research Section of the WM DPG. Dietitians in the WM DGP are provided wi...

  11. Nutrition and dietetic practice in eating disorder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S; Russell, J; Abraham, S

    2011-04-01

    This review examines the current literature that is available on nutrition and dietetic practice in the treatment of eating disorders. Evidence-based guidelines on nutrition and dietetic practice in the management of eating disorder patients are lacking, as is detailed information on how to implement existing recommendations into day-to-day practice. A search of databases was undertaken, with articles on nutrition and eating disorders being reviewed for strength of evidence, content and relevance to dietetic practice. Core dietetic skills used at the graduate level, such as dietary assessment, were not included in the literature review. There were a total of 61 references reviewed that discussed nutrition and dietetic practice in the management of eating disorder patients. Most papers were descriptive papers, with few examining the effectiveness of nutrition intervention. Three papers were surveys that assessed the professional needs and challenges of dietitians who work with eating disorder clients. Dietetic practice in the treatment of eating disorder patients is not well defined. Most publications are descriptions of practice, with few evaluating the effectiveness of dietetic work. Dietitians need to move from the clinical arena alone and become more involved in research, evaluating practice and defining a gold standard of nutritional treatment strategies that are best delivered by the dietitian. There is also a need for manualised approaches that can be prospectively examined. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  13. Crafting meaning: arts-informed dietetics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    University nutrition students' experiences of participation in an arts module as part of a senior nutrition course were explored to gain an understanding of the relationship of art to dietetics practice. The module comprised discussions, readings, and presentations from dietitian artists, along with three assignments: the production of art, an artist statement, and a reflection paper. The art production depicting an aspect of body image was presented to the class and optionally at a body image conference. An exploratory, qualitative methodology informed by Schön's reflective practice framework was employed. Three surveys administered at various times during the arts module were used to collect students' reflections and were thematically analyzed. Three themes emerged: hesitance to acceptance, emotion and connection, and relationship with dietetics. The education process facilitated a transformation among students, noted as changes in knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes over the course of the module. The arts provide an alternative platform for an exploration of self and others, for improving practice, and for an examination of novel ways for doing so. Reflection as an education component enables students to contemplate relationships, knowledge, emotions, and practice as interrelated and evolving entities.

  14. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen's University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen's University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds '55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds '57) and John Emery (Meds '57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds '66). John Davidson (Meds '82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds '88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds '03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division's clinical and academic mission. The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen's School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  15. 5 ARTICLE Departments of Dietetics and Paediatric Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adverse nutritional effects of cancer can be severe, compounded by the ... Nutritional supplementation in the form of snacks and nutritional ... and 51 g of protein. Patients received a daily median total energy and protein intake of 1 581 kcal and 64.6 g respectively. Because of the retrospective nature of the study, actual ...

  16. Global scientific production of robotic surgery in medicine: A 20-year survey of research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin; Gu, Guangfei; Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2016-06-01

    Robot-assisted surgery operations are being performed more frequently in the world these years. In order to have a macroscopic view of publication activities about robotic surgery, the first bibliometric analysis was conducted to investigate the publication distributions of robotic surgery. The original articles about robotic surgery were extracted from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-E) on Web of Science and analyzed concerning their distributions. We also explored the potential correlations between publications of different countries and their Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The total number of original articles retrieved from SCI-E was 3362 from 1994 to 2015. The number of original articles published in the last decade has a burgeoning increase of 572.87% compared with that published in the former decade. The leading country was USA who have published 1402 pieces of articles (41.701%), followed by Germany with 342 (10.173%). The journal published the highest number of original articles was Journal of Endourology with 237 (7.049%), followed by Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques (188, 5.592%). There was strong correlations between publication numbers and GDP of different countries (r(2) = 0.889, p research activities has the potential to guide future trend in the field of robotic surgery. There is a skyrocket trend of robotic surgery in medical research over the last two decades, and countries with high GDP tend to make more contributions to the medical field of robotic surgery. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  18. The Influence of Medical Insurance on Patient Access to Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine Appointments Under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Nwachuku, Emmanuel; Roth, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Save, Ameya; Anandasivam, Nidharshan S; Medvecky, Michael; Pelker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    The goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was to expand patient access to health care. Since the rollout of the PPACA, Medicaid patients have demonstrated difficulty obtaining appointments in some specialty care settings. To assess the effect of insurance type (Medicaid and private) on patient access to orthopaedic surgery sports medicine specialists for a semiurgent evaluation of a likely operative bucket-handle meniscus tear. The study was designed to determine whether disparities in access exist since the PPACA rollout. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. The design was to call 180 orthopaedic surgery sports medicine specialists in 6 representative states (California, Ohio, New York, Florida, Texas, and North Carolina) between June 2015 and December 2015. An appointment was requested for the caller's fictitious 25-year-old-brother who had suffered a bucket-handle meniscus tear. Each office was called twice to assess the ease of obtaining an appointment: once for patients with Medicaid and once for patients with private insurance. For each call, data pertaining to whether an appointment was given, wait times, and barriers to receiving an appointment were recorded. A total of 177 surgeons were called within the study period. Overall, 27.1% of offices scheduled an appointment for a patient with Medicaid, compared with 91.2% ( P insurance. Medicaid patients were significantly more likely to be denied an appointment due to lack of referral compared with private patients (40.2% vs 3.7%, P medicine specialists between Medicaid-expanded and -nonexpanded states. Medicaid reimbursement for knee arthroscopy with meniscus repair was not significantly correlated with appointment success rate or patient waiting periods. Despite the passage of the PPACA, patients with Medicaid have reduced access to care. In addition, patients with Medicaid confront more barriers to receiving appointments than patients with private insurance and wait longer for an

  19. Peculiar dietetic products (1900-1950 (II: scientism and advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Boatella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a continuation of the article “Peculiar dietetic products (1850-1950” (Act Diet. 2009; 13:27-30, this paper discusses various dietetic foods developed in Spain during the period 1900-1950. This time, the uniqueness of them focuses on aspects of their formulation (unreported, doubtful effectiveness, erroneous based on current knowledge, etc.. or with the advertising strategies used.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14306/renhyd.17.3.10

  20. Position of the American Dietetic Association: oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, Riva; Mobley, Connie C

    2007-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition is an integral component of oral health. The American Dietetic Association supports the integration of oral health with nutrition services, education, and research. Collaboration between dietetics and dental professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention. Scientific and epidemiological data suggest a lifelong synergy between nutrition and the integrity of the oral cavity in health and disease. Oral health and nutrition have a synergistic bidirectional relationship. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic, and terminal systemic diseases with oral manifestations, impact the functional ability to eat as well as diet and nutrition status. Likewise, nutrition and diet may affect the development and integrity of the oral cavity as well as the progression of oral diseases. As we advance in our discoveries of the links between oral and nutrition health, practitioners of both disciplines must learn to provide screening, baseline education, and referral to each other as part of comprehensive client/patient care. Dietetics practice requires registered dietitians to provide medical nutrition therapy that incorporates a person's total health needs, including oral health. Inclusion of both didactic and clinical practice concepts that illustrate the role of nutrition in oral health is essential in both dental and dietetic education programs. Collaborative endeavors between dietetics and dentistry in research, education, and delineation of health provider practice roles are needed to ensure comprehensive health care. The multifaceted interactions between diet, nutrition, and oral health in practice, education, and research in both dietetics and dentistry merit continued, detailed delineation.

  1. Advances of the Surgery of the Breast Cancer with help of the Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra Garcia, A.; Gomez Embuena, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of the nuclear medicine to the surgical current practice In the treatment of the cancer of breast, by means of the application of radioactive isotopes, have supposed a great achievement not only in the surgical and predicted results but also in the surgical skills more effective and less aggressive. The systematic research of the marking and extirpation of Sentinel Lymph Node is avoiding in the early cancer the linfadenectomy axilar. The application of the ROLL and SNOLL skills is being determinant in the extirpation with trustworthy margins of the non-palpable lesions cancer, with big safety instead harpoons that we used before. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Social Media and the Dietetics Practitioner: Opportunities, Challenges, and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Janet; Jones, Regan Miller

    2016-11-01

    Social media tools, including blogs, social networks, and media-sharing sites, help nutrition and dietetics practitioners reach broader audiences and connect directly with the public. In many ways, social media has transformed the practice of dietetics and has opened up new avenues for communicating food and nutrition information. Social media has been an effective tool for virtual nutrition counseling, patient education, peer-to-peer support, and public health campaigns. Increasingly, nutrition and dietetics practitioners are using social media to network and collaborate with colleagues, conduct a job search, stay current with new research, champion a cause, promote products or services, and build a business. The potential role of social media in the profession is far reaching, yet there are important guidelines to follow related to ethics and professionalism. When using social media, nutrition and dietetics practitioners must remember that they are governed by the same Code of Ethics that guides all other aspects of practice. In addition, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of all the factors related to social media professionalism, including disclosure rules from the Federal Trade Commission, patient/client privacy and confidentiality as covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and copyright laws that protect intellectual property. In today's digital age, it is essential for nutrition and dietetics practitioners to recognize the professional opportunities and challenges of social media. Failing to effectively and ethically use social media can reflect poorly on the individual practitioner and the profession. Certain violations may have legal implications. The purpose of this Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics practice paper is to provide guidance on social media's relevance, potential applications, best practices, benefits, and risks. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. New dietetic practitioners' perspectives on their education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jennifer; Lordly, Daphne; MacLellan, Debbie; Gingras, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the complex phenomenon of dietitian professional socialization, we examined factors that influence people's decisions to pursue a career in dietetics and how education and training processes influence the professional socialization of dietitians. Participants (n=12) had less than three years of work experience and included alumni from three Canadian universities representing different models of entry to practice. Three one-on-one interviews were conducted with each participant. The key influencing factor in participants' decision to pursue dietetics was the perceived congruence between dietetics and other aspects of their lives, including early interests and experiences (sports, food and cooking, an eating disorder), career aspirations (science, health care), and social networks (the desire to be a professional). A pivotal experience during high school or while enrolled in or after graduation from another program prompted participants' awareness of and subsequent decision to pursue a career in dietetics. Supportive relationships were vital to participants' professional socialization. Recruitment materials and education opportunities should help aspiring dietitians develop a clear idea of what being a dietitian means. Dietetic educators must attend to the informational and relational aspects involved in shaping future practitioners' dietitian identities.

  4. The Nature of Competition in Dietetics Education: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Jillian; Lordly, Daphne

    2017-09-01

    The impact on student development associated with being part of a competitive program is an emerging finding in dietetics research. As such, a narrative review of relevant literature was conducted pertaining to competition in post-secondary programs and the educational experience of students with respect to developing a career in dietetics. The review was guided by 2 questions: How is competition experienced by students? What strategies can reduce competition among dietetics students within the educational experience? A refined literature screening process justified including 32 articles in the review. The overall review findings suggested that, across dietetics programs, the outcomes of competition negatively impacted students' personal identity, motivation in the learning process, and involvement behaviours, including collaboration among students, participation in academic opportunities, and student relationships with faculty. The implementation of strategies conducive to addressing the effects of excessive competition and building a supportive academic environment, for example increasing collegiality and engaging students in intrinsic learning, are important for continued growth of the dietetics profession. Educators can reflect on the complex nature of competition and how the effects of excessive competition may be in opposition with the competencies that students are expected to develop as professionals.

  5. Food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheule, B

    2000-08-01

    To identify food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality management students. Written questionnaires were used to identify educational goals and the most important food safety competencies for entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers. The sample included all directors of didactic programs in dietetics approved by the American Dietetic Association and baccalaureate-degree hospitality programs with membership in the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education. Fifty-one percent of the directors responded. Descriptive statistics were calculated. chi 2 analysis and independent t tests were used to compare educators' responses for discrete and continuous variables, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis grouped statements about food safety competence. Internal consistency of factors was measured using Cronbach alpha. Thirty-four percent of dietetics programs and 70% of hospitality programs required or offered food safety certification. Dietetics educators reported multiple courses with food safety information, whereas hospitality educators identified 1 or 2 courses. In general, the educators rated food-safety competencies as very important or essential. Concepts related to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HAACP), irradiation, and pasteurization were rated less highly, compared with other items. Competencies related to reasons for outbreaks of foodborne illness were rated as most important. Food safety certification of dietitians and an increased emphasis on HAACP at the undergraduate level or during the practice component are suggested. Research is recommended to assess the level of food-safety competence expected by employers of entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers.

  6. Qualitative research in nutrition and dietetics: assessing quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilnick, A; Swift, J A

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, qualitative research has become much more widely used in healthcare settings and undoubtedly has much to offer nutrition and dietetics. Its value is, however, still sometimes called into question and, for those unfamiliar with qualitative approaches, it can be difficult to grasp what distinguishes 'good' qualitative research from that which has been less rigorously conceived and conducted. This review, the fourth in the series, aims to highlight some of the key scientific debates around the quality criteria that can be applied to qualitative research, and offers some flexible guidelines that may be used both in producing and assessing qualitative health research, including studies in nutrition and dietetics. Other reviews in this series provide a model for embarking on a qualitative research project in nutrition and dietetics, an overview of the principal techniques of data collection, sampling and analysis and some practical advice relevant to nutrition and dietetics, along with glossaries of key terms. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  7. History of education in medicine and surgery, first hospitals development of urology in danzig/Gdańsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajączkowski, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present the development of hospital services and the teaching of medicine, and the development of urology in Danzig (Gdańisk). Well known Danzig surgeons who were interested in surgery of the genitourinary system are also presented. The beginning of urological surgery and its development within the framework of the department of surgery and as an independent facility at the Medical Academy of Gdafisk in the post-war period is also described. Extensive research was undertaken for the collection of literature and documents in German and Polish archives and libraries in order to prepare this study. The history of hospitals in Danzig goes back to the arrival of the Teutonic Knights in 1308. The earliest institution, according to historical sources, was the Hospital of the Holy Spirit, built in the years 1310-1311. It was run by the Hospitalet Order until 1382, and was intended for the sick, elderly and disabled people, orphans and needy pilgrim, and the poor. Later centuries saw the further development of hospital services in Danzig. In the 19th century, the city's increas ing population, the development of the sciences, and rapid advances in medicine subsequently led to the establishment of three more hospitals in Gdafisk: The Hospital for Obstetrics and Gynaecological Disease (1819), the Holy Virgin Hospital (1852), and the Evangelical Hospital of Deaconess Sisters (1857), in addition to the old Municipal Hospital. In 1911, new modern buildings of Municipal Hospital in Danzig were finished. On the basis of the Municipal Hospi- tal, the Academy of Practical Medicine was established in 1935. It was known under the name Staatliche Akademie fiir Praktische Medizin in the Free City of Danzig. Five years later (in 1940) the Academy was developed and changed to the Medical Academy of Danzig (Medizinische Akad- emie Danzig - MAD). The beginning of medical teaching at the middle level in Danzig (Gdafsk) dates back to the 16th century. It had its

  8. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interventions for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Hollie A; Champagne, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that successful treatment of overweight and obesity in adults requires adoption and maintenance of lifestyle behaviors contributing to both dietary intake and physical activity. These behaviors are influenced by many factors; therefore, interventions incorporating more than one level of the socioecological model and addressing several key factors in each level may be more successful than interventions targeting any one level and factor alone. Registered dietitian nutritionists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, need to be current and skilled in weight management to effectively assist and lead efforts that can reduce the obesity epidemic. Using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Evidence on intrapersonal influences, such as dietary approaches, lifestyle intervention, pharmacotherapy, and surgery, is provided. Factors related to treatment, such as intensity of treatment and technology, are reviewed. Community-level interventions that strengthen existing community assets and capacity and public policy to create environments that support healthy energy balance behaviors are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Educational (Im)possibility for Dietetics: A Poststructural Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Inquiring into the theoretical underpinnings of dietetic curriculum provides a means for further understanding who dietitians are (identity) and what dietitians do (performativity). Since dietetic curriculum exists as a structural influence on the dietetic student identity, it is worth inquiring into how such a structure is theoretically informed,…

  10. Dietetic treatment lowers body mass index in overweight patients : an observational study in primary health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J; Swinkels, Ilse C; De Bakker, Dinny H; Seidell, J; Veenhof, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Greater insight into the effectiveness of usual dietetic care will contribute to the ongoing development of dietetic services. The present study examined the change in body mass index (BMI) in overweight patients after dietetic treatment in primary care, the sources of variability and

  11. Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Alves Dias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Dias R.A., Souza A.P. & Garino Júnior F. [Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB.] Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana nos setores de Clínica e Cirurgia de Pequenos Animais do Hospital Veterinário da UFCG, PB. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:173-177, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Av. Universitária, s/n, Bairro Santa Cecília, Patos, PB 58708-110, Brasil. E-mail: rafa.ad@hotmail.com With this study aimed to evaluate bacterial contamination sectors Clinic and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital UFCG, in order to prevent infections in patients attending hospital. An assessment of the environmental contamination of sectors before and after disinfection, where was collected samples of air, surfaces and hands of people who deal directly with the animals. Then the test was made of the effectiveness of disinfectants used. Of the 40 samples collected, was identified in 5 of them (12.5% Enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Klebisiella pneumoniae and in 22 samples (55% was identified Staphylococcus coagulase negative and positive. Was seen in the quantitative analysis that the number of cfu in some sample was above the indicated. The test showed that the disinfectant solution was effective against all micro-organisms found in the environments. The results indicate that more attention to procedures performed in the disinfection of areas evaluated, and also include measures to prevent contamination at these sites.

  12. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Health Implications of Dietary Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J; Stewart, Maria L

    2015-11-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Dietary fiber is defined by the Institute of Medicine Food Nutrition Board as "nondigestible carbohydrates and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants." Populations that consume more dietary fiber have less chronic disease. Higher intakes of dietary fiber reduce the risk of developing several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers, and have been associated with lower body weights. The Adequate Intake for fiber is 14 g total fiber per 1,000 kcal, or 25 g for adult women and 38 g for adult men, based on research demonstrating protection against coronary heart disease. Properties of dietary fiber, such as fermentability and viscosity, are thought to be important parameters influencing the risk of disease. Plant components associated with dietary fiber may also contribute to reduced disease risk. The mean intake of dietary fiber in the United States is 17 g/day with only 5% of the population meeting the Adequate Intake. Healthy adults and children can achieve adequate dietary fiber intakes by increasing their intake of plant foods while concurrently decreasing energy from foods high in added sugar and fat, and low in fiber. Dietary messages to increase consumption of whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, and nuts should be broadly supported by food and nutrition practitioners. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Validity of claims made in weight management research: a narrative review of dietetic articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphramor Lucy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best available evidence demonstrates that conventional weight management has a high long-term failure rate. The ethical implications of continued reliance on an energy deficit approach to weight management are under-explored. Methods A narrative literature review of journal articles in The Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics from 2004 to 2008. Results Although the energy deficit approach to weight management has a high long-term failure rate it continues to dominate research in the field. In the current research agenda, controversies and complexities in the evidence base are inadequately discussed, and claims about the likely success of weight management misrepresent available evidence. Conclusions Dietetic literature on weight management fails to meet the standards of evidence based medicine. Research in the field is characterised by speculative claims that fail to accurately represent the available data. There is a corresponding lack of debate on the ethical implications of continuing to promote ineffective treatment regimes and little research into alternative non-weight centred approaches. An alternative health at every size approach is recommended.

  14. An analysis of oral biopsies extracted from 1995 to 2009, in an oral medicine and surgery unit in Galicia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixto-Requeijo, Raquel; Diniz-Freitas, Marco; Torreira-Lorenzo, Juan-Carlos; García-García, Abel; Gándara-Rey, José M

    2012-01-01

    To conduct an analysis of the frequency of oral lesions in biopsies over a 14-year period in the Oral Medicine, Oral Surgery and Implantology Unit. We conducted a retrospective study of biopsies removed from 1995-2009, recording data regarding age, sex, location of the lesions, biopsy types, anatomical and pathological diagnosis and definitive diagnosis. Of the 562 patients studied, the average age was 51.8 years, with a standard deviation of 18.5 (range 5-96). The distribution by sex was 318 (56.6%) women and 244 (43.4%) men. The most common diagnostic category was mucosal pathologies in 37.9% of cases, followed by odontogenic cysts in 27.8%. Malignant tumors accounted for 3.9% of cases, oral squamous cell carcinomas were the most frequent malignancy, appearing in 22 cases. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws was the most common injury within the bone lesions group. Following the performance of 647 biopsies on 562 patients, we can say that the most common injury was radicular cysts (appearing in 108 cases), having found statistical differences in relation to the patients' sex and age.

  15. Commentary: Giuseppe Campani (1635-1715, Rome, Italy): the First Use of a Microscope in Medicine and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogna, Christian; Millesi, Matthias; Fiengo, Leslie; Richardson, Mark; Bhangoo, Ranjeev; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Türe, Ugur

    2018-02-01

    Giuseppe Campani (1635-1715) was a polymath in Rome, Italy, during the Scientific Revolution in the XVIIth century. In particular, he forged the screw barrel microscope and was manufacturing his own lenses for microscopes and telescopes. He mastered the art of lens grinding. Those lenses have been analyzed with modern methods and turned out to be of extremely good quality, shining light on the fact that Giuseppe Campani mastered the theories of optics. Moreover, in a letter that Giuseppe Campani sent to Pope Innocent XI, he clearly described the use of a microscope for the examination of wounds of legs. This letter dates back to 15 August 1686 and is the first evidence of the use of microscopes to analyze wounds, sores, and anatomic specimens in medical and surgical settings. MG Yasargil previously showed the lithography accompanying this letter and was the first to recognize its great importance. We accessed this original letter in the Vatican Library, and for the first time we have translated it from Latin to English in order to unveil its significance in the context of the Scientific Revolution and the history of medicine and surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  16. Practice paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics abstract: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lucia L; Campbell, Christina G

    2014-09-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that women of childbearing age should adopt a lifestyle optimizing health and reducing risk of birth defects, suboptimal fetal development, and chronic health problems in both mother and child.Components leading to healthy pregnancy outcome include healthy pre-pregnancy weight, appropriate weight gain and physical activity during pregnancy, consumption of a wide variety of foods, appropriate vitamin and mineral supplementation, avoidance of alcohol and other harmful substances, and safe food handling. Nutrition assessment needs to encompass changes in anthropometric,biochemical, and clinical indicators throughout pregnancy. Pregnant women should gain weight according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine Guidelines. Energy needs are no higher than the Estimated Energy Requirement for nonpregnant women until the second trimester; thereafter, the extra energy need per day is 340 kcal and 452 kcal in the second and third trimesters,respectively. Using the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, registered dietitian nutritionists and dietetics technicians, registered,can help pregnant women select a food plan based on age, physical activity, trimester, weight gain, and other considerations.Women are encouraged to participate in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity spread throughout the week or 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise on most days of the week.When good food choices are made, food consumption to meet extra energy needs and the increased absorption and efficiency of nutrient utilization that occurs in pregnancy are generally adequate to meet most nutrient needs. However, vitamin and mineral supplementation may be important in vulnerable cases including food insecurity; alcohol, tobacco, or other substance dependency; anemia; strict vegetarian (vegan) diet; or poor eating habits. Multiple strategies are needed to support healthy lifestyles for all women, from preconception

  17. Eating behaviour, eating attitude and body mass index of dietetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... matching career choice to prospective students.1 A preoccupation with food manifests itself ... relationship and stated that high-risk groups for the development of eating disorders include ..... Table IV: Comparison of body mass index, eating attitudes and eating behaviour of the first-year dietetic students ...

  18. Ethics misconduct among dietetic practitioners in South Africa (2007 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-11

    Sep 11, 2014 ... Original Research: Ethics misconduct among dietetic practitioners in South Africa (2007-2013). 2015;28(2) ... Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is a statutory body which was established in terms of the Health Professions Act (No 56 of 1974) to regulate .... financial litigation under common law.

  19. Qualitative research in nutrition and dietetics: getting started.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, J A; Tischler, V

    2010-12-01

    Qualitative research is well placed to answer complex questions about food-related behaviour because it investigates how and why individuals act in certain ways. The field of qualitative health research is undoubtedly gaining momentum and, increasingly, there is a recognition that it should be a vital part of the decision-making processes that direct the development of health policy and practice. Much of the guidance available, however, is difficult to navigate for those new to 'qualitative research', and there is little discussion of qualitative research issues specifically in relation to nutrition and dietetics. This review, the first in a series, outlines the field of qualitative enquiry, its potential usefulness in nutrition and dietetics, and how to embark upon this type of research. Furthermore, it describes a process to guide high-quality qualitative research in this area that proceeds from the research question(s) and considers the key philosophical assumptions about ontology, epistemology and methodology that underpin the overall design of a study. Other reviews in this series provide an overview of the principal techniques of data collection and sampling, data analysis, and quality assessment of qualitative work, and provide some practical advice relevant to nutrition and dietetics, along with glossaries of key terms. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Food Service Supervisor. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food service supervisor component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; nutrient…

  1. Qualitative research in nutrition and dietetics: data collection issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, A; Swift, J A

    2011-02-01

    The wide scope of qualitative enquiry presents the researcher with a number of choices regarding data collection and sampling. Selecting data collection and sampling techniques can therefore be somewhat daunting, particularly because, often, there is no single, universally accepted 'correct' option. Appropriate research methods are, however, crucial to ensure high-quality research. This review, the second in the series, provides an overview of the principal techniques of data collection and sampling that may be used for qualitative research in nutrition and dietetics. In addition, it describes a process for choosing appropriate data collection and sampling methods that considers the extent to which they provide data that answers the research question(s) and are compatible with the philosophical assumptions about ontology, epistemology and methodology that underpin the overall design of a study. Finally, it discusses the central role that the researcher plays in qualitative data collection and encourages researchers to acknowledge and reflect upon their impact on the data. Other reviews in this series provide a model for embarking on a qualitative research project in nutrition and dietetics, an overview of the principal techniques of data analysis and quality assessment of this kind of research, and some practical advice relevant to nutrition and dietetics, along with glossaries of key terms. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. Food Production Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food production worker component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; hygiene and…

  3. Recruiting Hispanics to dietetics: WIC educators' perceptions of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Cynthia J; Henley, Samantha M; Daniluk, Patricia; Rengers, Bruce; Fajardo-Lira, Claudia; Gillette, Cynthia Dormer; Bizeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although Hispanics comprise approximately 12% of the population, only 3% of registered dietitians (RDs) are Hispanic. This pilot study explored non-RD Hispanic Women, Infant and Children (WIC) educators' perceptions of dietetics and identified recruitment strategies to increase Hispanic representation. Hispanic WIC educators (n = 48) completed a questionnaire to determine reasons for not pursuing RD status, reasons Hispanics are underrepresented in dietetics, and recruitment strategies. Thirty-eight percent of respondents planned on becoming an RD; 56% had considered becoming an RD. Eighty-two percent postponed pursing the RD due to expense and 65% due to life circumstances. Reasons cited for underrepresentation of Hispanics in the field included lack of knowledge about dietetics, lack of Hispanic role models, and length and expense of training. Suggested recruitment strategies included scholarships, mentoring programs, and awareness campaigns with schools and community-based organizations serving Hispanics. Many WIC educators are interested in becoming RDs, but barriers prevent them from pursing the necessary education and training. To support WIC educators in becoming RDs, the length and expense of the education/ training should be addressed. Increasing awareness of the profession in the Hispanic community and providing financial support would help recruit more Hispanics to the dietetics major.

  4. Food Service Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food service worker component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; personal…

  5. Impact of Service-Learning on Undergraduate Dietetics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roofe, Nina L.

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative research was conducted with undergraduate nutrition majors at the University of Central Arkansas to explore the impact of service-learning on personal and professional development. After participating in the program, the dietetic students (n 20) wrote reflection papers. The personal impact sections of the reflections were coded and…

  6. University students' reservations about dietetics as a career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Dietetics students' reservations about their career choice were investigated. In several dietetics programs in various provinces, an in-class or online survey was administered to students in the early or late stages of their education (n=397). Data were coded and analyzed, using descriptive statistics. Chi-square testing for independence was used to establish significant relationships. Forty-three percent (n=149) of those responding to the research question (n=344) indicated they had reservations about a dietetics career, primarily because of internship, salary, and employment concerns. Students enrolled in a coordinated internship/degree program experienced no reservations about internship. Students experienced fewer career reservations when they had made their career decision before grade 12, were influenced by a dietitian, or were in the later stages of their education. Findings have implications for dietetics recruitment, retention, research, and education. An understanding of sources of reservations about career choice will allow policy-makers, researchers, and educators to address issues to ensure that potential professionals are well informed about career components and that educational programs meet students' needs.

  7. Prediction of graduate dietetic internship appointments in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, G M

    1991-01-01

    A statistical model of dietetic intern selection was developed from a profile of selection criteria that was obtained in a 1988 survey of Canadian graduate dietetic internship directors. The model was composed of four clusters of variables that resulted from the most frequently used selection criteria: academic performance, work experience, communication skills, and extracurricular activities. Data from a convenience sample of 39 dietetic intern applicants were analyzed, using principal components analysis and discriminant analysis, to test the model's power to predict success in obtaining an internship appointment. In descending order, the criteria with the greatest predictive powers were: academic performance; extracurricular activities; and supervisory, teaching, or instructing types of work experience. The model accounted for 41% of the differences between those who were successful and those who were not successful in obtaining internship appointments in 1989 and correctly classified 30 of 39 subjects. These results provide baseline data on the predictive power of some criteria used for selecting dietetic interns. These findings suggest the need for a replication study with a randomized national sample to crossvalidate the results obtained in this exploratory research.

  8. Striving for excellence: investigating the practical aspects of dietetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... The profession of dietetics is an evolving field,1,2 and never before has the importance of making the voice of the dietitian heard been as important as it is today. An abundance of scientific and non- scientific medical and nutritional information is available to the public in terms of social media, the Internet ...

  9. Pigments in fruits and vegetables: genomics and dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This comprehensive treatise provides a systemic and insightful overview of current advances in the biosynthetic genomics/genetics and preventive dietetics of carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains, from a general perspective, and in specific fruits and vegetables as well. Genomics/genetics focuses on...

  10. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Kathryn M; Trujillo, Elaine

    2014-02-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that nutritional genomics provides insight into how diet and genotype interactions affect phenotype. The practical application of nutritional genomics for complex chronic disease is an emerging science and the use of nutrigenetic testing to provide dietary advice is not ready for routine dietetics practice. Registered dietitian nutritionists need basic competency in genetics as a foundation for understanding nutritional genomics; proficiency requires advanced knowledge and skills. Unlike single-gene defects in which a mutation in a single gene results in a specific disorder, most chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer are multigenetic and multifactorial and therefore genetic mutations are only partially predictive of disease risk. Family history, biochemical parameters, and the presence of risk factors in individuals are relevant tools for personalizing dietary interventions. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is not closely regulated in the United States and may not be accompanied by access to health care practitioners. Applying nutritional genomics in clinical practice through the use of genetic testing requires that registered dietitian nutritionists understand, interpret, and communicate complex test results in which the actual risk of developing a disease may not be known. The practical application of nutritional genomics in dietetics practice will require an evidence-based approach to validate that personalized recommendations result in health benefits to individuals and do not cause harm. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethical tensions faced by dietetic students during fieldwork

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-05

    Sep 5, 2013 ... a moral problem. Ethical distress occurs when an individual knows what the right course of action is to follow, but feels constrained to act owing to ..... responsibilities. Power struggles. Little research exists on the topic of power issues among dietetic students performing fieldwork. This demonstrates that ...

  12. Long-Term Course of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS Patients Receiving Integrative Korean Medicine Treatment: A 1 Year Prospective Observational Multicenter Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinho Lee

    Full Text Available With increase of spine surgeries, failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS prevalence is also rising. While complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly used for low back pain (LBP, there are no studies reporting use of integrative Korean medicine in FBSS patients.Patients with pain continuing after back surgery or recurring within 1 year and visual analogue scale (VAS of LBP or leg pain of ≥6 (total n = 120 were recruited at 2 hospital sites from November 2011 to September 2014. Weekly sessions of integrative Korean medicine treatment were conducted for 16 weeks (herbal medicine, acupuncture/electroacupuncture, pharmacopuncture/bee venom pharmacopuncture, and Chuna manual therapy with additional follow-ups at 24 weeks and 1 year. Outcome measures included VAS of LBP and leg pain (primary outcome, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, Short-Form 36 (SF-36, medical use, and patient global impression of change (PGIC.VAS of LBP and leg pain improved at 6 months (LBP from 6.1±2.0 at baseline to 2.9±2.3; and leg pain from 5.4±2.6 to 2.4±2.5, respectively. Eighty patients (66.7% showed improvement of 50% or more in main pain of LBP or leg pain from baseline. Disability and quality of life also improved at 6 months (ODI from 41.3±12.3 at baseline to 23.6±13.6; and SF-36 from 42.8±14.5 to 62.7±16.8. At 1 year follow-up, conventional medical management use decreased, improvement in pain and disability was maintained, and 79.2% reported improvement of PGIC.Despite limitations as an observational study, integrative Korean medicine treatment showed positive results in pain, function, and quality of life of FBSS patients.

  13. Relationship Between Academic Performance and Student Self-Assessment of Clinical Performance in the College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoho, Robert M; Vardaxis, Vassilios; Millonig, Kelsey

    2016-05-01

    Student self-assessment is viewed as an important tool in medical education. We sought to identify the relationship between student academic performance and third-year clinical performance self-assessment. No such study exists in podiatric medical education. Third-year podiatric medical students from the classes of 2012 through 2014 completed a self-assessment of their performance for each of five broad clinical podiatric medical domains (Professionalism, Medicine, Radiology, Surgery, and Biomechanics/Orthopedics). The assessment was completed after students finished the first 12 weeks of their third-year clinical rotations (PRE) and a second time at the conclusion of the third year (POST). The mean self-assessment score for PRE and POST surveys for all combined domains was determined for each student. This mean was compared with the student's 3-year cumulative grade point average (GPA). Students' clinical experiences for the year were essentially identical. No statistically significant correlation was identified between cumulative GPA and the PRE and POST clinical self-assessments or with the change between PRE and POST assessments based on the Pearson correlation test for each class separately or on the pooled data. Published studies in allopathic medical education have shown that students with lower GPAs tend to rate their clinical performance higher in initial clinical performance self-assessment. Our results show that student academic performance was not correlated with clinical performance self-assessment. These findings may be due to the explicit description of successful clinical competency completion, the orientation students receive before the start of clinical training, and the continuous feedback received from clinical preceptors.

  14. Traditional Chinese and western medicine for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis after lower extremity orthopedic surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shibai; Song, Yi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Wenwei

    2018-04-10

    Chinese herbal medicine has traditionally been considered to promote blood circulation to remove obstruction in the channels and clear pathogenic heat to drain dampness effects. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate its benefits for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) after lower extremity orthopedic surgery. Relevant, published studies were identified using the following keywords: lower extremity orthopedic surgery, arthroplasty, joint replacement, fracture, traditional Chinese and western medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and Venous thromboembolism (VTE). The following databases were used to identify the literature consisting of RCTs with a date of search of 31 May 2017: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of knowledge, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, the Chongqing VIP Database, the Chinese Biomedical Database, and the Wanfang Database (including three English and four Chinese databases). All relevant data were collected from studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The outcome variables were the incidence rate of DVT, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and D-dimer; subcutaneous hematoma; and other reported outcomes. RevMan5.2. software was adopted for the meta-analysis. A total of 20 published studies (1862 cases) met the inclusion criteria. The experimental group, 910 patients (48.87%), received the Chinese herbal medicine or traditional Chinese and western medicine for prevention of DVT; the control group, 952 patients (51.13%), received the standard western treatment. The meta-analysis showed that traditional Chinese and western medicine therapy reduced the incidence rates of DVT significantly when compared with controls (risk ratio [RR] = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.54; P < 0.00001), and the D-dimer was lower in the experimental group (P = 0.01). Besides, the incidence rate of subcutaneous hematoma was lower in the experimental group (P < 0

  15. Demographic Characteristics and Medical Service Use of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients at an Integrated Treatment Hospital Focusing on Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Retrospective Review of Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Seung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report the patient demographics and nonsurgical complementary and alternative medicine treatment used at a Korean medicine hospital for low back pain (LBP and/or sciatica after surgery. Methods. Medical records of patients who visited a spine-specialized Korean medicine hospital at 2 separate sites for continuous or recurrent LBP or sciatica following back surgery were reviewed. The demographics, MRI and/or CT scans, and treatments were assessed. Results. Of the total 707 patients, 62% were male and the average age was 50.20 years. Ninety percent of patients presented with LBP and 67% with sciatica. Eighty-four percent were diagnosed with herniated nucleus pulposus at time of surgery. Of these patients, 70% had pain recurrence 6 months or later, but 19% experienced no relief or immediate aggravation of pain after surgery. Many patients selected traditional Korean medicine treatment as primary means of postsurgery care (47%. When time to pain recurrence was short or pain persisted after surgery, return of symptoms at the same disc level and side was frequent. Conclusion. An integrative treatment model focusing on Korean medicine and used in conjunction with radiological diagnostics and conventional medicine is currently used as a treatment option for patients with pain after lumbar spine surgery.

  16. Mixed-Methods Research in Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie; Harris, Jeffrey E

    2017-05-01

    This work focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR) and is the 11th in a series exploring the importance of research design, statistical analysis, and epidemiologic methods as applied to nutrition and dietetics research. MMR research is an investigative technique that applies both quantitative and qualitative data. The purpose of this article is to define MMR; describe its history and nature; provide reasons for its use; describe and explain the six different MMR designs; describe sample selection; and provide guidance in data collection, analysis, and inference. MMR concepts are applied and integrated with nutrition-related scenarios in real-world research contexts and summary recommendations are provided. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. African-American students' perceptions of their majors, future professions, and the dietetics major and profession: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Teena M; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M; Serrano, Elena; Hosig, Kathy W

    2008-07-01

    African-American professionals are underrepresented in the profession of dietetics. This preliminary qualitative study identified African-American students' perceptions of their majors, future professions, and the dietetics major/profession to understand why they did or did not enter dietetics. It was hypothesized that dietetics students chose dietetics primarily for altruistic reasons, whereas students in other fields of study did not choose dietetics due to lack of awareness of dietetics. To learn students' views, African-American college students engaged in elicitation interviews or focus group discussions. Twenty-eight women and 12 men participated. Phenomenologic analysis identified common themes and meanings: African-American students selected their majors for a variety of reasons, including desire to help people, interest in the field, recommendation from an adult, and family influence. African-American students in fields of study other than dietetics believed that the dietetics major was not selected due to lack of awareness about dietetics. Both dietetics students and students in other fields of study perceived versatility, ability to work with/help people, and to have an influence as positive qualities about their future professions. Advanced degree and training requirements, lack of diversity, and low salary were identified as negative qualities about future professions. African-American students in fields of study other than dietetics had not been exposed to the dietetics major, careers, and profession. Recruitment efforts should begin early to increase the number of African-American students in dietetics.

  18. Survey of disability-related content in Australian dietetics programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Shannon; Kellett, Jane; Bacon, Rachel; Byron, Annette

    2017-11-21

    Nutrition and dietetic services are an important component of healthcare for people living with a disability. The introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Australia is providing more opportunities for individuals to access these services from an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD). The aim of this research was to identify how students in Australian tertiary dietetics programs are being prepared to provide these services to people with a disability. A purpose-built questionnaire with eight open-ended questions was developed by the researchers to describe the disability-related content of university and professional placement learning opportunities and was distributed to all course conveners (or their nominated representative) of dietetics programs accredited by the Dietitians Association of Australia. The qualitative data were analysed using a descriptive approach. Responses were sorted into response category themes and counted to identify common themes. A representative from 14 of 18 programs (78% response rate) participated in the survey in September and October 2016. Results indicated that although 12 programs incorporate disability-related topics into the curriculum, content was inconsistent and of varying depths. Four programs offered a disability-specific placement opportunity and nine discussed the NDIS to varying degrees. It is important that graduates are provided with adequate learning opportunities in the area of disability to ensure that they are prepared for entry-level practise in this area. Further research may provide insight into the skills, knowledge and behaviours used by APDs working in disability to identify those that need to be strengthened in dietetics programs. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  19. Pre-registration dietetic students' attitudes to learning communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, B T; Lennie, S C

    2012-04-01

      Communication is a core skill and a prerequisite for dietitians' clinical competence. It is generally acknowledged that communication skills can be taught and learned. There is a paucity of published work identifying dietetic students' attitudes towards learning communication skills, and understanding this is important.   The present cross-sectional study aimed to address this issue using an adapted version of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS), which was designed to capture information concerning positive and negative attitudes to learning communication skills. An online questionnaire was sent to all undergraduate and post-graduate dietetic programmes in the UK.   Of the students' solicited for enrolment in the study, 33.4% (n = 300) completed the questionnaire. A one-way analysis of variance showed attitudes to learning communication skills differed significantly between years of study on both subscales of the CSAS. Subsequent analyses indicated that first-year students' attitudes to learning communication skills were significantly more positive than those of fourth-year students (P = 0.042). Third-year students had significantly more positive attitudes to learning communication skills than fourth-year students (P = 0.028). Negative attitudes were also linked to the year of study with fourth-year students having significantly more negative attitudes than third-year students (P = 0.046). Sex, practice placement experience and parental occupation did not significantly influence attitudes to learning communication skills.   These findings indicate that efforts are required to maintain positive attitudes to learning communication skills. Further longitudinal studies are recommended in this respect. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. The technologist's role in nuclear medicine in development of centellographic techniques, x-ray guides surgery and molecular techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Bettina; Juri, Cecilia; Manrique, Gonzalo; Andruskevicius, Patricia; Canepa, Jorge; Coppe, Fatima; Cuervo, Aurora; Lopez, Andrea; Gonzalez, Mirta; Guissoli, Patricia; Rodriguez, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    In our center the Technician in Nuclear Medicine participates in the development and evaluation of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology linked methodologies, with the strategy of the sentinel lymph node (SLN). The aim of the present work is to validate nuclear and molecular methods, using known clinical and prognostic illness parameters. We included prospectively 40 patients with clinically localized melanoma, with an average of 3.6 mm (status: 0.5-15.0 mm) Breslow thickness. The middle age of the patients was 54.2 years (status: 24-82 years), 25 females and 15 males. The tracer used was 99mTc labeled albumin nanocolloid, doing a lymphoscintigraphy 16-18 hours before the surgery, with a total dose of 111-185 MBq. Sequential images were acquired every 5 minutes in a gamma camera during an hour post injection or until drainage was visualized. Once a SLN was located, we did an orthogonal view to locate the nodals in the three-dimensional space. The nodal territories identified by means of lymphoscintigraphy were explored surgically employing an intraoperative gamma probe. Nodal and adjacent tissue radioactivity was measured in vivo and verified ex vivo after the resection. A relation of counts node/background bigger than 2 in vivo and bigger than 10 ex vivo was established in order to consider a node SLN. The SLNs were analyzed by means of histopathology and in 14 patients the expression was studied also using RT-PCR, employing TIR, MART-1 and MIA as markers, in a single-step protocol with 35 cycles of amplification. The experiments were done in duplicates and they included positive and negative control panels. SLN was identified in 38/39 surgical patients (97.4 %), each patient presenting an average of 1.3 nodal. Nodal metastasis were diagnosed by histopathology in 9 patients (24 %). A significant correlation was stated between the metastasis commitment of the SLN and the illness relapsing (p=0.019) during the follow up of 40.8 months (status: 6.7-94.6 months

  1. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kristi M; Francis, Coni

    2013-08-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to recognize that although all foods provide some level of physiological function, the term functional foods is defined as whole foods along with fortified, enriched, or enhanced foods that have a potentially beneficial effect on health when consumed as part of a varied diet on a regular basis at effective levels based on significant standards of evidence. The Academy supports Food and Drug Administration-approved health claims on food labels when based on rigorous scientific substantiation. All food is essentially functional at some level as it provides energy and nutrients needed to sustain life. However, there is growing evidence that some food components, not considered nutrients in the traditional sense, may provide positive health benefits. Foods containing these food components are called functional foods. Functional food research holds many promises for improving the quality of life for consumers; however, to achieve such outcomes, scientific research must effectively establish the bioavailability and efficacy of these compounds at levels that are physiologically achievable under typical dietary patterns. This Position Paper reviews the complexities of defining functional foods; categories of foods marketed as functional; regulation of functional foods; the scientific substantiation of and advancement of functional food research; as well as a message to registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, on how to remain current in their knowledge of functional food research and the translation of this information to consumers. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Learning styles of undergraduate nutrition and dietetics students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Etherington, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    It has been identified that health science students, and in particular undergraduate nutrition and dietetics (N&D) students, have distinctive learning needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the learning styles of undergraduate N&D students enrolled at a large Australian university. An awareness of the learning styles of undergraduate N&D students will assist university educators in providing appropriate learning opportunities and developing curricula to equip N&D graduates with the essential skills they need to work effectively in the modern practice environment. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory (K-LSI), Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and Success Types Learning Style Type Indicator (STLSTI) were distributed to 162 students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics program at one metropolitan university. One hundred twenty-nine questionnaires were returned, providing a response rate of 79.6%. The K-LSI showed that students were inclined toward converging (practical) and assimilating (reasoning) learning styles while the ILS identified the students as intuitive (innovative). The STLSTI results indicated an intraverted, sensing, feeling, judging approach to learning. It is recommended N&D educators take into consideration the learning styles of dietetics students when developing curricula and evaluating teaching approaches. Analysis of learning styles can inform the planning, implementation, and assessment of teaching and learning activities to create effective learning environments, appropriate learning opportunities, and a contemporary curriculum for N&D students.

  3. Position of the American Dietetic Association: use of nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Sweeteners elicit pleasurable sensations with (nutritive) or without (nonnutritive) energy. Nutritive sweeteners (eg, sucrose, fructose) are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), yet concern exists about increasing sweetener intakes relative to optimal nutrition and health. Dietary quality suffers at intakes above 25% of total energy (the Institutes of Medicine's suggested maximal intake level). In the United States, estimated intakes of nutritive sweeteners fall below this, although one in four children (ages 9 to 18 years) can surpass this level. Polyols (sugar alcohols), GRAS-affirmed or petitions filed for GRAS, add sweetness with reduced energy and functional properties to foods/beverages and promote dental health. Five nonnutritive sweeteners with intense sweetening power have FDA approval (acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin, sucralose) and estimated intakes below the Acceptable Daily Intake (level that a person can safely consume everyday over a lifetime without risk). By increasing palatability of nutrient-dense foods/beverages, sweeteners can promote diet healthfulness. Scientific evidence supports neither that intakes of nutritive sweeteners by themselves increase the risk of obesity nor that nutritive or nonnutritive sweeteners cause behavioral disorders. However, nutritive sweeteners increase risk of dental caries. High fructose intakes may cause hypertriglyceridemia and gastrointestinal symptoms in susceptible individuals. Thus, it is the position of The American Dietetic Association that consumers can safely enjoy a range of nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners when consumed in a diet that is guided by current federal nutrition recommendations, such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Dietary References Intakes, as well as individual health goals. Dietetics professionals should provide consumers with science-based information about sweeteners and support research on the use of sweeteners

  4. Strengthening the rural dietetics workforce: examining early effects of the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program on recruitment and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mary Ellen; Raftis, Denise; Wakewich, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    As with other allied health professions, recruitment and retention of dietitians to positions in rural and isolated positions is challenging. The aim of this study was to examine the early effects of the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program (NODIP) on recruitment and retention of dietitians to rural and northern dietetics practice. The program is unique in being the only postgraduate dietetics internship program in Canada that actively selects candidates who have a desire to live and work in northern and rural areas. Objectives of the survey were to track the early career experiences of the first five cohorts (2008-2012) of NODIP graduates, with an emphasis on employment in underserviced rural and northern areas of Ontario. NODIP graduates (62) were invited to complete a 27-item, self-administered, mailed questionnaire approximately 22 months after graduation. The survey, reflecting issues identified in the rural allied health and dietetics literature, documented their work history, practice locations, employment settings, roles, future career intentions and rural background. Aggregated data were analyzed descriptively to assess their early work experiences, with a focus on their acceptance of positions in rural and northern communities. Items also assessed professional and personal factors influencing their most recent decisions concerning practice locations. Three-quarters of graduates chose organizations serving rural or northern communities for their first employment positions and two-thirds were practicing in rural and underserviced areas when surveyed. Most worked as clinical, community health or public health dietitians, in diverse settings including clinics, hospitals and diabetes care programs. Although most had found permanent positions, working for more than one employer at a time was not uncommon. Factors affecting practice choices included prior awareness of employers, prospects for full-time employment, flexible working conditions, access to

  5. Results of a near-peer musculoskeletal medicine curriculum for senior medical students interested in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Adam; Salazar, Dane; Vetter, Christopher; Andre, John; Pinzur, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that medical students do not achieve an adequate musculoskeletal knowledge base on graduation from American medical schools. Several curriculums have been developed to address this measured deficit. Students entering orthopedic surgery residencies have a better musculoskeletal knowledge foundation than their peers but still fail to achieve an acceptable level of proficiency on graduation from medical school. Fourth-year medical students participating in senior elective rotations in orthopedic surgery over a 2-year period were given a series of lectures developed and presented by post graduate year 3 orthopedic surgery residents. Students completed a validated musculoskeletal competency examination and a survey following the conclusion of their experience, evaluating the effect of this curriculum. A total of 71 students over 2 years participated in the near-peer curriculum, with all students completing the validated test. The mean score for the students was 83.6%. Of the 71 students, 60 (84.5%) scored more than the previously published passing rate of 73.1%. There was no correlation identified with the mean test scores and the number of previous orthopedic surgery rotations. From the survey, 96% of the students rated the near-peer curriculum as appropriate for their level, whereas 75% noted that their own medical school's musculoskeletal curriculum was too advanced for their level of training. A series of lectures was developed by midlevel orthopedic residents for students interested in pursuing a career in orthopedic surgery. After participation in the curriculum, students scored 30-percentage points higher than a previously published test. This study demonstrates that a resident-initiated, near-peer curriculum increases the fundamental knowledge level of students entering orthopedic surgery. An added benefit appeared to be the skills obtained by the residents who created and delivered the lecture series. Copyright © 2014

  6. The 100 Most-Cited Human Cleft Lip and Palate-Related Articles Published in Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Medicine Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Panagiotis; Antonarakis, Gregory S

    2015-07-01

    To identify the 100 most-cited articles pertaining to human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals and to identify their principal bibliometric characteristics. Web-based bibliometric analysis. The Web of Science was searched to identify the 100 most-cited clinical articles related to cleft lip and/or palate. Information was extracted with regard to total number of citations, number of authors, affiliations, year, and journal of publication, Medical Subject Headings, type of study, specific area of study. Trends in citations were assessed. The 100 most-cited articles identified received between 437 and 58 citations. The oldest was published in 1954 and the most recent in 2008. The number of authors ranged from 1 to 12, with an average of three authors per article. Most of the first authors were affiliated with institutions in the United States, with the most prolific institution being the University of Iowa. More than 70% of the studies appeared in The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. There was a significant negative correlation between average citations per year and time since publication (P articles in human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals are listed and characterized. This can be used as a potential knowledge base for specialists in training or to produce relevant knowledge defining the direction of future research.

  7. Communication skills for behaviour change in dietetic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, K; Langley-Evans, S C; Tischler, V; Swift, J A

    2009-12-01

    Both the UK's National Health Service (NHS) and the National Institute of health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) have recommended increased training for health professionals in communication skills. There is evidence to suggest that communication skills are important in helping people to change health-related behaviour, which is a key role for dietitians. This study investigated the views of UK dietitians about their training needs and experience in relation to communication skills in dietetic practice. In October 2007, a cross-sectional survey was mailed to all British Dietetic Association members (n = 6013). The survey gathered quantitative data and free-text comments to ascertain the level, type and effect of communication skills training received by dietitians at both the pre- and post-registration level. There were 1158 respondents; a response rate of 19.3%. Ninety-eight percent (n = 1117) rated communication skills as either very or extremely important in client consultations. Post-registration training had been undertaken by 73% (n = 904). Of these, over 90% of respondents perceived that post-registration training had led to improvements in their relationships with patients, their confidence in client interviews and their ability to cope with challenging clients. However, 248 (21.4%) felt time keeping in interviews had worsened. Lack of time for client interviews was also the most commonly identified barrier (19%, n = 216) to implementing the skills. This study has explored an important and under-researched area. Respondents strongly endorsed the importance of good communication skills and the benefits of post-registration training in this area. Some felt that good communication was time consuming but others felt that time management had improved. Further research and training is required to support the implementation of these skills into dietetic practice.

  8. Employers' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Policies on Hiring of Graduates of Online Dietetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehpahlavan, Jaleh

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative explorative study explored dietetic employers' perceptions, attitudes, and policies regarding hiring of online dietetic graduates; how their perceptions were formed; and factors contributing to their development. Higher educational institutions and learners have embraced online education, evidenced by increased online program…

  9. The Use of Contextual Learning to Teach Biochemistry to Dietetic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, J. O.; Van Damme, M. -P.; Walker, K. Z.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of contextualized and "blended" learning to teach biochemistry to dietetic students during the second year of their professional training in a 4-year undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics). Contextualized content was used to engage students and motivate them to learn biochemistry, which many…

  10. What factors are associated with the number of consultations per dietetic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Swinkels, I.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the costs and effectiveness of dietetic healthcare. In order to study these effects, it is important to increase transparency in dietetic treatment, for example by comparing consultation sessions. This study examined variation and explored variables that were associated with

  11. Being an overseas student at the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Parma: the perceptions of students from Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masera, Giuliana; Ngo Bikatal, Catherine Jolie; Sarli, Annavittoria; Sarli, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    There is a steady rise in the number of overseas students taking degree courses at the Medicine and Surgery faculties of Italian Universities. Numerous scholars, mainly from the English speaking world, have testified to the fact that a university teaching organisation aimed at attaining good levels of integration among students of differing cultural appurtenance is a prerequisite for success in the acquisition of good treatment practices. To explore the experience of students from Cameroon studying on the degree courses in Medicine and Surgery and in Nursing at the University of Parma, in order to discover the strong and weak points of the organisation of the courses so as to achieve a good process of integration. An ethnographic study plan was adopted. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 students from Cameroon enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine of Parma University: 10 in the Degree Course in Medicine and Surgery and 10 in the Degree Course in Nursing. The interviews were recorded and analysed independently by two researchers, who then pooled their results. The age of the interviewed ranges from 24 to 31, the average age is 26,5. Independently from the attended degree course, most of the students interviewed claim that the process of integration has not been very successful: despite attempts to open up a dialogue with their Italian counterparts in order to get to know them, the latter showed no signs of willingness to integrate. Some students develop a self-critical attitude, maintaining that it would be a good idea to strengthen their awareness of their own cultural identity so as to start from a firm base in the attempt to open up to the host society without defensive attitudes that lead to ostracism. The difficulties of socialisation are compounded by those of learning, which many attribute to the language difficulties and some to the differing academic organisation between country of origin and host country. The problem of the difficulties of

  12. [Surgical treatment of hallux valgus deformity at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Zagreb School of Medicine, in the period 1981-2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarević, Mladen; Kolundzić, Robert; Smigovec, Igor

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate operative treatment of hallux valgus deformity at the Department of Orthopedic surgery, Zagreb School of Medicine, and present our protocol for the management of hallux valgus deformity. In the time period from 1981 to 2000 operative procedures for hallux valgus deformity were performed on 1211 feet in 820 patients (788 females and 32 males). Criteria for operative treatment were: increased hallux valgus angle (HVA), increased first intermetatarsal angle (IMTA), first metatarsophalangeal joint arthritis, pain and cosmetic reasons. Radiographic observations as well as clinical and subjective evaluation were made preoperatively and after the surgery. Observations were classified using Helal's modification of Boney and McNab classification. Resection of the proximal end of the proximal phalanx was performed in 250 patients (402 feet) with 55% of excellent results (221 patients over 60 years of age). Distal first metatarsal Austin osteotomy was performed in 312 patients (429 feet) with 49% of excellent results (210 feet, mean patient age 50 years, mean HVA 27 degrees, mean IMTA 15 degrees). Distal first metatarsal Mitchell osteotomy was performed in 230 patients (380 feet) with 40% of excellent results (152 feet, mean patient age 24 years, mean HVA 26 degrees, mean IMTA 15 degrees). Our experience in the operative treatment of hallux valgus deformity suggests that in order to achieve excellent results after surgery, strict criteria for each operative method must be applied.

  13. Review of Indigenous Health Curriculum in Nutrition and Dietetics at One Australian University: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M.; Mehta, Kaye; Miller, Jacqueline; Yaxley, Alison; Thomas, Jolene; Jackson, Kathryn; Wray, Amanda; Miller, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a review undertaken in 2012-2013 by Nutrition and Dietetics, Flinders University, to assess the Indigenous health curriculum of the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (BND) and Masters of Nutrition and Dietetics (MND). An action research framework was used to guide and inform inquiry. This involved four stages, each of…

  14. Academy of nutrition and dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in sports nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmuller, Patricia L; Kruskall, Laura J; Karpinski, Christine A; Manore, Melinda M; Macedonio, Michele A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2014-04-01

    Sports nutrition and dietetics addresses relationships of nutrition with physical activity, including weight management, exercise, and physical performance. Nutrition plays a key role in the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and for maintenance of health, and the ability to engage in physical activity, sports, and other aspects of physical performance. Thus, the Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as a resource for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this emerging practice area. The revised document reflects advances in sports nutrition and dietetics practice since the original standards were published in 2009 and replaces those standards. The Standards of Practice represents the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance covers six standards of professional performance: quality in practice, competence and accountability, provision of services, application of research, communication and application of knowledge, and utilization and management of resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standards can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists in sports nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Vegetarian Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, Vesanto; Craig, Winston; Levin, Susan

    2016-12-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity. Low intake of saturated fat and high intakes of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, soy products, nuts, and seeds (all rich in fiber and phytochemicals) are characteristics of vegetarian and vegan diets that produce lower total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and better serum glucose control. These factors contribute to reduction of chronic disease. Vegans need reliable sources of vitamin B-12, such as fortified foods or supplements. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A definition, description, and framework for advanced practice in dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildish, Deborah Ellen Boyko; Evers, Susan

    2010-01-01

    We explored advanced practice (AP) across the diversity of dietetics to develop a definition, description, and framework for guiding future education, research agendas, and policy development. The process began with a literature review and discussion with dietitians exploring AP in other countries. Various concepts were identified, and these informed the phase 1 survey questions. Phase 1 was a 36-item survey created in SurveyMonkey, engaging a purposeful sample of key stakeholders (n=136). A modified Delphi approach, involving seven dietitians from different geographical locations and practice areas, finalized the phase 2 survey. An e-mail link to this 50-item survey was sent to a random sample of dietitians (n=885). The proposed AP framework entailed an iterative approach, integrating survey results with AP literature. Response rates were 40% for phase 1 and 35% for phase 2. In phase 1, 83% of respondents agreed that a depth and breadth definition captured all dietetic job roles, and 95% agreed that it differentiated AP from entry-level practice. Descriptive statistics are presented to provide demographic information and level of agreement with themes relevant to AP. A framework is presented, and discrepancies with phase 2 results indicate areas for professional development, such as leadership, mentorship, and outcome measurement.

  17. Heart Surgery Experience in Hitit University Faculty of Medicine Corum Research and Training Hospital: First Year Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Diken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of our department of cardiac surgery which was newly introduced in Hitit University Corum Education and Research Hospital. Material and Method: Between November 2012 and November 2013, a total of 110 open-heart surgeries were performed. Ten out of these (9.1% were emergency operations for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction Off-pump technique was used in 31 (29.2% patients and cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 75 (70.8%. A total of 106 patients received coronary artery bypass grafting, 1 received mitral reconstruction, 1 received Bentall procedure, 1 received tricuspid valve repair, 1 received mitral valve replacement, 1 received aortic valve replacement with aortic root enlargement and 1 received aortic supracoronary graft replacement. Results: Hospital mortality occurred in 1 (0.9% patient. Four patients (3.6% who were on dual antiaggregants underwent a revision for bleeding on the day of the operation. Morbidities occurred in 3 (2.7% patients. Atrial fibrillation occurred in 11 (10% patients and the normal sinus rhythm was achieved by amiodarone. Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation was used in 5 (4.5% patients. Discussion: The newly introduced cardiac surgery department of the Hitit University Corum Education and Research Hospital, which provides tertiary care to a wide rural community, serves with low morbidity and mortality.

  18. Does evidence based medicine support the effectiveness of surgical facemasks in preventing postoperative wound infections in elective surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahli, Zahid Mehmood

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative wound infection is usually not the cause of death but it increases the length of hospital stay and cost of care and morbidity. Since their introduction a century ago there is still controversy about primary purpose of the facemasks as whether they provide protection for the patient from surgical team or weather they protect surgical team from the patient? The Objectives of this study were to critically analyze and systematically review the randomized trials regarding effectiveness of surgical facemasks in preventing post operative wound infection in elective surgery. Systematic literature review and analysis of all available trials (randomized controlled trials) regarding use of surgical face masks in elective surgeries. Medline (1966-2007), Embase (1996-2007), Cochrane database, Pubmed, Google Scholar, were searched for the selection of literature for the review. No significance difference in the incidence of postoperative wound infection was observed between masks group and groups operated with no masks (1.34, 95% CI, 0.58-3.07). There was no increase in infection rate in 1980 when masks were discarded. In fact there was significant decrease in infection rate (p masks harms or benefit the patients undergoing elective surgery.

  19. Sustained benefits of a community dietetics intervention designed to improve oral nutritional supplement prescribing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Corish, C A; Flanagan-Rughoobur, G; Glennon-Slattery, C; Sugrue, S

    2011-10-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community do not always prescribe oral nutritional supplements (ONS) according to best practice guidelines for the management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a community dietetics intervention on ONS prescribing practices and expenditure 1 year later. The intervention involved general practitioners (GPs), practice nurses, nurses in local nursing homes and community nurses. It comprised an education programme together with the provision of a new community dietetics service. Changes in health care professionals' nutrition care practices were determined by examining community dietetics records. ONS prescribing volume and expenditure on ONS were assessed using data from the Primary Care Reimbursement Service of the Irish Health Service Executive. Seven out of 10 principal GPs participated in the nutrition education programme. One year later, screening for malnutrition risk was better, dietary advice was provided more often, referral to the community dietetics service improved and ONS were prescribed for a greater proportion of patients at 'high risk' of malnutrition than before (88% versus 37%; P dietetics intervention improved ONS prescribing practices by GPs and nurses, in accordance with best practice guidelines, without increasing expenditure on ONS during the year after intervention. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Future changes driving dietetics workforce supply and demand: future scan 2012-2022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Marsha; Bettles, Craig

    2012-03-01

    The dietetics profession faces many workforce challenges and opportunities to ensure that registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) are at the forefront of health and nutrition. The profession must prepare for new public priorities, changes in population, and the restructuring of how people learn and work, as well as new advances in science and technology. In September 2010, the Dietetics Workforce Demand Task Force, in consultation with a panel of thought leaders, identified 10 change drivers that affect dietetics workforce supply and demand. This future scan report provides an overview of eight of these drivers. Two change drivers-health care reform and population risk factors/nutrition initiatives-are addressed in separate technical articles. A change matrix has been included at the end of this executive summary. The matrix contains a summary of each change driver and its expected impact and is designed to present the drivers in the context of a larger, dynamic system of change in the dietetics profession. The impact of any of these change drivers individually and collectively in a dynamic system is uncertain. The outcome of any change driver is also uncertain. The dietetics profession faces many choices within each change driver to meet the workforce challenges and seize the opportunities for leadership and growth. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [What Must the (Abdominal) Surgeon Know about Experimental Medicine (?) - Translational Research in General (Abdominal) Surgery(Viszeral-)Chirurg & experimentelle Medizin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, T; Kuester, D; Meyer, F

    2015-08-01

    Experimental medicine has evolved tremendously in the last few years. In particular, the introduction of novel techniques, in-vitro models, knock-out/transgenic animals and high-through put analytical methodologies have resulted in a deeper understanding of cellular pathophysiology and diseases. The daily clinical management has benefited by the introduction of biomarkers and targeted therapies. This development has been accompanied by increasing specialisation across all fields of research and medicine. Therefore, clinical-translational research requires a team of competent partners nowadays. The visceral surgeon can contribute significantly to these projects. The present review highlights several aspects of translational research and put chances and potential pitfalls into perspective in context with the work of the visceral surgeon. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Nutrition Care Process Implementation: Experiences in Various Dietetics Environments in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövestam, Elin; Boström, Anne-Marie; Orrevall, Ylva

    2017-11-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) are currently being implemented by nutrition and dietetics practitioners all over the world. Several advantages have been related to this implementation, such as consistency and clarity of dietetics-related health care records and the possibility to collect and research patient outcomes. However, little is known about dietitians' experiences of the implementation process. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Swedish dietitians' experiences of the NCP implementation process in different dietetics environments. Thirty-seven Swedish dietitians from 13 different dietetics workplaces participated in seven focus group discussions that were audiotaped and carefully transcribed. A thematic secondary analysis was performed, after which all the discussions were re-read, following the implementation narrative from each workplace. In the analysis, The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services implementation model was used as a framework. Main categories identified in the thematic analysis were leadership and implementation strategy, the group and colleagues, the electronic health record, and evaluation. Three typical cases are described to illustrate the diversity of these aspects in dietetics settings: Case A represents a small hospital with an inclusive leadership style and discussion-friendly culture where dietitians had embraced the NCP/NCPT implementation. Case B represents a larger hospital with a more hierarchical structure where dietitians were more ambivalent toward NCP/NCPT implementation. Case C represents the only dietitian working at a small multiprofessional primary care center who received no dietetics-related support from management or colleagues. She had not started NCP/NCPT implementation. The diversity of dietetics settings and their different prerequisites should be considered in the development of NCP/NCPT implementation strategies. Tailored

  3. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lucia; Allen, Lindsay H

    2008-03-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that women of child-bearing ages should maintain good nutritional status through a lifestyle that optimizes maternal health and reduces the risk of birth defects, suboptimal fetal growth and development, and chronic health problems in their children. The key components of a health-promoting lifestyle during pregnancy include appropriate weight gain; appropriate physical activity; consumption of a variety of foods in accordance with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005; appropriate and timely vitamin and mineral supplementation; avoidance of alcohol, tobacco, and other harmful substances; and safe food handling. Pregnant women with inappropriate weight gain, hyperemesis, poor dietary patterns, phenylketonuria, certain chronic health problems, or a history of substance abuse should be referred to a registered dietitian for medical nutrition therapy. Prenatal weight gain within the Institute of Medicine recommended ranges has been associated with better pregnancy outcomes. Most pregnant women need 2,200 to 2,900 kcal a day, but prepregnancy body mass index, rate of weight gain, maternal age, and appetite must be considered when tailoring this recommendation to the individual. The consumption of more food to meet energy needs, and the increased absorption and efficiency of nutrient utilization that occurs in pregnancy, are generally adequate to meet the needs for most nutrients. However, vitamin and mineral supplementation is appropriate for some nutrients and situations. This position paper also includes recommendations pertaining to use of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, and illicit drugs.

  4. Comparison of dietetics service delivery (demand and determinants within two Australian Medical Assessment and Planning Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela P Vivanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Assessment and Planning Units have increased globally however, models of care literature is limited. With high malnutrition prevalence amongst ageing populations, this case report identifies demands for dietetic services. Methods Descriptive data compared and contrasted two service including medical models, eligibility criteria, malnutrition screening, dietetic services, clinical follow-up, and team composition. Results High malnutrition prevalence (17 per cent, 31 per cent was evident with different screening approaches successfully implemented. Both units favoured rapid assessment and intervention. Conclusion Dietetic expertise was required for malnutrition assessment, and ongoing management in acute or community setting as determined by differing health-care system arrangements

  5. Improving Efficiency Of Dietetic Services In Chronic Kidney Disease With A Categorised Referral Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Morey

    2012-06-01

    At baseline, it was found that 18 of 57 (31.6% attempts to book dietetic appointments were not successful due to fully booked clinics (7 new and 11 reviews. While 6 of the 11 reviews were for reasons of higher dietetic urgency e.g. hyperkalaemia and malnutrition, 6 out of 7 new referrals were for lifestyle related reasons e.g. obesity, diabetes, and cholesterol. It is felt the new categorised referral tool and pathways will provide better guidance for referral and appropriate use of dietetic resources for CKD management, to be evaluated in early 2012.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Dietetic Technicians, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    DTRs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All DTRs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the DTR, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide a DTR's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the DTR are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All DTRs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the DTR. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  7. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Pawlak, Roman

    2015-05-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that vegetarian diets can provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain health conditions, including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Well-designed vegetarian diets that may include fortified foods or supplements meet current nutrient recommendations and are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarians must use special care to ensure adequate intake of vitamin B-12. Vegetarian diets are primarily plant-based, comprised of grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, vegetables, and fruit; do not include flesh foods (beef, pork, poultry and fowl, wild game, and fish); and may or may not include some animal products, such as dairy (milk and milk products), eggs, and processed foods that contain casein or whey. Although vegetarians may have a higher deficiency risk for some nutrients (eg, vitamin B-12) compared to nonvegetarians, nutritional deficiencies are not the main causes of mortality or morbidity in Western societies. Vegetarian diets are associated with a lower risk of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and some types of cancer; low-fat vegetarian diets, in combination with other healthy lifestyle factors, have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Vegetarians have lower low-density lipoprotein, better serum glucose control, and lower oxidative stress. Low intake of foods containing saturated fat and cholesterol, and high intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, and soy products that are rich in fiber and phytochemicals are components of a vegetarian diet that contribute to reduction of chronic disease. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards a standardized nutrition and dietetics terminology for clinical practice: An Austrian multicenter clinical documentation analysis based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)-Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäbler, Gabriele; Coenen, Michaela; Lycett, Deborah; Stamm, Tanja

    2018-03-03

    High quality, continuity and safe interdisciplinary healthcare is essential. Nutrition and dietetics plays an important part within the interdisciplinary team in many health conditions. In order to work more effectively as an interdisciplinary team, a common terminology is needed. This study investigates which categories of the ICF-Dietetics are used in clinical dietetic care records in Austria and which are most relevant to shared language in different medical areas. A national multicenter retrospective study was conducted to collect clinical dietetic care documentation reports. The analysis included the "best fit" framework synthesis, and a mapping exercise using the ICF Linking Rules. Medical diagnosis and intervention concepts were excluded from the mapping, since they are not supposed to be classified by the ICF. From 100 dietetic records, 307 concepts from 1807 quotations were extracted. Of these, 241 assessment, dietetics diagnosis, goal setting and evaluation concepts were linked to 153 ICF-Dietetics categories. The majority (91.3%) could be mapped to a precise ICF-Dietetics category. The highest number of ICF-Dietetics categories was found in the medical area of diabetes and metabolism and belonged to the ICF component Body Function, while very few categories were used from the component Participation and Environmental Factors. The integration of the ICF-Dietetics in nutrition and dietetic care process is possible. Moreover, it could be considered as a conceptual framework for interdisciplinary nutrition and dietetics care. However, a successful implementation of the ICF-Dietetics in clinical practice requires a paradigm shift from medical diagnosis-focused health care to a holistic perspective of functioning with more attention on Participation and Environmental Factors. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. [Short-term efficacy observation on Chinese traditional medicine used after functional endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qinghua; Qin, Guanduan; Hou, Tao; Liang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Wenjin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of chinese traditional treatment after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) for patients with chronic sinusitis. Eighty-eight cases of patients with chronic sinusitis were randomly divided into control group and treatment group after FESS and followed for 3 months. The control group received routine treatment. The treatment group received Chinese traditional treatment on the basis of routine treatment. VAS scores, Lund-Kennedy scores and Lund-Mackay scores were employed to conduct the subjective and objective assessment, comprehensively evaluate the clinical efficacy before and after treatment. (1) After 3 months of treatment, the two groups of VAS scores and Lund-Mackay scores were significantly improved before treatment (Ppostoperative mucosal edema and promote the postoperative recovery of sinus mucosal inflammation, is effective in preventing the recurrence of postoperative.

  10. Dietetic practices in hemodialysis units in Lebanon and their conformity with KDOQI nutrition guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karavetian, M.; Elzein, H.; Nahla, H.; de Vries, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: In Lebanon, HD units are exclusively hospital based, and most hospitals have only one dietitian performing all nutrition related activities in the hospital. This study investigated current dietetic practices and their conformity with Kidney Disease Quality Outcomes Initiative

  11. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients \\'at risk\\' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored.

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Narrative Review to Inform Dietetics Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Wolfgang; Kiss, Nicole; McCarthy, Alexandra L; McKavanagh, Dan; Isenring, Liz

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are common symptoms experienced by patients with cancer that influence nutrition. They exert a detrimental effect on dietary intake, risk of malnutrition, and quality of life. Whereas CINV are primarily managed with medication, nutrition and dietetics practitioners play an important role in the management of CINV-related complications such as reduced dietary intake. This review discusses the burden of nausea and vomiting that patients with cancer can experience, including the effect on quality of life, nutritional status, and treatment outcomes. Implications for dietetics practice include the need to explore the nature of reported symptoms, identify predisposing risk factors, and to consider the use of a variety of interventions that are individualized to a patient's symptoms. There are little clinical data regarding effective dietetic interventions for nausea and vomiting. In summary, this review discusses dietetics-related issues surrounding CINV, including the pathophysiology, risk factors, prevalence, and both pharmacologic and dietetic treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Review of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating amongst Nutrition Students and Dietetic Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahn, Heather Mciver; Lordly, Daphne

    2015-03-01

    The diet industry and media have a powerful influence over women, leading many to believe that they must modify their appearance for societal acceptance. Dietetics, as one of many predominantly female professions, may be particularly vulnerable to these pressures. An integrative review process was used to examine eating disorders and disordered eating within the dietetics profession with the aim to both synthesize existing data and develop questions for future research. Seventeen articles were reviewed using broad search terms and dates because of the dearth of available literature. Given nutrition programs and dietetic practice often involve significant exposure to food, ideas and opinions about food, weight, and its place in health and dietetic practice researchers were compelled to ask "why". Findings were organized under 3 categories including thinness ideology, implications of food and body associated with nutrition or dietetic education, and establishment of a continuum. This review serves as a platform to inspire future research in an understudied but important topic related to dietetic education and practice. Minimally as a profession, baseline data need to be collected to understand the prevalence of disordered eating and eating disorders along the continuum of practice in Canada.

  14. An automatic female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery registry and complications manager developed in an electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Roger P; Gafni-Kane, Adam; Jirschele, Kelly; Silver, Richard; Maurer, Darryck; Solomonides, Tony; Simmons, Alan; Silverstein, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to incorporate a structured clinical documentation system (SCDS) into the electronic medical record (EMR), allowing for automatic flow of clinical data into an enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and clinical registry. The SCDS programming was developed within inpatient and ambulatory EMR domains, allowing routine documentation in these settings to trigger data flow into an EDW. An extensive set of clinical outcomes was included, focusing on data points likely to exist in the forthcoming American Urogynecologic Society Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry. An electronic complications manager was developed to link immediate and/or delayed complications to the index surgery, allowing for accurate morbidity tracking. All aspects of EMR documentation were successfully reconfigured for charting in both inpatient and office settings. Clinicians transitioned to clinical documentation such that no additional data entry beyond routine charting was required, and this resulted in data flow into the EDW. Physician feedback led to the refinement of SCDS entry fields. This SCDS system allows for automatic flow of a comprehensive data set from our EMR into an EDW and registry. It also provides the ability to systematically track complications and longitudinal clinical outcomes. Integrated systems may eliminate barriers associated with free-standing registries including those relating to cost, maintenance, data integrity, and consistent clinician participation. In addition, it should improve ascertainment of a complete patient population in comparison to voluntary registries.

  15. Medicinal therapy for interventional surgery of the peripheral vascular system; Medikamentoese Therapie bei interventionellen Eingriffen am peripheren Gefaesssystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Klinikum Passau, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Passau (Germany); Lindhoff-Last, E. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaetsklinik Frankfurt, Schwerpunkt Angiologie/Haemostaseologie, Medizinische Klinik III, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of medicinal treatment, during and after femoral and crural interventions is to prevent early or late onset arterial thrombosis of the treated vascular segments. Therefore, unfractionated heparin is administered during the intervention by an intra-arterial or intravenous approach. To avoid late onset thrombosis, administration of platelet function inhibitors is recommended. However, valid data are only available for acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Therefore, ASA is recommended for long term medication. In several cardiological studies on stent implantation in coronary vessels the combination of ASA and clopidogrel for dual platelet inhibition has been proven to be effective. These results have been transferred to antithrombotic therapy of the lower extremities despite the lack of dedicated studies. There is no evidence for the use of vitamin K antagonists after peripheral interventions. (orig.) [German] Die medikamentoese Therapie waehrend und nach Interventionen am peripheren Gefaesssystem hat das Ziel, Frueh- und Spaetthrombosen im behandelten Gefaesssegment zu verhindern. Dies erfolgt waehrend der Intervention durch intravenoese oder -arterielle Gabe unfraktionierter Heparine. Zur Prophylaxe sekundaerer Thrombosen werden Thrombozytenaggregationshemmer empfohlen, von denen nur fuer ASS validierte Daten vorliegen. ASS wird daher als Dauertherapie empfohlen. Aus kardiologischen Studien haben sich Vorteile fuer eine duale Plaettchenhemmung nach koronarer Stentimplantation (ASS plus Clopidogrel) ergeben, die trotz fehlender Studien auf die Nachsorge nach Stentung/PTA im femoropoplitealen und kruralen Gefaessgebiet uebertragen werden. Orale Antikoagulanzien haben keinen Stellenwert zur postinterventionellen Nachsorge. (orig.)

  16. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: interventions for the prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kirk, Shelley; Ritchie, Lorrene; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2013-10-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity require systems-level approaches that include the skills of registered dietitians, as well as consistent and integrated messages and environmental support across all sectors of society to achieve sustained dietary and physical-activity behavior change. This position paper provides guidance and recommendations for levels of intervention targeting overweight and obesity prevention and treatment from preschool age through adolescence. Methods included a review of the literature from 2009 to April 2012, including the Academy's 2009 evidence analysis school-based reviews. Multicomponent interventions show the greatest impact for primary prevention; thus, early childhood and school-based interventions should integrate behavioral and environmental approaches that focus on dietary intake and physical activity using a systems-level approach targeting the multilevel structure of the socioecological model as well as interactions and relationships between levels. Secondary prevention and tertiary prevention/treatment should emphasize sustained family-based, developmentally appropriate approaches that include nutrition education, dietary counseling, parenting skills, behavioral strategies, and physical-activity promotion. For obese youth with concomitant serious comorbidities, structured dietary approaches and pharmacologic agents should be considered, and weight-loss surgery can be considered for severely obese adolescents. Policy and environmental interventions are recommended as feasible and sustainable ways to support healthful lifestyles for children and families. The Academy supports commitment of resources for interventions, policies, and research that promote healthful eating and physical-activity behaviors to ensure that all youth have the opportunity to achieve and maintain a weight that is optimal for health. Copyright © 2013 Academy of

  17. Engineering Foundation Conference: Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine, and surgery, Kona Surf Resort and Conference Center, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, August 1-6, 1999. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yodh, Arjun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Benaron, David

    2001-09-01

    The intent of the conference was to gather a group of cross-disciplinary investigators from universities, medical schools, national laboratories, industry, and government in order to highlight future applications and technology of the optical sciences in biotechnology, medicine, and surgery. The session chairs brought new participants and speakers to the conference who were not regular attendees of the OSA and SPIE conferences. Attendees included a good number of graduate and post-doctoral students who tended to join the more senior members in organized and spontaneous afternoon activities. A critique of the conference is given which discusses things that worked well and things that could have been better, focusing on costs, funding, and speaker cancellations. Sessions were held on the following topics: Photodynamic therapy: fundamental and clinical studies; Frontiers in spectroscopy; Photon migration; Advances in tissue microscopy, dyes and reporters; Advances in cell microscopy: spectroscopy and micromanipulation; Laser-tissue interactions: therapeutic interventions; and Optics for biotechnology. Along with the program and participant lists, nearly 50 poster presentations are included.

  18. Position of the American Dietetic Association: dietetics professionals can implement practices to conserve natural resources and protect the environment. (Previously titled "natural resource conservation and waste management").

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association to encourage environmentally responsible practices that conserve natural resources, minimize the quantity of waste that is generated, and have the least adverse affect on the health of all living organisms and the environment. All components of the food system, from farmer to consumer, are affected by the availability and cost of energy and the availability and quality of water. Outdoor and indoor air quality significantly impacts the health of all living organisms. Decisions that dietetics professionals make as practitioners and consumers can affect the quantity and type of solid waste generated. The demand for natural resources should be evaluated when selecting the most cost-effective, environmentally sensitive approach to the management of solid waste. Special precautions are needed when using and disposing of hazardous and medical waste to protect the safety of our clients and employees. This position paper provides information and resources for dietetics professionals for addressing the complexity of the environmental issue presented. Conservation strategies are identified that dietetics professionals can use in their worksites and at home. These conservation practices may reduce cost and decrease the environmental impact we have on our communities and the world.

  19. Media literacy: a critical role for dietetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Laurie A; Thompson, Angela M

    2005-01-01

    The mass media, including broadcast, electronic, and print media, have become entrenched in Canadians' daily lives. Spending the majority of their leisure time with mass media puts Canadians at increased health risk. Our review of the research literature shows that television (TV) viewing and content are linked to potential consumer health risks due to developed health attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours. The associated health risks of children and youth are of particular concern. Excessive TV viewing has been associated with obesity development, increased energy consumption, reduced energy expenditure, negative body image development, and reduced concern with the concept of self-care. Media literacy, the ability to view critically and understand mediated messages, is a possible technique to mitigate these adverse effects. The enhanced inclusion of media literacy concepts in health education activities of dietetic practice is advocated. Dietitians could increase their understanding of research findings on the health-related effects of mass media use and the implications of including media literacy in daily practice. Such awareness would further augment available health promotion strategies.

  20. Coming and going: dietetic students' experience of their education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Jennifer; Gingras, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition students' expectations for and experiences of their education were explored, as was the influence of the educational process on the students. In this qualitative research guided by a phenomenological approach, eight students in the first year and six in the final year of an undergraduate program completed semi-structured interviews. Although the students were diverse in terms of age, ethnicity, and class background, all stated that they wanted to become dietitians. Our findings illuminate the ways in which dietetic education influences students' relationship with food, their bodies, bodies of knowledge, and family and friends. Professionalization, as initiated through discourse, necessitates a particular loss of relationship with the self. Although students enter with an awareness of professional norms and discourses, their education fosters an identity shift based on the kinds of nutrition knowledge and discourses they are learning, as these are performed by educators. Acknowledging that an embodied curriculum has an impact on professionalization is important for educators and students because education is a critical site for developing a professional identity; this identity then influences how dietitians practise. This research has implications for recruitment language, professional practice curricula, faculty development, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and ongoing support for students as they enter practice contexts.

  1. Latina and Black Women's Perceptions of the Dietetics Major and Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Megan

    Racial and ethnic groups remain underrepresented in undergraduate health profession education programs and careers, such as nutrition and dietetics (Sullivan, 2004). Overwhelmingly, 82 percent of dietitians are White, three percent are Latino/Latina, and less than three percent are Black (Commission on Dietetic Registration, 2016). While the calls to increase recruitment of underrepresented minorities are plentiful and federal dollars are allotted to the effort, a critical lens is necessary to investigate the complexity of factors that impact the decision to pursue a career within dietetics. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to investigate how Latina and Black women enrolled in an undergraduate Health Career Opportunity Program (HCOP) narrated and reflected upon the dietetics profession. Through the lens of Critical Race Theory and situated learning, I sought to understand the sociocultural and historical underpinnings that hinder or promote career selection. Data collection methods included participant observation, interviews, artifacts, and reflexive journaling. Data were analyzed using inductive coding techniques. My findings revealed the ways in which Latina and Black women believed dietitians must match the socially constructed role model for body image, physical fitness, and healthy eating to be effective in practice. Using a critical media analysis to confront the stereotypical images of dietitians, the women used cliche messages as a selected discourse to mask perceptions of barriers to the dietetics field. Finally, the women believed a dietitian's professional role was to give diet advice which presented a barrier to the profession. Based on my findings I support early introduction to nutrition science as a means to empower individuals to support their health and the health of their community. Recruitment efforts must explicitly address the culture of dietetics which has embraced the stereotypical image. Collectively, the dietetics field must

  2. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Rughoobur, G F; Slattery, C G; Sugrue, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored. An education programme, incorporating 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST)' training, was implemented in eight of 10 eligible primary care practices (14 general practitioners and nine practice nurses attended), in seven private nursing homes (20 staff nurses attended) and two health centres (53 community nurses attended) in conjunction with a community dietetics service for patients at risk of malnutrition. Nutritional knowledge was assessed before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention using self-administered, multiple-choice questionnaires. Reported changes in practice and the acceptability of the education programme were considered using self-administered questionnaires 6 months after the intervention. A significant increase in nutritional knowledge 6 months after the intervention was observed (P dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition increased the nutritional knowledge and improved the reported management of malnourished patients in the community by healthcare professionals. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. The who, what, when, and how of choosing a dietetics career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne; Dubé, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    We describe factors influencing the career choices of students enrolled in Canadian dietetics programs. A survey was administered, in class or online, to core first- and fourth-year classes in seven dietetics programs in various provinces (n=397). Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Chi-square testing for independence established significant relationships. Students ranked personal satisfaction, job security, and a professional career as important general career outcomes. These factors were also perceived to be attainable through a dietetics career. The majority of students chose dietetics while they were enrolled in a post-secondary degree program (44%), were primarily influenced by family members (54%), and based their choice on information acquired through the media (50%). Motivations for choosing dietetics included an interest in nutrition (91%) and health (90%), and a desire to help others (82%). Younger students placed more importance on economic rewards and having a position of authority than did older students. Older students identified personal satisfaction as more important in career selection than did younger students. Female respondents placed higher value on job flexibility than did their male counterparts. Career choice is based on a variety of internal and external factors. Opportunities exist for strategic recruitment efforts by educators and the profession.

  4. Dietetic intervention for inpatients on fluid-only diets helps to achieve nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Sarah; Moran, Natalie; Laskey-Gilboy, Bonnie; De Jonge, Maree; Rothery, Shonnel; Ahnon, Kristina; Whiting, Melissa; Emeto, Theophilus I; Pain, Tilley

    2018-02-01

    The present study aimed to assess whether dietetic intervention helps patients on fluid-only diets to meet their energy and protein requirements. This topic has not been previously investigated. A quasi-experimental study of 57 patients receiving fluid-only diets was conducted at The Townsville Hospital. The fluid consumption of participants was observed over 24 hours and was used to calculate total energy and protein intakes. The percentage of protein and energy requirements met was compared between patients receiving dietetic intervention and patients who were not. Patients receiving dietetic interventions met a higher percentage of their energy requirements (75.88) than the control group (18.10) based on median intakes (P diet type showed no change in effect. This study shows that dietetic intervention enabled patients on fluid-only diets to meet up to 80% more of their energy requirements and up to 95% more of their protein requirements. These results were consistent across age, BMI and fluid diet type. The significance of these differences has resulted in a change of clinical practice at the study hospital. All patients on fluid-only diets for three days or longer are now blanket referred for dietetic intervention. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  5. A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Rachel; Kellett, Jane; Dart, Janeane; Knight-Agarwal, Cathy; Mete, Rebecca; Ash, Susan; Palermo, Claire

    2018-02-21

    The aim of this research was to evaluate a Consensus Model for competency-based assessment. An evaluative case study was used to allow a holistic examination of a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic model of assessment. Using a modified Delphi process, the competence of all 29 students enrolled in their final year of a Master of Nutrition and Dietetics course was assessed by a panel (with expertise in competency-based assessment; industry and academic representation) from a course e-portfolio (that included the judgements of student performance made by worksite educators) and a panel interview. Data were triangulated with assessments from a capstone internship. Qualitative descriptive studies with worksite educators (focus groups n = 4, n = 5, n = 8) and students (personal interviews n = 29) explored stakeholder experiences analysed using thematic analysis. Panel consensus was achieved for all cases by the third-round and corroborated by internship outcomes. For 34% of students this differed to the 'interpretations' of their performance made by their worksite educator/s. Emerging qualitative themes from stakeholder data found the model: (i) supported sustainable assessment practices; (ii) shifted the power relationship between students and worksite educators and (iii) provided a fair method to assess competence. To maximise benefits, more refinement, resources and training are required. This research questions competency-based assessment practices based on discrete placement units and supports a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic approach where evidence across a whole course of study is considered by a panel of assessors. © 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  6. Position of the American Dietetic Association: functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Clare M; Brown, Amy C

    2009-04-01

    All foods are functional at some physiological level, but it is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that functional foods that include whole foods and fortified, enriched, or enhanced foods have a potentially beneficial effect on health when consumed as part of a varied diet on a regular basis, at effective levels. ADA supports research to further define the health benefits and risks of individual functional foods and their physiologically active components. Health claims on food products, including functional foods, should be based on the significant scientific agreement standard of evidence and ADA supports label claims based on such strong scientific substantiation. Food and nutrition professionals will continue to work with the food industry, allied health professionals, the government, the scientific community, and the media to ensure that the public has accurate information regarding functional foods and thus should continue to educate themselves on this emerging area of food and nutrition science. Knowledge of the role of physiologically active food components, from plant, animal, and microbial food sources, has changed the role of diet in health. Functional foods have evolved as food and nutrition science has advanced beyond the treatment of deficiency syndromes to reduction of disease risk and health promotion. This position paper reviews the definition of functional foods, their regulation, and the scientific evidence supporting this evolving area of food and nutrition. Foods can no longer be evaluated only in terms of macronutrient and micronutrient content alone. Analyzing the content of other physiologically active components and evaluating their role in health promotion will be necessary. The availability of health-promoting functional foods in the US diet has the potential to help ensure a healthier population. However, each functional food should be evaluated on the basis of scientific evidence to ensure appropriate integration

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association: vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Winston J; Mangels, Ann Reed

    2009-07-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods. This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence- based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes. The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients

  8. Dietary acculturation: applications to nutrition research and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satia-Abouta, Jessie; Patterson, Ruth E; Neuhouser, Marian L; Elder, John

    2002-08-01

    The US immigrant population is growing dramatically, making the health status of racial/ethnic minorities an increasingly important public health issue. Immigration to the United States is usually accompanied by environmental and lifestyle changes that can markedly increase chronic disease risk. In particular, adoption of US dietary patterns that tend to be high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables is of concern. The process by which immigrants adopt the dietary practices of the host country--called "dietary acculturation"--is multidimensional, dynamic, and complex; in addition, it varies considerably, depending on a variety of personal, cultural, and environmental attributes. Therefore, to intervene successfully on the negative aspects of dietary acculturation, it is important to understand the process and identify factors that predispose and enable it to occur. In this report, we give an overview of acculturation, define dietary acculturation and present a model for how it occurs, discuss measurement issues related to dietary acculturation, review the literature relating acculturation to eating patterns, and provide a case study illustrating how information on acculturation can be used to design dietary interventions in 2 markedly different immigrant groups. Finally, we give applications for nutrition researchers and dietetic practitioners. Studies investigating associations of acculturation with disease risk should identify and intervene on those steps in the acculturation process that are most strongly associated with unhealthful dietary changes. Practitioners working with immigrants should determine the degree to which dietary counseling should be focused on maintaining traditional eating habits, adopting the healthful aspects of eating in Western countries, or both.

  9. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  10. Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Final Report. Supplemental Volume VI: Dietetic Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurg, Ronald B.

    An analysis of survey responses from a sample of dietetic technicians on competency characteristics for their occupation is presented in this document. (Dietetic technician is one of seventeen occupation groups included in this research.) The competencies are reported in five categories: (1) those competencies selected by the respondents from a…

  11. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating career values of dietetic students. A model for other allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Vista V; Shanklin, Carol W

    2004-01-01

    Increased job opportunities in health professions make recruitment of students imperative. Effective recruitment requires a knowledge of what students value when making career decisions. This study of dietetic (n = 514) and other college students (n = 352) showed that achievement and economic security were the most important factors in their career selection regardless of major or race. Dietetic majors rated achievement, economic security, ability utilization, personal development, altruism, and working conditions significantly higher than did nondietetic students (p values important to students in this study are attainable through careers in dietetics and other allied health professions. The results of this study should be examined further with a larger sample of allied health majors to assist educators in recruiting and providing career counseling to students.

  14. New Trend on Halva Production: Dietetic Halva and Nougat. Production Technology and Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Racolta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last years sugar free confectionery market had grown steadily. This types of products are primarily addressed to diabetics and dieters, but the main driving factor of their growth is the increase of the obese population who raised concern about their health. Halva is known as a high caloric product with its nutritional energy higher than 500 kcal/100g, the demand of a sugar free version for this confectionery products group being those a current need. This work aimed to develop new products – dietetic halva and nougat, their production technology and compositions being in detail described. A new trend on halva production was established by developing a dietetic halva and nougat. The problem which is solved by the current work is to assure a proper technology in order to obtain a dietetic halva similar in taste and texture with the conventional one.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  16. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) Improves Perceived Readiness for Clinical Placement in Nutrition and Dietetic Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Elaf; Rice, Gail; Daher, Noha; Heine, Nancy; Schneider, Louise; Connell, Bert

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly difficult to provide adequate clinical training for new dietetics graduates. Dietetic students obtain clinical experience by visiting patients and viewing their charts in hospital settings but rarely counsel them. To examine the change in nutrition and dietetic students' perceived readiness to practice after completing three Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE). 37 students (mean age 26.6±5.4 yrs, 95% female) from the Schools of Public Health and Allied Health Professions enrolled in a medical nutrition therapy course. Using a pre-post test design, 37 students completed the first 3 weeks of the laboratory section of the course at the medical center, followed by 3 weeks of OSCE. OSCE stations included reviewing a chart, counseling a standardized patient, and discussing findings with other healthcare professionals. Students answered the Perceived Readiness for Dietetic Practice questionnaire before and after the OSCE. OSCE significantly improved students' mean readiness to practice their role as clinical dietitians (4.9±2.5 vs 5.8±1.9, p=0.03). There was a significant improvement in the professional role (p=0.04) and charting (p=0.01). Students improved in all areas, but not all areas reached statistical significance. Seventy-six percent of students found the OSCE to be superior to the medical center experience, and 78% of students agreed that collaboration with other healthcare professionals helped prepare them for the dietetic role. The OSCE experience improved students' perceived clinical skills. The OSCE format can provide a realistic patient experience for dietetic students to develop their patient evaluation and counseling skills.

  17. Evaluation of the Introduction of an e-Health Skills Component for Dietetics Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Collins, Clare E; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley

    2017-11-01

    Appropriate and effective use of technology within practice is a key competency outlined in Australian dietetics training standards. An e-health skills component (lecture and workshop) was introduced to undergraduate students enrolled in an Australian nutrition and dietetics program. The lecture orientated students to key e-health terms and concepts relating to telehealth and m-health technologies, while the workshop provided an opportunity to apply knowledge. The workshop consisted of four stations with activities relating to (1) orientation to telehealth equipment; (2) comparison of dietetic consultation components completed in person versus remotely via video call; (3) quality assessment of mobile apps; and (4) exploration of advantages and disadvantages, and the ethical, security, and privacy issues relating to use of e-health technologies in dietetic practice. Student experience of the training was evaluated via questionnaire. Forty-five students (62.2% aged ≤19-24 years, 86.7% female) completed the survey. Following the workshop, the level of understanding relating to each key e-health concept improved significantly (p professional education to support the use of e-health technologies within dietetic practice were rated a high level of importance by most students (78-80%). The majority of students (93.3% to 97.8%) reported a positive experience at each of the four workshop stations, with "informative" the most common word selected to rate each station (37.8% to 44.4% of students across the four stations). The introduction of an e-health skills component resulted in an improved understanding of concepts for using these technologies. These findings provide preliminary support for integration of further e-health training within the dietetics program.

  18. History of the World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery (WFSLMS) and its Non-Profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS): Part 1: Origins to Inaugural Meeting, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    The first society formed to represent the "new" field of laser applications in medicine and surgery was the late Professor Kaplan's International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine, held in Israel in 1975. Following the ISLSM lead, a large number of national and international societies were very swiftly formed. As the number grew, it became obvious that some sort of linking forum would help all these separate societies to pool the knowledge of their members for the good of the clinicians and their patients. The World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery was formed to attempt to fill this role. The History: At the 1996 meeting of the Greek Medical Laser Association, the first international forum of representatives from 17 international and national laser societies was convened by Professor Nick Nicolopoulos, and the seed of an idea for a centralized forum to help separate laser societies coordinate efforts and knowledge was planted. This seed was nurtured by the ISLSM as the first medical laser society, and forums were called together at each meeting of the ISLSM and the other related societies from 1997 to 2003. At the 2004 Chinese Medical Laser Society meeting, the idea of worldwide federation of laser societies crystallized into a more tangible form The Inaugural WFSLMS Congress: The convening of the first WFSLMS congress took place in Tokyo in 2005, under the leadership of Professor Kazuhiko Atsumi. At this meeting, Professor Kaplan proposed that a Medical Laser Foundation should be established and donated the first seed money for its formation. Because of the Japanese legal requirements, a foundation was impossible and so a Non-profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS) was started, based in Japan, to oversee the work and fund the tasks of promoting laser surgery and medicine worldwide, for the good of mankind: the financing, running and holding WFSLMS congresses became one of the tasks of NPO-WFSLMS. Both the WFSLMS and NPO-WFSLMS were therefore on

  19. Factors associated with the number of consultations per dietetic treatment: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Greater understanding of the variance in the number of consultations per dietetic treatment will increase the transparency of dietetic healthcare. Substantial inter-practitioner variation may suggest a potential to increase efficiency and improve quality. It is not known whether inter-practitioner variation also exists in the field of dietetics. Therefore, the aims of this study are to examine inter-practitioner variation in the number of consultations per treatment and the case-mix factors that explain this variation. Methods For this observational study, data were used from the National Information Service for Allied Health Care (LiPZ). LiPZ is a Dutch registration network of allied health care professionals, including dietitians working in primary healthcare. Data were used from 6,496 patients who underwent dietetic treatment between 2006 and 2009, treated by 27 dietitians working in solo practices located throughout the Netherlands. Data collection was based on the long-term computerized registration of healthcare-related information on patients, reimbursement, treatment and health problems, using a regular software program for reimbursement. Poisson multilevel regression analyses were used to model the number of consultations and to account for the clustered structure of the data. Results After adjusting for case-mix, seven percent of the total variation in consultation sessions was due to dietitians. The mean number of consultations per treatment was 4.9 and ranged from 2.3–10.1 between dietitians. Demographic characteristics, patients’ initiative and patients’ health problems explained 28% of the inter-practitioner variation. Certain groups of patients used significantly more dietetic healthcare compared to others, i.e. older patients, females, the native Dutch, patients with a history of dietetic healthcare, patients who started the treatment on their own initiative, patients with multiple diagnoses, overweight, or binge eating disorder

  20. Factors associated with the number of consultations per dietetic treatment: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tol Jacqueline

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater understanding of the variance in the number of consultations per dietetic treatment will increase the transparency of dietetic healthcare. Substantial inter-practitioner variation may suggest a potential to increase efficiency and improve quality. It is not known whether inter-practitioner variation also exists in the field of dietetics. Therefore, the aims of this study are to examine inter-practitioner variation in the number of consultations per treatment and the case-mix factors that explain this variation. Methods For this observational study, data were used from the National Information Service for Allied Health Care (LiPZ. LiPZ is a Dutch registration network of allied health care professionals, including dietitians working in primary healthcare. Data were used from 6,496 patients who underwent dietetic treatment between 2006 and 2009, treated by 27 dietitians working in solo practices located throughout the Netherlands. Data collection was based on the long-term computerized registration of healthcare-related information on patients, reimbursement, treatment and health problems, using a regular software program for reimbursement. Poisson multilevel regression analyses were used to model the number of consultations and to account for the clustered structure of the data. Results After adjusting for case-mix, seven percent of the total variation in consultation sessions was due to dietitians. The mean number of consultations per treatment was 4.9 and ranged from 2.3–10.1 between dietitians. Demographic characteristics, patients’ initiative and patients’ health problems explained 28% of the inter-practitioner variation. Certain groups of patients used significantly more dietetic healthcare compared to others, i.e. older patients, females, the native Dutch, patients with a history of dietetic healthcare, patients who started the treatment on their own initiative, patients with multiple diagnoses, overweight

  1. Lizard reproductive medicine and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard S

    2002-09-01

    Lizards are a diverse group of some 4470 species, a wide variety of which are now kept in captivity. Interest in captive lizards continues to increase, wild populations seem to be declining in some areas, and herpetoculturists continue to succeed in breeding more species; consequently, veterinarians must understand basic lizard reproductive biology to successfully treat lizard patients with reproductive problems. Just obtaining First Filial Generation (F1) offspring is an accomplishment. But we must look down the road to maintain a species in captivity for succeeding generations, and a lineage may not continue if attention is not given to details of appropriate husbandry and proper reproductive pursuits. One study documents the senescence of lineages in parthenogenetic lizards in captivity apparently associated with husbandry problems [99].

  2. [Analysis of projects received and funded in fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China during 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Wang, Linlin; Chen, Xulin; Cao, Yongqian; Xiang, Chuan; Xue, Lixiang; Yan, Zhangcai

    2014-01-01

    To summarized the projects received and funded in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2013, put forward the thinking and perspective of this future trend in these fields. The number of the funded project and total funding in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from NSFC during 2010-2013 had been statistical analyzed, in the meantime, the overview situation of various branches in basic research and further preliminary analysis the research frontier and hot issues have been analyzed. (1) The number of funded project were 581 in H15 of NSFC during 2010-2013, total funding reached to 277.13 million RMB, including 117 projects in H1511 (emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery and other science issue), 96 projects in H1507 (wound healing and scar), 88 projects in H1502 (multi-organ failure), 71 projects in H1505 (burn), 61 projects in H1504 (trauma). (2) The top 10 working unit for project funding in the field of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery present as Third Military Medical University (70), Shanghai Jiao tong University (69), Second Military Medical University (40), Chinese PLA General Hospital (36), Forth Military Medical University (35), Zhejiang University (22), Sun Yat-Sen University (18), Southern Medical University (14), China Medical University (11), Capital Medical University (11) respectively, the number of funded project positive correlated with funding. (3) The funded research field in H15 covered almost all important organs and system injury or repair research, our scientists reached a fairly high level in some research field, for example, sepsis, trauma, repair, et al. "Sepsis" was funded 112 projects in H15 for 4 years, the growth rate became rapid and stable comparing to shock, burns and cardiopulmonary resuscitation funded projects

  3. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  4. Multimodal hybrid imaging agents for sentinel node mapping as a means to (re)connect nuclear medicine to advances made in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinJan, Gijs H; van den Berg, Nynke S; de Jong, Jeroen; Wit, Esther M; Thygessen, Helene; Vegt, Erik; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2016-07-01

    Radical prostatectomy and complementary extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) and non-sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) at risk of containing metastases are increasingly being performed using high-tech robot-assisted approaches. Although this technological evolution has clear advantages, the physical nature of robotic systems limits the integrated use of routine radioguided surgery technologies. Hence, engineering effort in robotics are focused on the integration of fluorescence guidance technologies. Using the hybrid SN tracer indocyanine green-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid (radioactive and fluorescent), for the first time in combination with a robot-integrated laparoscope, we investigated whether the robot-assisted approach affects the accuracy of fluorescence detection of SNs identified preoperatively using nuclear medicine. The study included 55 patients (Briganti nomogram-based risk >5 % on LN metastases) scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, SN biopsy and ePLND. Following indocyanine green-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid injection, preoperative nuclear imaging (lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT) was used to locate the SN(s). The fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify the SN(s) with standard fluorescence settings (in 50 patients) and with customized settings (in 5 patients). The number and location of the SNs, the radioactive, fluorescence (both in vivo and ex vivo) and tumour status of the resected SNs/LNs, and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Combined, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging identified 212 SNs (median 4 per patient). Intraoperative fluorescence imaging using standard fluorescence settings visualized 80.4 % (148/184 SNs; 50 patients; ex vivo 97.8 %). This increased to 85.7 % (12/14 SNs; 5 patients; ex vivo 100 %) with customized fluorescence settings. SPECT/CT images provided guidance towards the residual SNs. Ex vivo all removed SNs were radioactive. SNs

  5. Multimodal hybrid imaging agents for sentinel node mapping as a means to (re)connect nuclear medicine to advances made in robot-assisted surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KleinJan, Gijs H. [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, Nynke S. van den [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Jeroen de [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wit, Esther M.; Poel, Henk G. van der [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Thygessen, Helene [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vegt, Erik [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-07-15

    Radical prostatectomy and complementary extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) and non-sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) at risk of containing metastases are increasingly being performed using high-tech robot-assisted approaches. Although this technological evolution has clear advantages, the physical nature of robotic systems limits the integrated use of routine radioguided surgery technologies. Hence, engineering effort in robotics are focused on the integration of fluorescence guidance technologies. Using the hybrid SN tracer indocyanine green-{sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid (radioactive and fluorescent), for the first time in combination with a robot-integrated laparoscope, we investigated whether the robot-assisted approach affects the accuracy of fluorescence detection of SNs identified preoperatively using nuclear medicine. The study included 55 patients (Briganti nomogram-based risk >5 % on LN metastases) scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, SN biopsy and ePLND. Following indocyanine green-{sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid injection, preoperative nuclear imaging (lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT) was used to locate the SN(s). The fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify the SN(s) with standard fluorescence settings (in 50 patients) and with customized settings (in 5 patients). The number and location of the SNs, the radioactive, fluorescence (both in vivo and ex vivo) and tumour status of the resected SNs/LNs, and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Combined, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging identified 212 SNs (median 4 per patient). Intraoperative fluorescence imaging using standard fluorescence settings visualized 80.4 % (148/184 SNs; 50 patients; ex vivo 97.8 %). This increased to 85.7 % (12/14 SNs; 5 patients; ex vivo 100 %) with customized fluorescence settings. SPECT/CT images provided guidance towards the residual SNs. Ex vivo all removed SNs were radioactive. SNs

  6. Dietetics and Nutrition Students Response to Grocery Store Tour Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Elizabeth D.; Brunt, Ardith; Froelich, Christa; Borr, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Retail dietetics is a growing field, however, there is very little research available on effective teaching strategies for preparing students to enter this part of the profession. This paper is the second paper to report on the results of produce-focused grocery store tour training program. This paper focuses on the trained students' perception of…

  7. Determination of essential elements in dietetic sample by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siquelli, Murilo V.; Maihara, Vera A. Maihara

    2005-01-01

    In the last years there has been an increase of the dietetic product consumption by people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease and by people concerned about having a healthy life as well. Despite the increase of dietetic product presents in the diet of the Brazilian population, the use of these products is still controversial. The analysis of the nutritional composition of these products is becoming important because a great number of people is changing their traditional food by dietetic products. In the literature, there is no information about the inorganic composition, mainly related to the essential elements, in the dietetic products: diet and light . In this study are presented preliminary results of the concentrations of Br, Ca, Cr, Fe, Na and Zn determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in aspartame, saccharin and cyclamate sodium , and stevia based sweetener samples. Gelatin samples, diet and light, were also analyzed. Methodology validation was done analyzing NIST reference materials Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2). (author)

  8. Sustained benefits of a community dietetics intervention designed to improve oral nutritional supplement prescribing practices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2011-10-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community do not always prescribe oral nutritional supplements (ONS) according to best practice guidelines for the management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a community dietetics intervention on ONS prescribing practices and expenditure 1 year later.

  9. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos M.B. Nieweg; Dr. C.P. van der Schans; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar; Joke J. van de Kruk

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). SETTING:

  10. A Quantitative Assessment of the Cultural Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences of Junior and Senior Dietetics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H.; Greathouse, Karen R.; Smith, Erskine R.; Holbert, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the cultural competence of dietetics majors. Design: Self-administered questionnaire. Setting: Classrooms at 7 universities. Participants: Two hundred eighty-three students--98 juniors (34.6%) and 185 seniors (65.4%)--recruited during class time. Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge was measured using a multiple-choice test,…

  11. Nutrition/Dietetics Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in nutrition/dietetics in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  12. Critical-Thinking Dispositions among Dietetic Interns at the Completion of Their Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julie Raeder

    2014-01-01

    Critical-thinking skills permeate the ability to pass tests such as the Certification Registration Examination for Dietitians (RD Exam) (Dietetic Educators of Practitioners, 2011). The impact of critical thinking on the RD Exam should be evaluated to assist faculty members when developing curriculum-especially as trends in dispositions emerge.…

  13. Health professionals' and dietetics practitioners' perceived effectiveness of fruit and vegetable parenting practices across six countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit and vegetable intake may reduce the risk of some chronic diseases. However, many children consume less-than-recommended amounts of fruit and vegetables. Because health professionals and dietetics practitioners often work with parents to increase children’s fruit and vegetable intake, assessing...

  14. A Learning-Cycle-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Program for Students in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, William J.

    1982-01-01

    The laboratory of an organic chemistry course for dietetics students is based on the learning cycle approach (exploration, invention-concept introduction, and concept application). The laboratory program is divided into four sections: lab techniques, compound types, reaction types, and reaction characteristics. (SK)

  15. The Nutrition and Dietetics Workforce Needs Skills and Expertise in the New York Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ann; Shrivastava, Apoorva; Amadi, Chioma; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-09-28

    There is an increased demand in the Nutrition and Dietetics field which has fostered credentialing to ensure competent graduates. The objective of this study is to conduct an exploratory analysis to identify nutrition/dietetics workforce needs, skills and expertise in the New York metropolitan area as exemplified in position announcements over a 4 year period. We recorded position announcements for jobs in nutrition and dietetics from the New York State Registered Dietitian Yahoo group, and the Hunter College Nutrition and Food Sciences student and alumni listserv (NFS-L) over a 4 year period. Keywords were identified using job categories defined by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) compensation and benefits survey. This served as a starting point to enumerate the types of positions that have been posted for the New York metropolitan area in recent years. Four hundred and twelve (412) unique job postings were recorded. Various educational levels, credentials, and skills desired by these employers were identified, assessed, and compared with similar data from the "supply side" reports from AND. The credentials and skills most desired by employers are similar to some of the learning objectives set forth for DPD and DI programs by ACEND, but not entirely congruent. The need for both client/customer focus and computer literacy may be implicit in the standards, but a more overt inclusion of these skills would likely be of benefit to ensure these are inculcated into every program and student.

  16. Learning Style Preferences of Undergraduate Dietetics, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meredith G.; Hansen, Pamela; Rhee, Yeong; Brundt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the preferred learning style (LS) of college students and compared LS preferences among students majoring in Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Athletic Training. LS questionnaires were distributed to students (N = 693, mean age 20.5 ± 1.7) enrolled in health science courses at three Midwestern universities. Most students…

  17. Professional Development Portfolio: Perceptions of Nutrition and Dietetics Current Students and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouchilas, Gus; George, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    The Professional Development Portfolio (PDP) in family and consumer sciences nutrition and dietetics programs is a tool that can help students in their transition to professionals. Significant issues in the portfolio development process are: content selection, decision to create paper or online formatting, determination of proper timing to begin…

  18. Follow-Up Study of Dietetic Technician Graduates 1980-1982. Volume 12, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Henriette D.; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to evaluate and obtain externally required information about the dietetic technician program. Surveys were mailed to all 47 of the students who graduated from the program between 1980 and 1982 to obtain information on their employment status, job title, length of service,…

  19. Educational Requirements for Entry-Level Practice in the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Jorge, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The profession of nutrition and dietetics has experienced significant changes over the past 100 years due to advances in nutrition science and healthcare delivery. Although these advances have prompted changes in educational requirements in other healthcare professions, the requirements for entry-level registered dietitians have not changed since…

  20. Adding cognitive therapy to dietetic treatment is associated with less relapse in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werrij, Marieke Q.; Mulkens, Sandra; Elgersma, Hermien J.; Ament, Andre J. H. A.; Hospers, Hann J.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of obesity is universally disappointing; although usually some weight loss is reported directly after treatment, eventual relapse to, or even above, former body weight is common. In this study it is tested whether the addition of cognitive therapy to a standard dietetic

  1. The Nutrition and Dietetics Workforce Needs Skills and Expertise in the New York Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ann; Shrivastava, Apoorva; Amadi, Chioma; Joshi, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increased demand in the Nutrition and Dietetics field which has fostered credentialing to ensure competent graduates. The objective of this study is to conduct an exploratory analysis to identify nutrition/dietetics workforce needs, skills and expertise in the New York metropolitan area as exemplified in position announcements over a 4 year period. Methods: We recorded position announcements for jobs in nutrition and dietetics from the New York State Registered Dietitian Yahoo group, and the Hunter College Nutrition and Food Sciences student and alumni listserv (NFS-L) over a 4 year period. Keywords were identified using job categories defined by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) compensation and benefits survey. This served as a starting point to enumerate the types of positions that have been posted for the New York metropolitan area in recent years. Results: Four hundred and twelve (412) unique job postings were recorded. Various educational levels, credentials, and skills desired by these employers were identified, assessed, and compared with similar data from the “supply side” reports from AND. Conclusions: The credentials and skills most desired by employers are similar to some of the learning objectives set forth for DPD and DI programs by ACEND, but not entirely congruent. The need for both client/customer focus and computer literacy may be implicit in the standards, but a more overt inclusion of these skills would likely be of benefit to ensure these are inculcated into every program and student. PMID:26755482

  2. Systematic review of knowledge, confidence and education in nutritional genomics for students and professionals in nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, O R L

    2014-06-01

    This review examines knowledge and confidence of nutrition and dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics and evaluates the teaching strategies in this field within nutrition and dietetics university programmes and professional development courses internationally. A systematic search of 10 literature databases was conducted from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify original research. Any studies of either nutrition and/or dietetics students or dietitians/nutritionists investigating current levels of knowledge or confidence in nutritional genomics, or strategies to improve learning and/or confidence in this area, were eligible. Eighteen articles (15 separate studies) met the inclusion criteria. Three articles were assessed as negative, eight as neutral and seven as positive according to the American Dietetics Association Quality Criteria Checklist. The overall ranking of evidence was low. Dietitians have low involvement, knowledge and confidence in nutritional genomics, and evidence for educational strategies is limited and methodologically weak. There is a need to develop training pathways and material to up-skill nutrition and/or dietetics students and nutrition and/or dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics through multidisciplinary collaboration with content area experts. There is a paucity of high quality evidence on optimum teaching strategies; however, methods promoting repetitive exposure to nutritional genomics material, problem-solving, collaborative and case-based learning are most promising for university and professional development programmes. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: promoting and supporting breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessen, Rachelle; Kavanagh, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that exclusive breastfeeding provides optimal nutrition and health protection for the first 6 months of life, and that breastfeeding with complementary foods from 6 months until at least 12 months of age is the ideal feeding pattern for infants. Breastfeeding is an important public health strategy for improving infant and child morbidity and mortality, improving maternal morbidity, and helping to control health care costs. Research continues to support the positive effects of human milk on infant and maternal health, as it is a living biological fluid with many qualities not replicable by human milk substitutes. Recent research advancements include a greater understanding of the human gut microbiome, the protective effect of human milk for premature infants and those born to women experiencing gestational diabetes mellitus, the relationship of breastfeeding with human immunodeficiency virus, and the increased ability to characterize cellular components of human milk. Registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered, should continue efforts to shift the norm of infant feeding away from use of human milk substitutes and toward human milk feeds. The role of registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered, in breastfeeding promotion and support, in the context of the professional code of ethics and the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, are discussed in the "Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding," published on the Academy website at: www.eatright.org/positions. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic surgery and nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Christine; Manger, Thomas; Benedix, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The increasing prevalence of morbid obesity in Germany is associated with an increasing number of metabolic surgical interventions. Short-term surgical and long-term metabolic complications such as nutrient deficiencies can be considered as the main risks of metabolic surgery with its malabsorptive but also restrictive procedures. The aim of this review was to characterize the most relevant metabolic complications specific for the various bariatric procedures, which, subsequently, require a permanent surveillance and supplementation, respectively. Furthermore, we aimed to identify if there are diagnostic and therapeutic measures that can prevent those complications. Restrictive bariatric surgery such as "gastric banding" and "sleeve gastrectomy" can be associated with deficiencies related to B-vitamins whereas iron, folate, vitamin B1, B12 and D deficiencies are associated with the malabsorptive procedure such as "biliopancreatic diversion," "duodenal switch" and "Roux-en-Y gastric bypass". Due to possible metabolic and surgical complications after bariatric surgery, patients need to undergo life-long medical and dietetic surveillance. The recently published guidelines of the "American Association of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery" are the basis for recommendations on supplementation and treatment following weight loss surgery.

  5. Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Selecting Nutrient-Dense Foods for Good Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingle, Melanie D; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Maggi, Annette

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage selection of nutrient-dense foods for health promotion and disease prevention and management. The purpose of this Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics practice paper is to provide an update regarding the science and practice of nutrient-dense food identification and selection. Characterization of tools used to identify nutrient density of foods is provided and recommendations for how registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered, might use available profiling tools to help consumers select nutrient-dense foods is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a number ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many ...

  7. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for magnesium. The Panel considers that Average Requirements (ARs) and Population Reference Intakes (PRIs) for magnesium cannot be derived...

  8. Prevalence of Exercise Addiction Symptomology and Disordered Eating in Australian Students Studying Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocks, Tetyana; Pelly, Fiona; Slater, Gary; Martin, Lisa Anne

    2017-10-01

    Previous research has reported the existence of disordered eating in students studying nutrition and dietetics. However, the occurrence of exercise addiction, previously linked to disordered eating, is poorly understood in this group. The main objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of exercise addiction and the association with disordered eating in a sample of students studying nutrition and dietetics. A secondary objective was to compare the prevalence of exercise addiction to students enrolled in another health-related degree. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 165 undergraduate students. Participants were students of both sexes enrolled in nutrition and dietetics and occupational therapy degree programs at an Australian university in August 2013. Participants completed four validated questionnaires for assessment of exercise- and eating-related attitudes and behaviors measuring scores for exercise addiction, weekly volume of physical activity (PA), eating disorder symptoms, and cognitive restraint. Stretch stature and body mass were measured and body composition was assessed using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Independent t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and χ 2 test were completed to compare groups of students based on sex, degree, or eating attitudes. Spearman's correlation was performed to explore associations between continuous variables (exercise addiction scores, PA volume, and scores for eating attitudes and cognitive restraint). Approximately 23% of nutrition and dietetics students were found to be at risk of exercise addiction (20% females and 35% males; P=0.205), while the majority demonstrated some symptoms of exercise addiction. A similar proportion of at risk individuals was found in the female occupational therapy group (19%; P=1.000). In females (nutrition and dietetics and occupational therapy combined), the exercise addiction scores were associated with three other outcome measures: PA volume (r s

  9. Using Academy Standards of Excellence in Nutrition and Dietetics for organization self-assessment and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Joyce A; Kent, Sue; Cox, Sharon A; McCauley, Sharon M; Parekh, Janki; Klein, Catherine J

    2014-08-01

    Standards of Excellence in Nutrition and Dietetics for an Organization is a self-assessment tool to measure and evaluate an organization's program, services, and initiatives that identify and distinguish the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) brand as the professional expert in food and nutrition. The Standards of Excellence will serve as a road map to recognize RDNs as leaders and collaborators. Standards of Excellence criteria apply to all practice segments of nutrition and dietetics: health care, education and research, business and industry, and community nutrition and public health. Given the membership's call to action to be recognized for their professional expertise, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee developed four Standards of Excellence in Nutrition and Dietetics for Organizations: Quality of Leadership, Quality of Organization, Quality of Practice, and Quality of Outcomes. Within each standard, specific indicators provide strategies for an organization to demonstrate excellence. The Academy will develop a self-evaluation scoring tool to assist the organization in applying and implementing one or more of the strategies in the Standards of Excellence indicators. The organization can use the self-assessment tool to establish itself as a Center of Excellence in Nutrition and Dietetics. The role examples illustrate initiatives RDNs and organizations can take to identify themselves as a Center of Excellence in Nutrition and Dietetics. Achieving the Excellence level is an important collaborative initiative between nutrition and dietetics organizations and the Academy to provide increased autonomy, supportive management, respect within peers and community, opportunities for professional development, support for further education, and compensation for the RDN. For purposes of the Standards, "organization" means workplace or practice setting. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Examples and experience: on the uncertainty of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    After a brief account of the uncertainty of medicine in early modern thought, this paper focuses on two supple, sophisticated accounts of medicine by 'non-medical' writers--Michel de Montaigne's views of medical theory and medical practice and Francis Bacon's proposals for renovating both--in which the claims of individual sufferers are set against the normativity of medicine as a whole. From around 1500 to around 1680, in the common ensemble of both learned and popular invective, medicine was disparaged as poor philosophy and worse practice, even as the 'lowest of professions'. In remarkably broad, elegant interventions, Montaigne argues that medicine is based on 'examples and experience' (and 'so is my opinion', he adds), impugning its universalizing claims with the tractable experience of his own embodiment, with his own historia and consilium, while Francis Bacon enlists dietetics, Hippocratic case-taking and medical history in his broad programme for the reform of medicine. He more or less accepts Montaigne's argument for particularity in medical theory and practice, but presses the particular into service in his reformist programme. Like many sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century scholars and physicians frustrated with Galenic methods and models, both turn to Hippocratic practice and to hygiene and dietetics as salves for an ailing discipline. Finally, I argue that both writers enquire into viable means for inflecting learned medicine with particular experience, and both settle on rhetorical tools - analogy and exemplarity - as the means by which universalized medical models might be particularized or reformed.

  11. A sustainable dietetics bridging program: development and implementation in Atlantic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne; Guy, Jennifer; Barry, Paula; Garus, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A provincial focus on immigration and improved foreign credential recognition has led to an investigation of best practices and subsequent recommendations for the development and implementation of a sustainable university-based bridging program for internationally educated dietitians in Atlantic Canada. Data were collected from various sources and used to inform program decisions and direction. An advisory framework was established through a core group representing dietetics education and regulation and internationalization. Subsequently, a key stakeholder group was formed. As a result of this collaboration and research, a dietetics bridging framework was developed and a program pilot tested. Lessons learned may inform similar endeavours and highlight the importance of collaborative leadership and collaboration among multiple stakeholders, and of creatively addressing program sustainability issues while keeping learners (internationally educated dietitians) at the centre.

  12. [Breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant oncologic treatment for breast carcinoma at the 1st Department of Surgery, 1st Faculty of Medicine of Charles University and General Teaching Hospital in Prague over a ten-year period (20042013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuk, J; Schwarzbacherová, I; Kimleová, K

    2017-01-01

    Since the first breast conservative surgery following neoadjuvant oncotherapy performed in the 1990s, there has been a shift in indications, diagnostic, surgical and oncotherapeutic procedures. The aim of the study is to present the results of the comprehensive treatment of patients with breast conservative surgery performed after neoadjuvant oncologic treatment for breast cancer at our department of surgery. A retrospective study involving 96 patients operated on at our department between 2004 and 2013. The median follow-up time is 6 years and 8 months after the diagnosis. Breast recurrence was found in 2 (2.1%) cases. No axillary recurrence occurred. A total of 8 (8.3%) patients with generalized carcinoma of the breast died. Total remission was achieved in 81 (84.4%) patients. 76 (79.2%) patients survive in the CR. The results of the studies mentioned below as well as our results have shown that BCS after neoadjuvant oncologic therapy is safe and effective in appropriately selected patients.Key words: breast cancer neoadjuvant therapy - breast-conserving surgery - recurrence -cosmetic outcome.

  13. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: food and water safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Mildred M; Stretch, Theresa

    2014-11-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all people should have access to a safe food and water supply. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics supports science-based food and water regulations and recommendations that are applied consistently across all foods and water regulated by all agencies and incorporate traceability and recall to limit food- and waterborne outbreaks. Registered dietitian nutritionists and dietetic technicians, registered, are encouraged to participate in policy decisions, program development, and implementation of a food safety culture. Food safety affects all segments of the population in a global society, and, although the United States food and water system has many protections in place, food safety continues to be a public health concern. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in six Americans are sickened, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die annually from foodborne disease. Using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates for foodborne illness, it is estimated that the basic cost-of-illness averages $1,068/episode with a total annual cost of $51 billion. The food safety system is challenged by changing demographics, consumer preferences for convenience and variety, and issues of concern in the commercial food chain and in regulatory systems. The 2011-enacted Food Safety Modernization Act is an extensive expansion of federal food regulatory authority that mandates a risk-based food safety system approach and focuses on comprehensive science-based preventive measures across the total food safety system. Registered dietitian nutritionists and dietetic technicians, registered, have unique roles in promoting and establishing food safety cultures in foodservice settings, clinical practices, community settings, and in public venues because their training integrates food; science; and health, both preventive and therapeutic. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Trends impacting food safety in retail foodservice: implications for dietetics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jeannie; Strohbehn, Catherine H

    2008-07-01

    Food safety in retail foodservice is increasingly important to consumers. Trends that impact food safety concerns include the increasing number of meals eaten away from home, increasing consumer awareness about food safety, an aging population, changes in the foodservice workforce, changing technology in work environments, changes in food procurement, foodservice risk factors, and food defense concerns. Each of these trends has implications for dietetics practice, both in working with consumers and managing foodservice operations.

  15. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  16. Food and Culinary Knowledge and Skills: Perceptions of Undergraduate Dietetic Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Marcia J; Mezzabotta, Leanne; Murphy, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine food and culinary skills and knowledge of dietetic students. An online bilingual survey was created using Survey Monkey TM to explore the skills, knowledge, and perceptions of undergraduate dietetic students regarding food and cooking. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were used to compare skills and knowledge of food and culinary concepts. The final sample included second- (n = 22) and third-year (n = 22) students within the Baccalauréat specialisé en sciences de la nutrition program at the University of Ottawa. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) on 3 of 4 skills (preparing a cake, whipping egg whites, or baking a yeast bread) or knowledge concepts (fold, baste, braise, grill, and poach) amongst second- and third-year students. Third-year students perceived more skill in preparing a béchamel sauce. There was a trend for third-year students (59%) to have higher food and cooking skills and knowledge compared with second-year students (32%). Perceived knowledge and confidence was proportional with the academic year, whereas overall knowledge and skills of food and culinary concepts were moderate among both groups of students. This research suggests that more dedicated time may need to be spent on food and cooking competencies in undergraduate dietetic education.

  17. Stronger Together: Use of Storytelling at a Dietetics Conference to Promote Professional Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ann; Gillis, Doris; Anderson, Barb; Lordly, Daphne

    2017-03-01

    During a Dietitians of Canada conference session (2015), 4 facilitators drew upon "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (Alice) to engage participants in discussing the future of dietetic education. The aim was to feature Nova Scotia (NS) collaborative experiences as an example of dietetic education planning that could be implemented elsewhere. Three vignettes from the Alice story were chosen as metaphoric representations of dilemmas and assumptions commonly faced by dietetic educators. Story quotations and facilitator questions related to each vignette-guided discussion. The 3-part story-based arts approach of hearing stories, recognizing stories, and telling stories enabled participants to reflect on their own practice, relate to the challenges of others, and question conventional wisdom. Participants heard the Alice stories, recognized their experiences through the NS examples and had an opportunity to tell their own stories during discussions. Participants identified barriers to and strategies for collaborative planning in their own regions. Evaluation suggests most participants were positively engaged by the storytelling approach. Participants recommended that future offerings allow more time for orientation and for completion of planned activities. Bilingual programming should also be considered. Participants valued the unconventional approach to workshop engagement and planned to implement it in their own workplaces.

  18. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, Joke J; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Nieweg, Roos M B; van der Schans, Cees P

    2014-06-01

    To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). Data collection by 7 d dietary record and questionnaire. Dutch nutrition and dietetics students. Three hundred and fifty-two first-year and 216 fourth-year students were included. One hundred and thirty-three students in three cohorts were assessed twice. Of first-year students, >80 % met the RDA for all macronutrients. Of these students only 37 % met the RDA for fibre and in 43 % intake of saturated fat was too high. Fourth-year students more often met the RDA for fruits (55 %) and vegetables (74 %) compared with first-year students (32 % and 40 %, respectively). Intake of fruits and vegetables of both first- and fourth-year students was much higher than that of DNFCS participants (where 2 % and 7 %, respectively, met the corresponding RDA). Only 80 %). Intakes of dietary fibre, Ca, Mg, Se, riboflavin, niacin, fruits, vegetables and fish improved significantly during education. Dietary intake of nutrition and dietetics students is much better than that of DNFCS participants and improved during education. However, there is still a gap between actual dietary intake and the RDA, especially for Fe, Se and vitamin D.

  19. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: the impact of fluoride on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Carole A; Gilbert, Joyce Ann

    2012-09-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to support optimal systemic and topical fluoride as an important public health measure to promote oral health and overall health throughout life. Fluoride is an important element in the mineralization of bone and teeth. The proper use of topical and systemic fluoride has resulted in major reductions in dental caries and its associated disability. Dental caries remains the most prevalent chronic disease in children and affects all age groups of the population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has named fluoridation of water as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 21st century. Currently, >72% of the US population that is served by community water systems benefits from water fluoridation. However, only 27 states provide fluoridated water to more than three quarters of the state's residents on public water systems. Fluoride also plays a role in bone health. However, at this time, use of high doses of fluoride for osteoporosis prevention is considered experimental only. Dietetics practitioners should routinely monitor and promote the use of fluorides for all age groups. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Image-Based Dietary Assessment Ability of Dietetics Students and Interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Erica; Boushey, Carol J; Kerr, Deborah A; Tomayko, Emily J; Cluskey, Mary

    2017-02-07

    Image-based dietary assessment (IBDA) may improve the accuracy of dietary assessments, but no formalized training currently exists for skills relating to IBDA. This study investigated nutrition and dietetics students' and interns' IBDA abilities, the training and experience factors that may contribute to food identification and quantification accuracy, and the perceived challenges to performing IBDA. An online survey containing images of known foods and serving sizes representing common American foods was used to assess the ability to identify foods and serving sizes. Nutrition and dietetics students and interns from the United States and Australia ( n = 114) accurately identified foods 79.5% of the time. Quantification accuracy was lower, with only 38% of estimates within ±10% of the actual weight. Foods of amorphous shape or higher energy density had the highest percent error. Students expressed general difficulty with perceiving serving sizes, making IBDA food quantification more difficult. Experience cooking at home from a recipe, frequent measuring of portions, and having a food preparation or cooking laboratory class were associated with enhanced accuracy in IBDA. Future training of dietetics students should incorporate more food-based serving size training to improve quantification accuracy while performing IBDA, while advances in IBDA technology are also needed.

  1. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Food Insecurity in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, David H; Marshall, Michelle Berger

    2017-12-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that systematic and sustained action is needed to achieve food and nutrition security in the United States. To achieve food security, effective interventions are needed, along with adequate funding for, and increased utilization of, food and nutrition assistance programs; inclusion of nutrition education in such programs; strategies to support individual and household economic stability; and research to measure impact on food insecurity- and health-related outcomes. Millions of individuals living in the United States experience food insecurity. Negative nutritional and non-nutritional outcomes are associated with food insecurity across the lifespan, including substandard academic achievement, inadequate intake of key nutrients, increased risk for chronic disease, and poor psychological and cognitive functioning. Registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered, play key roles in addressing food insecurity and are uniquely positioned to make valuable contributions through competent and collaborative practice, provision of comprehensive food and nutrition education and training, innovative research related to all aspects of food insecurity, and advocacy efforts at the local, state, regional, and national levels. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition intervention in the treatment of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozier, Amy D; Henry, Beverly W

    2011-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition intervention, including nutritional counseling by a registered dietitian (RD), is an essential component of team treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders (EDs) during assessment and treatment across the continuum of care. Diagnostic criteria for EDs provide important guidelines for identification and treatment. In addition, individuals may experience disordered eating that extends along a range from food restriction to partial conditions to diagnosed EDs. Understanding the roles and responsibilities of RDs is critical to the effective care of individuals with EDs. The complexities of EDs, such as epidemiologic factors, treatment guidelines, special populations, and emerging trends highlight the nature of EDs, which require a collaborative approach by an interdisciplinary team of mental health, nutrition, and medical specialists. RDs are integral members of treatment teams and are uniquely qualified to provide medical nutrition therapy for the normalization of eating patterns and nutritional status. However, this role requires understanding of the psychologic and neurobiologic aspects of EDs. Advanced training is needed to work effectively with this population. Further efforts with evidenced-based research must continue for improved treatment outcomes related to EDs, along with identification of effective primary and secondary interventions. This paper supports the "Practice Paper of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Intervention in the Treatment of Eating Disorders" published online at www.eatright.org/positions. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Criteria for acceptance to preprofessional dietetics programs vs desired qualities of professionals: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K K

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to examine the literature and compare and contrast (a) qualities preferred in preprofessional dietetics students by directors of internships and approved preprofessional practice programs (AP4s), (b) characteristics needed to succeed in a scientific field, (c) traits emphasized by dietetics training programs compared with those most valued by employers, (d) skills needed by high-level managerial dietitians and those in business and communications, and (e) qualities dietitians have aspired to develop for increased competitiveness in the marketplace. Even though the revised Standards of Education have been in place since 1988, recent evaluation of criteria for internship and AP4 admission has shown traditional emphasis on academic performance and the importance of work experience. Success in scientific pursuits has been linked with more than innate intelligence; a drive for success and enthusiasm for learning are also involved. Internships foster mostly technical learning, so development of skills in human and conceptual areas are somewhat lacking. These skills, which have been identified as valuable to employers, need greater development or more consistent identification in the selection and training process. Perhaps serious consideration should be given to applicants for preprofessional programs who have shown leadership qualities through extracurricular activities or who have given themselves the opportunity to develop and improve these skills. Such students might hasten the metamorphosis of dietetics practitioners toward improved levels of compensation and professional fulfillment.

  4. Maze Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Maze Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Maze Surgery Article Info En español Electrical impulses in your ... called an arrhythmia. Why do I need Maze surgery? Maze surgery is also called the Maze procedure. ...

  5. Patient-reported dietetic care post hospital for free-living patients: a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H; Payette, H; Laporte, M; Bernier, P; Allard, J; Duerksen, D; Gramlich, L; Jeejeebhoy, K

    2018-02-01

    Transitions out of hospital can influence recovery. Ideally, malnourished patients should be followed by someone with nutrition expertise, specifically a dietitian, post discharge from hospital. Predictors of dietetic care post discharge are currently unknown. The present study aimed to determine the patient factors independently associated with 30-days post hospital discharge dietetic care for free-living patients who transitioned to the community. Nine hundred and twenty-two medical or surgical adult patients were recruited in 16 acute care hospitals in eight Canadian provinces on admission. Eligible patients could speak English or French, provide their written consent, were anticipated to have a hospital stay of ≥2 days and were not considered palliative. Telephone interviews were completed with 747 (81%) participants using a standardised questionnaire to determine whether dietetic care occurred post discharge; 544 patients discharged to the community were included in the multivariate analyses, excluding those who were admitted to nursing homes or rehabilitation facilities. Covariates during and post hospitalisation were collected prospectively and used in logistic regression analyses to determine independent patient-level predictors. Dietetic care post discharge was reported by 61/544 (11%) of participants and was associated with severe malnutrition [Subjective Global Assessment category C: odd's ratio (OR) 2.43 (1.23-4.83)], weight loss post discharge [(OR 2.86 (1.45-5.62)], comorbidity [(OR 1.09 (1.02-1.17)] and a dietitian consultation on admission [(OR 3.41 (1.95-5.97)]. Dietetic care post discharge occurs in few patients, despite the known high prevalence of malnutrition on admission and discharge. Dietetic care in hospital was the most influential predictor of post-hospital care. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  7. Dietetics in ancient Greek philosophy: Plato's concepts of healthy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiadas, P K; Lascaratos, J G

    2001-07-01

    Plato (5th-4th century BC), one of the most important philosophers of Greek antiquity, left a valuable spiritual heritage, compiled in his famous dialogues. His teachings extend to almost every single field of human knowledge. Among other philosophical concepts, Plato's works are imbued with the fundamental principle of moderation. This spirit is characteristically evident in his references to human diet. According to the philosopher, a moderate and thus a healthy diet, consists of cereals, legumes, fruits, milk, honey and fish. However, meat, confectionery and wine should be consumed only in moderate quantities. Excesses in food lead to ailments and therefore should be avoided. Plato considers physicians responsible for the regulation of human diet, for medicine is a science and not merely an art as in the case of cookery. The dietary pattern presented in Platonic dialogues shares many common components with the highly-reputed Mediterranean diet. As a whole, Plato's writings represent a valuable source for the study of the nutritional customs during the classical period of ancient Greece.

  8. Development And Evaluation Of Dietetic Unlea-vened Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anudeep R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes mellitus a heterogeneous metabolic disorder is characterized by hyperglycemia due to defective insulin secretion resistance to insulin action or both .Management of diabetes without any side effect is still a challenge to the medical community. Medicinal plants provide the useful source of pharmaceutical entitiesor as a dietary adjunct to existing therapies. So the concept of low glycaemic index foods are gaining interest for the effective management of diabetes mellit efforts has been accelerated in this direction to bring into light various foods of low glycaemic index. A whole wheat flour has been designed with the addition of functional food ingredient like methi seed powder neem powder and curry leaf powder at the suitable level that do not affect the functional properties of the product. The content of protein iron dietary fibre ash has been increased remarkable from 12.48-15.0612.87-23.82.91-9.432.32-4.54 respectively. The glycaemic index of the developed unleavened bread 42.18 was significantly lower as compared to the glycaemic index of whole wheat flour unleavened bread62.17. Enriched whole wheat unleavened bread can be included in the diet for the management of the diabetes more effectively and to avoid further secondary complications.

  9. Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Black Hawk; Morrison, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure-deep brain stimulation (DBS)-which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop's work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a major medical center. We present excerpts from an ethnographic study of the "case conference" where disease entities are presented, contested, ratified, and made objects for intervention with this technology. The case conference becomes the key site in the transition from "person-with-illness" to "person-with-brain-implant" as a team of health professionals determines a plan of action by interpreting both statistical and "quality of life" data regarding their patients. Second, this article explores these decision-making processes through Bishop's conceptualization of evidence-based medicine, which relies on statistical approaches as the ultimate authority in knowledge production and medical decisions. We then reflect on Bishop's critique of the social sciences and the methodological, analytical, and substantive ramifications that The Anticipatory Corpse can offer future sociological work. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Assessing the Risk of Orthorexia in Dietetic and Physiotherapy Students Using the BOT (Bratman Test for Orthorexia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittfeld, Anna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Koszowska, Aneta; Nowak, Justyna; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Jagielski, Paweł; Oświęcimska, Joanna; Ziora, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Orthorexia nervosa is an obsessive-compulsive focus on a "healthy" diet, which manifests as extreme concern about food content. This research was carried out in order to identify highly sensitive behaviours associated with eating a healthy diet. Assessment of risk of orthorexia nervosa among dietetics students compared to physiotherapy students. Presented research was conducted among 229 dietetic students and 201 physiotherapy students. It was based on general personal characteristics, the Bratman Test for Orthorexia (BOT) and questions posed by the authors. 26.6% of the dietetics students and only 14.9% of physiotherapy students were recognised as health food fanatics. The students of both dietetics (88.2%) and physiotherapy (52%) declared that they noticed changes in their attitude towards food after they had become students. It has been observed that these highly sensitive behaviours towards healthy eating are very common in both surveyed groups, however with a stronger tendency among the students of dietetics. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  11. The use and perceptions of concept mapping as a learning tool by dietetic internship students and preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Taylor, Kimberly A; Erickson, Dawn; Connell, Carol Lawson

    2009-01-01

    Critical thinking and problem solving skills are currently emphasis areas in the education of allied health professionals. Use of concept maps to teach these skills have been utilized primarily in nursing and medical education, but little has been published about their use in dietetics education. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of concept mapping as a learning tool for nutrition assessment among dietetic interns and its acceptability by internship preceptors. Nineteen dietetic interns and 31 preceptors participated in a quasi-experimental pre-/post-design in which the concept mapping strategy was taught as a replacement for the traditional nutrition care plan. The pre-concept map mean score was significantly lower than the post-concept mean score (28.35 vs. 117.96; p=0.001) based on the Student t-test, thus indicating improved critical thinking skills as evidenced through concept mapping. Overall students' perceptions of concept mapping as a teaching-learning method were more positive than the preceptors' perceptions. In conclusion, internship preceptors and dietetic interns perceived concept mapping as effective in assisting interns to engage in critical thinking, to problem solve, and understand relationships among medical nutrition therapy concepts. However, preceptors had more negative attitudes toward concept mapping than the dietetic interns related to time and effort to complete and evaluate the concept map.

  12. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. © 2012 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. [Helicobacter pylori: short overview on selected data from the history and their value for clinical medicine, in particular, surgery - what does the (general/abdominal) surgeon need to know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selgrad, M; Meyer, F; Malfertheiner, P

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) represents one of the most notable events in the field of experimental and clinical medicine with great impact to daily practice even to surgery. It has led to a paradigm shift in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. For the time period of almost one century, several scientists had described spiral-shaped bacteria in the stomach of animals and humans. However, it lasted till the early 1980s when Robin Warren and Barry Marshall successfully cultured H. pylori and recognised its causal relationship to chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Since then, our knowledge about H. pylori and related diseases has been continuously growing. Today, the bacterium is known to be mainly responsible for the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma and is considered as the main risk factor for the development of gastric cancer - all this led to a switch in the basic aetiopathogenetic considerations. In particular, eradication of H. pylori helped to i) develop an aetiology-based therapeutic and preventive approach to the diseases listed above according and adapted to findings, stage and manifestation, and ii) define a new role of surgery in the treatment concept. In addition, more and more evidence is being gathered for a possible association between the bacterium and several extragastric diseases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Ethnopsychiatry fosters creativity and the adoption of critical and reflexive thinking in higher education students: insights from a qualitative analysis of a preliminary pilot experience at the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Genoa, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Anna; Del Puente, Giovanni; Martini, Mariano; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is an ability that plays a major role in the modern economy and society. It should represent an important component of the medical syllabus. However, it is often overlooked by the formal courses at universities. The current study aimed at evaluating whether the interactive educational models, recently adopted by the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, at the University of Genoa, Italy, would favor the adoption of critical thinking, attitudes to changes, cultural diversity acceptance, and the adoption of relational soft skills versus traditional and frontal didactic teaching. Thirty students, who attended the last year of health care professional course at the Faculty of Medicine, volunteered to take part in the study and were randomly allocated to two groups: one group receiving an innovative, interactive excellence course and the other group receiving a more traditional approach. Ethnopsychiatry was chosen as the topic since it was hypothesized that it would have contributed to generation of a new approach toward diseases and patients. The first group of students, exposed to interactive lectures with the aim of promoting the adoption of critical thinking, were more satisfied than the second group. Participants who were involved in an active manner and had to work in small groups, actively finding their own solutions to solve the problems, perceived the utilized teaching method and experience more stimulating, involving, and effective. Implications for education policy makers are also envisaged.

  15. The Society for Translational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Aragón, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendati......The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy...

  16. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: ethical and legal issues in feeding and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Baird Schwartz, Denise; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2013-06-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that individuals have the right to request or refuse nutrition and hydration as medical treatment. Registered dietitians (RDs) should work collaboratively as part of the interprofessional team to make recommendations on providing, withdrawing, or withholding nutrition and hydration in individual cases and serve as active members of institutional ethics committees. RDs have an active role in determining the nutrition and hydration requirements for individuals throughout the life span. When individuals choose to forgo any type of nutrition and hydration (natural or artificial), or when individuals lack decision-making capacity and others must decide whether or not to provide artificial nutrition and hydration, RDs have a professional role in the ethical deliberation around those decisions. Across the life span, there are multiple instances when nutrition and hydration issues create ethical dilemmas. There is strong clinical, ethical, and legal support both for and against the administration of food and water when issues arise regarding what is or is not wanted by the individual and what is or is not warranted by empirical clinical evidence. When a conflict arises, the decision requires ethical deliberation. RDs' understanding of nutrition and hydration within the context of nutritional requirements and cultural, social, psychological, and spiritual needs provide an essential basis for ethical deliberation. RDs, as health care team members, have the responsibility to promote use of advanced directives. RDs promote the rights of the individual and help the health care team implement appropriate therapy. This paper supports the "Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Ethical and Legal Issues of Feeding and Hydration" published on the Academy website at: www.eatright.org/positions. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethnopsychiatry fosters creativity and the adoption of critical and reflexive thinking in higher education students: insights from a qualitative analysis of a preliminary pilot experience at the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Genoa, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna Siri,1 Giovanni Del Puente,2 Mariano Martini,3 Nicola Luigi Bragazzi1–3 1Department of Mathematics (DIMA, 2Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation (DINOGMI, 3Section of History of Medicine and Ethics, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Abstract: Creativity is an ability that plays a major role in the modern economy and society. It should represent an important component of the medical syllabus. However, it is often overlooked by the formal courses at universities. The current study aimed at evaluating whether the interactive educational models, recently adopted by the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, at the University of Genoa, Italy, would favor the adoption of critical thinking, attitudes to changes, cultural diversity acceptance, and the adoption of relational soft skills versus traditional and frontal didactic teaching. Thirty students, who attended the last year of health care professional course at the Faculty of Medicine, volunteered to take part in the study and were randomly allocated to two groups: one group receiving an innovative, interactive excellence course and the other group receiving a more traditional approach. Ethnopsychiatry was chosen as the topic since it was hypothesized that it would have contributed to generation of a new approach toward diseases and patients. The first group of students, exposed to interactive lectures with the aim of promoting the adoption of critical thinking, were more satisfied than the second group. Participants who were involved in an active manner and had to work in small groups, actively finding their own solutions to solve the problems, perceived the utilized teaching method and experience more stimulating, involving, and effective. Implications for education policy makers are also envisaged. Keywords: creative thinking, clinical case/example, medical education, medical syllabus, medical teaching 

  18. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the RD provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the RD's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the RD's individual scope of practice is based on education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the RD reflects the Academy's position on the RD's scope of practice and the essential role of the RD in directing and coordinating safe, timely, person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  19. Dietetics trends as reflected in various primary research projects, 1995-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Dick

    2012-03-01

    At the behest of the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) Workforce Demand Task Force, a retrospective examination and reanalysis of 12 primary research projects (sponsored by CDR and/or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics between 1995 and 2011) was undertaken to identify trends in supply of and demand for registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs). The analysis suggests that supply of RDs (and possibly DTRs) lags slightly behind demand-although, in the case of DTRs, that does not necessarily imply that demand is growing (supply was shrinking throughout most of the study period). The population of both groups is aging, and the number of RDs and DTRs reporting expected retirement in the near future is sure to affect supply/demand relationships. Neither group reflects the US population as a whole in terms of either sex or racial/ethnic diversity, and the trend lines in these areas are essentially flat. RD practice is seen to be moving incrementally toward the clinical arena, in inpatient and (increasingly) outpatient settings. The proportion of RDs in clinical long-term-care, as well as in food/nutrition management and consultation/business practice, is decreasing; a longer-term trend away from foodservice is noted. There is small growth in both the prevalence and the compensation of clinical specialists in areas like renal, pediatrics, and weight management at the expense of more general clinical practitioners. In a trend likely related to the increase in clinical practice, RD positions are gradually losing managerial responsibility. DTRs have experienced a similar phenomenon. For almost all RD positions in the clinical arena, registration as an RD is a requirement for employment, suggesting that clinical employment should continue to grow along with the increasing health care demand from an aging population. The DTR credential is not required at similarly high rates. A major supply issue is the relative shortage of DTRs in

  20. Dietetic practices in adult hemodialysis units compared to k/doqi guidelines, lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mirey karavetian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals in Lebanon mostly employ only one dietitian to conduct all dietetic/food service/administrative tasks including hemodialysis (HD units which are exclusively hospital based. Little is known about dietetic practices in these (HD units. Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI and American Dietetic Association (ADA presented evidence that the presence of a competent dietitian in the HD unit has benefits on HD patient’s health and quality of life and is cost effective. This study aimed to reveal the current practices provided by dietitians to HD patients in Lebanon compared to KDOQI nutrition guidelines. A 36 item anonymous self-administered questionnaire was sent to all HD units in Lebanon (n=55. The questionnaire included 2 sections: 1 demographics and professional characteristics; 2 routine clinical practice Thirty eight (69% of the dietitians responded; only 34 were of use. The questions in survey were categorical, thus only the answers with the majority of the respondents will be reported: 97% were female. 82% were within the age of 21–34, 62% had 3–10 years in clinical practice and 44% had only 0–2 years exposure to renal patients. Most dietitians (69% worked in hospitals with 50–150 inpatients and 26–75 HD patients. Sixty nine percent of dietitians spent more than 36 hours per week in the hospital, while 85% spent less than 10 hours per week in the HD unit. As to the level of applying KDOQI nutrition guidelines in routine practice, of the 23 guidelines asked, all dietitians used at least 1 guideline, 17% used 5 and 23% used 10 guidelines. Only one dietitian applied all guidelines. A total compliance to guidelines score was developed as a percentage of total compliance which showed 37±15.51% (min14, max 73. Barriers identified were lack of time and lack of integration into the medical team. It is evident that dietetic practices in Lebanon targeting HD patients need support in all aspects: time, knowledge

  1. Law regulations concerning food supplements, dietetic food and novel food containing herbal substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baraniak Justyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Food supplements are concentrated sources of nutrients and/or other substances with a nutritional or physiological effect. However, they often contain herbal substances or their preparations. Food supplements belong to category of food and for that reason are regulated by food legislation. European Union regulations and directives established general directions for dietary supplements, dietetic food, which due to their special composition or manufacturing process are prepared for specific groups of people with special nutritional needs, and novel food/novel food ingredients to ensure product safety, suitability and appropriate consumer information.

  2. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  3. Bibliometric analysis of nutrition and dietetics research activity in Arab countries using ISI Web of Science database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2014-01-01

    Reducing nutrition-related health problems in Arab countries requires an understanding of the performance of Arab countries in the field of nutrition and dietetics research. Assessment of research activity from a particular country or region could be achieved through bibliometric analysis. This study was carried out to investigate research activity in "nutrition and dietetics" in Arab countries. Original and review articles published from Arab countries in "nutrition and dietetics" Web of Science category up until 2012 were retrieved and analyzed using the ISI Web of Science database. The total number of documents published in "nutrition and dietetics" category from Arab countries was 2062. This constitutes 1% of worldwide research activity in the field. Annual research productivity showed a significant increase after 2005. Approximately 60% of published documents originated from three Arab countries, particularly Egypt, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia. However, Kuwait has the highest research productivity per million inhabitants. Main research areas of published documents were in "Food Science/Technology" and "Chemistry" which constituted 75% of published documents compared with 25% for worldwide documents in nutrition and dietetics. A total of 329 (15.96%) nutrition - related diabetes or obesity or cancer documents were published from Arab countries compared with 21% for worldwide published documents. Interest in nutrition and dietetics research is relatively recent in Arab countries. Focus of nutrition research is mainly toward food technology and chemistry with lesser activity toward nutrition-related health research. International cooperation in nutrition research will definitely help Arab researchers in implementing nutrition research that will lead to better national policies regarding nutrition.

  4. [Psychomotor skills assessment in basic procedures of laparoscopic surgery in undergraduate medical students at the School of Medicine of the University of Colima].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Díaz-Chávez, Emilio; Medina-Chávez, José Luís; Martínez-Lira, Rafael; Millán-Guerrero, Rebeca; Vázquez-Jiménez, Clemente; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamín

    2014-01-01

    The changes in recent decades in the training of medical student seem to agree that the educational model for professional skills is most appropriate. The virtual simulator translates skills acquired the operating room, in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Colima noticed the need to prepare the students of pregrade transferring surgical trainees' skills in basic laparoscopic activities that require a simple cognitive effort. The hypothesis in this study was to evaluate the acquisition of skills in laparoscopic simulator in students of pregrade. Educational research, analytical comparison, which was conducted within the activities of the program of Problem Based Learning in the program of Education and Surgical Technique, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Colima. All participants in the simulator achieved a significantly better during the task one after three repetitions (p= 0.001). The evaluation of final students calcification, we observed significant differences in means being lower during the initial assessment (8.60 ± 0.76) compared to the end (8.96 ± 0.58) p= 0.001. The acquisition of skills in the simulator is longer but at the end is better than the acquisition of skills from the traditional method, showing that leads to the acquisition of skills that promote the transfer of skills to the surgical environment.

  5. Potential Use of Classroom Response Systems (CRS, Clickers) in Foods, Nutrition, and Dietetics Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Susan Martin

    2016-10-01

    Although hundreds of articles have been published about the use of classroom response systems (CRS, clickers) in higher education, few address the use in foods, nutrition, and dietetics courses, especially upper-division, major courses. This technology has the potential to increase student engagement, motivation, assessment, and, possibly, learning. Thoughtfully designed questions may stimulate discussions, especially about challenging nutrition topics. This article presents the viability and potential benefits for the use of CRS in foods, nutrition, and dietetics classes through a brief literature summary, overview of the author's experiences, and guidance for implementing this technology. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The application of the continuum of care model in the re-configuration of nutrition and dietetics services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, C; Milosavljevic, M

    1999-09-01

    The continuum of health care model can be used to improve service delivery. Within a hospital setting, finite resources are available. Service gaps must be identified, priorities established and resources re-distributed to meet these gaps. Using Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) tools, barriers to change were identified and a plan for improvement was formulated. Areas receiving disproportionate resources were identified and a more even resource allocation adopted. In an illustration of the success of strategic change, core services were not only maintained but also showed improved efficiency. The Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Wollongong and Port Kembla Hospitals achieved an increase in dietetic services through a reorientation of current resources.

  7. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Obesity, Reproduction, and Pregnancy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Jamie; Huffman, Laurel G

    2016-04-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all women of reproductive age receive education about maternal and fetal risks associated with prepregnancy obesity, excessive gestational weight gain, and significant postpartum weight retention, including potential benefits of lifestyle changes. Behavioral counseling to improve dietary intake and physical activity should be provided to overweight and obese women, beginning in the preconception period and continuing throughout pregnancy, for at least 12 to 18 months postpartum. Weight loss before pregnancy may improve fertility and reduce the risk of poor maternal-fetal outcomes, such as preterm birth, gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, assisted delivery, and select congenital anomalies. Lifestyle interventions that moderate gestational weight gain may reduce the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, large for gestational age, and macrosomia, as well as lower the risk for significant postpartum retention. Postpartum interventions that promote healthy diet and physical activity behaviors may reduce postpartum weight retention and decrease obesity-related risks in subsequent pregnancies. Analysis of the evidence suggests that there is good evidence to support the role of diet, physical activity, and behavior changes in promoting optimal weight gain during pregnancy; however, there is currently a relative lack of evidence in other areas related to reproductive outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining Research Priorities for Nutrition and Mental Health: Insights from Dietetics Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andreamatteo, Carla; Davison, Karen M; Vanderkooy, Pat

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, a national initiative aimed at defining a research agenda for nutrition and mental health among diverse stakeholders was completed and included insights from more than 300 registered dietitians. This study explores the data from dietitians based on their years of practice, mental health experiences, and community of practice in relationship to identified mental health and nutrition research priorities. Analysis of numerical data (n = 299) and content analysis of open-ended responses (n = 269) revealed that respondents desired research for specific mental health conditions (MHCs), emotional eating, food addiction, populations with special needs, and people encountering major life transitions (e.g., recovery from abuse, refugees). Findings from the quantitative and textual data suggested that dietitians want research aimed at addressing the concerns of those in the community, fostering consumer nutrition knowledge and skill acquisition, and developing services that will impact quality of life. Subgroup analysis indicated that dietitians: (i) in early years of practice want information about specific MHCs; (ii) living in smaller towns and rural areas want data about the cost benefits of dietetics practice in mental health; and (iii) who also had additional stakeholder roles (e.g., service provider) selected priorities that address gaps in mental health services. This study highlights opportunities to tailor nutrition and mental health research that advance dietetics practice.

  9. [FOOD PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH A HEALTY BODY WEIGHT IN CHILEAN STUDENTS OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Agüero, Samuel; Fernández Godoy, Eloina; Fuentes Fuentes, Jessica; Hidalgo Fernández, Andrea; Quintana Muñoz, Carol; Yunge Hidalgo, Wilma; Fehrman Rosas, Pamela; Delgado Sánchez, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    to determine food patterns and its association with the consumption of various foods with nutritional status of Chilean university students of Nutrition and Dietetics. cross-sectional study, 634 students were evaluated Nutrition and Dietetics at the Universidad San Sebastián, of Santiago, Concepción, Valdivia and Puerto Montt. Each student a food survey was applied and an anthropometric assessment. 68% of students eat breakfast daily, 36.1% and 37.1% consume the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables, 64.9% consume soft drinks frequently. A positive association was observed between an adecuated weight and the fact of eat vegetables (≥ 2 servings/day) OR = 0.662 (0.440 to 0.996), whole grains OR = 0.474 (0.224 to 1.002), low consumption of fried and sweet snack OR = 0.643 (0.406 to 1.019) and OR = 0.545 (0.360 to 0.825) respectively. students have an insufficient intake of healthy foods and a high intake of unhealthy foods, also shows that the intake of vegetables, whole grains, low consumption of fried foods and sweet snacks are associated with a normal nutritional status among students evaluated. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Intervention and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields-Gardner, Cade; Campa, Adriana

    2010-07-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that efforts to optimize nutritional status through individualized medical nutrition therapy, assurance of food and nutrition security, and nutrition education are essential to the total system of health care available to people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection throughout the continuum of care. Broad-based efforts to improve health care access and treatment have stabilized HIV prevalence levels in many parts of the world and led to longer survival for people living with HIV infection. Confounding clinical and social issues, such as medication interactions, comorbidities, wasting, lipodystrophy, food insecurity, aging, and other related conditions further complicate disease management. With greater understanding of the mechanisms of HIV disease and its impact on body function, development of new treatments, and wider ranges of populations affected, the management of chronic HIV infection continues to become more complex and demanding. Achievement of food and nutrition security and management of nutrition-related complications of HIV infection remain significant challenges for clients with HIV infection and health care professionals. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, should integrate their efforts into the overall health care strategies to optimize their clinical and social influence for people living with HIV infection.

  11. The use of an active learning approach to teach metabolism to students of nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sancho, José Manuel; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora; Lasa, Marina; Molina, Susana; Vara, Francisco; del Peso, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the transition from a traditional instructor-centered course, based on lectures, to a student-centered course based on active learning methodologies as part of the reform of the Spanish higher education system within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). Specifically, we describe the use of active learning methodologies to teach metabolism to students of nutrition and dietetics during the first year of their professional training in a 4-year undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Human Nutrition and Dietetics). In the new course design, the number of didactic lectures was largely reduced and complemented with a series of activities (problems/case studies, discussion workshops, self-assessment quizzes) aimed to get students actively engaged, to encourage self-learning, and to promote sustained work throughout the length of the course. The article presents quantitative data demonstrating a clear and significant improvement in students' performance when an active approach was implemented. Importantly, the improved performance was achieved without work overload. Finally, students' responses to this new teaching methodology have been very positive and overall satisfaction high. In summary, our results strongly argue in favor of the teaching model described herein. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on bovine lactoferrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to carry out the additional assessment of ‘lactoferrin’ as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account the comments and objections...... of a scientific nature raised by Member States. Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) is a protein that occurs naturally in cow’s milk. The applicant intends to market bLF as an ingredient for food supplements, infant and follow-on formulae, dietetic food for special medical purposes and sports nutrition, and for a variety...... of foods. For infants with an age of 0 - 6 months, the applicant has estimated an intake of approximately 200 mg per kg bodyweight and 1.2 g bLF per day at the proposed use level. For adults, the mean and 95th percentile daily intakes were calculated to be about 1.4 g and 3.4 g for an adult person...

  13. Evaluating sago as a functional ingredient in dietetic mango ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashish S; Jana, Atanu H; Aparnathi, Kishore D; Pinto, Suneeta V

    2010-10-01

    A low fat mango ice cream (2.4% milk fat) was prepared in a mechanized 'ice and salt' type freezer using powdered sago at 2.5% as a natural bulking agent along with sodium alginate at 0.025% as adjunct. The low fat mango ice cream was compared with control mango ice cream having 10% milk fat and 0.15% sodium alginate as stabilizer. Both control as well as experimental ice creams contained 20% mango pulp solids. To impart richness to low fat mango ice cream, flavour enhancers like Cream Plus and Butter Buds were used at levels of 0.2% and 0.05%, respectively. The dietetic low fat ice creams compared well in sensory colour and appearance, flavour, body and texture, and melting quality to that of control ice cream. Incorporation of 2.5% powdered sago and 0.2% Cream Plus as flavour adjunct is recommended in the manufacture of 'low-fat' mango ice cream. The energy values for control and dietetic mango ice cream was 202.8 and 142.9 kcal/100 g, respectively, which represents about 30% reduction in calorie. The cost of ice cream per liter was Rs 39.9, Rs 37.6 and Rs 49.7 for experimental ice creams containing Cream Plus and Butter Bud, and control, respectively.

  14. A Cross-Country Exploration: Dietetic Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Intentions to Provide Services to the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Myeonghwa; Seo, Sunhee

    2009-01-01

    This study identified dietetic students' knowledge of aging, attitudes, and intentions to provide services to the elderly and compared the cross-cultural differences between the United States and South Korea. The results show that knowledge about aging and the elderly, coursework experiences, and internship experiences are much greater among…

  15. Follow-Up Study of Dietetic Tech Graduates 1986 and 1987 [and] 1983 and Prior. Volume XVII, Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Toni

    In spring 1988, a study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), Illinois, to gather follow-up information about graduates of the college's Dietetic Technician program. Questionnaires were mailed to the 16 students who graduated from the program in 1986 and 1987 and to the 76 former students who graduated prior to 1984. Information…

  16. Males in Dietetics, What Can Be Learned from the Nursing Profession? A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheller, Brandon; Lordly, Daphne

    2015-12-01

    In Canada 95% of dietitians are female despite serving a sex-diverse population. Literature examining why there are so few male dietitians is limited. However, nursing, like dietetics, is female dominated but has a large body of literature examining sex diversity within the profession. Therefore, a narrative literature review was conducted to find articles that examined the following questions: (i) What are the barriers and motivating factors for prospective male nursing students? and (ii) What are the perceived sex-based challenges that male nursing students encounter during their education? A total of 38 articles were included in the final review and the results are presented under the following headings: barriers, motivators, and educational experiences both in the classroom and during clinical rotations. The review outlines the current state of knowledge regarding sex as it relates to nursing and how this information compares with the current dietetics literature. Conclusions and recommendations are drawn about what changes could be made in dietetic education immediately and how further research could provide insight towards reducing the barriers and facilitating easier access to dietetics education for males.

  17. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for niacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for niacin. Niacin is a generic term for nicotinic acid and nicotinamide. Niacin can be synthesised in the human body from the indispensable amino...

  18. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) considered the evidence for setting Dietary Reference Values for chromium. Trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) has been postulated to be necessary for the efficacy of insulin in regulating...

  19. Utilization of an Accelerated Queso Fresco Recipe to Teach Concepts of Food Science in a Didactic Program in Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Mona; Calder, Beth L.; Castonguay, Zakkary J.

    2018-01-01

    Students in the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) at the University of Maine were exposed to the cheese-making process, within a lab setting of two hours, utilizing an accelerated recipe for a Queso Fresco-style cheese. The purpose of this project was to provide students with a novel, hands-on learning experience, which covered concepts of…

  20. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013 . Scientific Opinion on Rooster Combs Extract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Poulsen, Morten

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to carry out the additional assessment for „Rooster Combs Extract‟ (RCE) as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97, taking into account the comments...

  1. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies derived Dietary Reference Values for calcium. These include Average Requirement (AR), Population Reference Intake (PRI) and Adequate Intake (AI). For adults, data were analysed from a number...

  2. Post Graduate Programme in Dietetics & Food Service Management (MSCDFSM) Programme of IGNOU: Access through the Lucknow Regional Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorothy, J. S.; Kumar, Ashwini

    2014-01-01

    Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) which was established initially as a Single mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI) in the year 1985 opened its campus to face-to-face education in the year 2008 and thus now is a Dual mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI). The Post Graduate Programme (Master of Science) in Dietetics and Food…

  3. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: Comprehensive School Nutrition Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G.

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health,…

  4. An observational study investigating the impact of simulated patients in teaching communication skills in preclinical dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Davidson, Z E

    2016-08-01

    Simulated patients (SPs) are often used in dietetics for the teaching and assessment of communication skills. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a SP encounter on communication skills in undergraduate preclinical dietetic students in the context of the resources required for delivering this educational strategy. This observational study collected assessment data from four cohorts of third-year dietetic students to examine the effect of participation in SP-embedded Objective Structured Clinical Exams. Students completed two SP interviews, 2 weeks apart, and communication skills were measured on both occasions. A subgroup of students received a video of their SP encounter. Differences between the two SP interview scores were compared to assess the impact of the SP encounter on communication skills. The required staff and resources were described. Data were collected involving 215 students. Out of 30 marks, there was a modest mean (SD) improvement in communication skills from the first to the second SP interview of 2.5 (4.2) (P communication skills, with failing students demonstrating the greatest improvement between SP encounters. There were no observed benefits for the subset of students who received videos. Providing repeat SP interview opportunities results in only modest improvement in communication skills for most students. The use of SPs needs to be considered in context of the substantial costs and resources involved and tailored to student ability. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. [Installation of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics units in Spanish hospitals and the presence of dietitians in the same].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Alvarez, J R; Villarino Marín, A L; Cid Sanz, M C

    2002-01-01

    The appropriate nutritional status of hospitalized patients bears a close relationship with the existence of specialized Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics units or departments at health centres. The presence at these units of professionals with specific training to carry out tasks in the sphere of nutrition and dietetics, as is the case of dietitians, implies and evident strengthening of their capacity and operation. The main goal of the present paper to identify the number of Nutrition and Dietetics Units in the leading Spanish hospitals and also the presence of graduates in dietetics or nutrition specialists. Spanish hospital installations selected from the national hospital index. RESULTS OF THE TRIAL: It can be inferred that the implementation of the said services is not as complete as might be desired, and the presence of specifically qualified professionals (dietitians or nutritionists) is even lower. In this context, one is struck by the growing number of outsourced catering services at Spanish hospitals and the hiring of dietitians by these private companies, often at the request of the hospital itself. All of the data obtained show an ever greater importance of dietitians in hospital nutrition, with an uneven geographical distribution and implementation in Spain because of the peculiar policy adopted by the health authorities with regard to the recognition of these professionals. In Spain, these departments continue to be scorned and the role of the dietitian ignored.

  6. Effects of nutritional status and dietetic interventions on survival in Cystic Fibrosis patients before and after lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.M.; Pierre, van D.D.; Roos, de N.M.; Graaf, van de E.A.; Iestra, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively investigated nutritional status, dietetic intervention and intake in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients before and after lung transplantation (LTX). Methods: Body Mass Index (BMI), Fat Free Mass Index (FFMI) and nutritional intake were retrieved from 75 out-patients

  7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to re-evaluate the safety in use of calcium. The Panel was requested to consider if the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for calcium established by the SCF in 2003 (2,500 mg...

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to re-evaluate the safety in use of vitamin D and to provide, if necessary, revised Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs) of vitamin D for all relevant population groups. The ULs...

  9. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) deals with the setting of Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for protein. The Panel concludes that a Population Reference Intake (PRI) can be derived from nitrogen balance studies. Several health outcomes possibly...

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived dietary reference values for energy, which are provided as average requirements (ARs) of specified age and sex groups. For children and adults, total energy expenditure (TEE...... ARs for energy may need to be adapted depending on specific objectives and target populations. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  11. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  14. Nutrition, Food Science, and Dietetics Faculty Have Information Needs Similar to Basic and Medical Sciences Faculty – Online Access to Electronic Journals, PubMed/Medline, and Google. A Review of: Shpilko, I. (2011. Assessing information-seeking patterns and needs of nutrition, food science, and dietetics faculty. Library & Information Science Research, 33(2, 151-157.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mê-Linh Lê

    2011-01-01

    .1%. Databases were cited as the most effective way to locate relevant information (63.1%; PubMed was the most heavily used database (73.7%, although Medline (via EBSCO, Science Direct, and Academic Search Premier were also used.Respondents were asked how they preferred to obtain online research skills (e.g., on their own, via a colleague, via a librarian, or in some other way. The linked data does not answer this question, however, and instead supplies figures on what types of sessions respondents had attended in the past (44.4% attended library instruction sessions, while others were self-taught, consulted colleagues, attended seminars, or obtained skills through their PhD research.Conclusion – Strong public interest in nutritional issues is a growing trend in the Western world. For those faculty members and scholars researching and teaching on nutrition and related areas, more work on their information needs is required. This study begins to address that gap and found that nutrition, food science, and dietetics faculty share strong similarities with researchers in medicine and the other basic sciences with regard to information needs and behaviours. The focus is on electronic journals, PubMed/Medline, and online access to resources. Important insights include the fact that print journals are still in modest use, researchers use grey literature (e.g., government sources and other non-traditional formats (e.g., conference proceedings and electronic mail lists as information sources, and training sessions need to be offered in a variety of formats in order to address individual preferences.

  15. [Cognitive research about the use of virtual worlds among the students enrolled to the faculty of medicine and surgery "Campus Bio-Medico University" in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambone, V; Alessi, A; Macchi, I; Milighetti, S; Muzii, L

    2009-01-01

    The main difference between a virtual reality and a generic representation is to be directly involved into the action you are performing. As a matter of fact, within the shift from real to virtual world, our biological physique does not mutate but is amplified and connected to the virtual world by technological interfaces. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement (or replace) standard training. One of the two main goals of our study is to test, at first, how much students enrolled to the Faculty of Medicine at "University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome" are familiar with synthetic worlds, how long they have been using them and how they would like their Avatar to look like. Moreover, the second aim is to collect students' opinion about the use of virtual, interactive environments to enable learning and participation in dynamic, problem based, clinical, virtual simulations. Simulations might be used to allow learners to make mistakes safely in lieu of real life situations, learn from those mistakes and ultimately to improve performances by subsequent avoidance of those mistakes. The selected approach to the study is based on a semi-structured questionnaire made of 14 questions administered to all the medical students. Most of the students appear not to be very confident with virtual worlds mostly because of a lack of interest. However, a large majority of them are likely to use a virtual world for fun or escaping from reality. Students would select and customize their Avatar by giving her/him the same sexual identity, same figure, same social class but different employment. It is important to notice that a wide majority of the students is interested in practicing on a virtual world in order to manage new experiences and being able to face them; their willing is to get benefits from the ability to make mistakes in a safe environment as well as to record a positive impact on their understanding.

  16. Surgery in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, M; Targarona, E M; Moral, A; Pera, C

    1998-02-01

    The Iberian Peninsula-the southwestern point of Europe, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean-was visited and settled in ancient times by a variety of peoples. Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Celts, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths, and Arabs all left their mark on the peninsula, and their cultures blended together to found, among other things, a rich tradition in medicine and surgery. During the Renaissance, the fluid exchange of technical skills and knowledge with the rest of Europe and the emergence of universities ensured the development of a high level of medical expertise. Today, surgery in Spain is at the forefront of innovations in the field.

  17. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation Research and Fellowship Awards: A 26-Year Review at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverso, Gino; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Kaban, Leonard B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review outcomes of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Foundation's funding awards to members of the OMS department at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in terms of projects completed, abstracts presented, peer-reviewed publications, and career trajectories of recipients. Data were collected from MGH and OMS Foundation records and interviews with award recipients. Primary outcome variables included 1) number of awards and award types, 2) funding amount, 3) project completion, 4) number of presented abstracts, 5) conversion from abstracts to publications, 6) number of peer-reviewed publications, 7) career trajectories of awardees, and 8) additional extramural funding. Eleven Student Research Training Awards provided $135,000 for 39 projects conducted by 37 students. Of these, 34 (87.2%) were completed. There were 30 student abstracts presented, 21 peer-reviewed publications, and a publication conversion rate of 58.8%. Faculty research awards comprised $1,510,970 for 22 research projects by 12 faculty members and two research fellows. Of the 22 funded projects, 21 (95.5%) were completed. There were 110 faculty and research fellow abstracts presented and 113 peer-reviewed publications, for a publication conversion rate of 93.8%. In the student group, 17 of 37 (45.9%) are enrolled in or are applying for OMS residencies. Of the 10 students who have completed OMS training, 3 (30%) are in full-time academic positions. Of the 12 faculty recipients, 9 (75%) remain in OMS academic practice. During this time period, the department received $9.9 million of extramural foundation or National Institutes of Health funding directly or indirectly related to the OMS Foundation grants. The results of this study indicate that 90.2% of projects funded by the OMS Foundation have been completed. Most projects resulted in abstracts and publications in peer-reviewed journals. These grants encouraged students to pursue OMS careers and aided OMS

  18. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Addressing world hunger, malnutrition, and food insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struble, Marie Boyle; Aomari, Laurie Lindsay

    2003-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that access to adequate amounts of safe, nutritious, and culturally appropriate food at all times is a fundamental human right. Hunger continues to be a worldwide problem of staggering proportions. The Association supports programs and encourages practices that combat hunger and malnutrition, produce food security, promote self-sufficiency, and are environmentally and economically sustainable. The Association is aware that hunger exists in a world of plenty and that poverty, gender inequity, ethnocentrism, racism, and the lack of political will are key constraints to solving the problems of global hunger and malnutrition. Recognizing that simplistic approaches are inadequate, the ADA identifies sustainable development as the long-term strategy to ending world hunger and achieving food security. Sustainable development requires political, economic, and social changes that include empowering the disenfranchised, widening access to assets and other resources, narrowing the gap between rich and poor, and adjusting consumption patterns so as to foster good stewardship of nature. Additionally, because the health status of future generations is related to the well-being of their mothers, achieving food security will also require increased access for women to education, adequate health care and sanitation, and economic opportunities. This position paper reviews the complex issues of global food insecurity and discusses long-term solutions for achieving world food security. Achieving the end of world hunger has been and is now within our grasp. There is sufficient food to feed everyone, and solutions can be realized now that will benefit all of humanity. As noted in the paper, most people who examine the costs of ending versus not ending world hunger are bewildered by the question of why humanity did not solve the problem a long time ago. The Association supports programs and encourages practices that combat

  19. Practice paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics abstract: ethical and legal issues of feeding and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Posthauer, Mary Ellen; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2013-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that individuals have the right to request or refuse nutrition and hydration as medical treatment. Registered dietitians should work collaboratively as part of an interprofessional team to make recommendations on providing, withdrawing, or withholding nutrition and hydration in individual cases and serve as active members of institutional ethics committees. This practice paper provides a proactive, integrated, systematic process to implement the Academy's position. The position and practice papers should be used together to address the history and supporting information of ethical and legal issues of feeding and hydration identified by the Academy. Elements of collaborative ethical deliberation are provided for pediatrics and adults and in different conditions. The process of ethical deliberation is presented with the roles and responsibilities of the registered dietitian and the dietetic technician, registered. Understanding the importance and applying concepts dealing with cultural values and religious diversity is necessary to integrate clinical ethics into nutrition care. Incorporating screening for quality-of-life goals is essential before implementing the Nutrition Care Process and improving health literacy with individual interactions. Developing institution-specific policies and procedures is necessary to accelerate the practice change with artificial nutrition, clinical ethics, and quality improvement projects to determine best practice. This paper supports the "Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Ethical and Legal Issues of Feeding and Hydration" published in the June 2013 issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Twelve key nutritional issues in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Ronan; Huber, Olivier; Azagury, Dan E; Pichard, Claude

    2016-02-01

    In morbidly obese patients, i.e. body mass index ≥35, bariatric surgery is considered the only effective durable weight-loss therapy. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) are associated with risks of nutritional deficiencies and malnutrition. Therefore, preoperative nutritional assessment and correction of vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies, as well as long-term postoperative nutritional follow-up, are advised. Dietetic counseling is mandatory during the first year, optional later. Planned and structured physical exercise should be systematically promoted to maintain muscle mass and bone health. In this review, twelve key perioperative nutritional issues are raised with focus on LRYGBP and LSG procedures, the most common current bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  2. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  3. A quantitative assessment of the cultural knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of junior and senior dietetics students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H; Greathouse, Karen R; Smith, Erskine R; Holbert, Donald

    2011-01-01

    To assess the cultural competence of dietetics majors. Self-administered questionnaire. Classrooms at 7 universities. Two hundred eighty-three students-98 juniors (34.6%) and 185 seniors (65.4%)-recruited during class time. Knowledge was measured using a multiple-choice test, attitudes were assessed using scales, and experiences were measured using a list of activities. Descriptive statistics were obtained on all variables. Correlation analyses identified associations between competencies. Statistical significance was P intercultural activities engaged in most often were eating ethnic food and watching films about other cultures, whereas those undertaken least often were completing a study abroad program or an internship abroad. These students would benefit from more interactive intercultural learning opportunities to enhance their knowledge base and communication skills. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Hormonal and inflammatory impact of different dietetic composition: emphasis on dietary patterns and specific dietary factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen H M; Zulet, María Angeles; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2009-07-01

    Healthy dietary pattern, characterized by the consumption of fruits, vegetables, white meats, skim dairy products, nuts and moderate intake of vegetable oils and alcohol, is an important factor for a lower risk of chronic disease such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. This beneficial effect can be explained, at least partially, by its modulating role on biomarkers of insulin sensitivity and atherosclerosis as well as of inflammation and endothelial function. On the other hand, the intake of specific dietary factors, such as unsaturated fatty acids (oleic and alpha-linolenic) and micronutrients with antioxidant properties (vitamins A, E and C; selenium, zinc) has been discussed, due to its potential protector action due to chronic disease occurrence and its possible profits in hormonal, metabolic and inflammatory regulations that these dietetic factors can provide within a nutritional treatment to obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  5. What is translational research? Concepts and applications in nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie; Van Horn, Linda; Gleason, Philip M; Boushey, Carol J

    2015-07-01

    This monograph is tenth in a series of articles focused on research design and analysis, and provides an overview of translational research concepts. Specifically, this article presents models and processes describing translational research, defines key terms, discusses methodological considerations for speeding the translation of nutrition research into practice, illustrates application of translational research concepts for nutrition practitioners and researchers, and provides examples of translational research resources and training opportunities. To promote the efficiency and translation of evidence-based nutrition guidelines into routine clinical-, community-, and policy-based practice, the dissemination and implementation phases of translational research are highlighted and illustrated in this monograph. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Creating images of the future: a simulation game for dietetics students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, S L

    1986-08-01

    A learning activity was developed for senior dietetics students to prepare them to respond to a changing future. It combined two methods commonly used to study the future--scenarios and simulation games. The simulation game asked the players to make career choices in accordance with specified scenarios in the areas of politics, economics, health care, foodservice systems, education, and technology. Scenarios could change throughout the game, either by chance or the choice of the players. Major factors affecting individual life-styles, such as acquiring a partner or children, were included. Each player made career choices at 5-year intervals, as he or she moved through life from the present age to age 65. At each age interval, the players discussed the options created by the scenarios in relation to the availability of career choices. Student and instructor response to the activity has been favorable.

  7. Hippocrates' counselling with regard to physical exercise, gymnastics, dietetics and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikos, A; Bekiari, A; Nikitaras, N; Famissis, K; Sakellariou, K

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is the investigation of Hippocrates' consultative theory with regard to man's physical exercise, gymnastics, diet and health, on the basis of his work "Regimen" and his other works. The aforementioned issues are thematised in the works in question. By means of this thematisation, a medical counselling is formed, according to which exercise, gymnastics and diet aim at the maintenance and restoration of man's health; dietetics, maintenance of well-being, recovery and amelioration of man's health are involved in this thematisation. Hippocrates' views on the aforementioned issues constitute a basis for the discussion and pedagogical exploitation of them in contemporary education and, particularly, in sports education and physical exercise.

  8. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  9. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dihydrocapsiate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of a synthetic dihydrocapsiate (DHC) as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account...... the comments and objections of a scientific nature raised by Member States. Dihydrocapsiate belongs to a group known as capsinoids which have been shown to occur naturally in a number of chilli and sweet peppers. The applicant intends to market DHC to food manufacturers as an ingredient for incorporation...... into foods of various categories at concentration levels varying from 8 to 2050 mg per kg. Considering the proposed uses the mean intake of synthetic DHC was estimated to be around 12 – 13 mg/day (8.1 mg/day for pre-school children); the 97.5th percentile intakes of adults and the elderly were estimated...

  10. Online training introduces a novel approach to the Dietetic Care Process documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman-Elbaum, Shelly; Stark, Aliza H; Kachal, Josefa; Johnson, Teresa; Porat-Katz, Bat Sheva

    2017-09-01

    Nutrition professionals in Israel are developing a system to document the Dietetic Care Process (DCP) tailored for specific patient sectors and compliant with national health guidelines. The ultimate goal is to achieve uniform documentation and improve nutrition care. Israeli dietetic practitioners work in specific patient sectors; therefore, a patient population-specific reporting system is proposed instead of the typical singular format applied across all patient populations. The purpose of this project was to evaluate learning outcomes and attitudes among registered dietitians (RDs) after online training of a novel DCP documentation system. A total of 80 Israeli RDs working in geriatric practice completed an eight-week online educational program learning documentation that is compatible for use with electronic health records and compliant with Israeli standards of practice. A paired sample t-test and McNemar test were used to analyse pre- to post-test performance, while Pearson's r, point-biserial, Spearman's and ANOVA were used to assess relationships among variables. Post-test knowledge scores increased significantly, t (67)  = -9.007, P = 0.000; 95% CI (-26.713, -17.019). Age, education, geographic location and previous experience with online courses were not correlated with academic performance, suggesting that demographic characteristics did not impact training. Overall, RDs (>80%) responded positively to the training model and were highly interested in future proficiency online learning opportunities (98%). A sectoral DCP online training program significantly improved knowledge and was rated favourably by Israeli RDs. DCP training for clinical practitioners may be optimised when standardised nutrition care and reporting systems are adapted to specific patient populations. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  11. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: total diet approach to healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Nitzke, Susan

    2013-02-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that the total diet or overall pattern of food eaten is the most important focus of healthy eating. All foods can fit within this pattern if consumed in moderation with appropriate portion size and combined with physical activity. The Academy strives to communicate healthy eating messages that emphasize a balance of food and beverages within energy needs, rather than any one food or meal. Public policies and dietary patterns that support the total diet approach include the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet, MyPlate, Let's Move, Nutrition Facts labels, Healthy People 2020, and the Dietary Reference Intakes. In contrast to the total diet approach, classification of specific foods as good or bad is overly simplistic and can foster unhealthy eating behaviors. Alternative approaches are necessary in some situations. Eating practices are dynamic and influenced by many factors, including taste and food preferences, weight concerns, physiology, time and convenience, environment, abundance of foods, economics, media/marketing, perceived product safety, culture, and attitudes/beliefs. To increase the effectiveness of nutrition education in promoting sensible food choices, skilled food and nutrition practitioners utilize appropriate behavioral theory and evidence-based strategies. Focusing on variety, moderation, and proportionality in the context of a healthy lifestyle, rather than targeting specific nutrients or foods, can help reduce consumer confusion and prevent unnecessary reliance on supplements. Proactive, empowering, and practical messages that emphasize the total diet approach promote positive lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association: health implications of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne L

    2008-10-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Populations that consume more dietary fiber have less chronic disease. In addition, intake of dietary fiber has beneficial effects on risk factors for developing several chronic diseases. Dietary Reference Intakes recommend consumption of 14 g dietary fiber per 1,000 kcal, or 25 g for adult women and 38 g for adult men, based on epidemiologic studies showing protection against cardiovascular disease. Appropriate kinds and amounts of dietary fiber for children, the critically ill, and the very old are unknown. The Dietary Reference Intakes for fiber are based on recommended energy intake, not clinical fiber studies. Usual intake of dietary fiber in the United States is only 15 g/day. Although solubility of fiber was thought to determine physiological effect, more recent studies suggest other properties of fiber, perhaps fermentability or viscosity are important parameters. High-fiber diets provide bulk, are more satiating, and have been linked to lower body weights. Evidence that fiber decreases cancer is mixed and further research is needed. Healthy children and adults can achieve adequate dietary fiber intakes by increasing variety in daily food patterns. Dietary messages to increase consumption of high-fiber foods such as whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables should be broadly supported by food and nutrition professionals. Consumers are also turning to fiber supplements and bulk laxatives as additional fiber sources. Few fiber supplements have been studied for physiological effectiveness, so the best advice is to consume fiber in foods. Look for physiological studies of effectiveness before selecting functional fibers in dietetics practice.

  13. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward.

  14. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Hemorrhoid surgery may involve: Putting a small rubber band around a hemorrhoid to shrink it by blocking blood flow. Stapling a hemorrhoid to block blood flow, causing it to shrink. Using a ...

  15. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urology: Dental surgery: 1. Please be in ... Ward/Clinic at *7.00 a.m.r9.30 a.m.. 2. If you cannot bring your child, please telephone to make a new appointment. 3. If your child has a cold, ... Please do not give your child medicines containing aspirin for 2 weeks before ... Extraction/filling of teeth under general .. anaesthetic in ...

  16. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idea for teens? As with everything, there are right and wrong reasons to have surgery. Cosmetic surgery is unlikely to change your life. Most board-certified plastic surgeons spend a lot of time ... the right reasons. Many plastic surgery procedures are just that — ...

  17. [Research on Japanese monograph of comprehensive dietetic materia medica, the Pao chu bei yong wo ming ben cao (Japanese Materia Medica Prepared for Kitchen)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Ye, J

    2017-11-28

    Japanese physicians of Edo Period (1603-1867) wrote many dietetic books, by combining the knowledge system (content and compiling style) and thoughts of diet therapy from China with local condition in Japan. Among them, the Pao chu bei yong wo ming ben cao ( Japanese Materia Medica Prepared for Kitchen ), written by Mukai Genshou, a physician in the early Edo, is the earliest comprehensive work of dietetic materia medica. In this book, the choice and usage of Japanese dietetic materia medica reveals obvious Japanese local color, including the name, morphology, cultivation, collection, identification, nature and flavor, and indication etc., reflecting the sprouting idea of edible herbal plant at the beginning of Edo period and the characteristic of absorbing Chinese diet thoughts by Japanese physician. This is the important first-hand historical material to understand the development of Japanese dietetic herbalism in early Edo and its dietotherapy culture.

  18. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  19. The bariatric surgery patient: a growing role for registered dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulick, Doina; Hark, Lisa; Deen, Darwin

    2010-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, the total number of bariatric procedures increased almost 10-fold, from 13,386 procedures in 1998 to 121,055 in 2004. Current estimates suggest the number of bariatric operations will exceed 220,000 in 2010. Bariatric surgery encompasses several surgical techniques classified as restrictive or malabsorptive, based on the main mechanism of weight loss. Clinical studies and meta-analyses show that bariatric surgery decreases morbidity and mortality when compared with nonsurgical treatments. A successful long-term outcome of bariatric surgery is dependent on the patient's commitment to a lifetime of dietary and lifestyle changes. The registered dietitian (RD) is an important member of the bariatric team and provides critical instructions to help patients adhere to the dietary changes consistent with surgery. Referencing current literature, this article outlines the indications, contraindications, and types of bariatric surgery. The role of the RD for preoperative and postoperative nutrition assessment and medical nutrition therapy is highlighted. Management of long-term nutrition issues is also reviewed. The current recommendations include a multivitamin/mineral supplement plus vitamin B-12, calcium, vitamin D-3, iron, and folic acid. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity and bariatric surgery procedures, caring for patients who have undergone surgery will be an expanding role for the RD. Close postoperative follow-up and careful monitoring will improve the odds for successful surgical outcomes, and RDs play a very important part in this process. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. American College of Sports Medicine Joint Position Statement. Nutrition and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D Travis; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Burke, Louise M

    2016-03-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that the performance of, and recovery from, sporting activities are enhanced by well-chosen nutrition strategies. These organizations provide guidelines for the appropriate type, amount, and timing of intake of food, fluids, and supplements to promote optimal health and performance across different scenarios of training and competitive sport. This position paper was prepared for members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada (DC), and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), other professional associations, government agencies, industry, and the public. It outlines the Academy's, DC's and ACSM's stance on nutrition factors that have been determined to influence athletic performance and emerging trends in the field of sports nutrition. Athletes should be referred to a registered dietitian/nutritionist for a personalized nutrition plan. In the United States and in Canada, the Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD) is a registered dietitian/nutritionist and a credentialed sports nutrition expert.

  1. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  2. Evolution and trends of the dietetics profession in the United States of America and in Argentina: north and south united by similar challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defranchi, Romina L Barritta de; Nelson, Jennifer K

    2009-06-01

    Since the early stages the profession of dietetics has been characterized as a multifaceted discipline and influenced by scientific and social changes. Today, health and nutrition-related diseases are becoming more global--as is the dietetics profession. The aim of this article is to review the history, education, work and challenges for dietetic practitioners in North and South America, specifically in the United States and in the Argentinean Republic. It was in Argentina where the first Latin American dietetics school was established. Both countries have since shaped the profession creating standards for education and practice in response to advances in the biopsychosocial sciences and economic and environmental changes. Reviewing both the past and current diversities in both Americas contributes to a better understanding of professional strengths and weaknesses, and can prepare dietetics specialists to meet today's needs. Regardless of local disparities, it is interesting that current and future challenges for the dietetics profession are similar between the two countries, such as growing rates of obesity, limited access to and choice of healthy diets among various income groups, busy lifestyles and decline of family meals. These common issues and the availability of Internet tools offer a unique opportunity for partnership and research that can lead to successful creative nutrition interventions and programs. In turn, such joint initiatives will confirm the essential role for the profession--not only in the western hemisphere--but also globally.

  3. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  4. [Ethics in contemporary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Serrano, Octavio; Durante-Montiel, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Medical practice has been traditionally ruled by the principles of medical ethics and the scientific aspects that define it. However, today's medical practice is largely influenced by other aspects such as: economic interests, abuse of therapeutics, defensive medicine, unnecessary surgeries and conflicts of interests without excluding alterations in the application of the informed consent, the relation with the pharmaceutical industry, respect of confidentiality, organizational ethics, and the ethical practice that escapes the will of the medical professional.

  5. Preparing for surgery when you have diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 10. Review Date 5/7/2017 Updated by: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University ...

  6. Program directors' opinions in regard to Didactic Program in Dietetics graduates' failure to secure placement in Supervised Practice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, E; Robinson, L; Quinn, J

    2001-09-01

    This study investigated program directors' perspectives on Didactic Program in Dietetics graduates' inability to secure positions in Supervised Practice Programs. The sample included all 229 program directors listed in the Directory of Dietetics Programs 1997-98. Directors contacted by electronic mail or fax completed a 4-part survey instrument including 3 Likert scale sections exploring the effects of the situation and strategies suggested to lessen them. The fourth part reported current practices. Response rate was 56%. Graduates' failure to secure Supervised Practice Program positions was found to be a significant or somewhat significant problem regardless of program size or affiliation. Strategies to increase the likelihood of Supervised Practice Program acceptance included work experience, application coaching, graduate coursework, and reapplication. We found that program directors have a high level of concern about their graduates' futures and are frustrated by their limited ability to improve the situation. Helping graduates who do not secure Supervised Practice Program assignments identify career options is essential.

  7. Effectiveness of Dietetic Intervention on Nutritional Status and Hydration Status in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. LAM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Hong Kong, more than 3,000 patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF on CAPD in 20091. Protein-energy malnutrition and volume overload are common problems in CAPD patients and associated with high morbidity and mortality2-6. Hyperphosphatemia is also a frequent complication in Chinese CAPD patients and is associated with development of renal bone disease or osteodystrophy7. The Kidney Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI guidelines suggested a combination of valid, complementary measures should be used to assess nutritional status in CAPD patients and anthropometric measurements are valid and clinically useful indicators of protein-energy nutritional status in maintenance dialysis patients8. Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA, which is a simple, inexpensive and non-invasive method, provides another powerful tool for monitoring of nutrition and hydration in CAPD patients9—10. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of dietetic intervention in a local acute hospital on nutritional status and hydration status of patients on CAPD in outpatient setting. This is a retrospective study of 22 ESRF patients receiving dietetic intervention during CAPD training from February 2010 to January 2011. Patients with cognitive impairment or contraindicated with bioimepdence analysis (BIA were excluded. Baseline demographic and clinical data were retrieved from the dietetic consultation record and the electronic records in Clinical Management System (CMS. The parameters related to the nutrition and hydration status in the first and follow-up dietetic consultation were also collected from the record. They included the dietary protein and energy intakes estimated from the dietary history, anthropometric measurements such as weight, height, body mass index (BMI, skeletal muscle mass (SMM, body fat mass (BFM, body fat percentage (BF%, intracellular water (ICW, extracellular water (ECW measured by body composition analyzer (In

  8. Evolution of nuclear medicine: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Kamal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has Completed its 100 yeas in 1996. Nuclear medicine began with physics, expanded into chemistry and instrumentation, and then greatly influenced various fields of medicine. The chronology of the events that formulated the present status of nuclear medicine involves some of the great pioneers of yesterday like Becquerel, Curie, Joliot, Hevesy, Anger, Berson and Yallow. The field of nuclear medicine has been regarded as the bridge builder between various aspects of health care and within next 20 years, nuclear medicine enters a new age of certainty, in which surgery, radiation and chemotherapy will only be used when a benefit in certain to result from the treatment. (author)

  9. Comparison of standardized patients and real patients as an experiential teaching strategy in a nutrition counseling course for dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Vicki S; Rothpletz-Puglia, Pamela; Denmark, Robert; Byham-Gray, Laura

    2015-02-01

    To compare the quality of communication and behavioral change skills among dietetic students having two nutrition encounters with either a real patient or a standardized patient in the simulation laboratory at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States. A retrospective analysis of video recordings (n=138) containing nutrition encounters of dietetic students (n=75) meeting with a standardized patient (SP) or a real patient (RP). Trained raters evaluated communication skills with the 28 item Calgary Cambridge Observation Guide (CCOG) and skills promoting behavior change using the 11 item Behavior Change Counseling Index (BECCI) tool. Using the CCOG, there was a significantly greater mean score in the SP group for the category of "Gathering Information" in encounter one (p=0.020). There were good to excellent ratings in all categories of the CCOG and the BECCI scores for the SP and the RP groups at both encounters. There was no significant differences in change scores from encounter one to encounter two between groups. Encounters with SPs and RPs are both effective strategies for dietetic students to demonstrate their communication and behavior change skills. Utilizing SPs is an effective experiential strategy for nutrition counseling curricula. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely. Substantial growth in sales of foods attractive to vegetarians has occurred and these foods appear in many supermarkets. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine. A vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, use of fortified foods or supplements can be helpful in meeting recommendations for individual nutrients. Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life-cycle including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarian diets offer a number of nutritional benefits including lower levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein as well as higher levels of carbohydrates, fibre, magnesium, potassium, folate, antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and phytochemicals. Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than non-vegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer. While a number of federally funded and institutional feeding programs can accommodate vegetarians, few have foods suitable for vegans at this time. Because

  11. Position of the American Dietetic Association: health implications of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlett, Judith A; McBurney, Michael I; Slavin, Joanne L

    2002-07-01

    Dietary fiber consists of the structural and storage polysaccharides and lignin in plants that are not digested in the human stomach and small intestine. A wealth of information supports the American Dietetic Association position that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Recommended intakes, 20-35 g/day for healthy adults and age plus 5 g/day for children, are not being met, because intakes of good sources of dietary fiber, fruits, vegetables, whole and high-fiber grain products, and legumes are low. Consumption of dietary fibers that are viscous lowers blood cholesterol levels and helps to normalize blood glucose and insulin levels, making these kinds of fibers part of the dietary plans to treat cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Fibers that are incompletely or slowly fermented by microflora in the large intestine promote normal laxation and are integral components of diet plans to treat constipation and prevent the development of diverticulosis and diverticulitis. A diet adequate in fiber-containing foods is also usually rich in micronutrients and nonnutritive ingredients that have additional health benefits. It is unclear why several recently published clinical trials with dietary fiber intervention failed to show a reduction in colon polyps. Nonetheless, a fiber-rich diet is associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. A fiber-rich meal is processed more slowly, which promotes earlier satiety, and is frequently less calorically dense and lower in fat and added sugars. All of these characteristics are features of a dietary pattern to treat and prevent obesity. Appropriate kinds and amounts of dietary fiber for the critically ill and the very old have not been clearly delineated; both may need nonfood sources of fiber. Many factors confound observations of gastrointestinal function in the critically ill, and the kinds of fiber that would promote normal small and large intestinal function are usually

  12. Pain Control After Surgery: Pain Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks of opioids? Opioids can cause drowsiness, nausea, constipation, or itching. They can affect urination and breathing. ... staff Categories: Prevention and WellnessTags: adult, Drug Safety, elderly, older adults, pain killers, Pain Management, senior September ...

  13. Robotics in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  14. Nanotechnology in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Gerstle, Theodore L; Rabie, Amr N; Song, Yong-Ak; Melik, Rohat; Han, Jongyoon; Lin, Samuel J

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology has made inroads over time within surgery and medicine. Translational medical devices and therapies based on nanotechnology are being developed and put into practice. In plastic surgery, it is anticipated that this new technology may be instrumental in the future. Microelectromechanical systems are one form of nanotechnology that offers the ability to develop miniaturized implants for use in the treatment of numerous clinical conditions. The authors summarize their published preliminary findings regarding a microelectromechanical systems-based electrochemical stimulation method through modulation of ions around the nerve that is potentially implantable and clinically efficacious, and expand upon current and potential usages of nanotechnology in plastic surgery. Sciatic nerves (n = 100) of 50 American bullfrogs were placed on a microfabricated planar gold electrode array and stimulated electrically. Using Ca(2+)-selective membranes, ion concentrations were modulated around the nerve environment in situ. In addition, a comprehensive review of the literature was performed to identify all available data pertaining to the use of nanotechnology in medicine. A 40 percent reduction of the electrical threshold value was observed using the Ca(2+) ion-selective membrane. The uses of nanotechnology specifically applicable to plastic surgery are detailed. Nanotechnology may likely lead to advancements in the art and science of plastic surgery. Using microelectromechanical systems nanotechnology, the authors have demonstrated a novel means of modulating the activation of nerve impulses. These findings have potentially significant implications for the design of special nano-enhanced materials that can be used to promote healing, control infection, restore function, and aid nerve regeneration and rehabilitation.

  15. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR), Elsevier/Scopus (SJR), and also Scielo databases were used. Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5%) and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor. Analisar criticamente a eficácia e valor de indicadores bibliométricos dos periódicos da Cirurgia e Cirurgia Cardiovascular no contexto dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da área Medicina III da CAPES. Foi avaliada uma amostragem com 16 programas acadêmicos e um mestrado profissional da área de Medicina III, compreendendo a Cirurgia Geral e do Aparelho Digestivo, a Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cursos Multidisciplinares

  16. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  17. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  18. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sophia's Children Hospital/Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 4 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma's Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 5 Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ...

  19. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. P Stevens,1 E Muller,1 P Becker2. 1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, University of Pretoria. 2 South African Medical Research Council.

  20. Productivity and Time Use during Occupational Therapy and Nutrition/Dietetics Clinical Education: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Stephens, Elizabeth; Clark, Michele; Ash, Susan; Hurst, Cameron; Graves, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently in the Australian higher education sector higher productivity from allied health clinical education placements is a contested issue. This paper will report results of a study that investigated output changes associated with occupational therapy and nutrition/dietetics clinical education placements in Queensland, Australia. Supervisors’ and students’ time use during placements and how this changes for supervisors compared to when students are not present in the workplace is also presented. Methodology/Principal Findings A cohort design was used with students from four Queensland universities, and their supervisors employed by Queensland Health. There was an increasing trend in the number of occasions of service delivered when the students were present, and a statistically significant increase in the daily mean length of occasions of service delivered during the placement compared to pre-placement levels. Conclusions/Significance A novel method for estimating productivity and time use changes during clinical education programs for allied health disciplines has been applied. During clinical education placements there was a net increase in outputs, suggesting supervisors engage in longer consultations with patients for the purpose of training students, while maintaining patient numbers. Other activities were reduced. This paper is the first time these data have been shown in Australia and form a sound basis for future assessments of the economic impact of student placements for allied health disciplines. PMID:22952964

  1. Obesity with Comorbid Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Narrative Review to Inform Dietetics Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barbara; Shorter, Barbara; Isoldi, Kathy Keenan; Moldwin, Robert M

    2017-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common problem among women; clinical treatment guidelines include weight reduction as a strategy for controlling urinary leakage. The purpose of this review was to gather evidence on the association between obesity and SUI and to ascertain whether there are any special considerations for implementing medical nutrition therapy with community-dwelling, obese, adult females with comorbid SUI. Five key findings emerged: epidemiologic studies consistently report statistically significant associations between obesity and SUI, randomized control trials found that weight loss appears to ameliorate SUI symptoms, the SUI-activity link may affect weight management, there is a potential interplay between SUI and the obesity-sleep connection, and dietary components are associated with the exacerbation of urinary symptoms. The pathogenesis of SUI and obesity-related contributions to urinary leakage is included in the introductory discussion. Lastly, insights on special considerations for implementing nutrition interventions with this population are offered. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of the implementation of the mixed cafeteria system in a hospital nutrition and dietetic service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kamila Pires de; Martins, Flaviana Pereira de Oliveira; Custódio, Isis Danyelle Dias; Lima, Emanuelle Do Nascimento Santos; Souza, Daniela Nogueira Prado de; Maia, Yara Cristina de Paiva

    2017-10-24

    The type of service offered by the nutrition and dietetics service (NDS) of a hospital has a direct impact on food waste. To evaluate waste in the transition from a simple to a mixed cafeteria service. The study was carried out in a NDS of a University Hospital during 60 days (30 days for each type of service). The meals prepared and distributed and the leftovers of lunch and dinner were weighed. Per capita values of non-usable leftovers were below the acceptable range (7-25 g), not varying with the service transition (p = 0.3) at lunch. At dinner, on the contrary, values were above the acceptable range, with a median of 190 g and 202 g, also showing no difference with the service modification (p = 0.5). At lunch, with the transition, there was a reduction in the plate waste-ingestion (p foods (p = 0.007). At dinner, there was a reduction in the plate waste-ingestion (p food handlers and supervisors, implementation of standardized operating procedures and cost control in order to reduce waste, which has an economic, social and political impact.

  3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on bovine lactoferrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘lactoferrin’ as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account the comments and objections...... of a scientific nature raised by Member States. Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) is a protein that occurs naturally in cow’s milk. The applicant intends to market bLF that is isolated from cheese whey and skimmed milk, and purified. The applicant intends to add bLF to foods for particular nutritional uses, i.e. infant...... and follow-on formulae, dietary food for special medical purposes, dairy products, yoghurts and yoghurt drinks, and chewing gums. According to the applicant, the high intake estimate for infants would be 1.1 g bLF per day. For adults, the applicant’s calculation estimates a mean and 97.5th percentile intake...

  4. The use of smartphone health apps and other mobile health (mHealth) technologies in dietetic practice: a three country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Lieffers, J; Bauman, A; Hanning, R; Allman-Farinelli, M

    2017-08-01

    Smartphone health applications (apps) and other mobile health (mHealth) technologies may assist dietitians in improving the efficiency of patient care. The present study investigated the use of health apps and text messaging in dietetic practice and formulated intervention recommendations for supporting app uptake by dietitians based on the behavioural 'COM-B' system, where interactions between capability, opportunity and motivation influence behaviour. A 52-item online survey tool, taking 20 min to complete, was developed and piloted, with questions exploring the use of health apps and text messaging in dietetic practice, types of apps dietitians recommended and that patients used, and barriers and enablers to app use in dietetic practice. The Australian, New Zealand and British dietetic associations distributed the survey to their members. A 5% response rate was achieved internationally, with 570 completed responses included for further analysis. Health apps, namely nutrition apps, were used by 62% of dietitians in their practice, primarily as an information resource (74%) and for patient self-monitoring (60%). The top two nutrition apps recommended were MyFitnessPal ® (62%) and the Monash University Low FODMAP Diet ® (44%). Text messaging was used by 51% of respondents, mainly for appointment-related purposes (84%). Although the reported use of smartphone health apps in dietetic practice is high, health apps and other mHealth technologies are not currently being used for behaviour change, nor are they an integral part of the nutrition care process. Dietetic associations should provide training, education and advocacy to enable the profession to more effectively engage with and implement apps into their practice. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Users, Uses, and Effects of Social Media in Dietetic Practice: Scoping Review of the Quantitative and Qualitative Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Social media platforms are increasingly used by registered dietitians (RDs) to improve knowledge translation and exchange in nutrition. However, a thorough understanding of social media in dietetic practice is lacking. Objective The objective of this study was to map and summarize the evidence about the users, uses, and effects of social media in dietetic practice to identify gaps in the literature and inform future research by using a scoping review methodology. Methods Stages for conducting the scoping review included the following: (1) identifying the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies through a comprehensive multidatabase and gray literature search strategy; (3) selecting eligible studies; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing, and reporting results for dissemination. Finally, knowledge users (RDs working for dietetic professional associations and public health organizations) were involved in each review stage to generate practical findings. Results Of the 47 included studies, 34 were intervention studies, 4 were descriptive studies, 2 were content analysis studies, and 7 were expert opinion papers in dietetic practice. Discussion forums were the most frequent social media platform evaluated (n=19), followed by blogs (n=13) and social networking sites (n=10). Most studies targeted overweight and obese or healthy users, with adult populations being most studied. Social media platforms were used to deliver content as part of larger multiple component interventions for weight management. Among intervention studies using a control group with no exposition to social media, we identified positive, neutral, and mixed effects of social media for outcomes related to users’ health behaviors and status (eg, dietary intakes and body weight), participation rates, and professional knowledge. Factors associated with the characteristics of the specific social media, such as ease of use, a design for quick access to desired

  6. Users, Uses, and Effects of Social Media in Dietetic Practice: Scoping Review of the Quantitative and Qualitative Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Audrée-Anne; Lapointe, Annie; Desroches, Sophie

    2018-02-20

    Social media platforms are increasingly used by registered dietitians (RDs) to improve knowledge translation and exchange in nutrition. However, a thorough understanding of social media in dietetic practice is lacking. The objective of this study was to map and summarize the evidence about the users, uses, and effects of social media in dietetic practice to identify gaps in the literature and inform future research by using a scoping review methodology. Stages for conducting the scoping review included the following: (1) identifying the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies through a comprehensive multidatabase and gray literature search strategy; (3) selecting eligible studies; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing, and reporting results for dissemination. Finally, knowledge users (RDs working for dietetic professional associations and public health organizations) were involved in each review stage to generate practical findings. Of the 47 included studies, 34 were intervention studies, 4 were descriptive studies, 2 were content analysis studies, and 7 were expert opinion papers in dietetic practice. Discussion forums were the most frequent social media platform evaluated (n=19), followed by blogs (n=13) and social networking sites (n=10). Most studies targeted overweight and obese or healthy users, with adult populations being most studied. Social media platforms were used to deliver content as part of larger multiple component interventions for weight management. Among intervention studies using a control group with no exposition to social media, we identified positive, neutral, and mixed effects of social media for outcomes related to users' health behaviors and status (eg, dietary intakes and body weight), participation rates, and professional knowledge. Factors associated with the characteristics of the specific social media, such as ease of use, a design for quick access to desired information, and concurrent reminders of use

  7. The Biochemical Impact of Surgery and Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ General anesthesia has been considered by some medical historians as one of the most important contributions to modern medicine second to perhaps the concept of antiseptic medicine and hygiene. The first historical mention of a deep unnatural sleep so that surgery

  8. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  9. Medical Education: Should Undergraduate Medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1960 the first 13 medical students fully trained in Nigeria to internationally accepted standard graduated from the then University College Ibadan, earning the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) London degree. Since then thousands of doctors trained to international standard have been produced from ...

  10. Assessment of Parents' Satisfaction with Paediatric Surgery Services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ademuyıwa O Adesoji

    Items 1 - 14 ... Surgery Services at a Tertiary Hospital in South West. Nigeria: A Quality Control Check. Adesoji O Ademuyiwa, Samuel K Mosaku2, Raphael E Ogbolu3, Yewand O Oshodi4 and Chris O. Bode1. Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine & Lagos University ...

  11. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually undertaken as a scheduled elective procedure. An optimal age for a first rodding surgery has not ... which may prevent or postpone the need for replacement. The smallest diameter expanding rods are still too ...

  12. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to ... Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed ...

  13. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... action of certain hormones, such as ghrelin —“the hunger hormone.” People have these types of surgery if ... organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone Health Network is supported ...

  14. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the portion of your brain that's involved: Memory problems. The temporal lobe handles memory and language functions, so surgery on this part ... computerized tomography (SPECT). The scan image varies in color depending on the amount of blood flow in ...

  15. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There ... anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions. ...

  16. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  17. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  19. Students of dietetics & nutrition; a high risk group for eating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealha, Vanessa; Ferreira, Catarina; Guerra, Inês; Ravasco, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Changes in eating behaviour of university students are common and widely studied. Although the risk of developing eating disorders seems to be obvious among nutrition students, there is a lack of research in this field. This study aimed to: determine the risk of developing eating disorders in Dietetics and Nutrition (DN) students, through the comparison of eating behaviours, food habits, nutritional status, body composition and physical activity with those of other college students (from health and non-health degrees). Cross-sectional and comparative study. The sample included 189 female students, aged 18 to 25 years (20.3 ± 2.0), from two Portuguese public universities. All students were measured (weight, height, % fat mass and waist circumference) and answered four validated questionnaires to assess eating behaviour, food patterns and physical activity. There was a low risk of eating disorders development among these students (4.2%). No significant differences between students from DN, health and nonhealth degrees concerning eating behaviour, nutritional status and body composition were found, contrasting with differences in some food habits and physical activity (p students, a large percentage of them had body weight concerns. DN students had the highest percentages of normal weight, no cardio-metabolic risk according to waist circumference and normal fat mass. DN students had the healthiest food habits and they also practiced moderate and intense physical activity in a high percentage, suggesting a possible positive influence of more knowledge on food and health. Results suggested the importance of more research in college students in order to identify the need for intervention and improve their lifestyle. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between soy and isoflavone intake and periodontal disease: The Freshmen in Dietetic Courses Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okubo Hitomi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much research has shown that soy products inhibited various diseases. However, no published studies have examined the effects of consumption of soy and isoflavones on periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether soy and isoflavone intake is associated with the prevalence of periodontal disease. Methods The subjects were 3956 Japanese female students, aged 18 to 22 years, who were taking a dietetic course. Periodontal disease was defined as present when a subject reported diagnosis of the disorder by a dentist. Information on dietary factors was collected using a validated diet history questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios and their confidence intervals of periodontal disease. Adjustment was made for cigarette smoking, toothbrushing frequency, region of residence, and body mass index. Results The prevalence of periodontal disease was 8.0%. Intake of total soy product and tofu was independently associated with a decreased prevalence of periodontal disease; multivariate odds ratios in comparison of the highest with the lowest quintile were 0.68 and 0.68, respectively (95% confidence intervals = 0.47–0.97 and 0.47–0.98, P for trend = 0.01 and 0.004, respectively. A significant inverse dose-response relationship between the intake of isoflavones and the prevalence of periodontal disease was observed, although the difference in the adjusted odds ratio between the extreme quintiles was of borderline significance (P for trend = 0.04. There were no measurable dose-response relationships between consumption of tofu products, fermented soybeans, boiled soybeans, miso, or miso soup and the prevalence of periodontal disease. Conclusion Our findings suggest that soy and isoflavone intake may decrease the likelihood of periodontal disease. Further investigations with objective measures for periodontal disease are needed to confirm our findings.

  1. Therapeutic alliance in dietetic practice for weight loss: Insights from health coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Annaliese; McMahon, Anne; Tapsell, Linda; Deane, Frank; Arenson, Danielle

    2018-02-13

    The psychological construct of 'therapeutic alliance' can be used to better understand the effectiveness of consultations, particularly goal setting for weight management. We analysed audio-recorded health coaching sessions during a weight loss trial to explore relationships between therapeutic alliance and various contextual factors. Audio recordings of 50 health coaching sessions were analysed. After assessing fidelity to the protocol, therapeutic alliance was measured using an adapted Working Alliance Inventory Observer-rated Short Version (WAI-O-S), and examined by (i) identifying relationships between contextual factors and WAI-O-S scores (Spearman's coefficients); (ii) testing the impact of preparatory exercises and body mass index on WAI-O-S scores (one-way analysis of variance and least-squared differences tests) and (iii) comparing differences in WAI-O-S scores based on relationship status, gender and follow-up session completion (independent samples t-tests). Fidelity was high (mean 88%). WAI-O-S total scores ranged from 55 to 70 (out of 84). Session duration was significantly correlated with WAI-O-S component of 'Bond' (r = 0.42, P = 0.002). Those who completed preparatory exercises had significantly higher total WAI-O-S scores, 'Goal' and 'Task' scores. Participants who completed the follow-up session scored significantly higher for 'Goal' compared to no follow-up. Spending more time in a session appears related to increased bonding, a key component of therapeutic alliance. Preparatory work may help build therapeutic alliance and agreement on goals appears to influence follow-up completion. These exploratory findings provide directions for research addressing the professional relationship in dietetic consultations for weight loss. © 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  2. [Breast-feeding (part IV): Therapeutic uses, dietetic and addictions--guidelines for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin, L; Chantry, A A

    2015-12-01

    To describe the practical aspects of the use of the most commonly prescribed drugs during the postpartum period, the dietetic measures and the management of breast-feeding in case of addictive behaviors. Review of the literature between 1972 and May 2015 from the databases Medline, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, and international recommendations of learned societies. The precaution to stop breast-feeding when drugs are necessary is not justified in many situations (professional consensus). Aspirin at antiaggregant dose is allowed during breast-feeding while high doses are not recommended; NSAIDs with short half-life can be used (professional consensus). Precautions are needed in cases of use of morphonics (professional consensus). There is no justification to delay the initiation of breast-feeding in case of locoregional or general analgesia or for caesarean section. Antibiotic treatment does not justify discontinuing breast-feeding (professional consensus). Anxiolytics of the class of antihistaminic sedating H1 such as hydroxyzine (Atarax®) should not be prescribed in case of breast-feeding (professional consensus). Imaging does not justify to stop breast-feeding (professional consensus). Tobacco consumption is discouraged but is not a contraindication to breast-feed (professional consensus). It is recommended to avoid the consumption of alcohol (professional consensus). In case of occasional and moderate consumption of alcohol, delaying breast-feeding for a minimum of two hours is recommended (professional consensus). Cocaine consumption is a contraindication of breast-feeding (professional agreement), and breast-feeding is not recommended in case of cannabis use (professional consensus). Few drug treatments are not compatible with breast-feeding that can be continued in most of the cases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  4. Overview on nutritional issues in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude

    2016-11-01

    In the context of the worldwide obesity epidemic, bariatric surgery is the only therapy associated with a sustainable weight loss and to midterm prevention of obesity-related complications. However, nutritional and behavioral multidisciplinary medical preparation, as well as long-term postoperative nutritional follow-up, is strongly advised to avoid postoperative surgical, nutritional, or psychiatric complications. Due to a long history of restrictive diets and large body weight fluctuations, preoperative nutritional assessment and correction of vitamin and trace elements deficiencies are mandatory. A rapid and massive weight loss induces the loss of muscle mass and fat-free mass that could lead to malnutrition and osteoporosis. Dietetic counseling is advised to prevent postoperative food intolerance syndrome, malnutrition, and weight regain. Protein intake should be at least 60 g/day. Planned and structured physical exercise should be systematically promoted to maintain muscle mass and bone health. Bariatric surgery is mostly successful if patients are well prepared and monitored. The perfect patients' selection remains difficult in the absence of well defined predictive criteria of success. Future research is needed to define optimal perioperative nutritional management and its influence on long-term outcome, including quality of life and healthcare-related costs.

  5. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: food and nutrition for older adults: promoting health and wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Melissa; Munoz, Nancy

    2012-08-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all Americans aged 60 years and older receive appropriate nutrition care; have access to coordinated, comprehensive food and nutrition services; and receive the benefits of ongoing research to identify the most effective food and nutrition programs, interventions, and therapies. Health, physiologic, and functional changes associated with the aging process can influence nutrition needs and nutrient intake. The practice of nutrition for older adults is no longer limited to those who are frail, malnourished, and ill. The population of adults older than age 60 years includes many individuals who are living healthy, vital lives with a variety of nutrition-related circumstances and environments. Access and availability of wholesome, nutritious food is essential to ensure successful aging and well-being for the rapidly growing, heterogeneous, multiracial, and ethnic population of older adults. To ensure successful aging and minimize the effects of disease and disability, a wide range of flexible dietary recommendations, culturally sensitive food and nutrition services, physical activities, and supportive care tailored to older adults are necessary. National, state, and local strategies that promote access to coordinated food and nutrition services are essential to maintain independence, functional ability, disease management, and quality of life. Those working with older adults must be proactive in demonstrating the value of comprehensive food and nutrition services. To meet the needs of all older adults, registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, must widen their scope of practice to include prevention, treatment, and maintenance of health and quality of life into old age. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutrition guidance for healthy children ages 2 to 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Beth N; Hayes, Dayle

    2014-08-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that children ages 2 to 11 years should achieve optimal physical and cognitive development, maintain healthy weights, enjoy food, and reduce the risk of chronic disease through appropriate eating habits and participation in regular physical activity. Rapid increases in the prevalence of childhood obesity during the 1980s and 1990s focused attention on young children's overconsumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and beverages and lack of physical activity. While recent data suggest a stabilization of obesity rates, several public health concerns remain. These include the most effective ways to promote healthy weights, the number of children living in food insecurity, the under-consumption of key nutrients, and the early development of diet-related risks for chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, obesity, and osteoporosis. This Position Paper reviews what children 2 to 11 years old in the United States are reportedly eating, explores trends in food and nutrient intakes, and examines the impact of federal nutrition programs on child nutrition. Current dietary recommendations and guidelines for physical activity are also discussed. The roles of parents and caregivers in influencing the development of life-long healthy eating behaviors are highlighted. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics works with other allied health and food industry professionals to translate dietary recommendations and guidelines into positive, practical health messages. Specific recommendations and sources of science-based nutrition messages to improve the nutritional well-being of children are provided for food and nutrition practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  8. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  10. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  11. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    and carbohydrate metabolism. A specific manganese deficiency syndrome has not been described in humans. The body is able to adapt to a wide range of manganese intakes by regulating both efficiency of absorption in the intestine and the quantity excreted via bile. There are no reliable and validated biomarkers......Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for manganese. Manganese is an essential dietary mineral which is a component of a number of metalloenzymes involved in amino acid, lipid...

  12. Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Lieffers, Jessica; Bauman, Adrian; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-03-31

    Dietitians are engaging with mobile health (mHealth) technologies, particularly with diet and nutrition apps in their patient care. Despite the plethora of apps available, the majority are not designed with a dietitian's input. The aim of this study was to identify the user preferences of dietitians in relation to tools, resources, and design features for smartphone health apps that would support their dietetic professional practice and their patients. As part of a larger international Web-based survey of health-app use among dietitians, three open-ended responses were included for specific exploration of app design features and additional resources or tools that could guide the development of apps for use in dietetic practice and patient care. Inductive thematic analysis of responses was conducted using the qualitative data analysis program, NVivo version 11 (QSR International Pty Ltd), to understand the design preferences and features valued by dietitians. The responses from 381 dietitian respondents were analyzed. Five key themes were identified. Dietitians wanted access to credible apps, suggesting that dietetic associations should have greater involvement in reviewing and endorsing evidence-based apps for use in dietary counseling. Improvements to the usability of apps, relating to their ease of use and design, were also raised, as self-monitoring of dietary behaviors using existing nutrition apps was deemed to be burdensome. Furthermore, apps providing dietitian-oriented support were favored, for example, those with the ability to streamline the dietary assessment process, so that dietitians could spend more time on dietary counseling and negotiating patient goals for dietary and lifestyle behavior change. Provision of patient-oriented support, such as functionality to tailor apps to patient-specific needs, was also considered important. Finally, respondents valued apps that could integrate into their work systems to enhance the quality of the dietitian

  13. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for carbohydrates and dietary fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the establishment of Dietary Reference Values for carbohydrates and dietary fibre. Nutritionally, two broad categories of carbohydrates can be differentiated: “glycaemic carbohydrates”, i.e. carbohydrates...... but will depend on the amount of fat and protein ingested. The Panel proposes 45 to 60 E% as the reference Intake range for carbohydrates applicable to both adults and children older than one year of age. Although high frequency of intake of sugar-containing foods can increase the risk of dental caries...

  14. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on principles for deriving and applying Dietary Reference Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the general principles for development and application of Dietary Reference Values (DRVs). These quantitative reference values for nutrient intakes for healthy individuals and populations are based...... on health criteria. Derived from DRVs, nutrients goals and recommendations take into account other criteria such as food composition or dietary habits, and may be used for assessment and planning of diets. It is proposed to derive the following DRVs: 1) Population Reference Intakes (PRI), 2) Average...

  15. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary reference values for water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the setting of dietary reference values for water for specific age groups. Adequate Intakes (AI) have been defined derived from a combination of observed intakes in population groups with desirable...... osmolarity values of urine and desirable water volumes per energy unit consumed. The reference values for total water intake include water from drinking water, beverages of all kind, and from food moisture and only apply to conditions of moderate environmental temperature and moderate physical activity...

  16. On the uniqueness of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Josef E

    2005-03-01

    As the divergence between medicine and surgery increases, the author traces its beginnings not to the recent past, but as far back as the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Even at that time, physicians rarely came in physical contact with the patients and made their diagnoses from looking at flasks of urine from the patients. Skilled physicians allegedly could make approximately 1000 diagnoses from examining a flask of urine. On the other hand, barber surgeons were relatively unskilled and unrewarded, at a much lower class in society, and laid hands on the patient by draining abscesses, cauterizing, dealing with bladder stones, etc. Despite the Quincentenary of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh this year and the rendering of the first guild to the barber surgeons, this schism between medical and surgical practice has remained. The author attempts to fit this schism into medicine today by addressing continuity of care and the 80-hour workweek, stating that this schism is not a new development but has existed for many years. The proposal is made that medicine and surgery should work together as much as they can. However, if surgical patients are not well served by the lack of emphasis on continuity of care brought forth by the leadership of medicine in this country, who the author claims of intentionally distancing themselves from patient care, then surgery may need to go its own way. The patient comes first.

  17. Consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: indicators recommended for the identification and documentation of pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Patricia; Carney, Liesje Nieman; Corkins, Mark R; Monczka, Jessica; Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan E; Spear, Bonnie A; White, Jane V

    2015-02-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), utilizing an evidence-informed, consensus-derived process, recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic indicators be used to identify and document pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition) in routine clinical practice. The recommended indicators include z scores for weight-for-height/length, body mass index-for-age, or length/height-for-age or mid-upper arm circumference when a single data point is available. When 2 or more data points are available, indicators may also include weight gain velocity (Dietetics.

  18. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  19. Back surgery: Modern medical pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jc

    2002-01-01

    Medical iatrogenesis is at an all-time high with increasing deaths, disability, and costs compounded by unnecessary and ineffective surgeries despite the warnings from WHO, the US Public Health Service, and the Institute of Medicine. One area in particular, failed back surgeries, has drawn increasing attention by researchers due to disproved medical theories and surgical treatments. Paradoxically, while spinal manipulative therapy has been shown to achieve better results for this epidemic of low back pain in particular, medical and insurance programs often limit or boycott this inexpensive and effective treatment, indicating the solution to lowering medical costs and iatrogenesis now rests with political and economic factors primarily.

  20. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  1. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  2. An overview of space medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, P D; Anderton, R A; Posselt, B N; Fong, K J

    2017-12-01

    Space medicine is fundamental to the human exploration of space. It supports survival, function and performance in this challenging and potentially lethal environment. It is international, intercultural and interdisciplinary, operating at the boundaries of exploration, science, technology and medicine. Space medicine is also the latest UK specialty to be recognized by the Royal College of Physicians in the UK and the General Medical Council. This review introduces the field of space medicine and describes the different types of spaceflight, environmental challenges, associated medical and physiological effects, and operational medical considerations. It will describe the varied roles of the space medicine doctor, including the conduct of surgery and anaesthesia, and concludes with a vision of the future for space medicine in the UK.Space medicine doctors have a responsibility to space workers and spaceflight participants. These 'flight surgeons' are key in developing mitigation strategies to ensure the safety, health and performance of space travellers in what is an extreme and hazardous environment. This includes all phases from selection, training and spaceflight itself to post-flight rehabilitation and long-term health. The recent recognition of the speciality provides a pathway to train in this fascinating field of medicine and is a key enabler for the UK Government's commercial spaceflight ambition. © Crown copyright 2017.

  3. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interprofessional Education in Nutrition as an Essential Component of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Deen, Darwin

    2017-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) should play a significant role in educating medical students, residents, fellows, and physicians in practice. The more physicians learn about the effectiveness of nutrition for the prevention and treatment of noncommunicable diseases, the more likely they are to consult with RDNs and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy. The more interprofessional education that occurs between medical students, other health professional students, and RDNs, the more likely all health care professionals will understand and value the role of the RDN in improving the quality of care provided to patients. The training and experience of RDNs make them uniquely qualified for the role of educating medical students about nutrition as it relates to health and disease. This position paper provides RDNs with the tools and language to emphasize to medical educators, course directors, curriculum committees, medical school deans, residency and fellowship directors, physicians, and other health professionals in training and practice how ongoing nutrition counseling and management, conducted by an RDN, can benefit their patients. Specific teaching settings and examples for RDNs to take a leadership role (paid and unpaid positions) in ensuring that future physicians discuss nutrition, healthy lifestyle, and physical activity with their patients, consult with RDNs, and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy are presented. This position paper supports interprofessional education in nutrition as an essential component of medical education. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Communication competence within dietetics: dietitians' and clients' views about the unspoken dialogue--the impact of personal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cant, R P

    2009-12-01

    Although client communications are affected by clients' assumptions about professionals' characteristics drawn from dress attire, little is known about how this dialogue operates in dietetics. The present study aimed to describe how dietitians and their clients interpret this dialogue and to explore the implications for practice. A purposive quota sample of dietitians (n = 46) from 21 health services in one state of Australia and a quota of their adult patients (n = 34) were interviewed about dietitians' nutrition education roles. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and identified themes developed into a questionnaire to survey Australian dietitians. Analysis used frequencies and nonparametric statistics (P <0.05). Triangulation of the results obtained from the studies revealed a strong agreement between data sources. Dietitians' dress attire was perceived as a key source of nonverbal communications by dietetics clients. This was recognised by 75% of the 256 dietitians who were surveyed nationally. Dietitians favoured a professional style (i.e. skirt or slacks, with top). Many clients rejected formal dress (i.e. suit, high heels) as being a potential communication barrier. Some clients viewed dietitians' bodily size/shape as a role model. Implications of dietitians' presentation (i.e. how you look) were important to both clients and dietitians. Dress style is implicated in nonverbal communication dialogues between the dietitian and client. As a matter of competence and to maintain congruency in communication, dietitians should be aware of their clients' preferences for formality of dress, and conduct their attire accordingly.

  5. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Providing nutrition services for people with developmental disabilities and special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Riper, Cynthia L; Wallace, Lee Shelly

    2010-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition services provided by registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs), are essential components of comprehensive care for all people with developmental disabilities and special health care needs. Nutrition services should be provided throughout life in a manner that is interdisciplinary, family-centered, community-based, and culturally competent. People with developmental disabilities and special health care needs frequently have nutrition concerns, including growth alterations (failure to thrive, obesity, or growth retardation), metabolic disorders, poor feeding skills, medication-nutrient interactions, and sometimes partial or total dependence on enteral or parenteral nutrition. Individuals with special needs are also more likely to develop comorbid conditions such as obesity or endocrine disorders that require nutrition interventions. Poor health habits, limited access to services, and long-term use of multiple medications are considered health risk factors. Health maintenance and avoidance of complications can be promoted by timely and cost-effective nutrition interventions. Public policy for individuals with special needs has evolved over time, resulting in a transition from institutional facilities and programs to community living. The expansion of public access to technology and health information on the Internet challenges RDs and DTRs to provide accurate scientific information for those with developmental disabilities and special health care needs. Nationally credentialed RDs and DTRs are best prepared to provide appropriate nutrition information for wellness and quality of life.

  6. Feasibility of home-based dietetic intervention to improve the nutritional status of older adults post-hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamirudin, Aliza Haslinda; Walton, Karen; Charlton, Karen; Carrie, Amanda; Tapsell, Linda; Milosavljevic, Marianna; Pang, Glen; Potter, Jan

    2017-07-01

    To determine if a model of home-based dietetic care improves dietary intake and weight status in a specific group of older adults post-hospitalisation. The Department of Veterans' Affairs clients aged 65 years and over were recruited from hospitals in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia (n = 32 men, n = 36 women). Nutritional status was assessed at home at baseline (within two weeks post-discharge) and three months post-discharge using a diet history, a food frequency checklist and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Personalised dietary advice was provided by a single dietitian according to participants' nutritional status. Mean body weight improved significantly (P = 0.048), as well as mean MNA score (21.9 ± 3.5 vs 25.2 ± 3.1) (P 27 kg/m 2 ) (1.1 ± 0.3 g/kg) peers (P nutrition supplements (+95.5 ± 388.2 kJ/day) and milk (+259.6 ± 659.8 kJ/day). Dietetic intervention improved nutritional status 3 months after hospital discharge in older adults living in the community. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  7. Cosmetic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks.

  8. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery or subcutaneous mastectomy utilizing a periareolar or circumareolar ... old. Informed consent was obtained. The height of the patients was measured from heel to vertex with a standard height measuring device. The chest circumference was ... The procedure was followed with liposuction 3-6 months later if required.

  9. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The multidisciplinary management of Breast Cancer (BC) has evolved over the past 50 years: the patient is offered a choice of .... Choice of procedure. – For women with early BC, there is essentially a choice between 2 procedures: mastectomy or breast conserving surgery with radiation (BCT). The standard.

  10. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  11. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We plan to protocolise earlier surgery and blood conservation strategies intraoperatively in addition to a restrictive strategy in ..... Marshall JC. Review Transfusion trigger: when to transfuse? Crit Care. 2004;8(Suppl 2):S31-3. 11. Hofmann A, Farmer S, Towler SC. Strategies to preempt and reduce the use of blood products: ...

  12. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cosmetic-surgery/SN00006 Medical Tourism (Copyright © American Society of Plastic Surgeons) — People considering ... in exotic vacation spots. This publication talks about "medical tourism" and whether it's safe. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/ ...

  13. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. J Surg Oncol. 2016;113(2):188-193. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24125. 2. Wente MN, Veit JA, Bassi C, et al. Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH): An international study group of pancreatic surgery (ISGPS) definition. Surg. 2007;142(1):20-25. http://.

  15. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity...

  16. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaths due to other trauma types (gunshot wounds, road traffic fatalities and assault) ... the axillary artery was ligated during surgery. Type of ... Left axillary artery. Ischaemic left upper limb. 3. Fifth intercostal space on the left. Bilateral pneumothorax and haemothorax still present at autopsy. (intercostal drain only inserted on ...

  17. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  18. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  19. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valid therapies, delaying proven treatment for serious conditions. Holistic Treatments Holistic medicine is a system of health care ... techniques including meditation, biofeedback and relaxation training. While holistic treatments can be part of a good physical regimen, ...

  20. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  1. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  2. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for pantothenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for pantothenic acid. Pantothenic acid is a water-soluble vitamin, which is a component of coenzyme A (CoA) and acyl-carrier proteins. Pantothenic...

  3. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formulae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formula. This opinion reviews the opinion provided by the Scientific Committee on Food...

  4. Consensus statement of the academy of nutrition and dietetics/american society for parenteral and enteral nutrition: Characteristics recommended for the identification and documentation of adult malnutrition (undernutrition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic characteristics be used to identify and document adult malnutrition in routine clinical practice. An etiologically based diagno...

  5. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for vitamin E as α-tocopherol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for vitamin E. In this Opinion, the Panel considers vitamin E as α-tocopherol only. The Panel considers that Average Requirements (ARs...

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2015 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in pediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin-Folino, Nancy; Ogata, Beth N; Charney, Pamela J; Holt, Katrina; Brewer, Holly L; Sharrett, Mary K; Carney, Liesje N

    2015-03-01

    All of the health care professions recognize that care of infants and children is best managed as a specialty area of practice. Nutrition plays a key role in normal growth and development. Appropriate nutrition care is vital adjuvant therapy for infants and children with acute or chronic illness. Provision of nutrition services in pediatric practice requires that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have advanced knowledge in the focus area of pediatric nutrition. Therefore, the Pediatric Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed this revision of the Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for RDNs in Pediatric Nutrition as a resource for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition to assess skill level and to identify needs for professional development to advance practice in pediatric nutrition. This revision reflects recent advances in pediatric nutrition and replaces the previous Standards published in 2009. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance represent six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013 . S tatement on the safety of ' Cetyl Myristoleate Complex ' as an ingredient in food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to update its opinion on the safety of „Cetyl Myristoleate Complex‟ (CMC) as a novel food ingredient in the light of a new repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study in mice. In its p...

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allerg ies (NDA) ; Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to appetite ratings, weight management, and blood glucose concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to appetite ratings, weight management, and blood glucose concentrations. This guidance has been drawn from scientific...

  9. Snacking Patterns and Snack Correlates in Third- and Fourth-Year Nursing and Dietetics Students: An Exploratory Study from the Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H; Monahan, P L; Sheng, Zhaohui; Holbert, Donald

    2016-01-01

    To compare snacking behaviors and psychosocial correlates of third- and fourth-year nursing (n=52) and dietetics (n=48) students. Questionnaires assessed snack choices, awareness of healthy snacks, snack recommendations and beliefs, stage of change and perceived benefits/barriers for healthy snacking, and situational snacking. The snacks purchased most often on and off campus by the nursing students were soft drinks/caffeinated beverages (58%) and chips (42%), and for the dietetics students were chips (35%) and fresh fruit (33%). One-third of the nursing and 8% of the dietetics students believed their snack choices would have an unfavorable effect on their long-term health. Two-thirds of the nursing and 75% of the dietetics students self-classified in the action stages for healthy snacking. Snacks considered healthy and recommended by both samples were fresh fruits/vegetables and granola bars. More than 90% of both samples believed their job responsibilities would include modeling and teaching healthy snacking to patients. The barriers to healthy snacking identified most often by both samples were limited budget and not readily available. On-campus vendors should be approached with suggestions about featuring nutrient-dense snacks at discounted prices and offering smaller snack packs of popular products.

  10. Influence of low-protein dietetic foods consumption on quality of life and levels of B vitamins and homocysteine in patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C; Aranda, P; Planells, E; Galindo, P; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Larrubia, M; Llopis, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the consumption of low protein dietetic foods improved the quality of life and nutritional status for vitamins B and homocysteine in patients with chronic renal failure. This nutritional-intervention involved 28 men and 21 women, divided into two groups. The control-group consumed a low-protein diet prescribed, and the experimental-group consumed a diet in which some commonly used foods were replaced by low-protein dietetic foods. The study lasted 6 months. Food consumption was assessed by 24-h recall. Vitamin B6 as alphaEAST was measured in blood. Creatinine, urea, vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine were measured in plasma. The impact on the patients' quality of life from consuming the dietetic foods was assessed via the SF-36 questionnaire. After 6 months, the protein intake among the experimental-group had decreased by 40%, and the urea/creatinine ratio and alphaEAST activity were also lower. The results of the SF-36 questionnaire show that the patients in the experimental-group obtained higher scores in the categories of general health and physical status. The dietetic foods were very well accepted by all patients and their use allowed a better control of the protein intake, improved B6 status and a better quality of life.

  11. Determination of essential elements in dietetic sample by neutron activation analysis; Determinacao de elementos essenciais em alimentos dieteticos pela tecnica de analise por ativacao com neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siquelli, Murilo V.; Maihara, Vera A. Maihara [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica]. E-mail: murilo_siquelli@hotmail.com; vmaihara@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    In the last years there has been an increase of the dietetic product consumption by people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease and by people concerned about having a healthy life as well. Despite the increase of dietetic product presents in the diet of the Brazilian population, the use of these products is still controversial. The analysis of the nutritional composition of these products is becoming important because a great number of people is changing their traditional food by dietetic products. In the literature, there is no information about the inorganic composition, mainly related to the essential elements, in the dietetic products: diet and light . In this study are presented preliminary results of the concentrations of Br, Ca, Cr, Fe, Na and Zn determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in aspartame, saccharin and cyclamate sodium , and stevia based sweetener samples. Gelatin samples, diet and light, were also analyzed. Methodology validation was done analyzing NIST reference materials Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2). (author)

  12. maxillofacial surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of maxillofacial and oral injuries, including mandibular fractures, from 1650 BC to the present, is the topic of two publications.1,2 To summarise: the Greek. 'Father of Medicine' Hippocrates was the first to describe fracture treatment – he recommended bandages and single jaw fixation. Celsus, a Roman (30 BC ...

  13. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  14. Defensive medicine in Israel - a nationwide survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Asher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Defensive medicine is the practice of diagnostic or therapeutic measures conducted primarily as a safeguard against possible malpractice liability. We studied the extent, reasons, and characteristics of defensive medicine in the Israeli health care system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cross-sectional study performed in the Israeli health care system between April and July 2008 in a sample (7% of board certified physicians from eight medical disciplines (internal medicine, pediatrics, general surgery, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedic surgery, cardiology, and neurosurgery. A total of 889 physicians (7% of all Israeli board certified specialists completed the survey. The majority [60%, (95%CI 0.57-0.63] reported practicing defensive medicine; 40% (95%CI 0.37-0.43 consider every patient as a potential threat for a medical lawsuit; 25% (95%CI 0.22-0.28 have previously been sued at least once during their career. Independent predictors for practicing defensive medicine were surgical specialty [OR=1.6 (95%CI 1.2-2.2, p=0.0004], not performing a fellowship abroad [OR=1.5 (95%CI 1.1-2, p=0.027], and previous exposure to lawsuits [OR=2.4 (95%CI 1.7-3.4, p<0.0001]. Independent predictors for the risk of being sued during a physician's career were male gender [OR=1.6 (95%CI 1.1-2.2, p=0.012] and surgery specialty [OR=3.2 (95%CI 2.4-4.3, p<0.0001] (general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedic surgery, and neurosurgery. CONCLUSIONS: Defensive medicine is very prevalent in daily physician practice in all medical disciplines. It exposes patients to complications due to unnecessary tests and procedures, affects quality of care and costs, and undermines doctor-patient relationships. Further studies are needed to understand how to minimize defensive medicine resulting from an increased malpractice liability market.

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  17. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ...

  19. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were......The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... to sex, age, and somatosensory change. High satisfaction and improvement in facial esthetic after OS were seen. Young patients (16-25 years) and men indicated a higher degree of satisfaction than old (>25 years) patients and women. The use of social media seems to be an interesting platform...

  20. [Longlived examples. Function and formal principles of historical exempla of old age in the early-modern dietetic literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Since antiquity, the exemplum can be proven in numerous types of texts, as it fulfills a notable didactic and rhetorical function: On the one hand it serves to a deductive illustration of common doctrines; on the other it is until the Enlightenment the scientific basis of cognition: in the view of medieval artistotelists, of who FRANCIS BACON was (in a special sense) one of the last champions, the exemplum takes on an inductive function: the sensual perception of the exampla generates the understanding of the universal, as the exemplum always refers to the exemplar, to the original form. Regarding the eminent deductive/inductive significance of the exempla, it is not surprising that they are an essential factor in dietetic literature. Whereas such exemples were very rare in the general literature on health care written by physicians and in specific papers of old-age assistance, they formed an integral part of texts composed for a large public by medical laymen such as (Ps.-) ROGER BACON, MARSILIO FICINO, ALVISE CORNARO or FRANCIS BACON. In these studies, the issue of a natural limit of human life was discussed intensively. In this context the "historical" sources were of high importance, even if, from a todays point of view, their use was completely non-historical. Often their crude instrumentalization and new interpretations can only be understood in the scholarly context of the time: E.g. in debates of specialists with outsiders or when serving as argument for physiological theories and therapeutical regimes. Not until late Renaissance, the historical exemple was replaced by the individual experience. It is striking that most of all historical exemples found in dietetic papers were positive. This humanistic and Christian ideal concept of old age, which completely contradicts the medical reality, had obviously a stronger fascination on the authors of early modern times than the inductive function of negative exempla (which are very important for a rational

  1. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    RDs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All RDs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for RDs, and the applicable focus area SOP and SOPP for RDs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide an RD's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the RD are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning, and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All RDs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians; applicable focus area SOP and SOPP; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Standards of professional performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Sustainable, Resilient, and Healthy Food and Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagtow, Angie; Robien, Kim; Bergquist, Erin; Bruening, Meg; Dierks, Lisa; Hartman, Barbara E; Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Steinitz, Tamara; Tahsin, Bettina; Underwood, Teri; Wilkins, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Sustainability is the ability of a system to be maintained over the long term. Resilience is the ability of a system to withstand disturbances and continue to function in a sustainable manner. Issues of sustainability and resilience apply to all aspects of nutrition and dietetics practice, can be practiced at both the program and systems level, and are broader than any one specific practice setting or individual intervention. Given an increasing need to apply principles of sustainability and resilience to nutrition and dietetics practice, as well as growing interest among the public and by Registered Dietitian Nutritionists of health issues related to food and water systems, the Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this emerging practice area. This Standards of Professional Performance document covers six standards of professional performance: quality in practice, competence and accountability, provision of services, application of research, communication and application of knowledge, and utilization and management of resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interface Between Cosmetic and Migraine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Guyuron, Bahman

    2017-10-01

    This article describes connections between migraine surgery and cosmetic surgery including technical overlap, benefits for patients, and why every plastic surgeon may consider screening cosmetic surgery patients for migraine headache (MH). Contemporary migraine surgery began by an observation made following forehead rejuvenation, and the connection has continued. The prevalence of MH among females in the USA is 26%, and females account for 91% of cosmetic surgery procedures and 81-91% of migraine surgery procedures, which suggests substantial overlap between both patient populations. At the same time, recent reports show an overall increase in cosmetic facial procedures. Surgical techniques between some of the most commonly performed facial surgeries and migraine surgery overlap, creating opportunity for consolidation. In particular, forehead lift, blepharoplasty, septo-rhinoplasty, and rhytidectomy can easily be part of the migraine surgery, depending on the migraine trigger sites. Patients could benefit from simultaneous improvement in MH symptoms and rejuvenation of the face. Simple tools such as the Migraine Headache Index could be used to screen cosmetic surgery patients for MH. Similarity between patient populations, demand for both facial and MH procedures, and technical overlap suggest great incentive for plastic surgeons to combine both. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  5. Hirudotherapy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Natalia; Kantyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The saliva of medicinal leeches, e.g., Hirudo medicinalis and Hirudo verbana commonly used in hirudotherapy, contains more than 100 bioactive substances with various therapeutic effects, including anticoagulant, vasodilator, thrombolytic, anti-inflammatory and anaesthetic properties. Recently, leeches have been used very successfully in veterinary medicine to treat many diseases of animals, especially dogs, cats and horses. The most common indications for the use of leeches are hip and elbow dysplasia, acute and chronic arthritis, diseases associated with inflammation of tendons, ligaments, and fascia, diseases of the vertebrae and the treatment of scars. Leech therapy is a painless procedure which takes an average of 30 to 120 minutes, the time being dependent on the size of the animal. All leeches used in medical procedures should originate only from certified biofarms. The maintenance of sterile conditions for the culture, transport and storage of medical leeches is very important to protect animals from microbial infections. Hirudotherapy is successfully used in veterinary medicine, especially when traditional treatment is not effective, the effects of treatment are too slow, or after surgery, when the tissues may be threatened by venous congestion.

  6. The 2011 dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D: what dietetics practitioners need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Institute of Medicine Committee to Review Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D, comprehensively reviewed the evidence for both skeletal and nonskeletal health outcomes and concluded, that a causal role of calcium and vitamin D in skeletal health provided the necessary basis for th...

  7. MODERN PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY SEVERE CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Krylov; S. S. Petrikov; A. E. Talypov; Yu. V. Puras; A. A. Solodov; O. V. Levchenko; E. V. Grigoryeva; A. Yu. Kordonskiy

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays treatment methods of severe traumatic brain injury - state of the problem in the neurosurgery department of the Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine.Surgery of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the principal direction of research activities in the neurosurgery department of the Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine.With a view to produce an unified approach in treatment patients with TBI, in the neurosurgery department brain injury practical classific...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  12. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  14. [Treatments around surgery of prostate cancer and surgery of recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, L; Ploussard, G; Hennequin, C; Richaud, P; Soulié, M

    2015-11-01

    To describe neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments to surgery and the place of surgery in the recurrence after primary treatments. Bibliography search was performed from the database Medline (National Library of Medicine, Pubmed), selected according to the scientific relevance. The research was focused on treatments before and after surgery, biological recurrence and surgery as the procedure in case of failure of other treatments of non-metastatic prostate cancer. Main oncological objectif of surgery is to decrease positive surgical margins by good adequation between technics and tumor and patient status. Neoadjuvant treatments are today disappointing; however, adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonotherapy demonstrated their interest in case of extracapsular extension, positive margins or invasion of lymph nodes. Nevertheless, superiority of adjuvant treatment to salvage treatment is still debated. Radical prostatectomy is still the only curative treatment in case of failure of another localized treatment. Radical prostatectomy has to be one of the main references of localized prostate cancer treatments especially in case of multimodal approach. Pathological exam of specimen and postoperative PSA value should precise the optimal management of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    and phosphorus that are available for absorption from the diet cannot be determined; therefore, the whole-body calcium to phosphorus ratio was used to set DRVs. The data were considered insufficient to derive Average Requirements and Population Reference Intakes. Based on the DRVs for calcium and considering......Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for phosphorus. The Panel considered data from balance studies, losses of phosphorus from the body and intestinal absorption for possible use...... in a factorial approach, and studies on phosphorus intake and long-term health outcomes. The Panel concluded that these data were insufficient for setting DRVs for phosphorus. Data on the calcium to phosphorus ratio in bones of healthy adults, adjusted for the proportion of phosphorus found outside bone...

  16. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for biotin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for biotin. Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin which serves as a co-factor for several carboxylases that play critical roles in the synthesis...... of fatty acids, the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids and gluconeogenesis. Dietary biotin deficiency is rare. Data on biomarkers of biotin intake or status are insufficient to be used in determining the requirement for biotin. Data available on biotin intakes and health consequences are very limited...... and cannot be used for deriving DRVs for biotin. As there is insufficient evidence available to derive an Average Requirement and a Population Reference Intake, an Adequate Intake (AI) is proposed. The setting of AIs is based on observed biotin intakes with a mixed diet and the apparent absence of signs...

  17. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on establishing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) provides guidance on the translation of nutrient based dietary advice into guidance, intended for the European population as a whole, on the contribution of different foods or food groups to an overall diet...... that would help to maintain good health through optimal nutrition (food-based dietary guidelines). The main focus of this Opinion is put on the scientific process of developing food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) for the diverse European populations, following a stepwise approach which should ideally...... consist of: 1) Identification of diet-health relationships, 2) Identification of country specific diet-related health problems, 3) Identification of nutrients of public health importance, 4) Identification of foods relevant for FBDG, 5) Identification of food consumption patterns, 6) Testing...

  18. Medicinal smokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Faridi, Pouya; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2006-11-24

    All through time, humans have used smoke of medicinal plants to cure illness. To the best of our knowledge, the ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care have not been studied. Mono- and multi-ingredient herbal and non-herbal remedies administered as smoke from 50 countries across the 5 continents are reviewed. Most of the 265 plant species of mono-ingredient remedies studied belong to Asteraceae (10.6%), followed by Solanaceae (10.2%), Fabaceae (9.8%) and Apiaceae (5.3%). The most frequent medical indications for medicinal smoke are pulmonary (23.5%), neurological (21.8%) and dermatological (8.1%). Other uses of smoke are not exactly medical but beneficial to health, and include smoke as a preservative or a repellent and the social use of smoke. The three main methods for administering smoke are inhalation, which accounts for 71.5% of the indications; smoke directed at a specific organ or body part, which accounts for 24.5%; ambient smoke (passive smoking), which makes up the remaining 4.0%. Whereas inhalation is typically used in the treatment of pulmonary and neurological disorders and directed smoke in localized situations, such as dermatological and genito-urinary disorders, ambient smoke is not directed at the body at all but used as an air purifier. The advantages of smoke-based remedies are rapid delivery to the brain, more efficient absorption by the body and lower costs of production. This review highlights the fact that not enough is known about medicinal smoke and that a lot of natural products have potential for use as medicine in the smoke form. Furthermore, this review argues in favor of medicinal smoke extended use in modern medicine as a form of drug delivery and as a promising source of new active natural ingredients.

  19. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: nutrition security in developing nations: sustainable food, water, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Stacia M; Boyle, Marie; Kemmer, Teresa M

    2013-04-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all people should have consistent access to an appropriately nutritious diet of food and water, coupled with a sanitary environment, adequate health services, and care that ensure a healthy and active life for all household members. The Academy supports policies, systems, programs, and practices that work with developing nations to achieve nutrition security and self-sufficiency while being environmentally and economically sustainable. For nations to achieve nutrition security, all people must have access to a variety of nutritious foods and potable drinking water; knowledge, resources, and skills for healthy living; prevention, treatment, and care for diseases affecting nutrition status; and safety-net systems during crisis situations, such as natural disasters or deleterious social and political systems. More than 2 billion people are micronutrient deficient; 1.5 billion people are overweight or obese; 870 million people have inadequate food energy intake; and 783 million people lack potable drinking water. Adequate nutrient intake is a concern, independent of weight status. Although this article focuses on nutritional deficiencies in developing nations, global solutions for excesses and deficiencies need to be addressed. In an effort to achieve nutrition security, lifestyles, policies, and systems (eg, food, water, health, energy, education/knowledge, and economic) contributing to sustainable resource use, environmental management, health promotion, economic stability, and positive social environments are required. Food and nutrition practitioners can get involved in promoting and implementing effective and sustainable policies, systems, programs, and practices that support individual, community, and national efforts. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutritional status of iodine in pregnant women in Catalonia (Spain: study on hygiene-dietetic habits and iodine in urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrent Anna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a priority to achieve an adequate nutritional status of iodine during pregnancy since iodine deficiency in this population may have repercussions on the mother during both gestation and post partum as well as on the foetus, the neonate and the child at different ages. According to the WHO, iodine deficiency is the most frequent cause of mental retardation and irrreversible cerebral lesions around the world. However, few studies have been published on the nutritional status of iodine in the pregnant population within the Primary Care setting, a health care level which plays an essential role in the education and control of pregnant women. Therefore, the aim of the present study is: 1.- To know the hygiene-dietetic habits related to the intake of foods rich in iodine and smoking during pregnancy. 2.- To determine the prevalence of iodine deficiency and the factors associated with its appearance during pregnancy. Methods/design We will perform a cluster randomised, controlled, multicentre trial. Randomisation unit: Primary Care Team. Study population: 898 pregnant women over the age of 17 years attending consultation to a midwife during the first trimester of pregnancy in the participating primary care centres. Outcome measures: consumption of iodine-rich foods and iodine deficiency. Points of assessment: each trimester of the gestation. Intervention: group education during the first trimester of gestation on healthy hygiene-dietetic habits and the importance of an adequate iodine nutritional status. Statistical analysis: descriptive analysis of all variables will be performed as well as multilevel logistic regression. All analyses will be done carried out on an intention to treat basis and will be fitted for potential confounding factors and variables of clinical importance. Discussion Evidence of generalised iodine deficiency during pregnancy could lead to the promotion of interventions of prevention such as how to

  1. Orthorexia nervosa tendency among students of the department of nutrition and dietetics at a university in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Betul; Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Keskin, Nese; Karavus, Melda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an orthorexia nervosa scale score for and evaluate orthorexic tendency among students of nutrition and dietetics according to various sociodemographic characteristics. This cross-sectional study was carried out in May and June of 2016 among 208 students in the nutrition and dietetics department at a university in Istanbul. After receiving the approval of the university ethics committee, of a total of 300 students, 208 agreed to join the study. Participants completed a questionnaire related to individual characteristics and the ORTO-11 scale during a face-to-face interview. The ORTO-11 scale is a verified Turkish scoring system in which a low score indicates orthorexic tendency. The Mann-Whitney U test, independent samples t-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and analysis of variance were used to assess the data. P<0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Orthorexic tendency was significantly higher in males (p=0.050) and students who lived with their family (p=0.002). Mean ORTHO-11 scale score did not differ significantly between groups when the participants were grouped by parameters of smoking, alcohol consumption, chronic disease status, body mass index, diet observance, or use of nutritional supplement products. The orthorexic tendency was higher in men and in students who lived with their family. Additional assessment of individual eating habits, eating behavior, and personality characteristics would shed light on the reasons for the difference between gender groups. Qualitative studies should be carried out and possible confounding factors should be determined.

  2. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...... to rise as the population ages, this review summarises the evidence on which such guidance is based, and provides information about how anaesthetists might participate in audit and research aimed at improving local and national outcomes for these most vulnerable of patients....

  3. [The practice of medicine in 1910].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca-Treviño, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The aim is to describe the environmental and the practice of the medicine around the 1910, year of the Mexican Revolution. Prominent physicians and theirs contributions are describe. All of them from the Mexican clinical school development by Manuel Carpio and Miguel Jiménez. It is stand out the progress of the Mexican medicine with the incorporation of the European advances into the daily practice. It is also describe the development and contemporary practice of surgery of the Mexican surgery school forced by surgeons like Miguel Muñoz, Francisco Montes de Oca and Rafael Lavista.

  4. [Rapid development of cosmetic medicine in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kaihua; Pan, Baohua; Xia, Wei

    2006-04-01

    To review and summarize the development during the last 20 years and the current status of cosmetic medicine, i.e., cosmetic surgery, in China, for the healthier development of this specialty in the future. Literature concerned was reviewed, including conference abstracts, papers, and publications, and the present status and problems were analyzed. Cosmetic medicine was recognized as an independent specialty and gained its clear definition. The development of cosmetic medicine is an inevitable trend of the changing medical modules and the developing science and civilization. This trend fulfilled the need of the people. The related problems consisted of a high complication rate, confusion of management, and insufficient specific knowledge in part of the providers. The development of cosmetic medicine is an inevitable trend of the civilization development. For the healthy development of this specialty, scientific management and systemic education for the providers are crucial. Only those who have the plastic surgery background are able to participate in this practice.

  5. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  6. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  7. Predictive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne; ten Have, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In the last part of the twentieth century, predictive medicine has gained currency as an important ideal in biomedical research and health care. Research in the genetic and molecular basis of disease suggested that the insights gained might be used to develop tests that predict the future health

  8. Bioenergetic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  9. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  10. Female cosmetic genital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Genital plastic surgery for women has come under scrutiny and has been the topic of discussion in the news media, online, and in medical editorials. In the absence of measurable standards of care, lack of evidence-based outcome norms, and little standardization either in nomenclature or training requirements, concern has been raised by both ethicists and specialty organizations.Some women request alteration of their vulvas and vaginas for reasons of cosmesis, increasing self-esteem, and improving sexual function. Patients must be assured their surgeon is properly trained and should understand that few validated long-term safety or outcome data are presently available in this relatively new field. Women also should be made aware that, although they may wish to cosmetically or physically alter their external genitalia, this does not mean that they are developmentally or structurally "abnormal." It is important that training guidelines for practitioners be established and that long-term outcome, psychosexual, and safety data be published. The genital plastic surgeon must have sufficient training in sexual medicine to withhold these procedures from women with sexual dysfunction, mental impairment, or body dysmorphic disorder. In an atmosphere in which trademarked marketing terms are becoming part of the lexicon, a more descriptive terminology is suggested, incorporating the terms "labiaplasty," "reduction of clitoral hood," "perineoplasty," "hymenoplasty," and "vaginoplasty." The term "female cosmetic genital surgery" is presented as a descriptive umbrella encompassing these genital plastic procedures.

  11. Sexuality in Aesthetic Breast Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Paulo Afonso Monteiro Pacheco; Resende, Vanessa Contato Lopes; Sabino Neto, Miguel; Seito, Caroline Lumy; de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-12-01

    The breasts are important for a woman's psychological well-being, which may be negatively affected by distortions of breast size and shape. Improvements in self-esteem and sexuality are important psychological factors associated with motivation for cosmetic surgery. Mammaplasty is among the most sought-after and performed cosmetic procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of aesthetic breast surgery on a woman's sexuality. This study was conducted in a plastic surgery clinic of a hospital university in Brazil, between 2009 and 2012. Forty-six patients with hypomastia and 30 patients with breast hypertrophy, who expressed the desire for aesthetic breast surgery, were selected for the study. The patients were assessed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively using the sexual quotient-Female version scale (QS-F). The QS-F is a validated Brazilian questionnaire to assess sexual function. It contains ten items covering five domains of female sexual function: desire and interest, foreplay, excitement and harmony, comfort, and orgasm and satisfaction. Higher QS-F scores indicate better sexual functioning. There was a significant increase in the mean total QS-F score after surgery in both groups (p surgery was observed in both groups, which is consistent with the literature. Aesthetic breast surgery has a positive impact on the sexuality of patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  12. Dietary intake in the postoperative bariatric surgery at a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Crovesy-de-Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: bariatric surgery is a treatment for morbid obesity that besides result in high weight loss promotes improvements in laboratory tests and in the pressure reduction. However the surgery can cause bad effects as deficiency some nutrients. This fact become more important evaluates the adequacy of dietary intake of these patients. The objective this study was evaluates the adequacy dietetic of patients after bariatric surgery.Material and methods: we select forty women who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric and carried evaluation anthropometric and dietetic. The dietary evaluate was compared with the daily consumption requirement and food pyramid for these patients.Results: forty women with 43.1 ± 9.96 years, obesity and very high risk for metabolic complications associate with obesity, and with acceptation of supplementation (95% participated this study. The majority of women consumed group’s foods “high-calorie foods, fats and sweets are energy-dense foods” and showed high intake of foods groups “grains and cereals” and “high-fiber, low-calorie foods”. Dietary intake was low-calorie (1342.50 ± 474.06 Kcal, adequate in protein (22.10 ± 6.94%, carbohydrate (50.74 ± 10.96%, lipid (26.14 ± 7.17%, saturated fatty acids (8.69 ± 2.74% and polyunsaturated fatty acids (8.93 ± 3.51% and low-monounsaturated fatty acids (4.13 ± 1.78% and fibers (17.02 ± 10.64 g.Conclusions: nutritional habits of women showed inadequacy, these results reinforce the importance of nutritional accompanying in the late postoperative bariatric surgery.

  13. Advanced polymers in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Puoci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The book provides an up-to-date overview of the diverse medical applications of advanced polymers. The book opens by presenting important background information on polymer chemistry and physicochemical characterization of polymers. This serves as essential scientific support for the subsequent chapters, each of which is devoted to the applications of polymers in a particular medical specialty. The coverage is broad, encompassing orthopedics, ophthalmology, tissue engineering, surgery, dentistry, oncology, drug delivery, nephrology, wound dressing and healing, and cardiology. The development of polymers that enhance the biocompatibility of blood-contacting medical devices and the incorporation of polymers within biosensors are also addressed. This book is an excellent guide to the recent advances in polymeric biomaterials and bridges the gap between the research literature and standard textbooks on the applications of polymers in medicine.

  14. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    -depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed...... and many patients said that they joined the RCT in order to bypass waiting lists. Patients who chose to cross-over described training as time consuming, boring and as unable to provide sufficient results within a reasonable timeframe. Some said their injured knees had given-way; others experienced new knee...... a variety of views and beliefs about those treatments, and trial participation happens in the absence of equipoise. Furthermore, opting for surgical reconstruction does not necessarily provide patients with satisfactory outcomes. Definition of successful outcome may require an individualised approach...

  15. The day of surgery for your child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 10. Review Date 8/31/2016 Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  16. Environmental medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steneberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    'Environmental medicine' deals with the manifold health problems from environmental factors of chemical, physical and psychosocial origin that are possible or have been observed. The book gives insight into the current state of knowledge of environmental medicine institutions, possibilities of diagnosis and therapeutic methods. It offers a systematic overview of pollutant sources and pollutant effects and points out, inter alia, syndromes that are discussed in connection with environmental factors: not only allergies and carcinogenous diseases but also symptom complexes that are hard to diagnose by ordinary methods such as the sick-building syndrome, multiple sensitivity to chemicals, electrosensitivity, amalgam intoxications, disorders due to wood preservatives and fungal diseases. The lingering course of a disease and a set of symptoms varying from one patient to another are the rule, not the exception, because environmental diseases are due above all to the chronic uptake of low pollutant doses (orig./MG) [de

  17. Podiatry: an illustration of surgery provided by allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    As with the prescribing of medicines, the provision of surgery continues to evolve and this is particularly true in the delivery of foot surgery which, until the 1960s, in the United Kingdom was practiced exclusively by medically qualified surgeons. Over the last 40 years however podiatric surgery performed by podiatrists has become established as a viable, safe and cost effective alternative to traditional models of service provision.

  18. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  19. ENERGY MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Energy medicine is the most comprehensive concept introduced in medical diagnostics and therapy to account for a whole range of phenomena and methods available to help an individual proceed from sickness to health. The modern medical theories do not account for, much less accept many traditional therapies due to deep suspicion that the older methods are not scientific. However, the Holistic Health groups around the world have now created an environment for therapies which work at subtle energ...

  20. Transfusion medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application

  1. Advances of the Surgery of the Breast Cancer with help of the Nuclear Medicine; Avances de la cirugia del cancer de mama con la colaboracion de la medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra Garcia, A.; Gomez Embuena, D. A.

    2009-07-01

    The incorporation of the nuclear medicine to the surgical current practice In the treatment of the cancer of breast, by means of the application of radioactive isotopes, have supposed a great achievement not only in the surgical and predicted results but also in the surgical skills more effective and less aggressive. The systematic research of the marking and extirpation of Sentinel Lymph Node is avoiding in the early cancer the linfadenectomy axilar. The application of the ROLL and SNOLL skills is being determinant in the extirpation with trustworthy margins of the non-palpable lesions cancer, with big safety instead harpoons that we used before. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Current interest in careers in surgery and cardiothoracic surgery from the millennial generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Michael; Zhao, Lili; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2014-01-01

    Interest in cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) as a career has decreased over the past decade. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many surgeons develop an interest in CTS before medical school and even before college. This study evaluates the interest of high-school students at a magnet high school, with regard to careers in medicine, in surgery, and in CTS. A survey assessing career interests and values was conducted among junior and senior high-school students. Students were given a 1-hour presentation by a cardiothoracic (CT) surgeon on the postgraduate training process and then completed a postpresentation survey. A magnet math and science high school, the Kalamazoo Area Mathematics and Science Center. Of 128 students, 117 (91% response rate) completed the survey. Overall, 38% of students reported having a high interest in medicine; of this group, 58% reported a high interest in surgery and 36% reported having a high interest in CTS. Men were more likely than women were to have a high interest in surgery and CTS (p < 0.001). Students with at least 1 family member as a physician vs those without were more likely to be interested in medicine, surgery, and CTS and also have a higher level of concern for postgraduation debt (p < 0.01). Women were more likely than men were to have a high level of concern about postgraduation debt (p = 0.018). After a presentation by a CT surgeon, students showed no changes in interest in medicine careers but did report an increased level of knowledge about the process of becoming a CT surgeon, going from 31% to 72%. There exists a large interest in both surgery and CTS at the high-school level, but there may be a need for more active outreach to maintain and foster their interest in surgery and CTS through undergraduate and medical school. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  4. Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Role of the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sherry Coleman

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of food allergy has increased significantly over the past decade and represents an important health issue for millions of Americans. Diagnosis of immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergies is sometimes difficult because blood and skin tests have high rates of false positives, and oral food challenges are uncommon due to the expense and potential for serious reactions. Accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid unnecessary dietary restriction, especially in children. Because registered dietitian nutritionists often work independently, receiving referrals for dietary education and guidance for a patient who is followed by one or several other practitioners, navigating the data available and making the appropriate follow-up contact optimizes treatment. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to the registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technician, registered on appropriate and evidence-based nutrition counseling for diagnosis and management of food allergies. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ayurvedic medicine and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer L Pradhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of herbal medicines has increased dramatically over the past few years. The United States alone noted a 380% increase in the consumption of these products. Although the common practice of taking over-the-counter herbal soups, herbal teas and other such prepacked preparations was not associated with adverse events at large, still, some herbs are known to cause problems, especially when large doses are taken. The American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA has taken a conservative stance and recommended that it is prudent to stop these products at least 2-3 weeks prior to anaesthesia and surgery. This advice may be difficult to implement as most preoperative evaluations occur only a few days prior to surgery. Some of the Ayurvedic preparations have shown to improve the patient outcome when taken during the perioperative period. Hence, the conservative stance by ASA may not always benefit the patient. More scientific studies are needed to have more targeted recommendations. This article puts forward the facts that need to be addressed by researchers in the future.

  6. Current coding practices and patterns of code use of registered dietitian nutritionists: the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2013 coding survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, J Scott; White, Jane V; Schofield, Marsha; Hand, Rosa K; Gregoire, Mary B; Ayoob, Keith T; Pavlinac, Jessie; Lewis, Jaime Lynn; Smith, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Coding, coverage, and reimbursement for nutrition services are vital to the dietetics profession, particularly to registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) who provide clinical care. The objective of this study was to assess RDN understanding and use of the medical nutrition therapy (MNT) procedure codes in the delivery of nutrition services. Its design was an Internet survey of all RDNs listed in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy)/Commission on Dietetics Registration database as of September 2013 who resided in the United States and were not retired. Prior coding and coverage surveys provided a basis for survey development. Parameters assessed included knowledge and use of existing MNT and/or alternative procedure codes, barriers to code use, payer reimbursement patterns, complexity of the patient population served, time spent in the delivery of initial and subsequent care, and practice demographics and management. Results show that a majority of respondents were employed by another and provided outpatient MNT services on a part-time basis. MNT codes were used for the provision of individual services, with minimal use of the MNT codes for group services and subsequent care. The typical patient carries two or more diagnoses. The majority of RDNs uses internal billing departments and support staff in their practices. The payer mix is predominantly Medicare and private/commercial insurance. Managers and manager/providers were more likely than providers to carry malpractice insurance. Results point to the need for further education regarding the full spectrum of Current Procedural Terminology codes available for RDN use and the business side of ambulatory MNT practice, including the need to carry malpractice insurance. This survey is part of continuing Academy efforts to understand the complex web of relationships among clinical practice, coverage, MNT code use, and reimbursement so as to further support nutrition services codes revision and/or expansion

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  10. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download ... What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased ...

  11. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  12. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  13. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  15. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  17. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  18. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ... without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and ...

  20. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  1. Buying & Using Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health professionals to make the best medicine choices, buy safely, and use medicine so it's as safe ... Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Buying Medicines Over the Internet BeSafeRx: Know Your Online Pharmacy Buying Medicine from ...

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  3. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2017-04-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a general term that implies the use of a computer to model intelligent behavior with minimal human intervention. AI is generally accepted as having started with the invention of robots. The term derives from the Czech word robota, meaning biosynthetic machines used as forced labor. In this field, Leonardo Da Vinci's lasting heritage is today's burgeoning use of robotic-assisted surgery, named after him, for complex urologic and gynecologic procedures. Da Vinci's sketchbooks of robots helped set the stage for this innovation. AI, described as the science and engineering of making intelligent machines, was officially born in 1956. The term is applicable to a broad range of items in medicine such as robotics, medical diagnosis, medical statistics, and human biology-up to and including today's "omics". AI in medicine, which is the focus of this review, has two main branches: virtual and physical. The virtual branch includes informatics approaches from deep learning information management to control of health management systems, including electronic health records, and active guidance of physicians in their treatment decisions. The physical branch is best represented by robots used to assist the elderly patient or the attending surgeon. Also embodied in this branch are targeted nanorobots, a unique new drug delivery system. The societal and ethical complexities of these applications require further reflection, proof of their medical utility, economic value, and development of interdisciplinary strategies for their wider application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and nutrition professionals can implement practices to conserve natural resources and support ecological sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Alison H; Gerald, Bonnie L

    2007-06-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association to encourage environmentally responsible practices that conserve natural resources, minimize the quantity of waste generated, and support the ecological sustainability of the food system-the process of food production, transformation, distribution, access, and consumption. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, play various roles in the food system and work in settings where efforts to conserve can have significant effects. Natural resources that provide the foundation for the food system include biodiversity, soil, land, energy, water, and air. A food system that degrades or depletes its resource base is not sustainable. Making wise food purchases and food management decisions entails understanding the external costs of food production and foodservice and how these external costs affect food system sustainability. This position paper provides information, specific action-oriented strategies, and resources to guide registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, in food decision making and professional practice. Food and nutrition professionals also can participate in policy making at the local, state, and national levels, and can support policies that encourage the development of local sustainable food systems. Our actions today have global consequences. Conserving and protecting resources will contribute to the sustainability of the global food system now and in the future.

  5. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Public Health and Community Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Meg; Udarbe, Adrienne Z; Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth; Stell Crowley, Phyllis; Fredericks, Doris C; Edwards Hall, Leigh Ann

    2015-10-01

    The need and demand for population-level disease prevention has increased, especially with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, a worldwide increase in obesity and chronic disease, and a global emphasis on preventative health care that includes behavioral, environmental, and policy interventions. In response to these evolving needs, the Public Health and Community Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as tools for registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) currently in practice or interested in working in public health and community nutrition, to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for professional development. The Standards of Practice address the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process for community and public health RDNs, which are assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation/monitoring. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of the following six domains of professional performance for community and public health RDNs: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate the ways in which RDNs can address client and population nutrition and health. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs. These tools highlight the unique scope of expertise that RDNs provide to the field of public health and community nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists in management of food and nutrition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Rita M; Barkley, William C; Oliver, Patricia M; McLymont, Veronica; Puckett, Ruby

    2014-07-01

    Management in food and nutrition systems is presented with an ever-challenging tension between effective utilization of manpower resources, mechanical equipment, financial management, material production, and time constraints to produce optimal products. Management drives opportunities for personal development for multiple levels of its employee workforce. Given an increasing need to deliver high-quality food and services to satisfied customers, the Management in Food and Nutrition Systems Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Professional Performance, which replace the 2009 Standards, as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in food and nutrition systems management within health care and non-health care organizations. These Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how strong communication skills, attention to customer satisfaction, use of various resources, and application of personnel management principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists managing food and nutrition systems. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  9. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  10. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-06-15

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  11. Terapia nutricional oral em pacientes com Síndrome do Intestino Curto Oral dietetic therapy in patients with Short Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Barbosa NONINO

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome do Intestino Curto representa um dos quadros mais sérios e graves de má-absorção e a terapêutica dietética destes pacientes é um desafio importante a ser enfrentado. Este trabalho teve como objetivo descrever a terapia dietética via oral e a sua participação em evitar a desnutrição protéico-energética em portadores de Síndrome do Intestino Curto seguidos na Unidade Metabólica da Divisão de Nutrologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo. Foram acompanhados 12 pacientes, 7 homens e 5 mulheres, idade de 55 ± 10 anos, por um período de 24 meses. Eles receberam, concomitantemente à nutrição parenteral central ou periférica, dieta via oral fracionada em 7 a 8 refeições/dia, em intervalos regulares e constantes, com pequeno volume por refeição, hipogordurosa e restrita em açúcares simples e fibras insolúveis. As refeições eram isoenergéticas, isoprotéicas, sendo oferecidas em média 35 kcal/kg/dia e 1,5 g de proteína/kg/dia. Inicialmente eram oferecidos 25 a 50% do planejado e a variação de alimentos era restrita a 1 ou 2 alimentos. Com aceitação progressiva a oferta total de nutrientes era alcançada em 40 a 50 dias. Os resultados mostraram que 59% dos pacientes seguiram as orientações em relação ao consumo energético e 100% apresentaram ingestão protéica em quantidade adequada. Ao final do estudo cerca de 50% dos pacientes apresentaram índice de massa corporal dentro da faixa de normalidade e 92%, valores normais nos níveis de albumina sérica. Considerando o déficit absortivo destes pacientes, o esquema proposto mostrou-se positivo no tratamento da Síndrome do Intestino Curto.The Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS is one of the most serious and dangerous causes of malabsorption and the dietetic therapy is an important challenge to be faced. This study describes the oral dietetic therapy for all patients with Short Bowel

  12. Implementing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition Education for Children: Child-Care Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Schober, Daniel J; McBride, Brent A; Kok, Car Mun; Ramsay, Samantha

    2017-12-01

    National childhood obesity prevention policies recommend that child-care providers educate young children about nutrition to improve their nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Yet, the provision of nutrition education (NE) to children in child-care settings is limited. Using the 2011 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks for NE in child care as a guiding framework, researchers assessed child-care providers' perspectives regarding delivery of NE through books, posters, mealtime conversations, hands-on learning, and sensory exploration of foods to young children (aged 2 to 5 years). Using a qualitative design (realist method), individual, semistructured interviews were conducted until saturation was reached. The study was conducted during 2012-2013 and used purposive sampling to select providers. Final sample included 18 providers employed full-time in Head Start or state-licensed center-based child-care programs in Central Illinois. Child-care providers' perspectives regarding implementation of NE. Thematic analysis to derive themes using NVivo software. Three overarching themes emerged, including providers' motivators, barriers, and facilitators for delivering NE to children. Motivators for delivering NE included that NE encourages children to try new foods, NE improves children's knowledge of healthy and unhealthy foods, and NE is consistent with children's tendency for exploration. Barriers for delivering NE included that limited funding and resources for hands-on experiences and restrictive policies. Facilitators for delivering NE included providers obtain access to feasible, low-cost resources and community partners, providers work around restrictive policies to accommodate NE, and mealtime conversations are a feasible avenue to deliver NE. Providers integrated mealtime conversations with NE concepts such as food-based sensory exploration and health benefits of foods. Present study findings offer insights regarding providers' perspectives on

  13. Effects of nutritional status and dietetic interventions on survival in Cystic Fibrosis patients before and after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, F M; van Pierre, D D; de Roos, N M; van de Graaf, E A; Iestra, J A

    2014-03-01

    This study retrospectively investigated nutritional status, dietetic intervention and intake in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients before and after lung transplantation (LTX). Body Mass Index (BMI), Fat Free Mass Index (FFMI) and nutritional intake were retrieved from 75 out-patients aged 15-53 years. Patients were seen every 3-4 months during the waiting list time (range 0-81 months) and up to 116 months after LTX. Survival was measured in months. The median BMI at baseline was 19.2 kg/m(2) (range: 15.3 to 28.4 kg/m(2)) with 29 patients (39%) below ≤18.5 kg/m(2). FFMI (measured in 65 patients) had a median of 15.2 kg/m(2) (range: 11.1 to 22.4 kg/m(2)) with 39 patients (60%) ≤16.7 kg/m(2) (men) or ≤14.6 kg/m(2) (women). Median energy intake was 2800 kcal, 239 kcal higher than the estimated energy requirement. However, 8 patients consumed ≥500 kcal less than recommended. Protein intake was 104 (range 60-187) g or 1.9 g/kg per day. Despite dietetic intervention with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) (36 patients), tube feeding (12 patients), or both (13 patients), BMI and FFMI hardly improved pre-LTX. LTX was performed in 51 patients (68%); 10 patients died during follow-up, median survival time was 41 months. A BMI ≤18.5 kg/m(2) was more prevalent in patients who died before LTX (6/9) or who died after LTX (4/10) than in patients who were still alive on the waiting list (5/15) or who survived LTX (14/41). Results for FFMI were comparable. From 6-12 months post-LTX, BMI and FFMI markedly improved, especially in underweight patients. A BMI ≤18.5 kg/m(2) and an FFMI ≤16.7 kg/m(2) (men) or ≤14.6 kg/m(2) (women) appears to impair survival in LTX candidates with CF. Patients maintained a low body weight before LTX. After LTX weight gain is achieved. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  15. Gender Confirmation Surgery: Guiding Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Loren S; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Cohen, Mimis N; Kocjancic, Ervin; Claes, Karel E Y; Monstrey, Stan

    2017-06-01

    At this time, no formal training or educational programs exist for surgeons or surgery residents interested in performing gender confirmation surgeries. To propose guiding principles designed to aid with the development of formal surgical training programs focused on gender confirmation surgery. We use expert opinion to provide a "first of its kind" framework for training surgeons to care for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals. We describe a multidisciplinary treatment model that describes an educational philosophy and the institution of quality parameters. This article represents the first step in the development of a structured educational program for surgical training in gender confirmation procedures. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health Board of Directors unanimously approved this article as the framework for surgical training. This article builds a framework for surgical training. It is designed to provide concepts that will likely be modified over time and based on additional data and evidence gathered through outcome measurements. We present an initial step in the formation of educational and technical guidelines for training surgeons in gender confirmation procedures. Schechter LS, D'Arpa S, Cohen MN, et al. Gender Confirmation Surgery: Guiding Principles. J Sex Med 2017;14:852-856. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery.

  17. Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Surgery (BUMED M7) Falls Church, VA Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) San Antonio, TX NMPDC Bethesda, MD 4 echelon 3...Training and residency programs: •Two-year residencies in comprehensive dentistry, endodontics •Three-year residencies in oral and... maxillofacial pathology, orofacial pain, periodontics, and prosthodontics • One-year fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics • Maxillofacial prosthetics

  18. Infection management following ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin AB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anne B Chin, Elizabeth C Wick Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Surgical site infections (SSIs are frequent postoperative complications that are linked to measures of surgical quality and payment determinations. As surgical procedures are increasingly performed in the ambulatory setting, management of SSIs must transition with this trend. Prevention of SSIs should include optimization of patient comorbidities, aggressive infection control policies including appropriate skin decontamination, maintenance of normothermia, and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Systems must also be set in place to provide adequate surveillance for identification of SSIs when they do occur as well as provide direct feedback to surgeons regarding SSI rates. This may require utilization of claims-based surveillance. Patient education and close follow-up with the clinical team are essential for early identification and management of SSIs. Therapy should remain focused on source control and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, SSI, infection

  19. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casier, Ph.; Lepage, B.

    1998-01-01

    Except for dedicated devices for mobile nuclear cardiology for instance, the market is set on variable angulation dual heads cameras. These cameras are suited for all general applications and their cost effectiveness is optimized. Now, all major companies have such a camera in their of products. But, the big question in nuclear medicine is about the future of coincidence imaging for the monitoring of treatments in oncology. Many companies are focused on WIP assessments to find out the right crustal thickness to perform both high energy FDG procedures and low energy Tc procedures, with the same SPECT camera. The classic thickness is 3/8''. Assessments are made with 1/2'', 5/8'' or 3/4'' crystals. If FDG procedures proved to be of great interest in oncology, it may lead to the design of a dedicated SPECT camera with a 1'' crustal. Due to the short half of FDG, it may be the dawning of slip ring technology. (e.g. Varicam from Elscint). The three small heads camera market seems to be depressed. Will the new three large heads camera unveiled by Picker, reverse that trend? The last important topic in nuclear medicine is the emergence of new flat digital detectors to get rid of the old bulky ones. Digirad is the first company to manufacture a commercial product based on that technology. Bichron, Siemens and General Electric are working on that development, too. But that technology is very expensive and the market for digital detection in nuclear medicine is not as large as the market in digital detection in radiology. (author)

  20. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...... of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists...

  1. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  2. Deadly medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the methods the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum used to make an exhibition on the complex history of Nazi eugenics accessible to the museum's mass public and at the same time, provocative for special audiences consisting of professionals and students from the biomedical fields. Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race showed how both eugenics and related "euthanasia" programs in Nazi Germany helped pave the road to the Holocaust. The exhibition implicitly evoked the present-day appeal of biological explanations for human behavior and of new visions of human perfection. Educational programs used the exhibition as a springboard for discussions of bioethics and medical ethics.

  3. Applications of synchrotron radiation in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khole, V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the important role of synchrotron radiation in dealing with problems in various branches of biology and medicine, viz. molecular biology, molecular biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, X-ray microscopy, molecular surgery, medical diagnostics (angiography, X-ray radiography, forensic medicine, element analysis), environmental biology, pollution control and photobiology. (author). 15 refs., 9 figs

  4. Short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery vs open surgery for transverse colon cancer: a retrospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JW

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jong Wan Kim,1 Jeong Yeon Kim,1 Byung Mo Kang,2 Bong Hwa Lee,3 Byung Chun Kim,4 Jun Ho Park5 1Department of Surgery, Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Hwaseong Si, 2Department of Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon Si, 3Department of Surgery, Hallym Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang Si, 4Department of Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, 5Department of Surgery, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to compare the perioperative and oncologic outcomes between laparoscopic surgery and open surgery for transverse colon cancer.Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgery for transverse colon cancer at six Hallym University-affiliated hospitals between January 2005 and June 2015. The perioperative outcomes and oncologic outcomes were compared between laparoscopic and open surgery.Results: Of 226 patients with transverse colon cancer, 103 underwent laparoscopic surgery and 123 underwent open surgery. There were no differences in the patient characteristics between the two groups. Regarding perioperative outcomes, the operation time was significantly longer in the laparoscopic group than in the open group (267.3 vs 172.7 minutes, P<0.001, but the time to soft food intake (6.0 vs 6.6 days, P=0.036 and the postoperative hospital stay (13.7 vs 15.7 days, P=0.018 were shorter in the laparoscopic group. The number of harvested lymph nodes was lower in the laparoscopic group than in the open group (20.3 vs 24.3, P<0.001. The 5-year overall survival (90.8% vs 88.6%, P=0.540 and disease-free survival (86.1% vs 78.9%, P=0.201 rates were similar in both groups.Conclusion: The present study showed that laparoscopic surgery is associated

  5. [The future of vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.E. Jr.; Squire, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    The book presents a number of fundamental imaging principles in nuclear medicine. The fact that low radiation doses are sufficient for the study of normal and changed physiological functions of the body is an important advancement brought about by nuclear medicine. The possibility of quantitative investigations of organs and organ regions and of an assessment of their function as compared to normal values is a fascinating new diagnostic dimension. The possibility of comparing the findings with other pathological findings and of course control in the same patient lead to a dynamic continuity with many research possibilities not even recognized until now. The limits of nuclear scanning methods are presented by the imprecise structural information of the images. When scintiscans are compared with X-ray images or contrast angiography, the great difference in the imaging of anatomical details is clearly seen. But although the present pictures are not optimal, they are a great improvement on the pictures that were considered clinically valuable a few years ago. (orig./AJ) [de

  7. Practice paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics abstract: the role of nutrition in health promotion and chronic disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Nurgul; Morgan, Kathleen T; Slawson, Deborah Leachman

    2013-07-01

    Food intake, lifestyle behaviors, and obesity are linked to the development of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and cardiovascular diseases. It is recognized that physical and social environment influences individuals' behaviors, and some population subgroups such as racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with low socioeconomic status or limited literacy or language abilities seem to be especially vulnerable to disparities in disease risk factors, disease prevalence, or health outcomes. Certain life cycle phases appear to be especially important for health promotion and disease prevention as the development of chronic diseases can take several decades. Such complex health issues often require system-wide, multifactorial, and multidisciplinary solutions. Social ecological models, with approaches spanning from individual level to macro policy level, can provide registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) with a comprehensive framework to promote health and to prevent chronic diseases. Furthermore, the Nutrition Care Process can be utilized in carrying out the health promotion and disease prevention efforts. RDs and DTRs have the training and requisite skills to be leaders and active members of multidisciplinary teams to promote health and prevent chronic diseases across the life span. The position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics states that primary prevention is the most effective, affordable method to prevent chronic disease, and that dietary intervention positively impacts health outcomes across the life span. RDs and DTRs are critical members of health care teams and are essential to delivering nutrition-focused preventive services in clinical and community settings, advocating for policy and programmatic initiatives, and leading research in disease prevention and health promotion. In concordance with the Academy's position, this practice paper provides an overview of practice examples, effective

  8. Evaluation of a Nutrition Care Process-based audit instrument, the Diet-NCP-Audit, for documentation of dietetic care in medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövestam, Elin; Orrevall, Ylva; Koochek, Afsaneh; Karlström, Brita; Andersson, Agneta

    2014-06-01

    Adequate documentation in medical records is important for high-quality health care. Documentation quality is widely studied within nursing, but studies are lacking within dietetic care. The aim of this study was to translate, elaborate and evaluate an audit instrument, based on the four-step Nutrition Care Process model, for documentation of dietetic care in medical records. The audit instrument includes 14 items focused on essential parts of dietetic care and the documentation's clarity and structure. Each item is to be rated 0-1 or 0-2 points, with a maximum total instrument score of 26. A detailed manual was added to facilitate the interpretation and increase the reliability of the instrument. The instrument is based on a similar tool initiated 9 years ago in the United States, which in this study was translated to Swedish and further elaborated. The translated and further elaborated instrument was named Diet-NCP-Audit. Firstly, the content validity of the Diet-NCP-Audit instrument was tested by five experienced dietitians. They rated the relevance and clarity of the included items. After a first rating, minor improvements were made. After the second rating, the Content Validity Indexes were 1.0, and the Clarity Index was 0.98. Secondly, to test the reliability, four dietitians reviewed 20 systematically collected dietetic notes independently using the audit instrument. Before the review, a calibration process was performed. A comparison of the reviews was performed, which resulted in a moderate inter-rater agreement with Krippendorff's α = 0.65-0.67. Grouping the audit results in three levels: lower, medium or higher range, a Krippendorff's α of 0.74 was considered high reliability. Also, an intra-rater reliability test-retest with a 9 weeks interval, performed by one dietitian, showed strong agreement. To conclude, the evaluated audit instrument had high content validity and moderate to high reliability and can be used in auditing documentation of dietetic

  9. [Surgery as handicraft, surgery as art, surgery as science (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolner, E

    1982-03-19

    The reputation of surgery is not only based on manual skill, though in the light of history the surgeon belonged rather to craft-gilds than to hippocratism. Not until the evolution of the whole medical science a new status of the surgeon was created. Today in a high degree he is a devoted servant to science, despite the priority of manual skill. An artist is praised for his brilliant abilities to manage problems by intuition, to improvise successfully, thus the surgeon can be designated as of congenial spirits. Examples describing the activities at the 2nd Surgical Clinic of the University of Vienna, illustrate these three virtues of surgery: manual skill, artistic work, scientific attitude. In this sense students as well as graduates should receive their education. In future the surgeon himself must guarantee by extreme personal engagement that this ideal conception of the surgical professional, criticising the methods of scholastic medicine, is maintained and can bear up against organization obstacles.

  10. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on the safety of caffeine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of caffeine, providing advice on caffeine intakes, from all dietary sources that do not give rise to concerns about adverse health...... effects for the general healthy population and subgroups thereof. Possible interactions between caffeine and other constituents of so-called “energy drinks”, alcohol, p-synephrine and physical exercise should also be addressed. Single doses of caffeine up to 200 mg (about 3 mg/kg bw for a 70-kg adult) do....../L of caffeine, taurine and d-glucurono-γ-lactone, respectively), as well as alcohol at doses up to about 0.65 g/kg bw, would not affect the safety of single doses of caffeine up to 200 mg. Habitual caffeine consumption up to 400 mg per day does not give rise to safety concerns for non-pregnant adults. Habitual...

  11. Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Classic and Modified Ketogenic Diets for Treatment of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Kelly; Sewak, Sarika L

    2017-08-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) therapy is an established form of treatment for both pediatric and adult patients with intractable epilepsy. Ketogenic diet is a term that refers to any diet therapy in which dietary composition would be expected to result in a ketogenic state of human metabolism. While historically considered a last-resort therapy, classic KDs and their modified counterparts, including the modified Atkins diet and low glycemic index treatment, are gaining ground for use across the spectrum of seizure disorders. Registered dietitian nutritionists are often the first line and the most influential team members when it comes to treating those on KD therapy. This paper offers registered dietitian nutritionists insight into the history of KD therapy, an overview of the various diets, and a brief review of the literature with regard to efficacy; provides basic guidelines for practical implementation and coordination of care across multiple health care and community settings; and describes the role of registered dietitian nutritionists in achieving successful KD therapy. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition intervention in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition intervention, including nutritional counseling, by a registered dietitian (RD) is an essential component of the team treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders during assessment and treatment across the continuum of care. Diagnostic criteria for eating disorders provide important guidelines for identification and treatment. However, it is thought that a continuum of disordered eating may exist that ranges from persistent dieting to subthreshold conditions and then to defined eating disorders, which include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Understanding the complexities of eating disorders, such as influencing factors, comorbid illness, medical and psychological complications, and boundary issues, is critical in the effective treatment of eating disorders. The nature of eating disorders requires a collaborative approach by an interdisciplinary team of psychological, nutritional, and medical specialists. The RD is an integral member of the treatment team and is uniquely qualified to provide medical nutrition therapy for the normalization of eating patterns and nutritional status. RDs provide nutritional counseling, recognize clinical signs related to eating disorders, and assist with medical monitoring while cognizant of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy that are cornerstones of eating disorder treatment. Specialized resources are available for RDs to advance their level of expertise in the field of eating disorders. Further efforts with evidenced-based research must continue for improved treatment outcomes related to eating disorders along with identification of effective primary and secondary interventions.

  13. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: comprehensive school nutrition services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health, and academic performance of our nation's children. Local school wellness policies may strengthen comprehensive nutrition services by encouraging multidisciplinary wellness teams, composed of school and community members, to work together in identifying local school needs, developing feasible strategies to address priority areas, and integrating comprehensive nutrition services with a coordinated school health program. This joint position paper affirms schools as an important partner in health promotion. To maximize the impact of school wellness policies on strengthening comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools nationwide, ADA, SNA, and SNE recommend specific strategies in the following key areas: nutrition education and promotion, food and nutrition programs available on the school campus, school-home-community partnerships, and nutrition-related health services. Copyright © 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transgenic mammalian species, generated by somatic cell cloning, in biomedicine, biopharmaceutical industry and human nutrition/dietetics--recent achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiec, M; Skrzyszowska, M

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell cloning technology in mammals promotes the multiplication of productively-valuable genetically engineered individuals, and consequently allows also for standardization of transgenic farm animal-derived products, which, in the context of market requirements, will have growing significance. Gene farming is one of the most promising areas in modern biotechnology. The use of live bioreactors for the expression of human genes in the lactating mammary gland of transgenic animals seems to be the most cost-effective method for the production/processing of valuable recombinant therapeutic proteins. Among the transgenic farm livestock species used so far, cattle, goats, sheep, pigs and rabbits are useful candidates for the expression of tens to hundreds of grams of genetically-engineered proteins or xenogeneic biopreparations in the milk. At the beginning of the new millennium, a revolution in the treatment of disease is taking shape due to the emergence of new therapies based on recombinant human proteins. The ever-growing demand for such pharmaceutical or nutriceutical proteins is an important driving force for the development of safe and large-scale production platforms. The aim of this paper is to present an overall survey of the state of the art in investigations which provide the current knowledge for deciphering the possibilities of practical application of the transgenic mammalian species generated by somatic cell cloning in biomedicine, the biopharmaceutical industry, human nutrition/dietetics and agriculture.

  15. Quality of development and reporting of dietetic intervention studies in primary care: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, L E; Sladdin, I K; Mitchell, L J; Barnes, K A; Ross, L J; Williams, L T

    2018-02-01

    High-quality research methodologies and clear reporting of studies are essential to facilitate confidence in research findings. The aim of the present study was to conduct an in-depth examination of the methodological quality and reporting of studies included in a recent systematic review of dietitians' effectiveness at providing individualised nutrition care to adult patients. The methodological quality and reporting of 27 Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) were appraised using the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Guidelines for complex interventions and the CONSORT checklist for reporting RCTs. A quality appraisal checklist was developed for each guideline/assessment tool aiming to evaluate the extent to which each study met the designated criteria. Excerpts from studies that best addressed criteria were collated to provide exemplary accounts of how criteria may be achieved in future studies. None of the reviewed studies met more than half of the MRC Guidance criteria, indicating that there is clear room for improvement in reporting the methodological underpinnings of these studies. Similarly, no studies met all criteria of the CONSORT checklist, suggesting that there is also room for improvement in the design and reporting of studies in this field. Dietitians, researchers and journal editors are encouraged to use the results and exemplary accounts from this review to identify key aspects of studies that could be improved in future research. Improving future research will enhance the quality of the evidence-base that investigates the outcomes of dietary interventions involving dietitians. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Interpretive Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the

  17. MODERN PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY SEVERE CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Krylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays treatment methods of severe traumatic brain injury - state of the problem in the neurosurgery department of the Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine.Surgery of traumatic brain injury (TBI is the principal direction of research activities in the neurosurgery department of the Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine.With a view to produce an unified approach in treatment patients with TBI, in the neurosurgery department brain injury practical classifications have been designed. Using neurological examination and CT data they allow to diagnose and determine a severity of TBI.The conducted at the department researches allowed to clarify the indications to surgery and nonoperative treatment in patients with posterior cranial fossa injury and small intracranial hematomas. For the first time in Russia there was organized and carried out the randomized trial which was dedicated to the choice of surgery (decompressive craniectomy or craniotomy in severe TBI. There were identified risk factors of adverse outcomes in patients with severe TBI.There was worked out and embedded in daily practice the new original minimally invasive method of TBI surgery — the puncture aspiration and local fibrinolysis of traumatic intracranial hematomas. In surgery of subacute and chronic hematomas as well as in surgery of traumatic intracranial hematomas which are located in functionally significant regions of the brain, the endoscopy is being used actively. This method allows to reduce damages of surgical approach and keep its radicality. At the present time the researches is being conducted which are dedicated to surgery of acute brain herniation syndrome. Using original tools the minimally traumatic methods of tentorium and falx cerebri incisions were designed as well as the decompressive craniectomy in combination with lower medial temporal resection were developed.Application of new technologies in diagnosis and treatment in

  18. Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastrointestinal system Death (rare) Longer term risks and complications of weight-loss surgery vary depending on the type of surgery. They ... room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications. Your hospital stay may ... of bariatric surgery Each type of bariatric surgery has pros and ...

  19. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...