WorldWideScience

Sample records for medical radiological sciences

  1. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  2. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  3. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  4. Evaluation of quality control in the college of medical radiological sciences, conventional x-ray department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babiker, Esameldeen Mohamed Tom

    2002-02-01

    Quality control in diagnostic radiography aims to ensure continuous production of diagnostic images with optimum quality, using minimum necessary dose to the patients and staff. Therefore an ineffective quality control program can lead to poor quality images that can impair diagnosis, increase operating costs and contribute to unnecessary radiation exposure to both patients and staff. Apply basic quality control program is responsibility of each x-ray facility, and to achieve maximum benefits, all levels of management and technical staff must support and participate in operating the programme. The main parameters to be monitored during the quality control programme include: dose consistency, k Vp accuracy, k Vp variations, exposure timer accuracy, besides checking image receptors, recording system and processing conditions. The aims of this project is to evaluate the quality control in the x-ray department of the college of medical radiologic sciences. The evaluation was an experimental study done by checking the operational status of the radiographic equipment, beside data collection using questionnaires regarding quality control. In the applied experiments the results show that there is a noted variation in the accuracy of k Vp, exposure timer and also in the dose consistency. The obtained results from image receptors and processing system showed noted variations too. The results of the questionnaire and direct interviewing showed other causes of quality degradation such as absence of test tools, the status of the equipment, absence of regular quality control testing, in addition to absence of an organized team to deal with quality. (Author)

  5. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  6. Medical radiology terminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Standardization achievements in the field of radiology induced the IEC to compile the terminology used in its safety and application standards and present it in publication 788 (1984 issue), entitled 'Medical radiology terminology'. The objective pursued is to foster the use of standard terminology in the radiology standards. The value of publication 788 lies in the fact that it presents definitions of terms used in the French and English versions of IEC standards in the field of radiology, and thus facilitates adequate translation of these terms into other languages. In the glossary in hand, German-language definitions have been adopted from the DIN standards in cases where the French or English versions of definitions are identical with the German wording or meaning. The numbers of DIN standards or sections are then given without brackets, ahead of the text of the definition. In cases where correspondance of the various texts is not so good, or reference should be made to a term in a DIN standard, the numbers are given in brackets. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  8. Radiological accidents in medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Different radiological accidents that may occur in medical practice are shown. The following topics are focused: accident statistics for medical exposure, accidental medical exposures, radiotherapy accidents and potential accidental scenarios [es

  9. Radiological Protection Science and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Augustin; ); Mossman, Ken; Morgan, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of radiation at the end of the 19. century, the health effects of exposure to radiation have been studied more than almost any other factor with potential effects on human health. The NEA has long been involved in discussions on the effects of radiation exposure, releasing two reports in 1994 and 2007 on radiological protection science. This report is the third in this state-of-the-art series, examining recent advances in the understanding of radiation risks and effects, particularly at low doses. It focuses on radiobiology and epidemiology, and also addresses the social science aspects of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making. The report summarises the status of, and issues arising from, the application of the International System of Radiological Protection to different types of prevailing circumstances. Reports published by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) in 1998 and 2007 provided an overview of the scientific knowledge available at that time, as well as the expected results from further research. They also discussed the policy implications that these results could have for the radiological protection system. The 2007 report highlighted challenges posed by developments in relation to medical exposure and by intentions to include the environment (i.e. non-human species), within the scope of the radiological protection system. It also addressed the need to be able to respond to a radiological terrorist attack. This report picks up on where the 1998 and 2007 reports left off, and addresses the state of the art in radiological prevention science and application today. It is divided into five chapters. Firstly, following broadly the structural topics from the 1998 and 2007 reports, the more purely scientific aspects of radiological protection are presented. These include cancer risk of low dose and dose rates, non-cancer effects and individual sensitivity. In view of the increasing

  10. Evaluation of radiology personnel practice of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Background and purpose: Radiology department that provides images with proper quality plays a vital role in diagnosis of diseases. Good image is obtained by proper technical criteria and correct Positioning. Personnel practice of radiology department has a principal role on radiographs quality. This study was carried out to determine the radiology department personnel practice in university hospitals. Method and Material: Data collection was made using an observational check list. Its validity and reliability was determined previously. The sample size of which was thirty-nine persons. 29 items of practice related to technical and protect ional aspects at three working shifts were observed and recorded separately. Results: Results showed that most of the personnel were female (61.5%), over 40 years old (59%) and technicians (53.8%). On the whole, personnel's score percentages in technical field on three shifts of morning evening and night were 47.5%, 46.2%, and 45.9%, respectively which were less than them in protect ional field (60.3%, 56A% and 55.8%, respectively). Comparison of technical protection and total scores related to individual variables showed significant difference only in organizational grades (p<0.0001, p<0.05, p<0.0001, respectively) Le. The mean scores of radiological technologists holding BSc and associate degrees were more than those of technologists not holding university degrees. Conclusion: The quality of the personnel practice is not desirable; therefore continuing education programmers are needed for personnel. Protection against radiation exposure, availability of equipment and continuous evaluation of use of equipment can be effective in dose reduction in patients.

  11. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  12. Radiology education: a radiology curriculum for all medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Laura; Kok, E.M.; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in radiology are frequent and can cause severe patient harm. Despite large performance differences between radiologists and non-radiology physicians, the latter often interpret medical images because electronic health records make images available throughout the hospital. Some

  13. Analysis of scientific papers in the field of radiology and medical imaging included in Science Citation Index expanded and published by Turkish authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erhan; Karçaaltincaba, Muşturay

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to analyze scientific papers published by Turkish authors in "radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging" journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded and compared the number of published scientific papers from Turkey and other countries. We retrospectively searched all papers published by Turkish authors between 1945 and 2008 by using Web of Science software. We performed the analysis by typing "Turkey" in the address section and all radiology and medical imaging journals in the source title section using the general search function of the software. We further analyzed these results by using "analyze" function of the software according to the number of publications per year, journals, institution and type of papers. We also calculated total number of citations to published scientific papers using citation report function. We analyzed the rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of the number of published papers. Overall, 4,532 papers were published between 1945 and 2008. The first paper was published in 1976. Number of publications increased dramatically from 1976 (n = 1) to 2008 (n = 383). The top 5 journals publishing papers from Turkish authors were European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (n = 328), Clinical Nuclear Medicine (n = 296), European Journal of Radiology (n = 289), European Radiology (n = 207) and Journal of Clinical Ultrasound (n = 186). All published papers received 18,419 citations and citation to paper ratio was 4.06. The rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of published papers improved during the last 25 years. Number of papers from Turkey published in radiology and medical imaging journals has increased at the start of the new millennium. Currently, Turkey is among the top 12 countries when the number of scientific papers published in radiology journals is taken into consideration.

  14. Collaborative learning in radiologic science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Radiologic science is a complex health profession, requiring the competent use of technology as well as the ability to function as part of a team, think critically, exercise independent judgment, solve problems creatively and communicate effectively. This article presents a review of literature in support of the relevance of collaborative learning to radiologic science education. In addition, strategies for effective design, facilitation and authentic assessment of activities are provided for educators wishing to incorporate collaborative techniques into their program curriculum. The connection between the benefits of collaborative learning and necessary workplace skills, particularly in the areas of critical thinking, creative problem solving and communication skills, suggests that collaborative learning techniques may be particularly useful in the education of future radiologic technologists. This article summarizes research identifying the benefits of collaborative learning for adult education and identifying the link between these benefits and the necessary characteristics of medical imaging technologists.

  15. Medical imaging physics teaching to radiologic technologists in Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballani, Nasser S.; Sukkar, Ibrahim

    2005-01-01

    Physics of X-radiation and medical imaging is an important subject (among others) in the education and preparation of skilful and problem-solving radiologic technologists. This short communication gives a brief explanation of the physics courses at the Department of Radiologic Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Kuwait University, Kuwait. The methods of teaching and assessing the physics courses offered to radiographers as part of their education are also explained

  16. Radiology education: a radiology curriculum for all medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, Laura; Kok, Ellen M; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2017-09-26

    Diagnostic errors in radiology are frequent and can cause severe patient harm. Despite large performance differences between radiologists and non-radiology physicians, the latter often interpret medical images because electronic health records make images available throughout the hospital. Some people argue that non-radiologists should not diagnose medical images at all, and that medical school should focus on teaching ordering skills instead of image interpretation skills. We agree that teaching ordering skills is crucial as most physicians will need to order medical images in their professional life. However, we argue that the availability of medical images is so ubiquitous that it is important that non-radiologists are also trained in the basics of medical image interpretation and, additionally in recognizing when radiological consultancy should be sought. In acute situations, basic image interpretations skills can be life-saving. We plead for a radiology curriculum for all medical students. This should include the interpretation of common abnormalities on chest and skeletal radiographs and a basic distinction of normal from abnormal images. Furthermore, substantial attention should be given to the correct ordering of radiological images. Finally, it is critical that students are trained in deciding when to consult a radiologist.

  17. Medical radiology and population exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, B.F.; Kendall, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Surveys of both the frequency of medical X-ray examinations and their associated gonadal doses in 1977 were performed in National Health Service hospitals in Great Britain. The results indicated that 393 X-ray examinations per thousand of the population were performed over the year which represents an increase in the rate per thousand of 48% since 1957. This frequency level is lower than in most other industrialised countries. The frequency of radiological examinations per thousand was highest for old people. The frequency per thousand patients in their twenties had not changed significantly since 1957. A most important finding was the low reported frequency of the use of gonad shields. Gonadal doses were measured directly on 4565 patients undergoing 13 types of examination of the lower abdomen using lithium borate dosemeters. The mean ovarian dose of 1.6 cGy for barium enemas was > 3 times higher since 1957 due mainly to changes in techniques. Most of the other types of examination demonstrated either similar or reduced doses to those found in 1957. An enormous variability in gonadal doses delivered for the same type of examination was observed. This, together with the low usage of gonad shields, would suggest that some patients in the U.K. are receiving doses that are unnecessarily high. (U.K.)

  18. Film selection in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, Dogan

    1988-01-01

    Importing of medical imaging films is the responsibility of Turkish Red Croscend, but some institutions have currently started to import their own films. Because of the different resources in individual departments throughout Turkey, a general purpose medical film is imported by Turkish Red Croscend. This kind of film has the advantage to tolerate some technical faults related to the exposure, dark room and processing conditions and still reveals the necessary image quality. In addition to general purpose film, many companies produce special used films which improve some film characteristics in order to have a better image. The initial results of a project already started by Turkish Atomic Energy Authority showed that some other technical reasons prevent obtaining films with optimum quality. The film is the last step of diagnostic procedure and not only gives necessary clinical information, but also visualizes all the problems related to the lock of the calibration of X-ray system and dark room processing conditions. Because of these reasons, many people hold the film responsible for every technical problem. During the selection of the best film among the different companies, institutions have to fulfill some prerequisites at the beginning and than evaluate the quantitative results obtained from measurements according to their clinical purposes. It is the subject of this paper to show how to use film parameter as a comparison to different types of films measured with light sensitometry method. The dark room and processing problems which adversely effect the results are also given. The requirements for the best film selection both for general and special purposes are also evaluated. The extent of this paper is limited only to films using radiology and does not cover the types used in other imaging areas

  19. Science and Values in Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Eggermont, G.; Britt-Marie, Drottz Sjoberg; Tirmarche, M.; Geard, Ch.R.; Atkinson, M.; Murith, Ch.; Grant, K.G.; Luccioni, C.; Mays, C.; Sisko, Salomaa; Kelly, N.G.; Oughton, D.; Shannoun, F.; Grant, K.G.; Cooper, J.; Mays, C.; Weiss, V.; Oughton, D.; Kazuo, Sakai; Carroll, S.

    2010-01-01

    protection professionals can better identify and respond to civil society concerns. Session 1: Setting the scene: Holistic presentations of science, values, regulation and public health policy, NGO viewpoints.. An informed view of 'where we stand' on each case topic following the Helsinki workshop. Presentations: Radon as a public health issue (Margot Tirmarche); The continuing story of CT scan risks (Charles R. Geard). Break-out sessions 1. part - Issues surrounding current approaches. This session deepens the discussion and widens the process begun at Helsinki, regarding the new data, phenomena and observations that stimulate us to ask whether current public health and regulatory approaches in each topical area are still adequate, or whether they may need revision. The focus of this session is thus on scientific aspects which may induce a need for paradigm change. Presentation: Radon as a public health issue (Christophe Murith). Evening session 1: Stakeholder platform opportunity (Ola Holmberg). One of the workshop objectives is to foster dialogue between radiological protection professionals, researchers, regulators, and other stakeholders from interested publics in order to deepen discussion on points of interest. In order to maximize stakeholders' benefit in attending the workshop, a platform for communicating and discussing relevant stakeholder views and concerns is offered in this evening context. The on-topic interventions are intended to cover relevant subjects that may not be directly addressed during the rest of the workshop (e.g., risk communication, etc.). This evening session focusses on aspects of dose regulations in radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic fields, ALARA in medicine and other issues related to medical exposures. Discussion is intended to be linked to introductory talk in Session 1 on Public Health Perspective in Radiological Protection in Challenging Topical Areas. Presentation: Paediatric CT examinations in nineteenth developing countries (Kazuko

  20. Investigative report, science committee of Aggregate corporation Radiological technologist society of the Oita prefecture. Questionnaires research on security control of department of radiological technology of medical facilities in the Oita prefecture. The second report. Research on high risk incident measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Yoshihiro; Mano, Isao; Takagi, Ikuya; Murakami, Yasunori; Sueyoshi, Seiji; Yoshimoto, Asahi

    2007-01-01

    Oita association of radiological technologists carried out the questionnaires about the measures against high lisk incidental in department of radiological technology at the medical facilities in Oita. We distributed the questionnaire to 102 facilities, which are worked by the technologists (member), and got response from 91 facilities (89%). Research contents are Patient verification method'' ''Input and verification of patient attribute'' ''Infection in hospital'' ''Stumbles and falls of patient'' Contrast enhancement CT'' ''Something related to pacemaker'' ''MRI inspection and the magnetic substance'' ''Remedy mistake'' and ''Risk management''. The Result, Low level recognition contents of medical accident measures are ''Contrast enhancement CT'' ''Stumbles and falls of patient'' Risk management of department of radiological technology''. (author)

  1. Medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaohua; Nie Suifeng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear or radiologic emergencies are defined as incidents that are caused by radioactive substance or by other sources of radiation and can pose a serious hazard to public health. In case of nuclear or radiologic emergencies, radioactive rays will damage the human body and bring about psychological and mental stress, resulting in a series of social psychological effects. The key to medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies is to take effective measures which can minimize the body harm resulting from nuclear or radiologic emergencies and maintain social stability. This article reviews the personnel protection, on-the-spot salvage, treatments of various harm, and prevention of public psychological effect following nuclear or radiologic emergencies. (authors)

  2. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  3. Worker radiological protection: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposures experienced by workers are widely explained. The first evidences of biological effects, the implications for human health and the radiological protection have been covered. The conceptual structure that covers the radiological protection and adequate protection without limiting benefits, the scientific basis of radiology, the benefits and risks of the radiological protection are specified. The effective per capita doses are exposed in medical uses both for Latin America and for other regions in the average radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The manners of occupational exposures in the medicine are presented. Industrial uses have also its average effective dose in the industrial irradiation, industrial radiography and radioisotopes production. Within the natural radiation the natural sources can significantly contribute to occupational exposure and have their average effective dose. Occupational medical surveillance to be taken into industrial sites is detailed. In addition, the plan of international action for the solution of dilemmas of occupational exposures is mentioned and the different dilemmas of radioactive exposure are showed. The external irradiation, the acute diseases by radiations, the cutaneous syndrome of the chronic radiation, the radioactive contamination, the internal radioactive contamination, the combined lesion and accidental exposures are also treated [es

  4. Emergency radiology curriculum at Medical University - Plovdiv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkova, K.; Hilendarov, A.; Cvetkova, S.; Stoeva, M.; Petrova, A.; Stefanov, P.; Simova, E.; Georgieva, V.; Sirakov, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Recent advances in contemporary radiology turn it into one of the major sources for patient information with improved emergency techniques. Emergency Radiology (EP) focuses on acute diagnosing conditions in ER patients. Objectives: The main objective of this paper is to present the ER curriculum at Medical Imaging Department, Medical University - Plovdiv, aiming to deliver knowledge about the indications, possibilities and diagnostic value of the contemporary imaging methods in ER cases. Material and methods: The curriculum covers various aspects of ER Radiology - diagnostic imaging methods, contrast enhanced examinations, imaging topography, traumatic and acute conditions, physical and technical aspects. It includes 6 lectures and 12 practical classes. Results and discussion: The educational course in Emergency Radiology is available for medical students in their 8-th and 9-th semester. Therapeutic methods under imaging control are also covered by the course. Conclusion: Being one of the most advanced areas of radiology, ER improves the quality of care and treatment of patients and of the emergency medicine as a whole

  5. Paleontology investigations aided by medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansu, M.J.; Carpenter, K.; Albano, J.; Meals, R.; Brady, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Medical radiology instruments provide useful tools for nondestructive investigations in other scientific fields. To date, 15 paleontology specimens have been studied using conventional diagnostic units, therapy simulators, and CT scanners. Most specimens, individual marine animals or large dinosaur heads, needed a combination of studies to complete the investigation. Among the results shown are the inner ear of a Plesiosaurus, which is 76 million years old, and a pearl attached to an extinct clam species, which is 1 million years old. The results confirm the usefulness of radiology as a tool in the field of paleontology

  6. Radiologic science students' perceptions of parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Cheryl; Barymon, Deanna; Vanderford, Virginia; Hensley, Chad; Shaver, Gary

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of students is in the classroom, and they are not always alone. Helicopter parents, those who hover around the student and attempt to ease life's challenges, are accompanying the students to radiologic science programs across the nation. To determine radiologic science students' perception regarding their parents' level of involvement in their lives. A survey focused on student perceptions of parental involvement inside and outside of the academic setting was completed by 121 radiologic science students at 4 institutional settings. The analysis demonstrates statistically significant relationships between student sex, age, marital status, and perceived level of parental involvement. In addition, as financial support increases, students' perception of the level of parental involvement also increases. Radiologic science students want their parents to be involved in their higher education decisions. Research indicates that students with involved parents are more successful, and faculty should be prepared for increased parental involvement in the future. Radiologic science students perceive their parents to be involved in their academic careers. Ninety-five percent of respondents believe that the financial support of their parent or parents contributes to their academic success. Sixty-five percent of participants are content with their parents' current level of involvement, while 11% wish their parents were more involved in their academic careers.

  7. Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Barbaros S; Prevedello, Luciano M; Qian, Songyue; Demirer, Mutlu; Little, Kevin; Ryu, John; O'Donnell, Thomas; White, Richard D

    2018-02-01

    Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX) is a platform originally designed to both support the medical imaging-driven clinical and clinical research operational needs of Department of Radiology of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. REMIX accommodates the storage and handling of "big imaging data," as needed for large multi-disciplinary cancer-focused programs. The evolving REMIX platform contains an array of integrated tools/software packages for the following: (1) server and storage management; (2) image reconstruction; (3) digital pathology; (4) de-identification; (5) business intelligence; (6) texture analysis; and (7) artificial intelligence. These capabilities, along with documentation and guidance, explaining how to interact with a commercial system (e.g., PACS, EHR, commercial database) that currently exists in clinical environments, are to be made freely available.

  8. Study of graduate curriculum in the radiological science: problems and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Hwa Gon; Kang, Se Sik; Park, Byeong Rae; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-01-01

    Currently, Educational program of radiological science is developed in enormous growth, our educational environments leading allied health science education program in the number of super high speed medical industry. Radiological science may be the fastest growing technologies in our medical department today. In this way, Medical industry fields converged in the daily quick, the fact that department of radiological science didn't discharged ones duties on current educational environments. The curriculum of radiological technologists that play an important part between skill and occupation's education as major and personality didn't performed one's part most effectively on current medical environments and digital radiological equipment interface. We expect improvement and suggestion to grow natural disposition as studies in the graduate of radiological science. Therefore, in this paper, current curriculum of radiological science are catched hold of trend and problems on digital radiology environments, on fact the present state of problems, for Graduate program of radiological science, graduate courses of MS and ph.D. are suggested a reform measure of major education curriculum introduction

  9. Planning the medical response to radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive substances and other sources of ionizing radiation are used to assist in diagnosing and treating diseases, improving agricultural yields, producing electricity and expanding scientific knowledge. The application of sources of radiation is growing daily, and consequently the need to plan for radiological accidents is growing. While the risk of such accidents cannot be entirely eliminated, experience shows that most of the rare cases that have occurred could have been prevented, as they are often caused by human error. Recent radiological accidents such as those at Chernobyl (Ukraine 1986), Goiania (Brazil 1987), San Salvador (El Salvador 1989), Sor-Van (Israel 1990), Hanoi (Viet Nam 1992) and Tammiku (Estonia 1994) have demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation for dealing with such emergencies. Medical preparedness for radiological accidents must be considered an integral part of general emergency planning and preparedness and established within the national framework for radiation protection and safety. An IAEA Technical Committee meeting held in Istanbul in 1988 produced some initial guidance on the subject, which was subsequently developed, reviewed and updated by groups of consultants in 1989, 1992 and 1996. Special comments were provided by WHO, as co-sponsor of this publication, in 1997. This Safety Report outlines the roles and tasks of health authorities and hospital administrators in emergency preparedness for radiological accidents. Health authorities may use this document as the basis for their medical management in a radiological emergency, bearing in mind that adaptations will almost certainly be necessary to take into account the local conditions. This publication also provides information relevant to the integration of medical preparedness into emergency plans

  10. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1992 (from April 1992 through March 1993). Construction of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has reached semi-final stage. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 84 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 78 refs

  11. Integrating technology into radiologic science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Christopher Ira; Hobbs, Dan L; Mickelsen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    To review the existing literature pertaining to the current learning technologies available in radiologic science education and how to implement those technologies. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals and scholarly reports were used in the research for this review. The material was further restricted to those articles that emphasized using new learning technologies in education, with a focus on radiologic science education. Teaching in higher education is shifting from a traditional classroom-based lecture format to one that incorporates new technologies that allow for more varied and diverse educational models. Radiologic technology educators must adapt traditional education delivery methods to incorporate current technologies. Doing so will help engage the modern student in education in ways in which they are already familiar. As students' learning methods change, so must the methods of educational delivery. The use of new technologies has profound implications for education. If implemented properly, these technologies can be effective tools to help educators.

  12. Radiological protection worker: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, Erick

    2008-01-01

    International Organizations involved with radiation protection are presented in the first part. Also some documents related to the radiation that have been published by these organizations. Among the analyzed contents are the radiation and their patients, how to avoid the damage of radiation, pregnancy and exposure to medical radiation, effects of radiation, recommendations for the protection and safety standards. Occupational exposure is defined as the exposure received and understood by a worker during a period of work. In addition, it shows the types of occupational exposure, the protection that workers must have with the radiation, regulations, laws and the regulatory authority that protects the medical personnel in the uses of radiology [es

  13. Radiology in Medical Education: A Pediatric Radiology Elective as a Template for Other Radiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Hyatt, Eddie; Penrod, Cody H; Fleming, Amy E; Singh, Sudha P

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, the pediatric radiology elective for medical students and pediatric residents constituted a morning teaching session focused mainly on radiography and fluoroscopy. A more structured elective was desired to broaden the exposure to more imaging modalities, create a more uniform educational experience, and include assessment tools. In 2012, an introductory e-mail and formal syllabus, including required reading assignments, were sent to participants before the start date. A rotating weekly schedule was expanded to include cross-sectional imaging (ultrasound, CT, MR) and nuclear medicine. The schedule could accommodate specific goals of the pediatric resident or medical student, as requested. Starting in 2013, an online pre-test and post-test were developed, as well as an online end-of-rotation survey specific to the pediatric radiology elective. Taking the Image Gently pledge was required. A scavenger hunt tool, cue cards, and electronic modules were added. Pre-test and post-test scores, averaged over 2 years, showed improvement in radiology knowledge, with scores increasing by 27% for medical students and 21% for pediatric residents. Surveys at the end of the elective were overwhelmingly positive, with constructive criticism and complimentary comments. We have successfully created an elective experience in radiology that dedicates time to education while preserving the workflow of radiologists. We have developed tools to provide a customized experience with many self-directed learning opportunities. Our tools and techniques are easily translatable to a general or adult radiology elective. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Course on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices (4th Ed.) : Tel educational through Internet on Health Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Chico, P.; Armero, D.; Saura Iniesta, A. M.; Fernandez, H.; Vicente, V.

    2006-01-01

    The creation of an interdepartmental project subsidised by the Spanish Ministry of Education has made possible the elaboration of a series of specific didactic materials on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices, which has led to the publication of a specific manual and practical notebook. As a consequence, this material now constitutes the working base for those professionals exposed to ionising radiation who are following the first Tel educational continuous formation course in Spanish via the Internet on this subject. (Author)

  15. The newsletter 'European Research in Radiological Sciences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihet, P.; D'Errico, F.; Doerr, W.; Gruenberger, M.; Schofield, P.

    2004-01-01

    The newsletter 'European Research in Radiological Sciences' is jointly published by the European Late Effects Project Group and the European Radiation Dosimetry Group to disseminate information about research projects and activities carried out under the EURATOM Framework Programme. Since May 2003, the Newsletter is operated interactively from the Internet. The new site uses a dedicated database that automatically generates HTML pages. This system developed at the Univ. of Cambridge provides an innovative approach to improve the dissemination of project information. (authors)

  16. Conventional radiology: fixed installations in medical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the different procedures, the different types of specific hazards, the analysis of risks, their assessment and the preventive methods with regard to radioprotection in the case of fixed conventional radiology equipment in medical environment. It indicates and describes the concerned personnel, the course of procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels (definition of regulated areas, personnel categories), the strategy aimed at controlling the risk (risk reduction, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention, incident), the different measures of medical monitoring, the assessment of risk control, and other risks. An appendix proposes an example of workstation assessment

  17. Radiological accident 'The Citadel' medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez, Isis M.; Lopez, Gladys; Garcia, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Ramos, Enma O.; Villa, Rosario; Giron, Carmen M.; Escobar, Myrian; Zerpa, Miguel; Romero, Argenis H.; Medina, Julio; Laurenti, Zenia; Oliva, Maria T.; Sierra, Nitza; Lorenzo, Alexis

    2008-01-01

    The work exposes the medical actions carried out in the mitigation of the consequences of the accident and its main results. In a facility of storage of radioactive waste in Caracas, Venezuela, it was happened a radiological accident. This event caused radioactive contamination of the environment, as well as the irradiation and radioactive contamination of at least 10 people involved in the fact, in its majority children. Cuban institutions participated in response to the accident. Among the decisions adopted by the team of combined work Cuban-Venezuelan, we find the one of transferring affected people to Cuba, for their dosimetric and medical evaluation. Being designed a work strategy to develop the investigations to people affected by the radiological accident, in correspondence with the circumstances, magnitude and consequences of the accident. The obtained main results are: 100% presented affectations in its health, not associate directly to the accident, although the accident influenced in its psychological state. In 3 of studied people they were detected radioactive contamination with Cesium -137 with dose among 2.01 X 10-4 Sv up to 2.78 X 10-4 Sv. This accident demonstrated the necessity to have technical capacities to face these events and the importance of the international solidarity. (author)

  18. Medical and dental radiological trends in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kihara, Takuji; Sawada, Shozo

    1978-01-01

    Yearly trends in radiologic practice in Japan were estimated on the basis of annual dampling surveys of medical and dental examinations and treatments covered by Government-Managed Health Insurance, modified by (1) the ratio of all insurance-covered medical care to that covered by this insurance, and (2) the ratio of insured plus privately purchased medical care to insured medical care alone. All radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations, x-ray films consumed, radiation treatments, and dental x-ray examinations, increased during the 10 years prior to this study. In 1970, numbers of examinations or treatments per capita were 1.2 for radiography, 0.1 for fluoroscopy, 0.06 for radiation treatments, and 0.3 for dental radiography, respectively. The dental radiography data were interpolated to Hiroshima and Nagasaki Cities and compared with those submitted by institutions in both cities in October 1970. The Reports of Annual Medical Care Survey, the Fund Office's Annual Reports, and the Annual Reports of the National Health Insurance were main sources for this estimate and provided more than 90% of the necessary information. (auth.)

  19. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  20. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  1. Integrating radiology vertically into an undergraduate medical education curriculum: a triphasic integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qahtani F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahd Al Qahtani,1 Adel Abdelaziz2,31Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 3Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, EgyptAbstract: Fulfilling the goal of integrating radiology into undergraduate medical curricula is a real challenge due to the enduring faith assuming that traditional medical disciplines are worthy of consuming the available study time. In this manner, radiology is addressed occasionally and with relevance to these traditional disciplines. In Al-Baha University Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia, efforts have been made to integrate radiology vertically and in a structured manner into the undergraduate curriculum from the first year to the sixth year. For achieving convenient integration of radiology, a triphasic approach to integration is adopted. This approach consists of the integration of radiology foundations into the basic sciences phase, development of a distinct 4-week module in year 4, and finally, integration of clinical applications of radiology in the clinical phase modules. Feedback of students and inferences obtained through assessment and program evaluation are in favor of this approach to integration. Minor reform and some improvement related to time allocated and content balancing are still indicated.Keywords: radiology foundations, radiology module, students assessment

  2. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  3. Education and training of medical physicists in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, V.; Vassileva, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Medical radiology is chronologically the first and widest field of work of medical physicists. Therefore the education and training of medical radiological physicists is of big importance for both diagnostics and therapy. The education of medical radiological physicists in Bulgaria is organized in two levels: university and postgraduate, which is a good achievement of Bulgarian educational system. University education is in the framework of the M. Sc. program in Medical physics with a prevalent training in medical radiological physics. Three universities in the country have been carrying out this education since more than ten years. Postgraduate education covers specialties Medical Radiological Physics and Radiation Hygiene. It is organized by the Medical University but the training is opened also to specialists outside the health care system. The interests in both levels of education and training in Medical Physics is increasing with about 40 trainees in last years. The university and postgraduate education has good quality in theory but still inadequate in practical aspects. The continuous training and qualification of medical physicists has also difficulties; the main reasons are insufficient technical and financial resources as well as the lack of interest of the staff of the training centers. The responsibilities for education and training of medical physicists in radiology should be shared between physicists and physicians in the country

  4. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, A; Fujita, T; Goto, A; Hattori, T; Hamano, T; Hojo, S; Honma, T; Imaseki, H; Katagiri, K; Muramatsu, M; Sakamoto, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Suda, M; Sugiura, A; Suya, N

    2012-02-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  5. Network oriented radiological and medical archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Frixione, P.; Squarcia, S.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper the basic ideas of NORMA (Network Oriented Radiological and Medical Archive) are discussed. NORMA is an original project built by a team of physicists in collaboration with radiologists in order to select the best Treatment Planning in radiotherapy. It allows physicians and health physicists, working in different places, to discuss on interesting clinical cases visualizing the same diagnostic images, at the same time, and highlighting zones of interest (tumors and organs at risk). NORMA has a client/server architecture in order to be platform independent. Applying World Wide Web technologies, it can be easily used by people with no specific computer knowledge providing a verbose help to guide the user through the right steps of execution. The client side is an applet while the server side is a Java application. In order to optimize execution the project also includes a proprietary protocol, lying over TCP/IP suite, that organizes data exchanges and control messages. Diagnostic images are retrieved from a relational database or from a standard DICOM (Digital Images and COmmunications in Medicine) PACS through the DICOM-WWW gateway allowing connection of the usual Web browsers, used by the NORMA system, to DICOM applications via the HTTP protocol. Browser requests are sent to the gateway from the Web server through CGI (Common Gateway Interface). DICOM software translates the requests in DICOM messages and organizes the communication with the remote DICOM Application.

  6. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.

    2006-01-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  7. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The annual report for the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990 is presented. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering biological risk evaluation in public exposure and exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain, medical use of accelerated heavy ions, and survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; and (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff.

  8. Motivation in a multigenerational radiologic science workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalar, Traci

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in history, radiologic science (RS) workplaces consist of 4 generational cohorts. As each cohort possess their own attitudes, values, work habits, and expectations, motivating a generational diverse workplace is challenging. Through the understanding of generational differences, managers are better able to accommodate individual as well as generational needs and help create a more productive and higher performing workplace. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in the understanding and utilization of generational differences to effectively motivate staff in an RS workplace. Generational cohorts will be defined and discussed along with an in-depth discussion on each of the generations performing in today's RS workplace. Motivators and how they impact the different generational cohorts will be addressed along with how to best motivate a multigenerational RS workplace.

  9. Radiological attacks and accidents. Medical consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuta, Hidenari

    2007-01-01

    Probability of the occurrence of radiological attacks appears to be elevated after the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11 in 2001. There are a lot of scenarios of radiological attack: simple radiological device, radiological disperse device (RDD or dirty bomb), attacks against nuclear reactor, improvised nuclear device, and nuclear weapons. Of these, RDD attack is the most probable scenario, because it can be easily made and can generate enormous psychological and economic damages. Radiological incidents are occurring to and fro in the world, including several cases of theft to nuclear facilities and unsuccessful terrorist attacks against them. Recently, a former Russian spy has allegedly been killed using polonium-210. In addition, serious radiological accidents have occurred in Chernobyl, Goiania, and Tokai-mura. Planning, preparation, education, and training exercise appear to be essential factors to cope with radiological attacks and accidents effectively without feeling much anxiety. Triage and psychological first aid are prerequisite to manage and provide effective medial care for mass casualties without inducing panic. (author)

  10. Contribution of the Medical Radiology Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, to liquidation of radionuclide contamination aftereffects in the Kaluga Region that resulted from the Chernobyl power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, E.G.; Berdov, B.A.; Gorobets, V.F.; Tsyplyakovskaya, L.M.; Ivanov, V.K.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Pitkevich, V.A.; Omel'chenko, V.N.; Borovikova, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Specialists from the Medical Radiology Research Center, have been participating in liquidation of the Chernobyl power plant accident aftereffects since May-June, 1986. The basic trends of their work are mass dosimetric studies of the population of the contaminated areas, annual prophylactic check-ups of children and adolescents, pregnant and nursing women and other adults of high-risk groups (agricultural workers, patients with chronic diseases), development of recommendations for health and prophylactic measures in the districts under observation, treatment of patients from these regions, who are in need of a specialized care, at the clinic of the Center

  11. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences, April 1990 - March 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1990 through March 1991). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 86 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 102 refs

  12. Medical negligence | Otto | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. A study on the issues and improving directions of the rules related radiologic technologist in medical law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Seon

    1994-01-01

    According to the astonishing progress of medical science, the medical roles of the radiologic technologist are increasing gradually and specializing highly. However, there are the wide disagreements the actual roles of the radiologic technologists at clinics and the relating rules of the medical law. Therefore, it is required that the medical law should be corresponded with the actual state. To solve these problems. This study has proceeded to make the survey of the present medical law and has tried to offer the most suitable theories to the actual state. This study includes the survey of relevant professional literatures. The major contents of this study are as follows. First, medical technician is written (in Chinese character) at the present medical technician law, and that word is written wrong. So, it should be replaced with Therefore, radiologic technologist should be written Second, the relations between the doctor and the radiologic technologist should be written the 'request or other words' instead of 'direction' Third, in spite of the rules of the present medical law, the medical act of radiologic technologist at clinics should be belonging to the boundary of medical practice. Forth, to present the appropriate medical service to the patients, legal status of radiologic technologist as a member of medical team should be established. Fifth, it is desired that Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology as a business of radiologic technologist should be provided for in the medical law

  14. The preference of radiology as a postgraduate medical specialty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recruitment into medical specialties outside the core clinical departments remains a stumbling block to advancing medical practice in Nigeria. We set out to determine the factors influencing choice of diagnostic radiology as a field of specialization by the final year medical students in Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1997 are described, being divided into 14 categories: (1) heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designated research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) actual situation investigation, (8) accepted research, (9) general technology research for nuclear energy, (10) radioactivity investigation and research, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) safety evaluation for radioactive liquid waste reprocessing test, (14) human brain function research. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories, further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. A great number of research papers published are listed. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (M. Suetake)

  16. The Medical Science DMZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisert, Sean; Barnett, William; Dart, Eli; Cuff, James; Grossman, Robert L; Balas, Edward; Berman, Ari; Shankar, Anurag; Tierney, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We describe use cases and an institutional reference architecture for maintaining high-capacity, data-intensive network flows (e.g., 10, 40, 100 Gbps+) in a scientific, medical context while still adhering to security and privacy laws and regulations. High-end networking, packet filter firewalls, network intrusion detection systems. We describe a "Medical Science DMZ" concept as an option for secure, high-volume transport of large, sensitive data sets between research institutions over national research networks. The exponentially increasing amounts of "omics" data, the rapid increase of high-quality imaging, and other rapidly growing clinical data sets have resulted in the rise of biomedical research "big data." The storage, analysis, and network resources required to process these data and integrate them into patient diagnoses and treatments have grown to scales that strain the capabilities of academic health centers. Some data are not generated locally and cannot be sustained locally, and shared data repositories such as those provided by the National Library of Medicine, the National Cancer Institute, and international partners such as the European Bioinformatics Institute are rapidly growing. The ability to store and compute using these data must therefore be addressed by a combination of local, national, and industry resources that exchange large data sets. Maintaining data-intensive flows that comply with HIPAA and other regulations presents a new challenge for biomedical research. Recognizing this, we describe a strategy that marries performance and security by borrowing from and redefining the concept of a "Science DMZ"-a framework that is used in physical sciences and engineering research to manage high-capacity data flows. By implementing a Medical Science DMZ architecture, biomedical researchers can leverage the scale provided by high-performance computer and cloud storage facilities and national high-speed research networks while preserving privacy and

  17. Journal of Medical Chemical, Biological and Radiological Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Journal of Medical Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Defense is a free, on-line journal dedicated to providing an international, peer-reviewed journal of original scientific research and clinical and doctrinal knowledge in the area of medical treatment and countermeasures for chemical, biological and radiological defense; and to developing and maintaining an archive of current research and development information on training, doctrine, and professional discussions of problems related to chemical, biological and radiological casualties. The Journal, www.JMedCBR.org, now in its fifth year, is sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: Neuroprotectants; Bioscavengers for Nerve Agents; Medical Diagnostic Systems and Technologies; Medical Effects of Low Level Exposures; Toxicology and Biological Effects of TICs and TIMs; Broad Spectrum Medical Countermeasures; Treatments and Therapeutics for Bacterial, Viral and Toxin Agents; Radiological Medical Countermeasures; Clinical Treatment of Chemical, Biological or Radiological Casualties; Toxins Structures and Treatments. The Journal is supported by an editorial advisory board of distinguished scientists and researchers in the fields of CBR defense and medical treatment and countermeasures in eleven countries.(author)

  18. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medical Laboratory Science is a Quarterly Publication of the Association of Medical Laboratory Scientists of Nigeria. It Publishes Original Research and Review Articles in All Fields of Biomedical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Covering Medical Microbiology, Medical Parasitology, Clinical Chemistry, ...

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    From this year, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) started as an administrative corporation independent of the Government and concomitant internal re-organization was conducted: Three major Centers for Radiation safety, Radiation Emergency Medicine and Charged Particle Therapy were made. This report contains the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (N.I.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The fiscal year 2004 was the 4th year since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  1. Perceived barriers to online education by radiologic science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Nina K

    2014-01-01

    Radiologic science programs continue to adopt the use of blended online education in their curricula, with an increase in the use of online courses since 2009. However, perceived barriers to the use of online education formats persist in the radiologic science education community. An electronic survey was conducted to explore the current status of online education in the radiologic sciences and to identify barriers to providing online courses. A random sample of 373 educators from radiography, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine technology educational programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology was chosen to participate in this study. A qualitative analysis of self-identified barriers to online teaching was conducted. Three common themes emerged: information technology (IT) training and support barriers, student-related barriers, and institutional barriers. Online education is not prevalent in the radiologic sciences, in part because of the need for the clinical application of radiologic science course content, but online course activity has increased substantially in radiologic science education, and blended or hybrid course designs can effectively provide opportunities for student-centered learning. Further development is needed to increase faculty IT self-efficacy and to educate faculty regarding pedagogical methods appropriate for online course delivery. To create an excellent online learning environment, educators must move beyond technology issues and focus on providing quality educational experiences for students.

  2. Lack of security of networked medical equipment in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Vinu; Korah, Ipeson

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. There are few articles in the literature describing the security and safety aspects of networked medical equipment in radiology departments. Most radiologists are unaware of the security issues. We review the security of the networked medical equipment of a typical radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All networked medical equipment in a radiology department was scanned for vulnerabilities with a port scanner and a network vulnerability scanner, and the vulnerabilities were classified using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. A network sniffer was used to capture and analyze traffic on the radiology network for exposure of confidential patient data. We reviewed the use of antivirus software and firewalls on the networked medical equipment. USB ports and CD and DVD drives in the networked medical equipment were tested to see whether they allowed unauthorized access. Implementation of the virtual private network (VPN) that vendors use to access the radiology network was reviewed. RESULTS. Most of the networked medical equipment in our radiology department used vulnerable software with open ports and services. Of the 144 items scanned, 64 (44%) had at least one critical vulnerability, and 119 (83%) had at least one high-risk vulnerability. Most equipment did not encrypt traffic and allowed capture of confidential patient data. Of the 144 items scanned, two (1%) used antivirus software and three (2%) had a firewall enabled. The USB ports were not secure on 49 of the 58 (84%) items with USB ports, and the CD or DVD drive was not secure on 17 of the 31 (55%) items with a CD or DVD drive. One of three vendors had an insecure implementation of VPN access. CONCLUSION. Radiologists and the medical industry need to urgently review and rectify the security issues in existing networked medical equipment. We hope that the results of our study and this article also raise awareness among radiologists about the security issues of networked medical equipment.

  3. Evaluation of radiological medical practice during night duty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasu, J.P.; Rocher, L.; Miquel, A.; Rondeau, Y.; Blery, M.; Nguyen, D.T.; Spira, A.; Livartowski, J.; Ellrodt, A.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological activity during night duty, in a University Hospital, during 100 days, the radiological activity has been evaluated from examinations requiring radiologist (including US and CT, special X-ray examinations). The urgent nature and the agreement between the suspected disease and the final diagnose have been compared with the level of the clinician (medical student, resident, senior). 981 radiological examinations were performed on an emergency basis. In 39%, the examination was urgent or very urgent and for 61% little urgent or non-urgent. The level of the clinician was correlated with the degree of emergency evaluated by the radiologist and with the agreement between suspected disease and the final diagnose (p<0.0001). During night duty, the medical activity in radiology is not justified only be emergency, but also the continuous hospital activities. Better formation of the physician is required to limit the number of examinations. (authors)

  4. The May 26, 1999 Resolution of the Joint Meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section, Academic Council, Ministry of Health of Russia, the X-ray Diagnosis Ad Hoc Commission, Interdepartmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and the Executive Committee, Russian Association of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, V.P.; Rozhkova, N.I.; Vlasov, P.V.

    2000-01-01

    The text of the May 26, 1999 Resolution of the joint meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section of the Ministry of Health of Russia with the X-ray Diagnostics Ad Hoc Problem Commission of the Intergovernmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and the Executive Committee of Russian Association of Radiologists is presented. It is noted that in spite of the fact that the intervention radiology as an independent branch has not yet been formed, separate developments, aimed at application of invasive interventions under the control of radiodiagnostic methods are carried out in the area of bronco pulmonology, gastroenterology, mammology, gynecology, urology, oncology above 30 years and steps in legalization of this trend are also undertaken. Absence of statistical documentation on technical and staff provision of therapeutical-prophylactic establishments as well as unified terminology is noted. The tasks aimed at broader introduction of intervention radiology in Russia are set up [ru

  5. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Five years have passed since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) was reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001, and this fiscal year (2005-2006) is the last year in the first Mid-term Plan of NIRS. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, development of High-Coverage Expression Profiling (HiCEP) technique and new crossover studies. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  6. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract

  7. Annual report of national institute of radiological science in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1998 can be divided into 16 categories: (1) general research-heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designed research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) investigation of actual situation, (8) general research for the basic technology of nuclear energy, (9) human brain function research, (10) investigation and research of radioactivity, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) specific joint research, (14) technological evaluation for radioactive liquid waste decontamination test, (15) strategic basis research, (16) general research for emergency medical treatment. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. The detailed subjects of study are described in the report. A great number of research papers are published in Japan and all over the world. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (Suetake, M.)

  8. Radiology curriculum for undergraduate medical studies—A consensus survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Mankad, K.; McCoubrie, P.; Roberts, T.; Kessel, D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To establish an expert consensus of what, when, and how the teaching of radiology should be incorporated into the core undergraduate medical curriculum. Methods and materials: This Delphi survey consisted of four iterative rounds, with feedback given at the start of each successive round in the form of the results of the previous round. The participants consisted of both radiologists and non-radiologists with significant interest and involvement in radiology and undergraduate/Foundation training. The study addressed the questions of how, where, when, and by whom radiology should be taught. Results: The number of responses in rounds 1–4 was 20, 23, 41, and 25 (25, 22, 31, and 61% response rate, respectively). There was good consensus amongst the responders on the following: radiology teaching must be delivered in conjunction with anatomy and clinical case-based teaching, if possible in the department of radiology on picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstations, and the teaching should be delivered by a competent and credentialled individual. Case-based assessment was the most agreed method of assessment. The majority of the responders concurred that the curriculum should include general indications for commonly requested radiological investigations, consent and safety issues around radiological tests, and their basic interpretation. Conclusion: The consensus points reached by the present study not only serve as directive principles for developing a more comprehensive radiology curriculum, but also places emphasis on a broader range of knowledge required to promote the best use of a department of radiology by junior doctors in an attempt to improve patient experiences and care.

  9. Lessons learned from radiological accidents at medical exposures in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagundes, J.S.; Ferreira, A.F.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    An exposure is considered accidental in radiotherapy when there is a substantial deviation in the prescription of treatment. In this work, an analysis of published radiological accidents, both in Brazil and internationally, was performed during medical exposures in radiotherapy treatments, removing the main lessons learned. Of the research carried out, we highlight Brazil with four radiological accidents and one death in the period between 2011 and 2014; the United States of America with 169 accidents with two deaths from 2000 to 2010 and France from 2001 to 2014 had 569 deaths without patients. Lessons learned have been described, for example, that maintenance personnel training should specify limitations or restrictions on the handling or adjustment of critical parts on the accelerator. It is recommended to apply the 10 main lessons learned due to radiological accidents during medical exposures in radiotherapy treatments to avoid future events

  10. The radiology of complications in medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains eight chapters. They are: Nervous System; Respiratory Tract and Mediastinum; Cardiovascular System; Gastrointestinal System; Genitourinary System; Bone and Soft Tissues; Special Problems in Pediatrics; and Medical-Legal Considerations

  11. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1989 - March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1989 through March 1990). Efforts at the NIRS are particularly aimed at three long term projects: 'risk due to low level radiation exposure to the general population', 'assessment of radiation exposure of the public to radioactivities as related to the environment', and 'food chain and medical use of accelerated heavy ions'. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 80 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (N.K.)

  12. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  13. A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: educational environment in medical information education, content of a lecture in medical information, problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: motivation of the students is low, the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. (author)

  14. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  15. Fiscal 1982 plans of works in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Science and Technology Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, since its establishment in 1957, has engaged in the research and other works on the radiation injuries in human bodies, the medical utilization of radiation and the training and education of personnel in the field. The plans of works in fiscal 1982 in the NIRS are described. As special research works, there are the estimation of the degree of danger due to low level radiation for human bodies, environmental radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities, etc., the medical utilization of particle accelerators, and the biological effects of tritium in nuclear fusion reactor development. Ordinary research works include physics, chemistry, genetics, pharmacy, clinical research, etc. In other areas of activities are radiation risk evaluation, radioactivity investigation, technological aid, personnel education and training, and medical work. (Mori, K.)

  16. Radiological sciences in Turkey: its past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozyar, E.

    2002-01-01

    employed, Iodine-131 being the most common radionuclide used for this purpose. The area of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) centers are available in the country, one in Istanbul and the other in Izmir. There is a baby cyclotron in Gebze near Istanbul. Overall, medical radiologic sciences have taken a major step forward to keep up with recent progress in Turkey

  17. Medical negligence | Otto | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The progress made in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine has resulted in an increase in the number of malpractice suits brought against medical practitioners. To constitute negligence it must be shown that the conduct of the accused did not measure up to the standard of care the law required of him in the particular ...

  18. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-04-01

    This is the third in a series of reports prepared by the-National Advisory Committee on Radiation for the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service. The first two were directed to the broad responsibilities of the Service in the field of radiation control and to problems concerned with the protection of the public against undue radiation exposure from contamination of the environment with radioactive materials. In this report the Committee traces the remarkable growth that has taken place in the uses of ionizing radiation in the health professions, in industry, and in other walks of life. It also notes a number of emerging problems which not only are of importance from the point of view of radiation protection, but also, if not alleviated, threaten the quality of medical care in the United States and the translation of the advances of atomic research into needed benefits for the people. These problems include (a) serious weaknesses in academic departments of radiology which have restricted efforts to provide adequate instruction of medical and post-doctoral students in the clinical applications of ionizing radiation, including radiation protection; and (b) an increasingly severe shortage of manpower in all branches of the radiological sciences. The magnitude and complexity of these problems are sufficiently great that a concerted effort is needed by the Public Health Service to correct them. The alleviation of the problems just cited is but a part of a more comprehensive series of responsibilities faced by the Service in the radiological sciences. The Service must play an important role in the prevention of undue exposure of the population from medical, occupational, and environmental sources of ionizing radiation; at the same time, it must actively support the development and application of radiological methods in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In order that the Service may effectively meet its enlarging responsibilities in the radiological sciences

  19. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-04-01

    This is the third in a series of reports prepared by the-National Advisory Committee on Radiation for the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service. The first two were directed to the broad responsibilities of the Service in the field of radiation control and to problems concerned with the protection of the public against undue radiation exposure from contamination of the environment with radioactive materials. In this report the Committee traces the remarkable growth that has taken place in the uses of ionizing radiation in the health professions, in industry, and in other walks of life. It also notes a number of emerging problems which not only are of importance from the point of view of radiation protection, but also, if not alleviated, threaten the quality of medical care in the United States and the translation of the advances of atomic research into needed benefits for the people. These problems include (a) serious weaknesses in academic departments of radiology which have restricted efforts to provide adequate instruction of medical and post-doctoral students in the clinical applications of ionizing radiation, including radiation protection; and (b) an increasingly severe shortage of manpower in all branches of the radiological sciences. The magnitude and complexity of these problems are sufficiently great that a concerted effort is needed by the Public Health Service to correct them. The alleviation of the problems just cited is but a part of a more comprehensive series of responsibilities faced by the Service in the radiological sciences. The Service must play an important role in the prevention of undue exposure of the population from medical, occupational, and environmental sources of ionizing radiation; at the same time, it must actively support the development and application of radiological methods in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In order that the Service may effectively meet its enlarging responsibilities in the radiological sciences

  20. Accreditation of professionals for radiological protection in medical and dental radiology at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Guedes, Elton C.; Goncalves, Elaine C.; Nogueira, Maria Angela A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CDTN/CNEN as far as the radiological protection services in the medical and dental radiology has changed a lot due to the new Regulatory Directives. The CDTN/CNEN was recognized as the regional reference center for providing not only radiological survey services, but to coordinate an accreditation procedure for professional persons to be accepted by the State Regulatory Authorities to work at Minas Gerais. All the new activities were formalized in a Cooperation Agreement between the CDTN/CNEN and the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the accreditation procedure for candidates, the adopted requirements, the intercomparison results among measuring instruments and the main achievements during the first year of the Agreement. (author)

  1. Medical exposure and optimization of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, Gunter

    1997-01-01

    Full text. In the context of occupational and populational exposure the concepts of optimization are implemented widely, at least conceptually, by the relevant authorities and the responsible for radiation protection. In the case of medical exposures this is not so common since the patient is exposed deliberately and cannot be isolated from his environment. The concepts and the instruments of optimization in these cases are discussed with emphasis to the ICRP recommendations in Publication 73. (author)

  2. Protective effect of lead aprons in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an ongoing study regarding the protective effect that lead aprons, as used in medical radiology, have on the resulting effective dose for medical personnel. By means of model calculations we have analyzed the protection efficacy of lead aprons for various lead thicknesses, in function of tube potential and of variations in exposure geometry as they occur in practice. The degree of efficacy appears to be highly dependent on the fit of aprons because of the dominating influence of the equivalent dose of partially unshielded organs on the resulting effective dose. Also by model calculations we investigated the ratio between the effective dose and the operational quantify for personal dose monitoring. Our study enables the choice of appropriate correction factors for convering personal dosimetry measurements into effective dose, for typical exposure situations in medical radiology. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiation protection study of radiology medical workers in radiodiagnosis area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.; Orozco, M.; Rincon, A.; Padilla, Y.; Martinez, A.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects related to radiological safety and its organization in radiodiagnosis were evaluated by means of scanning carried out in 18 hospitals of Mexico City, divided in 11 public institutions and 7 private ones. The population being studied was: hospital personnel that works in radiodiagnosis. The survey was made with 31 dichotomic variables, being obtained 132 surveys. The personnel characteristics are 83% works in public institutions, 49% works in radiodiagnosis, 3% has an academic degree, 13% is member of a hospital professional association, 13% has updated information on radiological protection, 36% was trained, 45% works for more than 2 years, 52% uses personal dosemeter, less than the 20% knows about the fundamentals of the radiological protection and 24% states to suffer from biological radiation effects, due to the exposure to x-rays. As result of the study, it was found that the main problems that the radiological protection has, are: lack of training programs in radiological protection and supervision, medical surveillance and the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Data Science in Radiology: A Path Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2018-02-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI), especially deep learning, has the potential to fundamentally alter clinical radiology. AI algorithms, which excel in quantifying complex patterns in data, have shown remarkable progress in applications ranging from self-driving cars to speech recognition. The AI application within radiology, known as radiomics, can provide detailed quantifications of the radiographic characteristics of underlying tissues. This information can be used throughout the clinical care path to improve diagnosis and treatment planning, as well as assess treatment response. This tremendous potential for clinical translation has led to a vast increase in the number of research studies being conducted in the field, a number that is expected to rise sharply in the future. Many studies have reported robust and meaningful findings; however, a growing number also suffer from flawed experimental or analytic designs. Such errors could not only result in invalid discoveries, but also may lead others to perpetuate similar flaws in their own work. This perspective article aims to increase awareness of the issue, identify potential reasons why this is happening, and provide a path forward. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 532-4. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Portrayal of radiology in a major medical television series: How does it influence the perception of radiology among patients and radiology professionals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, T.; Merkle, E.M.; Boll, D.T.; Leyendecker, J.R.; Gupta, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    To assess how the portrayal of Radiology on medical TV shows is perceived by patients and radiology professionals. In this IRB-approved study with patient consent waived, surveys were conducted among adult patients scheduled for radiological examinations and radiology professionals. The questionnaire investigated medical TV watching habits including interest in medical TV shows, appearance of radiological examination/staff, radiology's role in diagnosis-making, and rating of the shows' accuracy in portraying radiology relative to reality. One hundred and twenty-six patients and 240 professionals (133 technologists, 107 radiologists) participated. 63.5 % patients and 63.2 % technologists rated interest in medical TV shows ≥5 (scale 1-10) versus 38.3 % of radiologists. All groups noted regular (every 2nd/3rd show) to >1/show appearance of radiological examinations in 58.5-88.2 % compared to 21.0-46.2 % for radiological staff appearance. Radiology played a role in diagnosis-making regularly to >1/show in 45.3-52.6 %. There is a positive correlation for interest in medical TV and the perception that radiology is accurately portrayed for patients (r = 0.49; P = 0.001) and technologists (r = 0.38; P = 0.001) but not for radiologists (r = 0.01). The majority of patients perceive the portrayed content as accurate. Radiologists should be aware of this cultivation effect to understand their patients' behaviour which may create false expectations towards radiological examinations and potential safety hazards. (orig.)

  6. Survey on medical information education for radiologic technologists working at hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ohoba, Hisateru; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the importance of medical information for radiologic technologists has increased. The purpose of this questionnaire survey was to clarify the method of acquiring skill in medical information for radiologic technologists from the point of view of the managers of radiology departments. The questionnaire was sent to 260 hospitals that had introduced picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs) for the person responsible for medical information in the radiology department. The response rate was 35.4% (92 hospitals). The results of this survey clarified that few hospital have staff for medical information in the radiology department. Nevertheless, the excellent staff who have the skills to troubleshoot and develop systems are earnestly needed in radiology departments. To solve this problem, many technologists should understand the content, work load, and necessity of medical information. In addition, cooperation between radiologic technologist schools and hospitals is important in the field of medical information education. (author)

  7. 2013 Dade W. Moeller lecture: medical countermeasures against radiological terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2014-08-01

    Soon after the 9-11 attacks, politicians and scientists began to question our ability to cope with a large-scale radiological terrorism incident. The outline of what was needed was fairly obvious: the ability to prevent such an attack, methods to cope with the medical consequences, the ability to clean up afterward, and the tools to figure out who perpetrated the attack and bring them to justice. The medical response needed three components: the technology to determine rapidly the radiation doses received by a large number of people, methods for alleviating acute hematological radiation injuries, and therapies for mitigation and treatment of chronic radiation injuries. Research done to date has shown that a realistic medical response plan is scientifically possible, but the regulatory and financial barriers to achieving this may currently be insurmountable.

  8. Medical SisRadiologia: a new software tool for analysis of radiological accidents and incidents in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Camila M. Araujo; Silva, Francisco C.A. da; Araujo, Rilton A.; Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.

    2013-01-01

    The man's exposure to ionizing radiation in health are has increased considerably due not only the great request of medical examinations as well as the improvement of the techniques used in diagnostic imaging, for example, equipment for conventional X-rays, CT scans, mammography, hemodynamic and others. Although the benefits of using of radiology techniques are unquestionable, the lack of training in radiation protection of the workers, associated with procedure errors, have been responsible for the increasing number of radiation overexposures of these workers. Sometimes these high doses are real and there is a true radiological accident. The radiation workers, named occupationally Exposed Individual (IOE), must comply with two national regulations: Governmental Decree 453/1998 of the National Agency of Sanitary Surveillance (Portaria 453/1998 ANVISA Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria), which establishes the basic guidelines for radiation protection in medial and dental radiology and; the Governmental Decree NR-32/2002 of the Ministry of Labour and Employment (Ministerio do Trabalho e Emprego), which establishes the basic guidelines for the worker's health. The two mandatory regulations postulate a detailed investigation in the event of radiation overexposure of an IOE. In order to advice the diagnostic institution to perform an efficient analysis, investigation and report of high doses, it is proposed the use of a computational tool named 'Medical SisRadiologia'. This software tool enables the compilation and record of radiological abnormal data occurred in a diagnostic institution. It will also facilitate the detailed analysis of the event and will increase the effectiveness and development of work performed by the Radiation Protection Service. At the end, a technical report is issued, in accordance with the regulations of the technical regulations, which could also be used as training tool to avoid another event in the future. (author)

  9. Medical SisRadiologia: a new software tool for analysis of radiological accidents and incidents in medical radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Camila M. Araujo; Silva, Francisco C.A. da, E-mail: araujocamila@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Rilton A.; Pelegrineli, Samuel Q., E-mail: consultoria@maximindustrial.com.br, E-mail: samuelfisica@maximindustrial.com.br [Maxim Industrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The man's exposure to ionizing radiation in health are has increased considerably due not only the great request of medical examinations as well as the improvement of the techniques used in diagnostic imaging, for example, equipment for conventional X-rays, CT scans, mammography, hemodynamic and others. Although the benefits of using of radiology techniques are unquestionable, the lack of training in radiation protection of the workers, associated with procedure errors, have been responsible for the increasing number of radiation overexposures of these workers. Sometimes these high doses are real and there is a true radiological accident. The radiation workers, named occupationally Exposed Individual (IOE), must comply with two national regulations: Governmental Decree 453/1998 of the National Agency of Sanitary Surveillance (Portaria 453/1998 ANVISA Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria), which establishes the basic guidelines for radiation protection in medial and dental radiology and; the Governmental Decree NR-32/2002 of the Ministry of Labour and Employment (Ministerio do Trabalho e Emprego), which establishes the basic guidelines for the worker's health. The two mandatory regulations postulate a detailed investigation in the event of radiation overexposure of an IOE. In order to advice the diagnostic institution to perform an efficient analysis, investigation and report of high doses, it is proposed the use of a computational tool named 'Medical SisRadiologia'. This software tool enables the compilation and record of radiological abnormal data occurred in a diagnostic institution. It will also facilitate the detailed analysis of the event and will increase the effectiveness and development of work performed by the Radiation Protection Service. At the end, a technical report is issued, in accordance with the regulations of the technical regulations, which could also be used as training tool to avoid another event in the future. (author)

  10. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. April 2000-March 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report contains all of accomplishments of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), including research and investigations, medical practice, training and technology assistance the institute performed during the given year. Actually, the content covers NIRS activity results in the fields of physics (6 presentations), chemistry (3), bio-medical sciences, clinical research (7), environmental science (15) and space science (5). The third involves fields of biochemistry and biophysics (6), cell biology (6), immunology and hematology (1), pathology and physiology (5), genetics (8) and radiotoxicology (1). Topical issues are clinical trials of heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer; researches of radiation-sensitive genes and gene-expression profiles; and activities for various accidents after the turning point of the JCO criticality accident in Tokai. NIRS was reborn as an independent corporative body as a result of the national administrative reform and this report is the final one as that from the national institute. (N.I.)

  11. Regional training course on medical response on radiological emergencies. Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This short information is an annex of the documentation distributed to the participants to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regional Training Course on Medical Response on Radiological Emergencies, organised by the IAEA in co-operation with the Government of Argentina thought the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 16-20 October 2000. The course was intended to people from IAEA Member State in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and to professionals and workers on medicine related with the radiation protection. This annex present information about: Radioactive materials transport; Internal and external contamination; Radiation accidents; Physical dosimetry

  12. Economics and ethics: Antagonists or synergists in the radiologic sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschal, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This presentation explores the relationship of some principles of economics and ethics as applied to the radiologic sciences community. The adversarial nature of these two topics is discussed, as well as how they work together in the improvement of health care delivery. With the health care system ''under the microscope,'' we must stringently watch our productivity and quality. These topics are also discussed in relation to the professional education of students and the continuing education of staff, educators, managers, and physicians in the radiologic sciences. With the rapid growth of more complex health technologies, the changing characteristics of health problems, and a commitment to serve the total population, a true team effort is required in health care delivery

  13. Mental and Medical sciences today

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Rowland; Ion G. Motofei

    2014-01-01

    Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences is designed as a free online, open access, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed journal. The JMMS mission is to address ideas and issues related to mind and medicine, publishing scientific review and empirical papers regarding mental and medical health and disease. Our goal is to stimulate constructive debates among scholars, researchers, physicians, scientists and health professionals with respect to the latest discoveries and trends in the field. The jour...

  14. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  15. Experience in teaching of radionuclide diagnosis in radiology course at Bogomolets national medical university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachenko, M.M.; Romanenko, G.O.; Morozova, N.L.; Mironova, O.V.

    2017-01-01

    The article highlights aspects of teaching radionuclide diagnosis (RND) in the study of complex radiation diagnosis and radiotherapy. Teaching of radiation at undergraduate stage is based on the results of new scientific achievements in radiology and guiding principles of evidence-based medicine. At present studying RND is intended to support the aspiration of European medical community to create a unified science-based approaches to diagnosis and it shows promise of new forms of learning that promote active creative work of a student.

  16. Korea's Contribution to Radiological Research Included in Science Citation Index Expanded, 1986-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, You Jin; Yoon, Dae Young; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Baek, Sora; Seo, Young Lan; Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun; Ju, Young Su

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate scientific papers published by Korean radiologists in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge-Web of Science (SCIE) database was searched for all articles published by Korean radiologists, in SCIE radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. We performed the analysis by typing 'Korea' and 'radiol' in the address section and selecting the subject area of 'Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Medical Imaging' with the use of the general search function of the software. Analyzed parameters included the total number of publications, document types, journals, and institutions. In addition, we analyzed where Korea ranks, compared to other countries, in terms of the number of published articles. All these data were analyzed according to five time periods: 1986-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010. Overall, 4974 papers were published by Korean radiologists, in 99 different SCIE journals, between 1986 and 2010, of which 4237 (85.2%) were article-type papers. Of the total 115395 articles, worldwide, published in radiology journals, Korea's share was 3.7%, with an upward trend over time (p < 0.005). The journal with the highest number of articles was the American Journal of Roentgenology (n 565, 13.3%). The institution which produced the highest number of publications was Seoul National University (n = 932, 22.0%). The number of scientific articles published by Korean radiologists in the SCIE radiology journals has increased significantly between 1986 and 2010. Korea was ranked 4th among countries contributing to radiology research during the last 5 years.

  17. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  18. JOURNAL CLUB: Redefining the Radiology Curriculum in Medical School: Vertical Integration and Global Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrouvey, Michele; Trace, Anthony Paul; Goodmurphy, Craig W; Shaves, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Radiology interconnects medical disciplines given that a working understanding of imaging is essential to clinicians of every specialty. Using online education, we created a globally accessible, web-based undergraduate medical radiology curriculum modeled after the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology program of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. Seventy-four radiology faculty-mentored video modules were produced, 50 of which were integrated into the 1st-year anatomy course. We administered tests to medical students before and after students saw the videos to assess the effectiveness of the modules. We surveyed students on their interests in pursuing radiology as a career before and after participating in this curriculum. On the preexamination questions, the mean score was 58.0%, which increased to 83.6% on the pair-matched imaging-related questions on the actual examination. Before participating in the new curriculum, 88% of students did not express an interest in radiology, and 9% were undecided about radiology as a future career. There was an increase in students who reported that they would definitely or most likely pursue a career in radiology (7%) after they had viewed the lectures. Radiology education is now available to a greater number of multidisciplinary learners worldwide. This project produced a comprehensive, globally accessible radiology curriculum in a self-paced, flexible learning format for new generations of physicians.

  19. Radiologic analysis of the medical collateral ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Che; Lee, Chang Jun; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung

    1979-01-01

    The medical collateral ligament rupture is the most common injury involving the knee joint ligaments. The ruptured medical collateral ligaments of 73 cases with clinical and surgical confirmations were radiologically analyzed. The results were obtained as follows: 1. The most risky age for tearing of the medical collateral ligament was third to fifth decades (50 cases of male and 23 of females). 2. The most common cause of the medical collateral ligament rupture was traffic accident (82.2%). 3. The mean distance of medial knee joint space was 7.9 ± 2.0 mm on the normal side and 13.7 ± 4.2 mm on the affected side. 4. The mean degree of knee joint space was 10.1 ± 2.5 on the normal side and 14.7 ± 3.8 on the affected side. 5. The fibula was the bone fractured most frequently in association with the medial collateral ligament rupture (30.6%).

  20. Science and values in radiological protection: impact on radiological protection decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, Sisko; Pinak, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work summarises the main ideas and achievements of the Science and Values in Radiological Protection Workshop that was held on 15-17 January 2008 in Helsinki, Finland. In the view of developing of new radiological applications and emerging scientific phenomena it has been recognized a need to develop a shared understanding of emerging challenges for radiological protection among scientific and regulatory communities, public and other concerned stake holders. In response to this the Committee of Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland tried to initiate a process of longer-term reflection on scientific and societal issues that might challenge radiological protection in the coming years. Among general issues like radiological policy issues, improvement of understanding between research and policy communities, sharing views on emerging scientific issues, there were addressed several scientific issues, like non-targeted effects, individual sensitivity; and circulatory diseases. The main focus of these discussions was to elaborate potential 'what if' scenarios and propose feasible solutions at various levels. These discussions addressed effects that are not direct and evident consequence of the initial lesions produced at the cellular and DNA level like bystander responses, genomic instability, gene induction, adaptive responses and low dose. Particular interest was paid to an extrapolation of risk estimates to low doses and role of Linear Non-Threshold theory in setting regulatory principles. Individual radio-sensitivity and identification of genes that are suspected of having an influence on it were also discussed in one of the Breakout Sessions. Another Breakout Session addressed circulatory diseases. There is emerging evidence in the A-bomb survivors and in other exposed groups that ionising radiation also causes other diseases than cancer, such as circulatory

  1. Repository National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the facilities of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). It was established as an auxiliary organ of the Science and Technology Agency in 1957. In April 2016, it became a comprehensive radiology research and development department of the Quantum Science and Technology Research Organization, and has been performing 'research for medical use of radiation' and 'research for radiation safety and emergency radiation medical care' as the two pillars of research. The laboratory hospital is a sole monotechnic radiation hospital in Japan specializing in radiotherapy. Heavy particle accelerator for medical use has been constructed, and advancement of heavy particle therapy using rotating gantry is expected. At the clinical nuclear medicine department, research facilities involved in molecular imaging are cyclotron building, positron building, imaging diagnostic building, and exploratory research building, and they are equipped with are three large and small cyclotrons, clinical PET device, animal-specialized PET device, 7-tesla MRI. The nuclear medicine laboratory is equipped with four PET/CT devices, one PET device, and one gamma camera, and performing tumor examination and clinical research on psychiatric and neurological diseases. (A.O.)

  2. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures; practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  3. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures. Practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  4. Medical and industrial radiation sources as radiological weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielefeld, T.; Fischer, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    The execution of attacks with radiological weapons are well within the capabilities of both local terrorist groups and transnational terrorist networks. In a research project, plausible attack scenarios have been developed, based on medical and industrial radioactive sources widely used in Germany. Special emphasis was put on how such sources could be obtained applying criminal tactics. To this end, working procedures in hospitals and companies have been analyzed. Furthermore, by means of simulations, the consequences of a terrorist attack using such sources were estimated. None of the scenarios we investigated led to doses at the site of the explosion which might cause acute radiation effects. However, in some scenarios, an attack would result in the necessity of a potentially very costly clean-up of large urban areas. Therefore, improvements in sources security are recommended. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of factors correlating with medical radiological examination frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, A.; Jaervinen, H.; Bly, R.; Olerud, H.; Vassilieva, J.; Vogiatzi, S.; Shannoun, F.

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission (EC) funded project Dose Datamed 2 (DDM2) had two objectives: to collect available data on patient doses from the radiodiagnostic procedures (X-ray and nuclear medicine) in Europe, and to facilitate the implementation of the Radiation Protection 154 Guidelines (RP154). Besides the collection of frequency and dose data, two questionnaires were issued to gather information about medical radiological imaging. This article analyses a possible correlation between the collected frequency data, selected variables from the results of the detailed questionnaire and national economic data. Based on a 35 countries dataset, there is no correlation between the gross domestic product (GDP) and the total number of X-ray examinations in a country. However, there is a significant correlation ( p < 0.01) between the GDP and the overall CT examination frequency. High income countries perform more CT examinations per inhabitant. That suggests that planar X-ray examinations are replaced by CT examinations. (authors)

  6. The terrorist threat nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical - a medical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, M.C. de; Gourmelon, M.C.S.; Vidal, P.C.; Renaudeau, P.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the fear of a large scale nuclear, biological and/or chemical terrorism is taken again into consideration at the highest level of national policies of risk prevention. The advent of international terrorism implies a cooperation between the military defense and the civil defense. The nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) experts of the health service of army and of civil defense will have to work together in case of major terror attack. This book presents this cooperation between civil and military experts in the NRBC domain: risk analysis, national defense plans, crisis management, syndromes and treatments. The different aspects linked with the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are analyzed by the best experts from French medical and research institutes. All topics of each NRBC domain are approached: historical, basic, diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive. (J.S.)

  7. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  8. Archives: Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 20 of 20 ... Archives: Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... The Journal of Medical and Biomedical Science publishes original, novel, peer-reviewed reports that pertain to medical and allied health sciences; confirmatory reports of previously ...

  10. Radiological emergency response in a medical waste treatment unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.; Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Vianna, Estanislau B.; Nicolau, Jose R.A.; Rodrigues, Demerval L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Radioactive materials are largely used in medicine, research and industry. The amount of radioactive material employed in each application varies from negligible to large and it can be in sealed or non-sealed form. A medical waste treatment unit that deals only with A-type medical waste (ABNT-NBR 12808), which does not include radioactive waste, detected abnormal radiation levels in a collecting truck and the IPEN-CNEN/SP Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response Team was called. The presence of radioactive material inside the truck was confirmed; however, its origin and nature were not possible to be determined because the truck had collected medical waste in several facilities. So, an operation in order to segregate and identify that material was carried out. During the operation, a second collecting truck presenting abnormal radiation levels arrived to the unit and the same procedure was carried out on that truck. In both situations, the contaminated objects found were infantile diapers. The radioactive waste was transported to IPEN-CNEN/SP to be managed. Samples of the radioactive materials were submitted to gamma spectrometry and the radionuclide was identified as Iodine-131. Since that attendance, similar occurrences have been frequent. These events suggest that it is necessary a better control of the radioactive waste at the generating facilities and there should be basic radioprotection orientations to the discharging patients that were submitted to nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  11. Radiological emergency response in a medical waste treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.; Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Vianna, Estanislau B.; Nicolau, Jose R.A.; Rodrigues, Demerval L.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive materials are largely used in medicine, research and industry. The amount of radioactive material employed in each application varies from negligible to large and it can be in sealed or non-sealed form. A medical waste treatment unit that deals only with A-type medical waste (ABNT-NBR 12808), which does not include radioactive waste, detected abnormal radiation levels in a collecting truck and the IPEN-CNEN/SP Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response Team was called. The presence of radioactive material inside the truck was confirmed; however, its origin and nature were not possible to be determined because the truck had collected medical waste in several facilities. So, an operation in order to segregate and identify that material was carried out. During the operation, a second collecting truck presenting abnormal radiation levels arrived to the unit and the same procedure was carried out on that truck. In both situations, the contaminated objects found were infantile diapers. The radioactive waste was transported to IPEN-CNEN/SP to be managed. Samples of the radioactive materials were submitted to gamma spectrometry and the radionuclide was identified as Iodine-131. Since that attendance, similar occurrences have been frequent. These events suggest that it is necessary a better control of the radioactive waste at the generating facilities and there should be basic radioprotection orientations to the discharging patients that were submitted to nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  12. Medical management of radiological accidents in non-specialized clinics: mistakes and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996-2002 three radiological accidents were developed in Georgia. There were some people injured in those accidents. During medical management of the injured some mistakes and errors were revealed both in diagnostics and scheme of the treatment. The goal of this article is to summarize medical management of the mentioned radiological accidents, to estimate reasons of mistakes and errors, to present the lessons drawn in result of Georgia radiological accidents. There was no clinic with specialized profile and experience. Accordingly due to having no relevant experience late diagnosis can be considered as the main error. It had direct influence on the patients' health and results of treatment. Lessons to be drawn after analyzing Georgian radiological accidents: 1. informing medical staff about radiological injuries (pathogenesis, types, symptoms, clinical course, principles of treatment and etc.); 2. organization of training and meetings in non-specialized clinics or medical institutions for medical staff; 3. preparation of informational booklets and guidelines.(author)

  13. The state of radiologic teaching practice in preclinical medical education: survey of American medical, osteopathic, and podiatric schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Zachary; Blackham, Kristine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the state of preclinical radiology curricula in North American allopathic, osteopathic, and podiatric medical schools. An online survey of teaching methods, radiology topics, and future plans was developed. The Associations of American Medical Colleges, Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, and Colleges of Podiatric Medicine listing for all US, Canadian, and Puerto Rican schools was used for contact information for directors of anatomy and/or radiology courses. Letters were sent via e-mail to 198 schools, with a link to the anonymous survey. Of 198 schools, 98 completed the survey (48%). Radiology curricula were integrated with other topics (91%), and taught by anatomists (42%) and radiologists (43%). The majority of time was spent on the topic of anatomy correlation (35%). Time spent teaching general radiology topics in the curriculum, such as physics (3%), modality differences (6%), radiation safety (2%), and contrast use (2%) was limited. Most schools had plans to implement an innovative teaching method in the near future (62%). The major challenges included limits on: time in the curriculum (73%); resources (32%); and radiology faculty participation (30%). A total of 82% reported that their curriculum did not model the suggestions made by the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. This survey describes the current state of preclinical radiology teaching: curricula were nonstandard, integrated into other courses, and predominantly used for anatomy correlation. Other important contextual principles of the practice of radiology were seldom taught. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  15. Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Health Sciences: Tele-Education for continued Postgraduate Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Chico, P.; Armero, D.; Saura Iniesta, A. M.; Vicente, V.

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of an inter departmental project, financed by the Spanish Ministry of Education, has made possible the development to specific didactic materials on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices. These have been published as a manual and practical notebook. This material constitutes the grounding work for the first continuous tele-education training course via Internet that Spanish professionals exposed to ionising radiation are following. Interactive multimedia training and tele-education may become one of the alternatives that allow health science professionals to receive continuous training, provided that adequate content and aims had been established during undergraduate training. (Author) 18 refs

  16. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  17. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  18. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.).

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1988 - March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The Annual Report of April 1988 - March 1989 provides the information on up-to-date research activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. Researches undertaken in the NIRS aim at promoting medical application of radiation and at investigating health effects of radiation and radiation protection. The research scope is therefore widely ranging from physics to genetics and from environmental science to clinical medicine. In addition to basic researches carried out by 14 research divisions. This volume is divided into the following scientific categories for ease of reader's understanding: physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, cell biology, immunology and hematology, pathology and physiology, genetics, clinical research, and environmental science, covering a total of 84 titles. Activities of each research division and organization of the NIRS are given in appendix. (J.P.N.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.)

  1. Luminescence in medical image science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandarakis, I.S., E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2016-01-15

    Radiation detection in Medical Imaging is mostly based on the use of luminescent materials (scintillators and phosphors) coupled to optical sensors. Materials are employed in the form of granular screens, structured (needle-like) crystals and single crystal transparent blocks. Storage phosphors are also incorporated in some x-ray imaging plates. Description of detector performance is currently based on quality metrics, such as the Luminescence efficiency, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) can be defined and evaluated. The aforementioned metrics are experimental evaluated for various materials in the form of screens. A software was designed (MINORE v1) to present image quality measurements in a graphical user interface (GUI) environment. Luminescence efficiency, signal and noise analysis are valuable tools for the evaluation of luminescent materials as candidates for medical imaging detectors. - Highlights: • Luminescence based medical imaging detectors. • Image science: MTF, NPS, DQE. • Phosphors screens light emission efficiency experimental evaluation. • Theoretical models for estimation of phosphor screen properties. • Software for medical image quality metrics.

  2. Implications of science and technology on the radiological protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; LAZO, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The mission of the Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) includes providing member -country governments with insight into evolving or emerging issues that could affect radiation protection policy, regulation or application. Although it can not be currently said that the scientific understanding of radiological risks has significantly changed recently, ongoing radio-biological and epidemiological research could challenge the conventional paradigm in the mid -term future. The C.R.P.P.H. finalized in March 2006 finalize a study of possible challenges and their implications. This study includes two principle areas: challenges arising from scientific developments; and, challenges to the implementation of radiation protection. This report updates the earlier C.R.P.P.H. report, 'Developments in Radiation Health Sciences and their Impact on Radiation Protection' (Nea 1998). Broadly speaking, ongoing radiation biology studies present the possibility that our current practice of summing various type s of exposures into a single value of effective dose is not scientifically supported because of significantly differing dose/response relationships (chronic vs. acute, internal vs. external, high Let versus low Let, etc.). In addition, non-targeted effects, and the possibility of individual hyper-sensitivity to radiation further challenge our current notion of the relationship between detriment and dose. Although there is no conclusive evidence for this at this time, the possible implications of such changes will be investigated to better prepare governments and the radiation protection community should sound scientific evidence emerge. In addition to these possible scientific challenges, the applications and events that would require radiological protection input are also evolving. In particular, the use of radiation in medicine, with new techniques and the spread of existing technologies

  3. Radiation dosimetry for medical management in nuclear/radiological disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Medical Management of radiation exposed victims depends on the amount of radiation doses received in their body and individual organs. The severity of radiation sickness; and early/late biological effects of radiation can be judged on the basis of absorbed dose level of the exposed individual. Radiation Dosimetry is a scientific technique for estimating radiation doses in material and living being. It is an important task for managing radiation effects/injuries to the living being in case of radiological accidents/disasters. In such scenario occupational radiation workers as well as public in general may be exposed with ionizing radiations such as; gamma, alpha, beta and neutron. Radiation dosimetric equipment's are available for occupational radiation workers, however, public in general may not have any dosimetry system with them. Therefore, absorbed dose estimation to the public on individual basis is a challenge to the society. The ambient environment materials in close proximity to the exposed individual may be analyzed using scientific techniques to estimate their personal radiation doses. The blood sample from exposed individual can be examined in laboratory using citometry techniques for dose estimation, however these techniques are very time consuming and may not be suitable for quick radiation management. The other human biological material such as; tooth, hair, and bone etc., can be examined using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry techniques. This technique is very efficient and capable in measuring radiation doses of the order of 20-30 mGy in very less time typically 2-3 min. In reality, this technique is costly affair and available mostly in developed countries. Thermoluminescence (TL) technique is very versatile and cost effective for routine personal dose estimation, This technique has been found suitable for measuring TL in many accidentally exposed environmental materials. The radiation exposed natural environmental materials, such as

  4. Image Gently(SM): a national education and communication campaign in radiology using the science of social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goske, Marilyn J; Applegate, Kimberly E; Boylan, Jennifer; Butler, Priscilla F; Callahan, Michael J; Coley, Brian D; Farley, Shawn; Frush, Donald P; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Jaramillo, Diego; Johnson, Neil D; Kaste, Sue C; Morrison, Gregory; Strauss, Keith J

    2008-12-01

    Communication campaigns are an accepted method for altering societal attitudes, increasing knowledge, and achieving social and behavioral change particularly within public health and the social sciences. The Image Gently(SM) campaign is a national education and awareness campaign in radiology designed to promote the need for and opportunities to decrease radiation to children when CT scans are indicated. In this article, the relatively new science of social marketing is reviewed and the theoretical basis for an effective communication campaign in radiology is discussed. Communication strategies are considered and the type of outcomes that should be measured are reviewed. This methodology has demonstrated that simple, straightforward safety messages on radiation protection targeted to medical professionals throughout the radiology community, utilizing multiple media, can affect awareness potentially leading to change in practice.

  5. Medical students' preferences in radiology education a comparison between the Socratic and didactic methods utilizing powerpoint features in radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lily; King, Alexander; Soman, Salil; Lischuk, Andrew; Schneider, Benjamin; Walor, David; Bramwit, Mark; Amorosa, Judith K

    2011-02-01

    The Socratic method has long been a traditional teaching method in medicine and law. It is currently accepted as the standard of teaching in clinical wards, while the didactic teaching method is widely used during the first 2 years of medical school. There are arguments in support of both styles of teaching. After attending a radiology conference demonstrating different teaching methods, third-year and fourth-year medical students were invited to participate in an online anonymous survey. Of the 74 students who responded, 72% preferred to learn radiology in an active context. They preferred being given adequate time to find abnormalities on images, with feedback afterward from instructors, and they thought the best approach was a volunteer-based system of answering questions using the Socratic method in the small group. They desired to be asked questions in a way that was constructive and not belittling, to realize their knowledge deficits and to have daily pressure to come prepared. The respondents thought that pimping was an effective teaching tool, supporting previous studies. When teaching radiology, instructors should use the Socratic method to a greater extent. Combining Socratic teaching with gentle questioning by an instructor through the use of PowerPoint is a preferred method among medical students. This information is useful to improve medical education in the future, especially in radiology education. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Rassiah, Premavathy; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Shariff Hambali, Ahmad; Muthuvelu, Pirunthavany; Sivalingam, S.

    2001-01-01

    A national dose survey of routine X-ray examinations in Malaysia (a Level II country) from 1993 to 1995 had established baseline data for seven common types of x-ray examinations. A total of 12 randomly selected public hospitals and 867 patients were included in this survey. Survey results are generally comparable with those reported in the UK, USA and IAEA. The findings support the importance of the ongoing national quality assurance programme to ensure doses are kept to a level consistent with optimum image quality. The data was useful in the formulation of national guidance levels as recommended by the IAEA. The medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology (1990-1994) enabled a comparison to be made for the first time with the UNSCEAR 2000 Report. In 1994, the number of physicians, radiologists, x-ray units and x-ray examinations per 1000 population was 0.45, 0.005, 0.065 and 183, respectively; 3.6 million x-ray examinations were performed; the annual effective dose per capita was 0.05 mSv and collective dose was 1000 person-Sv. Chest examinations contributed 63% of the total. Almost all examinations experienced increasing frequency except for barium studies, cholecystography, and intravenous urography (-23%, -36%, -51%). Notable increases were observed in computed tomography (161%), cardiac procedures (190%), and mammography (240%). (author)

  7. Environmental protection: Researches in National Inst. of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, S.; Ban-nai, T.; Doi, M.; Fujimori, A.; Ishii, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kawaguchi, I.; Kubota, Y.; Maruyama, K.; Miyamoto, K.; Nakamori, T.; Takeda, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    Some studies for radiological protection of the environment have been made at the National Inst. of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Transfer of radionuclides and related elements has been investigated for dose estimation of non-human biota. A parameter database and radionuclide transfer models have been also developed for the Japanese environments. Dose (rate)-effect relationships for survival, growth and reproduction have been investigated in conifers, Arabidopsis, fungi, earthworms, springtails, algae, duckweeds, daphnia and medaka. Also genome-wide gene expression analysis has been carried out by high coverage expression profiling (HiCEP). Effects on aquatic microbial communities have been studied in experimental ecosystem models, i.e., microcosms. Some effects were detected at a dose rate of 1 Gy day -1 and were likely to arise from inter-species interactions. The results obtained at NIRS have been used in development of frameworks for environmental protection by some international bodies, and will contribute to environmental protection in Japan and other Asian countries. (authors)

  8. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  9. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions', and 'survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation'; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, envionmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.) 870 refs

  10. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1989. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (I) newly started special researches for 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', and the continuing special research for 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (II) six assigned researches; (III) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmachochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (IV) risk estimation of radiation; (V) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (VI) project research; (VII) radioactivity survey; (VIII) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.) 809 refs

  11. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1988. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (I) newly started special researches for 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', and the continuing special research for 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (II) five assigned researches; (III) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmachochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (IV) risk estimation of radiation; (V) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (VI) project research; (VII) radioactivity survey; (VIII) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.)

  12. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1987. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) 5-year special projects concerning 'stochastic effects of radiation and risk estimation', 'assessment of human exposure to environmental radiation' and 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (2) 6 titles in assigned research; (3) 60 titles in ordinary research covering physics, chemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (6) project research; (7) radioactivity survey; (8) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. An outline of technical aids is given in terms of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron management. Appendices give publications, organization, and staff. (N.K.)

  13. Study on the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Liu Ying; Geng Xiusheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. Methods: It is based on the experience and lessons learned in the course of meeting the emergencies preparedness and response of nuclear and radiological emergencies in China and abroad with the reference of the relevant reports of International Atomic Energy Agency. Results: Essential requirements and practical recommendations for the roles, responsibilities, emergency preparedness, principles and procedures of medical assistance at the scene, as well as the radiological protection of medical support team were provided. Conclusion: The document mentioned above can be applied to direct the establishment, effective medical preparedness and response of the medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. (authors)

  14. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  15. Environment and Medical Sciences Division Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1980-06-01

    The 1979 annual progress report of the UKAEA Environmental and Medical Sciences Division covers both radiological and non-nuclear research programmes in the environmental and toxicological fields. The specific topics were 1) 'atmospheric pollution' which included the analysis of atmospheric trace gases by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the life cycle of atmospheric sulphur compounds, photochemical pollution, studies on stratospheric reactions, stratospheric ozone and the effects of pollutants, upper air sampling and monitoring gaseous atmospheric pollutants with passive samplers; 2) miscellaneous 'environmental safety projects'; 3) 'radiation physics' projects concerning a) radioactive fallout, b) studies of stable trace elements in the atmospheric environment and studies of radioactivity in the environment, c) various aspects of dosimetry research including radiation biophysics, d) personnel dosimetry, e) applied radiation spectrometry and f) data systems; 5) 'aerosol and metabolic studies' including whole body counting studies; 6) 'inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis' studies including actinide inhalation, cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of non-radioactive dusts, asbestos and glass fibre research, a Qauntimet 720 image analysis service and radionuclide analysis in biological materials; and 7) 'analytical services' used in relation to 'environmental safety and chemical analysis' projects. (U.K.)

  16. 75 FR 68200 - Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 892 [Docket No. FDA-2008-N-0273] Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full- Field Digital... and Drugs, 21 CFR part 892 is amended as follows: PART 892--RADIOLOGY DEVICES 0 1. The authority...

  17. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  18. Integration of basic sciences and clinical sciences in oral radiology education for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Mariam T; Carnahan, Heather; Lam, Ernest W N; Woods, Nicole N

    2013-06-01

    Educational research suggests that cognitive processing in diagnostic radiology requires a solid foundation in the basic sciences and knowledge of the radiological changes associated with disease. Although it is generally assumed that dental students must acquire both sets of knowledge, little is known about the most effective way to teach them. Currently, the basic and clinical sciences are taught separately. This study was conducted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of students when taught basic sciences segregated or integrated with clinical features. Predoctoral dental students (n=51) were taught four confusable intrabony abnormalities using basic science descriptions integrated with the radiographic features or taught segregated from the radiographic features. The students were tested with diagnostic images, and memory tests were performed immediately after learning and one week later. On immediate and delayed testing, participants in the integrated basic science group outperformed those from the segregated group. A main effect of learning condition was found to be significant (pbasic sciences integrated with clinical features produces higher diagnostic accuracy in novices than teaching basic sciences segregated from clinical features.

  19. A study on the civil liability of radiological technologist in medical malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Seon

    1995-01-01

    Recently the suits for medical malpractice are gradually increasing in this country. The main purpose of this study is to excavate the most suitable theories about civil liabilities on medical malpractice by radiological technologist. To solve the above-mentioned problems in medical malpractice, I have proceeded to make a survey of traditional theories and tried to excavate the most suitable theories for our medical circumstances among those theories. Both domestic and foreign relevant professional literatures and legal cases were investigated in this study. Several important findings of this study are as follows. First, the nature of legal interrelationship between radiological technologist and physician(or the representative of a hospital) is to define the content of employment. But in the eye of medical law, the interrelationship between radiological technologist and physician is written that radiological technologist should be directed by physician. Second, the nature of legal interrelationship between patient and physician(or the representative of a hospital) is to define the content of legal obligation of physician(or the representative of a hospital), and radiological technologist execute his obligation as proxy for physician. Therefore, patient can not clame any legal right to radiological technologist. Third, radiological technologist has the obligation of Due Care in medical practice. Fourth, on the medical malpractice by radiological technologist the civil liability can be treated as either tortious liability or contractual liability, and physician (or the representative of hospital) take the responsibility for the damage compensation. In this case, physician has the right of indemnity to radiological technologist. But it should be dinied or extremely limited

  20. Medical Practitioners of Radiology & Imaging in the Dock. ( Malpractice)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muyinda, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The average indemnification has doubled in the last 15 years for all physicians, it has tripled for radiology. Furthermore, 1/3 of all medical malpractice are lost by the radiologist. The most commonly missed diagnoses are breast cancer, lung cancer, and fracture of the spine. Clinical knowledge and practice is no longer a luxury of operating in calm and academic environment. In real life things don’t always go according to plan. Identification of the risk. This may vary depending upon the practice. E.g if the practice involves interpreting studies from a busy trauma center or a mammography center, the practice involves higher risk than a free-standing MRI center. When it is appropriate, a radiologist should not be reluctant to indicate that an additional study or procedure may be of diagnostic or confirmatory value when the initial diagnosis is not clear or in doubt Lack of appropriate and timely communication appears to be one of the greatest problems confronting radiologists today. However, this is the one area in which the radiologist can dramatically improve the odds against being sued, and that is by communicating and documenting the communication. The ACR Guideline for Communication indicates that a precise diagnosis should be given whenever possible and that a differential diagnosis should be given when appropriate Radiologist need be qualified to interpret or perform a procedure and maintain your competence. Do not attempt to interpret studies in an area in which you do not feel comfortable or have not had sufficient training. The ACR Guideline may be a double-edged sword for some. Certainly, the ACR Guideline can be used against you if you deviated from it and did not document why you did so

  1. Mental and Medical sciences today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Rowland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences is designed as a free online, open access, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed journal. The JMMS mission is to address ideas and issues related to mind and medicine, publishing scientific review and empirical papers regarding mental and medical health and disease. Our goal is to stimulate constructive debates among scholars, researchers, physicians, scientists and health professionals with respect to the latest discoveries and trends in the field. The journal pays special attention to interdisciplinary and integrative perspectives, focusing primarily on papers approaching mind and body as a unitary domain of study. Our supposition is that the study of the human body and mind needs to be better integrated—in fact should not be studied in isolation from one another, a position that originates fact from the collaborative efforts of the two main editors, namely a psychologist and a physician. As an example, the mind body problem—an age-old question—is still a much debated topic. Despite enormous progress in neuroimaging, it remains unclear how abstract ideas come to “control” the physical brain and body to generate actions, responses, and behaviors. Thus, abstract ideas of the mind (e.g., the desire to seek a promotion, to become famous, or to help those surrounding you can drive decision making and life choices more strongly than the concrete/ biological needs of the body (food, warmth, shelter, etc.. From a pathological perspective, heavy psychological and physical burden can “overload” the mind, creating a mental condition of stress which may then negatively impact bodily function through symptoms such as gastric ulcer, hypertension, and so on. From the opposite perspective, the body and brain can interfere with and direct the functioning of mind. The need for sleep, for example, is due to fluctuation of neuromodulators within the brain. When such neuromodulators are pharmacologically manipulated

  2. RADIOLOGY EDUCATION: A PILOT STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS REGARDING IMAGING IN TRAUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saad; Saeed, Muhammad Anwar; Shah, Noreen; Nadeem, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Trauma remains one of the most frequent presentations in emergency departments. Imaging has established role in setting of acute trauma with ability to identify potentially fatal conditions. Adequate knowledge of health professionals regarding trauma imaging is vital for improved healthcare. In this work we try to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging in trauma as well as identify most effective way of imparting radiology education. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted at Aga Khan University Medical College & Khyber Girls Medical College, to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging protocols practiced in initial management of trauma patients. Only 40 & 20% respectively were able to identify radiographs included in trauma series. Very few had knowledge of correct indication for Focused abdominal sonography in trauma. Clinical radiology rotation was reported as best way of learning radiology. Change in curricula & restructuring of clinical radiology rotation structure is needed to improve knowledge regarding Trauma imaging.

  3. L-027: EPR-First Responders: First Medical Response in a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The main topics covered in this conference are the tasks and the roles of medical emergency services and the local hospital such as firsts aid in a radiological emergency, protective measures, contamination level of the victims and lifesaving

  4. Analysis of radiology education in undergraduate medical doctors training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Derese, Anselme; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to describe how undergraduate radiology teaching is organized in Europe and to identify important characteristics of undergraduate radiology curriculum. Methods: An electronic survey on undergraduate teaching was distributed by the European Society of Radiology (ESR) to 38 national delegates of the ESR Education Committee. Results: The 'classic type' of radiology teaching method is more frequent than the 'modular type'. In 38% of medical training centres the first experience with radiology is in pre-clinical years. The students enrolled in the fourth medical year experience the largest involvement in radiology education. The total number of teaching hours (mean 89 h, median 76 h) varies across the countries and differs depending on the radiological topic (mean across all topics 14.8 h, median 13). Written tests and oral exams were the most frequently used examination modes. Clerkships are reported as a key part of training. Conclusion: This first international comparative study of undergraduate radiological curriculum in Europe identifies a large number of differences in curriculum content and teaching methods throughout Europe. More research is needed to establish the radiological educational competences resulting from these differing curricula's to improve and to standardize the teaching according to (inter)national and institutional needs.

  5. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1986 - March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The Annual Report of April 1986-March 1987 provides the information on up-to-date research activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. Researches undertaken in the NIRS aim at promoting medical application of radiation and at investigating health effects of radiation and radiation protection especially for the medical purpose. The research scope is therefore widely ranging from physics to genetics and from environmental science to clinical medicine. In addition to basic researches carried out by 14 research divisions, the following longterm projects which were organized by scientists recruited from several divisions are currently in progress: (1) biological effects of tritium; (2) stochastic effects of radiation and risk estimation; (3) assessment of human exposure to environmental radiation; and (4) medical use of accelerated heavy ions. This volume is divided into the following scientific categories for ease of reader's understanding: physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, cell biology, immunology and hematology, pathology and physiology, genetics, clinical research, and environmental science, covering a total of 97 titles. Activities of each research division and organization of the NIRS are given in Appendices. (N.K.)

  6. Role and responsibilities of medical physicists in radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides a brief history of the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), followed by some general comments on the radiological protection of patients. The importance of establishing scientific guidelines and professional standards is emphasized, as is the need to ensure the protection of patients undergoing radiation therapy. The responsibility of qualified medical physicists in the protection of patients in nuclear medicine and in diagnostic and interventional radiology is also discussed. (author)

  7. Medical response for radiological accidents from Regional cooperation : Latin-American radiopathology networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde, Nelson; Cardenas, Juan; Perez, Maria del Rosario; Trano, Jose Luiz Di; Gisone, Pablo

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this program is to have a system, in order to assure an appropriate medical response in the case of radiological accidents and to offer medical advice in aspects related to the biological effects of ionizing radiations in risk assessment of radiation workers, medical exposures, potential effects of prenatal irradiation

  8. Undergraduate radiology education in the era of dynamism in medical curriculum: An educational perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, Thomas N.B., E-mail: T.Pascual@iaea.org [Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency (I.A.E.A.), Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, Vienna (Austria); Chhem, Rethy, E-mail: R.Chhem@iaea.org [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, International Atomic Energy Agency (I.A.E.A.), Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Shih-Chang, E-mail: shih-chang.wang@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney Discipline of Imaging, University of Sydney, Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Hawkesbury Road, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Vujnovic, Sasa, E-mail: svujnovic@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Clinical Center Banja Luka, Zdrave Korda 1, 51000 Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2011-06-15

    Radiology undergraduate curriculum has undergone a tremendous transformation in the decades reflecting a change in the structure, content and delivery of instruction. These changes are not unique to the discipline, but rather a response in the cycle of the re-engineering process in the medical curriculum in order to ensure its proper role into the ever-changing context. Radiology education is now more integrated across the curriculum than ever. The diversity of how radiology is being taught within the medical undergraduate curriculum is extensive and promising with the expanding role of the radiologist in the spectrum within the medical curriculum. A strong interface between the medical student and the clinicians must always be integrated in the learning process in order to convey the essential and practical use of the different aspects of radiology essential to the student's career as a future clinician. With the recent advancement in educational and technological innovations, radiology education is mobilized in the most pioneering ways, stimulating a rekindled interest in the field of medical imaging. This paper describes the increasing interest in current role of undergraduate radiology education in the context of constant medical curriculum innovations and in the digital age.

  9. Undergraduate radiology education in the era of dynamism in medical curriculum: An educational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Chhem, Rethy; Wang, Shih-Chang; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2011-01-01

    Radiology undergraduate curriculum has undergone a tremendous transformation in the decades reflecting a change in the structure, content and delivery of instruction. These changes are not unique to the discipline, but rather a response in the cycle of the re-engineering process in the medical curriculum in order to ensure its proper role into the ever-changing context. Radiology education is now more integrated across the curriculum than ever. The diversity of how radiology is being taught within the medical undergraduate curriculum is extensive and promising with the expanding role of the radiologist in the spectrum within the medical curriculum. A strong interface between the medical student and the clinicians must always be integrated in the learning process in order to convey the essential and practical use of the different aspects of radiology essential to the student's career as a future clinician. With the recent advancement in educational and technological innovations, radiology education is mobilized in the most pioneering ways, stimulating a rekindled interest in the field of medical imaging. This paper describes the increasing interest in current role of undergraduate radiology education in the context of constant medical curriculum innovations and in the digital age.

  10. On history of medical radiology in Ukraine: main directions of scientific development (1920-1941)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, M.Yi.; Artamonova, N.O.; Busigyina, N.O.

    1994-01-01

    The work is devoted to the history of medical radiology in Ukraine. It deals with principal problems of scientific research development during 1920-1941. The authors describe both known and little known facts of the history of foundation and development of the first Ukrainian radiological, roentgenological and oncological institutes. Main achievements in radiology development i.e. foundation of large specialized research centres in Kharkov, kiev, Odessa, independent departments of roentgenology both at the majority of medical institutes and three advanced training institutes for doctors, organization of ALL-Union and Republican Congresses and Conferences of Radiologists, publication of a special journal > (Problems of Oncology) are described

  11. University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC): an assessment of its utility for teaching diagnostic imaging in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil; Malin, Greg; Trinder, Krista; Pinelle, David

    2015-01-01

    We have found it very challenging to integrate images from our radiology digital imaging repository into the curriculum of our local medical school. Thus, it has been difficult to convey important knowledge related to viewing and interpreting diagnostic radiology images. We sought to determine if we could create a solution for this problem and evaluate whether students exposed to this solution were able to learn imaging concepts pertinent to medical practice. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a novel interactive web application that enables preclinical medical students to acquire image interpretation skills fundamental to clinical practice. This web application reformats content stored in Medical Imaging Resource Center teaching cases for BlackBoard Learn™, a popular learning management system. We have deployed this solution for 2 successive years in a 1st-year basic sciences medical school course at the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. The "courseware" content covers both normal anatomy and common clinical pathologies in five distinct modules. We created two cohorts of learners consisting of an intervention cohort of students who had used USRC for their 1st academic year, whereas the nonintervention cohort was students who had not been exposed to this learning opportunity. To assess the learning experience of the users we designed an online questionnaire and image review quiz delivered to both of the student groups. Comparisons between the groups revealed statistically significant differences in both confidence with image interpretation and the ability to answer knowledge-based questions. Students were satisfied with the overall usability, functions, and capabilities of USRC. USRC is an innovative technology that provides integration between Medical Imaging Resource Center, a teaching solution used in radiology, and a Learning Management System.

  12. Integrating Radiology and Anatomy Teaching in Medical Education in the UK--The Evidence, Current Trends, and Future Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptonstall, N B; Ali, T; Mankad, K

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents the current evidence of the importance of integrating radiology and anatomy in medical education in the UK, a recommendation by a number of key anatomy, education, and radiology organizations. Current evidence highlights that on average only 5% of total teaching time in medical education is dedicated to radiology. Often, radiology teaching does not adequately fulfill students' learning needs and potentially leaves them underprepared for medical practice. Benefits of integrating radiology and anatomy include improved clinical application of anatomy, an increase in student's interest in anatomy, and ultimately improved radiological interpretation. Various modalities exist for the integration of radiology and anatomy, facilitated by the vast portability of radiological images. It appears that combining radiological resources with traditional anatomy teaching methodology in a blended approach is most beneficial. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  14. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal covers technical and clinical studies related to health, ethical and social issues in field of all aspects of medicine (Basic and Clinical), Health Sciences, Nursing, Medical Laboratory Sciences, Medical Radiography and Rehabilitation, Pharmacy, Biomedical Engineering, etc. Articles with clinical interest and ...

  15. Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this journal is to cover all aspects of medical laboratory science. Contributions are received from staff members of academic, basic and laboratory science departments of the different medical schools and research centres all over Egypt and it fulfils a real need amongst Egyptian doctors working in the ...

  16. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Grant

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%. Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%. Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47% experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42% at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%. An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018, career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009 and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014. Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees.

  17. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  18. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1987 - March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The Annual Report of April 1987-March 1988 provides the information on up-to-date research activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. Researches undertaken in the NIRS aim at promoting medical application of radiation and at investigating health effects of radiation and radiation protection. The research scope is therefore widely ranging from physics to genetics and from environmental science to clinical medicine. In addition to basic researches carried out by 14 research divisions, the following three longterm projects which were organized by scientists recruited from several divisions are currently in progress: (1) stochastic effects of radiation and risk estimation; (2) assessment of human exposure to environmental radiation; and (3) medical use of accelerated heavy ions. Projects (1) and (2) were finalized in this fiscal year. This volume is divided into the following scientific categories for ease of reader's understanding: physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, cell biology, immunology and hematology, pathology and physiology, genetics, clinical research, and environmental science, covering a total of 93 titles. Activities of each research division and organization of the NIRS are given in Appendices. (N.K.)

  19. RADIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bebeshko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the position of a 25-years’ experience to overcome the health effects of Chernobyl the dynamics of the radiation environment, the first summarizing at the international level (1988, the results of completed research and practical monitoring are analyzed. Cohort of acute radiation syndrome (ARS survivors under medical observation at the S.I. "Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" is the largest. Within the 25 years the functional state of the major organs and body systems, and metabolic homeostasis for this category of persons were studied, a comprehensive assessment of their health, mental and physical performance were given, and risk factors and peculiarities of stochastic and non-stochastic pathology courses were identified, as well as a system of rehabilitation patients after ARS was developed. ARS survivors are suffering from chronic diseases of internal organs and systems (from 5-7 to 10-12 diagnoses at the same time. A correlation between acute radiation effects and specific HLA phenotypes were revealed. The dynamics of the immune system recovery after irradiation was studied. The role and prognostic value of telomere length and programmed cell death of lymphocytes in the formation of the cellular effects of ionizing radiation were determined for the first time. Differences between spontaneous and radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias were found. Dose-dependent neuropsychiatric, neurophysiological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging deviations were identified after irradiation at doses above 0.3 Sv. It was shown that the lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers with doses 350 – 690 mGy can induce "the bystander effect" in the non-irradiated cells even after 19 years after exposure. The rates of cancer incidence and mortality of victims, the lessons and key problems to be solved in the third decade after the Chernobyl accident are considered.

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report presents activities at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the period April 1991-March 1992. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are arranged with twelve sections. The first section on special researches consists of continuing research projects entitled (1) 'Biological Risk Evaluation in Public Exposure', (2) 'Exposure Assessment in the Environment and the Public Through Food Chain', (3) 'Medical Use of Accelerated Heavy Ions', and (4) 'Preliminary Study for the Demonstration of Dose-Response Relationships in Low-Dose Range'. The section of assigned researches covers three titles. The section of ordinary researches covers physics (four titles), pharmacochemistry (four), biology (three), genetics (four), physiopathology (four), cytological radiation injuries (three), internal exposure (four), environmental science (four), clinical research (four), clinical research for radiation injuries (four), medical use of heavy particles (three), environmental radiation ecology (three), and aquatic radiation ecology (two). The section on technical aids gives an overview of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron management. Appendices give the information on personnel in NIRS. (N.K.)

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This annual report presents activities at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the period April 1992-March 1993. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are arranged with twelve sections. The first section on special researches deals with continuing research projects entitled (1) 'Biological Risk Evaluation in Public Exposure', (2) 'Exposure Assessment in the Environment and the Public Through Food Chain', (3) 'Medical Use of Accelerated Heavy Ions', and (4) 'Preliminary Study for the Demonstration of Dose-Response Relationships in Low-Dose Range'. All projects except for project (4) will be finished up to March 1993. The section of assigned researches covers four titles. The section of ordinary researches covers physics (four titles), pharmacochemistry (four), biology (three), genetics (four), physiopathology (four), cytological radiation injuries (three), internal exposure (four), environmental science (four), clinical research (four), clinical research for radiation injuries (three), medical use of heavy particles (three), environmental radiation ecology (three), and aquatic radiation ecology (two). The section on technical aids gives an overview of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron manaagement. Appendices give the information on personnel in NIRS. (N.K.)

  2. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  3. Role of accelerator science and technology in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Updated status of compact and advanced-compact medical accelerator development is reviewed. In their applications, medical physics and medical physicist are necessary. Their educational programs have started in several universities and institutes. As one important new trend on life-science, the research on the synergy of DDS (Drug Delivery System) and physical energies are proposed. (author)

  4. The nuclear terrorist, radiological, biological, chemical threat. Medical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourmelon, P.; Vidal, D.; Renaudeau, C.

    2005-01-01

    This book illustrates the cooperation of the civil and the military experts in the domain of the NBRC (nuclear, biological, radiological and chemical threat). The different aspects bond to the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, are discussed. Al topics of each domains (NRBC) are presented: historical and fundamental aspects, diagnostic, therapeutic and prevention. (A.L.B.)

  5. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  6. Radiologic science for technologists: physics, biology, and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The second edition of a textbook primarily for students in radiologic technology is presented. Separate chapters discuss mammography, computed tomography, diagnostic ultrasound, and design of radiologic physics. Radiation protection is specifically presented in two chapters as well as being integrated throughout the text. The fundamentals of radiobiology, molecular and cellular effects of irradiation, and early and late radiation effects comprise four chapters

  7. Analysis of the Importance of Subjects to Improve the Educational Curriculum in the Radiological Science: Focused on Radiological Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Chang Soo

    2012-01-01

    In this study a group of experts and clinical radiological technologists were surveyed to evaluate the clinical importance of current subjects in the radiological sciences. For the data collection and analysis, an open-ended questionnaire was distributed to the group of experts, and a multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to radiological technologists. Subjects were classified into 9 groups for analysis of the importance of subjects, and in regard to the questionnaire design for measurement of variables, departments and type of hospital were set up as independent variables, and the 9 groups of subjects were set up as dependent variables. As a result, clinical radiological technologists perceived Diagnostic Imaging Technology and practical courses, including general radiography, CT and MRI, as the most clinically necessary subjects, and the group of experts placed most weight on basic courses for the major. The result of this study suggests that the curriculum should be revised in a way that combines theory and practice in order to foster radiological technologists capable of adapting to the rapidly changing healthcare environment.

  8. Transporting radioactive materials and possible radiological consequences from accidents as might be seen by medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how medical personnel faced with treating victims of an accident involving radioactive material should be suspicious concerning possible radiological involvement. At the same time, they should be careful to obtain the necessary information in order to make a rational decision as to the likelihood of such involvement. Having made that decision, it is entirely possible then to approach the problem from a medical standpoint in such a way as to determine the extent of radiological involvement and to apply proper medical treatment consistent with that exposure

  9. Science fiction and the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gavin; McFarlane, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Research on science fiction within the medical humanities should articulate interpretative frameworks that do justice to medical themes within the genre. This means challenging modes of reading that encourage unduly narrow accounts of science fiction. Admittedly, science studies has moved away from reading science fiction as a variety of scientific popularisation and instead understands science fiction as an intervention in the technoscientific imaginary that calls for investment in particular scientific enterprises, including various biomedical technologies. However, this mode of reading neglects science fiction's critical relationship to the construction of 'the future' in the present: the ways in which science fiction proposes concrete alternatives to hegemonic narratives of medical progress and fosters critical self-awareness of the contingent activity which gives 'the future' substance in the here-and-now. Moreover, the future orientation of science fiction should not distract from the function of medical science fiction as 'cognitive estrangement': the technological innovations that dominate science-fiction narratives are less concrete predictions and more generic devices that explain in historical time the origins of a marvellous world bearing provocative correspondences to our own, everyday reality. The editorial concludes with a series of introductions to the articles comprising the special issue, covering the print edition and a special online-only section. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. [Information flow between medical and social sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, András; Somogyi, Anikó

    2014-12-28

    In order to reveal impacts of natural and social sciences on each other, the authors examined connections between fields of medical and social sciences using a search for references and citations of scientific publication. 1. The largest affinity between the medical and social sciences was found between neurosciences and psychology, but there was a significant affinity between clinical sciences and general social sciences, as well. 2. The example of General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes" suggests that in the period 2001-2010 the share of references to social sciences was significantly increased. In the meantime, social science papers in the same topics contained references to Clinical Medicine papers in a constantly high percentage. 3. In the sample under study, the age distribution of social science papers in the references did not differ significantly from that of the other sources. 4. Share of references to social science papers was found to be extremely high among Hungarian General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes". This finding still requires clarification, nevertheless, since e.g. it was not supported by an institutional comparison including the largest Hungarian medical research university. 5. The intensity of the reference/citation mediated information flows between the Hungarian Medical Journal, Orvosi Hetilap and social sciences appears to be in accordance with the current international trends.

  11. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Pawlik, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G. [University Hospital Regensburg, Institute of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Pawlik, Michael T. [Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Institute of Anaesthesiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  14. Business plan of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences for fiscal 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Based on the long-term plan of research, development and utilization of nuclear power of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission and mother plans of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, this business plan of the Institute is made for FY 1985. In the Research Division, following four special researches are emphasized to be carried out as well as conceptual design studies on heavy ion accelerator for a medical use : biological effect of tritium due to the utilization of nuclear fusion reactor, comprehensive studies on stochastic effect and risk of radiation, dose assessment of environmental radiation, and medical application of heavy particle beams. Researches are also to be carried out on specified subjects and general subjects. As for the Technical Assistance Division, suitable utilization of cooperative experimental facilities and equipments, and the cyclotron for a medical use is to be promoted together with renewal of a computer. Training of personnels for radiation protection and radiation use is carried out by the Education and Training Division. Hospital Division promotes medical treatment and emergency countermeasures on radiation injury. For the Administrative Division, efforts are to be carried out especially on improvement and reinforcement of properties of the Institute and on the cooperation with international or domestic organizations. Budget for these activities is 724,061 yen thousand for special and general researches, 1,666,950 yen thousand for the technical assistance, 9,158 yen thousand for the training and education, and 290,157 yen thousand for the management of the hospital. (Takagi, S.)

  15. Role and responsibilities of medical physicists in radiology and membership of Bulgaria in European union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, V.; Vassileva, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Medical radiology and especially the radiotherapy is the birthplace of modern medical physics. Medical physicists have proven place and important role in research and practice in radiotherapy. They share the responsibility with physicians in varied daily work in this medical speciality. The rapid development of medical imaging in last decades increases the need of competence of medical physicists. Quality assurance in Diagnostic Radiology aimed to achieve maximum diagnostic information at minimal risk and with minimal prize, which is obligatory for the members of the EU, is impossible to be implemented without medical physicists. The enforced recently Ordinance 30/2005 of the Ministry of Health forms the regulatory basis of obligatory implementation of Quality Assurance at medical use of ionizing radiation in the country. This Ordinance introduces the requirements of the EURATOM 97/43 Directive on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure. It regulates also the responsibilities of medical physicists in radiology. Forthcoming is the practical implementation of these requirements, which needs the competence and efforts of Medical physics community as well as of radiologists in the country

  16. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  17. Annual Report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1991 - March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1991 (from April 1991 through March 1992). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 69 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 64 refs

  18. The Stability of Factors Influencing the Choice of Medical Specialty Among Medical Students and Postgraduate Radiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Adam J; Webb, Emily M; Jordan, Eric J; Kallianos, Kimberly; Naeger, David M

    2018-06-01

    To investigate whether general psychological motivating factors that guide career selection of a medical specialty differ over the course of medical school and to compare differences in motivating factors among students choosing "controllable" lifestyle specialties, students choosing "uncontrollable" lifestyle specialties, and a cohort of radiology residents. An anonymous survey was distributed to first- through fourth-year medical students and radiology residents at a single institution. Participants were asked to select their top three of seven factors that most influenced their choice of medical specialty. Fourth-year students were asked to designate the specialty to which they had applied. The survey was distributed to 259 students and 47 radiology residents with a response rate of 93.8% (243 of 259) and 95.7% (45 of 47), respectively. The top three factors indicated by medical students were finding the daily work fulfilling, work-life balance, and interest in the subject. These top three factors were common to all medical student classes and did not differ between students choosing "controllable" versus "uncontrollable" fields. The factors uncommonly selected were similar personality to others in the field, attending income, competitiveness or prestige, and job market conditions. For radiology residents, the top three motivating factors were the same as for medical students. Three out of seven motivating factors were universally important to trainees, regardless of their stage of medical training or their selection of a controllable versus uncontrollable lifestyle specialty. These data suggest the variety of career choices made by students may not derive from differing underlying values. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Korea's Contribution to Radiological Research Included in Science Citation Index Expanded, 1986-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, You Jin; Yoon, Dae Young; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Baek, Sora; Seo, Young Lan; Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun; Ju, Young Su [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate scientific papers published by Korean radiologists in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge-Web of Science (SCIE) database was searched for all articles published by Korean radiologists, in SCIE radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. We performed the analysis by typing 'Korea' and 'radiol' in the address section and selecting the subject area of 'Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Medical Imaging' with the use of the general search function of the software. Analyzed parameters included the total number of publications, document types, journals, and institutions. In addition, we analyzed where Korea ranks, compared to other countries, in terms of the number of published articles. All these data were analyzed according to five time periods: 1986-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010. Overall, 4974 papers were published by Korean radiologists, in 99 different SCIE journals, between 1986 and 2010, of which 4237 (85.2%) were article-type papers. Of the total 115395 articles, worldwide, published in radiology journals, Korea's share was 3.7%, with an upward trend over time (p < 0.005). The journal with the highest number of articles was the American Journal of Roentgenology (n 565, 13.3%). The institution which produced the highest number of publications was Seoul National University (n = 932, 22.0%). The number of scientific articles published by Korean radiologists in the SCIE radiology journals has increased significantly between 1986 and 2010. Korea was ranked 4th among countries contributing to radiology research during the last 5 years.

  20. United States Department of Health and Human Services Biodosimetry and radiological/nuclear medical countermeasure programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, Mary J.; Raulli, Robert; Esker, John; Moyer, Brian; Wathen, Lynne; DiCarlo-Cohen, Andrea L.; Maidment, Bert W.; Rios, Carmen; Macchiarini, Francesca; Hrdina, Chad; Prasanna, Pataje G.

    2016-01-01

    The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is fully committed to the development of medical countermeasures to address national security threats from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear agents. Through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise, HHS has launched and managed a multi-agency, comprehensive effort to develop and operationalize medical countermeasures. Within HHS, development of medical countermeasures includes the National Institutes of Health (NIH), (led by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Preparedness and Response/Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA); with the Division of Medical Countermeasure Strategy and Requirements, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration as primary partners in this endeavor. This paper describes various programs and coordinating efforts of BARDA and NIH for the development of medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear threats. (authors)

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This report covers the period from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, and provides with the information on the researches conducted by the NIRS during this period. The total budget for the 1978 fiscal year was a little more than 3.35 billion yen including personnel cost. Besides basic researches, three projects have been carried on. One of these projects, ''Estimate of dose due to exposure to environmental radiation'', that had been conducted since April, 1973, was accomplished with fruitful results at the end of March, 1977. Instead, a new project, ''Research on the exposure to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities, etc.'', has been started from April, 1978. The other two projects, ''Risk assessment of radiation late effect'' and ''Medical use of cyclotrons'', have been developed satisfactorily. This report is the collection of the abstracts of papers, but it will assist in the understanding of the research activities at the NIRS as well as that of the recent advances of radiological sciences. The contents are as follows. Concerning physical sciences, 12 physics papers and 7 chemistry papers. Concerning biological studies, 16 biochemistry and biophysics papers, 5 cytology and morphology papers, 14 physiology papers and 11 genetics papers. Concerning medical studies, 13 papers. Concerning environmental studies, 13 papers. Appendix on publication, organization and staff is attached. (Kako, I.)

  2. Career choices for radiology: national surveys of graduates of 1974-2002 from UK medical schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.; Lambert, T.W.; Goldacre, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To report on trends in career choices for radiology among UK medical graduates. Materials and methods: One and 3 years after graduation, and at longer time intervals thereafter, postal questionnaire surveys were sent to all doctors who graduated from UK medical schools in 1974, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000 and 2002. Doctors were asked to specify their choice of long-term career and to identify factors influencing their choice. Employment details were also collected. Results were analysed using χ 2 statistics and binary logistic regression. Results: Seventy-four percent (24,621/33,412) and 73% (20,720/28,459) of doctors responded 1 and 3 years after graduation. Choices for radiology in year 1 increased significantly over time (1.7% of 1974 graduates to 3.2% of 2002 graduates; χ 2 test for trend = 15.3, p < 0.001). In particular, there has been a steady increase from the cohorts of 1993 onwards. Thirty-eight percent of those who chose radiology in year 1, and 80% who chose radiology in year 3, were still working in radiology 10 years after graduation. Hours and working conditions influenced long-term career choices more for radiology than for other careers. Conclusions: The proportion of UK trained junior doctors who want to become radiologists has increased in recent years. However, although medical school intake and the numbers making an early choice for radiology have risen, it is unclear whether sufficient UK graduates will be attracted to radiology to fulfil future service requirements from UK trained graduates alone

  3. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This year's Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE's core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  4. Terrorist threat, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear medical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, Th. de; Gourmelon, P.; Vidal, D.; Renaudeau, C.

    2005-01-01

    The different aspects linked to the use of nuclear, radiological, biological and or chemical weapons are gathered in this work. They concern history, fundamental aspect, diagnosis, therapy and prevention. The part devoted to the nuclear aspect concern the accidents in relation with ionizing radiations, the radiation syndrome, the contribution and limits of dosimetry, the treatment of medullary aplasia, the evaluation and treatment of an internal contamination, new perspectives on the use of cytokine for the treatment of accidental irradiated persons, alternative to the blood transfusion. (N.C.)

  5. Reinventing Radiology: Big Data and the Future of Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael A; Saboury, Babak; Burkett, Brian; Gao, Jackson; Siegel, Eliot L

    2018-01-01

    Today, data surrounding most of our lives are collected and stored. Data scientists are beginning to explore applications that could harness this information and make sense of it. In this review, the topic of Big Data is explored, and applications in modern health care are considered. Big Data is a concept that has evolved from the modern trend of "scientism." One of the primary goals of data scientists is to develop ways to discover new knowledge from the vast quantities of increasingly available information. Current and future opportunities and challenges with respect to radiology are provided with emphasis on cardiothoracic imaging.

  6. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina L

    2011-09-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P < .0001). In general, medical students lack the core knowledge that is needed for good-quality ordering of radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  7. Medical Science and Research in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Ebadifar, Asghar; Baradaran Eftekhari, Monir; Falahat, Katayoun

    2017-11-01

    During the last 3 decades, Iran has experienced a rapid population growth and at the same time the health of Iranian people has improved greatly. This achievement was mainly due to training and availability of health manpower, well organized public health network and medical science and research improvement. In this article, we aimed to report the relevant data about the medical science and research situation in Iran and compare them with other countries. In this study, after reviewing science development and research indicators in medical sciences with participation of key stakeholders, we selected 3 main hybrid indexes consisting of "Research and Development (R&D) expenditures," "Personnel in Science and Technology sector" and "knowledge generation" for evaluation of medical science and research situation. Data was extracted from reliable databases. Over the past decade, Iran has achieved significant success in medical sciences and for the first time in 2015 based on Scopus index, Iran ranked first in the number of published scientific papers and number of citations in the region and among all Islamic countries. Also, 2% of the world's publications belong to Iran. Regarding innovation, the number of Iranian patents submitted to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) was 3 and 43 in 2008 and 2013, respectively. In these years, the number of personnel in science and technology sectors including post graduate students, researchers and academic members in universities of medical sciences (UMSs) have increased. The female students in medical sciences field account for about twothirds of all students. Also, women comprise about one-third of faculty members. Since 5 years ago, Iran has had growth in science and technology parks. These achievements were attained in spite of the fact that research spending in Iran was still very low (0.5% of gross domestic product [GDP]) due to economic hardships and sanctions. Medical science and research development has

  8. Relativity Screens for Misvalued Medical Services: Impact on Noninvasive Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Silva, Ezequiel; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2017-11-01

    In 2006, the AMA/Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) introduced ongoing relativity screens to identify potentially misvalued medical services for payment adjustments. We assess the impact of these screens upon the valuation of noninvasive diagnostic radiology services. Data regarding relativity screens and relative value unit (RVU) changes were obtained from the 2016 AMA Relativity Assessment Status Report. All global codes in the 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule with associated work RVUs were classified as noninvasive diagnostic radiology services versus remaining services. The frequency of having ever undergone a screen was compared between the two groups. Screened radiology codes were further evaluated regarding the RVU impact of subsequent revaluation. Of noninvasive diagnostic radiology codes, 46.0% (201 of 437) were screened versus 22.2% (1,460 of 6,575) of remaining codes (P < .001). Most common screens for which radiology codes were identified as potentially misvalued were (1) high expenditures (27.5%) and (2) high utilization (25.6%). The modality and body region most likely to be identified in a screen were CT (82.1%) and breast (90.9%), respectively. Among screened radiology codes, work RVUs, practice expense RVUs, and nonfacility total RVUs decreased in 20.3%, 65.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. All screened CT, MRI, brain, and spine codes exhibited decreased total RVUs. Policymakers' ongoing search for potentially misvalued medical services has disproportionately impacted noninvasive diagnostic radiology services, risking the introduction of unintended or artificial shifts in physician practice. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Specialising in radiology in Switzerland: Still attractive for medical school graduates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B.; Hoffmann, A.; Christen, S.; Weishaupt, D.; Kubik-Huch, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To gain insight into the professional characteristics of radiologists in Switzerland and to determine how to enhance the attractiveness of radiology to medical graduates as a specialty. Materials and methods: Data from 262 members of the Swiss Society of Radiology (m:f = 76:24%) obtained in a questionnaire survey were analysed regarding socio-demographic variables, working status, specialty, main fields of interest, career success, mentoring and reasons for the shortage of radiologists. Results: 35 (56.4%) female and 85 (45.5%) male radiologists were aged ≤45 years. 228 (87%) were board-certified; 44 (17.9%) had completed a sub-specialisation. Men worked part-time mostly just before retirement, while women worked part-time at a younger age. As reasons for specialty choice, the wide range of clinical work and the combination of technology and medicine were ranked highest. Women reported significantly less career success and support. To improve the attractiveness of radiology to graduates, radiology should be visible on medical school curricula. Conclusion: In Switzerland, more female radiologists work part-time than male ones, and there is less career success and support for women. In order to make radiology more attractive to medical graduates as a specialty, structured residency programmes and reliable gender-respecting career support are needed.

  10. SU-F-E-16: A Specific Training Package for Medical Physicists in Support to Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghzifene, A; Berris, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the professional medical physicists with adequate competencies and skills in order to help them get prepared to support Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (NRE) situations. Methods: Although clinical medical physicists working have in-depth knowledge in radiation dosimetry, including dose reconstruction and dose measurements, they are usually not involved in NRE situations. However, in a few instances where medical physicists were involved in NREs, it appeared that many lacked specific knowledge and skills that are required in such situations. This lack of specific knowledge and skills is probably due to the fact that most current medical physics curricula do not include a specific module on this topic. As a response to this finding, the IAEA decided to initiate a project to develop a specific training package to help prepare medical physicists to support NRE situations. The training package was developed with the kind support of the Government of Japan and in collaboration with Fukushima Medical University (FMU) and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Results: The first International Workshop to test the training package was held in Fukushima, Japan in June 2015. It consisted of lectures, demonstrations, simulation, role play, and practical sessions followed by discussions. The training was delivered through 14 modules which were prepared with the support of 12 lecturers. A knowledge assessment test was done before the workshop, followed by the same test done at the end of the Workshop, to assess the knowledge acquired during the training. Conclusion: The Workshop was successfully implemented. The overall rating of the workshop by the participants was excellent and all participants reported that they acquired a good understanding of the main issues that are relevant to medical physics support in case of NRE situations. They are expected to disseminate the knowledge to other medical physicists in their countries.

  11. SU-F-E-16: A Specific Training Package for Medical Physicists in Support to Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meghzifene, A; Berris, T [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide the professional medical physicists with adequate competencies and skills in order to help them get prepared to support Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (NRE) situations. Methods: Although clinical medical physicists working have in-depth knowledge in radiation dosimetry, including dose reconstruction and dose measurements, they are usually not involved in NRE situations. However, in a few instances where medical physicists were involved in NREs, it appeared that many lacked specific knowledge and skills that are required in such situations. This lack of specific knowledge and skills is probably due to the fact that most current medical physics curricula do not include a specific module on this topic. As a response to this finding, the IAEA decided to initiate a project to develop a specific training package to help prepare medical physicists to support NRE situations. The training package was developed with the kind support of the Government of Japan and in collaboration with Fukushima Medical University (FMU) and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Results: The first International Workshop to test the training package was held in Fukushima, Japan in June 2015. It consisted of lectures, demonstrations, simulation, role play, and practical sessions followed by discussions. The training was delivered through 14 modules which were prepared with the support of 12 lecturers. A knowledge assessment test was done before the workshop, followed by the same test done at the end of the Workshop, to assess the knowledge acquired during the training. Conclusion: The Workshop was successfully implemented. The overall rating of the workshop by the participants was excellent and all participants reported that they acquired a good understanding of the main issues that are relevant to medical physics support in case of NRE situations. They are expected to disseminate the knowledge to other medical physicists in their countries.

  12. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan JMS is a joint project of continuous medical education program at Faculty of Medicine - Omdurman Islamic University, The National Centre for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Ibn Sina Hospital and Omdurman teaching Hospital (Sudan). Sudan JMS is published every three months. High-quality papers written ...

  13. Water-equivalence of gel dosimeters for radiology medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M; Vedelago, J.; Perez, P.; Chacon, D.; Mattea, F.; Velasquez, J.

    2017-10-01

    International dosimetry protocols are based on determinations of absorbed dose to water. Ideally, the phantom material should be water equivalent; that is, it should have the same absorption and scatter properties as water. This study presents theoretical, experimental and Monte Carlo modeling of water-equivalence of Fricke and polymer (NIPAM, PAGAT and itaconic acid ITABIS) gel dosimeters. Mass and electronic densities along with effective atomic number were calculated by means of theoretical approaches. Samples were scanned by standard computed tomography and high-resolution micro computed tomography. Photon mass attenuation coefficients and electron stopping powers were examined by Monte Carlo simulations. Theoretical, Monte Carlo and experimental results confirmed good water-equivalence for all gel dosimeters. Overall variations with respect to water in the low energy radiology range (up to 130 k Vp) were found to be less than 3% in average. (Author)

  14. Water-equivalence of gel dosimeters for radiology medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M; Vedelago, J.; Perez, P. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola - CONICET, Av. Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA, Cordoba (Argentina); Chacon, D.; Mattea, F. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, FAMAF, Laboratorio de Investigacion e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Av. Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina); Velasquez, J., E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [ICOS Inmunomedica, Lago Puyehue 01745, Temuco (Chile)

    2017-10-15

    International dosimetry protocols are based on determinations of absorbed dose to water. Ideally, the phantom material should be water equivalent; that is, it should have the same absorption and scatter properties as water. This study presents theoretical, experimental and Monte Carlo modeling of water-equivalence of Fricke and polymer (NIPAM, PAGAT and itaconic acid ITABIS) gel dosimeters. Mass and electronic densities along with effective atomic number were calculated by means of theoretical approaches. Samples were scanned by standard computed tomography and high-resolution micro computed tomography. Photon mass attenuation coefficients and electron stopping powers were examined by Monte Carlo simulations. Theoretical, Monte Carlo and experimental results confirmed good water-equivalence for all gel dosimeters. Overall variations with respect to water in the low energy radiology range (up to 130 k Vp) were found to be less than 3% in average. (Author)

  15. The role of radiology in diagnostic error: a medical malpractice claims review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Dana; Stratchko, Lindsay M; DeRoo, Courtney

    2017-09-26

    Just as radiologic studies allow us to see past the surface to the vulnerable and broken parts of the human body, medical malpractice claims help us see past the surface of medical errors to the deeper vulnerabilities and potentially broken aspects of our healthcare delivery system. And just as the insights we gain through radiologic studies provide focus for a treatment plan for healing, so too can the analysis of malpractice claims provide insights to improve the delivery of safe patient care. We review 1325 coded claims where Radiology was the primary service provider to better understand the problems leading to patient harm, and the opportunities most likely to improve diagnostic care in the future.

  16. Medical abortion reversal: science and politics meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Khadijah Z; Nguyen, Antoinette T; Stuart, Gretchen S

    2018-03-01

    Medical abortion is a safe, effective, and acceptable option for patients seeking an early nonsurgical abortion. In 2014, medical abortion accounted for nearly one third (31%) of all abortions performed in the United States. State-level attempts to restrict reproductive and sexual health have recently included bills that require physicians to inform women that a medical abortion is reversible. In this commentary, we will review the history, current evidence-based regimen, and regulation of medical abortion. We will then examine current proposed and existing abortion reversal legislation. The objective of this commentary is to ensure physicians are armed with rigorous evidence to inform patients, communities, and policy makers about the safety of medical abortion. Furthermore, given the current paucity of evidence for medical abortion reversal, physicians and policy makers can dispel bad science and misinformation and advocate against medical abortion reversal legislation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical features of the radiological accident in Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de

    1987-01-01

    The main medical features concerning the recent nuclear accident occurred in Chernobyl power station is summarized. The first measures taken by the Soviet medical authorities to minimize the effects of ionizing radiation on the victims are briefly commented on. The specialized laboratory analyses and therapeutic procedures adopted by the physicians during the course of the acute phase of the major syndromes are also discussed. (author) [pt

  18. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques int he social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  19. Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Sciences: A Description of a Radiological Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Anna; Staskiewicz, Grzegorz J.; Lisiecka, Justyna; Pietrzyk, Lukasz; Czekajlo, Michael; Arancibia, Carlos U.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of medical imaging techniques pervade modern medicine, and the changing portability and performance of tools like ultrasound imaging have brought these medical imaging techniques into the everyday practice of many specialties outside of radiology. However, proper interpretation of ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images…

  20. International collaboration in medical radiation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Gary; Allen, Carla; Platt, Jane

    2016-06-01

    International collaboration is recognised for enhancing the ability to approach complex problems from a variety of perspectives, increasing development of a wider range of research skills and techniques and improving publication and acceptance rates. The aim of this paper is to describe the current status of international collaboration in medical radiation science and compare this to other allied health occupations. This study utilised a content analysis approach where co-authorship of a journal article was used as a proxy for research collaboration and the papers were assigned to countries based on the corporate address given in the by-line of the publication. A convenience sample method was employed and articles published in the professional medical radiation science journals in the countries represented within our research team - Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA) were sampled. Physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational therapy and nursing were chosen for comparison. Rates of international collaboration in medical radiation science journals from Australia, the UK and the USA have steadily increased over the 3-year period sampled. Medical radiation science demonstrated lower average rates of international collaboration than the other allied health occupations sampled. The average rate of international collaboration in nursing was far below that of the allied health occupations sampled. Overall, the UK had the highest average rate of international collaboration, followed by Australia and the USA, the lowest. Overall, medical radiation science is lagging in international collaboration in comparison to other allied health fields.

  1. Distributed radiology clerkship for the core clinical year of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Felix S

    2002-11-01

    The central role that diagnostic radiology has in the modern practice of medicine has not always been reflected in radiology's place in the curriculum. We developed a new radiology clerkship for undergraduate medical students during their core clinical year that was supported by Web technology. The assumptions underlying the design of the clerkship were that radiology is best learned from radiologists and that students are most receptive to learning radiology when it is related to concurrent patient care experiences. Beginning in May 2000, a required radiology clerkship experience was incorporated into the core clinical year at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The core clinical year was organized into three 16-week blocks of clerkships. Two or four independent half-day radiology tutorial sessions were included with each clerkship block, and attended by all students in the block (approximately 35 students), regardless of their specific clerkship assignments. There were ten different radiology tutorials, each given three times during the year as students rotated through the clerkship blocks. Thus, each student attended a radiology tutorial session every four to eight weeks during the year. The topics covered during the tutorials were correlated with the content of the clerkship blocks and included adult and pediatric chest radiology, adult and pediatric abdominal radiology, body CT, neuroradiology, obstetric ultrasound, gynecologic ultrasound, osteoporosis, adult and pediatric fractures, mammography, and cervical spine trauma. The tutorials included pre- and post-test, lectures, case presentations, and sometimes tours of the radiology department. The educational emphasis was on pragmatic case-based learning exercises, development of verbal and visual vocabulary, and learning when and where to seek more information. To provide continuity and organization, Web-based curriculum materials were designed and implemented as a component of the clerkship. The home

  2. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez A, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  3. Medical social consequences of the safety problems of oncological radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, M.Yi.; Stadnik, L.L.; Shal'opa, O.Yu.; Rigan, M.M.; Skalets'kij, Yu.M.

    2015-01-01

    Actuality of the problem of patient safety in oncoradiology in Ukraine is grounded. The results of international audit TLD (IAEA/WHO) quality during dosimetry procedures cobalt-telegamma vehicles in Ukraine are investigated, as well as legal and regulatory framework providing for the safety of radiotherapy care, scientific publications on patient safety. Methods: statistical, analytical, bibliographical, systematic approach. On the example of radiation therapy using the results of the international program of the IAEA/WHO TLD audit quality dosimetry calibration devices for remote gamma therapy in Ukraine from 1998 to 2014 the attempt to assess the extent of medical and social consequences of underestimating of medical errors in oncoradiology is made. The problems of regulatory nature of medical errors in oncoradiology are preliminary identified. The problem of medical errors in the treatment of cancer radiation methods in Ukraine is extremely important. Usually the problems of errors in oncoradiology are considered in organizational, technical, personnel and technical aspects, while medical and social consequences of problem are not covered. About 10 thousand of cancer patients in year may suffer from errors related only to dose calculation according to the optimistic variant, while the number of patients for the same period on the pessimistic case can reach 15 thousand. There are a number of legal character problems in oncoradiology related to patient safety that require clarification. The first priority for improving the safety of patients in oncoradiology is the recording and analysis of radiation therapy defects and their consequences

  4. Teaching Critical Thinking in Graduate Medical Education: Lessons Learned in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Benjamin; Heilbrun, Marta E

    2017-01-01

    The 2014 Institute of Medicine report, Graduate Medical Education that Meets the Nation's Health Needs , challenged the current graduate medical training process and encouraged new opportunities to redefine the fundamental skills and abilities of the physician workforce. This workforce should be skilled in critically evaluating the current systems to improve care delivery and health. To meet these goals, current challenges, motivations, and educational models at the medical school and graduate medical education levels related to formal training in nonclinical aspects of medicine, especially critical thinking, are reviewed. Our diagnostic radiology training program is presented as a "case study" to frame the review.

  5. Medical aspects of 137Cs decorporation: The Goiania radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, R.; Brandao-Mello, C.E.; Oliveira, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, the Goiania radiological accident involving a source of 137 Cs culminated in about 140 victims who presented internal and/or external contamination and/or external exposure to radiation and/or radiation burns. Internal contamination was verified through analysis of urine and fecal samples. Internal contamination was also evaluated by measurements performed at the whole-body counter installed in Goiania in November 1987. To enhance the decorporation of 137Cs, patients were treated with the following: (1) Prussian Blue, oral administration, in 46 patients; (2) diuretics, oral administration, in 17 patients; (3) induced perspiration, increasing 137 Cs elimination. These procedures were done under rigorous clinical evaluation and considering the data from assay of excreta and data obtained from the whole-body counter. The doses of Prussian Blue exceeded about 6.5 times the dose previously indicated in the literature. It was the first time diuretics were used in humans to treat 137 Cs internal contamination. The results of these procedures are discussed

  6. Conventional radiology. Mobile installations in medical environment: radiographies in bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document presents the different procedures, the different types of specific hazards, the analysis of risks, their assessment and the preventive methods with regard to radioprotection in the case of mobile installations used in a medical environment to perform radiographies on patients lying on a bed. It indicates and describes the concerned personnel, the course of procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy aimed at controlling the risk (risk reduction, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention, incident), the different measures of medical monitoring, the assessment of risk control, and other risks

  7. Radiation safety knowledge of medical center radiology technologists in southern Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Wen-Chuan; Huang Ying-Fong; Chen Cheng-Chung; Chang Pao-Shu [Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China)

    2000-05-01

    People who live in Taiwan are getting more and more afraid of radiation. Sometimes the phobia results from distorted knowledge. Radiology technologists, in one hand, are more well-educated in radiation and, in the other hand, have more chance to expose to radiation when they are operating radiation producing medical instruments in their daily life. So we are interested in whether they have enough knowledge to protect themselves. We pick up the radiology technology board examination to make the questionnaire for this study. The population is the radiology technologists who work at department of diagnostic radiology, of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine in medical centers. Statistics is then used to see the relationship between knowledge and the factors including gender, age and career period. Based on statistics, we find out that there is significant correlation between the knowledge with age or education level. Elder or lower education level ones has worse knowledge. Continued education may be highly recommended for radiology technologists to avoid occupational radiation injury. (author)

  8. Radiation safety knowledge of medical center radiology technologists in southern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Wen-Chuan; Huang Ying-Fong; Chen Cheng-Chung; Chang Pao-Shu

    2000-01-01

    People who live in Taiwan are getting more and more afraid of radiation. Sometimes the phobia results from distorted knowledge. Radiology technologists, in one hand, are more well-educated in radiation and, in the other hand, have more chance to expose to radiation when they are operating radiation producing medical instruments in their daily life. So we are interested in whether they have enough knowledge to protect themselves. We pick up the radiology technology board examination to make the questionnaire for this study. The population is the radiology technologists who work at department of diagnostic radiology, of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine in medical centers. Statistics is then used to see the relationship between knowledge and the factors including gender, age and career period. Based on statistics, we find out that there is significant correlation between the knowledge with age or education level. Elder or lower education level ones has worse knowledge. Continued education may be highly recommended for radiology technologists to avoid occupational radiation injury. (author)

  9. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1994 -March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This annual report summarizes briefly the research activities and the achievement in the Institute for fiscal year of 1994 (from April 1994 to March 1995). As the middle of this period, commissioning of the new clinical trial of cancer treatment was successfully started using heavy ion beams of the HIMAC (heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba) which was completed at the end of fiscal year 1993. At the same time, various kinds of basic research projects using the same heavy ion beams were also begun in an open use system available to many facilities outside the Institute. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and radiation medicine including physics and engineering related to therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the collected topics have been classified into several categories from physics to environmental science. The appendix of this report includes recent publication in each area, list of keywords, author, index, and organization and staff. (M.N.)

  10. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1994 - March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This annual report summarizes briefly the research activities and the achievement in the Institute for fiscal year of 1994 (from April 1994 to March 1995). As the middle of this period, commissioning of the new clinical trial of cancer treatment was successfully started using heavy ion beams of the HIMAC (heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba) which was completed at the end of fiscal year 1993. At the same time, various kinds of basic research projects using the same heavy ion beams were also begun in an open use system available to many facilities outside the Institute. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and radiation medicine including physics and engineering related to therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the collected topics have been classified into several categories from physics to environmental science. The appendix of this report includes recent publication in each area, list of keywords, author, index, and organization and staff. (M.N.)

  11. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The activities of National Institute of Radiological Sciences in fiscal year 1985 was carried out on the basis of the total budget of 5,550.597 million yen and 404 regular staffs. The ordinary research was carried out on 65 subjects, and the results of internationally high level were obtained. The special research was carried out by selecting four subjects: the biological effect of tritium accompanying fusion reactor development, the probabilistic effect of radiation and risk evaluation, the evaluation of exposure to environmental radiation, and the medical application of heavy particle beam. In addition to these, the specified research and the research based on the science and technology promotion coordination expense were carried out. In this institute, research has been advanced by collective discipline method, and the results have obtained high reputation. This fact owes much to the efforts of Administration Division, Technical Division and Hospital Division as well as Research Division. The total number of trainees who finished various courses reached 3651 in fiscal year 1985, and this has contributed largely to the protection from and the utilization of radiation in Japan. Recently, the importance of international exchange has increased, and efforts have been exerted to take part in various international activities overcoming all difficulties. (Kako, I.)

  12. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The activities of National Institute of Radiological sciences in fiscal year 1984 were carried out on the basis of the total budget of 6052 million yen and 408 regular staffs. The ordinary research is the base of all research activities, and was carried out on 62 subjects, which achieved the results of internationally high level. The special research was performed by selecting four themes, that is, the investigation and research on the biological effect of tritium accompanying the development of nuclear fusion, the investigation and research on the probabilistic effect of radiation and risk evaluation, the investigation and research on the evaluation of environmental radiation exposure, and the investigation and research on the medical utilization of heavy particle beam and others. In addition, the specified research and the research using the science and technology promotion coordination expense were carried out. The total number of trainees who have finished various courses of the Education and Training Division reached 3466 in fiscal year 1984, and those contributed largely to the protection and utilization of radiation in Japan. Effort was exerted to promote the international exchange in this field. The activities in respective divisions are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Development of experts for radiation emergency medicine. An experience at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuzaki, H.; Hachiya, M.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been conducting many training courses on radiation emergency medicine, both for Japanese and foreigners. Medical professionals working in hospitals and first responders who deal with victims have been main participants of these courses for Japanese. Typically, these courses include table top exercises and/or practical drills, which give unique features to our courses, in addition to lectures. Apart from training courses, some medical professionals came to work as a staff member of NIRS for a long term, such as two years, to learn about radiation emergency medicine. Some foreigners also stayed in NIRS as short to middle term visitors to learn about the fields. Courses for foreigners were organized sometimes in cooperation with international organizations. Participants were mainly from Asian countries, and some courses targeted one country. For example, courses for Korean professionals were organized nine times. The NIRS will continue to contribute to human development in radiation emergency medicine with training courses and other methods of education. (author)

  14. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in fiscal year 1983 were carried out on the basis of the total budget of 5,835,354,000 yen and 412 staffs. In spite of the severe situation of administrative reform of the government, the works were accomplished, and the considerable results were obtained. Ordinary research was carried out on 63 subjects. Special research was carried out on four themes, that is, the biological effect of tritium accompanying the development of nuclear fusion reactors, the medical utilization of particle accelerators, the probabilistic effect and risk evaluation of radiation, and the evaluation of exposure to environmental radiation. In addition, specified research was carried out on three subjects. The number of trainees who finished various courses in the Training Division reached 3290 in fiscal year 1983, and it greatly contributed to the radiation protection and the utilization of radiation in Japan. The importance of the international exchange has increased, and the staffs attended various international meetings and exchanged opinion with visitors. Investigation and research works, technical assistance, training, medical treatment, the administration of Nakaminato Branch Office, book and editorial works and general affairs are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences were carried out on the basis of the budget of about 3,835 million yen and 419 regular staffs. In order to promote the investigation concerning the evaluation of injuries due to internal exposure, the construction of a new laboratory was approved as four-year plan beginning in this year. The total budget is 5,916 million yen. The primates laboratory became usable for the investigation concerning the estimation of danger of the heredity injuries due to radiation. The investigation concerning the environmental radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities started in the last year progressed smoothly. The investigation concerning the medical utilization of cyclotrons was completed in the last year, and the investigation concerning the medical utilization of particle accelerators was started in this year. The number of patients subjected to fast neutron treatment reached 550 as of the end of FY 1979. Also head positron CT was completed. In this report, the activities of various research divisions and the works concerning technical aid, training, therapy, the management of Nakaminato branch office, publication and general affairs are described. Also, the appendices showing the records of activities are attached. (Kako, I.)

  16. Health Instruction Packages: Medical Technologies--EEG, Radiology, & Biomedical Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittenham, Dorothea; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct medical technology students in a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "EEG Technology: Measurement Technique of the 'International 10-20 System'" by Dorothea Brittenham, describes a procedure used by electroencephalograph…

  17. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Quality control in medical radiology using T.L.D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolemberg Silva, F.A.; Nascimento Souza, D. do

    2006-01-01

    In this work tests of quality control in beams of X rays have been carried out, at diagnostic level, of two radiological services equipments of Brazilian hospitals (Aracaju, SE). We obtained the air kerma and kerma rate values, the beams efficiency, the coherence between the luminous fields and the referring fields of irradiation and half-value layer to each equipment and set of parameters. The measures of direct form have been obtained using two ionization chambers, one cylindrical and another one with parallel plates. An optional method for accomplishment some of the tests were carried out with CaSO 4 :Dy + Teflon thermoluminescent dosimeters. The values of air kerma were evaluated for three tube voltage, 40, 60 and 81 kV at 1.0 m from the focus of the equipments. For each one of the voltages three distinct current values were chosen besides a fixed value of exposition time. The results showed that the values of air kerma varied between 8.0 μGy and 0.35 μGy. The T.L.D. have revealed useful for the measures if the response to the dose is previously known for each set of beam parameters used for the irradiations. Otherwise, the tests with the dosimeters can serve to evaluate the beams conditions and their reproducibility. The evaluation results of coherence between the luminous fields and the irradiation fields demonstrated that the difference between the radiation and the luminous fields did not exceed 2% of the distance between the focal point and the film. We found satisfactory values for half-value layer. (author)

  19. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (Spanish Edition); Capacitacion clinica de fisicos medicos especialistas en radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  20. Medical Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In almost all nuclear and radiological emergencies, local emergency services (e.g. local medical, law enforcement, and fire brigades) will have the most important role in the early response. Within hours, hospitals may also have an important role to play in the response at the local level. Since nuclear and radiological emergencies are rare, medical responders often have little or no experience in dealing with this type of emergency and inexperience may lead to an inadequate response. For this reason, training in medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency is an important aspect of preparedness and response activities. These materials are designed for use at a training course on medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. They contain a wide range of lectures and supporting materials, which cover the basic topics and more specific areas of medical preparedness and response. Therefore, in planning their specific courses, organizers are encouraged to choose those lectures and supportive materials from the CD-ROM that best match their training priorities. Materials on the CD-ROM address the following areas: • Terrorism in Perspective; • Malicious Act Scenarios; • Providing Information to the Medical Community and the Public; • Medical Response to a Radiation Mass Casualty Event; • Handling of Contaminated Persons in Malicious Events; • Planning and Preparedness for Medical Response to Malicious Events with Radioactive Material; • Handling the Bodies of Decedents Contaminated with Radioactive Material; • Radiation Emergencies: Scope of the Problem; • Common Sources of Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Ionizing Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Radiation Protection; • Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation – Basic Notions; • Basics of Radiopathology; • External Radioactive Contamination; • Internal Radioactive Contamination; • Acute Radiation Syndrome; • Cutaneous Radiation

  1. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  2. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  3. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  4. Recognition difference and improvement direction of the radiological technologists and patient against medical service in department radiology - Inchon area in the object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Sung Min; Kim, Sung Chul

    2006-01-01

    Satisfaction of the patient against the medical service in department of radiology and it evaluated the different recognition of radiological technologist and patient, and investigates it's improvement direction. It sent the reply the above the which is a usual result in question result of the most that, the receipt process it was complicated in the portion which is insufficient. 'The receipt process is complication', 'waiting time is long' and ' don't radiation protection for patient and guardian'. Also these a facts was recognizing patients and radiological technologist all. And the effort of the radiological technologist is necessary with the method which reduces a recognition difference. The periodical medical service satisfaction investigates and must endeavor in reform measure preparation

  5. Emotional intelligence in medical laboratory science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Travis

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in the medical laboratory as well as 13 EI-related items. Laboratory administrators were asked to rate each item for its importance for job performance, their satisfaction with the item's demonstration among currently working medical laboratory scientists (MLS) and the amount of responsibility college-based medical laboratory science programs should assume for the development of each skill or attribute. Participants were also asked about EI training in their laboratories and were given the opportunity to express any thoughts or opinions about EI as it related to medical laboratory science. This study revealed that each EI item, as well as each of the three other items, was considered to be very or extremely important for successful job performance. Administrators conveyed that they were satisfied overall, but indicated room for improvement in all areas, especially those related to EI. Those surveyed emphasized that medical laboratory science programs should continue to carry the bulk of the responsibility for the development of technical skills and theoretical knowledge and expressed support for increased attention to EI concepts at the individual, laboratory, and program levels.

  6. Infuriating Tensions: Science and the Medical Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Contemporary medical students, it is suggested, view science in particular and the intellect in general as difficult allies at best. What emerges are physicians without inquiring minds, physicians who bring to the bedside not curiosity and a desire to understand but a set of reflexes. (MLW)

  7. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T.; Izeta G, A. C.; Azorin V, J. C.; Arreola, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  8. Applications of artificial neural networks in medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jigneshkumar L; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2007-09-01

    Computer technology has been advanced tremendously and the interest has been increased for the potential use of 'Artificial Intelligence (AI)' in medicine and biological research. One of the most interesting and extensively studied branches of AI is the 'Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs)'. Basically, ANNs are the mathematical algorithms, generated by computers. ANNs learn from standard data and capture the knowledge contained in the data. Trained ANNs approach the functionality of small biological neural cluster in a very fundamental manner. They are the digitized model of biological brain and can detect complex nonlinear relationships between dependent as well as independent variables in a data where human brain may fail to detect. Nowadays, ANNs are widely used for medical applications in various disciplines of medicine especially in cardiology. ANNs have been extensively applied in diagnosis, electronic signal analysis, medical image analysis and radiology. ANNs have been used by many authors for modeling in medicine and clinical research. Applications of ANNs are increasing in pharmacoepidemiology and medical data mining. In this paper, authors have summarized various applications of ANNs in medical science.

  9. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper

  10. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper

  11. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  12. Evaluation of medical and occupational exposures in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekoshi, Hisashi; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi; Tamiya, Tadashi; Nakamura, Kiyoko.

    1992-01-01

    Absorbed radiation doses received by patients and personnel during interventional procedures were estimated in this study. An Angiostar, a fluoroscopy x-ray unit, made by Siemens Co. Ltd. was used. Fluoroscopic conditions were 82 to 112 kV of tube voltage and 2.5 to 4.3 mA of tube current. The absorbed doses to the ovaries were measured in a Mix-Dp phantom after the image intensifier's field size was changed from 40 cm to 14 cm in diameter. X-ray scattering dose distributions in the vicinity of the fluoroscopy table were measured by an ionization survey meter. This measurement was carried out concurrently with the above x-ray exposure conditions. Patient and personnel exposure increased in relation to the decreased field size. These medical and occupational exposures increases were the result of the x-ray output gradually increasing as the image intensifier's field was progressively decreased. This condition was caused by the automatic brightness control circuits of the x-ray unit. When the smallest field size of the image intensifier (I.I.) was employed the exposure doses absorbed by both patients and personnel were about three times larger than the doses received in the largest field size. (author)

  13. The Future Medical Science and Colorectal Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin

    2017-12-01

    Future medical technology breakthroughs will build from the incredible progress made in computers, biotechnology, and nanotechnology and from the information learned from the human genome. With such technology and information, computer-aided diagnoses, organ replacement, gene therapy, personalized drugs, and even age reversal will become possible. True 3-dimensional system technology will enable surgeons to envision key clinical features and will help them in planning complex surgery. Surgeons will enter surgical instructions in a virtual space from a remote medical center, order a medical robot to perform the operation, and review the operation in real time on a monitor. Surgeons will be better than artificial intelligence or automated robots when surgeons (or we) love patients and ask questions for a better future. The purpose of this paper is looking at the future medical science and the changes of colorectal surgeons.

  14. National Programme for Radiological Protection in Medical Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    radiation protection and safety in medical exposure

  15. Collective dose estimation in Portuguese population due to medical exams of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro; Paulo, Graciano; Santos, Joana; Pascoal, Ana; Lanca, Isabel; Matela, Nuno; Sousa, Patrick; Carvoeiras, Pedro; Parafita, Rui; Simaozinho, Paula

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess the exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation due to medical examinations of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, a working group, consisting of 40 institutions, public and private, was created to evaluation the coletive dose in the Portuguese population in 2010. This work was conducted in collaboration with the Dose Datamed European consortium, which aims to assess the exposure of the European population to ionizing radiation due to 20 diagnostic radiology examinations most frequent in Europe (the 'TOP 20') and nuclear medicine examinations. We obtained an average value of collective dose of ≈ 1 mSv/caput, which puts Portugal in the category of countries medium to high exposure to Europe. We hope that this work can be a starting point to bridge the persistent lack of studies in the areas referred to in Portugal, and to enable the characterization periodic exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation in the context of medical applications

  16. Radiation protection in medical diagnostic radiology in the city of Sobral, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Alcantara, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability to radiation protection of four diagnostic radiology medical services in the city of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to analyze results of the literature for the cities of Rio Branco-AC, North of Brazil, and Rio de Janeiro-RJ, South-east of Brazil. In Sobral-CE, it was performed interviews and direct observations with reference to Brazilian law, the National Ordinance No.453/1998 of the Ministry of Health that regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. The results show the occurrence of many items in disagreement with the standard. The technical and operational infractions have basically due to unfamiliarity with the legislation, the lack of investment in training and/or professional development courses. (authors)

  17. Specification of carbon ion dose at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Nakai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The clinical dose distributions of therapeutic carbon beams, currently used at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), are based on in-vitro Human Salivary Gland (HSG) cell survival response and clinical experience from fast neutron radiotherapy. Moderate radiosensitivity of HSG cells is expected to be a typical response of tumours to carbon beams. At first, the biological dose distribution is designed so as to cause a flat biological effect on HSG cells in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. Then, the entire biological dose distribution is evenly raised in order to attain a RBE (relative biological effectiveness)=3.0 at a depth where dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) is 80 keV/μm. At that point, biological experiments have shown that carbon ions can be expected to have a biological effect identical to fast neutrons, which showed a clinical RBE of 3.0 for fast neutron radiotherapy at NIRS. The resulting clinical dose distribution in this approximation is not dependent on dose level, tumour type or fractionation scheme and thus reduces the unknown parameters in the analysis of the clinical results. The width SOBP and the clinical/physical dose at the center of SOBP specify the dose distribution. The clinical results analyzed in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) were found to show good agreement with the expected RBE value at higher TCP levels. The TCP analysis method was applied for the prospective dose estimation of hypofractionation. (author)

  18. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In FY 1978, the budget of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences was more than 3,368 million yen, and increased by 456 million yen as compared with the previous year. The laboratory for late occurring injuries commenced to function fully, and it is expected to produce useful results in the investigation concerning the estimation of danger of the late occurring injuries due to radiation. The investigation concerning the environmental radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities was newly started in 1978. The investigation concerning the medical utilization of cyclotrons progressed successively to the previous year, and the number of patients subjected to fast neutron treatment reached 432 as of the end of FY 1978. The production and utilization of short life radioisotopes were carried out smoothly, and the development of positron emission GT has been under way. Many papers were published in Japan and foreign countries by the researchers, and many persons took parts in various international meetings. In this report, the activities of various research divisions and the works concerning technical aid, training, therapy, the management of Nakaminato branch office, publication and general affairs are described. Also, the appendices showing the records of activities are attached. (Kako, I.)

  19. The journal of medical chemical, biological and radiological defense, an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, B. B. S.; Peitersen, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Journal of Medical Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Defense (www.JMedCBR.org) is a peer-reviewed scientific online journal focusing on the biology, chemistry, physiology, toxicology and treatment of exposure to threat agents. JMedCBR provides a central international forum for the publication of current research and development information on medical chemical, biological and radiological defense, as well as training, doctrine, and problems related to chemical, biological and radiological casualties. JMedCBR is sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Chem-Bio Technologies Directorate as part of its scientific outreach program in chemical and biological defense solutions for the Department of Defense. In addition to scientific and medical research, JMedCBR hosts an archive of related papers from authors in the field. Although organized into annual issues, articles are published on the web continuously. The complete JMedCBR is published electronically and is made available to the scientific community free of charge. JMedCBR is committed to providing its readers with quality scientific information and critical analyses. All submissions are peer-reviewed by an editorial board of recognized and respected international scientists who represent expertise in different aspects of medical chemical, biological and radiological defense. Contributions to JMedCBR must be original works of the author(s) and must not have been previously published or simultaneously submitted to other publications. The author(s) transfer the copyright of articles published in JMedCBR to the journal. A copyright transfer form must accompany each manuscript submission. For more information on submitting to JMedCBR, see the Authors' Guide, available at http://www.jmedcbr.org/authorGuide.html.(author)

  20. Qualification diploma in radiological and medical physics. Evolution of the initial training of hospital physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammadi, A.

    2009-01-01

    This series of slides presents: - the evolution of the radio-physicists training since its creation (history, 1995-2005 era, 2005-2009 changes); - the qualification diploma in radiological and medical physics (QDRMP - DQPRM in French) in figures (validating services, number of qualified people); - the QDRMP context and goals (strength needs, limited number of candidates); - the means implemented to reach the goals; - the perspectives (increase of students number, continuous training). (J.S.)

  1. Concept of radiological, medical and social protection of the population of Russia affected by accidental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osechinski, I.V.; Ivanov, E.V.; Ramzaev, P.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Tsyb, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    Main principles of population radiation protection from various accidental exposure, including the Chernobyl accident, have been implemented in officially approved Concept ''On radiological, medical, social protection and rehabilitation of the Russian Federation population affected by accidental radiation exposure''. The concept includes basic principles of radiation protection, designation of regional radionuclide contaminated territories, records and registers of exposed persons, health protection and rehabilitation, socio-economic and legal aspects

  2. Organisational aspects of the qualification and involvement of Medical Physicists in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, J.

    2004-01-01

    The specialist in Medical Physics has a key position in Quality Assurance process at diagnostic and therapeutic process and in Radiation Protection at medical use of ionizing radiation. The International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation of IAEA recommend and the EURATOM Directives 96/23 and 97/43 require qualified expert in medical physics to be involved in all the activities with ionizing radiation. In radiotherapeutic process this expert shall be closely involved and in nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology this specialist shall be available. The International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP) as well as a number of national organizations for Medical Physics in different countries have a clear concept for the qualification levels of the medical physics specialists, for the recognition scheme of their qualification and for the organization of the medical physics activities in a clinical environment. The legal requirements for medical physics expert's involvement in medicine is introducing in Bulgaria with the new Ordinance for Radiation Protection of Individuals at Medical Exposure that is expected to come into force in the beginning of next year. Some problems for discussion are submitted here finding necessary changes in the existing system for education and training of Medical physicists as well as in the organization of their involvement in health centers in the country. (author)

  3. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed. - Highlights: • The hazards associated to the use of radioactive sources must be taken into account. • Security issues are of paramount importance in the use of radioactive sources. • Radiation sources can be used to perpetrate terrorist acts (RDDs, INDs, REDs). • DSRS and orphan sources trigger radiological protection, safety and security concerns. • Regulatory control, from cradle to grave, of radioactive sources is mandatory.

  4. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahle, Larry

    2007-10-01

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241 Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

  5. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahle, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241 Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R and D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities

  6. Presentation of the main regulatory provisions applicable in medical and dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this document is to give an overview of the regulation framework to physicians, radiologists, dental surgeons, medical personnel employers, and persons with abilities in radioprotection. It addresses the procedures of declaration and authorization of possession and use of electric equipment generating ionizing radiation, the different persons intervening to ensure the radioprotection of patients and workers, the laying-out conditions for a radiology installation, the different aspects of population and worker radioprotection and of patient radioprotection, the maintenance and quality control of medical equipment, the declaration of incidents at the ASN, and radioprotection inspection

  7. Presentation of the main regulatory provisions applicable in medical and dental radiology. October 2016 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-10-01

    This document is an update of a previous version published in 2013. Its aim is to give an overview of the regulation framework to physicians, radiologists, dental surgeons, medical personnel employers, and persons with abilities in radioprotection. It addresses the procedures of declaration and authorization of possession and use of electric equipment generating ionizing radiation, the different persons intervening to ensure the radioprotection of patients and workers, the laying-out conditions for a radiology installation, the different aspects of population and worker radioprotection and of patient radioprotection, the maintenance and quality control of medical equipment, the declaration of incidents at the ASN, and radioprotection inspection

  8. Presentation of the main regulatory provisions applicable in medical and dental radiology - October 2013 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    This document is an update of a previous version published in May 2012. Its aim is to give an overview of the regulation framework to physicians, radiologists, dental surgeons, medical personnel employers, and persons with abilities in radioprotection. It addresses the procedures of declaration and authorization of possession and use of electric equipment generating ionizing radiation, the different persons intervening to ensure the radioprotection of patients and workers, the laying-out conditions for a radiology installation, the different aspects of population and worker radioprotection and of patient radioprotection, the maintenance and quality control of medical equipment, the declaration of incidents at the ASN, and radioprotection inspection

  9. Presentation of the main regulatory provisions applicable in medical and dental radiology - May 2012 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This document is an update of a previous version published in 2010. Its aim is to give an overview of the regulation framework to physicians, radiologists, dental surgeons, medical personnel employers, and persons with abilities in radioprotection. It addresses the procedures of declaration and authorization of possession and use of electric equipment generating ionizing radiation, the different persons intervening to ensure the radioprotection of patients and workers, the laying-out conditions for a radiology installation, the different aspects of population and worker radioprotection and of patient radioprotection, the maintenance and quality control of medical equipment, the declaration of incidents at the ASN, and radioprotection inspection

  10. Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Advanced Search. Journal Home > Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Advanced Search. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Computer science education for medical informaticians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Judith R; Price, Susan L

    2004-03-18

    The core curriculum in the education of medical informaticians remains a topic of concern and discussion. This paper reports on a survey of medical informaticians with Master's level credentials that asked about computer science (CS) topics or skills that they need in their employment. All subjects were graduates or "near-graduates" of a single medical informatics Master's program that they entered with widely varying educational backgrounds. The survey instrument was validated for face and content validity prior to use. All survey items were rated as having some degree of importance in the work of these professionals, with retrieval and analysis of data from databases, database design and web technologies deemed most important. Least important were networking skills and object-oriented design and concepts. These results are consistent with other work done in the field and suggest that strong emphasis on technical skills, particularly databases, data analysis, web technologies, computer programming and general computer science are part of the core curriculum for medical informatics.

  12. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, You Jin; Yoon, Dae Young; Yun, Eun Joo; Baek, Sora; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010

  13. Science and Values in Radiological Protection - Helsinki, Finland, 15-17 January 2008. Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Key scientific challenges arising from ongoing radiobiological research have been identified recently. From this scientific base, the possible implications for radiological protection science are expected to be further elaborated. Through discussions among members of various NEA committees, it is clear that there is a need for radiological protection policy makers, regulators and practitioners to better understand possible developments coming from radiological protection science. At the same time, there is also a need for radiological protection scientists to better understand the broad processes of radiological protection decision making and to better interact with these processes in terms of furnishing input coming from their research. Participants in this workshop will attempt to identify elements of a framework that are better suited for the integration of new scientific and technological developments and socio-political considerations into radiological protection. This workshop initiated a process of reflection and dialogue among researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders that will, in the longer term: - improve understanding in both the research and policy communities of what is at stake in the system of radiological protection as scientific knowledge and social values evolve; - contribute to the development of a more shared view of emerging scientific and societal challenges to radiological protection, taking into account existing differences; - identify research that will better inform decision makers' judgments on emerging issues; - be the first step in the identification of elements of a framework that is better suited for the integration of new scientific and technological developments and socio-political considerations into radiological protection; and - identify the most appropriate next steps in this process. To achieve the above objectives, selected examples of emerging radiological protection issues were addressed during the workshop. The

  14. A study of radiological protection for women of reproductive age in diagnostic radiology. Questionnaire for medical radiation technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubone, Chie; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    There has been great concern regarding the radiation protection for women of reproductive age when exposed to diagnostic radiation. The 10-day-rule proposed by the ICRP has not been recommended since 1983 because the risk to embryo and fetus within four weeks after menstruation may be small. However, some expects see that incomplete abandon of the 10-day-rule might cause confusion among the medical doctors and patients, and consequently unwarranted abortion happens. This paper surveyed the views of radiation technologies in hospitals and discussed how radiation exposure of women of reproductive age in medicine should be controlled. We found that the views to be 10-day-rule were spilt 50:50 and that radiation technologists do not necessarily think the 10-day-rule should be abandoned. Even the radiation technologists who are supposed to be able to explain to the patients the health risk following diagnostic exposure do not fully understand the risk involved. In conclusion, although a low-dose risk of diagnostic exposure should be sufficiently educated in order to obtain an exact understanding, the 10-day-rule may be useful in order to actually avoid any trouble in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  15. Proceedings of the 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health; 13. Brazilian Congress on Biomedical Engineering; 4. Brazilian Congress of Physicists on Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Biology and Nuclear Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.T.; Martins, H.L.; Muehlen, S.S.; Rockman, T.M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health presents works of several scientific institutions, including topics on bioengineering; modelling and simulation; sensors and transducers; ultrasonic on medicine; instrumentation processing of signs and medical images; biomedical informatics and clinical software; engineering of rehabilitation; bio-materials and bio-mechanical; clinical engineering; in vivo and in vitro nuclear medicine; radioisotope production and utilization; radiology; radiology protection and dosimetry; radiotherapy; evaluation of technology on health and education. (C.G.C.)

  16. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Van Cu; Nguyen Huu Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  17. Radiological Medical Device Innovation: Approvals via the Premarket Approval Pathway From 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Comeron W; Hayman, Emily L; Finkle, Joshua H; Walter, Jessica R; Xu, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to critically assess the clinical evidence leading to radiologic medical device approvals via the premarket approval pathway from 2000 to 2015. This study used the publically available FDA premarket database for radiologic device approvals over the past 15 years (September 1, 2000, to August 31, 2015). Approval characteristics were collected for each device, and statistical analysis was performed on the data for each pivotal trial. Additionally, methodological quality of the pivotal trial was determined using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Twenty-three class III radiologic device approvals were identified, with breast imaging accounting for 16 (70%) and computer-aided detection software accounting for 9 (39%) approvals. The median premarket approval time was 475 days (range, 180-1,116). Twenty-one devices were approved on the basis of multireader, multicenter studies, one on the basis of a randomized controlled trial, and one on the basis of a preclinical technical equivalence trial. The median number of patients per pivotal trial was 201 (range, 25-3,946). Twenty-six of the 34 pivotal trials (76%) had at least one methodologic bias. Breast imaging devices had a greater number of patients per pivotal trial (P = .009) and more prospective studies. With regard to all modalities, increased time to device approval correlated with weaker trial quality (r = 0.600, P assessing diagnostic technologies. Given that radiologic devices play a key role in modern medicine, further efforts should be made to increase transparency of clinical data leading to approval. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reist, H W [ed.; Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division`s progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department`s publications is included. figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reist, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division's progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department's publications is included. figs., tabs., refs

  20. Information on radiation hazard and on radiological protection in medical school in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagini, C.

    1993-01-01

    The state of teaching Radiation Protection in Medical School in Italy was considered. An historical approach was utilized, in order to define periods of time characterized by different conditions. Some data are collected by a concise enquiry on the information given during the course of Radiology in the second triennial cycle, and on some other teaching courses including information on radiation effects. The conclusion is that teaching times are exceedingly reduced, and the need of improving the diffusion of knowledge in the field is stressed. An official Act of the OECD and of European Community is expected, with the aim of emphasizing the importance of the information of doctors on Radiation Protection as a problem of public interest. A proposal is advanced of implementing the Teaching of Radiobiology in the second triennial cycle, changing the name of the course in 'Radiobiology and Radiological Protection'. 6 tabs

  1. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, You Jin; Yoon, Dae Young; Yun, Eun Joo; Baek, Sora; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  3. A Survey of Interventional Radiology Awareness Among Final-Year Medical Students in a European Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Sum; Keeling, Aoife N.; Lee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  4. Interpretive versus noninterpretive content in top-selling radiology textbooks: what are we teaching medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Emily M; Vella, Maya; Straus, Christopher M; Phelps, Andrew; Naeger, David M

    2015-04-01

    There are little data as to whether appropriate, cost effective, and safe ordering of imaging examinations are adequately taught in US medical school curricula. We sought to determine the proportion of noninterpretive content (such as appropriate ordering) versus interpretive content (such as reading a chest x-ray) in the top-selling medical student radiology textbooks. We performed an online search to identify a ranked list of the six top-selling general radiology textbooks for medical students. Each textbook was reviewed including content in the text, tables, images, figures, appendices, practice questions, question explanations, and glossaries. Individual pages of text and individual images were semiquantitatively scored on a six-level scale as to the percentage of material that was interpretive versus noninterpretive. The predominant imaging modality addressed in each was also recorded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. All six books had more interpretive content. On average, 1.4 pages of text focused on interpretation for every one page focused on noninterpretive content. Seventeen images/figures were dedicated to interpretive skills for every one focused on noninterpretive skills. In all books, the largest proportion of text and image content was dedicated to plain films (51.2%), with computed tomography (CT) a distant second (16%). The content on radiographs (3.1:1) and CT (1.6:1) was more interpretive than not. The current six top-selling medical student radiology textbooks contain a preponderance of material teaching image interpretation compared to material teaching noninterpretive skills, such as appropriate imaging examination selection, rational utilization, and patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving beyond quality control in diagnostic radiology and the role of the clinically qualified medical physicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, H; Christaki, K; Healy, B; Loreti, G; Poli, G L; Toroi, P; Meghzifene, A

    2017-09-01

    Quality control (QC), according to ISO definitions, represents the most basic level of quality. It is considered to be the snapshot of the performance or the characteristics of a product or service, in order to verify that it complies with the requirements. Although it is usually believed that "the role of medical physicists in Diagnostic Radiology is QC", this, not only limits the contribution of medical physicists, but is also no longer adequate to meet the needs of Diagnostic Radiology in terms of Quality. In order to assure quality practices more organized activities and efforts are required in the modern era of diagnostic radiology. The complete system of QC is just one element of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program that aims at ensuring that the requirements of quality of a product or service will consistently be fulfilled. A comprehensive Quality system, starts even before the procurement of any equipment, as the need analysis and the development of specifications are important components under the QA framework. Further expanding this framework of QA, a comprehensive Quality Management System can provide additional benefits to a Diagnostic Radiology service. Harmonized policies and procedures and elements such as mission statement or job descriptions can provide clarity and consistency in the services provided, enhancing the outcome and representing a solid platform for quality improvement. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promotes this comprehensive quality approach in diagnostic imaging and especially supports the field of comprehensive clinical audits as a tool for quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, A U; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J V K; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V K; Pradhan, A S

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  7. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp, linearity of tube current (mA station and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model RAD/FLU-9001, dose Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model 6001, ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%, lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%, nonlinearity of mA station (16% and timer (9%, improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%, faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%, nonavailability of warning light (red light at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%, and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%. The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  8. "Flipping" the introductory clerkship in radiology: impact on medical student performance and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Lily M; Bartolotta, Roger J; Giambrone, Ashley E; Davi, Caryn; Min, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Among methods of "blended learning" (ie, combining online modules with in-class instruction), the "flipped classroom" involves student preclass review of material while reserving class time for interactive knowledge application. We integrated blended learning methodology in a "flipped" introductory clerkship in radiology, and assessed the impact of this approach on the student educational experience (performance and perception). In preparation for the "flipped clerkship," radiology faculty and residents created e-learning modules that were uploaded to an open-source website. The clerkship's 101 rising third-year medical students were exposed to different teaching methods during the course, such as blended learning, traditional lecture learning, and independent learning. Students completed precourse and postcourse knowledge assessments and surveys. Student knowledge improved overall as a result of taking the course. Blended learning achieved greater pretest to post-test improvement of high statistical significance (P value, .0060) compared to lecture learning alone. Blended learning also achieved greater pretest to post-test improvement of borderline statistical significance (P value, .0855) in comparison to independent learning alone. The difference in effectiveness of independent learning versus lecture learning was not statistically significant (P value, .2730). Student perceptions of the online modules used in blended learning portions of the course were very positive. They specifically enjoyed the self-paced interactivity and the ability to return to the modules in the future. Blended learning can be successfully applied to the introductory clerkship in radiology. This teaching method offers educators an innovative and efficient approach to medical student education in radiology. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, A.U.; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J.V.K.; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V.K.; Pradhan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body. (author)

  10. The report of medical exposures in diagnostic radiology. Pt. 1. The questionnaire of medical exposure and standard radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakawa, Yasuhiro; Matsumura, Yoshitaka; Iwasaki, Takanobu; Segawa, Hiroo; Yasuda, Sadatoshi; Kusuhara, Toshiaki

    1997-01-01

    We had made reports of patient radiation exposure for doctors to judge adaptation of medical radiation rightly. By these reports the doctors can be offered data of exposure dose and somatic effect. First, we sent out questionnaires so that we grasped the doctor's understanding about radiation exposure. Consequently we understood that the doctors had demanded data of exposure dose and somatic effect. Secondly, by the result of questionnaires we made the tables of exposure dose about radiological examination. As a result we have be able to presume exposure dose about high radiation sensitive organization as concrete figures. (author)

  11. Deepening the reform of medical education, strengthening the training of reserve specialists in interventional radiology: a profound rethinking based on a survey of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Chongyang; Di Zhenhai; Li Linsun

    2010-01-01

    Although the interventional radiology, a rapidly expanding medical specialty, has already been widely popularized and generally accepted for many years, it is still facing lots of challenges and turf wars, such as the brain drain, understaffed and the gap between the old and the young. This article attempts to analyze the reasons through investigating the current teaching situation of interventional radiology in medical colleges and finding out the undergraduates' attitude to interventional radiology, in order to explore possible paths for solving the imbalance between supply and demand of qualified personnel. (authors)

  12. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  13. Course on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices (4th Ed.) : Tel educational through Internet on Health Science; Curso de Proteccion Radiologica y garantia de calidad en radiodiagnostico (4Ed): teleensenanza a traves de Internet en ciencias de la salud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M.; Chico, P.; Armero, D.; Saura Iniesta, A. M.; Fernandez, H.; Vicente, V.

    2006-07-01

    The creation of an interdepartmental project subsidised by the Spanish Ministry of Education has made possible the elaboration of a series of specific didactic materials on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices, which has led to the publication of a specific manual and practical notebook. As a consequence, this material now constitutes the working base for those professionals exposed to ionising radiation who are following the first Tel educational continuous formation course in Spanish via the Internet on this subject. (Author)

  14. Editorial: Journal of Contemporary Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dr. Abbas Matrood Bashi

    2016-04-01

    Our journal deals with different subjects of basic and clinical medical sciences. It is an open access, peer-reviewed journal which has been accepted both nationally and internationally and encourages the researchers to publish with this journal. This journal addresses four major aspects of writing journal-style scientific papers: (1 fundamental style considerations, (2 a suggested strategy for efficiently writing up research results, (3 the nuts and bolts of format and content of each section of a paper (describes how to follow instructions precisely to write a scientific paper, and (4 basic information regarding peer critiques of scientific writing.

  15. Perspective of Dimensional Analysis in Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalewski Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents several applications of the dimensional analysis method to problems investigated in medical sciences. The method is used to analyze various complex processes without using formal laws governing the same. It is particularly suitable for a general analysis of fluid transfer (liquids and gases in the human body. This paper mainly serves as an overview of selected applications, mostly those emerging in the recent years, and includes a discussion of the mathematical fundamentals of dimensional analysis together followed by its critical analysis. Containing detailed calculations of two examples, the paper also serves as training material in the area of the computational method of the dimensional analysis algorithm.

  16. The 2013 Dade W. Moeller Lecture: Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Soon after the 9–11 attacks, politicians and scientists began to question our ability to cope with a large-scale radiological terrorism incident. The outline of what was needed was fairly obvious: the ability to prevent such an attack; methods to cope with the medical consequences; the ability to clean up afterwards; and the tools to figure out who perpetrated the attack and bring them to justice. The medical response needed three components: the technology to rapidly determine the radiation doses received by a large number of people, methods for alleviating acute hematological radiation injuries, and therapies for mitigation and treatment of chronic radiation injuries. Research done to date has shown that a realistic medical response plan is scientifically possible, but the regulatory and financial barriers to achieving this may currently be insurmountable. PMID:24978287

  17. Introduction of low-osmolar contrast agents in radiology: medical, economic, legal, and public policy issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, P.D.; Rosenquist, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    This case study of the public policy implications of introducing a new technology in radiology, namely, low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM), raises the issues of whether and how to place appropriate limits on new technologies. Although these contrast media represent small episodic costs, they may add up to an aggregate expenditure of nearly $1 billion per year if used for all contrast injections. As a result, this technology raises a number of important medical, economic, legal, and public policy questions. The cost-effectiveness analysis and an analysis of the medical evidence suggest that LOCM should be limited to high-risk patients. The authors discuss in this article how the legal system might respond to such limitations, and they consider various public policy options for adopting restrictions on use. They conclude that the medical profession should take the lead in developing protocols for appropriate assessment, reimbursement, and use of LOCM

  18. National Institute of Radiological Sciences annual report. April 1997 - March 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Annual Report summarizes research activities and achievements of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in the fiscal years of 1997 (from April 1997 to March 1998). The clinical trials for cancer treatments using a heavy ion, one of the main projects at present, has been progressed for the past 4 years expanding indication to various organs. The outcomes of the trials were reported at Network Meeting for Heavy Ion Radiotherapy held semiannually in September, 1997 and March, 1998. The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been operated without substantial troubles for the trial and collaborative research. Training of specialists who deal with heavy particle radiotherapy is also important role. The 5 groups of the project studies started in 1995 and 1996. The two special researches 'Biological studies on detriments and their modifying factors' and Kinetics of radioactive substances in environments and measurements of exposures 'were finalized. The summarized reports are planned to be published in the following year. A comprehensive research of 'Heavy ion projects' has been performed by the continuing 5 gropes involving domestic and overseas experts. A new project on brain researches began this year, as a basic research on human studies in order to elucidate brain functions and its disorders. The studies have been carried out by a new group crossing over the existing divisions and the research groups. New outstanding developments in the field can be expected on the basis of accumulated achievements in nuclear medicine and radiation hazard related to brain. The first Forum for Emergency Measures of Acute Radiation Exposure was held in August. The International Seminar on Heavy Ion Radiotherapy was held in November, 1977. The International Workshop on Comparative Evaluation of Health Effects of Environmental Toxicants Derived from Advanced Technologies was held in January, 1998. The annual report includes 67 articles, those are

  19. National Institute of Radiological Sciences annual report. April 1997 - March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Annual Report summarizes research activities and achievements of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in the fiscal years of 1997 (from April 1997 to March 1998). The clinical trials for cancer treatments using a heavy ion, one of the main projects at present, has been progressed for the past 4 years expanding indication to various organs. The outcomes of the trials were reported at Network Meeting for Heavy Ion Radiotherapy held semiannually in September, 1997 and March, 1998. The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been operated without substantial troubles for the trial and collaborative research. Training of specialists who deal with heavy particle radiotherapy is also important role. The 5 groups of the project studies started in 1995 and 1996. The two special researches `Biological studies on detriments and their modifying factors` and Kinetics of radioactive substances in environments and measurements of exposures `were finalized. The summarized reports are planned to be published in the following year. A comprehensive research of `Heavy ion projects` has been performed by the continuing 5 gropes involving domestic and overseas experts. A new project on brain researches began this year, as a basic research on human studies in order to elucidate brain functions and its disorders. The studies have been carried out by a new group crossing over the existing divisions and the research groups. New outstanding developments in the field can be expected on the basis of accumulated achievements in nuclear medicine and radiation hazard related to brain. The first Forum for Emergency Measures of Acute Radiation Exposure was held in August. The International Seminar on Heavy Ion Radiotherapy was held in November, 1977. The International Workshop on Comparative Evaluation of Health Effects of Environmental Toxicants Derived from Advanced Technologies was held in January, 1998. The annual report includes 67 articles, those are

  20. Development of an informative system on aspects of radiological protection in the medical practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez B, G.M.; Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N.; Hernandez A, R.; Valdes R, M.; Cardenas H, J.; Zaldivar H, W.; Diaz B, M.; Machado T, A.

    2006-01-01

    Today in day is difficult to imagine the development of the medical practices in the diagnosis and treatment of diverse illnesses without the use of the ionizing radiations. In spite of the diffusion and application of these practices, the patients and the public in general don't have full conscience of like the procedures are carried out and the risks that these involve. For it diverse international and national organizations in the last years recommend to include in the programs of radiological protection, all the information that should be given to the patients and the one public that attend as users to the medical institutions to undergo to procedures that imply the use of the ionizing radiations. In Cuba a growing and quick tendency exists to the introduction of nuclear techniques for medical ends, however paradoxically the relative aspects to the communication to the patients and the public in general about the risks of the procedures to that they will be subjected and in consequence on the measures to minimize them is not adequate. Keeping in mind the above-mentioned, specialists of national centers linked to the control and consultant ship in the topics of radiological protection in the medical practices that use ionizing radiations, they worked in the country in the design of an information system that should contribute to elevate the population's culture before the mentioned aspects. The present work describes the structure of this system in function of the different medical attention levels of our national health system. Additionally it exposes the development of a package of varied informative and training tools among those that are folding, posters, guides, instructions, CD Show that its approach general and specific aspects of the uses and risks of medical practices in nuclear medicine, radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy directed so much to health professionals, patients as public in general. (Author)

  1. Computer in radiology: Physicians memorandum and administration of medical practice aided by COMRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.

    1983-01-01

    One year after introduction of the COMRAD EDP system of text processing to the radiological practice of the author, the advantages resulting for the physician and medical staff as well as for the transferring physician and their patients are presented and the econimic efficiency is determined. The high capacity of COMRAD including the automatic text processing for a complete computer aided administration of medical practice and the accounting department, is based on the advanced technological development of microelectronics and combined with a user specific software. The hardware equipment enables multiprogram processing, data processing in on-line operation as well as short access-time of stored data, due to the rapid tracertechnology of the computer. The software equipment, with text processing and a medical practice administration system, permits the regular workload to be handled efficiently and reliable. The main issue is text processing using a text rail. An integrated part of the result output is the performance capacity enabling automatic settlement of accounts with health insurance agencies and privatly insured patients. Statistical evaluation, for instance the daily performance efficiency of the practice can be recalled any time. An accounting system accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll and general accounting supplements the software package enabling a computer aided handling of all administrative tasks required in a radiological practice. (orig.)

  2. From Bertha Roentgen's hand to current medical imaging: one century of radiological progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    From 1896 to 1996 radiology progressed at an amazing and unforeseen pace. The analysis of a few examples shows that these developments were due to a few groups and were enhanced by a close interaction between radiologists, physicists, engineers and manufacturers. Radiologists emphasize needs and are often able to suggest avenues for research; engineers exploit the basic discoveries of physicists and find new technologies. Manufacturers proceed from prototypes to instruments that can be built on an industrial scale at an affordable price. This system works efficiently only in a few developed countries. The gap between developing and developed countries is not narrowing and a large proportion of the world population has no access to adequate medical imaging. Very sophisticated imaging technologies used in industrialized countries are costly in terms of both money and human resources and in developing countries may usurp the limited assets that are needed for public health. Thus, the current challenge facing radiology is to take advantage of technological progress, firstly for building affordable and easy to maintain equipment giving images of sufficient quality, and secondly, through progress in telecommunications and computers, to improve medical education, telemedicine and build hospital networks. These networks will enable easier access to consultations with specialized radiologists and will give physicians the means of sharing their medical expertise. The aim is not only to narrow the gap but to provide a sufficient level of care in imaging medicine and radiotherapy throughout the world. This will only be achieved through a clear strategy and adequate human, technical and financial resources. The role of the radiological community, in particular ISR, RSNA and EAR, shall be crucial in this endeavour. (orig.)

  3. Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences: A bibliometric assessment 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Zameer Hussain; Umedani, Loung V

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the growth of scientific research, authors' productivity, affiliation with the institute and geographic locations published in the Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences during the period of 2001 - 2010. This numerical analysis was conducted during mid-August 2016 to mid-October, 2016. The data for the study was downloaded from websites of e-journal of Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS) and Pak Medi-Net Com. A total number of 1199 articled were covered by PJMS in 10 volumes and 40 issues with contribution of 3798 (3%) authors during 2001 - 2010. The average number of papers per issue is 30%. A gender wise contribution of males was higher 3050 (80%) than the females 748 (20%). A majority of articles were multi-authored 1052 (87%) as opposed to single author contribution 147 (13%). All 1199 articles were covered under four major disciplines i.e Basic medical sciences, medicine & allied, surgery & allied and radiological sciences and 39 sub-specialties according to medical subject headings (MeSH). It observed that 467 (39%) articles were published in Pakistan and 732 (61%) articles produced by other 32 countries. The Karachi city of Pakistan has produced 199 (16%) articles as highest as its national level and followed by Tehran (Iran) 77 (6%) as followed internationally. This study reveals that the participation of 32 countries in the PJMS publications proves it to be an internationally circulated journal to support research with the constant approach of publishing articles to each volume in basic medical sciences, biomedical, clinical and public health sciences. Abbreviations: DOAJ: Directory of Open Access Journals IMEMR: Index Medicus Eastern Mediterranean Region HEC: Higher Education Commission (Pakistan) PJMS: Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences MeSH: Medical Subject Headings PMDC: Pakistan Medical & Dental Council SCIE: Science Citation Index Expanded.

  4. Mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists); Mammadiagnostik fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-07-01

    The text book on mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists) covers the following issues: Anatomy, development and physiology of mammary glands; tumor development an breast cancer risk; pathology, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography: physical-technical fundamentals; mammography: analogue technique; mammography: digital technique; mammography: quality assurance; mammography: legal questions and radiation protection; mammography: new developments; mammography: setting technique; mammography: use and appraisal; mamma-sonography: technique and methodology; mamma-sonography: assignment and appraisal, mamma-NMR: technique and methodology; mamma-NMR: assignment and appraisal lymph node diagnostics; mamma interventions; biopsy; mamma interventions: marking examination concepts; therapeutic concepts; hygienic concepts; communication and interaction.

  5. Program of training and technical expertise in radiation protection for personnel of medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio R. de

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to verify the actual conditions for the training of technicians in Radiology, in relation to the knowledge of radiation protection in the field of Medical Diagnostic Radiology. To evaluate the knowledge of professionals was prepared a questionnaire on the topic, having been answered by workers with varied experience. The questionnaire was divided into three parts, being the initial self-evaluation, followed by closed and open issues, all specific knowledge. With a total of 55 questionnaires answered, it was found that 85% of respondents consider themselves able to work in the area performing the function, but when questioned about the technical details regarding the exposure to ionizing radiation, it was found that only 15% of respondents had some knowledge about the subject. In relation to Radiological Protection, was found that little more than 10% of the respondents know about the subject. The results found in this survey outlined the creation of a technical specialization course in radiation protection, which is part of the permanent staff of course of the Polytechnical School of Health of FIOCRUZ, solving, partially, one of the problems pointed out today by health bodies, that is the lack of trained personnel

  6. Enterprise-wide PACS: beyond radiology, an architecture to manage all medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandon, David; Lovis, Christian; Geissbühler, Antoine; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2005-08-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) have the vocation to manage all medical images acquired within the hospital. To address the various situations encountered in the imaging specialties, the traditional architecture used for the radiology department has to evolve. We present our preliminarily results toward an enterprise-wide PACS intended to support all kind of image production in medicine, from biomolecular images to whole-body pictures. Our solution is based on an existing radiologic PACS system from which images are distributed through an electronic patient record to all care facilities. This platform is enriched with a flexible integration framework supporting digital image communication in medicine (DICOM) and DICOM-XML formats. In addition, a generic workflow engine highly customizable is used to drive work processes. Echocardiology; hematology; ear, nose, and throat; and dermatology, including wounds, follow-up is the first implemented extensions outside of radiology. We also propose a global strategy for further developments based on three possible architectures for an enterprise-wide PACS.

  7. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  8. Medical student knowledge regarding radiology before and after a radiological anatomy module: implications for vertical integration and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; O'Connor, Owen J; Cryan, John F; Maher, Michael M

    2014-10-01

    To examine the impact that anatomy-focused radiology teaching has on non-examined knowledge regarding radiation safety and radiology as a specialty. First-year undergraduate medical students completed surveys prior to and after undertaking the first-year anatomy programme that incorporates radiological anatomy. Students were asked opinions on preferred learning methodology and tested on understanding of radiology as a specialty and radiation safety. Pre-module and post-module response rates were 93 % (157/168) and 85 % (136/160), respectively. Pre-module and post-module, self-directed learning (SDL) ranked eighth (of 11) for preferred gross-anatomy teaching formats. Correct responses regarding radiologist/radiographer roles varied from 28-94 % on 16 questions with 4/16 significantly improving post-module. Identification of modalities that utilise radiation significantly improved for five of eight modalities post-module but knowledge regarding relative amount of modality-specific radiation use was variable pre-module and post-module. SDL is not favoured as an anatomy teaching method. Exposure of students to a radiological anatomy module delivered by senior clinical radiologists improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use, but there was no improvement in knowledge regarding radiation exposure relative per modality. A possible explanation is that students recall knowledge imparted in didactic lectures but do little reading around the subject when the content is not examined. • Self-directed learning is not favoured as a gross anatomy teaching format amongst medical students. • An imaging anatomy-focused module improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use. • Detailed knowledge of modality-specific radiation exposure remained suboptimal post-module. • Knowledge of roles within a clinical radiology department showed little change post-module.

  9. Structure and content of radiology reports, a quantitative and qualitative study in eight medical centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, Jan M.L.; Weyler, Joost J.; Parizel, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: In order to determine how the quality of the radiology report can be improved, the variation in content, form and length of the report needs to be examined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the length and structure of radiology reports (reports of abdominal CT examinations) in eight hospitals in the Netherlands and Flanders, the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Materials and methods: Eight hundred reports - 100 from each collaborating center - were collected. After exclusion of the reports that did not fulfill the criteria for a standard CT examination of the abdomen, 525 were retained for further study. The structure of each report was analyzed and the constituting parts (technical information, description of the findings, conclusion, advice, remark, note) were determined. The character and word count of the report and its constituting parts were measured and the results were grouped according to the country (Netherlands vs. Belgium/Flanders), the qualification of the radiologist (staff members vs. residents.) and the nature of the hospital (university medical centers vs. community hospitals). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the Netherlands and Flanders, and between staff members and residents. The authors also found a wide variety in the lay-out and the overall content of the radiology report. Conclusion: While most of the differences we found are probably rooted in local tradition, a standard model for the radiology report in centers sharing the same language may be a means to avoid interpretation mistakes by referring physicians, and to promote better care.

  10. Medical follow up of ten patients victims of the radiological accident occurred in Goiania, Goias State, Brazil 1988/1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, M.P.; Morais, M.S.A.; Silva, J.F.; Assis, P.R.; Oliveira, A.R.; Santos, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    The author makes an update of the medical aspects of ten victims of the radiological accident occurred in Goiania in September 1987. These patients received specialized treatment during the critical phase at Marcilio Dias Naval Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Actually these patients are under medical follow-up at Leide das Neves Ferreira Foundation since march 1988. The clinical, haematological and laboratorial results are presented and discussed. The importance of a close medical follow-up direct victims of a radiological accident is stressed. (author)

  11. The medical science DMZ: a network design pattern for data-intensive medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisert, Sean; Dart, Eli; Barnett, William; Balas, Edward; Cuff, James; Grossman, Robert L; Berman, Ari; Shankar, Anurag; Tierney, Brian

    2017-10-06

    We describe a detailed solution for maintaining high-capacity, data-intensive network flows (eg, 10, 40, 100 Gbps+) in a scientific, medical context while still adhering to security and privacy laws and regulations. High-end networking, packet-filter firewalls, network intrusion-detection systems. We describe a "Medical Science DMZ" concept as an option for secure, high-volume transport of large, sensitive datasets between research institutions over national research networks, and give 3 detailed descriptions of implemented Medical Science DMZs. The exponentially increasing amounts of "omics" data, high-quality imaging, and other rapidly growing clinical datasets have resulted in the rise of biomedical research "Big Data." The storage, analysis, and network resources required to process these data and integrate them into patient diagnoses and treatments have grown to scales that strain the capabilities of academic health centers. Some data are not generated locally and cannot be sustained locally, and shared data repositories such as those provided by the National Library of Medicine, the National Cancer Institute, and international partners such as the European Bioinformatics Institute are rapidly growing. The ability to store and compute using these data must therefore be addressed by a combination of local, national, and industry resources that exchange large datasets. Maintaining data-intensive flows that comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other regulations presents a new challenge for biomedical research. We describe a strategy that marries performance and security by borrowing from and redefining the concept of a Science DMZ, a framework that is used in physical sciences and engineering research to manage high-capacity data flows. By implementing a Medical Science DMZ architecture, biomedical researchers can leverage the scale provided by high-performance computer and cloud storage facilities and national high

  12. Cost benefit analysis of the radiological shielding of medical cyclotrons using a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar

    2001-01-01

    Adequate radiation shielding is vital to the safe operation of modern commercial medical cyclotrons producing large yields of short-lived radioisotopes. The radiological shielding constitutes a significant capital investment for any new cyclotron-based radioisotope production facility; hence, the shielding design requires an accurate cost-benefit analysis often based on a complex multi-variant optimization technique. This paper demonstrates the application of a Genetic Algorithm (GA) for the optimum design of the high yield target cave of a Medical Cyclotron radioisotope production facility based in Sydney, Australia. The GA is a novel optimization technique that mimics the Darwinian Evolution paradigm and is ideally suited to search for global optima in a large multi-dimensional solution space

  13. Quality index in medical radiology; Indice de qualidade em radiologia medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre Goncalves; Drexler, Gunter G.; Almeida, Carlos E. de, E-mail: luisalexandregm@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IBRAG/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia. Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Navarro, Marcus V. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    In the literature there are articles with methods for the calculation of potential risk in medical radiodiagnostics institutions: Evaluation Model for Potential Risk (MARP). These articles present results based on documental evaluation of the institutions, but they suggest that quantitative data from the equipment's quality assurance can be included. This article proposes an evaluation of medical radiology institutions with a variation of the Potential Risk model, which considers, besides the administrative factors, quantitative results from equipment's quality assurance: the quality index. Results of the application of this proposition in 42 institutions are presented, with 52 evaluated conventional X-Ray equipment, located in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (author)

  14. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  15. The medical science DMZ: a network design pattern for data-intensive medical science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peisert, Sean [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of computer Science; Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). ESnet; Barnett, William [Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Inst., Regenstrief Inst.; Balas, Edward [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Global Research Network Operations Center; Cuff, James [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Computing; Grossman, Robert L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Center for Data Intensive Science; Berman, Ari [BioTeam, Middleton, MA (United States); Shankar, Anurag [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Pervasive Technology Inst.; Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). ESnet

    2017-10-06

    We describe a detailed solution for maintaining high-capacity, data-intensive network flows (eg, 10, 40, 100 Gbps+) in a scientific, medical context while still adhering to security and privacy laws and regulations.High-end networking, packet-filter firewalls, network intrusion-detection systems.We describe a "Medical Science DMZ" concept as an option for secure, high-volume transport of large, sensitive datasets between research institutions over national research networks, and give 3 detailed descriptions of implemented Medical Science DMZs.The exponentially increasing amounts of "omics" data, high-quality imaging, and other rapidly growing clinical datasets have resulted in the rise of biomedical research "Big Data." The storage, analysis, and network resources required to process these data and integrate them into patient diagnoses and treatments have grown to scales that strain the capabilities of academic health centers. Some data are not generated locally and cannot be sustained locally, and shared data repositories such as those provided by the National Library of Medicine, the National Cancer Institute, and international partners such as the European Bioinformatics Institute are rapidly growing. The ability to store and compute using these data must therefore be addressed by a combination of local, national, and industry resources that exchange large datasets. Maintaining data-intensive flows that comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other regulations presents a new challenge for biomedical research. We describe a strategy that marries performance and security by borrowing from and redefining the concept of a Science DMZ, a framework that is used in physical sciences and engineering research to manage high-capacity data flows.By implementing a Medical Science DMZ architecture, biomedical researchers can leverage the scale provided by high-performance computer and cloud storage facilities and national high

  16. Analytical Chemistry in the Regulatory Science of Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Guan, Allan; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Phillips, K Scott

    2018-06-12

    In the United States, regulatory science is the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of all Food and Drug Administration-regulated products. Good regulatory science facilitates consumer access to innovative medical devices that are safe and effective throughout the Total Product Life Cycle (TPLC). Because the need to measure things is fundamental to the regulatory science of medical devices, analytical chemistry plays an important role, contributing to medical device technology in two ways: It can be an integral part of an innovative medical device (e.g., diagnostic devices), and it can be used to support medical device development throughout the TPLC. In this review, we focus on analytical chemistry as a tool for the regulatory science of medical devices. We highlight recent progress in companion diagnostics, medical devices on chips for preclinical testing, mass spectrometry for postmarket monitoring, and detection/characterization of bacterial biofilm to prevent infections.

  17. Regenerative medicine: A ray of light for medical science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Supekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The perimeters of medical science have expanded to include regenerative medicine as a translational science, which has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of incapacitating diseases and chronic disorders.

  18. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 -March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  1. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nina L; Spooner, Muirne; Galvin, P Leo; Ti, Joanna P; McElvaney, N Gerald; Lee, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  2. A trend study on radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy and radiological protection for medical exposure in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Gao Linfeng; Yao Jie; Wang Bin; Qian Aijun; Ji Guiyi; Xiao Hong; Zhuo Weihai

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the rapid development of various types of Radiodiagnosis and Radiotherapy in China and aboard, which leads to a dramatic increase of application frequency of medical exposure. Then summaries the trend found through the investigation on the medical exposure levels during the Eleventh Five-year Plan in Shanghai. According to the above analysis, suggestions to strengthen the medical exposure protection are proposed. When the X-ray diagnosis, interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology become indispensable means to modern medicine, the public exposure due to health examinations and disease diagnosis or treatments has been institutions undergoing X-ray diagnosis in Shanghai by the year of 2010, 2.1 more times of that in 1998. During this period, the total number of X-ray diagnosis equipment increased by 57.7%, and the number of X-CT scanners increased by 131.9%. The annual application frequency of X-ray diagnosis was 780.44 person · time for per 1000 population in 2009. Compared with the data in 1996, the total frequency increased by 58.3%, and the frequency of X-CT scans increased 317.l%. In clinical nuclear medicine, compared with the data in 1996, the annual application frequencies increased by 139.4% and 210.6% for diagnosis and therapy in 2008, respectively. In the field of radiation oncology, the annual frequency also increased by 59.9% during the same period. Shanghai pioneered the survey on medical exposure levels during the Eleventh Five-Year Plan period in China, and has accumulated a lot of valuable new information and mastered the development trends of medical exposure. This work lays a solid foundation for effectively strengthening the radiation protection from medical exposure, provides a scientific basis for the rational planning and utilization of health care resources. Meanwhile, this work is also very useful for promoting the healthy development of radiology career while avoiding disadvantages and to the

  3. Interaction effect study on stress reaction and job burnout, personality, self-esteem in radiological medical personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linlin; Feng Liyun; Yang Yanyan; Wu Di

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore interaction effect between stress reaction and job burnout, personality, self-esteem in radiological medical personnel with path analysis. Methods: 728 radiological medical personnels were investigated with Maslach burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), Chinese Perceived Stress Scale (CPSS), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) and Self-esteem Scale. Results: Multiple regression and path analysis revealed that there were statistically significant relation between stress reaction and job burnout, Personality and self-esteem. Conclusion: Psychological stress is a complicated and multiple interaction of psychological stress related factors. (authors)

  4. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 88). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  5. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  7. Evolution of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Osama; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-06

    Charged particles can achieve better dose distribution and higher biological effectiveness compared to photon radiotherapy. Carbon ions are considered an optimal candidate for cancer treatment using particles. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan was the first radiotherapy hospital dedicated for carbon ion treatments in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, the NIRS has pioneered this therapy with more than 69 clinical trials so far, and hundreds of ancillary projects in physics and radiobiology. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of carbon ion radiotherapy at the NIRS and some of the current and future projects in the field.

  8. Radiology Physician Extenders: A Literature Review of the History and Current Roles of Physician Extenders in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Vicki L; Flanagan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the literature review was to assess the origins of radiology physician extenders and examine the current roles found in the literature of advanced practice physician extenders within medical imaging. Twenty-six articles relating to physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), radiologist assistants (RAs), and nuclear medicine advanced associates (NMAAs) were reviewed to discern similarities and differences in history, scope of practice, and roles in the medical imaging field. The literature showed PAs and NPs are working mostly in interventional radiology. PAs, NPs, and RAs perform similar tasks in radiology, including history and physicals, evaluation and management, preprocedure work-up, obtaining informed consent, initial observations/reports, and post-procedure follow-up. NPs and PAs perform a variety of procedures but most commonly vascular access, paracentesis, and thoracentesis. RAs perform gastrointestinal, genitourinary, nonvascular invasive fluoroscopy procedures, and vascular access procedures. The review revealed NMAAs are working in an advanced role, but no specific performances of procedures was found in the literature, only suggested tasks and clinical competencies. PAs, NPs, and RAs are currently the three main midlevel providers used in medical imaging. These midlevel providers are being used in a variety of ways to increase the efficiency of the radiologist and provide diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures to patients. NMAAs are being used in medical imaging but little literature is available on current roles in clinical practice. More research is needed to assess the exact procedures and duties being performed by these medical imaging physician extenders.

  9. Dosimetric and medical aspects of the radiological accident in Goiania in 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    In September 1987, in Goiania, a city of one million inhabitants and capital of the Brazilian State of Goias, a rotating assembly of the shielding head of a teletherapy unit was removed and the capsule containing 50.9 TBq (1375 Ci) of {sup 137}Cs was dismantled. This serious radiological accident resulted in four fatalities, injuries to many people, and the widespread contamination of the central part of Goiania. This TECDOC describes the dosimetric and medical aspects of the Goiania accident, including the experience of some of the scientists and physicians who were involved in the management, monitoring and treatment of the victims. Many scientific papers have been published on the subject in different journals. This publication compiles up to data conclusions on the 10 year follow-up of the Goiania accident victims, and summarizes the experience that was acquired Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Dosimetric and medical aspects of the radiological accident in Goiania in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    In September 1987, in Goiania, a city of one million inhabitants and capital of the Brazilian State of Goias, a rotating assembly of the shielding head of a teletherapy unit was removed and the capsule containing 50.9 TBq (1375 Ci) of 137 Cs was dismantled. This serious radiological accident resulted in four fatalities, injuries to many people, and the widespread contamination of the central part of Goiania. This TECDOC describes the dosimetric and medical aspects of the Goiania accident, including the experience of some of the scientists and physicians who were involved in the management, monitoring and treatment of the victims. Many scientific papers have been published on the subject in different journals. This publication compiles up to data conclusions on the 10 year follow-up of the Goiania accident victims, and summarizes the experience that was acquired

  11. A Model for Protective Behavior Against the Harmful Effects of Radiation for Radiological Technologists in Medical Radiological Technologists in Medical Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Moon, In Ok

    2009-01-01

    Protective behavior of radiological technologists against radiation exposure is important to achieve reduction of the patient doses without compromising medical achievements. This study attempts to provide a basic model for the sophisticated intervention strategy that increases the level of the protective behavior of the technologists. The model was applied to real situations in Korea to demonstrate its utility. The results of this study are summarized as follows: First, the protective environment showed the highest relationship in the factors considered, r=0.637 (p<0.01). Secondly, the important factors were protective environment in environment characteristics, expectation for the protective behavior 0.228 (p<0.001), self efficacy 0.142 (p<0.001), and attitude for the protective behavior 0.178 (p<0.001) in personal characteristics, and daily patient -0.112 (p<0.001) and number of the participation in the education session for the protective behavior 0.074 (p<0.05). Thirdly, the final protective behavior model by a path analysis method had direct influence on the attitude 0.171 (p<0.01) and environment 0.405 (p<0.01) for the protective behavior, self efficacy 0.122 (p<0.01), expectation for the protective behavior 0.16 (p<0.01), and self-efficacy in the specialty of projects 0.154 (p<0.01). The acceptance of the model determined by the absolute fit index (GFI), 0.969, and by the incremental fit index (CFI), 0.943, showed very significant levels. Value of 2/df that is a factor applied to verify the acceptance of the model was 37, which implies that the result can be accepted in the desirable range. In addition, the parsimonious fit index configured by AGFI (0.890) and TLI (0.852) was also considered as a scale that accepts the model in practical applications. In case of the establishment of some specific intervention strategies based on the protective behavior model against harmful radiation effects proposed in this study, the strategy will provide an effective way

  12. A Model for Protective Behavior Against the Harmful Effects of Radiation for Radiological Technologists in Medical Radiological Technologists in Medical Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, In Ok [Ewha Woman' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Protective behavior of radiological technologists against radiation exposure is important to achieve reduction of the patient doses without compromising medical achievements. This study attempts to provide a basic model for the sophisticated intervention strategy that increases the level of the protective behavior of the technologists. The model was applied to real situations in Korea to demonstrate its utility. The results of this study are summarized as follows: First, the protective environment showed the highest relationship in the factors considered, r=0.637 (p<0.01). Secondly, the important factors were protective environment in environment characteristics, expectation for the protective behavior 0.228 (p<0.001), self efficacy 0.142 (p<0.001), and attitude for the protective behavior 0.178 (p<0.001) in personal characteristics, and daily patient -0.112 (p<0.001) and number of the participation in the education session for the protective behavior 0.074 (p<0.05). Thirdly, the final protective behavior model by a path analysis method had direct influence on the attitude 0.171 (p<0.01) and environment 0.405 (p<0.01) for the protective behavior, self efficacy 0.122 (p<0.01), expectation for the protective behavior 0.16 (p<0.01), and self-efficacy in the specialty of projects 0.154 (p<0.01). The acceptance of the model determined by the absolute fit index (GFI), 0.969, and by the incremental fit index (CFI), 0.943, showed very significant levels. Value of 2/df that is a factor applied to verify the acceptance of the model was 37, which implies that the result can be accepted in the desirable range. In addition, the parsimonious fit index configured by AGFI (0.890) and TLI (0.852) was also considered as a scale that accepts the model in practical applications. In case of the establishment of some specific intervention strategies based on the protective behavior model against harmful radiation effects proposed in this study, the strategy will provide an effective way

  13. A radiological case collection with interactive character as a new element in the education of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, T.; Kurz, P.; Eiers, M.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Schipp, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: evaluation of an interactive, multimedia case-based learning platform for the radiological education of medical students. Materials and methods: an interactive electronic learning platform for the education of medical students was built in html format independent of the operating system in the context of the Heidelberg Curriculum Medicinale (HeiCuMed). A case collection of 30 common and authentic clinical cases is used as the central theme and clinical background. The user has to work on each case by making decisions regarding a selection of diagnostic modalities and by analyzing the chosen studies. After a reasonable selection and sequence of diagnostic radiological modalities and their interpretation, a diagnosis has to be made. An extensive collection of normal findings for any modality is available for the user as a reference in correlation with the pathology at anytime within each case. The case collection consists of 2053 files with 1109 Internet pages (html) and 869 image files (jpeg) with approximately 10 000 crosslinks (links). The case collection was evaluated by a questionnaire (scale 1 - 5) at the end of the radiological student course. The development of the results of the radiological course exam was analyzed to investigate any effect on the learning performance after the case collection was introduced. Results: 97.6% of the course participants would use the case collection beyond the radiological student course to learn radiology in their medical studies. The handling of the case collection was rated excellent in 36.9%, good in 54.6%, satisfactory in 8% and unsatisfactory in 0.4%. 41% felt that the case collection was overall excellent, 49.2% good, 7.8% satisfactory, 1.6% unsatisfactory and 0.4% poor. A positive trend in the development of the results in the radiological course exam with less variance after the introduction of the case collection was found but failed statistical significance. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of medical radiation exposure to patients and ambient doses in several diagnostic radiology departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A.; Elhadi, T.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    In many countries diagnostic medical exposures typically account for a very large fraction of the collective effective dose that can be assigned to anthropological sources and activities. This in part flags up the question of whether sufficient steps are being taken in regard to potential dose saving from such medical services. As a first step, one needs to survey doses to compare against those of best practice. The present study has sought evaluation of the radiation protection status and patient doses for certain key radiological procedures in four film-based radiology departments within Sudan. The radiation exposure survey, carried out using a survey meter and quality control test tools, involved a total of 299 patients their examinations being carried out at one or other of these four departments. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was determined from exposure settings using DosCal software and an Unfors -Xi-meter. The mean ESAK for x-ray examination of the chest was 0.30±0.1 mGy, for the skull it was 0.96±0.7 mGy, for the abdomen 0.85±0.01 mGy, for spinal procedures 1.30±0.6 mGy and for procedures involving the limbs it was 0.43±0.3 mGy. Ambient dose-rates in the reception area, at the closed door of the x-ray room, recorded instantaneous values of up to 100 μSv/h. In regard to protection, the associated levels were found to be acceptable in three of the four departments, corrective action being required for one department, regular quality control also being recommended.

  15. Medical response in the initial phase of a radiological or nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Malvicini, M.

    2006-01-01

    The frequency of radiological and nuclear accidents is low with relationship to another type of have an accident, but the use of radioactive sources has been increased in the finish decades. Additionally, a growing world concern exists by the eventual use of radioactive material with malevolent ends. These facts put in relevance the necessity to have an appropriate preparation for the medical answer in this type of emergencies. The medical answer consists of different phases: Initial: pre-hospital and in local general hospitals; Intermediate: in local general hospitals and central reference hospitals. Late: in central reference hospitals and the pursuit to long term. The presence of conventional injuries (radio combined injuries) modifies in substantial form the assignment in the priority of the attention, the prediction and the evolution. The establishment of an appropriate triage is outstanding in the initial phase. The present communication approaches the early medical answer, sustained in the anamnesis, the chronology and severity of the symptoms and prodromal signs besides the laboratory results and complementary exams arisen during the first ones 24 to 72 hours. (Author)

  16. Medical and radiological aspects of emergency preparedness and response at SevRAO facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkin, M N; Sneve, M K; Grachev, M I; Frolov, G P; Shinkarev, S M; Jaworska, A

    2008-12-01

    Regulatory cooperation between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation has the overall goal of promoting improvements in radiation protection in Northwest Russia. One of the projects in this programme has the objectives to review and improve the existing medical emergency preparedness capabilities at the sites for temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. These are operated by SevRAO at Andreeva Bay and in Gremikha village on the Kola Peninsula. The work is also intended to provide a better basis for regulation of emergency response and medical emergency preparedness at similar facilities elsewhere in Russia. The purpose of this paper is to present the main results of that project, implemented by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre. The first task was an analysis of the regulatory requirements and the current state of preparedness for medical emergency response at the SevRAO facilities. Although Russian regulatory documents are mostly consistent with international recommendations, some distinctions lead to numerical differences in operational intervention criteria under otherwise similar conditions. Radiological threats relating to possible accidents, and related gaps in the regulation of SevRAO facilities, were also identified. As part of the project, a special exercise on emergency medical response on-site at Andreeva Bay was prepared and carried out, and recommendations were proposed after the exercise. Following fruitful dialogue among regulators, designers and operators, special regulatory guidance has been issued by FMBA to account for the specific and unusual features of the SevRAO facilities. Detailed sections relate to the prevention of accidents, and emergency preparedness and response, supplementing the basic Russian regulatory requirements. Overall it is concluded that (a) the provision of medical and sanitary components of emergency

  17. Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Journal of Medical and Biomedical Science publishes original, novel, peer-reviewed reports that pertain to medical and allied health sciences; confirmatory reports of previously described phenomena that either contain a novel finding or are of such magnitude to enhance the field; as well as laboratory or ...

  18. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  19. Estimated radiation exposure from medical imaging for patients of radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital, Oujda Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slimane Semghouli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effective dose received per radiological examination per patient and the additional cancer risk factor in the Radiological Service of Al Faraby Hospital in 2012. Methods: From the number of radiological procedures (NX made in 2012 in the radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital and the average effective dose DEX associated with each type of act exam X, it is possible to calculate the effective dose collective [S =∑ DEX * NX]. The additional cancer risk factor is calculated by the X-ray risk software promoting responsible imaging through patient and provider education. It is function of the effective dose received, the age at the time of exam, and gender of patient. Results: The radiological average effective dose received per act exam is 1 millisievert (mSv, whereas it is 4.45 mSv and 0.21 mSv for the computed tomography (CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the average number of acts per patient 2.66, the effective dose is 1.16 mSv and 3.8 mSv for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the average effective dose per patient 2.69 mSv, it is 5.16 mSv and 0.81 mSv for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the additional cancer risk in 40 years at the time of exam, the average additional cancer risk is equal to 2.17 × 10-4, wheras the risk is 4.17 × 10-4 and 6.54 × 10-5 for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. Conclusion: Medical exposure related to the diagnosis of patients in the radiology service in 2012 can be characterized by: (a 2.66 Act exams on average per patient diagnosis corresponding to a mean effective dose equal to 2.69 mSv per patient, (bfrequency of conventional radiology and CT scan was 81% and 19%, respectively. These act exams contribute to the collective effective dose by 17% and 83%, respectively, and (c radiological acts can be divided into three levels of exposures

  20. The effective factors on library anxiety of students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Sajad, Maryam Sadat; Rahmani, Sedigheh; Bahrami, Susan; Papi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The efficient use of libraries can be an important factor in determining the educational quality of Universities. Therefore, investigation and identification of factors affecting library anxiety becomes increasingly necessary. The purpose of this research is to determine the factors effecting library anxiety of students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied survey research using Bostick's Library Anxiety questionnaire as data gathering tool. The statistical population consisted of all students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (15011 students) with the sample size of 375 using stratified random sampling. The validity of data gathering tool was confirmed by experts in the library and information science and its reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.92). Descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (t-test and ANOVA) were used for data analysis using SPSS 18 software. Findings showed that the mean of library anxiety score was 2.68 and 2.66 for students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences respectively which is above average (2.5). Furthermore, age and gender had no meaningful effect on the library anxiety of students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, but gender had a meaningful effect on library anxiety of students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences while age had no such effect. The results showed that the mean of factors effecting library anxiety in students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences is higher than average and therefore not satisfactory and only factors relating to feeling comfortable in the library is lower than average and somewhat satisfactory.

  1. Main radiation protection actions for medical personnel as primary responders front of an event with radiological dispersive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, Hildanielle Ramos

    2015-01-01

    After the terrorist attack in New York, USA, in 2001, there was a worldwide concern about possible attacks using radioactive material in conventional detonators, called as Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb'. Several studies have been and are being made to form a global knowledge about this type of event. As until now, fortunately, there has not been an event with RDD, the Goiania Radiological Accident in Brazil, 1987, is used as a reference for decision-making. Several teams with technical experts should act in an event with RDD, but the medical staffs who respond quickly to the event must be properly protected from the harmful effects of radiation. Based on the radiological protection experts performance during the Goiania accident and the knowledge from lessons learned of many radiological accidents worldwide, this work presents an adaptation of the radiation protection actions for an event with RDD that helps a medical team as primary responders. The following aspects are presented: the problem of radioactive contamination from the explosion of the device in underground environment, the actions of the first responders and evaluation of health radiation effects. This work was based on specialized articles and papers about radiological accidents and RDD; as well as personal communication and academic information of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. The radiation protection actions, adapted to a terrorist attack event with RDD, have as a scenario a subway station in the capital. The main results are: the use of the basic radiation protection principle of time because there is no condition to take care of a patient keeping distance or using a shielding; the use of full appropriate protection cloths for contaminating materials ensuring the physical safety of professionals, and the medical team monitoring at the end of a medical procedure, checking for surface contamination. The main conclusion is that all medical actions

  2. How the radiologic and nuclear medical communities can improve nuclear security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Laura H; von Hippel, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Highly enriched uranium (HEU) is used to manufacture technetium-99m, the most widely used medical radioisotope in the world. Highly enriched uranium is also used to make nuclear bombs; 50 kg of HEU is enough to make a Hiroshima-type bomb. It is generally agreed that this technology is within the reach of a terrorist group; the main obstacle is acquiring HEU. Currently, as a legacy of the US and Soviet Atoms for Peace Program, there are civilian users of HEU in 40 countries, and about 1,000 kg are still being shipped each year. Unfortunately, the major international manufacturers of technetium-99m have been refusing to convert their production facilities to use low-enriched uranium (LEU), which cannot be used to make a nuclear bomb. Only 1% to 2% of the HEU is consumed in the process of producing technetium-99m. The remainder is accumulating in radioactive waste storage facilities. The radiologic and nuclear medical communities could make a tremendous contribution to a safer world by supporting the replacement of HEU with LEU in the production of technetium-99m. Low-enriched uranium is just as cost effective as HEU for the manufacture of technetium-99m and does not contribute to the risk for nuclear terrorism.

  3. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Ferrari, P.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of Medical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kVp, filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses. (authors)

  4. The First Report on Evaluating the Thoracic Radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jeong; Chu, Sang Deok; Park, So Young; Choi, Byung Soon; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Sung Jin; Ko, Kyung Sun

    2010-01-01

    The pnuemoconiotic findings on chest radiograph for pneumoconiosis are affected by the technique, the equipment and the reading environment. We report here on the results of evaluating the thoracic radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis (MIPs). For the first time, we visited the MIPs to evaluate the thoracic radiography that is used to treat patients with pneumoconiotic complications, and this included evaluating the equipment and the technical parameters for thoracic radiography, the computed tomography, the education for quality assurance health care and the reading environment. We used the guideline published by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI). Ten images were randomly picked from the MIPs for evaluating the image quality, and then these were rated by two experienced chest radiologists for pneumoconiosis according to the criteria of the OSHRI. Of the 33 institutions, the failed group (mean<60) scored 36.4% for radiological technique (RT), 30.3% for image quality (IQ) and 21.2% for the reading environment (RE). There were statistically significantly differences between the passed and failed groups for RT (75.8 ± 9.1 vs. 40.8 ± 13.6, p<0.001), for IQ (68.3 ± 5.8 vs. 47.8 ± 9.4, p<0.001) and for RE (78.3 ± 15.8 vs. 18.3 ± 21.9, p<0.001). The group that received education was significantly higher for the RT (68.7 vs. 53.2, p=0.032), the IQ (65.3 vs. 56.6, p=0.039) and the RE (76.2 vs. 47.0, p=0.005) than that for the group that didn't receive education. The MIPs need surveillance and education for improving the quality assurance health care in thoracic radiography for treating patients with pneumoconiosis and who have complications

  5. Attitudes and Views of Medical Students toward Science and Pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Adolfo; Paco, Ofelia

    2004-12-01

    To know opinions, attitudes and interest of medical students toward science and pseudoscience. A questionnaire was administered to 124 medical students of the San Marcos University in Lima, Peru. 173 students were surveyed. The response rate was 72%. Eighty-three percent (100/121) of respondents said that science is the best source of knowledge, 67% (82/123) said they were interested in science and technology news, 76% said they had not read any science magazine or book (other than medical texts and journals) in the last five years. Thirteen percent (16/124) of respondents said that astrology is "very scientific" and 40% (50/124) stated that it is "sort of scientific." 50% of respondents shared the opinion that some people possess psychic powers. Medical students' attitudes toward science are generally not favorable.

  6. On history of medical radiology development in Ukraine: war period and after war reconstruction (1941-1947)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, M.Yi.; Artamonova, N.O.; Busigyina, N.O.; Kononenko, O.K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper is devoted to history of Ukrainian medical radiology development, namely main problems of its scientific and practical aspects of development during 1941-1947. The authors describe the work of Ukrainian roentgenologists and radiologists during the war and after war restoration of radiological service. Contribution of Ukrainian scientists to practical and theoretical achievements of military roentgenology is shown. Operative mobilization of all the forces for restoration of destroyed during the war years roentgenological service allowed to start scientific research within a short term (already in 1945)

  7. The relevance of basic sciences in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C; Grant, T; McLoughlin, P; Last, J

    2016-02-01

    Evolving and changing undergraduate medical curricula raise concerns that there will no longer be a place for basic sciences. National and international trends show that 5-year programmes with a pre-requisite for school chemistry are growing more prevalent. National reports in Ireland show a decline in the availability of school chemistry and physics. This observational cohort study considers if the basic sciences of physics, chemistry and biology should be a prerequisite to entering medical school, be part of the core medical curriculum or if they have a place in the practice of medicine. Comparisons of means, correlation and linear regression analysis assessed the degree of association between predictors (school and university basic sciences) and outcomes (year and degree GPA) for entrants to a 6-year Irish medical programme between 2006 and 2009 (n = 352). We found no statistically significant difference in medical programme performance between students with/without prior basic science knowledge. The Irish school exit exam and its components were mainly weak predictors of performance (-0.043 ≥ r ≤ 0.396). Success in year one of medicine, which includes a basic science curriculum, was indicative of later success (0.194 ≥ r (2) ≤ 0.534). University basic sciences were found to be more predictive than school sciences in undergraduate medical performance in our institution. The increasing emphasis of basic sciences in medical practice and the declining availability of school sciences should mandate medical schools in Ireland to consider how removing basic sciences from the curriculum might impact on future applicants.

  8. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenke, Emeka; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Bauersachs, Anne; Eitner, Stephan; Budach, Alexander; Knipfer, Christoph; Stelzle, Florian

    2012-03-30

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology-enhanced learning cannot completely replace

  9. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkenke Emeka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired

  10. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology

  11. Computer aided instruction. Preliminary experience in the Radiological Sciences Institute of the University of Milan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardani, G.; Bertoli, M.A.; Bellomi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Computerised instruction means teaching by computer using a program that alternates information with self-checking multiple choice questions. This system was used to create a fully computerized lesson on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer which was then tested on a small group of madical students attending the Radiology School of the Milan University Institute of Radiological Sciences. At the end of the test, the students were asked to complete a questionnaire which was then analysed. The computer lesson consisted of 66 text messages and 21 self-checking questions. It aroused considerable interest, though the most common reason was curiosity about a novel system. The degree of fatigue caused was modest despite the fact that the computer lesson was at least as demanding as a traditional lesson, if not more so. The level of learning was considered high and optimised by the use of self-checking questions that were considered an essential element. However no student agreed to sit an official examination, even interactively, using the computer

  12. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  13. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  14. Medical radiological consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe in Russia. Estimation of radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.; Tsyb, A.; Ivanov, S.; Pokrovsky, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, one of the worst radiation-related disasters ever, occurred about 18 year ago. A lot has been done over the past years to mitigate the consequences of this accident, especially in the worst affected territories of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. The efforts to study health effects of the accident, however, need to be continued for many years to come, being an integral part of developing a general strategy for dealing with long-term effects. The question now arises: To what extent health consequences could be evaluated in 1986, given the existing scientific base of radiation epidemiology? The latest 20-30 years have seen a rapid development of radiation epidemiology, which was brought about, first of all, by the need to analyze long-term radiation effects of the 1945 atomic bombing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It may now be considered as proved that high and medium radiation doses (above 0.3 Sv) lead to an increase in cancer incidence rates. Based on the Japanese data, the ICRP proposed mathematical models to be used for predicting long-term effects of radiation exposure. This brings up a question: Are radiation risks derived for Hiroshima and Nagasaki applicable to low doses (0.2 Sv)? An answer is critically important, as the overwhelming majority of emergency workers and the population exposed as a result of the Chernobyl accident received doses within this range. Actually, understanding of these issues is crucial for dealing with long-term radiation effects of the Chernobyl accident. Deriving radiation risk factors for the Japanese cohort with medium and high doses was based on large-scale epidemiological studies of 86.5 thousand people during a prolonged period. As of now, no other approaches exist to estimating long-term radiation effects. Following the Chernobyl accident the All-Union Distributed Registry of persons exposed to radiation was established as soon as in the summer 1986. The Research Institute of Medical Radiology (Medical

  15. Rationing medical education | Walsh | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at the prospect of rationing, the truth is that rationing has always occurred in one form or another in medical education and in healthcare more broadly. Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. For example rationing may ...

  16. Medical management of radiation safety and radiological protection of patients in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovhannisyan, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    The events of the last 10 years, Spitak earthquake (1988) and collapse of the Former Soviet Union, brought forth the changes of the political situation in Armenia and significant disorder in economy, industry, relations, environmental and public health, including the radiation safety (RS) and control of patients in general diagnostic radiology. In Armenia there are about 750 X-ray rooms, 10 radionuclide diagnostic laboratories, 20 gamma and X-ray units. 95 enterprises in industry, science and technology use the Ionizing Radiation Sources (IRSs) with different purposes; there are 5 electron particle accelerators of different power capacity. About 6,000 individuals have constant contact to IRS: the roentgenologists, radiologists, the staff of Armenian Nuclear Power Plant and that of the accelerators, etc. Besides, more than 3,000 liquidators of the Chernobyl NPP disaster live in Armenia. Nowadays, the precise infrastructure of RS is established in Armenia. The regulating body is the 'State Atom Authority', performing the control, coordination and licensing of both enterprises and specialists. Ministry of Health, Ministry of Internal Affairs, and Ministry of Ecology perform the control of IRSs' delivery into the Republic of Armenia and then their proper use and waste disposal in Armenia. (author)

  17. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Submissions ... can be found on the journal's own website here http://www.amhsr.org/contributors.asp ... The Journal, however, grants to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual right ...

  18. The study on the perceptions of radiological technologist in medical imaging equipment used by the oriental doctor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Ho; Kang, Gi Bong; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    In order to examine how Radiological Technologists perceive the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment, surveys were conducted for the members of the Korean Radiological Technologists Association. The total number of respondents were 515 and 481, with 34 insincere responses removed caused of nonvalidated answer. The results of the analysis are as follows. Although there were no statistical significance in the difference in perception by location of residence, work place, and educational background, respondents with higher education showed a tendency to agree on the use of comprehensive medical imaging equipment, but tended to oppose the use of special medical imaging equipment. Differences in perception by gender showed a greater negative perception toward the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment by women than men. In particular, women showed more negative tendency for oriental doctor's use of special medical imaging equipment such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound equipment compared to men, and this was statistically significant. The difference in perception by age showed that the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment was negative in the 20∼30s, neutral in the 40∼50s, and positive in the 60s, which were statistically significant. The difference in perception by work experience showed that the longer the work experience was, the more positive it was toward oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment. Specifically, the most favorable tendency was found with work experience of more than 30 years, which was statistically significant. The results of this study revealed the Radiological Technologists' perceptions on the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment and this can contribute to the direction of public health promotion in the future

  19. The study on the perceptions of radiological technologist in medical imaging equipment used by the oriental doctor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Gi Bong [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Shinhan University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-03-15

    In order to examine how Radiological Technologists perceive the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment, surveys were conducted for the members of the Korean Radiological Technologists Association. The total number of respondents were 515 and 481, with 34 insincere responses removed caused of nonvalidated answer. The results of the analysis are as follows. Although there were no statistical significance in the difference in perception by location of residence, work place, and educational background, respondents with higher education showed a tendency to agree on the use of comprehensive medical imaging equipment, but tended to oppose the use of special medical imaging equipment. Differences in perception by gender showed a greater negative perception toward the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment by women than men. In particular, women showed more negative tendency for oriental doctor's use of special medical imaging equipment such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound equipment compared to men, and this was statistically significant. The difference in perception by age showed that the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment was negative in the 20∼30s, neutral in the 40∼50s, and positive in the 60s, which were statistically significant. The difference in perception by work experience showed that the longer the work experience was, the more positive it was toward oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment. Specifically, the most favorable tendency was found with work experience of more than 30 years, which was statistically significant. The results of this study revealed the Radiological Technologists' perceptions on the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment and this can contribute to the direction of public health promotion in the future.

  20. Medical thoracoscopy | Elameen | Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Medical thoracoscpy [MT] (pleuroscopy) is a minimally invasive procedure performed by using endoscopic telescope to visualize and evaluate the pleura, pleural space, ... It is performed by the pulmonary physician in an endoscopy suite or procedure room using non disposable rigid (or semi-rigid) instruments7.

  1. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Publication of Research Article: An Art or Science? ... for the relative importance of a journal, is now being considered a misleading tool in assessing ... should be kept in mind before manuscript preparation and submission, so that our research

  2. Scientific production of medical sciences universities in north of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Firooz, Mousa Yamin; Vahedi, Mohammad; Aligolbandi, Kobra

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. The study of the scientific evidence citation production by famous databases of the world is one of the important indicators to evaluate and rank the universities. The study at investigating the scientific production of Northern Iran Medical Sciences Universities in Scopus from 2005 through 2010. This survey used scientometrics technique. The samples under studies were the scientific products of four northern Iran Medical universities. Viewpoints quantity of the Scientific Products Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences stands first and of Babol University of Medical Sciences ranks the end, but from the viewpoints of quality of scientific products of considering the H-Index and the number of cited papers the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences is a head from the other universities under study. From the viewpoints of subject of the papers, the highest scientific products belonged to the faculty of Pharmacy affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medial Sciences, but the three other universities for the genetics and biochemistry. Results showed that the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences as compared to the other understudies universities ranks higher for the number of articles, cited articles, number of hard work authors and H-Index of Scopus database from 2005 through 2010.

  3. Fifteen years medical information sciences: the Amsterdam curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Monique W.; Fockens, Paul; Ravesloot, Jan H.; Limburg, Martien; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To inform the medical informatics community on the rational, goals, evolution and present contents of the Medical Information Sciences program of the University of Amsterdam and our achievements. Methods: We elaborate on the history of our program, the philosophy, contents and

  4. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.E.

    1976-07-01

    The activities of the AERE Environmental and Medical Sciences Division for January to December 1975 are reported under sections entitled: introduction; inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics; environmental analysis, atmospheric pollution; medical; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  5. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  6. Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Krishnaraj, Arun; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Rajendran, Ramji R; Fishman, Elliot K

    2017-05-01

    RadiologyInfo.org is a public information portal designed to support patient care and broaden public awareness of the essential role radiology plays in overall patient health care. Over the past 14 years, RadiologyInfo.org has evolved considerably to provide access to more than 220 mixed-media descriptions of tests, treatments, and diseases through a spectrum of mobile and desktop platforms, social media, and downloadable documents in both English and Spanish. In 2014, the RSNA-ACR Public Information Website Committee, which stewards RadiologyInfo.org, developed 3- to 5-year strategic and implementation plans for the website. The process was informed by RadiologyInfo.org user surveys, formal stakeholder interviews, focus groups, and usability testing. Metrics were established as key performance indicators to assess progress toward the stated goals of (1) optimizing content to enhance patient-centeredness, (2) enhancing reach and engagement, and (3) maintaining sustainability. Major changes resulting from this process include a complete redesign of the website, the replacement of text-rich PowerPoint presentations with conversational videos, and the development of an affiliate network. Over the past year, visits to RadiologyInfo.org have increased by 60.27% to 1,424,523 in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories. Twenty-two organizations have affiliated with RadiologyInfo.org with new organizations being added on a monthly basis. RadiologyInfo provides a tangible demonstration of how radiologists can engage directly with the global public to educate them on the value of radiology in their health care and to allay concerns and dispel misconceptions. Regular self-assessment and responsive planning will ensure its continued growth and relevance. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Some information about the radiological protection concerning the TRIGA spent fuel handling at the Medical University of Hanover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Harke, Heinrich; Klaus, Uwe; Loercher, Gunther

    2008-01-01

    The Medical University of Hanover (MHH) returned its 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements to the United States in summer of 1999. For the transportation inside the MHH control areas were installed outside the reactor area, along the transfer route in the department of nuclear medicine and in the temporary building. During fuel handling at MHH a lot of radiation protection measures were necessary. This paper presents methods and results of the radiological protection measurements. (authors)

  8. The role of the medical physic on radiologic, hemodynamic and surgery unit at Hospital das Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacelar, A.; Furtado, A.P.A.; Krebs, E.M.; Oliveira, S.S.; Lima, A.A.; Jacques, L.C.; Silveira, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    The activities executed by the medical physic in the radiologic, hemodynamic and surgery unit are presented. Topics such as organization of a radiologic protection project and a quality assurance program, monthly information of the individual doses, sanitary inspection and training of the professionals involved are emphasized. The methodology and results are briefly presented

  9. Results of questionnaire to members of Japanese college of radiology. Their attitude and act for medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Hideki; Ohno, Kazuko; Saito, Tsutomu; Furui, Shigeru; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes results of questionnaire conducted to members of Japanese College of Radiology (JCR) about their attitude and act for medical exposure. It asked, concerning medical exposure, about their attribute, attitude, education and knowledge, awareness at routine clinical practice and about occupational dose; was sent to 5,135 JCR members in September, 2011 for sending back within a month; and was replied by 1,177 members (22.9%), of which data were analyzed by chi-square distribution. Answered doctors (M/F of ca. 3/1, 30-59 years old) concerned with the actual practice (89.5%) for >10 years (ca. 67%) and >6 y (ca. 80) of imaging diagnosis (ca. 70%), radiotherapy (ca. 15) and nuclear medicine ( 300-bed hospital (ca. 70%). They were always or often aware of the medical exposure (>90%); their significantly high awareness was found in hospitals having >4 radiological doctors; and their awareness was significantly correlated with the population of their service area. They were also aware at CT (38%), IVR (interventional radiology) (27), radiotherapy (10) and PET (12), for patients of pediatrics (31%), of pregnancy-possible women (27), receiving frequent tests (30) and undergoing pelvic region imaging (12). Frequent questions to them arose from departments of nurse (28%), pediatrics (18), radiology (17), gynecology (13) and internal medicine (12); from patients often (5%), sometimes (28), rarely (55%) and null (12%). Significant relationship was found between questions by patients and the bed number/number of radiological doctors/population of medical service area. About 90% of doctors joined the education and training course always, often, or sometimes and about 40% of whom recognized its effectiveness. For accumulated dose restriction, 69.8% of doctors thought negative for patients while 72.1%, positive for volunteers in clinical trials (significant). Doctors who didn't explained patients about the exposure were 16%. Those highly aware of exposure wore the

  10. Velocity Estimation in Medical Ultrasound [Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the application of signal processing in medical ultrasound velocity estimation. Special emphasis is on the relation among acquisition methods, signal processing, and estimators employed. The description spans from current clinical systems for one-and two-dimensional (1-D an...

  11. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taha Um Bali. Department of Obs & Gyn, Sudan. Prof. Ishag Adam. Department of Obstetric & Gynecology Infectious Disease Medical Education, Khartoum University. Prof. Abdurahman Arshad. Department of Internal Medicine, Pakistan. Assoc. Prof. Suad El Tigani ElMahi, Paediatrics, Sudan. Assoc. Prof. Elhadi Awooda.

  12. Psychological intervention in medical preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Cuiping; Liu, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Although the incidence rate of nuclear or radiological accident and their terror attack is very low, their influence is tremendous because of the unexpected of their occurrence and uncertainty of their damage degree. An attack involving the release of radiation will create uncertainty, fear, and terror. Therefore, the management of acute psychological and behavioral responses is likely to be as important and challenging as the treatment of radiation-related injuries and illnesses. In this paper, we introduce the principle of psychological intervention at the preparation stage and during and after emergency. At the preparation stage, people should be educated by various means to prevent them from the impact of accident. When accident happens, effective action should be taken immediately to reduce the psychological influence. Special groups such as children and pregnant women must be considered. Furthermore, we analyze the symptom of different groups including victims, the public and responders and put forward the methods to prevent and treat psychological damage. After radiation accident, victims who have been exposed or anticipate possible exposure may experience feelings of vulnerability, anxiety, and lack of control. The most important element is providing good medical care. Moreover, communication between patients and their family is very important too. The public in the affected community is likely to be anxious and terrified. Trusted and informed leadership should be assigned to give psychological support in counselling center established at monitoring and evacuation centers. Government must be honest in communication with public and media. Responders have to perform their duty under stressful condition. Some of them are unable to deal with such stress could develop mental health problems such as post traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse or depression. Protective clothing and dosimeters must be provided to ensure responders' safety. Moreover

  13. The impact of quality assurance in medical radiology in raising the quality of life and the role of medical physicist in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal on establishing quality assurance programmes in diagnostic radiology at the European level is to provide explanations on regulations, which had been developed by International Organizations on the level of the existing knowledge on the use of ionizing radiation for medical diagnosis. Since it is well known that diagnostic radiological users often produce poor quality images and are applying to patients unnecessary high radiation exposure the criteria for performance characteristics related to good imaging quality and patient exposure had been established. The correct application of the principles of quality assurance and quality control in relation to patient exposure needs to be standardised on a general European level, since radiographs should be generally comparable. The implementation of quality assurance programmes and quality control methods could lead to more accurate diagnosis and better informed decisions regarding treatment. The role and responsibility of medical physicists in the process of image production, radiation exposure and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology is now implemented in this Directive. The tasks of the medical physicist in this process had been identified and explained. (author)

  14. Medical radiology terminology. French - English - German. Woerterbuch der physikalisch-technischen Begriffe der medizinischen Radiologie. Franzoesisch - Englisch - Deutsch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Standardization achievements in the field of radiology induced the IEC to compile the terminology used in its safety and application standards and present it in publication 788 (1984 issue), entitled 'Medical radiology terminology'. The objective pursued is to foster the use of standard terminology in the radiology standards. The value of publication 788 lies in the fact that it presents definitions of terms used in the French and English versions of IEC standards in the field of radiology, and thus facilitates adequate translation of these terms into other languages. In the glossary in hand, German-language definitions have been adopted from the DIN standards in cases where the French or English versions of definitions are identical with the German wording or meaning. The numbers of DIN standards or sections are then given without brackets, ahead of the text of the definition. In cases where correspondance of the various texts is not so good, or reference should be made to a term in a DIN standard, the numbers are given in brackets.

  15. Neuroscience and Brain Science Special Issue begins in the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences and the Orient Neuron Nexus have amalgated to publish a yearly special issue based on neuro- and brain sciences. This will hopefully improve the quality of peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of fundamental, applied, and clinical neuroscience and brain science from Asian countries. One focus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia is to strengthen neuroscience and brain science, especially in the field of neuroinformatics. PMID:25941457

  16. Advanced training as a specialized physician for medical radiology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessler, W.

    1982-01-01

    The complex subject of advanced training of physicians in radiology in Switzerland is treated in this contribution. There is a report on the reorganisation, new guidelines, educational centers, educational catalogues, the specialiced physician's examination and nuclear medicine. (APR) [de

  17. Mathematics and computer science in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viergever, M.A.; Todd-Pokroper, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The book is divided into two parts. Part 1 gives an introduction to and an overview of the field in ten tutorial chapters. Part 2 contains a selection of invited and proffered papers reporting on current research. Subjects covered in depth are: analytical image reconstruction, regularization, iterative methods, image structure, 3-D display, compression, architectures for image processing, statistical pattern recognition, and expert systems in medical imaging

  18. Exercising privacy rights in medical science

    OpenAIRE

    Hillmer, Michael; Redelmeier, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Privacy laws are intended to preserve human well-being and improve medical outcomes. We used the Sportstats website, a repository of competitive athletic data, to test how easily these laws can be circumvented. We designed a haphazard, unrepresentative case-series analysis and applied unscientific methods based on an Internet connection and idle time. We found it both feasible and titillating to breach anonymity, stockpile personal information and generate misquotations. We extended our metho...

  19. Basic science right, not basic science lite: medical education at a crossroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Ruth-Marie E; Wallach, Paul M; Richardson, W Scott

    2009-11-01

    This perspective is a counterpoint to Dr. Brass' article, Basic biomedical sciences and the future of medical education: implications for internal medicine. The authors review development of the US medical education system as an introduction to a discussion of Dr. Brass' perspectives. The authors agree that sound scientific foundations and skill in critical thinking are important and that effective educational strategies to improve foundational science education should be implemented. Unfortunately, many students do not perceive the relevance of basic science education to clinical practice.The authors cite areas of disagreement. They believe it is unlikely that the importance of basic sciences will be diminished by contemporary directions in medical education and planned modifications of USMLE. Graduates' diminished interest in internal medicine is unlikely from changes in basic science education.Thoughtful changes in education provide the opportunity to improve understanding of fundamental sciences, the process of scientific inquiry, and translation of that knowledge to clinical practice.

  20. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  1. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo, E-mail: lfaggioni@sirm.org [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Paolicchi, Fabio [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Bastiani, Luca [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Guido, Davide [Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  2. Students’ perceptions of the academic learning environment in seven medical sciences courses based on DREEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshialiabad, Hamid; Bakhshi, Mohammadhosien; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective Learning environment has a significant role in determining students’ academic achievement and learning. The aim of this study is to investigate the viewpoints of undergraduate medical sciences students on the learning environment using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) at Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences (RUMS). Methods The descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 493 medical sciences students in the following majors: nursing, midwifery, radiology, operating room nursing, laboratory sciences, medical emergency, and anesthesia. The DREEM questionnaire was used as a standard tool. Data were analyzed using SPSS (v17) software. Student’s t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical tests were used. Results The mean of the achieved scores in the five domains was 113.5 out of 200 (56.74%), which was considered to be more positive than negative. The total mean scores for perception of learning, teaching, and atmosphere were 27.4/48 (57.24%), 24.60/44 (55.91%), and 26.8/48 (55.89%), respectively. Academic and social self-perceptions were 20.5/32 (64.11%) and 15.7/28 (56.36%), respectively. The total DREEM scores varied significantly between courses (Penvironment. The differences between courses and their study pathway should be further investigated by analysis of specific items. Our results showed that it is essential for faculty members and course managers to make more efforts toward observing principles of instructional designs, to create an appropriate educational environment, and to reduce deficits in order to provide a better learning environment with more facilities and supportive systems for the students. PMID:25848331

  3. Diagnostic radiology physics: A handbook for teachers and students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, D. R. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford (United Kingdom); Christofides, S. [New Nicosia General Hospital (Cyprus); Maidment, A. D.A. [University of Pennsylvania (United States); McLean, I. D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ng, K. H. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-09-15

    This publication is written for students and teachers involved in programmes that train medical physicists for work in diagnostic radiology. It provides, in the form of a syllabus, a comprehensive overview of the basic medical physics knowledge required for the practice of modern diagnostic radiology. This makes it particularly useful for graduate students and residents in medical physics programmes. The material presented in the publication has been endorsed by the major international organizations and is the foundation for academic and clinical courses in both diagnostic radiology physics and in emerging areas such as imaging in radiotherapy.

  4. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, COPPE (Brazil); Mauricia, C. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Brazil); Barroso, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operatorserefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  5. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R.; Mauricia, C.; Barroso, R.

    2006-01-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operators, therefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  6. Importance of Radiology among the Spanish medical journal dealing with radiodiagnostics: analysis of their production between 1984 and 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.; Saez, J.M.; Garcia-Medina, V.

    1997-01-01

    We present a bibliometric analysis of the publications of the journal Radiologia between 1984 and 1993 to contribute to the study of radiodiagnostics reporting in Spain and to determine the importance of Radiologia as a source of information on this subject. We have used the database of the Spanish Medical Index (Indice Medico Espanol, IME) and the journal itself, analyzing the volume, course and distribution of publications on radiodiagnostic procedures. The journal Radiologia publishes 20.1% of the articles dealing with radiology and radiation therapy in Spain. The total number of works was 1,344, that of authors was 2,580 and that of signatures was 6.173, presenting an exponential growth with doubling times of 83.3, 8.5 and 7.4 years, respectively. The analysis shows that the journal's production not only increases over time, but also increments the proportion it contributes to the Spanish medical press as a whole. Radiologia is the most representative journal, in terms of volume of the scientific activity reported in the field of radiodiagnostics in Spain, and its production tends to adapt to the model established for other firmly consolidated scientific and medical disciplines. It alone constitutes the core of the medical journals devoted to radiology and its mean index of circulation according to the IME is 85.79/%. (Author) 34 refs

  7. Availability and use of medical isotopes in Canada : performed as part of a radiological terrorism risk assessment. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.L.

    2004-12-01

    An assessment of the availability of radioactive material used for medical applications in Canada has been performed as part of the CBRN Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) Project CRTI-02-0024RD (Probabilistic Risk Assessment Tool for Radiological Dispersal Devices). A general list of medical radioisotopes used worldwide was compiled via literature searches and Internet investigations. This list was then compared to all isotopes licenced to healthcare facilities in Canada. Sources of lesser concern for this study, such as noble gases, short-lived isotopes, and radioisotopes not licenced for medical applications in Canada, were eliminated. The remaining sources were then analysed for frequency of use and maximum licenced activity to assess which materials would be of highest concern in relation to radiological terrorism. A detailed description of the application, typical administered activity, and other relevant information for these most common and highest licenced activity medical sources was assembled to feed directly into the risk assessment database. A general discussion of security in healthcare facilities is also given. Due to the constant advances made in medicine, the information relating to licenced isotopes is dynamic and thus requires updating to ensure the database is kept current. (author)

  8. Upgrading the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory Towards ISO/IEC 17025: Radiation Standards and Calibration in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Norhayati Abdullah; Shahrul Azlan Azizan; Siti Sara Deraman; Nor Azlin Azraai; Md Khairusalih Md Zin

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of quality control (QC) test tools used in diagnostic radiology is legally required under the Ministry of Health (MOH) requirement. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency is the national focal point for the calibration of quality control test tools used in diagnostic radiology. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory has measurement traceability to primary standard dosimetry laboratory (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)), thus providing an interface between the primary standard dosimetry laboratory and Malaysian hospitals, clinics and license class H holder. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory facility is comprised of a constant potential x-ray system with a capability of 160 kV tube and a series of reference and working standard ion chambers. The stability of reference and working standard ion chambers was measured using strontium-90. Dosimetric instruments used in diagnostic radiology is calibrated in terms of air kerma to comply with an International Code of Practices of dosimetry for example IAEA's Technical Report Series number 457. The new series of standard radiation qualities was established based on ISO/IEC 61267. The measurement of beam homogeneity was measured using film and ion chamber to define the field size at certain distance and kV output was measured using the spectrometer and non-invasive kVp meter. The uncertainties measurement was determined with expended uncertainties to a level of confidence of approximately 95% (coverage factor k=2). This paper describes the available facility and the effort of the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to upgrade the laboratory towards ISO/IEC 17025. (author)

  9. Emergency radiology elective improves second-year medical students' perceived confidence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschied, Jessica R; Knoepp, Ursula S; Hoff, Carrie Nicole; Mazza, Michael B; Klein, Katherine A; Mullan, Patricia B; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-09-01

    Given recent advances in and wider availability of complex imaging, physicians are expected to understand imaging appropriateness. We introduced second-year medical students to the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC) in an interactive case-based elective to demonstrate their use in imaging for common emergency department clinical complaints. Prospective pre- and post-test design assessed second-year medical students' performance on case-based knowledge applications and self-assessed confidence related to ACR-AC guidelines compared to second-year students participating in a different concurrent radiology elective. Students participated in a 3-day elective covering the ACR-AC, comparative effective imaging, and risks associated with imaging radiation exposure, with outcomes of perceived confidence using a 5-point Likert scale and knowledge of ACR-AC using case-based multiple choice questions. Analysis included computing mean scores and assessing effect sizes for changes in knowledge. Before the elective, 24 students scored an average of 3.45 questions correct of 8 (43.1%). On course completion, students scored an average of 5.3 questions correct of the same questions (66.3%) (P .85; effect size = 0.008). Students' confidence in ordering appropriate imaging improved nearly 2-fold from a range of 1.9 to 3.2 (on a scale of 1.0 to 5.0) to a range of 3.7 to 4.5. Following a short radiology elective, second-year medical students improved their knowledge of appropriate image utilization and perceived awareness of the indications, contraindications, and effects of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimalism in Art, Medical Science and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okten, Ali Ihsan

    2018-01-01

    The word "minimalism" is a word derived from French the word "minimum". Whereas the lexical meaning of minimum is "the least or the smallest quantity necessary for something", its expression in mathematics can be described as "the lowest step a variable number can descend, least, minimal". Minimalism, which advocates an extreme simplicity of the artistic form, is a current in modern art and music whose origins go to 1960s and which features simplicity and objectivity. Although art, science and philosophy are different disciplines, they support each other from time to time, sometimes they intertwine and sometimes they copy each other. A periodic schools or teaching in one of them can take the others into itself, so, they proceed on their ways empowering each other. It is also true for the minimalism in art and the minimal invasive surgical approaches in science. Concepts like doing with less, avoiding unnecessary materials and reducing the number of the elements in order to increase the effect in the expression which are the main elements of the minimalism in art found their equivalents in medicine and neurosurgery. Their equivalents in medicine or neurosurgery have been to protect the physical integrity of the patient with less iatrogenic injury, minimum damage and the same therapeutic effect in the most effective way and to enable the patient to regain his health in the shortest span of time. As an anticipation, we can consider that the minimal approaches started by Richard Wollheim and Barbara Rose in art and Lars Leksell, Gazi Yaşargil and other neurosurgeons in neurosurgery in the 1960s are the present day equivalents of the minimalist approaches perhaps unconsciously started by Kazimir Malevich in art and Victor Darwin L"Espinasse in neurosurgery in the early 1900s. We can also consider that they have developed interacting with each other, not by chance.

  11. The 'medical humanities' in health sciences education in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S

    2014-02-01

    A new masters-level course, 'Medicine and the Arts" will be offered in 2014 at the University of Cape Town, setting a precedent for interdisciplinary education in the field of medical humanities in South Africa. The humanities and social sciences have always been an implicit part of undergraduate and postgraduate education in the health sciences, but increasingly they are becoming an explicit and essential component of the curriculum, as the importance of graduate attributes and outcomes in the workplace is acknowledged. Traditionally, the medical humanities have included medical ethics, history, literature and anthropology. Less prominent in the literature has been the engagement with medicine of the disciplines of sociology, politics, philosophy, linguistics, education, and law, as well as the creative and expressive arts. The development of the medical humanities in education and research in South Africa is set to expand over the next few years, and it looks as if it will be an exciting inter-disciplinary journey.

  12. Challenges of medical and biological engineering and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magjarevic, R [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2004-07-01

    All aspects of biomedical engineering and science, from research and development, education and training, implementation in health care systems, internationalisation and globalisation, and other, new issues are present in the strategy and in action plans of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) which, with help of a large number of highly motivated volunteers, will stay in leading position in biomedical engineering and science.

  13. Challenges of medical and biological engineering and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magjarevic, R.

    2004-01-01

    All aspects of biomedical engineering and science, from research and development, education and training, implementation in health care systems, internationalisation and globalisation, and other, new issues are present in the strategy and in action plans of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) which, with help of a large number of highly motivated volunteers, will stay in leading position in biomedical engineering and science

  14. Exercising privacy rights in medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Michael; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2007-12-04

    Privacy laws are intended to preserve human well-being and improve medical outcomes. We used the Sportstats website, a repository of competitive athletic data, to test how easily these laws can be circumvented. We designed a haphazard, unrepresentative case-series analysis and applied unscientific methods based on an Internet connection and idle time. We found it both feasible and titillating to breach anonymity, stockpile personal information and generate misquotations. We extended our methods to snoop on celebrities, link to outside databases and uncover refusal to participate. Throughout our study, we evaded capture and public humiliation despite violating these 6 privacy fundamentals. We suggest that the legitimate principle of safeguarding personal privacy is undermined by the natural human tendency toward showing off.

  15. Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences: translational and integrative mission

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Rowland; Ion G. Motofei

    2017-01-01

    Initiated four years ago, Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences (J Mind Med Sci.) established the mission to publish papers on mental and medical topics in distinct but closely interrelated domains. The editorial policy especially encourages interdisciplinary and integrative perspectives, being equally focused on basic research and clinical investigations and short reports. The journal adheres to the philosophy that high quality, original ideas and information should be readily accessibl...

  16. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Program for the radiological protection of the embryos-fetuses due to the medical exposure of him mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez B, G.M.; Martinez G, A.; Cardenas H, J.; Gonzalez R, N.; Valdes R, M.; Zaldivar H, W.

    2006-01-01

    In the last years the organizations in charge of the regulation in matter of radiological protection, its have adopted measures to minimize the risks derived of the medical exposures, paying special attention to those that involve women in age of procreation, gestating and in period of lactation, because the embryo - fetus and the newborn babies ones are very vulnerable to the risks of the ionizing radiations, which can end up producing them multiple effects of variable severity. In Cuba, a Maternal-children program that includes the genetic advice to the pregnant woman from the medical point of view exists but didn't so the evaluation of the radiological risk; which is only carried out by the Medical Surveillance Service of the Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations Center (CPHR), without that mediates an official link among both parts and whose existence is only known by a reduced group of professionals of the health and of specialists in Radiological Protection. On the other hand is not established a strategy at national level for the differentiated information and systematic in these topics that it contributes to the control of the exposures of the embryo fetus and the breast-fed baby. Keeping in mind the above-mentioned the specialists of the CPHR have elaborated a proposal of national program for the radiological protection of the embryo- fetus due to the medical exposure of its progenitor. In the same one it is settles down the interrelation between work groups and multidisciplinary institutions to achieve the detection, communication and consultant ship of the cases of exposure to the fetus or breast-fed baby that happen in the country and at the same time include the training so much of the professionals of the health like of the public in general. Presently work the program and the elements that conform it among those that are, the on-line system developed for the automation of the medical dosimetric evaluation, the technician-methodological documents

  18. Adrenal lesions encountered in current medical practice − a review of their radiological imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesha Naidu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern radiological technology has transformed the way that adrenal lesions are currently investigated. The contemporary radiologist has been catapulted to the forefront in the management of adrenal disease. With the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging, adrenal lesions are being serendipitously discovered in radiological studies undertaken for non-adrenal-related conditions – the so-called adrenal ‘incidentaloma’. This review discusses the imaging modalities available for characterising these lesions, highlighting current concepts and controversies in differentiating benign from malignant pathology. The article also provides a brief overview of the spectrum of adrenal pathology commonly encountered in the adult population.

  19. A current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gerald J; Roderer, Nancy K; Assar, Soraya

    2005-04-01

    The article offers a current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship. The authors: (1) discuss how definitions of medical informatics have changed in relation to health sciences librarianship and the broader domain of information science; (2) compare the missions of health sciences librarianship and health sciences informatics, reviewing the characteristics of both disciplines; (3) propose a new definition of health sciences informatics; (4) consider the research agendas of both disciplines and the possibility that they have merged; and (5) conclude with some comments about actions and roles for health sciences librarians to flourish in the biomedical information environment of today and tomorrow. Boundaries are disappearing between the sources and types of and uses for health information managed by informaticians and librarians. Definitions of the professional domains of each have been impacted by these changes in information. Evolving definitions reflect the increasingly overlapping research agendas of both disciplines. Professionals in these disciplines are increasingly functioning collaboratively as "boundary spanners," incorporating human factors that unite technology with health care delivery.

  20. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno Né Lehmann, Thomas M; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein Né Fritzsche, Klaus H; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment.

  2. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  3. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1984 - March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This report gives the information on the investigations conducted by the scientific staffs of the institute during this period. The total budget of the NIRS for fiscal year 1984 was about 6.052 billion yen, 21 million yen less than that for the previous year. Some new and important projects as well as the existing commitments were carried out by the prudent allocation of the budget. In addition to basic research, four long term research project were carried out, that is, research on the bilogical effect of tritium, studies on stochastic effects of irradiation and risk estimation, assessment of human exposures to environmental radiation, medical use of accelerated heavy ions. The fourth project has started from 1984 FY, which is based on the results obtained in the former project 'medical application of particle accelerator'. The gists of 11 reports related to physics, 5 reports related to chemistry, 7 reports related to biochemistry and biophysics, 9 reports related to cell biology, 11 reports related to immunology and hematology, 9 reports related to pathology, 10 reports related to genetics, 12 reports related to clinical science, and 15 reports related to environmental science are collected. (J.P.N.)

  4. FEATURES TERMINOLOGY IN MODERN MEDICAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlepko S.M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of compliance with terms and definitions in medical science and engineering to the actual essence. One of the components of successful development of these trends is adequate linguistic support of the process of development and operation, basic level of determination and terms which indicated certain principles, approaches, processes and so on.

  5. Pattern of Medical Admissions at Enugu State University of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu, 2Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching. Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla ... A review of medical admissions into the Enugu State University of Science and Technology. Teaching .... Cord lesions, rabies, Guilliane Barré syndrome, motor neuron disease and ...

  6. Endocrine Hypertension | Elamin | Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acromegaly, thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism, and hyperparathyroidism. Endocrine hypertension is noted in both adults and children but it is more relevant for children where it comes second to renal hypertension, the common cause of hypertension in that age group. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 3 (3) 2008: pp.

  7. A Graduate Academic Program in Medical Information Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Marsden S., Jr.; Wasserman, Anthony I.

    A graduate academic program in medical information science has been established at the University of California, San Francisco, for the education of scientists capable of performing research and development in information technology in the health care setting. This interdisciplinary program, leading to a Doctor of Philosophy degree, consists of an…

  8. Pattern of medical admissions at Enugu state university of science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of medical admissions at Enugu state university of science and technology teaching hospital: a 5 year review. ... The diseases encountered most were diabetes mellitus‑735/3,865 (19.1%), hypertension/congestive cardiac failure‑703/3,865 (18.2%), strokes‑614/3,865 (15.9%) and human immunodeficiency virus ...

  9. Assessing the Oldness and Capacity of Radiography and Ultrasound Equipments in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamati, Payman; Ghanaati, Hossein; Ghasemzadeh, Shahram; Jalali, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of imaging equipment is a very important part of the management of all medical imaging centers. To assess the oldness and capacity of radiography and ultrasound equipment in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The study was performed in 16 hospitals, 4 faculties and three healthcare centers of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. We evaluated all the X-ray equipment (including the simple plain and dental, panorex, mammography, fluoroscopy and C-arm X-Ray devices) and also simple and Doppler ultrasound machines in terms of the type and usage of the device, production year, quantity of utilization, location, brand and current condition. Among fixed X-ray systems, 15 were currently in use, two were junk, two were damaged, and one was not utilized. The mean (SD) of the usage of these was 2151 (2230) cliché/month, and the mean (SD) of the oldness was 16.9 (13.6) years. The oldness of radiography equipment in our study was more than 20 years in 16, between 11 and 20 in 46, and less than 10 years in 76 devices. The mean (SD) usage (patients/month) of simple and color Doppler devices were 234.1 (365.2) and 597.5 (505.3), respectively. The oldness of ultrasonography equipment in our study was more than 11 years in 12 and less than 10 years in 55 devices. We found that 22 (15.9%) of the radiography systems and two (3%) of the ultrasonography systems had been used for more than 20 years. Radiology equipment in Tehran University of Medical Sciences have potential capacity, but they need repair, and better maintenance and management and application of standards for the imaging system needs organized supervisory mechanisms

  10. Value of MRI in radiology. No MRI training in other special medical fields. A joint statement by the DRG and BVDRN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, K.J.; Fischer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Applications of MRI are restricted to the special field of diagnostic radiology, also comprising neuroradiology and pediatric radiology, and this is how it should be. This is the unanimous opinion of the medical self-administration bodies as well as of the supervisory bodies, declared with the coming into force of the WO of 1992. Any spreading of applications to other special medical fields will jeopardize the existence and development of diagnostic radiology. Only its being exclusively applied by diagnostic radiology experts will guarantee and maintain the high quality standards and economic efficiency meanwhile achieved with MRI. The demand for diagnostic MRI examinations is met by the currently available equipment at radiological specialists' practices. The Medical Associations of the Laender Baden-Wuerttemberg, Schleswig-Holstein, Saarland, and Westfalen-Lippe, other than the Bavarian Association, declared that the method should not be opened up for application by orthopedic specialists. The Federal Medical Association is called upon to use its competences as a recommending body in order to make this point clear in a general statement, recommending that MRI applications should be restricted to experts in the field of diagnostic radiology. Another good reason is warranty of equal conditions throughout Germany. There are no facts or reasons that would recommend a softening of current conditions by allowing deviating practice at Laender level. (Orig./AJ) [de

  11. Evaluation and comparison of medical records department of Iran university of medical sciences teaching hospitals and medical records department of Kermanshah university of medical sciences teaching hospitals according to the international standards ISO 9001-2000 in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam ahmadi

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The rate of final conformity of medical records system by the criteria of the ISO 9001-2000 standards in hospitals related to Iran university of medical sciences was greater than in hospitals related to Kermanshah university of medical sciences. And total conformity rate of medical records system in Kermanshah hospitals was low. So the regulation of medical records department with ISO quality management standards can help to elevate its quality.

  12. Combination of radiological and nuclear medical imaging in animals: an overview about the today's possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behe, M.; Keil, B.; Kiessling, A.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Alfke, H.; Boehm, I.; Gotthardt, M.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of small animals has made considerable progress in the last years. Various research fields are interested in imaging small animals due to the lower numbers of animals per experiment. This has advantages with respect to financial, ethical and research aspects. Non-invasive imaging allows examination of one animal several times during the same experiment. This makes it possible to follow a pathological process in the same animal over time. However, the radiological methods used such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography as well as the nuclear medicine methods such as single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography suffer from disadvantages. Molecular aspects are limited in the radiological methods while anatomical localization is difficult in nuclear medicine. The fusion of these methods leads to additional information. This review shows today's possibilities with their advantages as well as disadvantages. (orig.)

  13. Ghosts in the machine: publication planning in the medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Publication of pharmaceutical company-sponsored research in medical journals, and its presentation at conferences and meetings, is mostly governed by 'publication plans' that extract the maximum amount of scientific and commercial value out of data and analyses through carefully constructed and placed papers. Clinical research is typically performed by contract research organizations, analyzed by company statisticians, written up by independent medical writers, approved and edited by academic researchers who then serve as authors, and the whole process organized and shepherded through to journal publication by publication planners. This paper reports on a conference of an international association of publication planners. It describes and analyzes their work in an ecological framework that relates it to marketing departments of pharmaceutical companies, medical journals and publishers, academic authors, and potential audiences. The medical research described here forms a new kind of corporate science, designed to look like traditional academic work, but performed largely to market products.

  14. Current Approaches of Regulating Radiological Safety of Medical and Industrial Practices in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, C.

    2016-01-01

    The principal document regulating the radiological safety of ionizing radiation application in Romania is the “Fundamental Norms for Radiological Safety”. These norms establish the requirements concerning the assurance of radiological safety of occupational exposed workers, population and environment, in accordance with the provisions of Law 111/1996 on the safe deployment of nuclear activities, republished. Justification of practices for all new practices which lead to exposure to ionizing radiation shall be justified in writing by their initiator, underlining their economic, social or other nature advantages, in comparison with the detriment which they could cause to health. CNCAN authorise these practices, provided that they consider the justification as being thorough. The applicant, respectively the authorisation holder, has to demonstrate that all actions to ensure radiation protection optimization are undertaken, with a view to ensure that all exposures, including the potential ones, within the framework of practice developed are maintained at the lowest reasonable achievable level, taking into account the economic and social factors: ALARA principle.

  15. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  16. Gaming science innovations to integrate health systems science into medical education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Earla J; Lewis, Joy H; McCoy, Lise

    2018-01-01

    Health systems science (HSS) is an emerging discipline addressing multiple, complex, interdependent variables that affect providers' abilities to deliver patient care and influence population health. New perspectives and innovations are required as physician leaders and medical educators strive to accelerate changes in medical education and practice to meet the needs of evolving populations and systems. The purpose of this paper is to introduce gaming science as a lens to magnify HSS integration opportunities in the scope of medical education and practice. Evidence supports gaming science innovations as effective teaching and learning tools to promote learner engagement in scientific and systems thinking for decision making in complex scenarios. Valuable insights and lessons gained through the history of war games have resulted in strategic thinking to minimize risk and save lives. In health care, where decisions can affect patient and population outcomes, gaming science innovations have the potential to provide safe learning environments to practice crucial decision-making skills. Research of gaming science limitations, gaps, and strategies to maximize innovations to further advance HSS in medical education and practice is required. Gaming science holds promise to equip health care teams with HSS knowledge and skills required for transformative practice. The ultimate goals are to empower providers to work in complex systems to improve patient and population health outcomes and experiences, and to reduce costs and improve care team well-being.

  17. Clinical Correlations as a Tool in Basic Science Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J. Klement

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical correlations are tools to assist students in associating basic science concepts with a medical application or disease. There are many forms of clinical correlations and many ways to use them in the classroom. Five types of clinical correlations that may be embedded within basic science courses have been identified and described. (1 Correlated examples consist of superficial clinical information or stories accompanying basic science concepts to make the information more interesting and relevant. (2 Interactive learning and demonstrations provide hands-on experiences or the demonstration of a clinical topic. (3 Specialized workshops have an application-based focus, are more specialized than typical laboratory sessions, and range in complexity from basic to advanced. (4 Small-group activities require groups of students, guided by faculty, to solve simple problems that relate basic science information to clinical topics. (5 Course-centered problem solving is a more advanced correlation activity than the others and focuses on recognition and treatment of clinical problems to promote clinical reasoning skills. Diverse teaching activities are used in basic science medical education, and those that include clinical relevance promote interest, communication, and collaboration, enhance knowledge retention, and help develop clinical reasoning skills.

  18. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  19. Regulatory Science in Practice (Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

    Review, safety, and relief services of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency are primarily focused on scientifically evaluating pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and cellular and tissue-based products referring to their quality, efficacy, and safety, which requires a variety of scientific knowledge and methods. Pharmaceutical regulation should be established based on the most advanced scientific expertise at all times. In order to evaluate products that use cutting-edge technology such as induced pluripotent stem cells and information and communication technology adequately, since fiscal year 2012 the Science Committee has been established as a platform to exchange opinions among members from top-ranking domestic and international academia and to enhance personnel exchanges through the Initiative to Facilitate Development of Innovative Drugs. In addition, the Regulatory Science Center will be established in 2018 to increase the integrity of our services for product reviews and safety measures. In particular, requiring electronic data submissions for clinical trial applications followed by an advanced approach to analysis should not only enhance the quality of reviews of individual products but should also support the development of pharmaceuticals and medical devices by providing pharmaceutical affairs consultations on research and development strategies with various guidelines based on new insights resulting from product-bridging data analysis. Moreover, a database including electronic health records with comprehensive medical information collected mainly from 10 cooperating medical institutions will be developed with the aim of developing safety measures in a more timely manner using methods of pharmacoepidemiological analysis.

  20. Practice of Regulatory Science (Development of Medical Devices).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    Prototypes of medical devices are made in accordance with the needs of clinical practice, and for systems required during the initial process of medical device development for new surgical practices. Verification of whether these prototypes produce the intended performance specifications is conducted using basic tests such as mechanical and animal tests. The prototypes are then improved and modified until satisfactory results are obtained. After a prototype passes through a clinical trial process similar to that for new drugs, application for approval is made. In the approval application process, medical devices are divided into new, improved, and generic types. Reviewers judge the validity of intended use, indications, operation procedures, and precautions, and in addition evaluate the balance between risk and benefit in terms of efficacy and safety. Other characteristics of medical devices are the need for the user to attain proficiency in usage techniques to ensure efficacy and safety, and the existence of a variety of medical devices for which assessment strategies differ, including differences in impact on the body in cases in which a physical burden to the body or failure of a medical device develops. Regulatory science of medical devices involves prediction, judgment, and evaluation of efficacy, safety, and quality, from which data result which can become indices in the development stages from design to application for approval. A reduction in the number of animals used for testing, improvement in efficiency, reduction of the necessity for clinical trials, etc. are expected through rational setting of evaluation items.

  1. Control of radioactive materials on the medical science campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.H.; Vandergrift, J.F.; Slayden, S.A.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    There are persistent and difficult control problems associated with the large scale use of radionuclides: nowhere are these more apparent than in a large university medical center. If a safe environment is to be maintained with respect to employees, students, patients, and the general public, a program must be devised for effective supervision and control of radioactive sources. An automated system has been developed for the inventory and control of radioactive materials that has proven a valuable asset in a large institution. The reports generated have assisted in making responsible judgements, as well as assuring the continuation of single licensure for the medical science campus. (author)

  2. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April, 1983 - March, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    This report gives the information on the investigations conducted by the scientific staffs of the institute during this period. The total budget of the NIRS for fiscal year 1983 was about 5.835 billion yen, 15 million yen less than that for the previous year. Some new and important projects as well as the existing commitments were carried out by the prudent allocation of the budget. Four long term research projects were carried out, that is, research on the biological effect of tritium, medical application of particle accelerators, studies on the stochastic effect of irradiation and its risk estimation, and assessment of the exposure to environmental radiation of men, in addition to basic research. The second project was completed in fiscal year 1983, and the latter two projects began as five-year projects. The gists of 9 reports related to physics, 6 reports related to chemistry, 8 reports related to biochemistry and biophysics, 8 reports related to cell biology, 10 reports related to immunology and hematology, 10 reports related to physiology and pathology, 11 reports related to genetics, 10 reports related to clinical science, and 19 reports related to environmental science are collected. (Kako, I.)

  3. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  4. Eponyms in medical sciences: historical errors that lead to injustice

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque-Parra; John Barco-Ríos; Natalia Dávila-Alzate

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Throughout history, eponyms have been used in medical sciences to designate anatomical structures although they do not provide any descriptive or functional information, which is equivalent to a mistake in the light of current thinking. Double and triple eponyms have been used to name the same structure, thus creating confusion that leads to believe that a discovery or description was made by several persons at the same time. Although eponyms have been abolished from anatomical ...

  5. Applications of nuclear technique in environmental and medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xianfeng; Shen Hao; Liu Bo; Sun Minde; Yao Huiying; Zhou Shijun; Mi Yong

    2001-01-01

    The serious environmental pollution problem and application of the nuclear technique in environmental and medical sciences were discussed. The analysed results of the elemental distribution of particles in automobile exhaust, the aerosol particle of different size and the effect of Rare Earth on cells were reported. The authors can obtain some information related to element concentration. It offers a convenient method in inspecting the environmental pollution

  6. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1982-02-01

    A progress report on the work performed during 1980 by the Environmental and Medical Sciences Division at UKAEA Harwell is given. The programmes considered were atmospheric pollution; landfill research; monitoring of radioactive fallout and other radionuclides and trace elements in the environment; radioactive and non-radioactive aerosol metabolic studies; inhalation toxicology of radioactive aerosols and other hazardous materials; chemical analytical services; and radiation physics in dosimetry research, applied radiation spectrometry and data systems. (U.K.)

  7. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournane, S.; Conway, R.; Creagh, D.; Byrne, D.G.; Sheehy, N.; Silke, B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. Materials and methods: All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010–2014 were evaluated. The 50"t"h, 75"t"h, and 90"t"h centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. Results: For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. Conclusion: CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. - Highlights: • There are differing clinical complexities for patients depending on the modality. • A predictive risk model, incorporating advanced imaging, was devised. • Inpatients delays in radiology imaging associated with longer LOS. • Inpatients who underwent radiology imaging associated with increased hospital costs.

  8. The founding of ISOTT: the Shamattawa of engineering science and medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruley, Duane F

    2014-01-01

    The founding of ISOTT was based upon the blending of Medical and Engineering sciences. This occurrence is portrayed by the Shamattawa, the joining of the Chippewa and Flambeau rivers. Beginning with Carl Scheele's discovery of oxygen, the medical sciences advanced the knowledge of its importance to physiological phenomena. Meanwhile, engineering science was evolving as a mathematical discipline used to define systems quantitatively from basic principles. In particular, Adolf Fick's employment of a gradient led to the formalization of transport phenomena. These two rivers of knowledge were blended to found ISOTT at Clemson/Charleston, South Carolina, USA, in 1973.The establishment of our society with a mission to support the collaborative work of medical scientists, clinicians and all disciplines of engineering was a supporting step in the evolution of bioengineering. Traditional engineers typically worked in areas not requiring knowledge of biology or the life sciences. By encouraging collaboration between medical science and traditional engineering, our society became one of the forerunners in establishing bioengineering as the fifth traditional discipline of engineering.

  9. Financial Resources Allocation of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Afiyan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and Objectives : According to complexity of resource allocation, issue about how to allocate health care resources in an accurate and fair manner has become the subject of discussions and decisions of related groups. Therefore, in this research we aim to study the methods of financial resource allocation of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses for its promotion. Material and Methods : This study is a descriptive, qualitative sectional research and all comments have been collected by focus group discussions with experts and managers involved in the allocation of financial resources of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. All factors affecting the process of allocation have been reviewd carefully. Results : Results suggested that except the health sector, none of the other sectors use the formulated  and scientific methods for allocating financial resources and despite the emphasize in the 4th development plan for operating funding, the final cost of the services, has no role in allocating financial resources. Conclusion : Regarding to judgmental and subjective method of financial resources allocation of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences and lack of documented and formulated methods, there is an essential need for developing an appropriate and formulated model for scientific allocation of financial resources in order to improve the efficiency and fairness of the allocation.

  10. Terrorist threat, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear medical approach; Menace terroriste, approche medicale nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, Th. de [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, 92 - Clamart (France); Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Vidal, D. [Centre de Recherche du Service de Sante des Armees, 38 - La Tronche (France); Renaudeau, C. [Ecole du Val de Grace, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2005-07-01

    The different aspects linked to the use of nuclear, radiological, biological and or chemical weapons are gathered in this work. They concern history, fundamental aspect, diagnosis, therapy and prevention. The part devoted to the nuclear aspect concern the accidents in relation with ionizing radiations, the radiation syndrome, the contribution and limits of dosimetry, the treatment of medullary aplasia, the evaluation and treatment of an internal contamination, new perspectives on the use of cytokine for the treatment of accidental irradiated persons, alternative to the blood transfusion. (N.C.)

  11. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  12. EUTEMPE-RX, an EC supported FP7 project for the training and education of medical physics experts in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, H.; Van Peteghem, N.; Bliznakova, K.; Vassileva, J.; Padovani, R.; Christofides, S.; Tsapaki, V.; Caruana, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The core activity of the medical physics expert (MPE) is to ensure optimal use of ionising radiation in health care. It is essential that these health care professionals are trained to the highest level, defined as European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF) level 8 by the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report 174 'Guidelines on the MPE'. The main objective of the EUTEMPE-RX project is to provide a model training scheme that allows the medical physicist in diagnostic and interventional radiology (D and IR) to reach this high level. A European network of partners was brought together in this FP7 EC project to ensure sufficient expertise in all aspects of the subject and to create a harmonised course programme. Targeted participants are medical physicists in D and IR in hospitals, engineers and scientists in medical device industries and officers working in regulatory authorities. Twelve course modules will be developed at EQF level 8, with radiation safety and diagnostic effectiveness being prevalent subjects. The modules will combine online with face-to-face teaching using a blended learning approach. (authors)

  13. Optimization Of Scan Range For 3d Point Localization In Statscan Digital Medical Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta S. Kimuyu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of computerized medical imaging in early 1970s which merged with digital technology in the 1980s was celebrated as a major breakthrough in three-dimensional 3D medicine. However a recent South African innovation the high speed scanning Lodox Statscan Critical Digital Radiology modality posed challenges in X-ray photogrammetry due to the systems intricate imaging geometry. The study explored the suitability of the Direct Linear Transformation as a method for the determination of 3D coordinates of targeted points from multiple images acquired with the Statscan X-ray system and optimization of the scan range. This investigation was carried out as a first step towards the development of a method to determine the accurate positions of points on or inside the human body. The major causes of errors in three-dimensional point localization using Statscan images were firstly the X-ray beam divergence and secondly the position of the point targets above the X-ray platform. The experiments carried out with two reference frames showed that point positions could be established with RMS values in the mm range in the middle axis of the X-ray patient platform. This range of acceptable mm accuracies extends about 15 to 20 cm sideways towards the edge of the X-ray table and to about 20 cm above the table surface. Beyond this range accuracy deteriorated significantly reaching RMS values of 30mm to 40 mm. The experiments further showed that the inclusion of control points close to the table edges and more than 20 cm above the table resulted in lower accuracies for the L - parameters of the DLT solution than those derived from points close to the center axis only. As the accuracy of the L - parameters propagates into accuracy of the final coordinates of newly determined points it is essential to restrict the space of the control points to the above described limits. If one adopts the usual approach of surrounding the object by known control points then

  14. Radiation exposure and chromosome abnormalities. Human cytogenetic studies at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, 1963-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, T.; Kohno, S.; Minamihisamatsu, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of human cytogenetic studies performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan for about 25 years are described. The studies were pursued primarily under two major projects: one involving people exposed to radiation under various conditions and the other involving patients with malignant diseases, especially leukemias. Whereas chromosome abnormalities in radiation-exposed people are excellent indicators of radiation exposure, their behavior in bone marrow provide useful information for a better understanding of chromosome abnormalities in leukemias and related disorders. The role of chromosome abnormalities in the genesis and development of leukemia and related disorders is considered, suggesting a view for future studies in this field

  15. Science of health care delivery milestones for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havyer, Rachel D; Norby, Suzanne M; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Starr, Stephanie R; Lang, Tara R; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Reed, Darcy A

    2017-08-25

    The changing healthcare landscape requires physicians to develop new knowledge and skills such as high-value care, systems improvement, population health, and team-based care, which together may be referred to as the Science of Health Care Delivery (SHCD). To engender public trust and confidence, educators must be able to meaningfully assess physicians' abilities in SHCD. We aimed to develop a novel set of SHCD milestones based on published Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones that can be used by medical schools to assess medical students' competence in SHCD. We reviewed all ACGME milestones for 25 specialties available in September 2013. We used an iterative, qualitative process to group the ACGME milestones into SHCD content domains, from which SHCD milestones were derived. The SHCD milestones were categorized within the current ACGME core competencies and were also mapped to Association of American Medical Colleges' Entrustable Professional Activities (AAMC EPAs). Fifteen SHCD sub-competencies and corresponding milestones are provided, grouped within ACGME core competencies and mapped to multiple AAMC EPAs. This novel set of milestones, grounded within the existing ACGME competencies, defines fundamental expectations within SHCD that can be used and adapted by medical schools in the assessment of medical students in this emerging curricular area. These milestones provide a blueprint for SHCD content and assessment as ongoing revisions to milestones and curricula occur.

  16. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) compliance program guidance manual and updates (FY 86). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Irregular report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  17. Individual monitoring of medical staff working in interventional radiology in Switzerland using double dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damet, J.; Bailat, C.; Bize, P.; Buchillier, Th.; Tosic, M.; Verdun, F.R.; Baechler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Physicians who frequently perform fluoroscopic examinations are exposed to high intensity radiation fields. The exposure monitoring is performed with a regular personal dosimeter under the apron in order to estimate the effective dose. However, large parts of the body are not protected by the apron (e.g. arms, head). Therefore, it is recommended to wear a supplemental dosimeter over the apron to obtain a better representative estimate of the effective dose. The over-apron dosimeter can also be used to estimate the eye lens dose. The goal of this study was to investigate the relevance of double dosimetry in interventional radiology. First the calibration procedure of the dosimeters placed over the apron was tested. Then, results of double dosimetry during the last five years were analyzed. We found that the personal dose equivalent measured over a lead apron was underestimated by ∼20% to ∼40% for X-ray beam qualities used in radiology. Measurements made over five-year period confirm that the use of a single under-apron dosimeter is inadequate for personnel monitoring. Relatively high skin dose (>10 mSv/month) would have remained undetected without a second dosimeter placed on the apron.

  18. Radiological protection in medical facilities and applications and around accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Harder, D.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the meeting of radiation protection experts present the invited papers, of which 37 have been analysed and indexed for retrieval from the database. The papers discuss a broad spectrum of topics in the field of radiologic safety, as e.g. the fundamentals of assessing the effects of low-level ionizing radiation, new releases of international recommendations, the legal basis of activities for an optimization of radiological protection, including the tasks of the radiation protection officers, and recent developments in dose monitoring and measurement. There are papers dealing with topical aspects of radiation protection around accelerators for radiotherapy or radionuclide production, and at accelerators in research and industry. Experts in the field of diagnostic X-ray examination present the latest knowledge contributing to minimizing the radiation exposure from conventional or from novel, digital examination techniques, and recent developments in the field of quality assurance. In connection with the handling of unsealed radioactive materials, there are some papers discussing the monitoring and limits of intakes of radionuclides by workers. (orig./HP) With 124 figs., 72 tabs [de

  19. Generic Procedures for Medical Response During a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this manual is to provide the medical community with practical guidance for medical emergency preparedness and response, describing the tasks and actions of different members of the national, regional or local medical infrastructure in accordance with international standards. This document provides generic response procedures for medical personnel responding to different types of radiation emergencies and at the different stages of the emergency response (at the scene of the emergency, pre-hospital, hospital), and during the early post-emergency stage (about 1-2 months afterwards).

  20. Medical students' attitude of their success rate in clerkship period in Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hadjyabady

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background With regard to accelerated progresses in the world of science and technology, as well as changes in the needs of the society, medical education should be a developing process. One of the main factors that can promote education from a static to a dynamic and effective state is evaluation. Purpose The purpose of the present survey is to determine the rate of success of medical students passing their clerkship in Birjand University of Medical Sciences from their own views of attaining educational goals of Urology Department. Methods The study is descriptive-analytical and has been performed on 50 medical students in Birjand University of Medical Sciences. Having determined the validity as well as the reliability of the question­naires, we used them to collect the data. Results Participants were 37 men (74% and 13 women (26%. T-test demonstrated a significant statical difference between male and female students in practical management of cases in urology ward (p<0.03. significant. Better practical performance was evident when the students take practical approach, in addition to looking and listening. Also, if students used various methods of teaching and learning, they would better manage cases. Conclusion The rate of medical students' success in their clerkship period for educational goals of urology was good. However, providing required facilities for giving instructions on clinical skills such as educational clinical workshops, clinical skill workshops and clinical skills centre, educational films and bed­ side practice under supervision of professors, will promote the fulfilment of educational goals. Key word educational goals, medical students, urology ward

  1. Comparisonof depression prevalence in medical students between the first and last years of Birjand University of Medical Sciences: Brief Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Rahmani Bidokhti

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Apparently, prevalence of depression in medical students in Birjand university of Medical Sciences is high, although studying medicine is not significantly decisive in the occurrence of the problem.

  2. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadvand A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences.Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

  3. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Akkasheh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with  the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students  should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

     

  4. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  5. Coordinating the undergraduate medical (MBBS basic sciences programme in a Nepalese medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available KIST Medical College follows the curriculum of the Institute ofMedicine, Tribhuvan University. The programme aims toproduce socially responsible and competent physicians whoare willing and able to meet the existing and emergingchallenges of the national and international healthcaresystem. The first cohort of undergraduate medical students(MBBS students was admitted in November 2008 and threecohorts including the one admitted in 2008 have beenadmitted at the time of writing. The basic science subjects aretaught in an integrated, organ-system-based manner withcommunity medicine during the first two years. I wasappointed as the MBBS Phase I programme coordinator inSeptember 2008 and in this article I share my experiences ofrunning the basic sciences programme and also offersuggestions for running an efficient academic programme. Themanuscript will be of special interest to readers runningundergraduate medical programmes. The reader canunderstand our experiences in running the programme inadverse circumstances, learning to achieve greater integrationamong basic science, community medicine and clinicaldepartments, obtain information about a communitydiagnosis programme and know about running specialmodules on the medical humanities and pharmaceuticalpromotion.

  6. A combination of traditional learning and e-learning can be more effective on radiological interpretation skills in medical students: a pre- and post-intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajegheh, Ali; Jahangiri, Alborz; Dolan-Evans, Elliot; Pakneshan, Sahar

    2016-02-03

    The ability to interpret an X-Ray is a vital skill for graduating medical students which guides clinicians towards accurate diagnosis and treatment of the patient. However, research has suggested that radiological interpretation skills are less than satisfactory in not only medical students, but also in residents and consultants. This study investigated the effectiveness of e-learning for the development of X-ray interpretation skills in pre-clinical medical students. Competencies in clinical X-Ray interpretation were assessed by comparison of pre- and post-intervention scores and one year follow up assessment, where the e-learning course was the 'intervention'. Our results demonstrate improved knowledge and skills in X-ray interpretation in students. Assessment of the post training students showed significantly higher scores than the scores of control group of students undertaking the same assessment at the same time. The development of the Internet and advances in multimedia technologies has paved the way for computer-assisted education. As more rural clinical schools are established the electronic delivery of radiology teaching through websites will become a necessity. The use of e-learning to deliver radiology tuition to medical students represents an exciting alternative and is an effective method of developing competency in radiological interpretation for medical students.

  7. [Cooperation with the electronic medical record and accounting system of an actual dose of drug given by a radiology information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideo; Yoneda, Tarou; Satou, Shuji; Ishikawa, Toru; Hara, Misako

    2009-12-20

    By input of the actual dose of a drug given into a radiology information system, the system converting with an accounting system into a cost of the drug from the actual dose in the electronic medical record was built. In the drug master, the first unit was set as the cost of the drug, and we set the second unit as the actual dose. The second unit in the radiology information system was received by the accounting system through electronic medical record. In the accounting system, the actual dose was changed into the cost of the drug using the dose of conversion to the first unit. The actual dose was recorded on a radiology information system and electronic medical record. The actual dose was indicated on the accounting system, and the cost for the drug was calculated. About the actual dose of drug, cooperation of the information in a radiology information system and electronic medical record were completed. It was possible to decide the volume of drug from the correct dose of drug at the previous inspection. If it is necessary for the patient to have another treatment of medicine, it is important to know the actual dose of drug given. Moreover, authenticity of electronic medical record based on a statute has also improved.

  8. Total quality management (TQM) in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The branch of quality assurance is now taking a new direction towards total quality management (TQM). Being of industrial origin, the concepts and terminologies in TQM are alien to medical and paramedical professionals. However, the impetus it has already made in other areas of health sciences makes medical physicists left out when diagnostic radiology does not encompass TQM. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the terms used in TQM and some aspects of its application to diagnostic radiology. (author). 12 refs., 1 tab

  9. The terrorist threat nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical - a medical approach; Menace terroriste nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique - approche medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, M.C. de; Gourmelon, M.C.S.; Vidal, P.C.; Renaudeau, P.C.S

    2005-07-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the fear of a large scale nuclear, biological and/or chemical terrorism is taken again into consideration at the highest level of national policies of risk prevention. The advent of international terrorism implies a cooperation between the military defense and the civil defense. The nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) experts of the health service of army and of civil defense will have to work together in case of major terror attack. This book presents this cooperation between civil and military experts in the NRBC domain: risk analysis, national defense plans, crisis management, syndromes and treatments. The different aspects linked with the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are analyzed by the best experts from French medical and research institutes. All topics of each NRBC domain are approached: historical, basic, diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive. (J.S.)

  10. What are the implications of implementation science for medical education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Price

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Derived from multiple disciplines and established in industries outside of medicine, Implementation Science (IS seeks to move evidence-based approaches into widespread use to enable improved outcomes to be realized as quickly as possible by as many as possible. Methods: This review highlights selected IS theories and models, chosen based on the experience of the authors, that could be used to plan and deliver medical education activities to help learners better implement and sustain new knowledge and skills in their work settings. Results: IS models, theories and approaches can help medical educators promote and determine their success in achieving desired learner outcomes. We discuss the importance of incorporating IS into the training of individuals, teams, and organizations, and employing IS across the medical education continuum. Challenges and specific strategies for the application of IS in educational settings are also discussed. Conclusions: Utilizing IS in medical education can help us better achieve changes in competence, performance, and patient outcomes. IS should be incorporated into curricula across disciplines and across the continuum of medical education to facilitate implementation of learning. Educators should start by selecting, applying, and evaluating the teaching and patient care impact one or two IS strategies in their work.

  11. Research in medical education: balancing service and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mathieu; Hodges, Brian; Regehr, Glenn

    2007-02-01

    Since the latter part of the 1990's, the English-speaking medical education community has been engaged in a debate concerning the types of research that should have priority. To shed light on this debate and to better understand its implications for the practice of research, 23 semi-structured interviews were conducted with "influential figures" from the community. The results were analyzed using the concept of "field" developed by the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. The results reveal that a large majority of these influential figures believe that research in medical education continues to be of insufficient quality despite the progress that has taken place over the past 2 decades. According to this group, studies tend to be both redundant and opportunistic, and researchers tend to have limited understanding of both theory and methodological practice from the social sciences. Three factors were identified by the participants to explain the current problems in research: the working conditions of researchers, budgetary restraints in financing research in medical education, and the conception of research in the medical environment. Two principal means for improving research are presented: intensifying collaboration between PhD's and clinicians, and encouraging the diversification of perspectives brought to bear on research in medical education.

  12. Integrating the Radiology Information System with Computerised Provider Order Entry: The Impact on Repeat Medical Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Repeat and redundant procedures in medical imaging are associated with increases in resource utilisation and labour costs. Unnecessary medical imaging in some modalities, such as X-Ray (XR) and Computed Tomography (CT) is an important safety issue because it exposes patients to ionising radiation which can be carcinogenic and is associated with higher rates of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of implementing an integrated Computerised Provider Order Entry (CPOE)/Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) system on the number of XR and CT imaging procedures (including repeat imaging requests) for inpatients at a large metropolitan hospital. The study found that patients had an average 0.47 fewer XR procedures and 0.07 fewer CT procedures after the implementation of the integrated system. Part of this reduction was driven by a lower rate of repeat procedures: the average inpatient had 0.13 fewer repeat XR procedures within 24-hours of the previous identical XR procedure. A similar decrease was not evident for repeat CT procedures. Reduced utilisation of imaging procedures (especially those within very short intervals from the previous identical procedure, which are more likely to be redundant) has implications for the safety of patients and the cost of medical imaging services.

  13. Present state of studies on FFAG accelerator for radiotherapy of cancer in National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misu, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    From 2001, developmental contract studies with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for a compact accelerator for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer started in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with use of fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator, which had been developed in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This paper describes the present state of those studies. Described are FFAG accelerator design for repeated acceleration for 200 Hz or more toward the carbon ion at 400 MeV/u with the range of 25 cm in water, FFAG optical systems for these purposes by linear analyses, and the present situation of the design. Technological problems yielded and future study plan are also commented. (N.I.)

  14. [Cardiology was born with the modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils of Galileo. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this exploit could be written from view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic not imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. So it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galileo's thought. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani, K. Azam, F. Changani, E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past, medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities in Iran. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better managing the wastes from healthcare facilities. This study was carried in 12 educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The goals of this study were to characterize solid wastes generated in healthcare hospitals, to report the current status of medical waste management and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes at the considered hospitals. The methodology was descriptive, cross-sectional and consisted of the use of surveys and interviews with the authorities of the healthcare facilities and with personnel involved in the management of the wastes. The results showed that medical wastes generated in hospitals were extremely heterogeneous in composition. 42% of wastes were collected in containers and plastic bags. In 75% of hospitals, the stay-time in storage sites was about 12-24h. 92% of medical wastes of hospitals were collected by covered-trucks. In 46% of hospitals, transferring of medical wastes to temporary stations was done manually. The average of waste generation rates in the hospitals was estimated to be 4.42kg/bed/day.

  16. [Medical science and the human image--on the theory of medical tasks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, S

    1993-06-22

    Our science-determined medicine interprets the non-individual partial aspects of disease that are approachable by causal analytical thought; therefore, it becomes only then an art of healing when it is complemented by medical craftsmanship and philosophic reflection. Naturopathy perceives the individual as an open self-regulatory system whose innumerable mechanisms and strategies for maintenance of integrity have to be supported. In medical practise both concepts have always to be available concomitantly and and in equal rights, not only for repair of lesions but also for real healing.

  17. Medical response guide for the initial phase of a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2007-01-01

    In case of a sanitary emergency, the local community and its health care system are the first aid providers. Therefore, preparedness through education and training programs would allow emergency systems to provide an appropriate first medical response. The main objective of this guide is to give basic guidelines for the medical response management after situations involving radioactive materials, in an easy and simple way. The information contained in this guide is addressed to health care personnel of any local assistance center. (author) [es

  18. Perspectives of radiological protection facing the development of new medical technologies with ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arranz, L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of medical technologies with ionizing radiations is always showing a parallel effort on risks control. These technologies are a safe tool for accurate diagnosis and the elaboration of effective treatments. However it is not foreseen to achieve a decrease of the equivalent effective annual dose person due to medical irradiation (1.06 m Sv for OECD countries), because of the population growing and aging

  19. An Internet-Based Radiology Course in Medical School: Comparison of Academic Performance of Students on Campus Versus Those With Absenteeism Due to Residency Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Andrew George; Deas, Deborah; Lyons, Paul Eric

    2018-05-18

    Imaging and its optimal use are imperative to the practice of medicine, yet many students don't receive a formal education in radiology. Concurrently, students look for ways to take time away from medical school for residency interviewing. Web-based instruction provides an opportunity to combine these imperatives using online modalities. A largely Web-based course in radiology during the 4th year of medical school was evaluated both for its acceptance to students who needed to be away from campus for interviews, and its effectiveness on a nationally administered standardized test. All students were placed into a structured program utilizing online videos, online modules, online textbook assignments, and live interactive online lectures. Over half of the course could be completed away from campus. The Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology test exam bank was used as a final exam to evaluate medical knowledge. Positive student feedback included the freedom to travel for interviews, hands-on ultrasound training, interactive teaching sessions, and quality Web-based learning modules. Negative feedback included taking quizzes in-person, a perceived outdated online textbook, and physically shadowing hospital technicians. Most students elected to take the course during the interview months of October through January. The Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology final exam results (70.5%) were not significantly different than the national cohort (70%) who took the course in-person. Test scores from students taking the course during interview travel months were not significantly different from students who took the course before (P=.30) or after (P=.34) the interview season. Students desire to learn radiology and often choose to do so when they need to be away from campus during the fall of their 4th year of study to accomplish their residency interviews. Web-based education in radiology allows students' interview traveling and radiology course

  20. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  1. Clinical validation of a medical grade color monitor for chest radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Verschakelen, J.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2009-02-01

    Until recently, the specifications of medical grade monochrome LCD monitors outperformed those of color LCD monitors. New generations of color LCD monitors, however, show specifications that are in many respects similar to those of monochrome monitors typically used in diagnostic workstations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of different medical grade monitors in terms of detection of simulated lung nodules in chest x-ray images. Specifically, we wanted to compare a new medical grade color monitor (Barco Coronis 6MP color) to a medical grade grayscale monitor (Barco Coronis 3MP monochrome) and a consumer color monitor (Philips 200VW 1.7MP color) by means of an observer performance experiment. Using the free-response acquisition data paradigm, seven radiologists were asked to detect and locate lung nodules (170 in total), simulated in half of the 200 chest X-ray images used in the experiment. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis of the data showed a statistically significant difference between at least two monitors, F-value=3.77 and p-value =0.0481. The different Figure of Merit values were 0.727, 0.723 and 0.697 for the new color LCD monitor, the medical grade monitor and the consumer color monitor respectively. There was no difference between the needed reading times but there was a difference between the mean calculated Euclidian distances between the position marked by the observers and the center of the simulated nodule, indicating a better accuracy with both medical grade monitors. Present data suggests that the new generation of medical grade color monitors could be used as diagnostic workstations.

  2. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  3. Physiotherapy Students’ Attitudes to Basic Medical Sciences Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasaghi Gharamaleki B

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: Students’ attitude to the basic sciences courses has a considerable impact in their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of undergraduate and graduate students to the Physiotherapy rather than basic science. Instrument & Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on 151 undergraduate and graduate schools of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Tehran and Iran University of Medical Sciences students using easy access sampling in October and November of 2012. To evaluate the attitude and the importance and effectiveness subscales the West questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software using One-way ANOVA, independent T, and logistic regression tests. Findings: There was a significant difference between the sexes in response to items 1, 4, 7 and 8. The attitudes mean and the importance and effectiveness subscales were greater in women in the bachelor fifth and seventh semesters. The attitude and the importance of women were significantly more positive than men in Master degree students of the first semester, but there was no statistically significant difference between the sexes in the third semester of the Master degree students. Conclusion: Bachelor and Master students' positive attitudes toward physical science is affected by their gender and women pay more attention to learn treatment physiologically details, while men are more likely to emphasize on the results of the treatment. By increasing the presence of women in Master degrees their attitude get closer to men.

  4. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays; Curso de proteccion y seguridad radiologica en el diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, C.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  5. SOME ASPECTS OF USING MATHEMATICS IN MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ilic

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to present some new possibilities of using mathematicsin medical sciences and medical practice. The so-called mathematical way of thinkingis presented, which is, basically, the starting point of usual way of thinking, and alsothe essence of scientific and technological literacy, necessary for the development oftheoretical and practical modern medicine. The aim of the paper was to show that it isreasonable to choose certain mathematical points of view, present them to thestudents of medicine, and thus, help them to use that knowledge in their futurestudies in order to be more successful in their professions. Modern mathematical andstatistical methods are important in professional and scientific work in clinical andlaboratory environment.

  6. Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences Striving towards Visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    GHAZLI, Nur Farahin; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2013-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences has in its 25 years “Silver Jubilee” achieved another milestone of being visible to the biomedical community when it was accepted in PubMed. The journal aim to increase its readership so as to increase impact in the biomedical field amongst its Asian readers despite having a high rejection rate. This was done to maintain quality of the manuscripts published over the years. PubMed listing should enable more manuscripts to be cited as its the leading biomedical journal for the Asian community. PMID:24043990

  7. "Political co-authorships" in medical science journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Jaspreet; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    The issue of co-author relationships on medical sciences journal publications has become more pronounced as advances in technology have enabled collaboration across countries and institutions to occur much more efficiently. These relationships often have underlying political motivations and outcomes, including career advancement, attempting to increase prestige of a project, and maintaining research grants. Some authors may be listed as senior or honorary authors despite offering little or no contribution to the original research project. This may be done in an effort to enhance the gravitas of a research project, and attain publication in a highly regarded medical journal. The current review covers the topic of political co-authorship and germane literature and lists strategies to combat this phenomenon. Such co-authorship practices corrupt the integrity of the research process as they attempt to bypass the safeguard that medical journals and institutions have put in place to prevent fraud and falsification. A number of strategies have been proposed to combat the practice of co-authorship, but it may ultimately be an unavoidable feature of contemporary medical research publishing that is difficult to police. Clin. Anat. 30:831-834, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The field of medical anthropology in Social Science & Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Eggerman, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Conceptually and methodologically, medical anthropology is well-positioned to support a "big-tent" research agenda on health and society. It fosters approaches to social and structural models of health and wellbeing in ways that are critically reflective, cross-cultural, people-centered, and transdisciplinary. In this review article, we showcase these four main characteristics of the field, as featured in Social Science & Medicine over the last fifty years, highlighting their relevance for an international and interdisciplinary readership. First, the practice of critical inquiry in ethnographies of health offers a deep appreciation of sociocultural viewpoints when recording and interpreting lived experiences and contested social worlds. Second, medical anthropology champions cross-cultural breadth: it makes explicit local understandings of health experiences across different settings, using a fine-grained, comparative approach to develop a stronger global platform for the analysis of health-related concerns. Third, in offering people-centered views of the world, anthropology extends the reach of critical enquiry to the lived experiences of hard-to-reach population groups, their structural vulnerabilities, and social agency. Finally, in developing research at the nexus of cultures, societies, biologies, and health, medical anthropologists generate new, transdisciplinary conversations on the body, mind, person, community, environment, prevention, and therapy. As featured in this journal, scholarly contributions in medical anthropology seek to debate human health and wellbeing from many angles, pushing forward methodology, social theory, and health-related practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences: translational and integrative mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Rowland

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Initiated four years ago, Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences (J Mind Med Sci. established the mission to publish papers on mental and medical topics in distinct but closely interrelated domains. The editorial policy especially encourages interdisciplinary and integrative perspectives, being equally focused on basic research and clinical investigations and short reports. The journal adheres to the philosophy that high quality, original ideas and information should be readily accessible and freely shared within and amongst the scientific community. Accordingly, J Mind Med Sci. is an online, open access, non-for-profit journal which, because of individual/ private support, has levied no charges for submission, review, and publication of articles. All published articles may be freely downloaded and used by anyone from anywhere for scientific purposes. Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences is published by ValpoScholar/ Valparaiso University using the leading institutional repository platform of Digital Commons (powered by Bepress and under the local management of Jon Bull, Library Services, Valparaiso University, which combines submission management, editorial, and peer-review tools into a unique and flexible publishing software system. These editorial and publishing norms have facilitated the journal’s evolution, now indexed and abstracted in several international respected databases. Journal visibility is wide among international academic institutions and readers, as documented by the number of downloaded articles cited in respected journals, some indexed by Thomson Reuters and having high impact factors. In addition, published authors in J Mind Med Sci. periodically receive a statistical report about views / downloads of their articles. It is a pleasure and honor to thank all those who have thus far supported the journal activity (authors, reviewers, editorial board and assistance, publishing support, and to further invite and encourage

  10. Facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear power plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant introduces risks of injury or accidents that could also result in the exposure of personnel to radiation or radioactive materials. It is important in such an event to have adequate first aid and medical facilities, supplies, equipment, transportation capabilities and trained personnel available to provide necessary care. This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those overexposed to penetrating radiation or contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides. Recommendations cover facilities, supplies, equipment and the extent of care on-site, where first aid and initial care may be provided, and off-site at a local hospital, where further medical and surgical care may be provided. Additional recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. A brief discussion of specialized care is provided in an appendix

  11. Application of an internet web-site of medical images in tele-radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weizhong; Wang Hua; Xie Jingxia; Wang Songzhang; Li Xiangdong; Qian Min; Cao Huixia

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To build and Internet web-site of medical images for tele-education and tele-consultation. Methods: Collecting medical images of cases that fulfilled diagnostic standards for teaching and were pathologically proved. The images were digitized using digital camera and scanner. Frontpage 98, Homesite 2.5 and text editors were used for programming. Results: The web site encompasses many useful cases and was update every week. With smart and friendly interface, easy used navigation, the site runs reliably in TCP/IP environment. The site's URL is http://imager.163.net. At present, the site has received about 100 visits per week. Conclusion: The well-designed and programmed internet web site of medical images would be easily acceptable and is going to play an important role in tele-education and tele-consultation

  12. Radiotherapy and oncology. Medical technical radiology assistant, vocational training. 4. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, R.

    2003-01-01

    The toolbook is arranged in seven main parts. 1. General Part, with the chapters: - History of radiology and radiation therapy - Radiation therapy, radiotherapy, radiation oncology - Organisational aspects of radiation oncology in the hospital department and private practice - The MTRA in radiation therapy. 2. General Oncology, with the chapters: Tumor pathology - Epidemiology and aethiology - Tumor prophylaxis (prevention) - Fundamentals of tumor treatment - Tumor treatment strategies - Fundamentals of surgical tumor treatment - Fundamentals of internal medicine treatment of tumors. 3. Foundations of Radiation Therapy, with the chapters: - Radiation physics - Dose concepts and dose units - Radiobiology - Foundations of radiopathology - Special pathology - Instrumentation. 4. Radiation Treatment, with the chapters: Irradiation planning - Daily radiation treatment - Psychological patient management - Emergency management. 5. Special Oncology of Tumors, with 16 chapters discussing tumors of specific organs, and 2 chapters dealing with palliative radiation therapy and supportive treatment. 6. Radiation Therapy of Benign Neoplasms, with the chapters: Survey - Antiphlogistic radiation treatment - Radiation treatment for alleviation of irritations and pains induced by chronic inflammatory or degenerative processes - Radiation treatment of hypertropic lesions of the connective and supporting tissue, and benign tumors - Irradiation for immunosuppression - Castration by irradiation. 7. Radiation Protection. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical Liability and Patient Law in Germany: Main Features with Particular Focus on Treatments in the Field of Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S A; Geissler, R; Stampfl, U; Wolf, M B; Radeleff, B A; Richter, G M; Kauczor, H-U; Pereira, P L; Sommer, C M

    2016-04-01

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology--with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liablity of malpractice law. •On February 26th, 2013 the new patient law came into effect. Materially, there was no fundamental remodeling of the German liability for medical malpractice. •Regarding a physician's liability for medical malpractice two different elements of an offence come into consideration: for one the liability for malpractice and, in turn, liability for errors made during medical consultation in the process of obtaining informed consent.

  15. 76 FR 14028 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Implementation: Online Repository of Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... could facilitate patient access to information on what types of devices are available for their medical... input from the public on what they would want and need in labeling and how they would want to access it. CDRH is also interested in learning more about how patients, consumers, and caregivers acquire and use...

  16. Scientific conference at the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybakova, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    Review of reports at the scientific conference of the department of biomedical sciences of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, held in April, 1997, on the topic of Novel techniques in biomedical studied. Attention was paid to the creation and uses of rapid diagnosis instruments in micro devices, to the development of electron-photon, immuno enzyme and radionuclide techniques and their realization in automatic special equipment. Delay of native industry in creation of scientific-capacious highly efficient products, especially in the field of radiodiagnosis and instruments for laboratory studies was marked

  17. Learning Styles of Medical and Midwifery Students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zeraati

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students have individual learning style preferences including visual (V; learning from graphs, charts, and flow diagrams, auditory (A; learning from speech, read-write(R; learning from reading and writing, and kinesthetic (K; learning from touch, hearing, smell, taste, and sight.These preferences can be assessed using the VARK questionnaire.Purpose: We aimed to assess different learning styles of medical students in our collage.Methods: This study was conducted to describe learning styles of 214 Medical and Midwifery students in Mashhad University of medical sciences. By using the English version of the VARK questionnaire, we measured the difference in learning styles of medical students and midwifery students and compared with 57336 global general students who completed the test in VARK website up to Sep 2007.Results: The dominant learning preference of our students was Aural preference (30.8% followed by Read/Write (20.6%, while (7.5% were in Kinesthetic and (5.6% were Visual learners; still most of the students (35.5% represented a multimodal learning preference. No significant difference was found between males and females. The general pattern between medical student and Midwifery student is the same. There was a significant relation between Internship Entrance Exam score and thelearning styles of medical student and who were more Read/Write got higher scores.Conclusion: Knowing that our students have different preferred learning modes will help medical instructors in our faculty develop appropriate learning approaches and explore opportunities so that they will be able to make the educational experience more productive.Key words: MEDICAL EDUCATION, LEARNING MODELS VARK, VISUAL, AUDITORY, READ-WRITE, KINESTHETIC, SSTUDENTS.

  18. Perceived social support among students of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Alavijeh, Freshteh; Dehkordi, Fatemeh Raeesi; Shahry, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Social support is emotional and instrumental assistance from family, friends or neighbors, and has an important but different impact on individuals, mainly depending on contextual factors. To determine the status of perceived social support and related personal and family characteristics of medical sciences students in Ahvaz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the target population included the students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in the second semester of 2013-2014, of whom 763 were selected by cluster random sampling method. The study tool was a two-part questionnaire containing 48 self-administered questions including 25 questions of measurements of personal and family characteristics and a Persian modified version of Vaux's social support scale (Cronbach's α=0.745). Data were analyzed with T test, ANOVA and chi-square and using SPSS version 16 and 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. The mean score of the perceived social support was 17.06±3.6 and 60.3% of them reported low social support. There was a significant relationship among the perceived social support and sex (p=0.02), faculty (psocial support and importance of social support in reducing stress and academic failure, the planners need to provide efficient supportive interventions for students.

  19. Eponyms in medical sciences: historical errors that lead to injustice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque-Parra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Throughout history, eponyms have been used in medical sciences to designate anatomical structures although they do not provide any descriptive or functional information, which is equivalent to a mistake in the light of current thinking. Double and triple eponyms have been used to name the same structure, thus creating confusion that leads to believe that a discovery or description was made by several persons at the same time. Although eponyms have been abolished from anatomical terminology for over eight decades and still generate problems in communication and in the teachinglearning process, medical sciences professionals continue to use them. Objective: To analyze some examples of arbitrary assignment of eponyms in morphology that have led to historical errors and perpetuated them. Conclusion: Granting an eponym to an anatomical structure may not reflect the truth about the person who discovered it and may obey to arbitrary factors that induce possible historical errors and injustice. In addition, using them hinders communication between health professionals, as well as the teaching-learning process.

  20. Organizational intelligence and agility in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Taboli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Intelligence is a combination of all skills that organizations need and use; it enables us to make organizational decisions. Organizational Intelligence can increase the effectiveness of the existing informational structures in achieving organizational goals and result in organizational agility. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Organizational Intelligence and organizational agility in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This is an applied study in terms of purpose and descriptive in terms of method. The study population consisted of 1200 employees working in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The subjects were selected via convenience sampling. Based on Cochran formula, a sample size of 296 was determined with a confidence level of 95%. The measurement tools included the 36-item Organizational Intelligence questionnaire developed by Albrecht (2003 and a researcher-developed organizational agility questionnaire with 30 items. Expert opinion was used to determine the validity of the questionnaires and reliability was confirmed using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient via SPSS, version 19. Results: Tenure employees had the highest frequency among the participants (50%. In terms of education, employees with a bachelor’s degree were the most frequent (58%. Values obtained for all variables showed a significant positive relationship between Organizational Intelligence and Agility. Conclusion: It is recommended that the university officials take measures to include Organizational Intelligence courses in in-service training programs to promote the agility of the university, and improve the service provision process and speed.

  1. The role of national council for science and technology in advancing science and technology in Kenya as it relates to radiological services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onyatta, J.

    2006-01-01

    NCST is the national focal point for the IAEA matters and coordinates all projects funded under IAEA's TC. Kenya prepared its Country Programme Framework (CPF) for 2005-2010 and identified priority areas as human health, agriculture and livestock development, radiation protection, water resources, energy resources, manufacturing and industry. The human health sector programme as stated in the CPF, focuses among others on the improvement of the efficiency and quality of nuclear-based medical diagnostic and cancer treatment both curative and palliative capabilities at Kenyatta National hospital (KNH) and Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)as well as the New Nyanza General hospital in Kisumu. The NCST therefore, continues to ensure that Kenya meets her financial contributions to IAEA so that we can further benefit from the TC Programmes for the betterment of radiological services

  2. Student-Life Stress Level and its Related Factors among Medical Students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Roya Nikanjam; Majid Barati; Saeed Bashirian*; Mohammad Babamiri; Ali Fattahi; Alireza Soltanian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Student-life stress can lead to various negative consequences such as physical illness, mental disorders or exhaustion. The present study was conducted to evaluate the level of student life stress and its related factors among medical students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study applied multistage random sampling to select 500university students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences during 2015. The dat...

  3. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  4. The (human) science of medical virtual learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J

    2011-01-27

    The uptake of virtual simulation technologies in both military and civilian surgical contexts has been both slow and patchy. The failure of the virtual reality community in the 1990s and early 2000s to deliver affordable and accessible training systems stems not only from an obsessive quest to develop the 'ultimate' in so-called 'immersive' hardware solutions, from head-mounted displays to large-scale projection theatres, but also from a comprehensive lack of attention to the needs of the end users. While many still perceive the science of simulation to be defined by technological advances, such as computing power, specialized graphics hardware, advanced interactive controllers, displays and so on, the true science underpinning simulation--the science that helps to guarantee the transfer of skills from the simulated to the real--is that of human factors, a well-established discipline that focuses on the abilities and limitations of the end user when designing interactive systems, as opposed to the more commercially explicit components of technology. Based on three surgical simulation case studies, the importance of a human factors approach to the design of appropriate simulation content and interactive hardware for medical simulation is illustrated. The studies demonstrate that it is unnecessary to pursue real-world fidelity in all instances in order to achieve psychological fidelity--the degree to which the simulated tasks reproduce and foster knowledge, skills and behaviours that can be reliably transferred to real-world training applications.

  5. Big data in medical science--a biostatistical view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Harald; Blettner, Maria

    2015-02-27

    Inexpensive techniques for measurement and data storage now enable medical researchers to acquire far more data than can conveniently be analyzed by traditional methods. The expression "big data" refers to quantities on the order of magnitude of a terabyte (1012 bytes); special techniques must be used to evaluate such huge quantities of data in a scientifically meaningful way. Whether data sets of this size are useful and important is an open question that currently confronts medical science. In this article, we give illustrative examples of the use of analytical techniques for big data and discuss them in the light of a selective literature review. We point out some critical aspects that should be considered to avoid errors when large amounts of data are analyzed. Machine learning techniques enable the recognition of potentially relevant patterns. When such techniques are used, certain additional steps should be taken that are unnecessary in more traditional analyses; for example, patient characteristics should be differentially weighted. If this is not done as a preliminary step before similarity detection, which is a component of many data analysis operations, characteristics such as age or sex will be weighted no higher than any one out of 10 000 gene expression values. Experience from the analysis of conventional observational data sets can be called upon to draw conclusions about potential causal effects from big data sets. Big data techniques can be used, for example, to evaluate observational data derived from the routine care of entire populations, with clustering methods used to analyze therapeutically relevant patient subgroups. Such analyses can provide complementary information to clinical trials of the classic type. As big data analyses become more popular, various statistical techniques for causality analysis in observational data are becoming more widely available. This is likely to be of benefit to medical science, but specific adaptations will

  6. Preliminary survey for communicating risk in medical exposure. Perception of risk among nurses working in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Reiko; Tsuji, Satsuki; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted on radiation risk and medical exposure, particularly in applications involving children. The survey was targeted at nurses (170 females) engaged in important roles in communicating risk regarding medical exposure. The questionnaire survey yielded the following findings. A significant number of respondents associated the word radiation' with 'cancer treatment,' 'exposure,' and 'X-ray pictures.' Perceptions about 'food exposure' differed between respondents with children and those without. Among the potential health problems posed by radiation, effects on children,' 'cancer and leukemia,' and 'genetic effects' were perceived as the most worrisome. Significant differences in perception were noted regarding infertility between respondents with children and those without. Concerning the effects of medical exposure on fetuses/children, only 10 percent of all respondents replied that they were not anxious about negative effects in either case. Among the respondents who felt uneasy about these aspects, most tended to assess exposed parts, doses, damage potentially suffered, timing of occurrence, and uncertainty, based on their professional experience and knowledge, to rationally distinguish acceptable risks from unacceptable ones and to limit concern to the unacceptable aspects. (author)

  7. The future of radiological imaging information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keon Joong; Park, Kyung Jin

    1981-01-01

    The future promises accelerated developments for radiology. W. Roentgen produced the first medical radiographic image on December 22, 1895. For the past 80 years, four major discoveries affected imaging. First, the discovery of the image intensifier. Second, the discovery of radioisotopes. Third, the discovery of ultrasonic imaging. Fourth, the discovery of computed tomography. The emphasis on radiology over the next 20 years will be develop: (1) more sophisticated way to collect qualitative and quantitative information about morphology; (2) technologies that focus on physiology; (3) technologies that assess metabolic processes before microscopic. 20 years from now, a radiology department might be totally photo electronic. We must redirect some of funding, possibly be defining a new radiologic sciences. Funds from such an institute could then be channeled into research for the new technologies. This would accelerate the solutions to the problems of clinical medicine, and better care for patients

  8. The Introduction of an Undergraduate Interventional Radiology (IR) Curriculum: Impact on Medical Student Knowledge and Interest in IR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.; Shaygi, B.; Asadi, H.; Thanaratnam, P.; Pennycooke, K.; Mirza, M.; Lee, M.

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionInterventional radiology (IR) plays a vital role in modern medicine, with increasing demand for services, but with a shortage of experienced interventionalists. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a recently introduced IR curriculum on perception, knowledge, and interest of medical students regarding various aspects of IR.MethodsIn 2014, an anonymous web-based questionnaire was sent to 309 4th year medical students in a single institution within an EU country, both before and after delivery of a 10-h IR teaching curriculum.ResultsSeventy-six percent (236/309) of the respondents participated in the pre-IR module survey, while 50 % (157/309) responded to the post-IR module survey. While 62 % (147/236) of the respondents reported poor or no knowledge of IR compared to other medical disciplines in the pre-IR module survey, this decreased to 17 % (27/157) in the post-IR module survey. The correct responses regarding knowledge of selected IR procedures improved from 70 to 94 % for venous access, 78 to 99 % for uterine fibroid embolization, 75 to 97 % for GI bleeding embolization, 60 to 92 % for trauma embolization, 71 to 92 % for tumor ablation, and 81 to 94 % for angioplasty and stenting in peripheral arterial disease. With regard to knowledge of IR clinical roles, responses improved from 42 to 59 % for outpatient clinic review of patients and having inpatient beds, 63–76 % for direct patient consultation, and 43–60 % for having regular ward rounds. The number of students who would consider a career in IR increased from 60 to 73 %.ConclusionDelivering an undergraduate IR curriculum increased the knowledge and understanding of various aspects of IR and also the general enthusiasm for pursuing this specialty as a future career choice.

  9. The Introduction of an Undergraduate Interventional Radiology (IR) Curriculum: Impact on Medical Student Knowledge and Interest in IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, M. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Bradford Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Shaygi, B. [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Asadi, H., E-mail: asadi.hamed@gmail.com; Thanaratnam, P.; Pennycooke, K.; Mirza, M.; Lee, M., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    IntroductionInterventional radiology (IR) plays a vital role in modern medicine, with increasing demand for services, but with a shortage of experienced interventionalists. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a recently introduced IR curriculum on perception, knowledge, and interest of medical students regarding various aspects of IR.MethodsIn 2014, an anonymous web-based questionnaire was sent to 309 4th year medical students in a single institution within an EU country, both before and after delivery of a 10-h IR teaching curriculum.ResultsSeventy-six percent (236/309) of the respondents participated in the pre-IR module survey, while 50 % (157/309) responded to the post-IR module survey. While 62 % (147/236) of the respondents reported poor or no knowledge of IR compared to other medical disciplines in the pre-IR module survey, this decreased to 17 % (27/157) in the post-IR module survey. The correct responses regarding knowledge of selected IR procedures improved from 70 to 94 % for venous access, 78 to 99 % for uterine fibroid embolization, 75 to 97 % for GI bleeding embolization, 60 to 92 % for trauma embolization, 71 to 92 % for tumor ablation, and 81 to 94 % for angioplasty and stenting in peripheral arterial disease. With regard to knowledge of IR clinical roles, responses improved from 42 to 59 % for outpatient clinic review of patients and having inpatient beds, 63–76 % for direct patient consultation, and 43–60 % for having regular ward rounds. The number of students who would consider a career in IR increased from 60 to 73 %.ConclusionDelivering an undergraduate IR curriculum increased the knowledge and understanding of various aspects of IR and also the general enthusiasm for pursuing this specialty as a future career choice.

  10. 75 FR 65363 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  11. 75 FR 63843 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda...

  12. Consultation Needs Assessment in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Viewpoints of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus Jalili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Consultation can play an effective role in accommodating students to conditions and can be followed by academic achievement. This study was aimed to determine the consultation needs assessment among medical students in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 students from undergraduate basic sciences of medical faculty of KUMS during 2016. Two structured questionnaires were applied for collecting data: demographics and consultation needs assessment. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using bivariate correlations, t-test, and ANOVA test. Results: The age range of participants was 19 to 31 with the average of 22.78±2.30. Gender was associated significantly and statistically with the areas of individual growth and promotion needs, educational needs, employment needs and emotional needs; girls in these areas acquired a higher score compared to boys (P<0.05. Furthermore, the domain of individual growth and promotion needs acquired the highest score. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that most of the students' needs were in the field of individual and educational growth and promotion. Furthermore, the average scores of guidance and consultation needs assessment of the female students was higher, with the necessity of paying more attention to the consultation problems among them.

  13. Radiological protection for pregnant women at a large academic medical Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Bae; Miodownik, Daniel; Williamson, Matthew J; Gao, Yiming; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T

    2017-11-01

    Most radiation protection programs, regulations and guidance apply specific restrictions to the occupational exposure of pregnant workers. The aim of this study was to compile data from the declared pregnant woman (DPW) radiation protection program over more than 5years at a large, high-volume, comprehensive oncology academic/medical institution and to evaluate for effectiveness against existing regulations and guidance. A retrospective review was performed of the data collected as part of the DPW radiation protection program from January 2010 through May 2016, including the number of declared pregnancies, worker category, personal and fetal dosimetry monitoring measurements, workplace modifications, as well as the monthly and total recorded badge results during the entire pregnancy. 245 pregnancies were declared. The mean monthly fetal radiation dosimetry result was 0.009mSv with a median of 0.005mSv and a maximum of 0.39mSv. The mean total dose over the entire pregnancy was estimated to be 0.08mSv with a median of 0.05mSv and a maximum of 0.89mSv. Only 8 (3.2%) of the 245 declared pregnancies required that workplace modifications be implemented for the worker. The implementation of a declared pregnancy and fetal assessment program, careful planning, an understanding of the risks, and minimization of radiation dose by employing appropriate radiation safety measures as needed, can allow medical staff to perform procedures and normal activities without incurring significant risks to the conceptus, or significant interruptions of job activities for most medical workers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. In search of the soul in science: medical ethics' appropriation of philosophy of science in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronova, Elena

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and propelling a view of science that retreated from idealizations of scientific method without sacrificing philosophical realism. Appropriating Polanyi, they extended his account of science to biology and medicine. The contribution of Karl Popper to the debate on the applicability of philosophy of science to the issues of medical ethics provides the opportunity to discuss the ways in which political agendas of different epistemologies of science intertwined with questions of concern to medical ethics.

  15. Adapting a Computerized Medical Dictation System to Prepare Academic Papers in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Yadiel; Prabhakar, Anand M; Uppot, Raul N

    2017-09-14

    Everyday radiologists use dictation software to compose clinical reports of imaging findings. The dictation software is tailored for medical use and to the speech pattern of each radiologist. Over the past 10 years we have used dictation software to compose academic manuscripts, correspondence letters, and texts of educational exhibits. The advantages of using voice dictation is faster composition of manuscripts. However, use of such software requires preparation. The purpose of this article is to review the steps of adapting a clinical dictation software for dictating academic manuscripts and detail the advantages and limitations of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Studies on failure kind analysis of the radiologic medical equipment in general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Cheul; Kim, Jeong Lae

    1999-01-01

    This paper included a data analysis of the unit of medical devices using maintenance recording card that had medical devices of unit failure mode, hospital of failure mode and MTBF. The results of the analysis were as follows : 1. Medical devices of unit failure mode was the highest in QC/PM such A hospital as 33.9%, B hospital 30.9%, C hospital 30.3%, second degree was the Electrical and Electronic failure such A hospital as 23.5%, B hospital 25.3%, C hospital 28%, third degree was mechanical failure such A hospital as 19.6%, B hospital 22.5%, C hospital 25.4%. 2. Hospital of failure mode was the highest in Mobile X-ray device(A hospital 62.5%, B hospital 69.5%, C hospital 37.4%), and was the lowest in Sono devices(A hospital 16.76%, B hospital 8.4%, C hospital 7%). 3. Mean time between failures(MTBT) was the highest in SONO devices and was the lowest in Mobile X-ray devices which have 200 - 400 failure hours. 4. Average failure ratio was the highest in Mobile X-ray devices(A hospital 31.3%, B hospital 34.8%, C hospital 18.7%), and was the lowest in Sono(Ultrasound) devices (A hospital 8.4%, B hospital 4.2%, C hospital 3.5%). 5. Failure ratio results of medical devices according to QC/PM part of unit failure mode were as follows ; A hospital was the highest part of QC/PM (50%) in Mamo X-ray device and was the lowest part of QC/PM(26.4%) in Gastro X-ray. B hospital was the highest part of QC/PM(56%) in Mobile X-ray device, and the lowest part of QC/PM(12%) in Gastro X-ray. C hospital was the highest part of QC/PM(60%) in R/F X-ray device, and the lowest a part of QC/PM(21%) in Universal X-ray. It was found that the units responsible for most failure decreased by systematic management. We made the preventive maintenance schedule focusing on adjustment of operating and dust removal

  17. Applying ethical and legal principles to new technology: the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences' policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Monique; Malpas, Phillipa; Kersey, Kate; Merry, Alan; Bagg, Warwick

    2017-01-27

    To develop a policy governing the taking and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. The Rules of the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights were applied to the taking, storing and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. Stakeholders, including clinicians, medical students, lawyers at district health boards in the Auckland region, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Health and Disability Commissioner were consulted and their recommendations incorporated. The policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients' sets expectations of students in relation to: photographs taken for the purpose of providing care; photographs taken for educational or professional practice purposes and photographic or radiological images used for educational or professional practice purposes. In addition, it prohibits students from uploading images of patients onto image-sharing apps such as Figure 1. The policy has since been extended to apply to all students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. Technology-driven evolutions in practice necessitate regular review to ensure compliance with existing legal regulations and ethical frameworks. This policy offers a starting point for healthcare providers to review their own policies and practice, with a view to ensuring that patients' trust in the treatment that their health information receives is upheld.

  18. Creating a medical education enterprise: leveling the playing fields of medical education vs. medical science research within core missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Ligon, B Lee; Singhal, Geeta; Schutze, Gordon E; Turner, Teri L

    2017-01-01

    Unlike publications of medical science research that are more readily rewarded, clinician-educators' scholarly achievements are more nebulous and under-recognized. Create an education enterprise that empowers clinician-educators to engage in a broad range of scholarly activities and produce educational scholarship using strategic approaches to level the playing fields within an organization. The authors analyzed the advantages and disadvantages experienced by medical science researchers vs. clinician educators using Bolman and Deal's (B&D) four frames of organization (structural, human resource, political, symbolic). The authors then identified organizational approaches and activities that align with each B&D frame and proposed practical strategies to empower clinician-educators in their scholarly endeavors. Our medical education enterprise enhanced the structural frame by creating a decentralized medical education unit, incorporated the human resource component with an endowed chair to support faculty development, leveraged the political model by providing grant supports and expanding venues for scholarship, and enhanced the symbolic frame by endorsing the value of education and public recognition from leaderships. In five years, we saw an increased number of faculty interested in becoming clinician-educators, had an increased number of faculty winning Educational Awards for Excellence and delivering conference presentations, and received 12 of the 15 college-wide awards for educational scholarship. These satisfactory trends reflect early success of our educational enterprise. B&D's organizational frames can be used to identify strategies for addressing the pressing need to promote and recognize clinician-educators' scholarship. We realize that our situation is unique in several respects, but this approach is flexible within an institution and transferable to any other institution and its medical education program. B&D: Bolman and Deal; CRIS: Center for Research

  19. Preparing medical students for future learning using basic science instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylopoulos, Maria; Woods, Nicole

    2014-07-01

    The construct of 'preparation for future learning' (PFL) is understood as the ability to learn new information from available resources, relate new learning to past experiences and demonstrate innovation and flexibility in problem solving. Preparation for future learning has been proposed as a key competence of adaptive expertise. There is a need for educators to ensure that opportunities are provided for students to develop PFL ability and that assessments accurately measure the development of this form of competence. The objective of this research was to compare the relative impacts of basic science instruction and clinically focused instruction on performance on a PFL assessment (PFLA). This study employed a 'double transfer' design. Fifty-one pre-clerkship students were randomly assigned to either basic science instruction or clinically focused instruction to learn four categories of disease. After completing an initial assessment on the learned material, all participants received clinically focused instruction for four novel diseases and completed a PFLA. The data from the initial assessment and the PFLA were submitted to independent-sample t-tests. Mean ± standard deviation [SD] scores on the diagnostic cases in the initial assessment were similar for participants in the basic science (0.65 ± 0.11) and clinical learning (0.62 ± 0.11) conditions. The difference was not significant (t[42] = 0.90, p = 0.37, d = 0.27). Analysis of the diagnostic cases on the PFLA revealed significantly higher mean ± SD scores for participants in the basic science learning condition (0.72 ± 0.14) compared with those in the clinical learning condition (0.63 ± 0.15) (t[42] = 2.02, p = 0.05, d = 0.62). Our results show that the inclusion of basic science instruction enhanced the learning of novel related content. We discuss this finding within the broader context of research on basic science instruction, development of adaptive expertise and assessment

  20. Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology. Training objectives for the medical specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Vano, E.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Carrera, F.

    2003-01-01

    The Directive 97/43 Euratom on medical exposures and the report RP 116 published by the European Commission on Education and Training in radiation protection for medical exposures, established that interventional radiologists should have a more skilled training for handling X-Ray equipment and a better knowledge about the ways of protecting patients and staff against ionising radiation. To analyse the objectives for training in radiation protection recommended in the European Guideline and to show the most important points and modifications for a better practical application of this guide. An inquiry has been performed into the specific objectives recommended by the European Guideline RP 116 about training on Radiation Protection. Twenty interventional radiologists were requested to fill in the test, pointing out the importance of each objective (0-no necessary, 1-medium importance, 2-very important), and they were encouraged to suggest other more interesting for them not included in the European Guideline. The average scores for each of the objectives included in the European Guideline are shown, and an additional relation of suggested topics has been added to the current list. The scoring system show the priority and importance of the objectives that could be taken into account during the next training courses to be held in Spain and it could be used as a base of discussion in some European meeting in order to improve the European Guideline in the future. (Author) 13 refs

  1. 42. Science week: Laser Science and applications, Aleppo (SY), 2-4 Nov 2002, Book two: Laser science and medical laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication includes the papers presented at the 42nd science week of the Supreme Council of Sciences, held in Aleppo (Syria) from 2-4 November 2002. This proceedings is published in three books covering laser science and applications and in particular on material studies and medical uses. Part two covers medical applications, Part three on applications of laser in material sciences, while Part one is for contents and the proceedings program

  2. The patient's radiological protection in medical practices: Legal support in the Cuban legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Gonzalez, I.; Duran Delgado, M.

    2001-01-01

    Peaceful applications of nuclear energy have a great importance in medical practice, for their use in diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. The possibility to detect diseases and the use of radiation as a palliative or curative method, enables the use of such polemic energy. Practices associated with the use of ionizing radiation are under regulatory control, and in this regard it becomes necessary to prescribe a series of administrative requirements aimed at granting the corresponding authorization, once it has been demonstrated that the technical requirements that ensure the safe performance of the practice, without undue risk on life, goods and environment, are met. This includes the protection of any patient who could be under treatment, who is considered the main user of this application. (author)

  3. Endo-buccal dental radiology - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4249

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Megnigbeto, C.; Aubert, B.; Talbot, A.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Ariscon, J.M.; Barret, C.; Devaux, M.J.; Dohan, D.; Gambini, D.; Guerin, C.; Rocher, P.

    2009-04-01

    This document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing endo-buccal examinations. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process of snapshot taking, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks. In appendix, a table indicates radiation measurements about two endo-buccal radiography devices in specific use conditions

  4. Exo-buccal dental radiology - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Megnigbeto, C.; Aubert, B.; Rehel, J.L.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Ariscon, J.M.; Barret, C.; Devaux, M.J.; Dohan, D.; Gambini, D.; Guerin, C.; Le Denmat, D.; Rocher, P.; Sevalle, M.

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing exo-buccal examinations (by either panoramic radiography or by volume tomography). It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process of snapshot taking, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks

  5. The patient's radiological protection in medical practices, legal support in the cuban legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Gonzalez, Ivonne; Duran Delgado, Marlen

    2005-01-01

    Peaceful applications of nuclear energy have a great importance in medical practice, for their use in diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. The possibility to detect diseases and the use of radiation as a palliative or curative method, ennobles the use of such polemic energy. Practices associated with the use of ionizing radiation are under regulatory control, and in this regard it becomes necessary to prescribe a series of administrative requirements aimed at granting the corresponding authorization, once it has been demonstrated that the technical requirements that ensure the safe performance of the practice, without undue risk on life, goods and environment are met. This includes the protection of any patient who could be under treatment, who is considered the main user of this application

  6. Attitude, Knowledge and Skill of Medical Students Toward E-Learning Kerman University Of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovati M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: According to the development of e-learning and its high efficiency on the development of Iran’s universities, level of knowledge and the attitude of the students to this modern method of education and indeed students’ skills in using it needed to be assessed to improve the quality and quantity of universities’ education. This study aimed to determine the attitude, knowledge and skill of medical students toward e-learning at Kerman University of Medical Sciences.  Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study that was performed in 2013, 196 students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were selected using proportional stratified sampling method. The research instrument was a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and independent T tests by SPSS 19 software.  Findings: The level of knowledge and skill of the students toward e-learning was “moderate” and their attitude was “high”. There were significant relationships between knowledge and skill (p=0.001 r=0.82 and also knowledge and attitude (p=0.001 r=0.37 but there was no significant relationship between skill and attitude (p=0.35 r=0.82. The scores of knowledge and skill were significantly different according to sex, but attitude had no significant difference with sex.  Conclusion: Kerman University of Medical Sciences’ students have a positive attitude to e-learning but according to their moderate knowledge and skills, performing this method of learning is not welcomed in this university.

  7. Clinical education stressors in medical trainees in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHDIEH MOMAYYEZI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress is an important factor in the educational process. Teaching and learning are stressful processes. This stress can affect one’s ability and change his/her performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate stressors of clinical education from the perspective of medical students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted in Yazd University of Medical Science during year 2014-2015. The sample size was 170 medical students who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a questionnaire including four components: interpersonal relationship, educational environment, clinical experience and the unpleasant emotions. A significance level of 0.05 was considered for analysis. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-tests, using SPSS software, version 14. Results: The results showed that the highest domain score belonged to interpersonal relationship (3.33±0.3 followed by unpleasant emotions domain (3.3±0.3. The lowest domain score of clinical education stressors was educational environment (3.12±0.1. The results showed that the mean score of interpersonal relationship domain was more in women than in men (p<0.05. Conclusion: The relationship between teachers and students is an effective factor in all dimensions of clinical education stressors. So proper measures such as the promotion of scientific awareness of teachers and educational staff about factors that lead to stress and the best way to communicate with students should be taken to reduce the students’ stress.

  8. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  9. Research in forensic radiology and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalders, M. C.; Adolphi, N. L.; Daly, B.

    2017-01-01

    of America, and the Netherlands Forensic Institute. During this meeting, an international and multidisciplinary panel of forensic scientists discussed the current state of science in forensic radiology, and drafted a research agenda to further advance the field. Four groups for further research focus were...... identified: big data and statistics, identification and biological profiling, multimodal imaging, and visualization and presentation. This paper describes each of these research topics and thereby hopes to contribute to the development of this exciting new field of forensic medical science.......This paper presents the outcome of the first international forensic radiology and imaging research summit, organized by the International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, the International Association of Forensic Radiographers, the National Institute of Justice of the United States...

  10. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010-2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees' tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations.

  11. Medical liability and patient law in Germany. Main features with particular focus on treatments in the field of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, S.A.; Geissler, R.; Stampfl, U.; Radeleff, B.A.; Kauczor, H.U.; Sommer, Christof M.; Richter, G.M.; Per