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Sample records for medical radiological sciences

  1. Radiologic science for technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  2. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  3. Radiation Protection in Radiology Departments of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospitals, Ahvaz, Iran, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouladi Dehaghi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Application of ionizing radiation in many fields especially in medicine is growing, and can cause adverse health effects. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate the radiation protection principles in radiology departments, based on national standards. Materials and Methods The current study was conducted in all radiology departments of the teaching hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, and their radiation protection status was investigated using Audit technique. For this purpose Audit checklist was prepared and essential information gathered by observation, interview with radiology department managers, and documentary surveying. At the end, standard situations were classified in three levels: poor (˂ 50%, medium (50 - 75%,s and good (75 - 100%. Results The mean of radiation protection in the studied radiology departments was 70.53%. The highest and lowest levels of radiation protection were in quality control and suitable ventilation, respectively. Radiation protection was evaluated as medium in 71.4% and good in 28.6% of the studied radiology departments. Conclusions The state of observed radiation protection principles was relatively in the weak level in the studied radiology departments especially in facilities such as ventilation system, radiography entrance, and darkroom situation. More important reason was usage changing of sections as radiology billet from related organizations.

  4. Analysis of scientific papers in the field of radiology and medical imaging included in Science Citation Index expanded and published by Turkish authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erhan; Karçaaltincaba, Muşturay

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to analyze scientific papers published by Turkish authors in "radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging" journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded and compared the number of published scientific papers from Turkey and other countries. We retrospectively searched all papers published by Turkish authors between 1945 and 2008 by using Web of Science software. We performed the analysis by typing "Turkey" in the address section and all radiology and medical imaging journals in the source title section using the general search function of the software. We further analyzed these results by using "analyze" function of the software according to the number of publications per year, journals, institution and type of papers. We also calculated total number of citations to published scientific papers using citation report function. We analyzed the rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of the number of published papers. Overall, 4,532 papers were published between 1945 and 2008. The first paper was published in 1976. Number of publications increased dramatically from 1976 (n = 1) to 2008 (n = 383). The top 5 journals publishing papers from Turkish authors were European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (n = 328), Clinical Nuclear Medicine (n = 296), European Journal of Radiology (n = 289), European Radiology (n = 207) and Journal of Clinical Ultrasound (n = 186). All published papers received 18,419 citations and citation to paper ratio was 4.06. The rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of published papers improved during the last 25 years. Number of papers from Turkey published in radiology and medical imaging journals has increased at the start of the new millennium. Currently, Turkey is among the top 12 countries when the number of scientific papers published in radiology journals is taken into consideration.

  5. Science and Values in Radiological Protection

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    Lochard, J. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire (CEPN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Eggermont, G. [Belgian Association of Radiation Protection (Belgium); Britt-Marie, Drottz Sjoberg [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway); Tirmarche, M. [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Geard, Ch.R. [Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University (United States); Atkinson, M. [Institute of Radiation Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Munich (Germany); Murith, Ch. [Federal Office of Public Health (Switzerland); Grant, K.G. [RESOLVE (United States); Luccioni, C. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France); Mays, C. [NEA, 75 - Paris (France); Sisko, Salomaa [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland); Kelly, N.G.; Oughton, D. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Shannoun, F. [WHO, Geneva (Switzerland); Grant, K.G. [RESOLVE (United States); Cooper, J. [Health Protection Agency (United Kingdom); Mays, C. [NEA, 75 - Paris (France); Weiss, V. [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz (Germany); Oughton, D. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Kazuo, Sakai [National Institute of Radiological Science (Japan); Carroll, S. [Swedish Biodiversity Centre, University of Agricultural Sciences and Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    protection professionals can better identify and respond to civil society concerns. Session 1: Setting the scene: Holistic presentations of science, values, regulation and public health policy, NGO viewpoints.. An informed view of 'where we stand' on each case topic following the Helsinki workshop. Presentations: Radon as a public health issue (Margot Tirmarche); The continuing story of CT scan risks (Charles R. Geard). Break-out sessions 1. part - Issues surrounding current approaches. This session deepens the discussion and widens the process begun at Helsinki, regarding the new data, phenomena and observations that stimulate us to ask whether current public health and regulatory approaches in each topical area are still adequate, or whether they may need revision. The focus of this session is thus on scientific aspects which may induce a need for paradigm change. Presentation: Radon as a public health issue (Christophe Murith). Evening session 1: Stakeholder platform opportunity (Ola Holmberg). One of the workshop objectives is to foster dialogue between radiological protection professionals, researchers, regulators, and other stakeholders from interested publics in order to deepen discussion on points of interest. In order to maximize stakeholders' benefit in attending the workshop, a platform for communicating and discussing relevant stakeholder views and concerns is offered in this evening context. The on-topic interventions are intended to cover relevant subjects that may not be directly addressed during the rest of the workshop (e.g., risk communication, etc.). This evening session focusses on aspects of dose regulations in radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic fields, ALARA in medicine and other issues related to medical exposures. Discussion is intended to be linked to introductory talk in Session 1 on Public Health Perspective in Radiological Protection in Challenging Topical Areas. Presentation: Paediatric CT examinations in nineteenth developing

  6. White Paper: Radiological Curriculum for Undergraduate Medical Education in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl-Wagner, B; Barkhausen, J; Mahnken, A H; Mentzel, H J; Uder, M; Weidemann, J; Stumpp, P

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Radiology represents a highly relevant part of undergraduate medical education from preclinical studies to subinternship training. It is therefore important to establish a content base for teaching radiology in German Medical Faculties. Materials and Methods: The German Society of Radiology (DRG) developed a model curriculum for radiological teaching at German medical universities, which is presented in this article. There is also a European model curriculum for undergraduate teaching (U-level curriculum of the European Society of Radiology). In a modular concept, the students shall learn important radiological core principles in the realms of knowledge, skills and competences as well as core scientific competences in the imaging sciences. Results: The curriculum is divided into two modules. Module 1 includes principles of radiation biology, radiation protection and imaging technology, imaging anatomy as well as the risks and side effects of radiological methods, procedures and contrast media. This module is modality-oriented. Module 2 comprises radiological diagnostic decision-making and imaging-based interventional techniques for various disease entities. This module is organ system-oriented. Conclusion: The curriculum is meant as a living document to be amended and revised at regular intervals. The curriculum can be used as a basis for individual curricular development at German Medical Faculties. It can be integrated into traditional or reformed medical teaching curricula. Key Points: • Radiology is an integral and important part of medical education.• The German Society of Radiology (DRG) developed a model curriculum for teaching radiology at German Medical Faculties to help students develop the ability to make medical decisions based on scientific knowledge and act accordingly.• This curriculum can be used for individual curricular development at medical departments. It is divided into two modules with several chapters. Citation Format

  7. Early radiology and the National Medical Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, Alan E

    2011-01-01

    Both the discovery of the x-ray and the founding of the National Medical Association (NMA) occurred in 1895. Radiologists have participated importantly in the NMA since the lecture of Dr Marcus F. Wheatland at the 1909 Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, which led to his election as president of the NMA for the following year. More recently, Dr Tracy M. Walton was president of the NMA in its centennial year. This article details early and continued participation in the NMA by radiologists, including the founding of the Section on Radiology in 1949, with its first chairman, Dr William E. Allen, Jr, longtime leader in radiology, the section, and the NMA.

  8. Workshop Sciences and values in radiological protection; Atelier 'Sciences and values in radiological protection

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    Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [CEA Cadarache (DSV/DIR/CARMIN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gaillard-Lecanu, E. [CEA Cadarache (DSV/DIR/CARMIN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2008-04-15

    The Nea (Nuclear Energy Agency) organized a workshop entitled 'Sciences and values in radiological protection' in order to identify the possible ways of integration of results, coming from scientific research on the biological and health effects of ionizing radiation, in radiological protection. Three current topics were addressed: non-targeted effects, individual radiosensitivity and cardiovascular diseases. At the end of this workshop, recommendations towards scientists, radiological protection practitioners and stakeholders were expressed. (authors)

  9. Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Barbaros S; Prevedello, Luciano M; Qian, Songyue; Demirer, Mutlu; Little, Kevin; Ryu, John; O'Donnell, Thomas; White, Richard D

    2017-08-24

    Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX) is a platform originally designed to both support the medical imaging-driven clinical and clinical research operational needs of Department of Radiology of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. REMIX accommodates the storage and handling of "big imaging data," as needed for large multi-disciplinary cancer-focused programs. The evolving REMIX platform contains an array of integrated tools/software packages for the following: (1) server and storage management; (2) image reconstruction; (3) digital pathology; (4) de-identification; (5) business intelligence; (6) texture analysis; and (7) artificial intelligence. These capabilities, along with documentation and guidance, explaining how to interact with a commercial system (e.g., PACS, EHR, commercial database) that currently exists in clinical environments, are to be made freely available.

  10. Radiological Dispersion Devices and Basic Radiation Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics courses present the basic concepts of radioactivity and an overview of nuclear physics that emphasizes the basic decay relationship and the various types of emitted radiation. Although this presentation provides insight into radiological science, it often fails to interest students to explore these concepts in a more rigorous…

  11. Radiology in Medical Education: A Pediatric Radiology Elective as a Template for Other Radiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Hyatt, Eddie; Penrod, Cody H; Fleming, Amy E; Singh, Sudha P

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, the pediatric radiology elective for medical students and pediatric residents constituted a morning teaching session focused mainly on radiography and fluoroscopy. A more structured elective was desired to broaden the exposure to more imaging modalities, create a more uniform educational experience, and include assessment tools. In 2012, an introductory e-mail and formal syllabus, including required reading assignments, were sent to participants before the start date. A rotating weekly schedule was expanded to include cross-sectional imaging (ultrasound, CT, MR) and nuclear medicine. The schedule could accommodate specific goals of the pediatric resident or medical student, as requested. Starting in 2013, an online pre-test and post-test were developed, as well as an online end-of-rotation survey specific to the pediatric radiology elective. Taking the Image Gently pledge was required. A scavenger hunt tool, cue cards, and electronic modules were added. Pre-test and post-test scores, averaged over 2 years, showed improvement in radiology knowledge, with scores increasing by 27% for medical students and 21% for pediatric residents. Surveys at the end of the elective were overwhelmingly positive, with constructive criticism and complimentary comments. We have successfully created an elective experience in radiology that dedicates time to education while preserving the workflow of radiologists. We have developed tools to provide a customized experience with many self-directed learning opportunities. Our tools and techniques are easily translatable to a general or adult radiology elective. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists; Paediatrische Radiologie fuer MTRA/RT

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    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-07-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  13. Handheld technology acceptance in radiologic science education and training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to, personal digital assistants such as a Palm TX, Apple iPod Touch, Apple iPad or Hewlett Packard iPaq, and cellular or smartphones with third generation mobile capabilities such as an Apple iPhone, Blackberry or Android device. The study employed a non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design to determine the potential of adopting handheld technologies based on the constructs of Davis's (1989) Technology Acceptance Model. An online self-report questionnaire survey instrument was used to gather study data from 551 entry level radiologic science programs specializing in radiography, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and medical sonography. The study design resulted in a single point in time assessment of the relationship between the primary constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and the behavioral intention of radiography program directors to adopt the information technology represented by hand held devices. Study results provide justification for investing resources to promote the adoption of mobile handheld devices in radiologic science programs and study findings serve as a foundation for further research involving technology adoption in the radiologic sciences.

  14. Algorithms in radiology and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasoulis, C A; Lee, A K

    1987-08-01

    As a tool in clinical decision making, algorithms deserve careful consideration. The potential use or abuse of algorithms in rationing health care renders such consideration essential. In radiology and medical imaging, algorithms have been applied as teaching tools in the conference room setting. These teaching decision trees, however, may not be applicable in the clinical situation. If an algorithmic approach to clinical radiology is pursued, several issues should be considered. Specifically, the application, design, designer, economics, and universality of the algorithms must be addressed. As an alternative to the wide dissemination of clinical algorithms, the authors propose the development of consensus opinions among specialists and the promulgation of the principle of radiologist-consultant-decision maker. A decision team is preferable to a decision tree.

  15. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  16. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  17. Integrating radiology vertically into an undergraduate medical education curriculum: a triphasic integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qahtani F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahd Al Qahtani,1 Adel Abdelaziz2,31Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 3Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, EgyptAbstract: Fulfilling the goal of integrating radiology into undergraduate medical curricula is a real challenge due to the enduring faith assuming that traditional medical disciplines are worthy of consuming the available study time. In this manner, radiology is addressed occasionally and with relevance to these traditional disciplines. In Al-Baha University Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia, efforts have been made to integrate radiology vertically and in a structured manner into the undergraduate curriculum from the first year to the sixth year. For achieving convenient integration of radiology, a triphasic approach to integration is adopted. This approach consists of the integration of radiology foundations into the basic sciences phase, development of a distinct 4-week module in year 4, and finally, integration of clinical applications of radiology in the clinical phase modules. Feedback of students and inferences obtained through assessment and program evaluation are in favor of this approach to integration. Minor reform and some improvement related to time allocated and content balancing are still indicated.Keywords: radiology foundations, radiology module, students assessment

  18. Motivation in a multigenerational radiologic science workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalar, Traci

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in history, radiologic science (RS) workplaces consist of 4 generational cohorts. As each cohort possess their own attitudes, values, work habits, and expectations, motivating a generational diverse workplace is challenging. Through the understanding of generational differences, managers are better able to accommodate individual as well as generational needs and help create a more productive and higher performing workplace. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in the understanding and utilization of generational differences to effectively motivate staff in an RS workplace. Generational cohorts will be defined and discussed along with an in-depth discussion on each of the generations performing in today's RS workplace. Motivators and how they impact the different generational cohorts will be addressed along with how to best motivate a multigenerational RS workplace.

  19. Network oriented radiological and medical archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Frixione, P.; Squarcia, S.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper the basic ideas of NORMA (Network Oriented Radiological and Medical Archive) are discussed. NORMA is an original project built by a team of physicists in collaboration with radiologists in order to select the best Treatment Planning in radiotherapy. It allows physicians and health physicists, working in different places, to discuss on interesting clinical cases visualizing the same diagnostic images, at the same time, and highlighting zones of interest (tumors and organs at risk). NORMA has a client/server architecture in order to be platform independent. Applying World Wide Web technologies, it can be easily used by people with no specific computer knowledge providing a verbose help to guide the user through the right steps of execution. The client side is an applet while the server side is a Java application. In order to optimize execution the project also includes a proprietary protocol, lying over TCP/IP suite, that organizes data exchanges and control messages. Diagnostic images are retrieved from a relational database or from a standard DICOM (Digital Images and COmmunications in Medicine) PACS through the DICOM-WWW gateway allowing connection of the usual Web browsers, used by the NORMA system, to DICOM applications via the HTTP protocol. Browser requests are sent to the gateway from the Web server through CGI (Common Gateway Interface). DICOM software translates the requests in DICOM messages and organizes the communication with the remote DICOM Application.

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science in 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1997 are described, being divided into 14 categories: (1) heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designated research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) actual situation investigation, (8) accepted research, (9) general technology research for nuclear energy, (10) radioactivity investigation and research, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) safety evaluation for radioactive liquid waste reprocessing test, (14) human brain function research. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories, further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. A great number of research papers published are listed. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (M. Suetake)

  1. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  2. Medical Ethics and Law in Radiologic Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Eric P; Matthews, Tracy M

    2015-01-01

    At every stage of their careers, radiologic technologists and student technologists must adhere to high ethical standards, obey the law, and consistently conduct themselves with professionalism. This article explains how modern health care ethics evolved, focusing on 8 important theorists. It also describes the ethical responsibilities of health care providers and the rights of patients. Important civil rights laws are discussed, focusing on the rights of health care workers as employees. A brief overview of the U.S. legal system follows, including the causes of action that most commonly involve health care professionals. Finally, this article discusses professionalism and its implications for radiologic technologists.

  3. Readiness for Radiological and Nuclear Events among Emergency Medical Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Cham E; Klein, Kelly R; Lehman, Thomas; Kodama, Takamitsu; Harris, Curtis Andrew; Swienton, Raymond E

    2017-01-01

    Among medical providers, even though radiological and nuclear events are recognized as credible threats, there is a lack of knowledge and fear about the medical consequences among medical personnel which could significantly affect the treatment of patients injured and/or contaminated in such scenarios. This study was conducted to evaluate the relative knowledge, willingness to respond, and familiarity with nuclear/radiological contamination risks among U.S. and Japanese emergency medical personnel. An institutional review board-approved anonymous paper survey was distributed at various medical and disaster conferences and medicine courses in Japan and in the U.S. The surveys were written in Japanese and English and collected information on the following four categories: generalized demographics, willingness to manage, knowledge of disaster systems, and contamination risks. A total of 418 surveys were completed and collected. Demographics showed that physicians and prehospital responders were the prevalent survey responders. The majority of responders, despite self-professed disaster training, were still very uncomfortable with and unaware how to respond to a radiological/nuclear event. Despite some educational coverage in courses and a limited number of disaster events, it is concluded that there is a lack of comfort and knowledge regarding nuclear and radiological events among the medical community. It is recommended that considerable development and subsequent distribution is needed to better educate and prepare the medical community for inevitable upcoming radiological/nuclear events.

  4. Evaluation of the Degree of Educational Goal Fulfillment of Theoretical Courses in Technology for Radiology Students in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Shams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Evaluation of educational programs is very important in the process of programming. Evaluation is a comparison between educational results and predetermined goals in order to make decision about programs. Via evaluation, one can judge about programs and of course can correct or change them if necessary. "nMaterials and Methods: In this study, the degree of fulfillment of educational goals for radiology students in technology has been evaluated from 1385 to 1386 by distributing questionnaires among these students. The relationship between fulfillment of educational goals and scores of students in different semesters were evaluated by statistical analysis. "nResults: About 24%, 96% and 100% of students of semester 1, 2 and 3 completely answered the ques-tions and the others were excluded from the study. About 79.3% of the first semester students of radiology assessed a medium fulfillment of educational goals, but in one case, public health lesson, most of them (64% believed in low fulfillment of goals. Second semester students of radiology, as the same ratio, assessed the fulfillment of goals as high, medium and low. Most of the third semester students (60.3% believed that the fulfillment of educational goals had been medium. Most of students believed that the degree of fulfillment of educational goals of courses taught by professors who were not members of the school was higher. There was no statistically significant relation between the fulfillment of educational goals and the score of students in related lessons. "nConclusion: The study revealed that the degree of fulfillment of educational goals for students in different semesters of Radiology was different. There were significant differences between fulfillment of educational goals in theoretical courses conducted by groups inside and outside the paramedical school. "nKeywords: Educational Planning, Vocational Education, Evaluation, Technology, Radiology Student

  5. Lack of security of networked medical equipment in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Vinu; Korah, Ipeson

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. There are few articles in the literature describing the security and safety aspects of networked medical equipment in radiology departments. Most radiologists are unaware of the security issues. We review the security of the networked medical equipment of a typical radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All networked medical equipment in a radiology department was scanned for vulnerabilities with a port scanner and a network vulnerability scanner, and the vulnerabilities were classified using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. A network sniffer was used to capture and analyze traffic on the radiology network for exposure of confidential patient data. We reviewed the use of antivirus software and firewalls on the networked medical equipment. USB ports and CD and DVD drives in the networked medical equipment were tested to see whether they allowed unauthorized access. Implementation of the virtual private network (VPN) that vendors use to access the radiology network was reviewed. RESULTS. Most of the networked medical equipment in our radiology department used vulnerable software with open ports and services. Of the 144 items scanned, 64 (44%) had at least one critical vulnerability, and 119 (83%) had at least one high-risk vulnerability. Most equipment did not encrypt traffic and allowed capture of confidential patient data. Of the 144 items scanned, two (1%) used antivirus software and three (2%) had a firewall enabled. The USB ports were not secure on 49 of the 58 (84%) items with USB ports, and the CD or DVD drive was not secure on 17 of the 31 (55%) items with a CD or DVD drive. One of three vendors had an insecure implementation of VPN access. CONCLUSION. Radiologists and the medical industry need to urgently review and rectify the security issues in existing networked medical equipment. We hope that the results of our study and this article also raise awareness among radiologists about the security issues of networked medical equipment.

  6. Annual report of national institute of radiological science in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1998 can be divided into 16 categories: (1) general research-heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designed research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) investigation of actual situation, (8) general research for the basic technology of nuclear energy, (9) human brain function research, (10) investigation and research of radioactivity, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) specific joint research, (14) technological evaluation for radioactive liquid waste decontamination test, (15) strategic basis research, (16) general research for emergency medical treatment. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. The detailed subjects of study are described in the report. A great number of research papers are published in Japan and all over the world. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (Suetake, M.)

  7. A post rotation survey of medical students attitude to radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyekun, A A

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of a three-week radiology rotation on the attitudes and knowledge of medical students about the specialty. It was found that the students believed in the relevance of radiology in the medical school curriculum and its importance to future medical practice. There was acceptable level of awareness of radiation protection. However, the rotation failed to change the misconception of Radiologists enormous workload with resultant bias to the specialty. It is concluded that the rotation had a mixed effect on student's knowledge and perception of radiology. This finding is comparable with other studies done in industrialized countries. Measures aimed at improving the unfavourable attitudes are suggested.

  8. Introduction of a virtual workstation into radiology medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Colin D; Lowry, Peter A; Petersen, Brian D; Jesse, Mary K

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article describes the creation of a virtual workstation for use by medical students and implementation of that workstation in the reading room. CONCLUSION. A radiology virtual workstation for medical students was created using OsiriX imaging software to authentically simulate the experience of interacting with cases selected to cover important musculoskeletal imaging diagnoses. A workstation that allows the manipulation and interpretation of complete anonymized DICOM images may enhance the educational experience of medical students.

  9. Portrayal of radiology in a major medical television series: How does it influence the perception of radiology among patients and radiology professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, T; Merkle, E M; Leyendecker, J R; Boll, D T; Gupta, R T

    2016-08-01

    To assess how the portrayal of Radiology on medical TV shows is perceived by patients and radiology professionals. In this IRB-approved study with patient consent waived, surveys were conducted among adult patients scheduled for radiological examinations and radiology professionals. The questionnaire investigated medical TV watching habits including interest in medical TV shows, appearance of radiological examination/staff, radiology's role in diagnosis-making, and rating of the shows' accuracy in portraying radiology relative to reality. One hundred and twenty-six patients and 240 professionals (133 technologists, 107 radiologists) participated. 63.5 % patients and 63.2 % technologists rated interest in medical TV shows ≥5 (scale 1-10) versus 38.3 % of radiologists. All groups noted regular (every 2nd/3rd show) to >1/show appearance of radiological examinations in 58.5-88.2 % compared to 21.0-46.2 % for radiological staff appearance. Radiology played a role in diagnosis-making regularly to >1/show in 45.3-52.6 %. There is a positive correlation for interest in medical TV and the perception that radiology is accurately portrayed for patients (r = 0.49; P = 0.001) and technologists (r = 0.38; P = 0.001) but not for radiologists (r = 0.01). The majority of patients perceive the portrayed content as accurate. Radiologists should be aware of this cultivation effect to understand their patients' behaviour which may create false expectations towards radiological examinations and potential safety hazards. • Radiology in medical TV shows is conveyed as important in diagnosis making • Presence of radiological staff is less frequent compared to examinations shown • Positive correlation for interest in medical TV and radiology perceived as accurate • TV experience may create false expectations and potential safety hazards.

  10. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  11. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  12. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  13. [Initial medical management in radiological accidents and nuclear disaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    Major radiological emergencies include criticality in nuclear power plants or terrorist attacks using dirty bombs or nuclear device detonation. Because irradiation itself does not cause any immediate death of the victims, and there is a minimum risk of secondary irradiation to medical personnel during decontamination procedures, lifesaving treatments should be prioritized. When a major radiological accident occurs, information is scarce and/or becomes intricate. We might face with significant difficulties in determining the exact culprits of the event, i.e., radiological or chemical or others. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for the national and local governments, related organizations and hospitals to develop comprehensive systems to cope with all hazards(chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear, and explosion) under the common incident command system.

  14. Handheld Technology Acceptance in Radiologic Science Education and Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to,…

  15. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medical Laboratory Science is a Quarterly Publication of the Association of ... It Publishes Original Research and Review Articles in All Fields of ... Covering Medical Microbiology, Medical Parasitology, Clinical Chemistry, ...

  16. Attitudes of Radiologic Science Students, Technologists, and Clinical Instructors Regarding Their Experiential Learning and Career Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Radiologic science is an essential part of the healthcare continuum and preparing radiologic science students with experiential learning is essential. It is from this experience working with the patient that students begin to prepare for entry-level practice. The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes of current radiologic science…

  17. 2013 Dade W. Moeller lecture: medical countermeasures against radiological terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2014-08-01

    Soon after the 9-11 attacks, politicians and scientists began to question our ability to cope with a large-scale radiological terrorism incident. The outline of what was needed was fairly obvious: the ability to prevent such an attack, methods to cope with the medical consequences, the ability to clean up afterward, and the tools to figure out who perpetrated the attack and bring them to justice. The medical response needed three components: the technology to determine rapidly the radiation doses received by a large number of people, methods for alleviating acute hematological radiation injuries, and therapies for mitigation and treatment of chronic radiation injuries. Research done to date has shown that a realistic medical response plan is scientifically possible, but the regulatory and financial barriers to achieving this may currently be insurmountable.

  18. Problem-solving model in radiology for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, C E; Vydareny, K H; Ten Haken, J D; Calhoun, J G

    1989-05-01

    Current undergraduate medical education is criticized for not preparing physicians to be independent thinkers. The rapid development of new imaging techniques and the problem of escalating medical costs call for efficient patient management. The development of algorithms in imaging work-up of patient problems is an excellent example of problem solving or medical decision making. The senior elective in radiology at our institution incorporates this type of problem-solving session. Small groups (15-25 students) with faculty guidance discuss 5-6 common patient problems to develop an investigative plan in imaging. Algorithms are thus developed by the group, but not presented for memorization. Small changes are then made in the case history so that the students are forced to make new hypotheses and generate a modified algorithm. Correlative costs are included. Flexibility and initiative in development of patient management algorithms are stressed.

  19. Medical SisRadiologia: a new software tool for analysis of radiological accidents and incidents in medical radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Camila M. Araujo; Silva, Francisco C.A. da, E-mail: araujocamila@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Rilton A.; Pelegrineli, Samuel Q., E-mail: consultoria@maximindustrial.com.br, E-mail: samuelfisica@maximindustrial.com.br [Maxim Industrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The man's exposure to ionizing radiation in health are has increased considerably due not only the great request of medical examinations as well as the improvement of the techniques used in diagnostic imaging, for example, equipment for conventional X-rays, CT scans, mammography, hemodynamic and others. Although the benefits of using of radiology techniques are unquestionable, the lack of training in radiation protection of the workers, associated with procedure errors, have been responsible for the increasing number of radiation overexposures of these workers. Sometimes these high doses are real and there is a true radiological accident. The radiation workers, named occupationally Exposed Individual (IOE), must comply with two national regulations: Governmental Decree 453/1998 of the National Agency of Sanitary Surveillance (Portaria 453/1998 ANVISA Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria), which establishes the basic guidelines for radiation protection in medial and dental radiology and; the Governmental Decree NR-32/2002 of the Ministry of Labour and Employment (Ministerio do Trabalho e Emprego), which establishes the basic guidelines for the worker's health. The two mandatory regulations postulate a detailed investigation in the event of radiation overexposure of an IOE. In order to advice the diagnostic institution to perform an efficient analysis, investigation and report of high doses, it is proposed the use of a computational tool named 'Medical SisRadiologia'. This software tool enables the compilation and record of radiological abnormal data occurred in a diagnostic institution. It will also facilitate the detailed analysis of the event and will increase the effectiveness and development of work performed by the Radiation Protection Service. At the end, a technical report is issued, in accordance with the regulations of the technical regulations, which could also be used as training tool to avoid another event in the future. (author)

  20. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Guss

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.).

  2. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  3. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

    2008-04-16

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  4. The state of radiologic teaching practice in preclinical medical education: survey of American medical, osteopathic, and podiatric schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Zachary; Blackham, Kristine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the state of preclinical radiology curricula in North American allopathic, osteopathic, and podiatric medical schools. An online survey of teaching methods, radiology topics, and future plans was developed. The Associations of American Medical Colleges, Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, and Colleges of Podiatric Medicine listing for all US, Canadian, and Puerto Rican schools was used for contact information for directors of anatomy and/or radiology courses. Letters were sent via e-mail to 198 schools, with a link to the anonymous survey. Of 198 schools, 98 completed the survey (48%). Radiology curricula were integrated with other topics (91%), and taught by anatomists (42%) and radiologists (43%). The majority of time was spent on the topic of anatomy correlation (35%). Time spent teaching general radiology topics in the curriculum, such as physics (3%), modality differences (6%), radiation safety (2%), and contrast use (2%) was limited. Most schools had plans to implement an innovative teaching method in the near future (62%). The major challenges included limits on: time in the curriculum (73%); resources (32%); and radiology faculty participation (30%). A total of 82% reported that their curriculum did not model the suggestions made by the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. This survey describes the current state of preclinical radiology teaching: curricula were nonstandard, integrated into other courses, and predominantly used for anatomy correlation. Other important contextual principles of the practice of radiology were seldom taught. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Image Gently(SM): a national education and communication campaign in radiology using the science of social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goske, Marilyn J; Applegate, Kimberly E; Boylan, Jennifer; Butler, Priscilla F; Callahan, Michael J; Coley, Brian D; Farley, Shawn; Frush, Donald P; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Jaramillo, Diego; Johnson, Neil D; Kaste, Sue C; Morrison, Gregory; Strauss, Keith J

    2008-12-01

    Communication campaigns are an accepted method for altering societal attitudes, increasing knowledge, and achieving social and behavioral change particularly within public health and the social sciences. The Image Gently(SM) campaign is a national education and awareness campaign in radiology designed to promote the need for and opportunities to decrease radiation to children when CT scans are indicated. In this article, the relatively new science of social marketing is reviewed and the theoretical basis for an effective communication campaign in radiology is discussed. Communication strategies are considered and the type of outcomes that should be measured are reviewed. This methodology has demonstrated that simple, straightforward safety messages on radiation protection targeted to medical professionals throughout the radiology community, utilizing multiple media, can affect awareness potentially leading to change in practice.

  6. Impact of case-based radiology education on first-year medical students knowledge, perceptions, and interests in the field of radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Rohr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical training institutions utilize a variety of approaches to present specialty educational material such as radiology. Typically, this material is introduced during the latter years of medical school and includes interactive modules, individual contexts, and case-based learning. This is a quasiexperimental study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of case-based radiology education presented to first-year medical students. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to measure changes in knowledge, perceptions of, and career interest in radiology. The results suggest that the use of case-based learning may improve medical students’ perceived knowledge of radiology and perceived importance of radiologists in the patient care process.

  7. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  8. 75 FR 68200 - Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 892 Medical Devices; Radiology Devices... the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 892 is amended as follows: PART 892--RADIOLOGY DEVICES...

  9. [Digital library for archiving files of radiology and medical imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvauferrier, R; Rambeau, M; Moulène, F

    1993-01-01

    The Conseil des Enseignants de Radiologie de France in collaboration with the Ilab-TSI company and Schering laboratories has developed a computer programme allowing the storage and consultation of radiological teaching files. This programme, developed on Macintosh from standard Hypercard and Quicktime applications, allows, in consultation mode, the multicriteria search and visualisation of selected radiological files. In the author mode, new files can be included after digitalizing the author's own images or after obtaining images from another image library. This programme, which allows juxtaposition of digitalised radiological files, is designed to be extremely open and can be easily combined with other computer-assisted teaching or computer-assisted presentation applications.

  10. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  11. Analysis of radiology education in undergraduate medical doctors training in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Derese, Anselme [Centre for Education Development, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to describe how undergraduate radiology teaching is organized in Europe and to identify important characteristics of undergraduate radiology curriculum. Methods: An electronic survey on undergraduate teaching was distributed by the European Society of Radiology (ESR) to 38 national delegates of the ESR Education Committee. Results: The 'classic type' of radiology teaching method is more frequent than the 'modular type'. In 38% of medical training centres the first experience with radiology is in pre-clinical years. The students enrolled in the fourth medical year experience the largest involvement in radiology education. The total number of teaching hours (mean 89 h, median 76 h) varies across the countries and differs depending on the radiological topic (mean across all topics 14.8 h, median 13). Written tests and oral exams were the most frequently used examination modes. Clerkships are reported as a key part of training. Conclusion: This first international comparative study of undergraduate radiological curriculum in Europe identifies a large number of differences in curriculum content and teaching methods throughout Europe. More research is needed to establish the radiological educational competences resulting from these differing curricula's to improve and to standardize the teaching according to (inter)national and institutional needs.

  12. Radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vassallo, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Radiology is the fastest developing field of medicine and these unprecedented advances have been mainly due to improving computer technology. Digital imaging is a technology whereby images are acquired in a computer format, so that they can be easily stored and recalled for display on any computer workstation. Digital image acquisition has been used in ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the start. The use of digital imaging in conventional X-rays, k...

  13. RADIOLOGY EDUCATION: A PILOT STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS REGARDING IMAGING IN TRAUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saad; Saeed, Muhammad Anwar; Shah, Noreen; Nadeem, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Trauma remains one of the most frequent presentations in emergency departments. Imaging has established role in setting of acute trauma with ability to identify potentially fatal conditions. Adequate knowledge of health professionals regarding trauma imaging is vital for improved healthcare. In this work we try to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging in trauma as well as identify most effective way of imparting radiology education. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted at Aga Khan University Medical College & Khyber Girls Medical College, to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging protocols practiced in initial management of trauma patients. Only 40 & 20% respectively were able to identify radiographs included in trauma series. Very few had knowledge of correct indication for Focused abdominal sonography in trauma. Clinical radiology rotation was reported as best way of learning radiology. Change in curricula & restructuring of clinical radiology rotation structure is needed to improve knowledge regarding Trauma imaging.

  14. Undergraduate radiology education in the era of dynamism in medical curriculum: an educational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B; Chhem, Rethy; Wang, Shih-Chang; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2011-06-01

    Radiology undergraduate curriculum has undergone a tremendous transformation in the decades reflecting a change in the structure, content and delivery of instruction. These changes are not unique to the discipline, but rather a response in the cycle of the re-engineering process in the medical curriculum in order to ensure its proper role into the ever-changing context. Radiology education is now more integrated across the curriculum than ever. The diversity of how radiology is being taught within the medical undergraduate curriculum is extensive and promising with the expanding role of the radiologist in the spectrum within the medical curriculum. A strong interface between the medical student and the clinicians must always be integrated in the learning process in order to convey the essential and practical use of the different aspects of radiology essential to the student's career as a future clinician. With the recent advancement in educational and technological innovations, radiology education is mobilized in the most pioneering ways, stimulating a rekindled interest in the field of medical imaging. This paper describes the increasing interest in current role of undergraduate radiology education in the context of constant medical curriculum innovations and in the digital age. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Undergraduate radiology education in the era of dynamism in medical curriculum: An educational perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, Thomas N.B., E-mail: T.Pascual@iaea.org [Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency (I.A.E.A.), Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, Vienna (Austria); Chhem, Rethy, E-mail: R.Chhem@iaea.org [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, International Atomic Energy Agency (I.A.E.A.), Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Shih-Chang, E-mail: shih-chang.wang@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney Discipline of Imaging, University of Sydney, Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Hawkesbury Road, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Vujnovic, Sasa, E-mail: svujnovic@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Clinical Center Banja Luka, Zdrave Korda 1, 51000 Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2011-06-15

    Radiology undergraduate curriculum has undergone a tremendous transformation in the decades reflecting a change in the structure, content and delivery of instruction. These changes are not unique to the discipline, but rather a response in the cycle of the re-engineering process in the medical curriculum in order to ensure its proper role into the ever-changing context. Radiology education is now more integrated across the curriculum than ever. The diversity of how radiology is being taught within the medical undergraduate curriculum is extensive and promising with the expanding role of the radiologist in the spectrum within the medical curriculum. A strong interface between the medical student and the clinicians must always be integrated in the learning process in order to convey the essential and practical use of the different aspects of radiology essential to the student's career as a future clinician. With the recent advancement in educational and technological innovations, radiology education is mobilized in the most pioneering ways, stimulating a rekindled interest in the field of medical imaging. This paper describes the increasing interest in current role of undergraduate radiology education in the context of constant medical curriculum innovations and in the digital age.

  16. Radiologic science for technologists: physics, biology, and protection. [Textbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The second edition of a textbook primarily for students in radiologic technology is presented. Separate chapters discuss mammography, computed tomography, diagnostic ultrasound, and design of radiologic physics. Radiation protection is specifically presented in two chapters as well as being integrated throughout the text. The fundamentals of radiobiology, molecular and cellular effects of irradiation, and early and late radiation effects comprise four chapters. (JMT)

  17. University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC): an assessment of its utility for teaching diagnostic imaging in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil; Malin, Greg; Trinder, Krista; Pinelle, David

    2015-01-01

    We have found it very challenging to integrate images from our radiology digital imaging repository into the curriculum of our local medical school. Thus, it has been difficult to convey important knowledge related to viewing and interpreting diagnostic radiology images. We sought to determine if we could create a solution for this problem and evaluate whether students exposed to this solution were able to learn imaging concepts pertinent to medical practice. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a novel interactive web application that enables preclinical medical students to acquire image interpretation skills fundamental to clinical practice. This web application reformats content stored in Medical Imaging Resource Center teaching cases for BlackBoard Learn™, a popular learning management system. We have deployed this solution for 2 successive years in a 1st-year basic sciences medical school course at the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. The "courseware" content covers both normal anatomy and common clinical pathologies in five distinct modules. We created two cohorts of learners consisting of an intervention cohort of students who had used USRC for their 1st academic year, whereas the nonintervention cohort was students who had not been exposed to this learning opportunity. To assess the learning experience of the users we designed an online questionnaire and image review quiz delivered to both of the student groups. Comparisons between the groups revealed statistically significant differences in both confidence with image interpretation and the ability to answer knowledge-based questions. Students were satisfied with the overall usability, functions, and capabilities of USRC. USRC is an innovative technology that provides integration between Medical Imaging Resource Center, a teaching solution used in radiology, and a Learning Management System.

  18. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M; Pawlik, Michael T; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6% of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2%), histology (12.4%), and blood analysis (9.6%). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6%) and MRI (30.6%). In 52.2% of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. • Radiology was the most important specialty for finding the final diagnosis. • CT was the most successful problem-solving imaging modality followed by MRI. • MRI and CT had the best solution rates of more than 30%.

  19. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  20. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  1. Radiology Exposure in the Undergraduate Curriculum: A Medical Student Perspective on Quality and Opportunities for Positive Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Kari L; Faden, Lisa; Nassrallah, Georges; Speer, Stacey; Wiseman, Daniele

    2017-08-01

    This article is a continuation of a qualitative study designed to explore how radiology exposures can impact medical student opinions and perceptions of radiology and radiologists. We focused on: 1) conducting a radiology exposure inventory from the perspective of the medical student; 2) student evaluation of the quality of the radiology exposures and suggestions for positive change; and 3) development of a framework to address the needs of medical students as it relates to radiology education in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Research methodology and design for this qualitative study were described in detail in a previous article by Visscher et al [1]. Participants included 28 medical students; 18 were in medical school years 1 and 2 (preclerkship), and 10 were in years 3 and 4 (clerkship). Specific to the focus of this article, the data revealed 3 major findings: 1) multiple exposures to radiology exist, and they are received and valued differently depending on the medical student's stage of professional development; 2) medical students value radiology education and want their radiology exposure to be comprehensive and high quality; 3) Medical students have constructive suggestions for improving the quality of both formal and informal radiology exposures. Performing a radiology exposure inventory from a medical student perspective is a useful way to explore how students receive and value radiology instruction. Medical students want a more comprehensive radiology education that can be summarized using the 5 C's of Radiology Education framework. The 5 C's (curriculum, coaching, collaborating, career and commitment) reflect medical students' desires to learn content that will support them in clinical practice, be supported in their professional development, and have the necessary information to make informed career decisions. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RADIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bebeshko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the position of a 25-years’ experience to overcome the health effects of Chernobyl the dynamics of the radiation environment, the first summarizing at the international level (1988, the results of completed research and practical monitoring are analyzed. Cohort of acute radiation syndrome (ARS survivors under medical observation at the S.I. "Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" is the largest. Within the 25 years the functional state of the major organs and body systems, and metabolic homeostasis for this category of persons were studied, a comprehensive assessment of their health, mental and physical performance were given, and risk factors and peculiarities of stochastic and non-stochastic pathology courses were identified, as well as a system of rehabilitation patients after ARS was developed. ARS survivors are suffering from chronic diseases of internal organs and systems (from 5-7 to 10-12 diagnoses at the same time. A correlation between acute radiation effects and specific HLA phenotypes were revealed. The dynamics of the immune system recovery after irradiation was studied. The role and prognostic value of telomere length and programmed cell death of lymphocytes in the formation of the cellular effects of ionizing radiation were determined for the first time. Differences between spontaneous and radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias were found. Dose-dependent neuropsychiatric, neurophysiological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging deviations were identified after irradiation at doses above 0.3 Sv. It was shown that the lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers with doses 350 – 690 mGy can induce "the bystander effect" in the non-irradiated cells even after 19 years after exposure. The rates of cancer incidence and mortality of victims, the lessons and key problems to be solved in the third decade after the Chernobyl accident are considered.

  3. Korea's Contribution to Radiological Research Included in Science Citation Index Expanded, 1986-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, You Jin; Yoon, Dae Young; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Baek, Sora; Seo, Young Lan; Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun; Ju, Young Su [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate scientific papers published by Korean radiologists in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge-Web of Science (SCIE) database was searched for all articles published by Korean radiologists, in SCIE radiology journals, between 1986 and 2010. We performed the analysis by typing 'Korea' and 'radiol' in the address section and selecting the subject area of 'Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Medical Imaging' with the use of the general search function of the software. Analyzed parameters included the total number of publications, document types, journals, and institutions. In addition, we analyzed where Korea ranks, compared to other countries, in terms of the number of published articles. All these data were analyzed according to five time periods: 1986-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010. Overall, 4974 papers were published by Korean radiologists, in 99 different SCIE journals, between 1986 and 2010, of which 4237 (85.2%) were article-type papers. Of the total 115395 articles, worldwide, published in radiology journals, Korea's share was 3.7%, with an upward trend over time (p < 0.005). The journal with the highest number of articles was the American Journal of Roentgenology (n 565, 13.3%). The institution which produced the highest number of publications was Seoul National University (n = 932, 22.0%). The number of scientific articles published by Korean radiologists in the SCIE radiology journals has increased significantly between 1986 and 2010. Korea was ranked 4th among countries contributing to radiology research during the last 5 years.

  4. [Celedonio Calatayud-Costa and the birth of the specialty, the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology, and the journal: the beginning of a century of Spanish radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyalto de Pablo, P; Sánchez Fernández, J J; García Santos, J M

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Celedonio Calatayud-Costa, an eminent Spanish radiologist, electrical engineer, researcher, and co-founder of the Spanish Society of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology, was also the founder of the Spanish Journal of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology. The journal, the first journal dedicated specifically to the incipient specialty of electrology, from which radiology would later develop, was the official publication of that primordial Society, and was thus the first antecessor of Radiología, which is today the official journal of the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology. This article analyzes the figure of Dr. Calatayud, based on the scant information available about him, in the centennial of the publication of his journal. Criticized by some and eulogized by others, knowledge about this controversial figure is essential to any understanding of the beginnings of the specialty and its scientific publication in Spain.

  5. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G. [University Hospital Regensburg, Institute of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Pawlik, Michael T. [Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Institute of Anaesthesiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  7. Radiology in World War II (Medical Department, United States Army)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    of opinion as the war progressed. They included: 102 RADIOLOGY FJiuG-z 33.-Moderately advanced pulmon - ary tuberculosis detected in routine roent...therapy of cancer , like its surgical management, had become so complex that, unless the disease was treated with skill far above the average, therapeutic...efforts directed toward it could be wasted. To control cancer with X-rays produced by the equipment available to Army hospitals, except the equipment

  8. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina L

    2011-09-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P < .0001). In general, medical students lack the core knowledge that is needed for good-quality ordering of radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  9. Resource Manual Development for Quality Management in the Radiologic Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Dale E.

    A study determined elements to be included in developing a resource manual to assist radiologic technologists in completing quality management (QM) activities in diagnostic imaging. The study included these parts: a literature review; survey to assess effectiveness, content features, and improvement of six categories of resource materials…

  10. [Evaluating radiation dose load in medical personnel of radiologic diagnostic departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, B V; Koroleva, E P

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with materials on radiation hygienic evaluation of radiologic diagnostic departments in various medical institutions of Moscow. The studies covered work of medical staffers in X-ray examination and in contact with short-lived isotope generators. The authors outlined the examination types and stages with maximal radiation danger. Disimetric information obtained during the study helped to calculate values of equivalent, effective doses of radiation for medical personnel and maximal potential doses.

  11. Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Sciences: A Description of a Radiological Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Anna; Staskiewicz, Grzegorz J.; Lisiecka, Justyna; Pietrzyk, Lukasz; Czekajlo, Michael; Arancibia, Carlos U.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of medical imaging techniques pervade modern medicine, and the changing portability and performance of tools like ultrasound imaging have brought these medical imaging techniques into the everyday practice of many specialties outside of radiology. However, proper interpretation of ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images…

  12. Relativity Screens for Misvalued Medical Services: Impact on Noninvasive Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Silva, Ezequiel; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2017-06-01

    In 2006, the AMA/Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) introduced ongoing relativity screens to identify potentially misvalued medical services for payment adjustments. We assess the impact of these screens upon the valuation of noninvasive diagnostic radiology services. Data regarding relativity screens and relative value unit (RVU) changes were obtained from the 2016 AMA Relativity Assessment Status Report. All global codes in the 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule with associated work RVUs were classified as noninvasive diagnostic radiology services versus remaining services. The frequency of having ever undergone a screen was compared between the two groups. Screened radiology codes were further evaluated regarding the RVU impact of subsequent revaluation. Of noninvasive diagnostic radiology codes, 46.0% (201 of 437) were screened versus 22.2% (1,460 of 6,575) of remaining codes (P < .001). Most common screens for which radiology codes were identified as potentially misvalued were (1) high expenditures (27.5%) and (2) high utilization (25.6%). The modality and body region most likely to be identified in a screen were CT (82.1%) and breast (90.9%), respectively. Among screened radiology codes, work RVUs, practice expense RVUs, and nonfacility total RVUs decreased in 20.3%, 65.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. All screened CT, MRI, brain, and spine codes exhibited decreased total RVUs. Policymakers' ongoing search for potentially misvalued medical services has disproportionately impacted noninvasive diagnostic radiology services, risking the introduction of unintended or artificial shifts in physician practice. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mental and Medical sciences today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Rowland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences is designed as a free online, open access, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed journal. The JMMS mission is to address ideas and issues related to mind and medicine, publishing scientific review and empirical papers regarding mental and medical health and disease. Our goal is to stimulate constructive debates among scholars, researchers, physicians, scientists and health professionals with respect to the latest discoveries and trends in the field. The journal pays special attention to interdisciplinary and integrative perspectives, focusing primarily on papers approaching mind and body as a unitary domain of study. Our supposition is that the study of the human body and mind needs to be better integrated—in fact should not be studied in isolation from one another, a position that originates fact from the collaborative efforts of the two main editors, namely a psychologist and a physician. As an example, the mind body problem—an age-old question—is still a much debated topic. Despite enormous progress in neuroimaging, it remains unclear how abstract ideas come to “control” the physical brain and body to generate actions, responses, and behaviors. Thus, abstract ideas of the mind (e.g., the desire to seek a promotion, to become famous, or to help those surrounding you can drive decision making and life choices more strongly than the concrete/ biological needs of the body (food, warmth, shelter, etc.. From a pathological perspective, heavy psychological and physical burden can “overload” the mind, creating a mental condition of stress which may then negatively impact bodily function through symptoms such as gastric ulcer, hypertension, and so on. From the opposite perspective, the body and brain can interfere with and direct the functioning of mind. The need for sleep, for example, is due to fluctuation of neuromodulators within the brain. When such neuromodulators are pharmacologically manipulated

  14. Basic sciences curriculum in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional methods are generally used for teaching basic science courses at Shiraz Medical School. Such courses are taught during the first and second years of a seven-year medical program. The goal of this study was to analyze teachers and students’ perceptions of basic science teaching in medical education. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the college of medicine of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Results: Regarding the students’ viewpoints, 71.4% reported that curriculum content in basic sciences was enough and had good relevance. 59.2% of students believed the objectives of basic sciences curriculum were clear. Conclusion: The burden of teaching basic sciences ranges from sustaining interest to clinical relevance. It is expected that medical schools will continuously monitor what works and what does not work with their curricula and make the necessary adaptations as required.

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1994 - March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This annual report summarizes briefly the research activities and the achievement in the Institute for fiscal year of 1994 (from April 1994 to March 1995). As the middle of this period, commissioning of the new clinical trial of cancer treatment was successfully started using heavy ion beams of the HIMAC (heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba) which was completed at the end of fiscal year 1993. At the same time, various kinds of basic research projects using the same heavy ion beams were also begun in an open use system available to many facilities outside the Institute. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and radiation medicine including physics and engineering related to therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the collected topics have been classified into several categories from physics to environmental science. The appendix of this report includes recent publication in each area, list of keywords, author, index, and organization and staff. (M.N.)

  16. Distributed radiology clerkship for the core clinical year of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Felix S

    2002-11-01

    The central role that diagnostic radiology has in the modern practice of medicine has not always been reflected in radiology's place in the curriculum. We developed a new radiology clerkship for undergraduate medical students during their core clinical year that was supported by Web technology. The assumptions underlying the design of the clerkship were that radiology is best learned from radiologists and that students are most receptive to learning radiology when it is related to concurrent patient care experiences. Beginning in May 2000, a required radiology clerkship experience was incorporated into the core clinical year at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The core clinical year was organized into three 16-week blocks of clerkships. Two or four independent half-day radiology tutorial sessions were included with each clerkship block, and attended by all students in the block (approximately 35 students), regardless of their specific clerkship assignments. There were ten different radiology tutorials, each given three times during the year as students rotated through the clerkship blocks. Thus, each student attended a radiology tutorial session every four to eight weeks during the year. The topics covered during the tutorials were correlated with the content of the clerkship blocks and included adult and pediatric chest radiology, adult and pediatric abdominal radiology, body CT, neuroradiology, obstetric ultrasound, gynecologic ultrasound, osteoporosis, adult and pediatric fractures, mammography, and cervical spine trauma. The tutorials included pre- and post-test, lectures, case presentations, and sometimes tours of the radiology department. The educational emphasis was on pragmatic case-based learning exercises, development of verbal and visual vocabulary, and learning when and where to seek more information. To provide continuity and organization, Web-based curriculum materials were designed and implemented as a component of the clerkship. The home

  17. Physics, radiology, and chemistry. An introduction to natural science. Textbook for the medical professions and nursing training centres. 7. rev. ed. Physik, Strahlenkunde und Chemie. Eine Einfuehrung in diese Naturwissenschaften. Studienbuch fuer Angehoerige der Heilberufe und Krankenpflegeschulen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an introduction to physics and chemistry especially for medical personnel. After a general introduction, measurement methods, mechanics including mechanics of solid bodies, fluids and gases, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, radiations including their biological effects, general chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry are treated. Every chapter contains exercises mostly in connection with medical and biological effects. Furthermore, connections with biology and medicine are considered. The chapters on physiological chemistry, computer and information theory, chemistry and ecology, and metabolism have been rewritten. (HP).

  18. Physics, radiology, and chemistry. An introduction to natural science. Textbook for the medical professions and nursing training centres. 8. rev. ed. Physik, Strahlenkunde und Chemie. Eine Einfuehrung in diese Naturwissenschaften. Studienbuch fuer Angehoerige der Heilberufe und Krankenpflegeschulen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book is an introduction to physics and chemistry especially for medical personnel. After a general introduction, measurement methods, mechanics including mechanics of solid bodies, fluids and gases, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, radiations including their biological effects, general chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry are treated. Every chapter contains exercises mostly in connection with medical and biological effects. Furthermore connections with biology and medicine are considered. (orig./HP) With 104 figs., 51 tabs.

  19. Quality control in medical radiology using T.L.D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolemberg Silva, F.A.; Nascimento Souza, D. do [Universidade Federal de Sergipe - CCET - Dept. de Fisica, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work tests of quality control in beams of X rays have been carried out, at diagnostic level, of two radiological services equipments of Brazilian hospitals (Aracaju, SE). We obtained the air kerma and kerma rate values, the beams efficiency, the coherence between the luminous fields and the referring fields of irradiation and half-value layer to each equipment and set of parameters. The measures of direct form have been obtained using two ionization chambers, one cylindrical and another one with parallel plates. An optional method for accomplishment some of the tests were carried out with CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + Teflon thermoluminescent dosimeters. The values of air kerma were evaluated for three tube voltage, 40, 60 and 81 kV at 1.0 m from the focus of the equipments. For each one of the voltages three distinct current values were chosen besides a fixed value of exposition time. The results showed that the values of air kerma varied between 8.0 {mu}Gy and 0.35 {mu}Gy. The T.L.D. have revealed useful for the measures if the response to the dose is previously known for each set of beam parameters used for the irradiations. Otherwise, the tests with the dosimeters can serve to evaluate the beams conditions and their reproducibility. The evaluation results of coherence between the luminous fields and the irradiation fields demonstrated that the difference between the radiation and the luminous fields did not exceed 2% of the distance between the focal point and the film. We found satisfactory values for half-value layer. (author)

  20. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  1. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  2. Science fiction and the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gavin; McFarlane, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Research on science fiction within the medical humanities should articulate interpretative frameworks that do justice to medical themes within the genre. This means challenging modes of reading that encourage unduly narrow accounts of science fiction. Admittedly, science studies has moved away from reading science fiction as a variety of scientific popularisation and instead understands science fiction as an intervention in the technoscientific imaginary that calls for investment in particular scientific enterprises, including various biomedical technologies. However, this mode of reading neglects science fiction's critical relationship to the construction of 'the future' in the present: the ways in which science fiction proposes concrete alternatives to hegemonic narratives of medical progress and fosters critical self-awareness of the contingent activity which gives 'the future' substance in the here-and-now. Moreover, the future orientation of science fiction should not distract from the function of medical science fiction as 'cognitive estrangement': the technological innovations that dominate science-fiction narratives are less concrete predictions and more generic devices that explain in historical time the origins of a marvellous world bearing provocative correspondences to our own, everyday reality. The editorial concludes with a series of introductions to the articles comprising the special issue, covering the print edition and a special online-only section.

  3. [Information flow between medical and social sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, András; Somogyi, Anikó

    2014-12-28

    In order to reveal impacts of natural and social sciences on each other, the authors examined connections between fields of medical and social sciences using a search for references and citations of scientific publication. 1. The largest affinity between the medical and social sciences was found between neurosciences and psychology, but there was a significant affinity between clinical sciences and general social sciences, as well. 2. The example of General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes" suggests that in the period 2001-2010 the share of references to social sciences was significantly increased. In the meantime, social science papers in the same topics contained references to Clinical Medicine papers in a constantly high percentage. 3. In the sample under study, the age distribution of social science papers in the references did not differ significantly from that of the other sources. 4. Share of references to social science papers was found to be extremely high among Hungarian General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes". This finding still requires clarification, nevertheless, since e.g. it was not supported by an institutional comparison including the largest Hungarian medical research university. 5. The intensity of the reference/citation mediated information flows between the Hungarian Medical Journal, Orvosi Hetilap and social sciences appears to be in accordance with the current international trends.

  4. Medical physics: some recollections in diagnostic X-ray imaging and therapeutic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J E; Orton, C G

    2000-12-01

    Medical physics has changed dramatically since 1895. There was a period of slow evolutionary change during the first 70 years after Roentgen's discovery of x rays. With the advent of the computer, however, both diagnostic and therapeutic radiology have undergone rapid growth and changes. Technologic advances such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostic imaging and three-dimensional treatment planning systems, stereotactic radiosurgery, and intensity modulated radiation therapy in radiation oncology have resulted in substantial changes in medical physics. These advances have improved diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy while expanding the need for better educated and experienced medical physics staff.

  5. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  6. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper

  7. Radiological and Nuclear Emergencies: Medical Management of Radiation Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ravi Shankar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear radiation which could be in the form of alpha, beta, gamma rays, etc, could cause radioactive contamination, radiation burns, acute radiation syndrome or a combination of any of these above-mentioned disasters. Effects of radiation and the subsequent treatment depend on the severity of exposure and the organs directly involved. Radiation levels up to 200 rads lead to nausea and vomiting whilst radiation levels between 200 rads and 400 rads lead to diarrhea, vomiting and pneumonitis. Whilst 450 rads is lethal in 50 per cent population, doses above this cause increased fatality and organ involvement with the Central Nervous System being affected with 2000 rads radiation. Nuclear disaster management lies most importantly in identifying that patient who would recover if treated immediately. Whereas decontamination of skin and wounds is done first, immediate first aid may take priority in a seriously injured patient. In the event of internal contamination, effective decorporation maybe required. This is followed by prevention and treatment of infections in sterile conditions. Radiation burn injuries will require effective long-term management. Finally, what would be most important is the necessity to have suitable hospital care where bone marrow, stem cell transfusion and restitution of the immune system would take place.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.113-117, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.830

  8. Radiological Medical Device Innovation: Approvals via the Premarket Approval Pathway From 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Comeron W; Hayman, Emily L; Finkle, Joshua H; Walter, Jessica R; Xu, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to critically assess the clinical evidence leading to radiologic medical device approvals via the premarket approval pathway from 2000 to 2015. This study used the publically available FDA premarket database for radiologic device approvals over the past 15 years (September 1, 2000, to August 31, 2015). Approval characteristics were collected for each device, and statistical analysis was performed on the data for each pivotal trial. Additionally, methodological quality of the pivotal trial was determined using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Twenty-three class III radiologic device approvals were identified, with breast imaging accounting for 16 (70%) and computer-aided detection software accounting for 9 (39%) approvals. The median premarket approval time was 475 days (range, 180-1,116). Twenty-one devices were approved on the basis of multireader, multicenter studies, one on the basis of a randomized controlled trial, and one on the basis of a preclinical technical equivalence trial. The median number of patients per pivotal trial was 201 (range, 25-3,946). Twenty-six of the 34 pivotal trials (76%) had at least one methodologic bias. Breast imaging devices had a greater number of patients per pivotal trial (P = .009) and more prospective studies. With regard to all modalities, increased time to device approval correlated with weaker trial quality (r = 0.600, P < .001). Radiologic devices are largely approved by multireader, multicenter studies, the recommended standard for assessing diagnostic technologies. Given that radiologic devices play a key role in modern medicine, further efforts should be made to increase transparency of clinical data leading to approval. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CareerTrac Webinar for RISE and Bridges Program Directors Biomedical Beat : Science for the Public Fall 2017 Issue of Findings ... National Institutes of Health: NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ® USA.gov National Institute of General Medical Sciences 45 Center Drive MSC 6200 Bethesda, MD 20892- ...

  10. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  11. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, You Jin [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young, E-mail: evee0914@chollian.net [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Eun Joo [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Sora [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010.

  12. Women in Radiology: Exploring the Gender Disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zener, Rebecca; Lee, Stefanie Y; Visscher, Kari L; Ricketts, Michelle; Speer, Stacey; Wiseman, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    In 2015, only 1.5% of female Canadian medical students pursued radiology as a specialty, versus 5.6% of men. The aim of this study was to determine what factors attract and deter Canadian medical students from pursuing a career in radiology, and why fewer women than men pursue radiology as a specialty. An anonymous online survey was e-mailed to English-speaking Canadian medical schools, and 12 of 14 schools participated. Subgroup analyses for gender and radiology interest were performed using the Fisher exact test (P Physics deterred more women (47%) than it did men (21%), despite similar educational backgrounds for the two gender groups in physical sciences (P < .0001). More women who were considering radiology as a specialty rated intellectual stimulation as being important to their career choice (93%), compared with women who were not (80%; P = .002). Fewer women who were not interested in radiology had done preclinical observerships in radiology (20%), compared with men who were not interested in radiology (28%; P = .04). A perceived lack of direct patient contact dissuades medical students from pursuing radiology as a career. Women have less preclinical radiology exposure than do men. Programs that increase preclinical exposure to radiology subspecialties that have greater patient contact should be initiated, and an effort to actively recruit women to such programs should be made. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. International collaboration in medical radiation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Gary; Allen, Carla; Platt, Jane

    2016-06-01

    International collaboration is recognised for enhancing the ability to approach complex problems from a variety of perspectives, increasing development of a wider range of research skills and techniques and improving publication and acceptance rates. The aim of this paper is to describe the current status of international collaboration in medical radiation science and compare this to other allied health occupations. This study utilised a content analysis approach where co-authorship of a journal article was used as a proxy for research collaboration and the papers were assigned to countries based on the corporate address given in the by-line of the publication. A convenience sample method was employed and articles published in the professional medical radiation science journals in the countries represented within our research team - Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA) were sampled. Physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational therapy and nursing were chosen for comparison. Rates of international collaboration in medical radiation science journals from Australia, the UK and the USA have steadily increased over the 3-year period sampled. Medical radiation science demonstrated lower average rates of international collaboration than the other allied health occupations sampled. The average rate of international collaboration in nursing was far below that of the allied health occupations sampled. Overall, the UK had the highest average rate of international collaboration, followed by Australia and the USA, the lowest. Overall, medical radiation science is lagging in international collaboration in comparison to other allied health fields.

  14. National Institute of Radiological Sciences annual report. April 1997 - March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Annual Report summarizes research activities and achievements of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in the fiscal years of 1997 (from April 1997 to March 1998). The clinical trials for cancer treatments using a heavy ion, one of the main projects at present, has been progressed for the past 4 years expanding indication to various organs. The outcomes of the trials were reported at Network Meeting for Heavy Ion Radiotherapy held semiannually in September, 1997 and March, 1998. The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been operated without substantial troubles for the trial and collaborative research. Training of specialists who deal with heavy particle radiotherapy is also important role. The 5 groups of the project studies started in 1995 and 1996. The two special researches `Biological studies on detriments and their modifying factors` and Kinetics of radioactive substances in environments and measurements of exposures `were finalized. The summarized reports are planned to be published in the following year. A comprehensive research of `Heavy ion projects` has been performed by the continuing 5 gropes involving domestic and overseas experts. A new project on brain researches began this year, as a basic research on human studies in order to elucidate brain functions and its disorders. The studies have been carried out by a new group crossing over the existing divisions and the research groups. New outstanding developments in the field can be expected on the basis of accumulated achievements in nuclear medicine and radiation hazard related to brain. The first Forum for Emergency Measures of Acute Radiation Exposure was held in August. The International Seminar on Heavy Ion Radiotherapy was held in November, 1977. The International Workshop on Comparative Evaluation of Health Effects of Environmental Toxicants Derived from Advanced Technologies was held in January, 1998. The annual report includes 67 articles, those are

  15. Towards case-based medical learning in radiological decision making using content-based image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Rolf W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiologists' training is based on intensive practice and can be improved with the use of diagnostic training systems. However, existing systems typically require laboriously prepared training cases and lack integration into the clinical environment with a proper learning scenario. Consequently, diagnostic training systems advancing decision-making skills are not well established in radiological education. Methods We investigated didactic concepts and appraised methods appropriate to the radiology domain, as follows: (i Adult learning theories stress the importance of work-related practice gained in a team of problem-solvers; (ii Case-based reasoning (CBR parallels the human problem-solving process; (iii Content-based image retrieval (CBIR can be useful for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD. To overcome the known drawbacks of existing learning systems, we developed the concept of image-based case retrieval for radiological education (IBCR-RE. The IBCR-RE diagnostic training is embedded into a didactic framework based on the Seven Jump approach, which is well established in problem-based learning (PBL. In order to provide a learning environment that is as similar as possible to radiological practice, we have analysed the radiological workflow and environment. Results We mapped the IBCR-RE diagnostic training approach into the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA framework, resulting in the proposed concept of the IRMAdiag training application. IRMAdiag makes use of the modular structure of IRMA and comprises (i the IRMA core, i.e., the IRMA CBIR engine; and (ii the IRMAcon viewer. We propose embedding IRMAdiag into hospital information technology (IT infrastructure using the standard protocols Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM and Health Level Seven (HL7. Furthermore, we present a case description and a scheme of planned evaluations to comprehensively assess the system. Conclusions The IBCR-RE paradigm

  16. Towards case-based medical learning in radiological decision making using content-based image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Petra; Deserno, Thomas M; Fischer, Benedikt; Günther, Rolf W; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2011-10-27

    Radiologists' training is based on intensive practice and can be improved with the use of diagnostic training systems. However, existing systems typically require laboriously prepared training cases and lack integration into the clinical environment with a proper learning scenario. Consequently, diagnostic training systems advancing decision-making skills are not well established in radiological education. We investigated didactic concepts and appraised methods appropriate to the radiology domain, as follows: (i) Adult learning theories stress the importance of work-related practice gained in a team of problem-solvers; (ii) Case-based reasoning (CBR) parallels the human problem-solving process; (iii) Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) can be useful for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). To overcome the known drawbacks of existing learning systems, we developed the concept of image-based case retrieval for radiological education (IBCR-RE). The IBCR-RE diagnostic training is embedded into a didactic framework based on the Seven Jump approach, which is well established in problem-based learning (PBL). In order to provide a learning environment that is as similar as possible to radiological practice, we have analysed the radiological workflow and environment. We mapped the IBCR-RE diagnostic training approach into the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) framework, resulting in the proposed concept of the IRMAdiag training application. IRMAdiag makes use of the modular structure of IRMA and comprises (i) the IRMA core, i.e., the IRMA CBIR engine; and (ii) the IRMAcon viewer. We propose embedding IRMAdiag into hospital information technology (IT) infrastructure using the standard protocols Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and Health Level Seven (HL7). Furthermore, we present a case description and a scheme of planned evaluations to comprehensively assess the system. The IBCR-RE paradigm incorporates a novel combination of essential aspects

  17. [Value of automated medical indexing of an image database and a digital radiological library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvauferrier, R; Le Beux, P; Pouliquen, B; Seka, L P; Morcet, N; Rolland, Y

    1997-06-01

    We indexed the contents of a radiology server on the web to facilitate access to research documents and to link reference texts to images contained in radiology databases. Indexation also allows case reports to be transformed with no supplementary work into formats compatible with computer-assisted training. Indexation was performed automatically by ADM-Index, the aim being to identify the medical concepts expressed within each medical text. Two types of texts were indexed: medical imaging reference books (Edicerf) and case reports with illustrations and captions (Iconocerf). These documents are now available on a web server with HTML format for Edicerf and on an Oracle database for Iconocerf. When the user consults a chapter of a book or a case report, the indexed terms are displayed in the heading; all reference texts and case reports containing the indexed terms can then be called up instantaneously. The user can express his search in natural language. Indexation follows the same process allowing instantaneous recall of all reference texts and case reports where the same concept appears in the diagnosis or clinical context. By using the context of the case reports as the search index, all case reports involving a common medical concept can be found. The context is interpreted as a question. When the user responds to this question, ADM-Index compares this response with the answer furnished by the reference texts and case reports. Correct or erroneous responses can thus be identified, converting the system into a computer-assisted training tool.

  18. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp, linearity of tube current (mA station and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model RAD/FLU-9001, dose Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model 6001, ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%, lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%, nonlinearity of mA station (16% and timer (9%, improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%, faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%, nonavailability of warning light (red light at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%, and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%. The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  19. Moving beyond quality control in diagnostic radiology and the role of the clinically qualified medical physicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, H; Christaki, K; Healy, B; Loreti, G; Poli, G L; Toroi, P; Meghzifene, A

    2017-09-01

    Quality control (QC), according to ISO definitions, represents the most basic level of quality. It is considered to be the snapshot of the performance or the characteristics of a product or service, in order to verify that it complies with the requirements. Although it is usually believed that "the role of medical physicists in Diagnostic Radiology is QC", this, not only limits the contribution of medical physicists, but is also no longer adequate to meet the needs of Diagnostic Radiology in terms of Quality. In order to assure quality practices more organized activities and efforts are required in the modern era of diagnostic radiology. The complete system of QC is just one element of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program that aims at ensuring that the requirements of quality of a product or service will consistently be fulfilled. A comprehensive Quality system, starts even before the procurement of any equipment, as the need analysis and the development of specifications are important components under the QA framework. Further expanding this framework of QA, a comprehensive Quality Management System can provide additional benefits to a Diagnostic Radiology service. Harmonized policies and procedures and elements such as mission statement or job descriptions can provide clarity and consistency in the services provided, enhancing the outcome and representing a solid platform for quality improvement. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promotes this comprehensive quality approach in diagnostic imaging and especially supports the field of comprehensive clinical audits as a tool for quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  1. Medical student knowledge regarding radiology before and after a radiological anatomy module: implications for vertical integration and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; O'Connor, Owen J; Cryan, John F; Maher, Michael M

    2014-10-01

    To examine the impact that anatomy-focused radiology teaching has on non-examined knowledge regarding radiation safety and radiology as a specialty. First-year undergraduate medical students completed surveys prior to and after undertaking the first-year anatomy programme that incorporates radiological anatomy. Students were asked opinions on preferred learning methodology and tested on understanding of radiology as a specialty and radiation safety. Pre-module and post-module response rates were 93 % (157/168) and 85 % (136/160), respectively. Pre-module and post-module, self-directed learning (SDL) ranked eighth (of 11) for preferred gross-anatomy teaching formats. Correct responses regarding radiologist/radiographer roles varied from 28-94 % on 16 questions with 4/16 significantly improving post-module. Identification of modalities that utilise radiation significantly improved for five of eight modalities post-module but knowledge regarding relative amount of modality-specific radiation use was variable pre-module and post-module. SDL is not favoured as an anatomy teaching method. Exposure of students to a radiological anatomy module delivered by senior clinical radiologists improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use, but there was no improvement in knowledge regarding radiation exposure relative per modality. A possible explanation is that students recall knowledge imparted in didactic lectures but do little reading around the subject when the content is not examined. • Self-directed learning is not favoured as a gross anatomy teaching format amongst medical students. • An imaging anatomy-focused module improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use. • Detailed knowledge of modality-specific radiation exposure remained suboptimal post-module. • Knowledge of roles within a clinical radiology department showed little change post-module.

  2. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  3. The 2013 Dade W. Moeller Lecture: Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Soon after the 9–11 attacks, politicians and scientists began to question our ability to cope with a large-scale radiological terrorism incident. The outline of what was needed was fairly obvious: the ability to prevent such an attack; methods to cope with the medical consequences; the ability to clean up afterwards; and the tools to figure out who perpetrated the attack and bring them to justice. The medical response needed three components: the technology to rapidly determine the radiation doses received by a large number of people, methods for alleviating acute hematological radiation injuries, and therapies for mitigation and treatment of chronic radiation injuries. Research done to date has shown that a realistic medical response plan is scientifically possible, but the regulatory and financial barriers to achieving this may currently be insurmountable. PMID:24978287

  4. Emotional Intelligence in Medical Laboratory Science

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Travis Miles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in...

  5. Applications of artificial neural networks in medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jigneshkumar L; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2007-09-01

    Computer technology has been advanced tremendously and the interest has been increased for the potential use of 'Artificial Intelligence (AI)' in medicine and biological research. One of the most interesting and extensively studied branches of AI is the 'Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs)'. Basically, ANNs are the mathematical algorithms, generated by computers. ANNs learn from standard data and capture the knowledge contained in the data. Trained ANNs approach the functionality of small biological neural cluster in a very fundamental manner. They are the digitized model of biological brain and can detect complex nonlinear relationships between dependent as well as independent variables in a data where human brain may fail to detect. Nowadays, ANNs are widely used for medical applications in various disciplines of medicine especially in cardiology. ANNs have been extensively applied in diagnosis, electronic signal analysis, medical image analysis and radiology. ANNs have been used by many authors for modeling in medicine and clinical research. Applications of ANNs are increasing in pharmacoepidemiology and medical data mining. In this paper, authors have summarized various applications of ANNs in medical science.

  6. Enterprise-wide PACS: beyond radiology, an architecture to manage all medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandon, David; Lovis, Christian; Geissbühler, Antoine; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2005-08-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) have the vocation to manage all medical images acquired within the hospital. To address the various situations encountered in the imaging specialties, the traditional architecture used for the radiology department has to evolve. We present our preliminarily results toward an enterprise-wide PACS intended to support all kind of image production in medicine, from biomolecular images to whole-body pictures. Our solution is based on an existing radiologic PACS system from which images are distributed through an electronic patient record to all care facilities. This platform is enriched with a flexible integration framework supporting digital image communication in medicine (DICOM) and DICOM-XML formats. In addition, a generic workflow engine highly customizable is used to drive work processes. Echocardiology; hematology; ear, nose, and throat; and dermatology, including wounds, follow-up is the first implemented extensions outside of radiology. We also propose a global strategy for further developments based on three possible architectures for an enterprise-wide PACS.

  7. Mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists); Mammadiagnostik fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-07-01

    The text book on mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists) covers the following issues: Anatomy, development and physiology of mammary glands; tumor development an breast cancer risk; pathology, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography: physical-technical fundamentals; mammography: analogue technique; mammography: digital technique; mammography: quality assurance; mammography: legal questions and radiation protection; mammography: new developments; mammography: setting technique; mammography: use and appraisal; mamma-sonography: technique and methodology; mamma-sonography: assignment and appraisal, mamma-NMR: technique and methodology; mamma-NMR: assignment and appraisal lymph node diagnostics; mamma interventions; biopsy; mamma interventions: marking examination concepts; therapeutic concepts; hygienic concepts; communication and interaction.

  8. Comparison of Color LCD and Medical-grade Monochrome LCD Displays in Diagnostic Radiology

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, medical-grade monochrome displays are usually recommended because of their higher luminance. Standard color displays can be used as a less expensive alternative, but have a lower luminance. The aim of the present study was to compare image quality for these two types of displays. Images of a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom were read by four radiologists using a 2-megapixel (MP) color display (143 cd/m2 maximum luminance) as well as 2-MP (295 cd/m2) and 3-MP monochrome d...

  9. Medical preparedness for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) events: gaps and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Diana; Waruszynski, Barbara; Mazurik, Laurie; Szymczak, Ann-Marie; Redmond, Erin; Lichacz, Fred

    2010-11-01

    The Workshop on Medical Preparedness for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) events: national scan was held on 20 and 21 May 2010 at the Diefenbunker Museum in Ottawa, Canada. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the CBRNE Research and Technology Initiative with a Canadian national profile of existing capabilities and anticipated gaps in casualty management consistent with the community emergency response requirements. The workshop was organised to enable extensive round-table discussions and provide a summary of key gaps and recommendations for emergency response planners.

  10. Course on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices (4th Ed.) : Tel educational through Internet on Health Science; Curso de Proteccion Radiologica y garantia de calidad en radiodiagnostico (4Ed): teleensenanza a traves de Internet en ciencias de la salud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M.; Chico, P.; Armero, D.; Saura Iniesta, A. M.; Fernandez, H.; Vicente, V.

    2006-07-01

    The creation of an interdepartmental project subsidised by the Spanish Ministry of Education has made possible the elaboration of a series of specific didactic materials on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices, which has led to the publication of a specific manual and practical notebook. As a consequence, this material now constitutes the working base for those professionals exposed to ionising radiation who are following the first Tel educational continuous formation course in Spanish via the Internet on this subject. (Author)

  11. Structure and content of radiology reports, a quantitative and qualitative study in eight medical centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosmans, Jan M.L. [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium); Faculty of Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.bosmans@uza.be; Weyler, Joost J. [Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium); Parizel, Paul M. [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium); Faculty of Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Rationale and objectives: In order to determine how the quality of the radiology report can be improved, the variation in content, form and length of the report needs to be examined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the length and structure of radiology reports (reports of abdominal CT examinations) in eight hospitals in the Netherlands and Flanders, the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Materials and methods: Eight hundred reports - 100 from each collaborating center - were collected. After exclusion of the reports that did not fulfill the criteria for a standard CT examination of the abdomen, 525 were retained for further study. The structure of each report was analyzed and the constituting parts (technical information, description of the findings, conclusion, advice, remark, note) were determined. The character and word count of the report and its constituting parts were measured and the results were grouped according to the country (Netherlands vs. Belgium/Flanders), the qualification of the radiologist (staff members vs. residents.) and the nature of the hospital (university medical centers vs. community hospitals). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the Netherlands and Flanders, and between staff members and residents. The authors also found a wide variety in the lay-out and the overall content of the radiology report. Conclusion: While most of the differences we found are probably rooted in local tradition, a standard model for the radiology report in centers sharing the same language may be a means to avoid interpretation mistakes by referring physicians, and to promote better care.

  12. Rating and Classification of Incident Reporting in Radiology in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad; Aran, Shima; Shaqdan, Khalid W; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rate of safety incident report of adverse events in a large academic radiology department and to share the various types that may occur. This is a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, institutional review board-approved study. Consent requirement was waived. All incident reports from April 2006-September 2012 were retrieved. Events were further classified as follows: diagnostic test orders, identity document or documentation or consent, safety or security or conduct, service coordination, surgery or procedure, line or tube, fall, medication or intravenous safety, employee general incident, environment or equipment, adverse drug reaction (ADR), skin or tissue, and diagnosis or treatment. Overall rates and subclassification rates were calculated. There were 10,224 incident reports and 4,324,208 radiology examinations (rate = 0.23%). The highest rates of the incident reports were due to diagnostic test orders (34.3%; 3509/10,224), followed by service coordination (12.2%; 1248/10,224) and ADR (10.3%; 1052/4,324,208). The rate of incident reporting was highest in inpatient (0.30%; 2949/970,622), followed by emergency radiology (0.22%; 1500/672,958) and outpatient (0.18%; 4957/2,680,628). Approximately 48.5% (4947/10,202) of incidents had no patient harm and did not affect the patient, followed by no patient harm, but did affect the patient (35.2%, 3589/10,202), temporary or minor patient harm (15.5%, 1584/10,202), permanent or major patient harm (0.6%, 62/10,202), and patient death (0.2%, 20/10,202). Within an academic radiology department, the rate of incident reports was only 0.23%, usually did not harm the patient, and occurred at higher rates in inpatients. The most common incident type was in the category of diagnostic test orders, followed by service coordination, and ADRs.

  13. Emotional intelligence in medical laboratory science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Travis

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in the medical laboratory as well as 13 EI-related items. Laboratory administrators were asked to rate each item for its importance for job performance, their satisfaction with the item's demonstration among currently working medical laboratory scientists (MLS) and the amount of responsibility college-based medical laboratory science programs should assume for the development of each skill or attribute. Participants were also asked about EI training in their laboratories and were given the opportunity to express any thoughts or opinions about EI as it related to medical laboratory science. This study revealed that each EI item, as well as each of the three other items, was considered to be very or extremely important for successful job performance. Administrators conveyed that they were satisfied overall, but indicated room for improvement in all areas, especially those related to EI. Those surveyed emphasized that medical laboratory science programs should continue to carry the bulk of the responsibility for the development of technical skills and theoretical knowledge and expressed support for increased attention to EI concepts at the individual, laboratory, and program levels.

  14. [Medical science during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

    2015-04-01

    Forms of organization of scientific work in the interests of the front were different: for example, united efforts of physicians to organize a proper work at Scientific Medical Boards directed by the Head of the Main Army Medical Department of the Red Army and the Head of the Health and Sanitary Department of the Navy, as well as Scientific and Hospital boards of the People's Commissariat of Health of the USSR. At the plenary sessions the heads of these boards considered the most important medical problems of evacuation, treatment, sanitary and disease control and also new methods of treatments of wounded, results of medical services during particular period of war, new tasks and etc. The most prominent scientists and presenters of all leading sectors of healthcare worked at these boards, that allowed developing, testing and implementing of the latest achievements of medical science.

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  16. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  17. Singapore National Medical Image Resource Centre (SN.MIRC): a world wide web resource for radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Liang; Lim, C C Tchoyoson

    2006-08-01

    Radiology education is heavily dependent on visual images, and case-based teaching files comprising medical images can be an important tool for teaching diagnostic radiology. Currently, hardcopy film is being rapidly replaced by digital radiological images in teaching hospitals, and an electronic teaching file (ETF) library would be desirable. Furthermore, a repository of ETFs deployed on the World Wide Web has the potential for e-learning applications to benefit a larger community of learners. In this paper, we describe a Singapore National Medical Image Resource Centre (SN.MIRC) that can serve as a World Wide Web resource for teaching diagnostic radiology. On SN.MIRC, ETFs can be created using a variety of mechanisms including file upload and online form-filling, and users can search for cases using the Medical Image Resource Center (MIRC) query schema developed by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The system can be improved with future enhancements, including multimedia interactive teaching files and distance learning for continuing professional development. However, significant challenges exist when exploring the potential of using the World Wide Web for radiology education.

  18. Quality index in medical radiology; Indice de qualidade em radiologia medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre Goncalves; Drexler, Gunter G.; Almeida, Carlos E. de, E-mail: luisalexandregm@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IBRAG/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia. Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Navarro, Marcus V. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    In the literature there are articles with methods for the calculation of potential risk in medical radiodiagnostics institutions: Evaluation Model for Potential Risk (MARP). These articles present results based on documental evaluation of the institutions, but they suggest that quantitative data from the equipment's quality assurance can be included. This article proposes an evaluation of medical radiology institutions with a variation of the Potential Risk model, which considers, besides the administrative factors, quantitative results from equipment's quality assurance: the quality index. Results of the application of this proposition in 42 institutions are presented, with 52 evaluated conventional X-Ray equipment, located in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (author)

  19. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nina L; Spooner, Muirne; Galvin, P Leo; Ti, Joanna P; McElvaney, N Gerald; Lee, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  20. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  1. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  2. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  3. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reist, H.W. [ed.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division`s progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department`s publications is included. figs., tabs., refs.

  4. Information Status of the Patients about Radiological Examinations and Encountered Ethical and Medical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Büyükkaya1

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is observed that the patient compliance and technical quality is increased in sufficiently informed patients by the doctor at the examinations requested from the radiology clinics. We aimed to point to rate of the patients have been informed by the doctor about ultrasound and interventional radiological examinations requested from the clinical disciplines and accordingly encountered medical and ethic problems. Methods: Simple yes or no questions were asked to 1000 patients (550 male, mean age 44, 450 women, mean age 42 admitted to our clinic to assess their level of information about the investigation. Whether the patients were informed by the doctor, know why and what is the examination wanted and knowledge about the way of technique were asked to the patients simply and clearly. Results: 880 of 1000 (88% patients were not informed by the doctor about tests, 710 patients (71% had no information about the examination. Patients with information about research (290 patients classified according to source of the information; 120 patients were informed by the physician (41.4%, 90 patients (31% had examination before, 44 patients (15.2% received information from the relatives and other patients examined, while the remaining 36 patients (12.4% were found information from a variety of media organs and from the internet. Conclusion: As a result of our research it is concluded that information status of the patients about radiological examinations is insufficient and the patients are not informed adequately by clinicians. Patient non-compliance during the examination because of having no information or false information decreases the quality of the investigation and makes it difficult to reach the diagnosis.

  5. The medical information sciences program of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, M W M; Fockens, P; Ravesloot, J H; Limburg, M

    2003-01-01

    The medical information sciences program of Amsterdam has been in existence for 15 years now. Starting in 1987, the program has been modified several times. Now a full-fledged 4 years master program exists. Students are taught skills to adequately and systematically apply information and communication technologies in order to optimize health care information processing. The program is offered within the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Amsterdam. The structure and contents of the current program will be described.

  6. Comparison of color LCD and medical-grade monochrome LCD displays in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Håkan; Geijer, Mats; Forsberg, Lillemor; Kheddache, Susanne; Sund, Patrik

    2007-06-01

    In diagnostic radiology, medical-grade monochrome displays are usually recommended because of their higher luminance. Standard color displays can be used as a less expensive alternative, but have a lower luminance. The aim of the present study was to compare image quality for these two types of displays. Images of a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom were read by four radiologists using a 2-megapixel (MP) color display (143 cd/m(2) maximum luminance) as well as 2-MP (295 cd/m(2)) and 3-MP monochrome displays. Thirty lumbar spine radiographs were also read by four radiologists using the color and the 2-MP monochrome display in a visual grading analysis (VGA). Very small differences were found between the displays when reading the CDRAD images. The VGA scores were -0.28 for the color and -0.25 for the monochrome display (p = 0.24; NS). It thus seems possible to use color displays in diagnostic radiology provided that grayscale adjustment is used.

  7. Computer science education for medical informaticians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Judith R; Price, Susan L

    2004-03-18

    The core curriculum in the education of medical informaticians remains a topic of concern and discussion. This paper reports on a survey of medical informaticians with Master's level credentials that asked about computer science (CS) topics or skills that they need in their employment. All subjects were graduates or "near-graduates" of a single medical informatics Master's program that they entered with widely varying educational backgrounds. The survey instrument was validated for face and content validity prior to use. All survey items were rated as having some degree of importance in the work of these professionals, with retrieval and analysis of data from databases, database design and web technologies deemed most important. Least important were networking skills and object-oriented design and concepts. These results are consistent with other work done in the field and suggest that strong emphasis on technical skills, particularly databases, data analysis, web technologies, computer programming and general computer science are part of the core curriculum for medical informatics.

  8. Radiology Physician Extenders: A Literature Review of the History and Current Roles of Physician Extenders in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Vicki L; Flanagan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the literature review was to assess the origins of radiology physician extenders and examine the current roles found in the literature of advanced practice physician extenders within medical imaging. Twenty-six articles relating to physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), radiologist assistants (RAs), and nuclear medicine advanced associates (NMAAs) were reviewed to discern similarities and differences in history, scope of practice, and roles in the medical imaging field. The literature showed PAs and NPs are working mostly in interventional radiology. PAs, NPs, and RAs perform similar tasks in radiology, including history and physicals, evaluation and management, preprocedure work-up, obtaining informed consent, initial observations/reports, and post-procedure follow-up. NPs and PAs perform a variety of procedures but most commonly vascular access, paracentesis, and thoracentesis. RAs perform gastrointestinal, genitourinary, nonvascular invasive fluoroscopy procedures, and vascular access procedures. The review revealed NMAAs are working in an advanced role, but no specific performances of procedures was found in the literature, only suggested tasks and clinical competencies. PAs, NPs, and RAs are currently the three main midlevel providers used in medical imaging. These midlevel providers are being used in a variety of ways to increase the efficiency of the radiologist and provide diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures to patients. NMAAs are being used in medical imaging but little literature is available on current roles in clinical practice. More research is needed to assess the exact procedures and duties being performed by these medical imaging physician extenders.

  9. A Model for Protective Behavior Against the Harmful Effects of Radiation for Radiological Technologists in Medical Radiological Technologists in Medical Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, In Ok [Ewha Woman' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Protective behavior of radiological technologists against radiation exposure is important to achieve reduction of the patient doses without compromising medical achievements. This study attempts to provide a basic model for the sophisticated intervention strategy that increases the level of the protective behavior of the technologists. The model was applied to real situations in Korea to demonstrate its utility. The results of this study are summarized as follows: First, the protective environment showed the highest relationship in the factors considered, r=0.637 (p<0.01). Secondly, the important factors were protective environment in environment characteristics, expectation for the protective behavior 0.228 (p<0.001), self efficacy 0.142 (p<0.001), and attitude for the protective behavior 0.178 (p<0.001) in personal characteristics, and daily patient -0.112 (p<0.001) and number of the participation in the education session for the protective behavior 0.074 (p<0.05). Thirdly, the final protective behavior model by a path analysis method had direct influence on the attitude 0.171 (p<0.01) and environment 0.405 (p<0.01) for the protective behavior, self efficacy 0.122 (p<0.01), expectation for the protective behavior 0.16 (p<0.01), and self-efficacy in the specialty of projects 0.154 (p<0.01). The acceptance of the model determined by the absolute fit index (GFI), 0.969, and by the incremental fit index (CFI), 0.943, showed very significant levels. Value of 2/df that is a factor applied to verify the acceptance of the model was 37, which implies that the result can be accepted in the desirable range. In addition, the parsimonious fit index configured by AGFI (0.890) and TLI (0.852) was also considered as a scale that accepts the model in practical applications. In case of the establishment of some specific intervention strategies based on the protective behavior model against harmful radiation effects proposed in this study, the strategy will provide an effective way

  10. Estimated radiation exposure from medical imaging for patients of radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital, Oujda Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slimane Semghouli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effective dose received per radiological examination per patient and the additional cancer risk factor in the Radiological Service of Al Faraby Hospital in 2012. Methods: From the number of radiological procedures (NX made in 2012 in the radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital and the average effective dose DEX associated with each type of act exam X, it is possible to calculate the effective dose collective [S =∑ DEX * NX]. The additional cancer risk factor is calculated by the X-ray risk software promoting responsible imaging through patient and provider education. It is function of the effective dose received, the age at the time of exam, and gender of patient. Results: The radiological average effective dose received per act exam is 1 millisievert (mSv, whereas it is 4.45 mSv and 0.21 mSv for the computed tomography (CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the average number of acts per patient 2.66, the effective dose is 1.16 mSv and 3.8 mSv for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the average effective dose per patient 2.69 mSv, it is 5.16 mSv and 0.81 mSv for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. As for the additional cancer risk in 40 years at the time of exam, the average additional cancer risk is equal to 2.17 × 10-4, wheras the risk is 4.17 × 10-4 and 6.54 × 10-5 for CT scan and conventional radiological examinations, respectively. Conclusion: Medical exposure related to the diagnosis of patients in the radiology service in 2012 can be characterized by: (a 2.66 Act exams on average per patient diagnosis corresponding to a mean effective dose equal to 2.69 mSv per patient, (bfrequency of conventional radiology and CT scan was 81% and 19%, respectively. These act exams contribute to the collective effective dose by 17% and 83%, respectively, and (c radiological acts can be divided into three levels of exposures

  11. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  12. Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences: A bibliometric assessment 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Zameer Hussain; Umedani, Loung V

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the growth of scientific research, authors' productivity, affiliation with the institute and geographic locations published in the Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences during the period of 2001 - 2010. This numerical analysis was conducted during mid-August 2016 to mid-October, 2016. The data for the study was downloaded from websites of e-journal of Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS) and Pak Medi-Net Com. A total number of 1199 articled were covered by PJMS in 10 volumes and 40 issues with contribution of 3798 (3%) authors during 2001 - 2010. The average number of papers per issue is 30%. A gender wise contribution of males was higher 3050 (80%) than the females 748 (20%). A majority of articles were multi-authored 1052 (87%) as opposed to single author contribution 147 (13%). All 1199 articles were covered under four major disciplines i.e Basic medical sciences, medicine & allied, surgery & allied and radiological sciences and 39 sub-specialties according to medical subject headings (MeSH). It observed that 467 (39%) articles were published in Pakistan and 732 (61%) articles produced by other 32 countries. The Karachi city of Pakistan has produced 199 (16%) articles as highest as its national level and followed by Tehran (Iran) 77 (6%) as followed internationally. This study reveals that the participation of 32 countries in the PJMS publications proves it to be an internationally circulated journal to support research with the constant approach of publishing articles to each volume in basic medical sciences, biomedical, clinical and public health sciences. Abbreviations: DOAJ: Directory of Open Access Journals IMEMR: Index Medicus Eastern Mediterranean Region HEC: Higher Education Commission (Pakistan) PJMS: Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences MeSH: Medical Subject Headings PMDC: Pakistan Medical & Dental Council SCIE: Science Citation Index Expanded.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography for medical-technical radiology assistants and radiologists; Magnetresonanztomografie fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzebiatowski, Elisabeth [MVZ Hanserad Radiologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The textbook on NMR tomography for medical-technical radiology assistants and radiologists covers the following issues: (1) Before the NMR examination; (2) Physical background; (3) Angiography; (4) Measurements; (5) The NMR imaging facility; (6) Parameter planning; (7) Examination of different anatomical regions: head/neck, spinal cord, abdomen, thorax, extremities; (8) Selection of indications: head/neck, spinal cord, abdomen, thorax, extremities.

  14. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkenke Emeka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired

  15. Editorial: Journal of Contemporary Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dr. Abbas Matrood Bashi

    2016-04-01

    Our journal deals with different subjects of basic and clinical medical sciences. It is an open access, peer-reviewed journal which has been accepted both nationally and internationally and encourages the researchers to publish with this journal. This journal addresses four major aspects of writing journal-style scientific papers: (1 fundamental style considerations, (2 a suggested strategy for efficiently writing up research results, (3 the nuts and bolts of format and content of each section of a paper (describes how to follow instructions precisely to write a scientific paper, and (4 basic information regarding peer critiques of scientific writing.

  16. Medical radiation countermeasures for nuclear and radiological emergencies: Current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Arora

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs occurred globally and recent incidences in India are indicating toward the need for comprehensive medical preparedness required both at incident site and hospitals. The enhanced threat attributed toward insurgency is another causative factor of worry. The response capabilities and operational readiness of responders (both health and non-health service providers in contaminated environment need to be supported by advancement in R & D and technological efforts to develop prophylactics and radiation mitigators. It is essential to develop phase 1 alternatives of such drugs for unseen threats as a part of initial preparedness. At the incident site and hospital level, external decontamination procedures need to be standardized and supported by protective clothing and Shudika kits developed by INMAS. The medical management of exposure requires systematic approach to perform triage, resuscitation and curative care. The internal contamination requires decorporation agents to be administered based on procedural diagnostics. Various key issues pertaining to policy decisions, R & D promotion, community awareness, specialized infrastructure for NREs preparedness has been discussed. The present review is an attempt to provide vital information about the current status of various radiation countermeasures and future perspective(s ahead.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinou, E; Ferrari, P; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Struelens, L

    2011-03-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of MEDical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kV(p), filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses.

  18. Awareness of ionizing radiation exposure among junior doctors and senior medical students in radiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelhia, Elfatih

    2017-03-01

    The awareness and knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure in radiological investigations among junior doctors and medical students were studied. The participants were year four to year six senior medical students enrolled at University of Dammam and interns in King Fahad University Hospital. The survey consisted of 22 questions designed online using the software 'QuestionPro' licensed to the University of Dammam. 100 hard copies were also distributed manually and collected. A total of 221 (88.5%) questionnaires were completed. 213 participants viewed, 151 started and 128 (84.7%) completed online. 93% of the distributed samples were completed. Overall knowledge was poor; 44% and 19% of the respondents thought incorrectly that MRI and ultrasound emit ionizing radiation, respectively. Respondents (92%; n  =  203) underestimated the dose of abdominal spiral computed tomography (CT) and 4% thought no ionizing radiation involved in CT. 59% of respondents underestimated the radiation doses in nuclear medicine; bone scan 87%, PET/CT scan 67%, thyroid isotope scan 45% and PET scan 36%. 47% of the subjects had attended formal lectures, tutorials or workshops on radiation protection while 53% (n  =  119) had not. For future education the majority stated they would prefer tutorials or workshops (42.3%) or problem-based learning/case studies (32.4%), while web-based modules would be their last choice (8.1%).

  19. Assessment of medical students' knowledge retention in a diagnostic radiology course: lecture attendees versus absentees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Pong

    2009-03-01

    To compare class attendees versus absentees in their ability to retain knowledge during a diagnostic radiology course. This study recruited 146 fourth-year medical students who attended a diagnostic radiology course from February 2004 to June 2004. Eight unit tests were conducted. Questions for each test covered content taught in the prior class. Another examination (which students were not aware of beforehand) was conducted in June, and the questions for this examination included content from all lectures in the course. The class attendance rates were measured separately 6 times during the course. Students who were present on the last of these dates were categorised as attendees (group A students) and those who were absent were categorised as absentees (group B). The average class attendance was 76.8% and the lowest attendance was 56.8%. For the unit tests, the average score of group A students (80.7 +/- 7.3) was significantly higher than that of the group B students (76.2 +/- 8.8) (P = 0.001). However, in the unanticipated examination, there was no significant difference in the scores between group A (68.1 +/- 10.3; range, 36-92) and group B students (65.5 +/- 13.5; range, 28- 88) (P = 0.19). Self-learning time was related to the unit test scores (P = 0.001) but not to the unanticipated examination scores (P = 0.27). Students who frequently attend classes or study for longer can retain their knowledge over a short period of time, but there is no difference in knowledge retention between class attendees and absentees at the end of a 4-month course.

  20. Spaced education activates students in a theoretical radiological science course: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkenke Emeka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed at determining if the addition of spaced education to traditional face-to-face lectures increased the time students kept busy with the learning content of a theoretical radiological science course. Methods The study comprised two groups of 21 third-year dental students. The students were randomly assigned to a “traditional group” and a “spaced education group”. Both groups followed a traditional face-to-face course. The intervention in the spaced education group was performed in way that these students received e-mails with a delay of 14 days to each face-to-face lecture. These e-mails contained multiple choice questions on the learning content of the lectures. The students returned their answers to the questions also by e-mail. On return they received an additional e-mail that included the correct answers and additional explanatory material. All students of both groups documented the time they worked on the learning content of the different lectures before a multiple choice exam was held after the completion of the course. All students of both groups completed the TRIL questionnaire (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation for the evaluation of courses at university after the completion of the course. The results for the time invested in the learning content and the results of the questionnaire for the two groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney-U test. Results The spaced education group spent significantly more time (216.2 ± 123.9 min on keeping busy with the learning content compared to the traditional group (58.4 ± 94.8 min, p  Conclusions Adding spaced education to a face-to-face theoretical radiological science course activates students in a way that they spend significantly more time on keeping busy with the learning content.

  1. Significance of nanotechnology in medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaur Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the molecular level in scales smaller than 1 µm, normally 1-100 nm, and the fabrication of devices within that size range. Two main approaches are used in nanotechnology. In the "bottom-up" approach, materials and devices are built from molecular components, which assemble themselves chemically by principles of molecular recognition. In the "top-down" approach, nano-objects are constructed from larger entities without atomic-level control. In addition, as the need for the development of new medicines is pressing, and given the inherent nanoscale functions of the biological components of living cells, nanotechnology has been applied to diverse medical fields such as oncology, cardiovascular medicine, and in treatment of other chronic diseases. Indeed, nanotechnology is being used to refine discovery of biomarkers, molecular diagnostics, and drug discovery and drug delivery, which could be applicable to management of these patients. In this review, we will focus upon significance of nanotechnology in medical sciences, as well as the plausible side effects related to their use.

  2. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  3. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients.

  4. The study on the perceptions of radiological technologist in medical imaging equipment used by the oriental doctor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Gi Bong [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Shinhan University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-03-15

    In order to examine how Radiological Technologists perceive the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment, surveys were conducted for the members of the Korean Radiological Technologists Association. The total number of respondents were 515 and 481, with 34 insincere responses removed caused of nonvalidated answer. The results of the analysis are as follows. Although there were no statistical significance in the difference in perception by location of residence, work place, and educational background, respondents with higher education showed a tendency to agree on the use of comprehensive medical imaging equipment, but tended to oppose the use of special medical imaging equipment. Differences in perception by gender showed a greater negative perception toward the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment by women than men. In particular, women showed more negative tendency for oriental doctor's use of special medical imaging equipment such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound equipment compared to men, and this was statistically significant. The difference in perception by age showed that the oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment was negative in the 20∼30s, neutral in the 40∼50s, and positive in the 60s, which were statistically significant. The difference in perception by work experience showed that the longer the work experience was, the more positive it was toward oriental doctor's use of medical imaging equipment. Specifically, the most favorable tendency was found with work experience of more than 30 years, which was statistically significant. The results of this study revealed the Radiological Technologists' perceptions on the oriental doctor's use of Medical Imaging Equipment and this can contribute to the direction of public health promotion in the future.

  5. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  6. Spaced education activates students in a theoretical radiological science course: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenke, Emeka; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Bauersachs, Anne; Eitner, Stephan; Budach, Alexander; Knipfer, Christian; Stelzle, Florian

    2012-05-23

    The present study aimed at determining if the addition of spaced education to traditional face-to-face lectures increased the time students kept busy with the learning content of a theoretical radiological science course. The study comprised two groups of 21 third-year dental students. The students were randomly assigned to a "traditional group" and a "spaced education group". Both groups followed a traditional face-to-face course. The intervention in the spaced education group was performed in way that these students received e-mails with a delay of 14 days to each face-to-face lecture. These e-mails contained multiple choice questions on the learning content of the lectures. The students returned their answers to the questions also by e-mail. On return they received an additional e-mail that included the correct answers and additional explanatory material.All students of both groups documented the time they worked on the learning content of the different lectures before a multiple choice exam was held after the completion of the course. All students of both groups completed the TRIL questionnaire (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) for the evaluation of courses at university after the completion of the course. The results for the time invested in the learning content and the results of the questionnaire for the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. The spaced education group spent significantly more time (216.2 ± 123.9 min) on keeping busy with the learning content compared to the traditional group (58.4 ± 94.8 min, p didactics of the course significantly better than the traditional group (p = .034). The students of the spaced education group also felt that their needs were fulfilled significantly better compared to the traditional group as far as communication with the teacher was concerned (p = .022). Adding spaced education to a face-to-face theoretical radiological science course activates students in a way that

  7. Monthly Progress Report October 1952. Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1952-10-01

    The present monthly report covers the work in Argonne National Laboratory's Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952.

  8. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, COPPE (Brazil); Mauricia, C. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Brazil); Barroso, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operatorserefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  9. Opinions Of The Teachers Of Basic Medical Sciences Of Istanbul Medical Faculty On The Education In Basic Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNER, Pernur

    2004-01-01

    In the present study which aims to assess the criticisms, opinions and suggestions of 63 teachers of basic medical sciences who teach in the 1st, and 2nd years, questionnaires were evaluated. Since the percentage of participating teachers is 70 %, the reliability of the results obtained are very high. Approximately 80 % of them revealed that, theoretical lessons are required to be presented by interactive education principles. Lecture presentations enriched with advanced technology-based...

  10. Emergency radiology elective improves second-year medical students' perceived confidence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschied, Jessica R; Knoepp, Ursula S; Hoff, Carrie Nicole; Mazza, Michael B; Klein, Katherine A; Mullan, Patricia B; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-09-01

    Given recent advances in and wider availability of complex imaging, physicians are expected to understand imaging appropriateness. We introduced second-year medical students to the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC) in an interactive case-based elective to demonstrate their use in imaging for common emergency department clinical complaints. Prospective pre- and post-test design assessed second-year medical students' performance on case-based knowledge applications and self-assessed confidence related to ACR-AC guidelines compared to second-year students participating in a different concurrent radiology elective. Students participated in a 3-day elective covering the ACR-AC, comparative effective imaging, and risks associated with imaging radiation exposure, with outcomes of perceived confidence using a 5-point Likert scale and knowledge of ACR-AC using case-based multiple choice questions. Analysis included computing mean scores and assessing effect sizes for changes in knowledge. Before the elective, 24 students scored an average of 3.45 questions correct of 8 (43.1%). On course completion, students scored an average of 5.3 questions correct of the same questions (66.3%) (P .85; effect size = 0.008). Students' confidence in ordering appropriate imaging improved nearly 2-fold from a range of 1.9 to 3.2 (on a scale of 1.0 to 5.0) to a range of 3.7 to 4.5. Following a short radiology elective, second-year medical students improved their knowledge of appropriate image utilization and perceived awareness of the indications, contraindications, and effects of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Attitudes and Views of Medical Students toward Science and Pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Adolfo; Paco, Ofelia

    2004-12-01

    To know opinions, attitudes and interest of medical students toward science and pseudoscience. A questionnaire was administered to 124 medical students of the San Marcos University in Lima, Peru. 173 students were surveyed. The response rate was 72%. Eighty-three percent (100/121) of respondents said that science is the best source of knowledge, 67% (82/123) said they were interested in science and technology news, 76% said they had not read any science magazine or book (other than medical texts and journals) in the last five years. Thirteen percent (16/124) of respondents said that astrology is "very scientific" and 40% (50/124) stated that it is "sort of scientific." 50% of respondents shared the opinion that some people possess psychic powers. Medical students' attitudes toward science are generally not favorable.

  12. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adrenal lesions encountered in current medical practice − a review of their radiological imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesha Naidu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern radiological technology has transformed the way that adrenal lesions are currently investigated. The contemporary radiologist has been catapulted to the forefront in the management of adrenal disease. With the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging, adrenal lesions are being serendipitously discovered in radiological studies undertaken for non-adrenal-related conditions – the so-called adrenal ‘incidentaloma’. This review discusses the imaging modalities available for characterising these lesions, highlighting current concepts and controversies in differentiating benign from malignant pathology. The article also provides a brief overview of the spectrum of adrenal pathology commonly encountered in the adult population.

  14. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical Radiologic Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Post High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Louis Community Coll. at Forest Park, MO.

    Prepared to aid in the planning and initiation of radiologic technology programs in community colleges and vocational technical schools, this curriculum guide should be useful to school administrators, advisory committees, and faculty, and may be modified to meet local, state, and regional needs. It contains full descriptions of 22 course…

  16. Interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrich, W. (ed.) (Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Medizinische Radiologie); Gross-Fengels, W. (ed.) (Allgemeines Krankenhaus Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie)

    1993-01-01

    In interventional radiology adjunctive medical therapy can increase patient's comfort, and should further reduce the risks of the procedures. In order to fulfill the responsibility of the interventionist to the patients and to increase the success rate of the interventions, a profound knowledge of certain drugs is indispensable. This includes, for example, sedatives, analgesics, cardiovascular drugs and agents to prevent infections, thromboembolic complications or restenoses. Moreover, a good monitoring system during complex procedures will increase the safety of radiological interventions. These topics and several more are presented in this book. (orig.). 32 figs.

  17. The "RTR" medical response system for nuclear and radiological mass-casualty incidents: a functional TRiage-TReatment-TRansport medical response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdina, Chad M; Coleman, C Norman; Bogucki, Sandy; Bader, Judith L; Hayhurst, Robert E; Forsha, Joseph D; Marcozzi, David; Yeskey, Kevin; Knebel, Ann R

    2009-01-01

    Developing a mass-casualty medical response to the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) or large radiological dispersal device (RDD) requires unique advanced planning due to the potential magnitude of the event, lack of warning, and radiation hazards. In order for medical care and resources to be collocated and matched to the requirements, a [US] Federal interagency medical response-planning group has developed a conceptual approach for responding to such nuclear and radiological incidents. The "RTR" system (comprising Radiation-specific TRiage, TReatment, TRansport sites) is designed to support medical care following a nuclear incident. Its purpose is to characterize, organize, and efficiently deploy appropriate materiel and personnel assets as close as physically possible to various categories of victims while preserving the safety of responders. The RTR system is not a medical triage system for individual patients. After an incident is characterized and safe perimeters are established, RTR sites should be determined in real-time that are based on the extent of destruction, environmental factors, residual radiation, available infrastructure, and transportation routes. Such RTR sites are divided into three types depending on their physical/situational relationship to the incident. The RTR1 sites are near the epicenter with residual radiation and include victims with blast injuries and other major traumatic injuries including radiation exposure; RTR2 sites are situated in relationship to the plume with varying amounts of residual radiation present, with most victims being ambulatory; and RTR3 sites are collection and transport sites with minimal or no radiation present or exposure risk and a victim population with a potential variety of injuries or radiation exposures. Medical Care sites are predetermined sites at which definitive medical care is given to those in immediate need of care. They include local/regional hospitals, medical centers, other

  18. Medical informatics between technology, philosophy and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2004-01-01

    Medical (health) informatics occupies the central place in all the segments of modern medicine in the past thirty years--in practical work, education and scientific research. In all that, computers have taken over the most important role and are used intensively for the development of the health information systems. Following activities develop within the area of health informatics: health-documentation, health-statistics, health-informatics and biomedical scientific and professional information. The medical informatics as the separate medical discipline very quickly gets developed, both in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In our country, the medical informatics is a separate subject for the last ten years, regarding to the Medical curriculum at the biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina is in accordance with the project of the education related to Bologna declaration and the project EURO MEDICINA.

  19. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  20. Scientific production of medical sciences universities in north of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Firooz, Mousa Yamin; Vahedi, Mohammad; Aligolbandi, Kobra

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. The study of the scientific evidence citation production by famous databases of the world is one of the important indicators to evaluate and rank the universities. The study at investigating the scientific production of Northern Iran Medical Sciences Universities in Scopus from 2005 through 2010. This survey used scientometrics technique. The samples under studies were the scientific products of four northern Iran Medical universities. Viewpoints quantity of the Scientific Products Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences stands first and of Babol University of Medical Sciences ranks the end, but from the viewpoints of quality of scientific products of considering the H-Index and the number of cited papers the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences is a head from the other universities under study. From the viewpoints of subject of the papers, the highest scientific products belonged to the faculty of Pharmacy affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medial Sciences, but the three other universities for the genetics and biochemistry. Results showed that the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences as compared to the other understudies universities ranks higher for the number of articles, cited articles, number of hard work authors and H-Index of Scopus database from 2005 through 2010.

  1. Knowledge and attitude of medical science students toward hepatitis B and C infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Roya; Joukar, Farahnaz; Souti, Fatemeh; Atrkar-Roushan, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    The present survey aimed to determine the knowledge level and attitude of medical students in Guilan University toward Hepatitis B and C viruses' infections. In a cross-sectional survey, the knowledge and attitude of 424 medical science undergraduate students of nursing, midwifery, operating room technician, laboratory, anesthesiology and radiology in Guilan University of Medical Sciences toward Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The mean (SD) knowledge level of the medical students toward HBV and HCV were 17 ± 5 from 28 and 10.58 ± 6.7 from 29 questions respectively. Females, nursing students, forth year students, those who worked in hospital and those who had needle stick injuries (NSI) history showed significantly higher knowledge scores toward HBV (Ptoward HCV (Pattitude toward HBV and HCV was positively correlated with their mean knowledge level (r=0.14, p=0.004), (r=0.18, p=0.0001). Education on the nature, symptoms, transmission, prevention and treatment of HBV and HCV infections may increase the willingness of health care workers to care for infected persons.

  2. Research status and development of medical science in cold regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-hai SUN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To propose the concept, objects of study,tasks and roles of military medical sciences in cold regions(CM, and provide a theoretical basis and academic reference for its establishment anddevelopment. Methods  Literature concerning medical sciences in cold regions were retrieved with infomatics method to analyze the research status and development of medical sciences in cold regions in the military,domestic and abroad, and venture to propose the strategy and direction of development of medical sciences in cold regions. Results CM is a comprehensive medical science composing of multiple speciaties.A large area of Chinese territory is situated in frigid area, where the garrison servicemen have to take up onerous duties, so that the establishment anddevelopment of CM should be considered as a special subject and an important specialty in military medical support. Conclusion Research work on CM in PLA is in preliminary stage.For developing CM in the future,it is suggested to integrate medical resources of CM, with the aim of gathering and rectifying interrelated medical resources,improving related medical equipment,in order to establish abasic and clinical research platform for improving the health level of garrison forces both at peacetime and during military conflicts, and also in prevention of organic and psychological diseases.Therefore,it is important to emphasize the establishment of such specialty, with an effort to accelerate team construction of science and technology of medicine of cold regions, with an increase in funding for research andimprovement in improve the scientific innovation, with a purpose of safeguarding andimproving the combat effectiveness of troops in cold regions.

  3. A proposal for field-level medical assistance in an international humanitarian response to chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malich, Gregor; Coupland, Robin; Donnelly, Steve; Baker, David

    2013-10-01

    A capacity for field-level medical assistance for people exposed to chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) agents or medical support for people potentially exposed to these agents is intrinsically linked to the overall risk management approach adopted by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) for an international humanitarian response to a CBRN event. This medical assistance articulates: ▸the characteristics of the agent concerned (if known) ▸the need for immediate care particularly for people exposed to agents with high toxicity and short latency ▸the imperative for those responding to be protected from exposure to the same agents. This article proposes two distinct capacities for medical assistance--CBRN field medical care and CBRN first aid--that take the above into account and the realities of a CBRN event including the likelihood that qualified medical staff may not be present with the right equipment. These capacities are equally pertinent whether in support of ICRC staff or for assistance of victims of a CBRN event. Training of those who will undertake CBRN field medical care and CBRN first aid must include: ▸knowledge of CBRN agents, their impact on health and the corresponding toxidromes ▸skills to use appropriate equipment ▸use of appropriate means of self-protection ▸an understanding of the additional complexities brought by the need for and interaction of triage, transfer and decontamination. The development of CBRN field medical care and CBRN first aid continues within the ICRC while acknowledging that the opportunities for learning in real situations are extremely limited. Comments from others who work in this domain are welcome.

  4. [Medical education: between science and Bildungsroman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion-Veyron, Régis; Bourquin, Céline; Saraga, Michael; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2016-02-10

    For many years, a major focus of interest has been the patient, in the context of a constantly changing society and increasingly complex medical practices. We propose to shift this focus on the physician, who is entangled in a similar, but less evident way. In these three articles, we explore, in succession, the lived experience of the contemporary physician, the ethos which brings together the medical community, and the education of the future physician, using research projects currently under way within the Service of Liaison Psychiatry at Lausanne University Hospital. The article hereunder is dedicated to the education and will examine the multiple and paradoxical expectations that punctuate it.

  5. Accreditation of professionals for radiological protection in medical and dental radiology at Minas Gerais, Brazil; Certificacao de profissionais de protecao radiologica em radiodiagnostico medico e odontologico em Minas Gerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Guedes, Elton C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: sp@urano.cdtn.br; Goncalves, Elaine C.; Nogueira, Maria Angela A. [Secretaria de Estado de Saude de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Superintendencia de Vigilancia Sanitaria. Diretoria de Vigilancia em Estabelecimentos de Saude

    2000-07-01

    The role of the CDTN/CNEN as far as the radiological protection services in the medical and dental radiology has changed a lot due to the new Regulatory Directives. The CDTN/CNEN was recognized as the regional reference center for providing not only radiological survey services, but to coordinate an accreditation procedure for professional persons to be accepted by the State Regulatory Authorities to work at Minas Gerais. All the new activities were formalized in a Cooperation Agreement between the CDTN/CNEN and the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the accreditation procedure for candidates, the adopted requirements, the intercomparison results among measuring instruments and the main achievements during the first year of the Agreement. (author)

  6. Neuroscience and Brain Science Special Issue begins in the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2014-12-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences and the Orient Neuron Nexus have amalgated to publish a yearly special issue based on neuro- and brain sciences. This will hopefully improve the quality of peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of fundamental, applied, and clinical neuroscience and brain science from Asian countries. One focus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia is to strengthen neuroscience and brain science, especially in the field of neuroinformatics.

  7. Terrorist threat, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear medical approach; Menace terroriste, approche medicale nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, Th. de [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, 92 - Clamart (France); Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Vidal, D. [Centre de Recherche du Service de Sante des Armees, 38 - La Tronche (France); Renaudeau, C. [Ecole du Val de Grace, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2005-07-01

    The different aspects linked to the use of nuclear, radiological, biological and or chemical weapons are gathered in this work. They concern history, fundamental aspect, diagnosis, therapy and prevention. The part devoted to the nuclear aspect concern the accidents in relation with ionizing radiations, the radiation syndrome, the contribution and limits of dosimetry, the treatment of medullary aplasia, the evaluation and treatment of an internal contamination, new perspectives on the use of cytokine for the treatment of accidental irradiated persons, alternative to the blood transfusion. (N.C.)

  8. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  9. Velocity Estimation in Medical Ultrasound [Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the application of signal processing in medical ultrasound velocity estimation. Special emphasis is on the relation among acquisition methods, signal processing, and estimators employed. The description spans from current clinical systems for one-and two-dimensional (1-D an...

  10. Combating Fraud in Medical Research: Research Validation Standards Utilized by the Journal of Surgical Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavin Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fraud in medical publishing has risen to the national spotlight as manufactured and suspect data have led to retractions of papers in prominent journals. Moral turpitude in medical research has led to the loss of National Institute of Health (NIH grants, directly affected patient care, and has led to severe legal ramifications for some authors. While there are multiple checks and balances in medical research to prevent fraud, the final enforcement lies with journal editors and publishers. There is an ethical and legal obligation to make careful and critical examinations of the medical research published in their journals. Failure to follow the highest standards in medical publishing can lead to legal liability and destroy a journal’s integrity. More significant, however, is the protection of the medical profession’s trust with their colleagues and the public they serve. This article discusses various techniques and tools available to editors and publishers that can help curtail fraud in medical publishing.

  11. Optimization Of Scan Range For 3d Point Localization In Statscan Digital Medical Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta S. Kimuyu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of computerized medical imaging in early 1970s which merged with digital technology in the 1980s was celebrated as a major breakthrough in three-dimensional 3D medicine. However a recent South African innovation the high speed scanning Lodox Statscan Critical Digital Radiology modality posed challenges in X-ray photogrammetry due to the systems intricate imaging geometry. The study explored the suitability of the Direct Linear Transformation as a method for the determination of 3D coordinates of targeted points from multiple images acquired with the Statscan X-ray system and optimization of the scan range. This investigation was carried out as a first step towards the development of a method to determine the accurate positions of points on or inside the human body. The major causes of errors in three-dimensional point localization using Statscan images were firstly the X-ray beam divergence and secondly the position of the point targets above the X-ray platform. The experiments carried out with two reference frames showed that point positions could be established with RMS values in the mm range in the middle axis of the X-ray patient platform. This range of acceptable mm accuracies extends about 15 to 20 cm sideways towards the edge of the X-ray table and to about 20 cm above the table surface. Beyond this range accuracy deteriorated significantly reaching RMS values of 30mm to 40 mm. The experiments further showed that the inclusion of control points close to the table edges and more than 20 cm above the table resulted in lower accuracies for the L - parameters of the DLT solution than those derived from points close to the center axis only. As the accuracy of the L - parameters propagates into accuracy of the final coordinates of newly determined points it is essential to restrict the space of the control points to the above described limits. If one adopts the usual approach of surrounding the object by known control points then

  12. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H. Mehrparvar; M. Bahaloo; M. H. Davari

    2013-01-01

    .... opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni...

  13. EUTEMPE-RX, an EC supported FP7 project for the training and education of medical physics experts in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, H; Bliznakova, K; Padovani, R; Christofides, S; Van Peteghem, N; Tsapaki, V; Caruana, C J; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The core activity of the medical physics expert (MPE) is to ensure optimal use of ionising radiation in healthcare. It is essential that these healthcare professionals are trained to the highest level, defined as European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF) level 8 by the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report 174 'Guidelines on the MPE'. The main objective of the EUTEMPE-RX project is to provide a model training scheme that allows the medical physicist in diagnostic and interventional radiology (D&IR) to reach this high level. A European network of partners was brought together in this FP7 EC project to ensure sufficient expertise in all aspects of the subject and to create a harmonised course programme. Targeted participants are medical physicists in D&IR in hospitals, engineers and scientists in medical device industries and officers working in regulatory authorities. Twelve course modules will be developed at EQF level 8, with radiation safety and diagnostic effectiveness being prevalent subjects. The modules will combine online with face-to-face teaching using a blended learning approach.

  14. Report of the work of the Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services Divisions for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1953-10-01

    The monthly progress report from the Argonne National Laboratory includes material from one-third of the Laboratory. The three divisions into which the work has been divided are: (l) Reactor Engineering, Physics, Instrument Research and Development, and Electronics, (2) Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services, and (3) Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Metallurgy, and Remote Control Engineering. The present monthly progress report covers the work in Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

  15. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H Mehrparvar; M Bahaloo; M. H Davari

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire whic...

  16. Future challenges for nuclear power plant development research, and for radiological protection sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Edward

    2007-11-01

    The promise of the future shines brightly for nuclear energy technology and production, yet also holds many challenges. Focus on new reactor designs is currently aiming at what is termed the fourth generation of reactors, which will come into operation after 2030. The 10 countries participating in the Generation-IV International Forum to develop the new generation of reactors have designated six reactor designs that will be studied. This paper will briefly discuss some of these challenges in new reactor designs in general. In addition to the challenges posed by new reactor designs, radiation protection is also faced with a series of challenges for the future. These are borne from experience with the implementation of the current system of radiological protection, from the evolution of radiation biological research, and from changes in society in the area of radiological risk assessment and management. This paper will address all of these emerging challenges, and point towards approaches to resolve them in the future.

  17. Radiology Undergraduate and Resident Curricula: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linaker, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the literature regarding radiology curricula for both undergraduates and residents. Methods A review of the literature was performed using relevant key words. Articles were retrieved through December 2012 using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ERIC, Proquest, and ICL databases along with a manual review of references. Results Of the 4716 unique abstracts reviewed by the author, 142 were found to be relevant to the purpose of this study. Undergraduate radiology education, radiology curriculum, and radiology pedagogy vary widely between disciplines and between colleges within disciplines. Formal radiology education is not taught at all medical programs and little radiology training is incorporated into non-radiology residencies. This results in some medical graduates not being taught how to interpret basic radiology images and not learning contraindications and indications for ordering diagnostic imaging tests. There are no definitive studies examining how to incorporate radiology into the curriculum, how to teach radiology to either undergraduates or residents, or how to assess this clinical competency. Conclusions This review shows that radiology education is perceived to be important in undergraduate and residency programs. However, some programs do not include radiology training, thus graduates from those programs do not learn radiology essentials. PMID:26770172

  18. Minimalism in Art, Medical Science and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökten, Ali İhsan

    2016-12-21

    The word ''minimalism'' is a word derived from French the word ''minimum''. Whereas the lexical meaning of minimum is ''the least or the smallest quantity necessary for something'', its expression in mathematics can be described as ''the lowest step a variable number can descend, least, minimal''. Minimalism, which advocates an extreme simplicity of the artistic form, is a current in modern art and music whose origins go to 1960s and which features simplicity and objectivity. Although art, science and philosophy are different disciplines, they support each other from time to time, sometimes they intertwine and sometimes they copy each other. A periodic schools or teaching in one of them can take the others into itself, so, they proceed on their ways empowering each other. It is also true for the minimalism in art and the minimal invasive surgical approaches in science. Concepts like doing with less, avoiding unnecessary materials and reducing the number of the elements in order to increase the effect in the expression which are the main elements of the minimalism in art found their equivalents in medicine and neurosurgery. Their equivalents in medicine or neurosurgery have been to protect the physical integrity of the patient with less iatrogenic injury, minimum damage and the same therapeutic effect in the most effective way and to enable the patient to regain his health in the shortest span of time.

  19. [Cooperation with the electronic medical record and accounting system of an actual dose of drug given by a radiology information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideo; Yoneda, Tarou; Satou, Shuji; Ishikawa, Toru; Hara, Misako

    2009-12-20

    By input of the actual dose of a drug given into a radiology information system, the system converting with an accounting system into a cost of the drug from the actual dose in the electronic medical record was built. In the drug master, the first unit was set as the cost of the drug, and we set the second unit as the actual dose. The second unit in the radiology information system was received by the accounting system through electronic medical record. In the accounting system, the actual dose was changed into the cost of the drug using the dose of conversion to the first unit. The actual dose was recorded on a radiology information system and electronic medical record. The actual dose was indicated on the accounting system, and the cost for the drug was calculated. About the actual dose of drug, cooperation of the information in a radiology information system and electronic medical record were completed. It was possible to decide the volume of drug from the correct dose of drug at the previous inspection. If it is necessary for the patient to have another treatment of medicine, it is important to know the actual dose of drug given. Moreover, authenticity of electronic medical record based on a statute has also improved.

  20. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... paper entitled ''Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure... the ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly...

  1. The terrorist threat nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical - a medical approach; Menace terroriste nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique - approche medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, M.C. de; Gourmelon, M.C.S.; Vidal, P.C.; Renaudeau, P.C.S

    2005-07-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the fear of a large scale nuclear, biological and/or chemical terrorism is taken again into consideration at the highest level of national policies of risk prevention. The advent of international terrorism implies a cooperation between the military defense and the civil defense. The nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) experts of the health service of army and of civil defense will have to work together in case of major terror attack. This book presents this cooperation between civil and military experts in the NRBC domain: risk analysis, national defense plans, crisis management, syndromes and treatments. The different aspects linked with the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are analyzed by the best experts from French medical and research institutes. All topics of each NRBC domain are approached: historical, basic, diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive. (J.S.)

  2. Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Health Sciences: Tele-Education for continued Postgraduate Training; Proteccion Radiologica y Garantia de Calidad en Ciencias de la Salud: La teleensenanza para cursos de perfeccionamiento de postgrado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M.; Chico, P.; Armero, D.; Saura Iniesta, A. M.; Vicente, V.

    2003-07-01

    The establishment of an inter departmental project, financed by the Spanish Ministry of Education, has made possible the development to specific didactic materials on Radiological Protection and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiodiagnostic Practices. These have been published as a manual and practical notebook. This material constitutes the grounding work for the first continuous tele-education training course via Internet that Spanish professionals exposed to ionising radiation are following. Interactive multimedia training and tele-education may become one of the alternatives that allow health science professionals to receive continuous training, provided that adequate content and aims had been established during undergraduate training. (Author) 18 refs.

  3. The 'medical humanities' in health sciences education in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S

    2014-02-01

    A new masters-level course, 'Medicine and the Arts" will be offered in 2014 at the University of Cape Town, setting a precedent for interdisciplinary education in the field of medical humanities in South Africa. The humanities and social sciences have always been an implicit part of undergraduate and postgraduate education in the health sciences, but increasingly they are becoming an explicit and essential component of the curriculum, as the importance of graduate attributes and outcomes in the workplace is acknowledged. Traditionally, the medical humanities have included medical ethics, history, literature and anthropology. Less prominent in the literature has been the engagement with medicine of the disciplines of sociology, politics, philosophy, linguistics, education, and law, as well as the creative and expressive arts. The development of the medical humanities in education and research in South Africa is set to expand over the next few years, and it looks as if it will be an exciting inter-disciplinary journey.

  4. Integrating the Radiology Information System with Computerised Provider Order Entry: The Impact on Repeat Medical Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Repeat and redundant procedures in medical imaging are associated with increases in resource utilisation and labour costs. Unnecessary medical imaging in some modalities, such as X-Ray (XR) and Computed Tomography (CT) is an important safety issue because it exposes patients to ionising radiation which can be carcinogenic and is associated with higher rates of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of implementing an integrated Computerised Provider Order Entry (CPOE)/Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) system on the number of XR and CT imaging procedures (including repeat imaging requests) for inpatients at a large metropolitan hospital. The study found that patients had an average 0.47 fewer XR procedures and 0.07 fewer CT procedures after the implementation of the integrated system. Part of this reduction was driven by a lower rate of repeat procedures: the average inpatient had 0.13 fewer repeat XR procedures within 24-hours of the previous identical XR procedure. A similar decrease was not evident for repeat CT procedures. Reduced utilisation of imaging procedures (especially those within very short intervals from the previous identical procedure, which are more likely to be redundant) has implications for the safety of patients and the cost of medical imaging services.

  5. Piezoelectric materials and devices applications in engineering and medical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Vijaya, M S

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric Materials and Devices: Applications in Engineering and Medical Sciences provides a complete overview of piezoelectric materials, covering all aspects of the materials starting from fundamental concepts. The treatment includes physics of piezoelectric materials, their characteristics and applications. The author uses simple language to explain the theory of piezoelectricity and introduce readers to the properties and design of different types of piezoelectric materials, such as those used in engineering and medical device applications.This book: Introduces various types of dielect

  6. Estimated radiation exposure from medical imaging for patients of radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital, Oujda Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effective dose received per radiological examination per patient and the additional cancer risk factor in the Radiological Service of Al Faraby Hospital in 2012. Methods: From the number of radiological procedures (NX) made in 2012 in the radiology service of Al Faraby Hospital and the average effective dose DEX associated with each type of act exam X, it is possible to calculate the effective dose collective [S =∑ DEX * NX]. The additional cancer risk factor is calcu...

  7. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  8. Medical Science: A Milestone in Scientific Field and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraneel Banerjee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear SirI am writing in context of the first issue of Medical Science published recently. First I would like to congratulate the editor in Chief in particular for taking this initiative to start this esteemed journal. Medical Science is a peer reviewed multidisciplinary journal which publishes articles from various fields like medical, dental, nursing and allied health. I read with great interest the first issue of Medical Science which consists of five articles 1. The Editorial- Preface to first edition [1]2. Impact of Gender, Nationality and Drawbacks in Medical Profession as a Predictor of Future Career Specialization among Medical Students3. Use of computer among medical students: A cross sectional study4. Application of Binary Regression analysis in the prescription pattern of Antidepressants5. Teaching Communication Skills: A five year experience from a private medical school of NepalThe First edition was primarily focused on medical education. Article by Kumar S has showed that the use of computer is very important in life. It has exhibited that the use of computers are increasing in medical education technology. All the medical students should learn use computers as most of the laboratory investigations, X rays, open heart surgeries, C arm in Orthopaedic Surgeries are done with the help of computers. Even computer is needful for presenting any paper in the conferences by using power point presentations. So a medical student should learn computer because it will be useful for them in future [2].Article by Roy B et.al on drawbacks in medical profession is written with lot of effort. The article has showed that how proper steps can be taken to choose the future career of a medical student and what are the drawbacks of different specialties of medical profession [3].Teaching communication skills article is from a different field. It an article from Pharmacology. The article has demonstrated that Communication with the patients always remains

  9. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: Educational and Science-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer…

  10. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: Educational and Science-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer…

  11. Medical Sciences Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Research programs from the medical science division of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) are briefly described in the following areas: Biochemistry, cytogenetics, microbiology, center for epidemiologic research, radiation medicine, radiation internal dose information center, center for human reliability studies, facility safety, occupational medicine, and radiation emergency assistance center/training site.

  12. Study for Teaching Behavioral Sciences in Schools of Medicine, Volume III: Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC. Medical Sociology Council.

    Volume III of a study of teaching behavioral sciences in medical school presents perspectives on medical behavioral science from the viewpoints of the several behavioral disciplines (anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, behavioral biology and medical education). In addition, there is a discussion of translating…

  13. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays; Curso de proteccion y seguridad radiologica en el diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, C.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  14. Study of effective factors on comprehensive test of basic medical sciences of the medical students of Lorestan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parisa namdari

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: In order to improve and achieve needed changes in medical education and regarding the important role of the courses of basic sciences on the students as future physicians, taking some amendatory steps seem necessary.

  15. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  17. FEATURES TERMINOLOGY IN MODERN MEDICAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlepko S.M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of compliance with terms and definitions in medical science and engineering to the actual essence. One of the components of successful development of these trends is adequate linguistic support of the process of development and operation, basic level of determination and terms which indicated certain principles, approaches, processes and so on.

  18. 77 FR 21785 - Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science... scientific progress and accomplishments. Date and Time: This symposium will be held on Tuesday, June 5 and... viewing via Web cast must register by Tuesday, May 29, 2012, at 5 p.m. EST. Location: The symposium...

  19. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee A. Date: June 28, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  20. [Science and medical education in Brazil (1930-1950)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcão, Lúcia Grando; El-Kareh, Almir Chaiban; Sayd, Jane Dutra

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the role of science and its impact on the curricula of medical schools between 1930 and 1950, sketching out the web of interrelations built up around these institutions, and bringing to light the connection between the contents of the curricula and the prevailing social, political and economic context. The scientific concepts at the time influenced the development of university level institutions, and had particular significance in medical education. In this period, the political and economic ties with the USA were manifested by the Rockefeller Foundation, especially in the arena of education and health. As a concept and working method as well as an ideological category, science was an important factor in standardizing the curricula of Brazil's medical schools, especially as concerned basic research.

  1. Research in forensic radiology and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalders, M. C.; Adolphi, N. L.; Daly, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of the first international forensic radiology and imaging research summit, organized by the International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, the International Association of Forensic Radiographers, the National Institute of Justice of the United States...... of America, and the Netherlands Forensic Institute. During this meeting, an international and multidisciplinary panel of forensic scientists discussed the current state of science in forensic radiology, and drafted a research agenda to further advance the field. Four groups for further research focus were...... identified: big data and statistics, identification and biological profiling, multimodal imaging, and visualization and presentation. This paper describes each of these research topics and thereby hopes to contribute to the development of this exciting new field of forensic medical science....

  2. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Mirmohammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire which validity and reliability was confirmed. The questions were asked from 183 individuals were interviewed by telephone in 2012. Results: Mean satisfaction score of quality of education was 3.86/5 and 3.18/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The average satisfaction score for regular presence of faculty members in classes was 4.11/5 and 3.98/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The difference between the two groups regarding the satisfaction from quality of education was not diufferent (P=0.237. However, this difference was significant for satisfaction from regular presence in classes and time spent for education (P<0.001. Conclusion: The condition of education in Yazd University of Medical Sciences was satisfactory from the alumni viewpoint and the satisfaction level was higher for basic sciences than clinical science education.

  3. [A continuous 4-year evaluation of medical informatics education in a graduate school of health sciences using a questionnaire survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzen, Satoru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of awareness among undergraduate students regarding medical informatics and to ascertain whether educational training has progressed with time in the Department of Health Sciences at Hirosaki University, Japan, which is a co-medical staff training institution that conducts a 4-year university course in medical informatics. The university accepts students who have completed the 3rd grade of medical licensing tests and who have attended the medical informatics lectures for 4 years (2007-2010). The ratio of first sight terminology percentage in any given fiscal year in all the 30 terminology categories varied widely from 0% to 80%, but the trend in various categories did not vary between fiscal years. The terminology of informatics under medical technology students obtained high scores of 52.5-77.3% after attending courses, which was higher compared with students from other classes. On the other hand, student nurses and occupational therapy students obtained 0-44.2%. Each class scored a high percentage of correct answers in the medical information-related terminology. Among the radiology students who attended the classes, the percentage of correct answers in categories of "digital imaging and communication in medicine" and "picture archiving and communication system" were lower than other medical terminology categories. These results reflect the gaps in educational curriculum of 1st and 2nd grades of medical licensing tests.

  4. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  5. Investigating the Relationship of Sociodemographic and Personality Factors to Faculty Perceptions and Motivations Regarding the Use of Online Instruction in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to investigate the relationship of sociodemographic and personality traits to faculty perceptions and motivations regarding the use of online instruction in radiologic and imaging sciences. A faculty perception and motivations survey of online instruction was administered online in order to…

  6. Ghosts in the machine: publication planning in the medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Publication of pharmaceutical company-sponsored research in medical journals, and its presentation at conferences and meetings, is mostly governed by 'publication plans' that extract the maximum amount of scientific and commercial value out of data and analyses through carefully constructed and placed papers. Clinical research is typically performed by contract research organizations, analyzed by company statisticians, written up by independent medical writers, approved and edited by academic researchers who then serve as authors, and the whole process organized and shepherded through to journal publication by publication planners. This paper reports on a conference of an international association of publication planners. It describes and analyzes their work in an ecological framework that relates it to marketing departments of pharmaceutical companies, medical journals and publishers, academic authors, and potential audiences. The medical research described here forms a new kind of corporate science, designed to look like traditional academic work, but performed largely to market products.

  7. Demographic Survey Of The Spiritual Intelligence In Medical Faculty Of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Marziye Raisi; Hoda Ahmari Tehran; Saeede Heidari; Nahid Mehran

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Spiritual intelligence is a kind of ultimate intelligence that shows the conceptual and valuable issues and to solve the problems associated with it. the foundation of individual beliefs can have important role in various fields especially in the promotion and provision of psychic health . Thus, the aim of this study was to survey the rate of spiritual intelligence among the students of Medical Faculty of Qom University of Medical Sciences and the relation between t...

  8. University libraries and the indispensable changes in Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elinor Dulzaides Iglesias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with some aspects related with university libraries as an ideal environment to articulate science, knowledge and culture and the need of reorganization of structures and functions within these institutions. We make reference to the changes in the Higher Educational System, which have an impact in other teaching levels. We discuss the new challenges in information and knowledge management and conditions in Medical Science field to adapt traditional methods to the new environment. We discuss how to support the required transformations to turn libraries into research and educational centres.

  9. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  10. Regulatory Science in Practice (Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

     Review, safety, and relief services of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency are primarily focused on scientifically evaluating pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and cellular and tissue-based products referring to their quality, efficacy, and safety, which requires a variety of scientific knowledge and methods. Pharmaceutical regulation should be established based on the most advanced scientific expertise at all times. In order to evaluate products that use cutting-edge technology such as induced pluripotent stem cells and information and communication technology adequately, since fiscal year 2012 the Science Committee has been established as a platform to exchange opinions among members from top-ranking domestic and international academia and to enhance personnel exchanges through the Initiative to Facilitate Development of Innovative Drugs. In addition, the Regulatory Science Center will be established in 2018 to increase the integrity of our services for product reviews and safety measures. In particular, requiring electronic data submissions for clinical trial applications followed by an advanced approach to analysis should not only enhance the quality of reviews of individual products but should also support the development of pharmaceuticals and medical devices by providing pharmaceutical affairs consultations on research and development strategies with various guidelines based on new insights resulting from product-bridging data analysis. Moreover, a database including electronic health records with comprehensive medical information collected mainly from 10 cooperating medical institutions will be developed with the aim of developing safety measures in a more timely manner using methods of pharmacoepidemiological analysis.

  11. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  12. Radiological protection of the medical personnel in Switzerland; Strahlenschutz des medizinischen Personals in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, J. [Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Radiologische Physik; Valley, J.F. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiophysique Appliquee; Zeller, W. [Bundesamt fuer Gesundheitswesen (BAG), Bern (Switzerland). Abt. Strahlenschutz

    2000-07-01

    The recommended occupational dose limits of ICRP 1990 have been adopted by national legislation as early as in 1994, and experience is very positive. Dose monitoring and registration services for medical staff and personnel cover at present about 42 000 persons, 12 000 of them working in the field of dentistry (the total of occupationally exposed persons is 60 000). This corresponds to 0.6% of the population. The national dose registry can furnish at any time up-to-date information and personal dosimetry data. The responsible public authorities emphasize that attention should be focused on two important aspects, i.e. relevant training of medical personnel, and equipment quality assurance. (orig./CB) [German] Bereits 1994 wurden in der Schweiz die von der ICRP 1990 empfohlenen Dosisgrenzwerte gesetzlich verankert. Die bisher gemachten Erfahrungen ergeben ein positives Bild. Im medizinischen Bereich werden etwa 42.000 (von insgesamt 60.000) beruflich strahlenexponierte Personen ueberwacht. Dies sind 0,6% der Bevoelkerung. Davon arbeiten 12.000 in der Zahnmedizin. Das zentrale Dosisregister erlaubt eine stets aktuelle Darstellung der Personendosimetrie. Die zustaendigen Behoerden fordern fuer die Ausbildung des Personals und fuer den Zustand der Geraete groessere Beachtung. (orig.)

  13. Practice of Regulatory Science (Development of Medical Devices).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo

    2017-01-01

     Prototypes of medical devices are made in accordance with the needs of clinical practice, and for systems required during the initial process of medical device development for new surgical practices. Verification of whether these prototypes produce the intended performance specifications is conducted using basic tests such as mechanical and animal tests. The prototypes are then improved and modified until satisfactory results are obtained. After a prototype passes through a clinical trial process similar to that for new drugs, application for approval is made. In the approval application process, medical devices are divided into new, improved, and generic types. Reviewers judge the validity of intended use, indications, operation procedures, and precautions, and in addition evaluate the balance between risk and benefit in terms of efficacy and safety. Other characteristics of medical devices are the need for the user to attain proficiency in usage techniques to ensure efficacy and safety, and the existence of a variety of medical devices for which assessment strategies differ, including differences in impact on the body in cases in which a physical burden to the body or failure of a medical device develops. Regulatory science of medical devices involves prediction, judgment, and evaluation of efficacy, safety, and quality, from which data result which can become indices in the development stages from design to application for approval. A reduction in the number of animals used for testing, improvement in efficiency, reduction of the necessity for clinical trials, etc. are expected through rational setting of evaluation items.

  14. Visualizing the Structure of Iranian Medical Science Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Rahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a bibliometric analysis of the Medical Sciences (MS domains in Iran. Totally 9047 articles indexed in ISI (Thomson Reuters Database from 1989 to 2008 in December 2008 have been extracted. HistCiteTM applications are used to discover the Iranian publication status during this period. The publication count has grown at an approximate rate of 40.5% per year. We tried to introduce the most productive authors, and cited works. Moreover, distributions of output in journals identified by ISI and research output analysis of different universities were presented. The most influential cited authors and articles in this research were drawn. Finally, the process of the evolution of the medical sciences discipline, and its shift over the period of the research was traced and shown in the map. Using HistCiteTM applications, retrieved articles were analyzed and visualized.

  15. E-Readiness Assessment at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadesh; Mohammad Hossein Biglu; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parviz saleh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: E-readiness assessment is the evaluation of one’s ability to accept and use information technologies and their relevant applications. E-readiness assessment helps us identify and study the strengths and weaknesses and consequently find solutions and formulate strategies to improve e-readiness which is considered as a guarantee for the implementation of knowledge development programs. This study aimed to assess ereadiness at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The cur...

  16. [CASTOR-Radiology: software of management in a Unit of Medical Imaging: use in the CHU of Tours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, P; Rouleau, P; Alison, D; Bristeau, M; Minard, P; Saad, B

    1993-01-01

    Despite the large volume of information circulating in radiology departments, very few of them are currently computerised, although computer processing is developing rapidly in hospitals, encouraged by the installation of PMSI. This article illustrates the example of an imaging department management software: CASTOR-Radiologie, Computerisation of part of the Hospital Information System (HIS) must allow an improvement in the efficacy of the service rendered, must reliably reflect the department's activity and must be able to monitor the running costs. CASTOR-Radiologie was developed in conformity with standard national specifications defined by the Public Hospitals Department of the French Ministry of Health. The functions of this software are: unique patient identification, HIS base, management of examination requests, allowing a rapid reply to clinician's requests, "real-time" follow-up of patients in the department, saving time for secretaries and technicians, medical files and file analysis, allowing analysis of diagnostic strategies and quality control, edition of analytical tables of the department's activity compatible with the PMSI procedures catalogue, allowing optimisation of the use of limited resources, aid to the management of human, equipment and consumable resources. Links with other hospital computers raise organisational rather than technical problems, but have been planned for in the CASTOR-Radiologie software. This new tool was very well accepted by the personnel.

  17. Academic opportunities in radiology education and education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jannette

    2002-07-01

    Education can be the focus of a rewarding and successful career in academic radiology. Educational opportunities for academic radiologists include teaching medical students, residents, nursing students, physician assistant students, radiology technologist students, and other allied health profession students. Teaching can occur in large or small groups, or as a one-on-one encounter. Teaching is the very best way to learn a subject well; thus, educators are often considered experts in their fields. Educators can develop innovative teaching materials that are passed on to generations of students. Opportunities in educational administration and personal development are available both locally and nationally. Participation in radiology education research allows a radiologist to contribute to the body of knowledge in radiology education and advance the field of radiology education through science.

  18. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  19. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  20. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  1. Comparisonof depression prevalence in medical students between the first and last years of Birjand University of Medical Sciences: Brief Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Rahmani Bidokhti

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Apparently, prevalence of depression in medical students in Birjand university of Medical Sciences is high, although studying medicine is not significantly decisive in the occurrence of the problem.

  2. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... microbiology/MCM devices. The ultimate goal is to advance regulatory science for highly multiplexed devices... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly...

  3. The Chernobyl – Thirty Years After The Post – Accidental Radiological – Hygienic and Medical Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Onishchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the result of the Chernobyl NPP accident more than 200 thousand square kilometers of the European territories were contaminated by Cs-137 in the amount of above 37 kBq/m2 (1 Ci/km2 . Belorussia, Russia and Ukraine amount up to 70% of this entire affected area. More than 600 000 people were engaged in the accidental cleanup operations, 340000 were evacuated or relocated within 1986-1991. The early stage evacuation efficacy is confirmed by the absence of acute radiation syndrome among the population and by the prevented collective dose which amounts to no less than 10 000 man/Sv. The effective measure to reduce the internal radiation dose to the population at the early accidental stage was introduction of maximum tentative permissive levels of radionuclide content in the foodstuffs.Among the identified post -accident medical consequences of the Chernobyl is the radiation syndrome found in 134 emergency cleanup workers within the first 24 hours of the accident’s development. Out of that number, 28 people died within the first four months, 19 people died before 2006. The accident’s liquidators developed radiation -induced leukemia ( the attributive risk value is 45-60% . People exposed to high radiation doses display the statistically significant 18% morbidity increase of all types of solid cancers at the doses above 150 mSv. There is the statistically significant information indicating the increased amount of thyroid cancer morbidity among those who were just children and teenagers at the time of the accident. The adverse psychological consequences are accounted for not just the fear of overexposure but also for the disturbance of the habitual lifestyle especially mindful of the forced relocation.The longterm protection measures, radionuclide decay and selfcleaning of the contaminated areas resulted in the drastic reduction of the population dose in the radioactively contaminated territories. In 2015, only in some settlements of the Briansk

  4. Evaluation of clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding medical radiological exposure: findings from a mixed-methods investigation (survey and qualitative study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, B; Vilar, J; González-Álvarez, I; Guilabert, M; Parker, L A; Pastor-Valero, M; Domingo, M L; Fernández-Lorente, M F; Hernández-Aguado, I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of initiatives aiming to increase clinician awareness of radiation exposure; to explore the challenges they face when communicating with patients; to study what they think is the most appropriate way of communicating the long-term potential risks of medical radiological exposure to patients. Design A quantitative and qualitative evaluation through a survey and focal groups. Setting San Juan Hospital and Dr Peset Hospital (Southeast Spain) and clinicians from Spanish scientific societies. Participants The surveys were answered (a) in person (216: all the radiologists (30), urologists (14) and surgeons (44) working at both participant hospitals; a sample of general practitioners from the catchment area of one hospital (45), and a consecutive sample of radiologists attending a scientific meeting (60)) or (b) electronically through Spanish scientific societies (299: radiologists (45), pneumologists (123), haematologists (75) and surgeons (40)). Clinicians were not randomly selected and thus the results are limited by the diligence of the individuals filling out the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures Clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding medical radiological exposure, and what they considered most appropriate for communicating information to patients. Results Nearly 80% of the clinicians surveyed had never heard of the European recommendations. Fewer than 20% of the clinicians surveyed identified correctly the radiation equivalence dose of intravenous urography or barium enema. It was reported by 31.7% that they inform patients about the long-term potential risks of ionising radiation. All participants agreed that the most appropriate way to present information is a table with a list of imaging tests and their corresponding radiation equivalence dose in terms of chest X-rays and background radiation exposure. Conclusions Medical radiological exposure is frequently underestimated and rarely explained to patients. With a

  5. Improving radiation awareness and feeling of personal security of non-radiological medical staff by implementing a traffic light system in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmaier, C.; Mayor, A.; Zuber, N.; Weishaupt, D. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Fodor, P. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2016-03-15

    Non-radiological medical professionals often need to remain in the scanning room during computed tomography (CT) examinations to supervise patients in critical condition. Independent of protective devices, their position significantly influences the radiation dose they receive. The purpose of this study was to assess if a traffic light system indicating areas of different radiation exposure improves non-radiological medical staff's radiation awareness and feeling of personal security. Phantom measurements were performed to define areas of different dose rates and colored stickers were applied on the floor according to a traffic light system: green = lowest, orange = intermediate, and red = highest possible radiation exposure. Non-radiological medical professionals with different years of working experience evaluated the system using a structured questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation test were applied for statistical analysis. Fifty-six subjects (30 physicians, 26 nursing staff) took part in this prospective study. Overall rating of the system was very good, and almost all professionals tried to stand in the green stickers during the scan. The system significantly increased radiation awareness and feeling of personal protection particularly in staff with ? 5 years of working experience (p < 0.05). The majority of non-radiological medical professionals stated that staying in the green stickers and patient care would be compatible. Knowledge of radiation protection was poor in all groups, especially among entry-level employees (p < 0.05). A traffic light system in the CT scanning room indicating areas with lowest, in-termediate, and highest possible radiation exposure is much appreciated. It increases radiation awareness, improves the sense of personal radiation protection, and may support endeavors to lower occupational radiation exposure, although the best radiation protection always is to re-main outside the CT room during the scan.

  6. The Development of Radiology among Slovenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonka Zupanič Slavec

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Few discoveries in the history of science brought such significant progress as did the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen in 1895. The finding did not only bring a revolution to the field of medicine but also to many other technical branches. With technological progress in the 20th century, medical roentgenology swiftly developed. The first significant step forward was the introduction of contrast media followed by others including computerised image data management and digital techniques. Medical diagnostics embraced other imaging methods based on other types of energy such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The beginnings of roentgenology in the Slovene Lands go back to the year 1900. Bone fractures were the first to be imaged, followed by thoracic imaging and contrast imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The use of roentgenology spread significantly after World War I, with the implementation in the following years of X-ray machines in all Slovenian hospitals, some spas and sanatoria. Gradually the need for an independent scientific institution emerged, which led to the establishment of the Roentgenological Institute for Slovenia and Istria in Ljubljana in 1923. At the same time radiology was developing also by other Slovenian hospitals.In the 1950s, Slovenian roentgenology increasingly stayed in touch with contemporary international development, updated its equipment and introduced new methods. The modern concept of centralised radiological management, comparable with that of modern European institutions, was realised in Ljubljana in 1973 after the relocation of the Radiological Institute to the new facilities at the Ljubljana University Medical Centre. The first computer tomography machine was installed in 1980, the first ultrasound machine was acquired in 1981, the first digital subtraction angiography (DSA machine was introduced in 1986 and the first magnetic resonance machine was installed in

  7. Quality of life of medical students in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the quality of life (QOL) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences' (TUMS) medical students at different educational levels and specify the most important factors related to this quality. A sample of 242 medical students was selected randomly, given their number in three educational levels (basic sciences, physiopathology-stager and intern). The QOL was measured by WHOQOL-BREF. The students obtained average high score in two psychological and environmental health domains, and low score in physical health and social relationship domains. As the educational level of students increased their quality of life decreased at all four domains. At social relationship domain, the female students had overall better situation as compared to males (p=0.009). The female and male students had opposite condition at the level of basic sciences and internship, in a way that the female students earned higher marks at basic sciences level and the males at internship level (P= 0.008). The condition of female students in terms of environmental, physical and psychological health became static while their education rose. However, only environmental health of the male students reduced as their education level increased (P= 0.05). The students were of undesirable conditions in two domains of social relationship and physical health. Internship is a specific level in both groups which has a negative impact on the dimensions of quality of life and naturally needs more care for the students. Married status improved the students' QOL and could moderate the undesired effects of internship.

  8. What are the implications of implementation science for medical education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Price

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Derived from multiple disciplines and established in industries outside of medicine, Implementation Science (IS seeks to move evidence-based approaches into widespread use to enable improved outcomes to be realized as quickly as possible by as many as possible. Methods: This review highlights selected IS theories and models, chosen based on the experience of the authors, that could be used to plan and deliver medical education activities to help learners better implement and sustain new knowledge and skills in their work settings. Results: IS models, theories and approaches can help medical educators promote and determine their success in achieving desired learner outcomes. We discuss the importance of incorporating IS into the training of individuals, teams, and organizations, and employing IS across the medical education continuum. Challenges and specific strategies for the application of IS in educational settings are also discussed. Conclusions: Utilizing IS in medical education can help us better achieve changes in competence, performance, and patient outcomes. IS should be incorporated into curricula across disciplines and across the continuum of medical education to facilitate implementation of learning. Educators should start by selecting, applying, and evaluating the teaching and patient care impact one or two IS strategies in their work.

  9. [Regulatory Science in the Review of Drugs and Medical Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The review of drugs and medical devices is an integral part of regulatory science. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) evaluates the efficacy, safety, and quality of drugs and medical devices after applications are submitted for regulatory approval. The products are approved when their benefits exceed their risks, i.e., an application is approved if the efficacy of the product in patients was demonstrated and the safety of the product is acceptable in view of its observed benefits. However, drugs and medical devices for which efficacy was not clearly demonstrated in clinical trials makes the decision to approve a difficult process. Under those circumstances, the approval process is based on the totality of information, such as the reason why clinical trials did not succeed and medical needs in Japan. The Wingspan stent system, which was approved for the treatment of intracranial arterial stenosis, is an example of a product with a use different from that intended by the US Food and Drug Administration and PMDA.

  10. Research in medical education: balancing service and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mathieu; Hodges, Brian; Regehr, Glenn

    2007-02-01

    Since the latter part of the 1990's, the English-speaking medical education community has been engaged in a debate concerning the types of research that should have priority. To shed light on this debate and to better understand its implications for the practice of research, 23 semi-structured interviews were conducted with "influential figures" from the community. The results were analyzed using the concept of "field" developed by the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. The results reveal that a large majority of these influential figures believe that research in medical education continues to be of insufficient quality despite the progress that has taken place over the past 2 decades. According to this group, studies tend to be both redundant and opportunistic, and researchers tend to have limited understanding of both theory and methodological practice from the social sciences. Three factors were identified by the participants to explain the current problems in research: the working conditions of researchers, budgetary restraints in financing research in medical education, and the conception of research in the medical environment. Two principal means for improving research are presented: intensifying collaboration between PhD's and clinicians, and encouraging the diversification of perspectives brought to bear on research in medical education.

  11. Coordinating the undergraduate medical (MBBS basic sciences programme in a Nepalese medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available KIST Medical College follows the curriculum of the Institute ofMedicine, Tribhuvan University. The programme aims toproduce socially responsible and competent physicians whoare willing and able to meet the existing and emergingchallenges of the national and international healthcaresystem. The first cohort of undergraduate medical students(MBBS students was admitted in November 2008 and threecohorts including the one admitted in 2008 have beenadmitted at the time of writing. The basic science subjects aretaught in an integrated, organ-system-based manner withcommunity medicine during the first two years. I wasappointed as the MBBS Phase I programme coordinator inSeptember 2008 and in this article I share my experiences ofrunning the basic sciences programme and also offersuggestions for running an efficient academic programme. Themanuscript will be of special interest to readers runningundergraduate medical programmes. The reader canunderstand our experiences in running the programme inadverse circumstances, learning to achieve greater integrationamong basic science, community medicine and clinicaldepartments, obtain information about a communitydiagnosis programme and know about running specialmodules on the medical humanities and pharmaceuticalpromotion.

  12. [William Harvey and the beginnings of modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists, and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils, of Galilei. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this achievement could be written from the view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic, not the imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. Nevertheless, the second monograph of the English researcher, dealing with the generation of animals, published in 1651, has some passages that correspond to modern scientific reasoning yet in others he includes confused, vague and capricious assertions compatible with the prescientific era that the author was not able to escape completely. In conclusion, it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galilei's thought.

  13. [Cardiology was born with the modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils of Galileo. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this exploit could be written from view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic not imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. So it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galileo's thought. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    In this institute, many valuable results have been obtained from the investigations on somatic effects of radiation and the prevention, diagnosis and treatments as well as medical use of radiation. Since the mortality of cancers has been rising with the coming of aging society, the social interests in medical utilization of radiation has been increasing. Development of a heavy ion accelerator for cancer therapy called as HIMAC has been progressed as a part of 10-year project for cancer prevention and in this year, a clinical study using the apparatus was started. Further, a general research protect ``heavy particle project research`` was started to advance the clinical studies using the heavy ion accelerator, the clinical and diagnostic researches and biological, physical and engineering researches. This project has progressed aiming to establish a center of excellence (COE) for heavy particle medicine in the world. In addition, 4 special researches; (1) Biological investigation on radiation exposure detriment and its modifying factors, (2) Analysis of human genome regions involved in biological effects of radiation, (3) Status of radioactive substances in environments and estimation of the exposure dose and (4) Development of leading tracers using cycrotron-produced nuclides and application to elucidation of biological functions were attempted in 1994. (M.N.)

  15. [Alumni of medical sciences and their life satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenbauch, K; Meister, U; Schmutzer, G; Alfermann, D

    2006-03-01

    Medical doctors are especially burdened with psychological and social aspects of their occupation. These circumstances may lead to low life satisfaction and substance abusing behaviour and burn out symptoms are probable. In this paper we investigate, if alumni of medical sciences show lower life satisfaction compared to their peers. If so, we want to know, which factors influence this result. This survey is based on n = 671 alumni of medicine in seven German universities. The life satisfaction of alumni differs significantly from the peer sample. Outstanding are the highly significant and powerful differences to the scale "leisure". It was evident by an iterative regression that the variables "extreme input at work", "instrumentality/masculinity", "effort-reward imbalance", "expressivity/femininity" as well as "career self-efficacy-expectation", clarify 43 % of the variance in the group of alumni working by the time of enquiry. The results point out, that already alumni of medical science are in the "circle of burn-out". Their life satisfaction is more affected, if the workload is perceived high and the perceived benefits are low. Individual as well as external aspects influence life satisfaction and can be a starting-point for prevention.

  16. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  17. Accidental exposure to blood in medical interns of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Batoul; Shahidzadeh-Mahani, Ali; Oveysi, Turadj; Akhlaghi, Hengameh

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare workers and medical students are at risk of exposure to blood-borne viruses such as HBV, HCV HIV, etc. Here we report the results of a survey of the frequency and causes of cutaneous blood exposure accidents (CBEA) among medical students. Anonymous questionnaires were randomly distributed to 200 interns in their second year of internship in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A definite exposure was defined as injury by a sharp object causing obvious bleeding, whereas a possible exposure was defined as subtle or superficial injury due to contact with a contaminated instrument or needle but without bleeding, or contamination of an existing wound with blood or other body fluids. One hundred eighty-four subjects (92% of the original sample) responded to the questionnaire. We recorded 121 definite exposures and 259 possible exposures over a mean time interval of 14 months. Needles were the most common objects (41% of exposure episodes) causing CBEAs, while phlebotomy and suturing were the hospital procedures that accounted for the highest percentage of exposure episodes (30 and 28 percent, respectively). Only a minority of students regularly observed basic safety measures (wearing gloves, not recapping used needles and proper disposal of sharp objects). Considering the high incidence of blood exposure in medical interns at Tehran University of Medical Sciences and the ensuing risk of blood-borne infections, the subjects are likely to develop such infections during their internship period.

  18. Emotional Intelligence of Medical Residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ghajarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one’s own and other’s emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%. Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008. Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009. Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  19. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-04-06

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1996 - March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for the fiscal year of 1996. The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams have been progressed with promising results. Various kinds of basic studies using the heavy ion beams have been performed in an open use system and remarkable outcomes have been derived from many collaborative researchers. The reported topics extended over several categories including physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, radiopharmacy and environmental science. As another important role of the Institute, training of personnels who are being engaged in and willing to come into the radiation-related fields such as radiation protection, nursing, emergency measures, biomedicine, etc. was carried out. This report presents a total of 91 abstracts of researches made in the institute and the list of publications in the fiscal year of 1996. (M.N.)

  1. Presentation of the main regulatory provisions applicable in medical and dental radiology; Presentation des principales dispositions reglementaires de radioprotection applicables en radiologie medicale et dentaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this document is to give an overview of the regulation framework to physicians, radiologists, dental surgeons, medical personnel employers, and persons with abilities in radioprotection. It addresses the procedures of declaration and authorization of possession and use of electric equipment generating ionizing radiation, the different persons intervening to ensure the radioprotection of patients and workers, the laying-out conditions for a radiology installation, the different aspects of population and worker radioprotection and of patient radioprotection, the maintenance and quality control of medical equipment, the declaration of incidents at the ASN, and radioprotection inspection

  2. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani, K. Azam, F. Changani, E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past, medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities in Iran. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better managing the wastes from healthcare facilities. This study was carried in 12 educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The goals of this study were to characterize solid wastes generated in healthcare hospitals, to report the current status of medical waste management and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes at the considered hospitals. The methodology was descriptive, cross-sectional and consisted of the use of surveys and interviews with the authorities of the healthcare facilities and with personnel involved in the management of the wastes. The results showed that medical wastes generated in hospitals were extremely heterogeneous in composition. 42% of wastes were collected in containers and plastic bags. In 75% of hospitals, the stay-time in storage sites was about 12-24h. 92% of medical wastes of hospitals were collected by covered-trucks. In 46% of hospitals, transferring of medical wastes to temporary stations was done manually. The average of waste generation rates in the hospitals was estimated to be 4.42kg/bed/day.

  3. Flexner revisited: the role and value of the basic sciences in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Edward P; Chauvin, Sheila; Bonaminio, Giulia; Andrews, Mark; Carroll, Robert G; Pangaro, Louis N

    2010-02-01

    A central tenet of Flexner's report was the fundamental role of science in medical education. Today, there is tension between the time needed to teach an ever-expanding knowledge base in science and the time needed for increased instruction in clinical application and in the behavioral, ethical, and managerial knowledge and skills needed to prepare for clinical experiences. One result has been at least a perceived reduction in time and focus on the foundational sciences. In this context, the International Association of Medical Science Educators initiated a study to address the role and value of the basic sciences in medical education by seeking perspectives from various groups of medical educators to five questions: (1) What are the sciences that constitute the foundation for medical practice? (2) What is the value and role of the foundational sciences in medical education? (3) When and how should these foundational sciences be incorporated into the medical education curriculum? (4) What sciences should be prerequisite to entering the undergraduate medical curriculum? (5) What are examples of the best practices for incorporating the foundational sciences into the medical education curriculum? The results suggest a broad group of experts believes that an understanding of basic science content remains essential to clinical practice and that teaching should be accomplished across the entire undergraduate medical education experience and integrated with clinical applications. Learning the sciences also plays a foundational role in developing discipline and rigor in learners' thinking skills, including logical reasoning, critical appraisal, problem solving, decision making, and creativity.

  4. Negotiating science and experience in medical knowledge: gynaecologists on endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Emma

    2009-04-01

    This paper analyses the gynaecological literature on endometriosis, particularly endometriosis classification, to evaluate the epistemological concepts it uses. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on a sample of gynaecological literature published between 1985 and 2000, a period that witnessed the explosion of both evidence-based and patient-centred models of medicine, with their dwelling emphases on science and experience. It was found that the discourse of science is used strategically in this literature as a formal epistemology to lend weight to authors' claims and to guide medical thinking and research. However, gynaecologists also use the notion of experience to assert their own credibility and to question the credibility of other experts. In fact, accounts of their own experience and the experiential accounts of their patients are foundational to gynaecologists' claims-making activities, including their engagement with scientific research.

  5. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  6. "Political co-authorships" in medical science journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Jaspreet; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    The issue of co-author relationships on medical sciences journal publications has become more pronounced as advances in technology have enabled collaboration across countries and institutions to occur much more efficiently. These relationships often have underlying political motivations and outcomes, including career advancement, attempting to increase prestige of a project, and maintaining research grants. Some authors may be listed as senior or honorary authors despite offering little or no contribution to the original research project. This may be done in an effort to enhance the gravitas of a research project, and attain publication in a highly regarded medical journal. The current review covers the topic of political co-authorship and germane literature and lists strategies to combat this phenomenon. Such co-authorship practices corrupt the integrity of the research process as they attempt to bypass the safeguard that medical journals and institutions have put in place to prevent fraud and falsification. A number of strategies have been proposed to combat the practice of co-authorship, but it may ultimately be an unavoidable feature of contemporary medical research publishing that is difficult to police. Clin. Anat. 30:831-834, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interpreting chronic disorders of consciousness: medical science and family experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Andrew; Kitzinger, Celia; Kitzinger, Jenny

    2015-06-01

    Chronic disorders of consciousness (CDoC) pose significant problems of understanding for both medical professionals and the relatives and friends of the patient. This paper explores the tensions between the different interpretative resources that are drawn upon by lay people and professionals in their response to CDoC. A philosophical analysis of data from 51 interviews with people who have relatives who are (or have been) in a vegetative or minimally conscious state. The medical specialist and the lay person tend to draw on two different interpretative frameworks: a medical science framework, which tends to construct the patient in terms of measurable physical parameters, and an interpretative framework that encompasses the uniqueness of the patient and the relative's relationship to them as a social being. These differences potentially lead to ruptures in communication between medical professionals and relatives such that that an increased self-consciousness of the framing assumptions being made will facilitate communication and enrich understanding of CDoCs. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Teaching Psychology in the Medical School Curriculum: Students' Perceptions of a Basic Science Course in Medical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Basic science courses that emphasize relationships between behavior and health have been developed at several medical schools. Surveys of students who took these courses indicated that they were interested in the psychosocial aspects of medicine. These data deny the stereotype of the medical student who is biased against behavioral science. (CS)

  9. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-10-01

    Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  10. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

  11. Quality Control Status of Radiology Centers of Hospitals Associated with Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholamhosseinian-Najjar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Using ionization radiation for diagnostic and treatment fields has increased worldwide dramatically. This issue causes an increase in the absorbed and collective doses in society noticeably. With regard to two main principles in radiation protection, i.e., justification and optimization, it is necessary to have imaging process with minimum dose to patients and personnel. For achieving this, it is vital to perform quality control tests regularly. On this topic, many studies have been performed and reported worldwide  which  show necessities and meaningfulness of QC tests. Materials and Methods In this study, Unfors Mult-O-Meter model 303 is used for surveying accuracy of kVp and time, linearity of exposure with mAs, and reproducibility of exposure. Results According to recommendations of AAPM (2002 and ICRP 103, in this study, 27% of apparatuses in accuracy of kVp, 45% in accuracy of timer, and 30% in accuracy of reproducibility were out of accepted range. Conclusion In surveyed apparatuses, both ends of operating range have large errors in therefore it is recommended that these devices should not be used  in the mentioned regions. Performing strict quality control on all radioactive devices is one of the radiation protection priorities that should be done periodically .With regard to the results, repair, substitution or omition of  some devices are suggested.

  12. Clinical education stressors in medical trainees in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momayyezi, Mahdieh; Fallahzadeh, Hossein; Momayyezi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Stress is an important factor in the educational process. Teaching and learning are stressful processes. This stress can affect one's ability and change his/her performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate stressors of clinical education from the perspective of medical students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted in Yazd University of Medical Science during year 2014-2015. The sample size was 170 medical students who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a questionnaire including four components: interpersonal relationship, educational environment, clinical experience and the unpleasant emotions. A significance level of 0.05 was considered for analysis. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-tests, using SPSS software, version 14. The results showed that the highest domain score belonged to interpersonal relationship (3.33±0.3) followed by unpleasant emotions domain (3.3±0.3). The lowest domain score of clinical education stressors was educational environment (3.12±0.1). The results showed that the mean score of interpersonal relationship domain was more in women than in men (peffective factor in all dimensions of clinical education stressors. So proper measures such as the promotion of scientific awareness of teachers and educational staff about factors that lead to stress and the best way to communicate with students should be taken to reduce the students' stress.

  13. The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences: five decades of collaborative medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur; Nitayaphan, Sorachai

    2011-05-01

    The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) is a 50-year-old joint institute of the US and Royal Thai Army Medical Departments located in Bangkok, Thailand. Investigators from the Institute have carried out research in Thailand and the region, in collaboration with many partners, focused on a large number of tropical infectious diseases. In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this paper summarizes highlights of this research, focusing on malaria, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, diarrhea and HIV. In addition, research done in support of the medical problems of refugees and of the health of Thai peace-keeping forces are summarized. The research carried out by AFRIMS and added to the scientific literature has contributed significantly to advancement in multiple areas of tropical infectious disease.

  14. Perceived social support among students of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Alavijeh, Freshteh; Dehkordi, Fatemeh Raeesi; Shahry, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Social support is emotional and instrumental assistance from family, friends or neighbors, and has an important but different impact on individuals, mainly depending on contextual factors. To determine the status of perceived social support and related personal and family characteristics of medical sciences students in Ahvaz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the target population included the students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in the second semester of 2013-2014, of whom 763 were selected by cluster random sampling method. The study tool was a two-part questionnaire containing 48 self-administered questions including 25 questions of measurements of personal and family characteristics and a Persian modified version of Vaux's social support scale (Cronbach's α=0.745). Data were analyzed with T test, ANOVA and chi-square and using SPSS version 16 and 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. The mean score of the perceived social support was 17.06±3.6 and 60.3% of them reported low social support. There was a significant relationship among the perceived social support and sex (p=0.02), faculty (psocial support and importance of social support in reducing stress and academic failure, the planners need to provide efficient supportive interventions for students.

  15. Review of Virtual Reality Technology Application in Fire and Medical Exercise for Development of VR based Radiological Emergency Exercise System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Park, Younwon [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The article of Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (APPRE) was amended as a nuclear licensee shall formulate a radiological emergency exercise plan as prescribed by the Ordinance of the Prime minister and execute such plan with the approval of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). Current radiological emergency exercise is basically conducting in the field. The field exercise essentially requires participation of mass population. Due to lack of time, cost, communication and participation, the field exercise necessarily causes several limitations in an aspect of effectiveness. The public participants often misunderstood the situation as real though it is just an exercise so several conflicts are occurring. Furthermore, the exercise program is too ideal to reflect the real accident situation. In this point of view, application of virtual reality (VR) technology is highlighted with its many advantages. VR technology is expected to resolve those existing problems. Our research team is currently developing VR based radiological emergency exercise system. In this paper, the advantages and actual application of VR based training were introduced. With those advantages and improvement of existing disadvantages, our VR based radiological emergency exercise system will be developed. Not only physical interactive features, but also interactive fail-considered real-like scenarios will be adopted in the system. The ultimate goal of the system is safe and perfect evacuation of residents in case of radioactive accident.

  16. Citation analysis in journal rankings: medical informatics in the library and information science literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanatham, R

    1998-10-01

    Medical informatics is an interdisciplinary field. Medical informatics articles will be found in the literature of various disciplines including library and information science publications. The purpose of this study was to provide an objectively ranked list of journals that publish medical informatics articles relevant to library and information science. Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Social Science Citation Index were used to identify articles published on the topic of medical informatics and to identify a ranked list of journals. This study also used citation analysis to identify the most frequently cited journals relevant to library and information science.

  17. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  18. Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space.

  19. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  20. In search of the soul in science: medical ethics' appropriation of philosophy of science in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronova, Elena

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and propelling a view of science that retreated from idealizations of scientific method without sacrificing philosophical realism. Appropriating Polanyi, they extended his account of science to biology and medicine. The contribution of Karl Popper to the debate on the applicability of philosophy of science to the issues of medical ethics provides the opportunity to discuss the ways in which political agendas of different epistemologies of science intertwined with questions of concern to medical ethics.

  1. Radiological source tracking in oil/gas, medical and other industries: requirements and specifications for passive RFID technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, Farid U. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface sensors that employ radioisotopes, such 241Am-Be and 137Cs, for reservoir characterization must be tracked for safety and security reasons. Other radiological sources are also widely used in medicine. The radiological source containers, in both applications, are small, mobile and used widely worldwide. The nuclear sources pose radiological dispersal device (RDD) security risks. Security concerns with the industrial use of radionuclide sources is in fact quite high as it is estimated that each year hundreds of sealed sources go missing, either lost or stolen. Risk mitigation efforts include enhanced regulations, source-use guidelines, research and development on electronic tracking of sources. This report summarizes the major elements of the requirements and operational concepts of nuclear sources with the goal of developing automated electronic tagging and locating systems.

  2. The practice of radiology education. Challenges and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deven, Teresa; Hibbert, Kathryn M. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry; Chhem, Rethy K. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Ulm Univ. (Germany). Inst. for the History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine

    2010-07-01

    The role of medical imaging is increasingly integral to health care, drug discovery, biology, and other life sciences. The changes that are occurring call for innovation in the training of the medical imaging experts of tomorrow. In their previous book, Radiology Education: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2008), the editors addressed the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of scholarship in radiology education. Now, in The Practice of Radiology Education: Challenges and Trends, they focus on the application of these concepts within educational programs for radiology residents and fellows. The book has three sections on Curriculum, Programs and Trainees, and Leadership and Resources. Within this framework, each chapter addresses theory and principles, practical issues, and resources and literature relevant to educational practice. The contributors are educators in radiology from around the world, providing a global perspective on the main challenges facing medical imaging education and the potential strategies required to meet these challenges. It is hoped that the book will assist in attaining the ultimate goal of radiology education: to help patients. (orig.)

  3. Review and expectation of integrated curriculum of basic medical sciences of Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yin NIU; Song YU; Xiao-kui GUO

    2015-01-01

    Since early 1950 s,many domestic and foreign medical schools have carried out the integrated teaching reform of medical education. In our school of basic medical sciences,there have been three types of integrated curriculum reform carried out in history,i. e. horizontally integrated courses,problem-oriented basic medical sciences curriculum, and organ system-based integrated curriculum. This article reviews the experience of these three teaching reforms and the problems encountered and hopes to provide some references for the integration of basic medical sciences curriculum of other medical schools.

  4. Radiology and Ethics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Aline; Liu, Li; Yousem, David M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess medical ethics knowledge among trainees and practicing radiologists through an online survey that included questions about the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics. Most survey respondents reported that they had never read the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics or the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics (77.2% and 67.4% of respondents, respectively). With regard to ethics education during medical school and residency, 57.3% and 70.0% of respondents, respectively, found such education to be insufficient. Medical ethics training should be highlighted during residency, at specialty society meetings, and in journals and online resources for radiologists.

  5. Development of an informative system on aspects of radiological protection in the medical practices; Desarrollo de un sistema informativo sobre aspectos de proteccion radiologica en las practicas medicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, G.M.; Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N.; Hernandez A, R.; Valdes R, M.; Cardenas H, J.; Zaldivar H, W. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa C.P. 11300 La Habana (Cuba); Diaz B, M.; Machado T, A. [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear, Ciudad de la Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: gladys@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    Today in day is difficult to imagine the development of the medical practices in the diagnosis and treatment of diverse illnesses without the use of the ionizing radiations. In spite of the diffusion and application of these practices, the patients and the public in general don't have full conscience of like the procedures are carried out and the risks that these involve. For it diverse international and national organizations in the last years recommend to include in the programs of radiological protection, all the information that should be given to the patients and the one public that attend as users to the medical institutions to undergo to procedures that imply the use of the ionizing radiations. In Cuba a growing and quick tendency exists to the introduction of nuclear techniques for medical ends, however paradoxically the relative aspects to the communication to the patients and the public in general about the risks of the procedures to that they will be subjected and in consequence on the measures to minimize them is not adequate. Keeping in mind the above-mentioned, specialists of national centers linked to the control and consultant ship in the topics of radiological protection in the medical practices that use ionizing radiations, they worked in the country in the design of an information system that should contribute to elevate the population's culture before the mentioned aspects. The present work describes the structure of this system in function of the different medical attention levels of our national health system. Additionally it exposes the development of a package of varied informative and training tools among those that are folding, posters, guides, instructions, CD Show that its approach general and specific aspects of the uses and risks of medical practices in nuclear medicine, radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy directed so much to health professionals, patients as public in general. (Author)

  6. Angioplasty, embolization, biopsy, drainage. Interventional methods in medical radiology. Angioplastie, Embolisation, Punktion, Drainagen. Interventionelle Methoden der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, G.; Steinbrich, W.; Gross-Fengels, W. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology has been emerging as a significant tool allowing treatments such as catherization, embolization, and vascular stenting, assisted by the rapid development of digital imaging methods. For this reason, interventional radiology has been chosen as a main topic of the '6th Cologne Symposium on Biomedical Imaging Methods', where interventional methods have been given large space for presentation by experienced specialists, and for a comprehensive survey ranging from basic principles and tools for the variety of applications, the relevant pre- and after-treatment, to specialized techniques for complex tasks. The proceedings give the full texts and illustrations of all papers presented to the symposium. The topcis discussed are as follows: Accompanying drug therapy (1 paper), vascular recanalization (7 papers), local fibrinolytic therapy (1 paper), vascular stenting (4 papers), biopsy and drainage (5 papers), embolization (3 papers), and present status and future direction of interventional radiology in the U.S.A. (1 paper).

  7. Interactive Radiological Anatomy eLearning Solution for First Year Medical Students: Development, Integration, and Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its…

  8. Incorporating Radiology into Medical Gross Anatomy: Does the Use of Cadaver CT Scans Improve Students' Academic Performance in Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufler, Rebecca S.; Zumwalt, Ann C.; Romney, Carla A.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiological images show anatomical structures in multiple planes and may be effective for teaching anatomical spatial relationships, something that students often find difficult to master. This study tests the hypotheses that (1) the use of cadaveric computed tomography (CT) scans in the anatomy laboratory is positively associated with…

  9. Incorporating Radiology into Medical Gross Anatomy: Does the Use of Cadaver CT Scans Improve Students' Academic Performance in Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufler, Rebecca S.; Zumwalt, Ann C.; Romney, Carla A.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiological images show anatomical structures in multiple planes and may be effective for teaching anatomical spatial relationships, something that students often find difficult to master. This study tests the hypotheses that (1) the use of cadaveric computed tomography (CT) scans in the anatomy laboratory is positively associated with…

  10. The nuclear terrorist, radiological, biological, chemical threat. Medical approach; Menace terroriste nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique. Approche medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourmelon, P.; Vidal, D.; Renaudeau, C

    2005-07-01

    This book illustrates the cooperation of the civil and the military experts in the domain of the NBRC (nuclear, biological, radiological and chemical threat). The different aspects bond to the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, are discussed. Al topics of each domains (NRBC) are presented: historical and fundamental aspects, diagnostic, therapeutic and prevention. (A.L.B.)

  11. Interactive Radiological Anatomy eLearning Solution for First Year Medical Students: Development, Integration, and Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its…

  12. Program of training and technical expertise in radiation protection for personnel of medical radiology; Programa de capacitacao e especializacao tecnica em protecao radiologica para profissionais em radiologia medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sergio R. de, E-mail: oliveirasr@fiocruz.br [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (EPSJV/FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola Politecnica de Saude Joaquim Venancio

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to verify the actual conditions for the training of technicians in Radiology, in relation to the knowledge of radiation protection in the field of Medical Diagnostic Radiology. To evaluate the knowledge of professionals was prepared a questionnaire on the topic, having been answered by workers with varied experience. The questionnaire was divided into three parts, being the initial self-evaluation, followed by closed and open issues, all specific knowledge. With a total of 55 questionnaires answered, it was found that 85% of respondents consider themselves able to work in the area performing the function, but when questioned about the technical details regarding the exposure to ionizing radiation, it was found that only 15% of respondents had some knowledge about the subject. In relation to Radiological Protection, was found that little more than 10% of the respondents know about the subject. The results found in this survey outlined the creation of a technical specialization course in radiation protection, which is part of the permanent staff of course of the Polytechnical School of Health of FIOCRUZ, solving, partially, one of the problems pointed out today by health bodies, that is the lack of trained personnel.

  13. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    H Mozaffari-Khosravi; Vaziri, N; A. Mohammadimanesh; Z. Naderi; H. Daneshbodi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was comp...

  14. A residência em Radiologia: o ponto de vista do médico residente Medical Residency in Radiology: the point of view of the resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Guimarães de Sousa

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores entrevistaram 211 médicos residentes de 44 instituições de saúde, cujos programas de Residência em Radiologia estavam credenciados ou com projetos reconhecidos pela Comissão Nacional de Residência Médica. Nessas entrevistas, foram relacionados os pontos positivos, os pontos negativos e as sugestões para o aprimoramento desses programas. Os médicos residentes apontaram como aspectos mais relevantes dos programas o número de exames realizados e a diversidade de doenças encontradas. Como principais pontos negativos, citaram a falta de alguns aparelhos e o número excessivo de equipamentos danificados ou sucateados. Entre as sugestões, ressaltaram o intercâmbio entre médicos residentes das instituições e a possibilidade de atividades específicas de Residência em Radiologia durante eventos científicos como as mais importantes. Espera-se que os aspectos destacados e as sugestões apresentadas possam servir de subsídios para o aprimoramento dos programas de Residência Médica em Radiologia no País.The authors interviewed 211 medical residents from 44 health care institutions in which Residency in Radiology programs were accredited or had projects recognized by the National Committee of Medical Residency. During these interviews, positive and negative aspects of medical residence in radiology programs were presented along with suggestions of improvement. The residents pointed out the number of exams performed and the diversity of diseases diagnosed as the most relevant features of these programs. One of the negative features appointed by the residents was the excessive number of damaged or obsolete equipment and the lack of some equipment. The most important suggestions pointed out were the interchange of residents among health institutions and the possibility of specific radiology residency activities in scientific meetings. We hope that the aspects and suggestions presented in this paper may contribute for the

  15. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010-2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees' tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations.

  16. The Webometric Status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Behjat; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Zahed, Arash; Otroj, Zahra; Mazaheri, Elahe; Soleimanzade-Najafi, Nayere-Sadat

    2015-08-01

    Webometrics refers to the quantitative study of science production, application, structure and technology in the cyber environment. Impact analysis, website collaboration, and recognition of core websites are regarded as the most practical advantages of webometrics. Furthermore, webometrics is applied in ranking studies for universities and academic institutes. This serves as an internationally approved means of academic ranking worldwide. Our study aimed to evaluate the webometric status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and its place in the Webometric Ranking of World Universities. We also tried to comment on how to improve the university's webometric rank at national, regional, and international levels. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study including all websites of Iranian universities. Census sampling was applied to cover all Iranian university websites. Then the websites were evaluated according to the latest criteria for the international webometric ranking methodology (Cyberometric Lab, July 2012) and their webometric rank at the international level as well as the changes in the rank between July 2012 and January 2013 were analyzed. The webometric rank of IUMS was compared with other medical universities at different levels as well. According to the findings, from July 2012 to January 2013, IUMS webometric rank improved by 707, 5 and 2 at international, national and ministerial levels, respectively. Moreover, the rank of IUMS for openness rose from 4477 to 193 during the mentioned period (∆ 4284). In excellence, the university rank did not change sensibly (1537 /1538). In the same period, the rank in presence shifted from 1137 to 1091. Meanwhile, growth in website impact was negative as the university impact rank declined from 3369 to 3393. It seems that impact as the most influential ranking indicator fails to grow proportionately as other factors of IUMS website. This is potentially due to the content language (Farsi) which is an

  17. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  18. Attitude, Knowledge and Skill of Medical Students Toward E-Learning Kerman University Of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovati M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: According to the development of e-learning and its high efficiency on the development of Iran’s universities, level of knowledge and the attitude of the students to this modern method of education and indeed students’ skills in using it needed to be assessed to improve the quality and quantity of universities’ education. This study aimed to determine the attitude, knowledge and skill of medical students toward e-learning at Kerman University of Medical Sciences.  Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study that was performed in 2013, 196 students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were selected using proportional stratified sampling method. The research instrument was a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and independent T tests by SPSS 19 software.  Findings: The level of knowledge and skill of the students toward e-learning was “moderate” and their attitude was “high”. There were significant relationships between knowledge and skill (p=0.001 r=0.82 and also knowledge and attitude (p=0.001 r=0.37 but there was no significant relationship between skill and attitude (p=0.35 r=0.82. The scores of knowledge and skill were significantly different according to sex, but attitude had no significant difference with sex.  Conclusion: Kerman University of Medical Sciences’ students have a positive attitude to e-learning but according to their moderate knowledge and skills, performing this method of learning is not welcomed in this university.

  19. [The function of philosophy of science in the teaching of medical history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaming

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of science yields 3 important functions in the teaching of medical history. Firstly, by analyzing the development of medicine from the perspective of philosophy, we can integrate medical history into the history of human thought and clearly show the close connection between the development of humanity and the development of medical science. Secondly, philosophical analysis on the general rules of scientific discoveries involved in medical history can help medical students to understand the methodology in the research of sciences in history. Thirdly, philosophy of science offers new dimensions for understanding the relationship between medicine and the society. By making use of the relevant theory in scientific philosophy to explore the relationship between medicine and the society, the nature of medicine and the social nature and function of science can be further understood by medical students so as to exert an active role in the research and clinical work in the future.

  20. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  1. Medical students' perceptions of the educational environment at an Iranian Medical Sciences University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Ismaeil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students' perceptions of their educational environment have a significant impact on their behavior and academic progress. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions of medical students concerning their educational environment at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were distributed to 210 medical students and 182 were analyzed (response rate = 86.6%; twenty-eight questionnaires were excluded because they were incomplete or unreturned for analysis. Data were collected using a DREEM questionnaire which comprised 50 items based on the Likert scale (scores could range from 0 to 200. There were five domains to the questionnaire including students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Results The mean age of the subjects was 21.7 years (SD = 2.7; 38.5% were male and 61.5% were female. Students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere, students' social self-perceptions and total DREEM score were 21.2/48, 24.2/44, 15.8/32, 23.8/48, 14.5/28 and 99.6/200, respectively. There was no significant difference between male and female students in educational environment subscales, but there were significant differences between students enrolled on a basic sciences and pathophysiology course and those enrolled on a clinical course in terms of perceptions of learning, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere and overall perceptions of educational environment (p Conclusion Overall, respondents assessed the educational environment as average. Therefore, improvements are required across all five domains of the educational environment.

  2. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Hayat, Ali Asghar; Abbasi, Karim; Bazrafkan, Aghdas; Rohalamini, Azadeh; Fardid, Mozhgan

    2017-01-01

    The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors' and experts' comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach'salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren't at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn't a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the result of independent t-test did not show a

  3. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFKAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with crosssectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310 was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors’ and experts’ comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach’s alpha (0.85. Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance using SPSS 14 software. Results: 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7% were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren’t at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57 and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32. The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn’t a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy

  4. Investigation of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences, a 6-year assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Yadollahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Science production is one of the main dimensions of sustainable development in any country. Thus, universities as the major centers for science production play a key role in development. The present study aimed to assess the trend of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences from 2007 to 2012. Method: In this study, the universities’ scores of empowering, governance and leadership, science production, student researches, and number of published articles were computed based on the evaluations of universities of medical sciences by the Ministry of Health, Treatment, and Medical Education from 2007 to 2012. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the figures were drawn by Excel software. Results: This study assessed science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences and analyzed each university’s proportion in publication of articles. According to the results, most of the published articles were affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. However, considering the role of number of faculty members, different results were obtained. With respect to the evaluation raw scores, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences showed a considerable reduction of scores in 2012, while other universities had a constant or ascending trend. Besides, indexed articles followed an ascending trend in all the universities and most of the articles had been published in index 1. Conclusion: Similar to other studies, the findings of this study revealed an increase in science productions in Iran through the recent years. Yet, the highest scores of the studied indexes, except for student researches, were related to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This great difference between this university and other universities might be due to accumulation of specific potentials and forces in this region. Overall, science productions followed an ascending trend in all type I universities of

  5. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  6. Radiology employees' quality of work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hussein; Changizi, Vahid; Jazayeri Gharabagh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    Quality of work Life (QWL) originates from interactions between employees' needs and relative organizational resources. QWL is aimed to improve and retain employees' satisfaction, productivity and effectiveness of all organizations. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 15 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A Cross-Sectional, descriptive study was conducted among 15 Tehran University of Medical Sciences' Hospitals' Radiology Departments' Employees by QWL questionnaire. Respondents were asked to express their attitudes about a range of key factors as the most important issues impacting their QWL. The data was collected and analyzed by SPSS version 15 software. Most of the respondents indicated that they were unsatisfied and very unsatisfied with key factors of their QWL. Comparison of QWL key factors of TUMS radiology employees with the other countries indicated that most of the employees are unsatisfied with their poor QWL factors. We hope, the implications of these findings deliberate to improve QWL within each of TUMS hospitals radiology departments and also be relevant and value to policymakers of healthcare organizations in Iran.

  7. Knowledge of triage in the senior medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSEIN MAHMOODIAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Triage is a response to the problem of overcrowding in Emergency Departments (EDs and accuracy of decisions made by the triage unit affects the ultimate outcome of EDs. This study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge of triage among last year medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study whose subjects were all the senior students of medicine (62 in the last year of medicine from January to June 2013 who attended emergency medicine course in the screen room of 2 University Hospitals. This questionnaire was designed in 3 sections including personal data, 15 questions on knowledge of triage and 10 case scenarios for triage decision making and completed by the students. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS statistical software (version 14 using independent sample t-test, one way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient (p≤0.001. Results: The total mean score of the participants was 10.6±1.5, ranging from 7 to 13. 58(93.5% students had poor triage knowledge. In the scenario’s section, the percentage of correct triage by students was 49.2% and those of over and under triage were 28.1% and 22.7%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the triage accuracy and level of triage (ESI 4 (p≤0.001. Conclusion: The level of knowledge of triage in the last year medical students was poor, although most of them had passed a course in the screen room. It is recommended that medical students’ educational courses should include sections on the knowledge of triage in emergency rooms.

  8. Risk management in radiology departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  9. Risk management in radiology departments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Horea; Craciun; Kshitij; Mankad; Jeremy; Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as aresult of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients.

  10. Mapping for meaning. Using concept maps to integrate clinical and basic sciences in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, Cijlvia Christina (Sylvia)

    2014-01-01

    Medical curricula are intended to help students to relate clinical and basic science knowledge. Localizing underlying basic science mechanisms allows teacher and students to focus on relevant relations with clinical phenomena. Concept maps are promising for medical education because of the potential

  11. Development of a Medical-text Parsing Algorithm Based on Character Adjacent Probability Distribution for Japanese Radiology Reports

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N. Nishimoto; S. Terae; M. Uesugi; K. Ogasawara; T. Sakurai

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to investigate the transitional probability distribution of medical term boundaries between characters and to develop a parsing algorithm specifically for medical texts. Methods...

  12. [The evolution theory in the medical sciences in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-02-01

    The evolutionist ideas of Lamarck, Darwin and Haeckel entered the country through the arrival of their books. "On the origin of Species" arrived in Chile in 1869. The most outstanding immigrant european physicians that discussed these ideas were Rodulfo A Phillippi (1808-1904) and Juan José Brunner (1825-1899). Both discussed Darwin's ideas in their books and conferences as academics of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile. The first Chilean physicians that read and discussed the validity of evolution theory were Adolfo Valderrama (1834-1902) and Pedro Candia Salgado. Both wrote articles about this matter in Revista Médica de Chile in 1872 and 1874. The professor of general biology, Juan Noé Crevani, italian physician and zoologist that arrived in Chile in 1912, was the first to teach directly the concepts of the evolution theory until his death in 1947. Professor Noé founded the great biological school of the twentieth century in Chile and his disciples introduced the concepts of Mendelian theory and neodarwinism in the decade of fifties. The theory of evolution was taught as a chapter of general biology in the Faculty of Medicine between 1913 and 1947, but its practical applications to medicine were introduced with the birth of medical genetics in the decade of fifties and the foundation of Chilean Genetics society in 1964, under the direction of professors Danko Brncic and Gustavo Hoecker, both awarded with the National Sciences Prize.

  13. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  14. International student exchange and the medical curriculum: evaluation of a medical sciences translational physiology course in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mariana; Jones, T David; Rocha, Maria Jose Alves; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W; Salgado, Helio C; Johnson, Alan Kim; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Michelini, Lisete C; Goldstein, David L

    2006-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to conduct a short-term international course on translational physiology for medical students from Wright State University and the University of Iowa. The goals were to 1) provide students with an exposure to the academic, cultural, and medical environments in Brazil; 2) promote awareness of the global medical community; and 3) provide an academic course focused on translational physiology. An evaluation of the students was conducted to determine whether such a short-term course might be useful in the medical curriculum. The 2-wk course was held in the summer of 2005 at the University of São Paulo School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, for 23 American students. The program included presentations of basic and clinical topics, meetings with medical students, and clinical presentations. The program finished with student attendance at a scientific meeting sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hypertension. Student surveys evaluated issues related to perceived treatment, Brazilian medical school environment, culture and personal attributes, and career aspirations. The international Medical Sciences Translational Physiology course for medical students provided a brief, but intense, experience. It gave students a picture of the medical environment in Brazil and an appreciation for the differences and similarities in cultures. Most students reported that it was a positive experience that would be beneficial to their careers. In conclusion, a short-term international course provides an efficient means for medical students to experience aspects of global medical science.

  15. University receives $1.4 million science education award from Howard Hughes Medical Institute to support innovate undergraduate science education

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech was among 50 top research universities nationwide to receive a Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) that will be used to encourage university faculty to develop new ways to teach and inspire undergraduate students about science and research.

  16. Medical Residents’ Viewpoints on Clinical Training Status of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ordoei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical training is an important process in residency academic program in different fields. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, we identified the views of clinical residents about clinical training status at Yazd University of Medical Sciences at their second-year of residency or above. We used questionnaire as the instrument for collecting information and select all residents as the sample of study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Clinical training status was assessed to be at an intermediate level by residents, and the areas of evaluation method, resources and facilities, training system, performance, performance of personnel of therapeutic departments, and resident’s performance received the highest score, respectively. Areas of evaluation method and facilities were determined as strengths, and areas of the performance of therapeutic department’s personnel and residents as the weaknesses of clinical training.

  17. Educational Status of Dental Basic Science Course and its Correlation with Students' Educational Background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Mozafar Khazaei; Fatemeh Abasi; Mohammad Rasool Khazaei; Farshad Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Basic science course plays a pivotal role in the academic achievement of the students. The scientific background and educational performance of the students are also influential in this period. The aim of the present study was to investigate the educational status of dental basic science course in the first three admissions (2009-2011) and its association with students’ educational background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS). Methods: In this descriptive cr...

  18. The redesign of the medical informatics master of science course at the University of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Monique W M; Hasman, Arie

    2007-10-11

    The University of Amsterdam redesigned its former 4 years Medical Informatics university program into a Dutch 3 years BSc program and a 2 years English MSc program. The new MSc program is aimed at (international) baccalaureates in medical informatics, computer science, medicine, health sciences, and biology. Besides, health care professionals or professionals with a background in computer science may enter the program. We present our new MSc program shortly.

  19. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  20. Utilization of the Family and Medical Leave Act in Radiology Practices According to the 2016 ACR Commission on Human Resources Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Parikh, Jay R; Wolfman, Darcy; Gridley, Daniel; Bender, Claire; Bluth, Edward

    2016-12-01

    To assess gender utilization of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in radiology practices across the United States. The Practice of Radiology Environment Database was utilized to identify U.S. practice leaders, who were asked to complete an electronic survey developed by the ACR Human Resources (HR) Commission. In 2016, new survey questions asked about number of radiologists in each practice who took FMLA, the reasons why, the average number of weeks taken, and how such absences were covered. Thirty-two percent (579/1815) of practice group leaders responded to the survey and of these, 73% (432/579) answered FMLA questions, with 15% of those (64/432) answering affirmatively that a radiologist in their practice had taken FMLA leave. Reasons for this in 2015 included to care for a newborn/adopted child (49%), because of a personal serious health condition (42%), to care for an immediate family member (8%), or for active military duty (1%). Women took a greater number of weeks of FMLA leave than men for all reasons (care of newborn/adopted child: 10.7 versus 4.7; personal serious health condition: 10.3 versus 8.0; care of immediate family member: 9.7 versus 8.7) except for military duty (24 weeks taken, all by men). At least 69% of leave time was paid, irrespective of reason for leave or gender of person taking it. Most practices (82%) made no workforce changes to cover FMLA leave. Both genders of radiologists needed absences from work for FMLA-sanctioned reasons. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Moving Away From Spoon-Feeding as a Teaching Style in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Shiraz; Ros, Pablo

    2016-12-01

    Medical education has been an important topic in the literature, with many new attempts to revitalize and improve efforts to teach physicians and students. As a unique subspecialty that incorporates visual learning, knowledge of clinical management and presentation, basic science topics such as physics and mechanics, and procedural skills, radiology affords itself to new and more effective methods of teaching. Much of radiology education has currently focused on the concept of spoon-feeding information from the teacher to the learners. This article outlines the dangers of this approach in radiology and offers solutions for educators to improve their teaching skills and use the potential afforded by the diversity of the field.

  2. Prevalence of Depression Among Students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahbar, Narges; Jasemi, Madineh; Mesgar Zadeh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, thoughts and behaviors. This study was performed to identify the presence of depression among medical students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 700 undergraduate medical and basic sciences students. Beck depression inventory (BDI) used for data gathering. Results: Mean score of BDI was 10.4 ± 0.8 and 52.6% of students scored under the depression th...

  3. Causes of academic failure of medical and medical sciences students in Iran: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Sheida; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Fata, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Academic failure of medical and medical sciences students is one of the major problems of higher education centers in many countries. This study aims to collect and compare relevant researches in this field in Iran. The appropriate keywords were searched in the national and international databases, and the findings were categorized into related and non-related articles accordingly. Only 22 articles were included in this systematic review. In terms of content analysis, gender, living in a dorm, employment, marital status, age, special rights in the entrance exams, the time lag between diploma and university, diploma average, learning style, being nonnative students, being a transferred student, psychological problems, occupation of the mother, salary level, diploma type, field of study, self-esteem, exam anxiety and interest on the field of study were considered as the influential factors for academic failure of the students. This systematic review shows that there is no definite academic failure criterion. It is also suggested Iranian researchers should pay more attention on the documentation of the higher educational strategies that have been implemented to prevent avoidable academic failure and contain physiological academic failure.

  4. Use of Clinical Decision Guidance as a New Public Health Tool for the Medical Management of Internal Contamination in Radiological Mass Casualty Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Albert L

    2016-09-01

    This review is a discussion of special issues associated with the medical and public health management of persons at risk of internal contamination from radionuclides, following various radiological mass-casualty scenarios, as well as definition, discussion and use of the Clinical Decision Guidance (CDG) in such scenarios. Specific medical countermeasures are available for reducing the internal radiation dose and the subsequent stochastic and deterministic risks to persons internally contaminated with radionuclides from nuclear power plant, fuel processing and nuclear weapon accidents/incidents. There is a public health need for rapidly identifying and quantifying the 'source term' of such radiation exposures and assessment of the associated committed doses, so that appropriate medical countermeasure(s) can be given as soon as possible. The CDG, which was initially defined in NCRP-161, was specifically developed to be a new public health tool for facilitating the integration of local community healthcare professionals into the general medical, mass casualty, triage and treatment response of internally contaminated populations.

  5. Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

  6. Problem-Based Learning of Social Sciences and Humanities by Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Kathleen K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required fourth-year course integrating the social sciences and humanities into the required clinical medical curriculum at Dartmouth Medical School is intended to prepare students to deal with the social and humanistic issues involved in medical practice, including law, ethics, economics, and social anthropology. (MSE)

  7. Emergency department musculoskeletal radiological requests abuse and patients attitude toward radiological exposure in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Montaser*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: People in Saudi Arabia expose to huge amount of radiological hazardous with a common believe that radiology is essential for diagnosis all musculoskeletal injuries. Wealthy medical system does not always lead to competent practice.

  8. The Internet and the medical radiation science practitioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Madeleine [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)], E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.au; Herrington, Anthony; Herrington, Jan [Faculty of Education, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: The Internet is an important information source for health practitioners providing immediate access to the most current health and medical information. Factors limiting practitioner access to the Internet have been identified and the literature shows that access to the Internet varies across and within health professions. There is therefore a need for each health profession to investigate practitioner access to the Internet. There has been, however, no identified empirical research investigating medical radiation science (MRS) practitioner access to or use of the Internet. This research sought to establish the professional use of Internet-based tools by Australian MRS practitioners and issues affecting access to the Internet within MRS workplaces. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches were used in this research. These included interviews with 28 MRS practitioners from the four areas of specialisation, namely nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, radiography and sonography and a survey of MRS practitioners. In 2007 a 4-page postal survey was sent to a random sample of 1142 MRS practitioners with a response rate of 32.8%. Results: The Internet is an important information source widely used by MRS practitioners. MRS practitioners search the Internet (87%), access specific web pages (86%), use email (82%) and listservs (39.4%) to update their professional knowledge. It was evident that access to the Internet within the workplace varied within the MRS profession. Whilst the majority (96.4%) of MRS practitioners had some level of access to the Internet in their workplace, factors shown to affect practitioner access were workplace setting (p = 0.000), work environment (p = 0.000), and geographic location (p = 0.025). The majority of clinical workplaces (81%) did not provide practitioners with remote access to electronic resources available in the workplace such as e-journals and databases. Conclusions: This research provides baseline data to the MRS

  9. Evolutionary Science as a Method to Facilitate Higher Level Thinking and Reasoning in Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Joseph L; Reiber, Chris; Thanukos, Anna; Hurtado, Magdalena; Wolpaw, Terry

    2016-10-15

    Evolutionary science is indispensable for understanding biological processes. Effective medical treatment must be anchored in sound biology. However, currently the insights available from evolutionary science are not adequately incorporated in either pre-medical or medical school curricula. To illuminate how evolution may be helpful in these areas, examples in which the insights of evolutionary science are already improving medical treatment and ways in which evolutionary reasoning can be practiced in the context of medicine are provided. In order to facilitate the learning of evolutionary principles, concepts derived from evolutionary science that medical students and professionals should understand are outlined. These concepts are designed to be authoritative and at the same time easily accessible for anyone with the general biological knowledge of a first-year medical student. Thus we conclude that medical practice informed by evolutionary principles will be more effective and lead to better patient outcomes.Furthermore, it is argued that evolutionary medicine complements general medical training because it provides an additional means by which medical students can practice the critical thinking skills that will be important in their future practice. We argue that core concepts from evolutionary science have the potential to improve critical thinking and facilitate more effective learning in medical training. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  10. Evolutionary science as a method to facilitate higher level thinking and reasoning in medical training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Joseph L.; Reiber, Chris; Thanukos, Anna; Hurtado, Magdalena; Wolpaw, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary science is indispensable for understanding biological processes. Effective medical treatment must be anchored in sound biology. However, currently the insights available from evolutionary science are not adequately incorporated in either pre-medical or medical school curricula. To illuminate how evolution may be helpful in these areas, examples in which the insights of evolutionary science are already improving medical treatment and ways in which evolutionary reasoning can be practiced in the context of medicine are provided. To facilitate the learning of evolutionary principles, concepts derived from evolutionary science that medical students and professionals should understand are outlined. These concepts are designed to be authoritative and at the same time easily accessible for anyone with the general biological knowledge of a first-year medical student. Thus, we conclude that medical practice informed by evolutionary principles will be more effective and lead to better patient outcomes. Furthermore, it is argued that evolutionary medicine complements general medical training because it provides an additional means by which medical students can practice the critical thinking skills that will be important in their future practice. We argue that core concepts from evolutionary science have the potential to improve critical thinking and facilitate more effective learning in medical training. PMID:27744353

  11. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  12. Ready! Aim! Fire! targeting the right medical science journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Timothy C; Serginson, James M

    2017-09-01

    Inadvertently submitting a paper to a journal that is unlikely to publish it is a waste of resources and ultimately delays dissemination of one's research. A high proportion of manuscripts are rejected by their author's first-choice journal. The aim of the present work was to review guidance provided within the literature for journal selection that might minimize the chance of manuscript rejection. We also consider papers that encompass more than one main medical science and describe the selection process that we used with a paper that was published in Cardiovascular Endocrinology. A database search (Embase, PubMed and Medworm) was performed for all articles published in the scientific literature providing guidance on journal selection. Articles were identified that either had journal selection as their principal topic or included journal selection as part of a broader discussion of publishing. The relative performance of four free-to-use, web-based applications that claim to provide guidance on journal selection was compared. The searches identified 286 hits, of which 249 were in English. Of these papers, 16 discussed journal selection and a further 10 articles were identified from citations within the original 16 articles. Only one article described a comprehensive model for submission decision-making. Identification of appropriate candidate journals by various web-based applications was erratic, with the Jane database providing the most robust suggestions. Our work suggests that little attention has been focused in the scientific literature on the mechanisms that authors use to select a journal for their work. Nevertheless, scientists for the most part seem to have a good sense of where their papers are most likely to be accepted. Beyond ensuring that a manuscript fulfils all the target journal's requirements, the literature suggests that it is important to have an objective view of the scientific contribution or 'value' of your work.

  13. Defining medical information sciences: a health care science for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S

    1984-01-01

    There exists a field; there are already researchers committed and busily at work; and there are meetings, journals, and organizations. Principal researchers in the field and those willing to lend their support should renew their efforts at crystallizing the identity of the field. In reviewing the nature of the field, there is a reasonable definition possible that is responsive to three fundamental constituents related to health care: the setting in which the care is provided, the patient to whom it is provided, and the health care professional by whom it is provided. Using these areas, we get a natural division of the field that is also historically and intuitively appealing. Using these divisions, research issues can be identified since information processing activities in the three categories become the areas to investigate. Instruction needs are similarly implied since one should have some understanding of each of these areas as part of a total health care science. In addition, understanding of the major information processing methodologies, combined with broad topics about the milieu appropriate for the professional, comprises a suitable graduate programme of study. By whatever title, the time is ripe to move forward on the enterprise to advance medical information science by self-identification and common support.

  14. [Educational system for medical sciences at the University of Tsukuba--with special reference to medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Toshiko

    2006-03-01

    Three-year colleges for nursing, medical technology, and so on, have all been reorganized into four-year educational institutions in national universities. Since the reform, universities are not responsible for educating medical scientists except nurses. The new College of Nursing and Medical Technology in the University of Tsukuba has been developed along these lines. Here introduce some of its attempts and provide an opportunity to a better system. The Department has the following three characteristics: 1. Medical scientists are educated in the new Department, and the Department is closely cooperating with the School of Medicine. 2. There are courses for medical researchers concerning Molecular Pathology, Pathological Engineering and Environmental Pathology. 3. The qualification to apply to a national test for medical technologists is given to the students. Unfortunately, the system is not fully understood by the faculty or the students and does not work well because the Medical Technology Department and the Nursing Department are grouped together as a single institution. Moreover, this flaw in the system prevents the Medical Technology Department from actively promoting highly advanced medical sciences, such as organ transplantation, artificial organs, gene therapy, reproductive medicines, and so forth (Fig. 1). Few specialists exist who can bridge achievements in basic or advanced sciences and clinical application. Serious social problems about food safety, care systems, post-genome medicine, the youth, and so on, have to be dealt with, too. We are thus planning to separate the Department as the College of Medical Science (Fig. 2) and link it to the educational system in the master's and doctoral programs (Fig. 3). This model will successfully educate a new type of medical specialists.

  15. Interactive radiological anatomy eLearning solution for first year medical students: Development, integration, and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its effectiveness was evaluated using a questionnaire, pre- and post-tests, focus groups, summative assessment, and tracking data. Since introduced in 2009, a total of 781 students have used RA eLearning, and among them 167 Year 1 students in 2011, of whom 116 participated in the evaluation study. Students enjoyed learning (77%) with RA eLearning, found it was easy to use (81%) and actively engaged them in their learning (75%), all of which were associated to the usability, learning design of the TELT solution and its integration in the curriculum; 80% of students reported RA eLearning helped their revision of anatomy and 69% stated that it facilitated their application of anatomy in a clinical context, both of which were associated with the benefits offered by the learning and activities design. At the end of course summative assessment, student knowledge of RA eLearning relevant topics (mean 80%; SD ±16) was significantly better as compared to topics not relevant to RA eLearning (mean 63%; SD ±15) (mean difference 18%; 95% CI 15% to 20%; P < 0.001). A well designed and integrated TELT solution can be an efficient method for facilitating the application, integration, and contextualization of anatomy and radiology to create a blended learning environment.

  16. Medical students from natural science and nonscience undergraduate backgrounds. Similar academic performance and residency selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, R L; Sarnacki, R E; Schimpfhauser, F T; Katz, L A

    1980-06-27

    The majority of matriculating US medical students continue to major in the natural sciences as college undergraduates in the belief that this will enhance their chances of admission to and their performance in medical school. The present study compared the academic performance and residency selection of natural science and nonscience majors in three separate medical school classes at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Statistical analysis of grades in the first two years of medical school, clinical performance in the third year, and part I and part II National Board Medical Examination scores revealed no significant differences across three class replications. Residency selection among graduating seniors was also independent of undergraduate major. It is suggested that admissions committees, premedical advisors, and students reconsider their attitudes about the necessity of concentration in the natural sciences before entering medical school.

  17. Medical response in the initial phase of a radiological or nuclear emergency; Respuesta medica en la fase inicial de una emergencia radiologica o nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Malvicini, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: mvazquez@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The frequency of radiological and nuclear accidents is low with relationship to another type of have an accident, but the use of radioactive sources has been increased in the finish decades. Additionally, a growing world concern exists by the eventual use of radioactive material with malevolent ends. These facts put in relevance the necessity to have an appropriate preparation for the medical answer in this type of emergencies. The medical answer consists of different phases: Initial: pre-hospital and in local general hospitals; Intermediate: in local general hospitals and central reference hospitals. Late: in central reference hospitals and the pursuit to long term. The presence of conventional injuries (radio combined injuries) modifies in substantial form the assignment in the priority of the attention, the prediction and the evolution. The establishment of an appropriate triage is outstanding in the initial phase. The present communication approaches the early medical answer, sustained in the anamnesis, the chronology and severity of the symptoms and prodromal signs besides the laboratory results and complementary exams arisen during the first ones 24 to 72 hours. (Author)

  18. Reform in medical and health sciences educational system: a Delphi study of faculty members' views at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, A; Harris, N; Lotfi, F; Hashemi, N; Kojouri, J; Amini, M

    2014-04-03

    Despite the strengths in the Iranian medical and health sciences educational system, areas in need of improvement have been noted. The purpose of this study was to understand the views of faculty members at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences about current and future needs for medical and health sciences education, with the goal of improving the quality of the educational system. The data were collected using a Delphi consensus method. Analysis of the findings identified the following key themes among the factors likely to contribute to medical and health sciences education and training: adding and/or increasing student numbers in higher degrees in preference to associate degrees; providing more interactive, student-centred teaching methods; improving the educational content with more practical and research-based courses tailored to society's needs; and an emphasis on outcome-based student evaluation techniques. These changes aim to respond to health trends in society and enhance the close relationship between medical education and the needs of the Iranian society.

  19. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Madeleine, E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.a [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Herrington, Anthony [Head, School of Regional, Remote and eLearning (RRE), Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Herrington, Jan [School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst

  20. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology--part II: vascular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this second part of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary vasculature, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiological anatomy - evaluation of integrative education in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, S; Schmiedl, A; Meyer, S; Giesemann, A; Pabst, R; Weidemann, J; Wacker, F K; Kirchhoff, T

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation and analysis of the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" established since 2007 at the Medical School Hannover (MHH) in comparison with conventional education. Anatomy and radiology are usually taught separately with a considerable time lag. Interdisciplinary teaching of these associated subjects seems logical for several reasons. Therefore, the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" was established in the second year of medical education, combining these two closely related subjects. This interdisciplinary course was retrospectively evaluated by consideration of a student questionnaire and staff observations. The advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching in medical education are discussed. The course ratings were excellent (median 1; mean 1.3 on a scale of 1 to 6). This is significantly (p radiology increased during the course (88 %). According to the students' suggestions the course was enhanced by a visitation in the Department of Radiology and the additional topic central nervous system. Integrative teaching of anatomy and radiology was well received by the students. Both, anatomical and radiological comprehension and the motivation to learn were improved. However, it should be considered, that the amount of work and time required by the teaching staff is considerably increased compared to traditional teaching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  4. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  5. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  6. Radiology's value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  7. Nuremberg lamentation: for the forgotten victims of medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelman, W E

    1996-12-07

    Fifty years after the Nuremberg medical trial there remain many unanswered questions about the role of the German medical profession during the Third Reich. Other than the question of human experimentation, important ethical challenges arising from medicine in Nazi Germany which have continuing relevance were not addressed at Nuremberg. The underlying moral question is that of the exercise of professional power and its impact on vulnerable people seeking medical care. Sensitisation to the obligations of professional power may be achieved by an annual commemoration and lament to the memory of the victims of medical abuse which would serve as a recurring reminder of the physician's vulnerability and fallibility.

  8. Radiological protection; Proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Division de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon de los Aldama, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  9. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  10. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  11. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  12. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University...

  13. The effect of life skills training on emotional intelligence of the medical sciences students in iran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lolaty, Hamideh A; Ghahari, Sharbanoo; Tirgari, Abdolhakim; Fard, Jabbar Heydari

    2012-01-01

    .... The present study is aimed at determining the effect of life skills training on the emotional intelligence among the first year students of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  14. A Case Based-Shared Teaching Approach in Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: A Way for Integration in Basic and Clinical Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soheil Peiman; Azim Mirzazadeh; Maryam Alizadeh; Sara Mortaz Hejri; Mohammad-Taghi Najafi; Abbas Tafakhori; Farnoosh Larti; Besharat Rahimi; Babak Geraiely; Parichehr Pasbakhsh; Gholamreza Hassanzadeh; Fatemeh Nabavizadeh Rafsanjani; Mohammad Ansari; Seyed Farshad Allameh

    2017-01-01

    ...; Problem based learning; Medical students Introduction There is a growing interest in the connection between basic and clinical sciences in teaching, and learning strategies and the medical schools seek to train medical...

  15. Studying in Australia at The University of Sydney:Bachelor of Applied Science(Medical Radiation Sciences) Diagnostic Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria; Fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The University of Sydney offers a range of undergraduate courses in the area of health sciences,including the Bachelor of Applied Science(MRS) Diagnostic Radiography.The degree prepares students for clinical practice as diagnostic radiographers, working in places such as emergency wards or private clinics.According to a medical practitioner’s request, radiographers aim to work closely with radiologists to

  16. The role of analytical sciences in medical systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Stroobant, P.; Heijden, R. van der

    2004-01-01

    Medical systems biology has generated widespread interest because of its bold conception and exciting potential, but the field is still in its infancy. Although there has been tremendous progress achieved recently in generating, integrating and analysing data in the medical and pharmaceutical field,

  17. QUANTITIES AND UNITS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE - A PLEA FOR STANDARDIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJLSTRA, WG

    1993-01-01

    The paper puts forward the idea that a relative lack of interest in the quantitative aspects of pathophysiological processes has made medical practice as well as medical research vulnerable to misconceptions carried into the field by technical innovations. More attention to these matters may not onl

  18. Relationship between Studying and Learning Strategies and Academic Performances in Medical Sciences Students

    OpenAIRE

    Babaei Shirvani Z; Faramarzi M; Naderi H; Fakhri S

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Survey in learning strategies and its relation with academic achievement will result in movement toward optimal learning. The purpose of this survey was to assess the relation between learning strategies and academic performance in students of Babol University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive-analytical correlation study that was performed in Babol University of Medical Sciences in 2013-14 academic year, 199 students of Medicine, Density, and Paramedicin...

  19. The medical science fiction of James White: Inside and Outside Sector General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard

    2016-12-01

    James White was a Northern Irish science fiction author working in the subgenre of medical science fiction from the mid-1950s to the end of the twentieth century. The aim of this article is to introduce White to scholars working in the medical humanities, pointing to features of interest and critiquing the more excessive utopian impulses of the author. The article covers White's Sector General series, set on a vast intergalactic hospital, as well as the author's standalone fictions.

  20. [Academy of medical sciences during the Great Patriotic War and first years after war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

    2014-06-01

    In the article presented the history of foundation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR and its activities during the World War Two and the early postwar years. According to the authors, the scientific development of many fundamental problems from domestic medicine experience during the war has retained its relevance in solving of the contemporary issues in health and medical science in modern Russia.

  1. A Master of Science course at the Cardiff School of Medical Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R J; Evans, R W; Young, S

    1993-07-01

    Formal teaching and training in medical photography at Cardiff started in 1969 when a School of Medical Photography was established, as part of the Department of Medical Illustration, at the Cardiff Royal Infirmary. In the early 1970s the school was transferred with the Medical Illustration Department to the newly built University Hospital of Wales, and housed in planned accommodation at what is now the Institute of Health Care Studies. The school offered courses in medical photography at the level of the qualifying examinations of the Professional Institutes, to suitably qualified in-service students appointed to the Medical Illustration Department as Trainee Medical Photographers. In 1990, the University of Wales approved a Master of Science course in Medical Illustration (Photography and Video) offered by the school. The course is available both to in-service students of the school and to practising medical photographers as mature students on a distance learning programme. Details of the new course and its delivery are given.

  2. Radiology information management system, TOSRIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Yuichiro; Uchiyama, Akira; Kimura, Hirohito (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    This is a report on a new type of distributed computer system for radiology departments named 'TOSRIM' (Toshiba radiology information management system), which is designed to be installed between medical diagnosis equipment and a host computer system in a hospital. Recently, a new type of host computer system has been developed which enables doctors to order any of the hospital's entire activities using terminals. By connecting 'TOSRIM' to this type of host computer system, many of the activities of a radiology department can be carried out via terminals without the use of examination requirement forms. As well as being connected to medical diagnosis equipment, 'TOSRIM' can also be connected to a medical imaging system which stores and displays medical images. By means of these connections, doctors will be able to diagnose medical images using display terminals without the need for films. (author).

  3. Main radiation protection actions for medical personnel as primary responders front of an event with radiological dispersive device; Principais acoes de protecao radiologica para equipe medica como primeiros respondedores frente a um evento com dispositivo de dispersao radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Hildanielle Ramos

    2015-07-01

    After the terrorist attack in New York, USA, in 2001, there was a worldwide concern about possible attacks using radioactive material in conventional detonators, called as Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb'. Several studies have been and are being made to form a global knowledge about this type of event. As until now, fortunately, there has not been an event with RDD, the Goiania Radiological Accident in Brazil, 1987, is used as a reference for decision-making. Several teams with technical experts should act in an event with RDD, but the medical staffs who respond quickly to the event must be properly protected from the harmful effects of radiation. Based on the radiological protection experts performance during the Goiania accident and the knowledge from lessons learned of many radiological accidents worldwide, this work presents an adaptation of the radiation protection actions for an event with RDD that helps a medical team as primary responders. The following aspects are presented: the problem of radioactive contamination from the explosion of the device in underground environment, the actions of the first responders and evaluation of health radiation effects. This work was based on specialized articles and papers about radiological accidents and RDD; as well as personal communication and academic information of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. The radiation protection actions, adapted to a terrorist attack event with RDD, have as a scenario a subway station in the capital. The main results are: the use of the basic radiation protection principle of time because there is no condition to take care of a patient keeping distance or using a shielding; the use of full appropriate protection cloths for contaminating materials ensuring the physical safety of professionals, and the medical team monitoring at the end of a medical procedure, checking for surface contamination. The main conclusion is that all medical actions

  4. A comparison of personality attributes of science teachers and medical technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, M. U.; Piper, Martha K.

    Undergraduate students who major in science make diverse career choices. Two such career choices are medical technologists and science teachers. One possible reason for science majors selecting different career choices might be attributed to varied personality dimensions. The purpose of this study was to identify a set of personality attributes that distinguish practicing medical technologists from practicing science teachers. The subjects of this study consisted of 83 medical technologists and 57 science teachers. Eysenck Personality (EPI) was utilized to investigate the personality attributes of subjects in terms of Eysenck's personality variable of Extroversion-Introversion and Neuroticism-Stability. Vocational Preference Inventory was utilized to investigate the vocational personality profile of subjects in terms of Holland's classification of occupations and work environment. Data with EPI revealed that there was no significant difference between medical technologists and science teachers with respect to Eysenck's personality variable of extroversion. However, there was found a significant difference between the two groups with respect to Eysenck's personality variable of neuroticism. Data with VPI revealed that there was no significant difference between medical technologists and science teachers with respect to Eysenck's personality variable of extroversion. Both the groups were characterized by the personality profile of IAS (Intellectual-Artistic-Social). This profile was different from that required earlier in literature.

  5. A CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASES, ATTENDING THE CHEST HOSPITAL OF MEDICAL COLLEGE FROM NORTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To know the clinical and radiological profile of patients of Interstitial Lung Diseases attending the Chest Hospital of Medical College from North India from February 2014 to December 2015. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study was conducted in Department of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, G.S.V.M. Medical College, Kanpur (India. The patients were subjected to complete clinical history (Including work environment and occupational history, physical examination, various haematological investigations, spirometry and high resolution computerized tomography thorax. RESULTS In present study a total of 80 patients with interstitial lung disease were analysed. There were 36 males and 44 females (mean age was 54.4±1.8 years. Of 80 patients of interstitial lung diseases examined, Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF pattern was present in maximum number (38.8% followed by sarcoidosis (17.5%, Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (15% Non-specific interstitial pneumonias (10%, Connective Tissue Disorder (C.T.D. associated ILD (7.5% and Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonias (C.O.P. in 5% of cases. CONCLUSION IPF was the most common subgroup among ILDs.

  6. Herzl's Altneuland: Zionist utopia, medical science and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Nadav; Seidelman, Rhona

    In this article we explore how the vision uniting Zionism, science, medicine and public health is depicted in Herzl's novel Altneuland (Old-New Land). Altneuland, which belongs to the genre of fin-de-siècle utopian novels, presents a modernistic vision of progress, integrating science with a humanistic society of equals. The remedy for the "psychopathology of the Jew" was believed by many Zionists to be a return to Palestine, and the establishment there of a healthy national Jewish home. Yet, Herzl's utopia, as depicted in Altneuland, is homogeneous, not allowing for other voices to be expressed, such as those of women and Arabs. Moreover, the belief that science and technology could solve social problems did not take into account the tensions that they would create in the society and environment. This vision of science and society, with its inherent tensions, will continue to inform the Zionist discourse of our present day.

  7. Inspiring Careers in STEM and Healthcare Fields through Medical Simulation Embedded in High School Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Louis J.; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L.; Goyal, Riya; Joyal, Julie A.; Gordon, James A.; Faux, Russell; Oriol, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    The most effective ways to promote learning and inspire careers related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain elusive. To address this gap, we reviewed the literature and designed and implemented a high-fidelity, medical simulation-based Harvard Medical School MEDscience course, which was integrated into high school…

  8. Emergency Medical Science (T-139). Curriculum Models, Guidelines, and Outcome-Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovin, Barbara Keelor

    Developed for use by curriculum planners in Emergency Medical Science (EMS) programs throughout the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS), and by evaluators in their reviews of existing programs, this manual provides a model set of guidelines for the education and training of the Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic (EMT-P) in…

  9. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences - Vol 4, No 2 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    e-Learning: The nextbig thing in medical education · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Faecal Contamination of Feeding Bottles Contents, Among Artificially Fed Children ... Article Neurotransmitters – A biochemical view · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL ...

  10. SAMJ Editorial From science council to health and medical research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-07-07

    Jul 7, 1994 ... important to ensure its proper acceptance and credibility among its clients .... possibility that this form of nutritional therapy might reduce the long-term ..... commitment of the medical schemes industry to accept responsibility for ...

  11. Pattern of Medical Admissions at Enugu State University of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESUTTH are routinely admitted into any of the female and male medical wards ..... of electronic media for dissemination of information about the infection may also ... made data collection time consuming and laborious, and in some cases, to ...

  12. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research ... 7JN Dr Osita Nwaneri Department of Pediatrics Graduate Medical Education University of Minnesota ... Orthopedic Hospital Enugu, Nigeria

  13. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Medical research-ethics applied to social sciences: relevance, limits, issues and necessary adjustments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desclaux, A

    2008-04-01

    Social sciences are concretely concerned by the ethics of medical research when they deal with topics related to health, since they are subjected to clearance procedures specific to this field. This raises at least three questions: - Are principles and practices of medical research ethics and social science research compatible? - Are "research subjects" protected by medical research ethics when they participate in social science research projects? - What can social sciences provide to on-going debates and reflexion in this field? The analysis of the comments coming from ethics committees about social science research projects, and of the experience of implementation of these projects, shows that the application of international ethics standards by institutional review boards or ethics committees raises many problems in particular for researches in ethnology anthropology and sociology. These problems may produce an impoverishment of research, pervert its meaning, even hinder any research. They are not only related to different norms, but also to epistemological divergences. Moreover, in the case of studies in social sciences, the immediate and differed risks, the costs, as well as the benefits for subjects, are very different from those related to medical research. These considerations are presently a matter of debates in several countries such as Canada, Brasil, and USA. From another hand, ethics committees seem to have developed without resorting in any manner to the reflexion carried out within social sciences and more particularly in anthropology Still, the stakes of the ethical debates in anthropology show that many important and relevant issues have been discussed. Considering this debate would provide openings for the reflexion in ethics of health research. Ethnographic studies of medical research ethics principles and practices in various sociocultural contexts may also contribute to the advancement of medical ethics. A "mutual adjustment" between ethics of

  15. The Oral History Program: II. Personal views of health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D; Pifalo, V

    1998-07-01

    The Medical Library Association Oral History Program uses accepted oral history techniques to collect and preserve interviews with members. The original taped interviews and transcripts are kept in the Medical Library Association archives and made available for research purposes; edited copies of the interviews are distributed through the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and members are encouraged to borrow and read the histories. Summaries of forty-three interviews provide personal views on health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association.

  16. Profile of thoracic injury at College of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2014-01-01

    injury. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 30-39 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9671

  17. Determining the Correlation Between Language Scores Obtained by Medical Students in their University Entrance and Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Some professors and educators in the field of English language believe that the high grades attained by medical students in their Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE are mainly a result of the students prior fluency in the language before entering medical colleges; they are of the opinion that these grades are not necessarily a result of the combined effort of the English teachers and students in language courses at the university. This research aims at determining the correlation between the level of fluency in English of medical students prior to university entrance and the grades obtained by them in their CMBSE after 3 terms of language courses at the university. Methods: Seven of the major and smaller universities of medical sciences were selected. The language scores of 2426 students admitted to these universities during the three academic years of 1999 to 2002 in both the National University Entrance Examination (NUEE and the Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE were obtained from their related universities and from the secretariat of the Council of Medical Basic Sciences Education respectively. The language scores of each student obtained in both NUEE and CMBSE were then matched. The related SPSS software was used to assess the level of correlation between these two groups of language scores for the students of each university, for each academic year and semester and also the overall score for the three years. Results: Overall a positive and moderately significant correlation was found between the NUEE language scores and those of the CMBSE of the students of the universities studied (P<0/001; R=443%. The level of correlation for the various universities studied differed (Max. 69%, min.27%. A comparison of the means of these two groups of scores also confirmed this correlation. Conclusion: students’ grades The NUEE language score was not the only factor affecting the student’s CMBSE

  18. Impacts of outsourcing in educational hospitals in Iran: A study on Isfahan University of Medical Sciences-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Saeed; Agharahimi, Zahra; Yaghoubi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Outsourcing in healthcare is a cost-effective strategy that can lead to increase services quality. The aim of this study was to determine the types of services that have been outsourced in educational hospitals in Isfahan and to investigate managers' view about the impact of Outsourcing. A descriptive-survey study carried out in 2010. Our samples consisted of 100 educational hospital and treatment deputy senior managers of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and 53 usable questionnaires were received. Survey instrument main points were the extent to which educational hospital outsource services and the impact of Outsourcing. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire have been verified. Data are analyzed with SPSS18 software. The results for medical-diagnostics services showed physiotherapy, radiology, and ultrasound that have the highest rate (33%) of being outsourced. Between logistic and administrative activities, housekeeping, and facility engineering maintenance services are the highest rate of outsourced (100%) and green space, CSR, laundry, and medical records are the lowest rate of outsourced (16%). In managers' view, in relation to advantages of outsourcing, pay more attention to internal and external customers in private sector (57.2%) was the highest. In relation to disadvantages of outsourcing, costs increase for the patients (45.6%) was the highest. In relation to barriers of outsourcing, forgetting the goal of outsourcing (efficiency) (60.6%) was the highest. Finally, managers' views about outsourcing in health services organizations were rather acceptable, but in their views, there are barriers in implementation of outsourcing and they are focused on removing the barriers before outsourcing. Fundamental infrastructure developments as making competing market, promoting of cultures, education, modifying the management attitude and approach, and establishing incentive policies are emphasized for successful implementation of outsourcing.

  19. Integrating of scenario-based simulation into radiology education to improve critical thinking skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuzaid MM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available MM Abuzaid, W Elshami Medical Diagnostic Imaging Department, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Introduction: For many years, conventional radiographic films have been used for radiology education. Nevertheless, advances in imaging modalities, image quality, and the number of images produced by various methods have seen a move toward digital formats. Certainly, a patient’s case has a significant value in medical education; it can transfer theoretical knowledge to real experiences. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of scenario-based simulations in radiology education and their impact on professional learning outcomes.Materials and methods: Patient scenarios were collected and converted to digital teaching files, each supported by clinical history, anatomy illustration, as well as medical and radiological investigation. The scenarios were presented online to radiology professionals for 6 months. At the end of the study, the scenarios were evaluated regarding design, content, and their role in improving critical thinking.Results: Twenty-two scenarios were published online covering various radiology areas. Two hundred and thirty-eight radiology professionals were invited, and 84% participated in the evaluation process. Each participant completed an average of 13 scenarios with an approximate time of 23 minutes for each. The majority of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the scenarios were well designed (94%, were appropriate to their level of knowledge (70%, and helped them in critical thinking and in understanding similar cases (79%. Conclusion: The integration of scenario-based simulations in radiology education led to a positive impact on learning outcomes, formative interactive learning, and filling the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, it promoted critical thinking skills and allowed radiology professionals to demonstrate their knowledge of similar cases

  20. Medical anthropology: toward a third moment in social science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, W W

    2001-12-01

    This article about medical anthropology was inspired by the work of Pierre Bourdieu, specifically, his efforts to reconcile the antinomy of a "social structuralist" and a "cultural constructivist" perspective. These perspectives are often opposed in the literature, but, in Bourdieu's view, human life cannot be studied without taking into account both how individuals are situated within and constrained by social structures and how those individuals construct an understanding of and impose meaning on the world around them. I argue that the special subject matter of medical anthropology--human health--demands that a synthetic approach be taken in our theory and research. I illustrate this argument with examples from my own research on social and cultural factors associated with blood pressure, and I point to other examples of this synthesis in medical anthropology. The results of this research hold promise for the continuing refinement of culture theory.

  1. Radiologic assessment of a self-shield with boron-containing water for a compact medical cyclotron

    OpenAIRE

    Horitsugi, Genki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Hiromi; Hamada, Seiki; Obara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The cyclotron at our hospital has a self-shield of boron-containing water. The amount of induced radioactivity in the boron-containing water shield of a compact medical cyclotron has not yet been reported. In this study, we measured the photon and neutron dose rates outside the self-shield during cyclotron operation. We estimated the induced radioactivities of the boron-containing water used for the self-shield and then measured them. We estimated the activation of concrete outside the self-s...

  2. Towards effective evaluation and reform in medical education: a cognitive and learning sciences perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L; Yoskowitz, Nicole A; Arocha, Jose F

    2009-12-01

    Health professions education is dealing with major transformations in light of the changing nature of the health care delivery system, including the use of technology for "just in time" delivery of care, evidence-based practice, personalized medical care and learning, as health professionals strive to integrate biomedical advances and clinical practice. This has forced the medical education community to reassess the current teaching and learning practices and more importantly, the evaluation of the medical education process. There have been recent advances in cognitive and learning sciences theories, some of which can inform medical educators about best teaching and learning practices and their impact on the evaluation process. An understanding of these theories provides a sound rationale for choosing specific instructional strategies and choosing evaluation measures that assess the curricular objectives. The review begins with an overview of evaluation and assessment in education, followed by an overview of major theories from the cognitive and learning sciences. Next, the role of cognitive and learning sciences theories in informing the process of medical education evaluation is discussed, including its impact on student learning, performance and professional competence, as well as recommendations for reform of medical curricula based on such theories. The paper continues with the elaboration of current trends in health sciences education, particularly medical education, and available evidence for the impact on student learning and performance as well as areas where more research is needed.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewski Wojciech; Roszak Magdalena; Kołodziejczak Barbara; Ren-Kurc Anna; Bręborowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  4. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  5. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology; Dosimetria en medico especialista en procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, Col. Villa Quietud, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Izeta G, A. C. [Hospital Central Militar, Periferico y Av. Ejercito Nacional s/n, 11200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Instituto de Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Arreola, M., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Shands Hospital at University of Florida, Department of Radiology, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  6. Science means business: medical imaging shows colour of money

    CERN Multimedia

    Macfie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Doctors have used x-ray machines for 100 years, but they remain an imprecise and limited diagnostic tool. But a team of Canterbury University researchers is aiming to revolutionise medical x-ray technology with high-precision colour imaging. (1,5 page)

  7. [Conception and embryonic development between poetry and medical science: Dracontius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Innocenzo

    2010-01-01

    The article examines on the ancient theme of conception and development of embryo such as presented in the narration of Christus' conception in the De laudibus dei by Dracontius. Dracontius' description is not the only one in ancient Christian poetry, but it is surely the most ancient and the richest in medical details.

  8. Features of Medical Student's Theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a Five-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Hamzavi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of the studies conducted in Iranian medical schools are carried out as student's theses on which a lot of time and energy is spent. The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of medical student's theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a five year period (2004-2008.Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study a checklist consisting of 21 questions was designed. The data were gathered from all medical student's theses during 2004-2008 (n=189 using a consensus method of data collection. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software.Results: In terms of type, most of the theses were descriptive cross-sectional (33.3%, descriptive (29.1%, and descriptive-analytical (18.5%. The highest number of theses belonged to clinical psychiatry (18.5% and obstetrics and gynecology (17.5% departments. Other departments, especially basic science departments had the lowest number of theses because clinical teachers constituted 86.2% of the supervisors. The duration of the thesis completion was between 2 and 24 months. Using hospital records and inpatients files were the methods mostly used for data collection and as data sources. Furthermore, we could not find an appropriate assessment and scoring system of theses in place.Conclusion: Medical student's theses lacked appropriate quality therefore this issue should be seriously taken into consideration by educational managers.

  9. Disciplining Medicine: Science and the Rhetoric of Medical Education Reform in Britain, 1770-1858

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Pollei, Kimberly A.

    In Britain, medical education evolved significantly between roughly 1770 and 1858. The doctrines established by medical teachers in the late eighteenth century not only revised or overturned received theories of disease, physiology, and therapeutics, but also entailed new approaches to instruction. Though this educational reform process met some resistance, by the mid-nineteenth century, the new scientific perspective had displaced the traditional humanistic paradigm in medical pedagogy. In Britain, this evolution was initiated in Scotland, where its leading medical teachers would gain considerable fame for championing a new science-based educational curriculum. A contribution to the fields of rhetoric of medicine and rhetoric of science, this study investigates the rhetorical demarcation of the medical discipline in Britain during the years of medical education reform. It draws attention to how the medical discipline evolved and transformed between these years, ultimately defining itself as a science. Focusing on documents addressed to questions of pedagogical method, curricular emphases, and doctrinal disputes, this study identifies the chief arguments, assumptions, and aspirations that motivated and justified innovations in the teaching of medicine at specific British institutions and promoted broader, sweeping reform of the whole system of British medical education. The analysis of these texts highlights the complexities of medical education reform in Britain, and the diverse perspectives that coalesced to shape medical education in new ways. Moreover, these discourses serve as historical markers for how the medical discipline was (re)shaped scientifically. Finally, this study contends that disciplines are most apparently shaped through what is taught, and to understand the rhetoric of disciplinarity in British medical education reform, one must understand the history of its teaching practices.

  10. Medical imaging in personalised medicine: a white paper of the research committee of the European Society of Radiology (ESR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually tailored treatments, a concept that has been designated 'personalised medicine' (PM), which aims to deliver the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Medical imaging has always been personalised and is fundamental to almost all aspects of PM. It is instrumental in solving clinical differential diagnoses. Imaging procedures are tailored to the clinical problem and patient characteristics. Screening for preclinical disease is done with imaging. Stratification based on imaging biomarkers can help identify individuals suited for preventive intervention. Treatment decisions are based on the in vivo visualisation of the location and extent of an abnormality, as well as the loco-regional physiological, biochemical and biological processes using structural and molecular imaging. Image-guided biopsy provides relevant tissue specimens for genetic/molecular characterisation. In addition, radiogenomics relate imaging biomarkers to these genetic and molecular features. Furthermore, imaging is essential to patient-tailored therapy planning, therapy monitoring and follow-up of disease, as well as targeting non-invasive or minimally invasive treatments, especially with the rise of theranostics. Radiologists need to be prepared for this new paradigm as it will mean changes in training, clinical practice and in research. Key Points • Medical imaging is a key component in personalised medicine • Personalised prevention will rely on image-based screening programmes • Anatomical, functional and molecular imaging biomarkers affect decisions on the type and intensity of treatment • Treatment response assessment with imaging will improve personalised treatment • Image-based invasive intervention integrates personalised diagnosis and personalised treatment.

  11. ImaSim, a software tool for basic education of medical x-ray imaging in radiotherapy and radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    guillaume elandry

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: X-ray imaging is an important part of medicine and plays a crucial role in radiotherapy. Education in this field is mostly limited to textbook teaching due to equipment restrictions. A novel simulation tool, ImaSim, for teaching the fundamentals of the x-ray imaging process based on ray-tracing is presented in this work. ImaSim is used interactively via a graphical user interface (GUI.Materials and methods: The software package covers the main x-ray based medical modalities: planar kilo voltage (kV, planar (portal mega voltage (MV, fan beam computed tomography (CT and cone beam CT (CBCT imaging. The user can modify the photon source, object to be imaged and imaging setup with three-dimensional editors. Objects are currently obtained by combining blocks with variable shapes. The imaging of three-dimensional voxelized geometries is currently not implemented, but can be added in a later release. The program follows a ray-tracing approach, ignoring photon scatter in its current implementation. Simulations of a phantom CT scan were generated in ImaSim and were compared to measured data in terms of CT number accuracy. Spatial variations in the photon fluence and mean energy from an x-ray tube caused by the heel effect were estimated from ImaSim and Monte Carlo simulations and compared.Results: In this paper we describe ImaSim and provide two examples of its capabilities. CT numbers were found to agree within 36 Hounsfield Units (HU for bone, which corresponds to a 2% attenuation coefficient difference. ImaSim reproduced the heel effect reasonably well when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Discussion: An x-ray imaging simulation tool is made available for teaching and research purposes. ImaSim provides a means to facilitate the teaching of medical x-ray imaging.

  12. ImaSim, a software tool for basic education of medical x-ray imaging in radiotherapy and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; deBlois, François; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: X-ray imaging is an important part of medicine and plays a crucial role in radiotherapy. Education in this field is mostly limited to textbook teaching due to equipment restrictions. A novel simulation tool, ImaSim, for teaching the fundamentals of the x-ray imaging process based on ray-tracing is presented in this work. ImaSim is used interactively via a graphical user interface (GUI). Materials and methods: The software package covers the main x-ray based medical modalities: planar kilo voltage (kV), planar (portal) mega voltage (MV), fan beam computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The user can modify the photon source, object to be imaged and imaging setup with three-dimensional editors. Objects are currently obtained by combining blocks with variable shapes. The imaging of three-dimensional voxelized geometries is currently not implemented, but can be added in a later release. The program follows a ray-tracing approach, ignoring photon scatter in its current implementation. Simulations of a phantom CT scan were generated in ImaSim and were compared to measured data in terms of CT number accuracy. Spatial variations in the photon fluence and mean energy from an x-ray tube caused by the heel effect were estimated from ImaSim and Monte Carlo simulations and compared. Results: In this paper we describe ImaSim and provide two examples of its capabilities. CT numbers were found to agree within 36 Hounsfield Units (HU) for bone, which corresponds to a 2% attenuation coefficient difference. ImaSim reproduced the heel effect reasonably well when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Discussion: An x-ray imaging simulation tool is made available for teaching and research purposes. ImaSim provides a means to facilitate the teaching of medical x-ray imaging.

  13. The graduate training in medical information sciences in the Academic Medical Centre at the University of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, L N; Zwetsloot-Schonk, J H; Jaspers, M W; Louter, G L; Timmers, T

    1998-06-01

    Since its inception in 1987, the 4-year Medical Information Sciences (MIS) curriculum at the Academic Medical Centre (AMC), Amsterdam has gone through several major changes. The present curriculum started in 1994. The course takes 4 years, the first 3 years are programmed in integrated modules of 7 weeks in duration each. In these modules much attention is given to interactive teaching, problem based learning and private study. Typical for the Amsterdam curriculum is a strong emphasis on the role and significance of data and information in health care and its management. The authors see information technology per se as auxiliary to this orientation. Presently, about 150 students follow the courses.

  14. Program evaluation of an Integrated Basic Science Medical Curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, Using CIPP Evaluation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooholamini, Azadeh; Amini, Mitra; Bazrafkan, Leila; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeilzadeh, Zohreh; Nabeiei, Parisa; Rezaee, Rita; Kojuri, Javad

    2017-07-01

    In recent years curriculum reform and integration was done in many medical schools. The integrated curriculum is a popular concept all over the world. In Shiraz medical school, the reform was initiated by stablishing the horizontal basic science integration model and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. This study is an analytic descriptive and triangulation mixed method study which was carried out in Shiraz Medical School in 2012, based on the views of professors of basic sciences courses and first and second year medical students. The study evaluated the quality of the relationship between basic sciences and clinical courses and the method of presenting such courses based on the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) model. The tools for collecting data, both quantitatively and qualitatively, were some questionnaires, content analysis of portfolios, semi- structured interview and brain storming sessions. For quantitative data analysis, SPSS software, version 14, was used. In the context evaluation by modified DREEM questionnaire, 77.75%of the students believed that this educational system encourages them to actively participate in classes. Course schedule and atmosphere of class were reported suitable by 87.81% and 83.86% of students. In input domain that was measured by a researcher made questionnaire, the facilities for education were acceptable except for shortage of cadavers. In process evaluation, the quality of integrated modules presentation and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) was good from the students' viewpoint. In product evaluation, students' brain storming, students' portfolio and semi-structured interview with faculties were done, showing some positive aspects of integration and some areas that need improvement. The main advantage of assessing

  15. O residente ideal em radiologia e diagnóstico por imagem The ideal medical resident for radiology and imaging diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Guimarães de Sousa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Comissão Nacional de Residência Médica, em 2003, estabeleceu novos critérios para o credenciamento de programas de Residência Médica em Radiologia e Diagnóstico por Imagem. Apesar dessas normas representarem um avanço no treinamento do residente, outras competências e habilidades específicas deverão ser desenvolvidas no sentido de acompanhar o rápido desenvolvimento técnico e científico, e para atender as novas exigências do mercado de trabalho. Os autores apresentam as principais competências e habilidades que complementam a formação do radiologista, sugerindo modificação nos atuais programas para que os residentes possam adquiri-las.In 2003, the National Committee of Medical Residency established new criteria for the accreditation of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis Residency programs. Although these rules represent an advance to the resident's training, other specific abilities and skills should be developed in order to keep up with the technical and scientific advances and with the new requirements of the career. The authors' present the must important competencies and skills that complement the radiologist's education and suggest a change in current programs so that the resident can acquire these competencies and skills.

  16. Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical

  17. Is basic science disappearing from medicine? The decline of biomedical research in the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin E; Goldenberg, Neil M; Fairn, Gregory D; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Slutsky, Arthur S; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Explosive growth in our understanding of genomics and molecular biology have fueled calls for the pursuit of personalized medicine, the notion of harnessing biologic variability to provide patient-specific care. This vision will necessitate a deep understanding of the underlying pathophysiology in each patient. Medical journals play a pivotal role in the education of trainees and clinicians, yet we suspected that the amount of basic science in the top medical journals has been in decline. We conducted an automated search strategy in PubMed to identify basic science articles and calculated the proportion of articles dealing with basic science in the highest impact journals for 8 different medical specialties from 1994 to 2013. We observed a steep decline (40-60%) in such articles over time in almost all of the journals examined. This rapid decline in basic science from medical journals is likely to affect practitioners' understanding of and interest in the basic mechanisms of disease and therapy. In this Life Sciences Forum, we discuss why this decline may be occurring and what it means for the future of science and medicine. © FASEB.

  18. Trends of Training Courses Conducted in the Human Resources Development Center of the National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology After the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuko; Iida, Haruzo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-07-01

    Environmental contamination with radioactive materials caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in 2011 raised a serious health concern among residents in Japan, and the demand for radiation experts who can handle the radiation-associated problems has increased. The Human Resources Development Center (HRDC) of the National Institute of for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan has offered a variety of training programs covering a wide range of technologies associated with radiation since 1959. In this study, the time-course change in the number and age of the applicants for training programs regularly scheduled at HRDC were analyzed to characterize the demand after the NPP accident. The results suggested that the demand for the training of industrial radiation experts elevated sharply after the NPP accident followed by a prompt decrease, and that young people were likely stimulated to learn the basics of radiation. The demand for the training of medical radiation experts was kept high regardless of the NPP accident. The demand for the training of radiation emergency experts fluctuated apparently with three components: a terminating demand after the criticality accident that occurred in 1999, an urgent demand for handling of the NPP accident, and a sustained demand from local governments that undertook reinforcement of their nuclear disaster prevention program. The demand for the training of school students appeared to be increasing after the NPP accident. It could be foreseen that the demand for training programs targeting young people and medical radiation experts would be elevated in future.

  19. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The NSS/MIC is a well-established meeting that has continuously provided an exceptional venue to showcase outstanding developments and contributions across the nuclear and medical instrumentation fields. This conference brings together engineers and scientists from around the world to share their knowledge and to gain insight and inspiration from others. The conference will include a distinguished series of short courses, relevant refresher courses, and workshops that will address areas of particular interest.

  1. Rhazes contribution to the development and progress of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gammal, S Y

    1995-01-01

    Rhazes was fond of music since his childhood, then studied philosophy and wrote several books about it. Later on he indulged himself in the study of chemistry and medicine. After finishing his studies, Rhazes went back to his home town and practised medicine and soon became very famous. He wrote more than 224 books on various subjects. His most important work is the medical encyclopaedia "continens" (Al-Hawi) which greatly effected the human civilization specially in Europe.

  2. Study of Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems Among Medical Students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences Loni, Western Maharashtra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, PA; Baviskar, MP; Phalke, DB

    2013-01-01

    Background: Good quality sleep and adequate amount of sleep are important in order to have better cognitive performance and avoid health problems and psychiatric disorders. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates, interns and postgraduate students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. Subject and Methods: Sleep habits and problems were investigated using a convenience sample ...

  3. Radiologic assessment of a self-shield with boron-containing water for a compact medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitsugi, Genki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Hiromi; Hamada, Seiki; Obara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The cyclotron at our hospital has a self-shield of boron-containing water. The amount of induced radioactivity in the boron-containing water shield of a compact medical cyclotron has not yet been reported. In this study, we measured the photon and neutron dose rates outside the self-shield during cyclotron operation. We estimated the induced radioactivities of the boron-containing water used for the self-shield and then measured them. We estimated the activation of concrete outside the self-shield in the cyclotron laboratory. The thermal neutron flux during cyclotron operation was estimated to be 4.72 × 10(2) cm(-2) s(-1), and the activation of concrete in a cyclotron laboratory was about three orders of magnitude lower than the clearance level of RS-G-1.7 (IAEA). The activity concentration of the boron-containing water did not exceed the concentration limit for radioactive isotopes in drainage in Japan and the exemption level for Basic Safety Standards. Consequently, the boron-containing water is treatable as non-radioactive waste. Neutrons were effectively shielded by the self-shield during cyclotron operation.

  4. Radiology preparedness in ebola virus disease: guidelines and challenges for disinfection of medical imaging equipment for the protection of staff and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollura, Daniel J; Palmore, Tara N; Folio, Les R; Bluemke, David A

    2015-05-01

    The overlap of early Ebola virus disease (EVD) symptoms (eg, fever, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, emesis, and fatigue) with symptoms of other more common travel-related diseases (eg, malaria, typhoid fever, pneumonia, and meningococcemia) may result in delayed diagnosis of EVD before isolation of infected patients. Radiology departments should consider policies for and approaches to decontamination of expensive and potentially easily damaged radiology equipment. In addition, the protection of radiology personnel must be considered during the work-up phase of undiagnosed EVD patients presenting to emergency departments. The purpose of this article is to consider the effect of EVD on radiology departments and imaging equipment, with particular consideration of guidelines currently available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that may be applicable to radiology. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  5. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanazi AF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment

  6. Changing educational needs of psychologists: do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belar, Cynthia D

    2008-03-01

    Psychologists of the 21st century must be highly skilled and versatile to function effectively in academic health centers (AHCs). Thus, the current paper focuses on the training psychologists receive to prepare them for their diverse roles in AHCs. The paper is framed around the question: Do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science? posed to the author by the conference organizers of the 3rd National Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Conference and is based on the perspective of the author.

  7. Reasons of absence from clinical foundation classes from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abedin vakili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Absence of students from classes can reduce the quality of education and increase the failure rate. The present study aims to assess the reasons of absence from classes in basic sciences from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed using a questionnaire with the participation of medical students who undertook basic sciences' course and BSc. students who studied in year two of the course. A questionnaire containing demographic data and factors influencing on students' absence including teacher, student, educational processing and physical conditions of classrooms was designed. Students completed the questionnaire before starting of lectures in classrooms. Results: The results showed that 39% of students were absent two hours and 22.4% were absent for four hours per course credit and 38.6% said they were not aim to be absent except in emergency situation. at all.   Inappropriate teaching was identified as the main reason for absence (3.53 / 4±1.1 followed by inadequate sleep the night before the class (3.45 / 4±1.33 lack of scholarship in teaching (3.43 / 4±1.21 and lack of self-interest to the field (1.76 / 4±1.13. Conclusion: Education planners should consider factors influencing on absence of students. In faculty recruitment, academic proficiency and scholarship of teaching should also be considered. Moreover, emotional status of students should be noticed.

  8. [Suggestions of reshaping medical education (The Hungarian medical elite at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences) 1947-1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Szabó, József

    2017-03-01

    This study is part of the monograph entitled Scientific Elites and Politics (1945-1948) to be published soon. The relationships of political parties with several elite groups, such as groups of agronomic, human, economic, legal, technical and natural sciences, as well as the roles of these elites in scientific life, have been looked into and published in renowned periodicals. Using new sources, different specialist groups' and political powers' suggestions of reshaping medical education in 1947 and 1948, are presented. The medical elite's situation at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is also outlined. The study renders an account of the entire post-war medical elite. It will be stated who and based on what scientific achievement became member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, who was appointed to professor and who became a habilitated doctor. This study, which is a desideratum of research, may not only interest researchers but is aimed at a broader readership, including physicians. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(11), 432-437.

  9. Interconnections of basic science research and product development in medical device design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Mary Beth; Design, M; Johnson, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between basic science research and product design/development are intertwined. This paper explores the definition of basic science and design as it relates to medical device development. It is intended to serve as a reference for both researchers and device developers to assist in trans-disciplinary collaborative efforts in improving patient care as each are of equal importance. The definition of a medical device is broad and varied. This paper is aimed towards those devices which interact with tissue and are rooted in the tenets of science. Both the scientific method and the design process are compared with similarities and opposites identified. The paper concludes identifying fundamental principles of medical device development and highlights the importance of both entities.

  10. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays; Avance del Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdejo S, M. [Direccion de Riesgos Radiologicos, Direccion General de Salud Ambiental (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  11. [Bernardino Ramazzini's influence in medical science in the XVIII century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, S

    2010-01-01

    Neo-hippocratism consists in a rational and mechanic method to explain pathological phenomena and discover the causes of diseases. Bernardino Ramazzini uses Hippocratic empirical observation to investigate the relations between the alterations of the air--due to mephitic vapours, of organic and inorganic origin--and the development of pathological processes. His notion of corruption of the atmosphere as the origin of epidemics and specific diseases, and that of prevention as the main strategy of modern medicine, is developed in medical literature and in the Public Medicine projects of the end of the Seventeenth century.

  12. Sleep Hygiene Practices and Their Relation to Sleep Quality in Medical Students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poor quality of sleep is a distressing and worrying condition that can disturb academic performance of medical students. Sleep hygiene practices are one of the important variables that affect sleep quality. The objective of this study was to assess association between sleep hygiene practices and sleep quality of medical students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, a total of 285 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire. Demographic data, sleep-wake schedule in weekday and weekend, and sleep duration were collected. Students' sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver 13. Results: Overall, 164 (57.5 of students had poor sleep quality. Mean global PSQI score and average score of four subscales were significantly higher in male than female. Regression analysis showed that male students (β=-0.85, P<0.05, students at senior level (β=-0.81, P<0.05, married students (β=-0.45, P<0.05, and those with improper sleep hygiene practices slept worse. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the prevalence of poor sleep quality in medical students is high. Improper sleep hygiene behaviors might be a reason for poor quality of sleep in medical students.

  13. Reciprocal Evolution of Opiate Science from Medical and Cultural Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Pilonis, Nastazja; Ptacek, Radek; Kream, Richard M

    2017-06-13

    Over the course of human history, it has been common to use plants for medicinal purposes, such as for providing relief from particular maladies and self-medication. Opium represents one longstanding remedy that has been used to address a range of medical conditions, alleviating discomfort often in ways that have proven pleasurable. Opium is a combination of compounds obtained from the mature fruit of opium poppy, papaver somniferum. Morphine and its biosynthetic precursors thebaine and codeine constitute the main bioactive opiate alkaloids contained in opium. Opium usage in ancient cultures is well documented, as is its major extract morphine. The presence of endogenous opiate alkaloids and opioid peptides in animals owe their discovery to their consistent actions at particular concentrations via stereo select receptors. In vitro expression of morphine within a microbiological industrial setting underscores the role it plays as a multi-purpose pharmacological agent, as well as reinforcing why it can also lead to long-term social dependence. Furthermore, it clearly establishes a reciprocal effect of human intelligence on modifying evolutionary processes in papaver somniferum and related plant species.

  14. Evaluation of board performance in Iran's universities of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Farzan, Homayoun; Aminlou, Hasan; Hadi, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME). In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time.RESULTS also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards' resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process.

  15. Perception of the Medical Students on Their Future Career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them...

  16. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andyscarsbrook1@aol.com; Graham, R.N.J. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Perriss, R.W. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training.

  17. Position of information science in the medical and health studies curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralova, E; Kukurova, E; Bergendi, L; Traubner, P

    2006-01-01

    Innovation of both the content and forms of informatics teaching directed on exploitation of technical facilities and methods of information and communication technologies (ICT) in non-informatics universities study programmes and in life-long education is still actual today. Expanding knowledge base of the life and health sciences requires to form new skills to educate the end-users and facilitate an immediate information access. Theoretical and practical teaching in pregradual medical and health studies includes the basic contacts of students with the modern technique and special medical devices supported or completed by computers. The teaching of information science and corresponding subjects represents small but important part of medical and health studies curricula at all medical faculties in Slovakia (Fig. 2, Ref. 8).

  18. Monograph support provided by the National Library of Medicine and its regional medical libraries in the medical behavioral sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, J D; Griffith, B C

    1988-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine's (NLM) monographic resources in the medical behavioral sciences (MBS) were examined to assess NLM's ability to support the needs of researchers writing in this area. A sample of 239 representative monographs derived from citations in MBS-related articles published in 61 journals in 1981 were evaluated. These monographs were limited to works published between 1978 and 1981, inclusive. The subject distribution of the sample included fourteen of the twenty-one main classes in the LC classification, although BF (psychology), H (social sciences), and R (medicine) constituted 80.3% of the sample. The study revealed that NLM held 48.5% of the sample. The holdings of ten research medical libraries, including six of the seven regional medical libraries, were also evaluated in order to gauge NLM's ability to support that element of the medical library network. The holding rates of these libraries ranged widely (9.6% to 36%), although NLM was found to have far more extensive holdings overall, and when assessed against classes BF, H, and R. Overall, NLM could have supplied from 28.8% to 44.5% of the monographs not held by the medical libraries. In only a few cases were the ten medical libraries able to provide access to monographs not held by NLM. The findings of the study indicate that, regardless of NLM's indication of support to the MBS area, the holdings of more general research and academic libraries are essential to support the monograph needs of MBS researchers. PMID:3224221

  19. AN ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY ASPECTS OF THE STUDENTS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nikpour

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a base-scale is prepared for the evaluation of the personality grounds of the Tehran University of Medical Science students. Such a scoring scale may be useful to help the medical science students in career development, psychosocial consultations, and appropriate supportive care plans. A sample of 205 female and male students resident in dormitories were evaluated using “Bernreuter” personality questionnaires and computer programs prepared in this center. The percentiles of each scale is scored and represented in a systematic framework. Considering the normal distribution of the results using their means and standard deviations, the important percentages in each scale is tabulated.

  20. Radiological analysis of osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, C

    2000-09-30

    This paper is intended to provide medical radiation technologists with an overview of how radiology can play a role in the detection of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is defined as disease where there is a generalized or localized deficiency of bone matrix. This deficiency causes bones to become weak resulting in an increased risk of fracture. Current methods to detect bone deficiency involve the use of bone densitometry. Over the years both radioactivity and ionizing radiation have been used to measure bone density. Currently the preferred method of choice for bone densitometry is a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry unit. This unit has the greatest reliability and precision with a low absorbed dose to the patient. With early detection of the disease, treatment can begin and further bone loss prevented. In the future, radiology will continue to be a valuable asset in the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. (author)

  1. Information and its role in medical and pharmaceutical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Manabu

    This is a record of the lecture at the Lecturer Meeting for Scientific and Technical Information, which was held as one of the events of Science and Technology Week in 1989. Lecturer explains how the scientific information takes part in research and how researchers make use of it, based on his own experience. He states that the information is especially important in R & D and creative research, by showing the case of studies in the chironomidmidges as an example. Referring to the researches being conducted outside of large cities, he states that online service have eliminated the regional differences in obtaining scientific information and gave researchers much more time for carring out their own research works. Finally, he expects that floppy disk will become popular as one of the information media in the future.

  2. Medical geology:new relevance in the earth sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CharlotteA.Bowman; PeterT.Bobrowsky; OlleSelinus

    2003-01-01

    The interdisciplinary fieldresponds to the need to betterof "Medical Geology" understand the relationships between human health and our surrounding environment. The influence of earth resources, natural environmental factors and land-use on human health has long been recognized, dating back to ancient Rome and Peru's Inca civilization. Today links between the natural environment and health can be found throughout the world. This review introduces the historical context of this particular type of research, contrasts the direct geological and indirect natural hazard influences on healthas a framework of study, elaborates on pathways of elemental accumulation in the body and provides examples of specific geochemical behaviours and diseases that are often associated with either too much or not enough of certain elements which comprise the Earth.

  3. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Biri, S; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2015-01-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide bandwidth (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effec...

  4. Research progress and prospects of Saudi Arabia in global medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, S A; Hassan, A; Usmani, A M

    2013-12-01

    Since last decade, Saudi Arabia has been swiftly moving ahead to promote an education and research in the country. This study aimed to investigate the research outcome of Saudi Arabia in medical sciences during the period 1996-2012. In this study, the research papers published in various global science journals during the period 1996-2012 were accessed. We recorded the total number of research documents having an affiliation with Saudi Arabia. The main source for information was Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, Thomson Reuters and SCI-mago/Scopus. In global science data base, Saudi Arabia contributed 103804 documents in all science and social sciences. In medicine the total number of research papers from Saudi Arabia are 16196, citable documents 14732, total citations 102827, citations per documents 6.36 and Hirsch index (h-index) is 92. However, in combined medical and allied health sciences the total number of research papers are 27246, citable documents 25416, total citations 181999, mean citations per documents 7.07 and mean h-index is 41.44. Furthermore, Saudi Arabia contributed 40797 research documents in ISI indexed journals only and also 151 research documents in highly reputable and towering science journals. Saudi Arabia's research performance in global medical sciences has markedly increased during the period 2006-2012. The research publications are continuously on mounting path; however, the number of citations has decreased. The country improved its regional as well as international research rankings and graded 45 in the world in year 2012.

  5. Clinical demand for and access to images and interpretations of chest radiographs in a medical intensive care unit serviced by an integrated PACS-radiology information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shile, Peter E.; Kundel, Harold L.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Carey, Bruce; Kishore, Sheel; Brikman, Inna; Feingold, Eric R.; Lanken, Paul N.

    1994-05-01

    Digital communication systems have been proposed as a means of improving the flow of information between radiologists and other physicians. In the intensive care unit (ICU), physicians require more rapid access to images and interpretations than physicians in most other hospital settings. Thus these systems must be designed to ensure that rapid exchange of radiological information can be achieved. To better define system design for the electronic communication of radiological information to ICUs, this study examined bottlenecks in information flow through an integrated PACS-Radiology Information System.

  6. Perception of the medical students on their future career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-06-25

    Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them, 67.5% were female with mean age of 21.7±2.4. The main factors for deciding to study in medicine were their interest (64.1%), family pressure (13.5%) and social prestige of medical career (9.8%). The mean score of attitudes was 2.3±0.6. In total, 24.5% of students demonstrated not having interest in studying medicine. The most important cause of their interest change was long duration of education (24.4%) and cost of studying in medicine (13.8%). In total, 88.6% of students had negative viewpoint towards their medical career in future. In general, the attitude of medical students toward their future career was negative.

  7. Medical Students’ View about the Effects of Practical Courses on Learning the General Theoretical Concepts of Basic Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Roshangar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The basic medical sciences section requires 2.5 years in the medical education curriculum. Practical courses complement theoretical knowledge in this period to improve their appreciation. Despite spending lots of disbursement and time, this period’s efficacy is not clearly known. Methods: One hundred thirty-three General Practitioner (GP students have been included in this descriptive cross-sectional study and were asked by questionnaire about the positive impact of practical courses on learning theoretical knowledge. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Result: The agreement in “Practical Head and Neck Anatomy” was 40.91% ± 29.45, in “Practical Trunk Anatomy” was 63.62% ± 2.32 and in “Practical Anatomy of Extremities” was 56.16% ± 2.57. In “Practical Histology”, agreement was 69.50%±2.19; “Practical Biophysics” was 45.97%±2.25, “Practical Physiology” 61.75%±2.17; “Practical Biochemistry” 36.28%±2.42; “Practical Pathology” 59.80%±2.53; “Practical Immunology” 56.25%±26.40; “Practical Microbiology and Virology” 60.39%±2.27 and “Practical Mycology and Parasitology” 68.2%± 2.16.Conclusion: GP students in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences are not optimistic about the applicability of practical courses of basic medical sciences lessons.

  8. The Mathematics of Medical Imaging in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Charles P.; Jafari, Farhad; Eubank, William B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an integrated exposition of aspects of secondary school mathematics and a medical science specialty. Reviews clinical medical practice and theoretical and empirical literature in mathematics education and radiology to develop and pilot model integrative classroom topics and activities. Suggests mathematical applications in numeration and…

  9. The Mathematics of Medical Imaging in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Charles P.; Jafari, Farhad; Eubank, William B.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents an integrated exposition of aspects of secondary school mathematics and a medical science specialty together with related classroom activities. Clinical medical practice and theoretical and empirical literature in mathematics education and radiology were reviewed to develop and pilot model integrative classroom topics and…

  10. Correlation between Grades in the Medical Basic Science Course and Scores on the Comprehensive Basic Sciences Exam in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Mahboobi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students in Iran are required to undertake a Basic Sciences Comprehensive Exam (BSCE at the end of their BS course in order to progress to the next stage of medical education. BSCE results are widely used to evaluate medical education programs among different medical universities. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation between BSCE results and students’ mean BS course scores.Methods: A cross-sectional study, using secondary data analysis, was carried out in 2007 in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences (HUMS in Iran. Data from the 20th BSCE (held in 1998 to the 36th BSCE (held in 2006 was collected. All medical students who took these exams and for whom the mean results of the BS course and the BSCE were available were eligible for inclusion in the study. For each medical student, data were obtained regarding age at the time of participation in BSCE, together with sex, entrance year, zone as categorised by the national quota system, mean BS course scores, BSCE result, duration of BS course (number of semesters and number of failed semesters. Students whose data was not complete were excluded from the study. Data was analysed by using SPSS 15 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA software.Results: 372 students undertook the BSCE during the research study period. Complete data was available for 365 medical students (98.1%. Among the participants, 224 (61.4% were female and 141 (38.6% were male. The mean age at the time of sitting the BSCE was 22.01±1.22. Mean BSCE scores were higher among students who had not previously failed a semester and who also finished the BS course within five semesters. Students with higher BS course scores had higher BSCE scores (P=0.000.Conclusions: Students’ BS course scores were found to correlate to BSCE results. Hence it may be prudent to identify medical students with low BS course scores, in order to provide additional educational support to improve their medical knowledge

  11. Evaluation of doctors' performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salwani Ismail,1 Abdus Salam,2 Ahmed G Alattraqchi,1 Lakshmi Annamalai,1 Annamalai Chockalingam,1 Wan Putri Elena,3 Nor Iza A Rahman,1 Abdullahi Rabiu Abubakar,1 Mainul Haque1 1Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia Background: Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students' perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012–2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. Results: The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Conclusion: Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning. Keywords: lecture, effectiveness, evaluation, undergraduate medical

  12. Student-Life Stress Level and its Related Factors among Medical Students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Nikanjam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Student-life stress can lead to various negative consequences such as physical illness, mental disorders or exhaustion. The present study was conducted to evaluate the level of student life stress and its related factors among medical students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study applied multistage random sampling to select 500university students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences during 2015. The data collection tool used in this study was a self-report questionnaire containing two parts: a section on subjects' demographic details and another section for Student-Life Stress Inventory (SLSI. Data were analyzed in SPSS20-using descriptive and inferential statistics, such as independent t-test, Pearson’s correlation test and one-way ANOVA. Results: This study revealed that %57of the students had moderate levels of stress. The most important stressors included self-impose and pressure, and also the most important reactions to stressors included cognitive appraisal and emotional reactions, respectively. There was a significant association between exam stressors and branch, educational level, and mother's and father's education level (P< 0.05. Conclusions: According to the high level of stress in students and the recognition of demographic factors, effective educational interventions can be conducted to reduce stress.

  13. Developing a Career Development Program for Medical Sciences Students: Reflecting "In" and "On" Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocodia, Ebinepre A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a reflective practice approach this paper provides an outline of the development of a new career development and counselling program for students within a medical sciences off-campus precinct. Drawing on Schön's (1983) reflective practice framework the aim included reflecting "in" and "on" action during the development…

  14. 76 FR 6803 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following...

  15. 76 FR 10039 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, 45 Center..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and...

  16. 76 FR 13196 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, 45 Center..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and...

  17. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of P01 Grant Application. Date: November 21, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological...

  18. 77 FR 5816 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ...; Review of R24 Grant Applications. Date: February 10, 2012. Time: 12 PM to 2 PM. Agenda: To review and... Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological...

  19. 76 FR 67199 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee A. Date: November 17, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  20. 77 FR 35413 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Grant Applications. Date: June 28, 2012. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda...

  1. 76 FR 29773 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee B. Date: June 17, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  2. 76 FR 64954 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee B Date: November 16-17, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  3. 75 FR 7488 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee A. Date: March 4, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  4. 77 FR 31862 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee B. Date: June 21, 2012. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  5. 77 FR 6809 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee A. Date: March 8, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant...

  6. 75 FR 42759 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Review of Minority Biomedical Research Support Chemistry Applications. Date: July 26, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 6 p.m...

  7. 75 FR 30408 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Review Group; ] Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee B. Date: June 18, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... patentable materials, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant applications...

  8. Medical Simulation in the Community College Health Science Curriculum: A Matrix for Future Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Michael P.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2010-01-01

    As the nation's healthcare education system struggles to keep pace with the demand for its services, educators are seeking creative and innovative solutions to meet the needs of a growing number of students. The integration of medical simulation technology into the community college health science curriculum is a creative solution that can meet…

  9. Inspiring careers in STEM and healthcare fields through medical simulation embedded in high school science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Louis J; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L; Goyal, Riya; Joyal, Julie A; Gordon, James A; Faux, Russell; Oriol, Nancy E

    2014-09-01

    The most effective ways to promote learning and inspire careers related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain elusive. To address this gap, we reviewed the literature and designed and implemented a high-fidelity, medical simulation-based Harvard Medical School MEDscience course, which was integrated into high school science classes through collaboration between medical school and K-12 faculty. The design was based largely on the literature on concepts and mechanisms of self-efficacy. A structured telephone survey was conducted with 30 program alumni from the inaugural school who were no longer in high school. Near-term effects, enduring effects, contextual considerations, and diffusion and dissemination were queried. Students reported high incoming attitudes toward STEM education and careers, and these attitudes showed before versus after gains (P < .05). Students in this modest sample overwhelmingly attributed elevated and enduring levels of impact on their interest and confidence in pursuing a science or healthcare-related career to the program. Additionally, 63% subsequently took additional science or health courses, 73% participated in a job or educational experience that was science related during high school, and 97% went on to college. Four of every five program graduates cited a health-related college major, and 83% offered their strongest recommendation of the program to others. Further study and evaluation of simulation-based experiences that capitalize on informal, naturalistic learning and promote self-efficacy are warranted.

  10. Using TOSCE (Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination in the second national medical sciences olympiad in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Amini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Second National Medical Sciences Olympiad was done in Shiraz in August 2010 with aim of indentifying scientifically talented individuals, motivating students and orienting extracurricular activities. This Olympiad was done in 3 areas, basic sciences, clinical sciences and management. In clinical sciences, we used TOSCE (Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination. In this article we report the details of this exam and participants′ satisfaction. Materials and Methods: This Olympiad in Clinical Medical Sciences was held in 2 levels: Individual and team. In the team stage, 9 teams from 9 universities participated. We used TOSCE for measuring clinical competency of teams. Each team consisted of 3 students. We designed 12 stations based on emergency medicine in medical and surgical fields. The time considered for each station was 15 min, after doing this exam the view of students was measured using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: Most of the students believed that TOSCE was a useful examination for measuring competency. More than 50% of students reported that success in this exam needs clinical competency, team work and problem solving ability. Nearly, half (48.1% of students believed that 15 min is not enough for each station and they need more time. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that this kind of exam is useful for measuring clinical competency from students′ viewpoint .

  11. Explaining feast or famine in randomized field trials. Medical science and criminology compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P

    2003-06-01

    A feast of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in medical science and comparative famine in criminology can be explained in terms of cultural and structural factors. Of central importance is the context in which the evaluation of interventions is done and the difference in status of situational research in the two disciplines. Evaluation of medical interventions has traditionally been led by practitioner (clinical) academics. This is not the case in criminal justice, where theory has had higher status than intervention research. Medical science has advanced in, or closely associated with, university teaching hospitals, but links between criminology and criminal justice services are far more tenuous. The late development of situational crime prevention seems extraordinary from a medical perspective, as does the absence of university police schools in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. These structural and cultural factors explain concentration of expectation, resource, and RCT productivity in medical science. The Campbell Collaboration and the Academy of Experimental Criminology are forces which are reducing this polarization of feast and famine in RCTs. But unless scientific criminology is embedded in university schools which are responsible for the education and training of law, probation, and police practitioners, convergence in terms of RCTs and implementation of findings in practice seems unlikely.

  12. Educational Status of Dental Basic Science Course and its Correlation with Students' Educational Background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Khazaei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic science course plays a pivotal role in the academic achievement of the students. The scientific background and educational performance of the students are also influential in this period. The aim of the present study was to investigate the educational status of dental basic science course in the first three admissions (2009-2011 and its association with students’ educational background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, all dental students admitted to school of dentistry in 2009-2011 years were included. The students’ academic background (scores, grade point average, score of comprehensive basic sciences examination (CBSE were recorded. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: Kermanshah dental students admitted to university in 2009-2011 were mostly female (59.2%, belonged to regions 2 and 3 (81.6% of university entrance exam, had sciences diploma (89.8% and their grade point average of diploma was nearly 18. There was a significant difference between the three groups of students admitted to university in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Arabic, English language and Theology lessones of entrane exam (P<0.05. The students’ failure rate was 1.5% in university coureses. They all (100% passed CBSE and were ranked second nationally in the year. There was no significant difference between male and female students in terms of age, diploma grade point average, grade point average of basic sciences and score of CBSE. Conclusion: Basic science courses of dentistry in Kermanshah enjoyed a rather constant status and students had a good academic level in these courses.

  13. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  14. Medical students' attitudes towards science and gross anatomy, and the relationship to personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisant, Odile; Stephens, Shiby; Apaydin, Nihal; Courtois, Robert; Lignier, Baptiste; Loukas, Marios; Moxham, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    Assessment of the personalities of medical students can enable medical educators to formulate strategies for the best development of academic and clinical competencies. Previous research has shown that medical students do not share a common personality profile, there being gender differences. We have also shown that, for French medical students, students with personality traits associated with strong competitiveness are selected for admission to medical school. In this study, we further show that the medical students have different personality profiles compared with other student groups (psychology and business studies). The main purpose of the present investigation was to assess attitudes to science and gross anatomy, and to relate these to the students' personalities. Questionnaires (including Thurstone and Chave analyses) were employed to measure attitudes, and personality was assessed using the Big Five Inventory (BFI). Data for attitudes were obtained for students at medical schools in Cardiff (UK), Paris, Descartes/Sorbonne (France), St George's University (Grenada) and Ankara (Turkey). Data obtained from personality tests were available for analysis from the Parisian cohort of students. Although the medical students were found to have strongly supportive views concerning the importance of science in medicine, their knowledge of the scientific method/philosophy of science was poor. Following analyses of the BFI in the French students, 'openness' and 'conscientiousness' were linked statistically with a positive attitude towards science. For anatomy, again strongly supportive views concerning the subject's importance in medicine were discerned. Analyses of the BFI in the French students did not show links statistically between personality profiles and attitudes towards gross anatomy, except male students with 'negative affectivity' showed less appreciation of the importance of anatomy. This contrasts with our earlier studies that showed that there is a

  15. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  16. Analysis and countermeasures of medical adverse events in department of radiology%放射科医疗不良事件分析与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷正元

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate situation of medical adverse events, analyze reasons, put forward improvement plan.Methods 109 medical adverse events in hospital from October 2011 to December 2013 were retrospective analyzed. SH9 classification method was used to classification evaluation. Event types were analyzed.Results Treatment error event rate (34.86%) > equipment using event rate (24.77%) >doctor-patient communication event rate (21.10%) > information transmission error event rate(10.09%) >medical accident check event rate (4.59%) > other event rate (2.75%) > catheter event rate(1.83%). Grade Ⅲ no consequences event rate (75.23%) > grade Ⅳ hazard event rate (15.6%) > grade Ⅰ warning event rate (5.50%) > grade Ⅱ adverse outcome event rate (3.67%).Conclusion Prevention and control situation of medical adverse events in department of radiology is more serious, we should strengthen daily maintenance of equipment, require physicians to strictly abide by rules and regulations, strengthen risk prevention awareness, enhance sense of responsibility, change idea, timely carry out communication and training between doctors and patients.%目的:探讨放射科医疗不良事件状况,分析原因,提出改进方案.方法:回顾性分析本院2011年10月~2013年12月发生的医疗不良事件109起,采用S H9分类法进行分级评价,分析事件类型.结果:治疗错误事件发生率(34.86%)>设备使用事件发生率(24.77%)>医患沟通事件发生率(21.10%)>信息传递错误事件发生率(10.09%)>医疗事故检查事件发生率(4.59%)>其他事件发生率(2.75%)>导管事件发生率(1.83%),Ⅲ级未造成后果事件发生率(75.23%)>Ⅳ级隐患事件发生率(15.60%)>Ⅰ级警告事件发生率(5.50%)>Ⅱ级不良后果事件发生率(3.67%).结论:放射科医疗不良事件的防控形势较为严峻,应当加强设备的日常维护,要求医师严格遵守规章制度,强化风险防范意识,提高责任心,转变理念,及时开展医患沟通和培训.

  17. The experiences of successful faculty members in medical school in teaching of basic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic sciences are an important part of education in medical courses, which without it training the competent and efficient physicians is impossible. Given the complexities of teaching and in particular the teaching of basic sciences and its influence of various factors, comprehensive investigate this phenomenon was felt. This study was aimed to explore the underlying factors affecting the teaching based on experiences of successful faculty members of basic sciences in Isfahan medical school. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis. The data was collected using purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews with faculty members of basic sciences and group interviews with the students of basic sciences. Results: After analysis the data, the extracted data were divided into three main categories and seven sub- classes, including strengthen the construction of teaching infrastructures (lesson plans, useful and practical educational materials, and continuous curriculum reform, improving the teaching process (facilitating learning and appropriate transfering of content and completing the teaching process (appropriate evaluation tool and continuity assessment. Conclusion: Some positive experiences, such as reducing volume of materials, teaching useful and practical materials, attractive teaching, early clinical exsposure and provide the appropriate educational materials should be considered as a model and to eliminate negative experiences such as teaching of pure basic sciences, drowning in detail, the emphass on memorization, indulge in speech, the multiple choice tests systems and some faculty members were not ready for some of teaching methods should be taken account some items.

  18. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

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    H. Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was completed. Each correct answer had one score and wrong answers had no score. Results: Of 114 students, 69 students (60.5% were female and 45 students (39.5% were male with the mean age of 24.1±1.5 year. The mean score of students in basic nutrition, nutrition in the life cycle and diet therapy was 4.6±2.2, 6.2±3.2 and 6.2±3.8, respectively. There was significant association between the score of nutrition course and nutritional knowledge score in all of the fields. Conclusion: The average of scores was low. Improving the nutrition courses, especially clinical aspects, during clinical education and presence of nutritionist in treatment teams will be helpful.

  19. A Plan for the Evaluation of a Project to Develop Basic Medical Sciences Lessons on PLATO IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Les A.; And Others

    A project to introduce PLATO IV computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in medical sciences education for health professionals was implemented at the School of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Illinois. This paper describes the plan for evaluation of the project. Using a student questionnaire and additional general questions, the…

  20. Croatian Medical Journal citation score in Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sember, Marijan; Utrobicić, Ana; Petrak, Jelka

    2010-04-01

    To analyze the 2007 citation count of articles published by the Croatian Medical Journal in 2005-2006 based on data from the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Web of Science and Scopus were searched for the articles published in 2005-2006. As all articles returned by Scopus were included in Web of Science, the latter list was the sample for further analysis. Total citation counts for each article on the list were retrieved from Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The overlap and unique citations were compared and analyzed. Proportions were compared using chi(2)-test. Google Scholar returned the greatest proportion of articles with citations (45%), followed by Scopus (42%), and Web of Science (38%). Almost a half (49%) of articles had no citations and 11% had an equal number of identical citations in all 3 databases. The greatest overlap was found between Web of Science and Scopus (54%), followed by Scopus and Google Scholar (51%), and Web of Science and Google Scholar (44%). The greatest number of unique citations was found by Google Scholar (n=86). The majority of these citations (64%) came from journals, followed by books and PhD theses. Approximately 55% of all citing documents were full-text resources in open access. The language of citing documents was mostly English, but as many as 25 citing documents (29%) were in Chinese. Google Scholar shares a total of 42% citations returned by two others, more influential, bibliographic resources. The list of unique citations in Google Scholar is predominantly journal based, but these journals are mainly of local character. Citations received by internationally recognized medical journals are crucial for increasing the visibility of small medical journals but Google Scholar may serve as an alternative bibliometric tool for an orientational citation insight.

  1. Scientometric Analysis of the Journals of the Academy of Medical Sciences in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-02-01

    Currently in Bosnia and Herzegovina there are 25 journals in the field of biomedicine, 6 of them are indexed in Medline/PubMed base (Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica, Acta Informatica Medica, Acta Medica Academica, Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences (BJBMS) and Medical Glasnik), and one (BJBMS) is indexed in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE)/Web of Science base. The aim of this study was to show the scope of work of the journals that were published by Academy of Medical Sciences of Bosnia and Herzegovina - Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica. The research presents a meta-analysis of three journals, or their issues, during the calendar year 2015 (retrospective and descriptive character). During 2015 calendar year a total of 286 articles were published (in Medical Archives 104 (36.3%), in Materia Socio-Medica 99 (34.6%), and in Acta Informatica Medica 83 (29%)). Original articles are present in the highest number in all three journals (in Medical Archives 80.7%, in Materia Socio Medica 77.7%, and in Acta Informatica Medica 68.6%). In Medical Archives, 90.3% of the articles were related to the field of clinical medicine. In Materia Socio-Medica, the domain of clinical medicine and public health was the most represented. Preclinical areas are most frequent in Acta Informatica Medica. The period of 50-60 days for a decision on the admission of article is most common in all three journals, with trend of shortening of that period. Articles came from 19 countries, mostly from Bosnia and Herzegovina, then from Iran, Kosovo, Saudi Arabia and Greece. In Medical Archives original articles in the field of clinical medicine (usually internal and surgical disciplines) are most often present, and that is the case in last four years. The number of articles in Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica is growing from year to year. In Materia Socio-Medica there is a trend of growth of articles in the field of public health

  2. A key player in biomedical sciences and clinical service in China, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Qimin; Liu, Depei

    2007-08-01

    The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) is the largest medical institution in China and has a leading high-level multidisciplinary medical research and medial service. Under the CAMS and PUMC infrastructure, there are 17 biomedical institutes and 6 large hospitals, which cover most fields of the human disease-related research. CAMS and PUMC has always attached great emphasis on the control and cure of severe diseases, as well as a series of innovative drug researches, and has made significant progress in those fields. The long-term goals for CAMS and PUMC in the future development are: reaching the international advanced level in the areas of severe disease prediction, prevention, control, diagnosis, and research on drug innovation; establishing theoretical and technological system for explanation of the mechanism of severe diseases, which possesses Chinese style and represents the frontier level in the world, and at the same time, providing scientific support for the prevention and treatment of severe disease and making contribution to the establishment and development of a harmonious society in China.

  3. Reinventing radiology reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; Adema, Denise

    2005-01-01

    Lee Memorial Health System (LMHS), located in southwest Florida, consists of 5 hospitals, a home health agency, a skilled nursing facility, multiple outpatient centers, walk-in medical centers, and primary care physician offices. LMHS annually performs more than 300,000 imaging procedures with gross imaging revenues exceeding dollar 350 million. In fall 2002, LMHS received the results of an independent audit of its IR coding. The overall IR coding error rate was determined to be 84.5%. The projected net financial impact of these errors was an annual reimbursement loss of dollar 182,000. To address the issues of coding errors and reimbursement loss, LMHS implemented its clinical reimbursementspecialist (CRS) system in October 2003, as an extension of financial services' reimbursement division. LMHS began with CRSs in 3 service lines: emergency department, cardiac catheterization, and radiology. These 3 CRSs coordinate all facets of their respective areas' chargemaster, patient charges, coding, and reimbursement functions while serving as a resident coding expert within their clinical areas. The radiology reimbursement specialist (RRS) combines an experienced radiologic technologist, interventional technologist, medical records coder, financial auditor, reimbursement specialist, and biller into a single position. The RRS's radiology experience and technologist knowledge are key assets to resolving coding conflicts and handling complex interventional coding. In addition, performing a daily charge audit and an active code review are essential if an organization is to eliminate coding errors. One of the inherent effects of eliminating coding errors is the capturing of additional RVUs and units of service. During its first year, based on account level detail, the RRS system increased radiology productivity through the additional capture of just more than 3,000 RVUs and 1,000 additional units of service. In addition, the physicians appreciate having someone who "keeps up

  4. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.MSc,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medical Sciences and all the 250 students studying at nursing, medical, and paramedical schools were participated in it. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was used to determine the knowledge about and attitude toward solid waste recycling. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, Pearson correlation and independent T test. Findings The knowledge of students was the highest about the definition of recycling (84.4% and lowest about delivery of recycled materials to badgers (23.6%. Most medical (55.1% and paramedical (75.3% students had “weak” and most nursing students (47.1% had “moderate” knowledge about solid waste recycling. 69.2% of paramedical, 27.3% of medical and 25.5% of nursing students stated that “there is no information about recycling in the university courses”. Conclusion Most of the students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences have weak knowledge regarding to solid waste recycling and their knowledge are different among schools.

  5. Statistics in the medical sciences - the long Germany road to there

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiß, Christel

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution aims at tracing the development of statistical methods in medical science. Statistical methodology in medical research was first implemented in England in the age of the Enlightenment during the 18th century. As this approach stood in a clear opposition to the conventional medical practice directed in a rather authoritarian manner, this research field had to overcome a lot of difficulties. Nowadays, there is a widespread consensus that medical research is hardly possible without profound knowledge and application of statistical methods. Nevertheless, it took an extremely long time until the end of the 20th century, before this methodology was taken notice of and became appreciated. In order to better understand this long process, a brief summary of the development of statistics beginning from the Ancient Times is presented. It is shown how medical progress evolved parallel to the advancing mathematical understanding. A focus is put on the influence of the latter on medical sciences. Moreover, the special case of Germany in this aspect is analysed.

  6. American diagnostic radiology residency and fellowship programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumack, Carol Masters

    2011-03-01

    American Diagnostic Radiology Residency and Fellowship programmes are Graduate Medical Education programmes in the United States (US) equivalent to the Postgraduate Medical Education programmes in Singapore. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited diagnostic radiology residency programmes require 5 years total with Post Graduate Year (PGY) 1 year internship in a clinical specialty, e.g. Internal Medicine following medical school. PGY Years 2 to 5 are the core years which must include Radiology Physics, Radiation Biology and rotations in 9 required subspecialty rotations: Abdominal, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Musculoskeletal, Neuroradiology, Nuclear and Paediatric Radiology, Obstetric & Vascular Ultrasound and Vascular Interventional Radiology. A core curriculum of lectures must be organised by the required 9 core subspecialty faculty. All residents (PGY 2 to 4) take a yearly American College of Radiology Diagnostic In-Training Examination based on national benchmarks of medical knowledge in each subspecialty. Because the American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations are changing, until 2012, residents have to take 3 ABR examinations: (i) ABR physics examination in the PGY 2 to 3 years, (ii) a written examination at the start of the PGY 5 year and (iii) an oral exam at the end of the PGY 5 year. Beginning in 2013, there will be only 2 examinations: (i) the physics and written examinations after PGY 4 will become a combined core radiology examination. Beginning in 2015, the final certifying examination will be given 15 months after the completion of residency. After residency, ACGME fellowships in PGY 6 are all one-year optional programmes which focus on only one subspecialty discipline. There are 4 ACGME accredited fellowships which have a Board Certifi cation Examination: Neuroradiology, Nuclear, Paediatric and Vascular Interventional Radiology. Some ACGME fellowships do not have a certifying examination: Abdominal, Endovascular

  7. Evaluation of hospital information systems of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, based on the American College of Physicians Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital information system (HIS is a computerized system used for management of hospital information as an electronic device and has an indispensible role in the field of qualified healthcare services. Nevertheless, compared to other industrial and commercial systems, this information system is lagged in using the information technology and applying the controlling standards for satisfying the customers. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate HIS, identify its strength and weak points, and improve it in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Method: The present descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the 8 teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences which used HIS in 2011. The study data were collected through interview and direct observation using the criteria of American Physician College check-list. Finally, SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data through descriptive statistics. Results: The study results showed that laboratory and medical records had respectively the most %43.5 and the least %21.03 conformity to the criteria of American College of Physicians. Also, Faghihi and Zeinabiye hospitals respectively had the most %41.8 and the least %25.2 conformity to the American College of Physicians’ criteria. In pharmacy, data entrance mechanism and presentation of reports had complete conformity to the scales of American College of Physicians, while drug interactions showed no conformity. In laboratory, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. The possibility of receiving information from centers out of laboratory had no conformity to the desired criteria. In the radiology department, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. Besides, the possibility

  8. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neal R; Stuart, Melissa K; Singh, Vineet K; Sargentini, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) METHODS: Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  9. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal R. Chamberlain

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM and Infectious Diseases (ID Methods : Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results : Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I and students who participated in the CPs (Group II. In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P < 0.018; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test. Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P < 0.001; P < 0.001. Conclusion : Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  10. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neal R.; Stuart, Melissa K.; Singh, Vineet K.; Sargentini, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) Methods Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Conclusion Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians. PMID:22435014

  11. The evaluation of non-ionizing radiation (near-infrared radiation) based medical imaging application: Diabetes foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Cheol Won; Ahn, Sung Min; Hong, Jun Yong; Ahn, Yun Jin; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Near-infrared radiation (NIR) is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and deep tissue penetration in biological material, thereby increasing research interests as a medical imaging technique in the world. However, the use of current near-infrared medical image is extremely limited in Korea (ROK) since it is not well known among radiologic technologists and radiological researchers. Therefore to strengthen the knowledge for NIR medical imaging is necessary so as to prepare a qualified radiological professionals to serve medical images in high-quality on the clinical sites. In this study, an overview of the features and principles of N IR imaging was demonstrated. The latest research topics and worldwide research trends were introduced for radiologic technologist to reinforce their technical skills. In particular, wound care and diabetic foot which have high feasibility for clinical translation were introduced in order to contribute to accelerating NIR research for developing the field of radiological science.

  12. The Most Accredited English Language Free Electronic Journals in Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid Danesh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Finding free e-journals is very difficult in web environment, because these types of journals are all scattered and they are rarely found in traditional bibliographic sources. Therefore, locating and their retrieval are hard. Then it is not easy to disseminate the accredited ones. The aim of this study was to determine the most accredited free English e-journals in medical sciences. The research methods were content and link analysis. In order to collect the data, a checklist has been used which its validity has been confirmed. The research population consisted of 700 free electronic journals of medical sciences which were collected from two reputable websites. Using qualitative study on the websites of these journals, the number of eligible journals in this research decreased to 269 journals. In the next step, Journals' websites has been analyzed with webometrics methods. Then, utilizing core journal formula, the accredited ones were determined. Results showed that "New South Wales Public Health Bulletin" in Health, "Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care" in Nursery, "BMC Oral Health" in Dentistry and "Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research" in Medicine were the most accredited journals in term of in links. Also, "International Journal of Integrated Care" in Health, "BMC Nursing" in Nursery, "Journal of Oral Science" in Dentistry, "The New York State Dental Journal" and "Journal of Oral Science" were the top free e-journals in term of web impact factor.

  13. Radiology in 2030: A Guide for Strategic Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Akhlaghpoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging science and technology are major contributors to the discovery of new knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of disease. Given such rapid past advances, is it not likely the future rate of progress will be at least as great? As part of the strategic plan is to estimate future change, it is necessary to have a vision for what will happen in radiology in next 20 years. There are several questions that we should find answer for them: 1. Which type of information clinicians will request from radiologists? 2. How will imaging devices of the future differ from those of the present? 3. What appearance might medical images of the future have? Only 30 years ago, radiologists depended heavily on plain radiographs, tomography, and catheter angiography.Presently, very high-resolution crosssectional imaging studies, four-dimensional sonography, and functional imaging techniques (such as brain activation studies and perfusion imaging are common place. Physicians in the future will increasingly seek clinical information that is physiological, and not solely anatomical, in nature.Functional and molecular imaging will be the area of great development in future. Broadly, multidisciplinary, molecular imaging incorporates methods and concepts from molecular and cell biology, imaging sciences, chemistry, highthroughput"nbiology (eg, genomics, proteomics, nanotechnology, pharmacology, and bioinformatics. It is through molecular imaging that radiology is expected"nto play a critical role in advancing molecular medicine and potentially revolutionize patient care and biomedical research. Other promising options will be minimally invasive image-guided therapy and interventional radiology The convergence of molecular imaging and interventional radiology benefits both fields. This lecture is an effort to explain a roadmap for future in the field of Radiology.

  14. [European curriculum for further education in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl-Wagner, B

    2014-11-01

    The European training curriculum for radiology of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) aims to harmonize training in radiology in Europe. Levels I and II constitute the centerpiece of the curriculum. The ESR recommends a 5-year training period in radiology with 3 years of level I and 2 years of level II training. The undergraduate (U) level curriculum is conceived as a basis for teaching radiology in medical schools and consists of a modality-oriented U1 level and an organ-based U2 level. Level III curricula provide contents for subspecialty and fellowship training after board certification in radiology. The curricular contents of all parts of the European Training Curriculum are divided into the sections knowledge, skills as well as competences and attitudes. The European training curriculum is meant to be a recommendation and a basis for the development of national curricula, but is not meant to replace existing national regulations.

  15. Drug use prevalence among students of universities of medical sciences in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Taremian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug use among students of universities of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Method: Four thousands of medical students (both sexes in academic year 1388-89 in different level of education, B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. were selected by random stratified sampling method. These students were selected from Iran, Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities of Medical Sciences considering their sex and level of education. We used drug use prevalence questionnaire. Findings: The most prevalent drug of abuse in life time period was qalyan (classical pipe, followed by cigarette, and alcohol. The least frequent drug of abuse was Shisheh, followed by heroine krack. As we expected, drugs morphine, ritalin and tramadol were placed in forth, fifth and sixth of prevalent drugs. Use of different substances was significantly more prevalent in male students. Conclusion: Using soft drugs (qalyan, cigarette and alcohol was more prevalent than hard drugs (hashish, taryak, heroine kerack among Universities Medical Sciences of Tehran. Similar to drug use pattern in society, use of all of drugs were more prevalent in male students. We should pay special attention to use of drugs such as tramadol, ritalin, petedin and morphine.

  16. Clinical and basic science teachers' opinions about the required depth of biomedical knowledge for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koens, Franciska; Custers, Eugène J F M; ten Cate, Olle T J

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether basic scientists and physicians agree on the required depth of biomedical knowledge of medical students at graduation. A selection of basic science and clinical teachers rated the relevance of biomedical topics for students at graduation, illustrated by 80 example items. The items were derived from ten organ systems and designed at four levels: clinical, organ, cellular and molecular. Respondents were asked to identify for each item to what extent recently graduated medical students should have knowledge about it. In addition, they were asked to indicate whether the content of the item should be included in the medical curriculum. Analysis showed that basic scientists and physicians do not diverge at the clinical level. At the organ, cellular and molecular levels however, basic scientists judge that medical students should have more active knowledge. As expected, basic scientists also indicate that more deep level content should be included. Explanations for this phenomenon will be discussed.

  17. Development of the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences Guideline for Rating Physical Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Won, Jong-Uk; Kim, So-Yun; Sohn, Myong-Sei; Youm, Yoo-Sik; Lee, Yoon-Seong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Cho, Soo-Hun; Lee, Mi-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Systematic and effective welfare for the disabled is possible when there are scientific and objective criteria demonstrating either presence or severity of the impairment. We need our own scientific criteria suitable for our culture and society, since the impairment is influenced by them. In 2007, we established the Developing Committee of Korean Academy of Medical Sciences (KAMS) Guideline for Impairment Rating under KAMS supervision. We included all fixed and permanent physical impairments after a sufficient medical treatment. The impairment should be stable and medically measurable. If not, it should be reevaluated later. We benchmarked the American Medical Association Guides. The KAMS Guideline should be scientific, objective, valid, reasonable and practical. In particular, we tried to secure objectivity. We developed the KAMS Guideline for Impairment Rating. PMID:19503676

  18. [Development of interest in research on the quality of life in medical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukielczak, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is an interdisciplinary concept, defined and used in the work by representatives of the medical sciences and the humanities. In the era of continuous development of medicine, physicians are increasingly able to treat and the gradual lengthening of life. Subjective assessment of health status of the patient has made in recent years, more and more important. Health evaluation of the patient makes a special role in the healing process and is indispensable in assessing the effectiveness of therapy. Hence arose the need to initiate research on the quality of life. The article discusses methods of determining quality of life, that are used in medical sciences. It also includes a summary of trends in the use of quality of life investigations in medical sciences. A review of research methods quality of life, which are used in medical science. In addition, analyzes the contents of the database "Medline" using password "quality of life". The article presents the types of questionnaires examining quality of life, recommended by the panel of experts, and are listed and briefly characterized the basic quality of life questionnaires to general and specific. In particular, the review provides a list of principal quality of life diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, in disorders and mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. The article also includes information about the requirements associated with the reliability of the questionnaire, and provides information on the possible acquisition and use of research tools with ready-made MAPI Institute. This paper presents apparent in recent decades the development of medical research using the assessment of quality of life related to health. It is the use of validated questionnaires, so that the results of the tests were reliable and reproducible, which increases their value.

  19. Applying Systems Engineering Reduces Radiology Transport Cycle Times in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin A; Yun, Brian J; Lev, Michael H; Raja, Ali S

    2017-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is widespread, and can result in care delays, medical errors, increased costs, and decreased patient satisfaction. Simultaneously, while capacity constraints on EDs are worsening, contributing factors such as patient volume and inpatient bed capacity are often outside the influence of ED administrators. Therefore, systems engineering approaches that improve throughput and reduce waste may hold the most readily available gains. Decreasing radiology turnaround times improves ED patient throughput and decreases patient waiting time. We sought to investigate the impact of systems engineering science targeting ED radiology transport delays and determine the most effective techniques. This prospective, before-and-after analysis of radiology process flow improvements in an academic hospital ED was exempt from institutional review board review as a quality improvement initiative. We hypothesized that reorganization of radiology transport would improve radiology cycle time and reduce waste. The intervention included systems engineering science-based reorganization of ED radiology transport processes, largely using Lean methodologies, and adding no resources. The primary outcome was average transport time between study order and complete time. All patients presenting between 8/2013-3/2016 and requiring plain film imaging were included. We analyzed electronic medical record data using Microsoft Excel and SAS version 9.4, and we used a two-sample t-test to compare data from the pre- and post-intervention periods. Following the intervention, average transport time decreased significantly and sustainably. Average radiology transport time was 28.7 ± 4.2 minutes during the three months pre-intervention. It was reduced by 15% in the first three months (4.4 minutes [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-7.3]; to 24.3 ± 3.3 min, P=0.021), 19% in the following six months (5.4 minutes, 95% CI [2.7-8.2]; to 23.3 ± 3.5 min, P=0.003), and 26% one year

  20. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  1. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  2. Predictors of dietary supplement usage among medical interns of Tehran university of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudeh, Gity; Kabiri, Sanaz; Yeganeh, Haleh Sadrzadeh; Koohdani, Fariba; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dietary supplement-use and its relationship with demographics and lifestyle of medical interns. The study sample comprised 356 interns aged 23 to 25 years. Participants completed a questionnaire on dietary supplement-use during the month preceding the study, information on demographic characteristics and lifestyle was also obtained. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were employed to assess the correlates of dietary supplement-use. The prevalence of dietary supplement-use was about 33% (males 20.4% and females 43.2%, pnutritional status (39.3%) and reducing hair loss (23.4%). The decision to use dietary supplement was mostly driven by the interns themselves (56% in males, 61% in females). In the univariable analysis, men who exercised once or twice a week were less likely to use supplements compared to those who reported doing exercise more than twice weekly (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.98). Females who reported their health status to be 'excellent' were more likely to use supplements compared to those who described their health status as 'moderate/poor/very poor' (OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.15-5.56) as were women who mentioned their breakfast consumption status as 'always' (OR=2.69, 95% CI 1.47-4.92). In the multivariable analysis, only breakfast consumption was significantly related with dietary supplement-use in females (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.11-4.38). In conclusion, dietary supplement-use among medical interns, especially among females, was relatively very common. Dietary supplement-use was related to a healthier lifestyle.

  3. Evidence-Based Radiology (EBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Fatehi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nRecent increase in scientific advancements has led to inability to cover many scientific data and remain “up-to-date”. Nowadays doubling time of scientific data production is remarkably reduced, so that there is no adequate time to find this information and it seems inevitable to use resources which periodically assess most published papers or web-based data in that particular field to finally provide evidence-based knowledge, namely “Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM” in medical sciences. EBM is the systematic, scientific and explicit use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Medical practice is largely based on clinical anecdotes, uncontrolled investigations and expert opinion. In radiology, the situation is especially problematic. "nRadiologists require to be able to evaluate studies in the literature, i.e., how reliable is this information and does it apply to patients in the radiologist’s practice? "nWe may find that our textbooks are out of date, guidelines are non-specific and there are conflicting "nor unreliable reports in the literature. Expert opinions vary from centre to centre. "nWhen we go to the literature ourselves, the first problem we encounter is the volume of literature being published and the next (at least for most of us is lack of training in how to separate good studies from weak ones. Evidence-based radiology (EBR can be a solution. "nThere are 5 steps in applying an approach as a solution: "n1. Ask - Information needs relevant to individual patients are converted into ‘answerable’ or ‘focused’ questions. "n2. Search - A comprehensive literature search is performed to find the best evidence to help answer these questions. "n3. Appraise - The evidence must then be critically appraised, in an explicit and structured manner, in order to establish its validity, reliability and usefulness in practice. "n4. Apply - The results of this critical appraisal are then

  4. Program for the radiological protection of the embryos-fetuses due to the medical exposure of him mother; Programa para la proteccion radiologica del embrio-feto debido a la exposicion medica de su progenitora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, G.M.; Martinez G, A.; Cardenas H, J.; Gonzalez R, N.; Valdes R, M.; Zaldivar H, W. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa C.P. 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: gladys@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    In the last years the organizations in charge of the regulation in matter of radiological protection, its have adopted measures to minimize the risks derived of the medical exposures, paying special attention to those that involve women in age of procreation, gestating and in period of lactation, because the embryo - fetus and the newborn babies ones are very vulnerable to the risks of the ionizing radiations, which can end up producing them multiple effects of variable severity. In Cuba, a Maternal-children program that includes the genetic advice to the pregnant woman from the medical point of view exists but didn't so the evaluation of the radiological risk; which is only carried out by the Medical Surveillance Service of the Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations Center (CPHR), without that mediates an official link among both parts and whose existence is only known by a reduced group of professionals of the health and of specialists in Radiological Protection. On the other hand is not established a strategy at national level for the differentiated information and systematic in these topics that it contributes to the control of the exposures of the embryo fetus and the breast-fed baby. Keeping in mind the above-mentioned the specialists of the CPHR have elaborated a proposal of national program for the radiological protection of the embryo- fetus due to the medical exposure of its progenitor. In the same one it is settles down the interrelation between work groups and multidisciplinary institutions to achieve the detection, communication and consultant ship of the cases of exposure to the fetus or breast-fed baby that happen in the country and at the same time include the training so much of the professionals of the health like of the public in general. Presently work the program and the elements that conform it among those that are, the on-line system developed for the automation of the medical dosimetric evaluation, the technician

  5. Survey of Professional Skill Among Medical Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Science For Breaking Bad News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Matloubi-Sisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge on scientific behaving with patients during giving bad news involves most of physicians even experienced physicians. Interestingly, this hurts physicians mind and in some cases causes sadness and depression or reaction on dealing with patient. In a cross sectional-descriptive study, 203 clinical assistant were included in study from 2009 to 2010 at Tabriz university of medical sciences. Comments of residents about giving bad news were registered on valid and reliable questionnaire. State of awareness by considering positive answers of statistical population were categorized into three groups; first group: weak awareness (true questions fewer than 50%, second group: medium awareness (true questions between 50 to75%, and third group: good awareness (true questions more than 75%. Validity of questionnaire was assessed by evaluating contents and reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Stratified sampling was used based on academic year. Mean age of residents was 32.01±3.25 years between the ranges of 26 to 43 years. Females were 76 individuals (37.4% and 127 individuals (62.6% males. Mean of physicians work experience was 2.1-2.9 (0-15 years range at general period. Among residents, internal medicine residents agree on considering patients education before giving bad news much than other majors residents (P=0.004. Mean score for residents' awareness about patients' right for knowing disease were 4.81±1.58 (min=0, max=7; the mean for female residents was 4.9±1.49 and 4.75±1.64 for male residents. There is statistically significant differences between majors.Present study, has shown that the knowledge of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences residents about breaking bad news are low. It seems that holding workshops about breaking bad news are necessary for educating medical students and residents. Keywords: Breaking bad news; residents; knowledge; attitude

  6. Quality of publication ethics in the instructions to the authors of Iranian journals of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Fatemeh; Sobhani, Abdol-Rasoul; Mallaei, Mahin

    2013-03-01

    Providing a perfect instruction to authors can prevent most potential publication ethics errors. This study was conducted to determine the quality of ethical considerations in the instructions to the authors of Iranian research scientific journals of medical sciences (accredited by the Commission for Accreditation and Improvement of Iranian Medical Journals) in October 2011. Checklist items (n=15) were extracted from the national manual of ethics in medical research publications, and the validity of the manual of ethics was assessed. All the accredited Iranian journals of medical sciences (n=198) were entered into the study. The instructions to the authors of 160 accredited Iranian journals were available online and were reviewed. The ANOVA and Kendall Correlation coefficient were performed to analyze the results. A total of 76 (47.5%) of the 160 journals were in English and 84 (52.5%) were in Farsi. The most frequently mentioned items related to publication ethics comprised "commitment not to send manuscripts to other journals and re-publish manuscripts" (85%, 83.8%), "aim and scope" of the journal (81.9%), "principles of medical ethics in the use of human samples" (74.4%), and "review process" (74.4%). On the other hand, the items of "principles of advertising" (1.2%), "authorship criteria" (15%), and "integrity in publication of clinical trial results" (30.6%) were the least frequently mentioned ones. Based on the study findings, the quality of publication ethics, as instructed to the authors, can improve the quality of the journals.

  7. Peabody's "Care of the Patient" and the Nature of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Francis W. Peabody's 1927 essay "The Care of the Patient" is widely quoted, yet few appreciate the subtlety of its interweaving of medical science with its more obvious humanistic elements. Understanding the essay in context requires a recapitulation of Peabody's life story, a review of earlier work that led up to the culminating lecture in 1926, and a detailed analysis of the thread of argument Peabody wove through the lecture. A better understanding of the essay shows how Peabody anticipated several important later developments in medical thought.

  8. Effect of an Integrated Case-based Nutrition Curriculum on Medical Education at Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi, Ahmad; Mohamadi, Ali Akbar Haj Agha; Sarchami, Ramin; Ziaee, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition education is identified as an important part of medical education by organizations. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, school of medicine (QUMS SOM), has a required basic nutrition course of 36 hr in second year of medical school, but education experts reports show that the course does not provide required therapeutic skills for graduate student. Method: We decided to organize an 8-hr diet therapy work shop in order to develop a patient experience clinical based case study teaching to enhance clinical skills at QUMS SOM. Results: Students’ perception score about adequacy of nutrition instruction increased from 20% (at baseline) to 70% (after intervention). The mean nutrition knowledge score of total students in clinical nutrition were different between before and one month after integration (8.3±2.5, 13.4±3.2, P curriculum at QUMS was appropriate method to enhance student’s perception about nutrition integration and to increase and translate the knowledge to clinical practice. PMID:22980104

  9. Relationship between Eating Disorders, Stress and Depression in Medical Students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Ahmadian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Nowadays eating disorders are considered as one of the main psychological disorders. These types of disorder result in physical and mental health problems and affect the individuals’ quality of life. This study has aimed to survey eating disorders and its relation with depression and stress in medical students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: In a descriptive study, 340 university students were chosen by the use of simple random sampling and also three questionnaires had been used: 1 Eating attitude questionnaire (EAT-26, revised Beck depression inventory (BDI and Students stressors questionnaire by Pouladi. Collected information was analyzed by the use of SPSS software and statistical tests. Findings: Based on research results 9.41% of students had eating disorder, 12.5% had average depression, 33.4% had severe depression, 12.5% had average stress and 31.3% had high stress. Relative frequency of eating disorder in medical students was the same based on gender, age, living conditions and marital status. Also there was a significant relation between relative frequency of eating disorder, depression severity and stress. Conclusion: Study findings showed that there was a relation between eating disorder, depression severity and stress; thus necessity of paying more attention to some mental symptoms such as depression and stress helps clinicians diagnose and cure eating disorders.

  10. ІСТОРІЯ РАДІОЛОГІЇ В КОНТЕКСТІ ДОСЯГНЕНЬ ПРИРОДНИЧИХ НАУК / THE HISTORY OF RADIOLOGY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE ACHIEVEMENT OF SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Бірюкова Тетяна

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Бирюкова Татьяна, Федив Владимир, Олар Елена, Гайдичук Надежда, Микитюк Орися История радиологиы в контексте развития естественных наук. История радиологии в контексте достижений естественных наук. Аннотация. В статье рассмотрены основные исторические этапы развития радиологии. Приведены примеры достижений различных направлений развития, использования для диагностических и лечебных целей методик рентгенодиагностики, радионуклидной диагностики; рентгеновской компьютерной томографии. Ключевые слова: рентген, радионуклид, излучения, томография, диагностика, лечение. Biriukova Tatyana, Fediv Volodymyr, Olar Olna, Haydychuk Nadiya, Mykytyuk Orysya The history of radiology in the context of the achievements of science Summary. The article describes the main historical stages of Radiology, directly related to the significant achievements in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. Radiology - discipline that studies using of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in medicine. Medical Radiology includes two major medical disciplines: radiodiagnostics (diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy (radiation therapy. In this article are shown major achievements of science and its application in medicine. The establishment and development of Radiology started after X-rays (1895 and natural radioactivity (1896 discovering. X-rays were used for diagnosis and later for medical reasons immediately after discovering. Further development of radiology is linked to the following

  11. Prevalence of ADHD among the Students Residing in Dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Sadeghi Movahed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a heredity and psychological disorder that often continues to adulthood and causes great number of emotional, social, educational and occupational problem for college students. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of ADHD among students residing in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences.   Methods: In this cross sectional study, all students in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences were included. They filled the Self reporting Conner’s ADHD questionnaires. Data were extracted and analyzed with SPSS.   Results: During this study, the prevalence of ADHD was 8.6 percent. The males show more involvement rate than females. The students with ADHD showed more incidences of smoking and psychotropic drug consumption.   Conclusion: Due to the high prevalence of ADHD among the college students, early diagnosis and treatment of ADHD seems to be necessary.

  12. The effective factors on the academic progress of the students of Tehran University of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudbari, Masoud; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Roudbari, Soudeh; Sedghi, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    To examine factors influencing the academic performance of students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between 2008 and 2009 at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data was obtained from the education office of the university and SPSS version 15 was used for data analysis. Of the 670 students in the study, 230 (34.3%) were boys and 440 (65.6%) were girls.The highest mean score of courses belonged to the Psychiatry Institute (18.68) and the lowest was in the School of Medicine (15.20). Twenty nine per cent of students had failed course and 8.4% had failed semester. The variables gender, level of education, and school are the most important factors affecting the educational progress of students. Overall, students' failure ratios varied significantly between schools and educational levels.

  13. Shared learning in medical science education in the Islamic Republic of Iran: an investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irajpour, Alireza; Barr, Hugh; Abedi, Heidarali; Salehi, Shayesteh; Changiz, Tahereh

    2010-03-01

    Almost all information about interprofessional education (IPE) comes from a few western countries; little from the rest of the world. This paper helps to rectify that omission. It reports the first phase of a study of "shared learning" between health professions in "medical sciences education" in the Islamic Republic of Iran based on a documentary search and national survey of all government affiliated medical sciences universities (MSUs) with examples which meet some of the criteria for IPE. The second phase, to be reported later, will present findings from an analysis of interviews with administrators at governmental level and teachers and organizers at institutional level regarding their perceptions, experience and expectations of such learning. The study is set in the context of reforms in the organization and delivery of higher education and health care services in Iran.

  14. Mutations in Soviet public health science: post-Lysenko medical genetics, 1969-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This paper traces the integration of human genetics with Soviet public health science after the Lysenko era. For nearly three decades, USSR biology pursued its own version of anti-bourgeois, Soviet 'creative Darwinism', departing from western, post-WWII scientific developments. After Lysenko was suspended, research niches of immunology, biophysics and mutation research formed the basis of new departments at the Institute of Medical Genetics, which was founded in 1969 as part of the Soviet Academy of Medical Sciences. Focussing on early research activities and collaborations at the institute, I show how the concept of mutagenesis, a pivotal issue during the Cold War, became mobilized from Drosophila genetics to human heredity and to society as a whole. This mode of scaling up and down through population studies shaped not only Soviet human biology and genetics; it also brought about changes in clinical practice and public health as well as in the monitoring and regulation of mutagenic agents in the environment.

  15. Current radiology. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  16. A radiological study on intra- and extra-cranial calcifications in adults with X-linked hypophosphatemia and associations with other mineralizing enthesopathies and childhood medical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Kjaer, Inger; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) The objective of this study was to explore radiological signs of intracranial and nuchal ligament calcifications in adult patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) compared with controls and 2) to correlate signs of cranial calcifications in XLH patients with the presence of ot...

  17. History of neurosurgery in Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS is the only tertiary care institute in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. The department of neurosurgery was established nearly three decades ago and continues to be the leader in providing high quality neurosurgical services in the region. The article provides an insight into the genesis of the department and its sustained growth over these years. It also describes the plans for its future development.

  18. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Background Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using a pretested self-administered structured questionnaire from May-June 2013. The primary outcome indicator was self-reported absenteeism from lectures in the semester preceding the study period. The stud...

  19. Profession and professionalisation in medical radiation science as an emergent profession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jenny [RMIT University, Medical Radiations, School of Medical Sciences, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.sim@rmit.edu.au; Radloff, Alex [Central Queensland University, Rockhampton Campus, Bruce Highway, North Rockhampton, Queensland 4702 (Australia)], E-mail: pvcas@cqu.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: Deregulation, reduced operating costs, new ways of organising the professional workforce, increasing competition within the healthcare sector and increasing consumer expectations are factors that challenge any health profession. This paper, which forms part of the first author's doctoral study on continuing professional development in medical radiation science, details the journey of medical radiation science as a profession in Australia. Specifically, the paper examines the challenges confronting practitioners in their struggle to be recognised as a profession in its own right. Findings: The challenges facing medical radiation science practitioners included low professional self-esteem and apathy, which adversely affects their willingness and ability to continue learning and to assume increasing work responsibilities which are essential attributes of a health professional. Low self-esteem and apathy are also preventing practitioners from venturing beyond their comfort zone of daily workplace practices. This ultimately impacts on their ability to advance clinical practice in response to a constantly changing health care system. Conclusion: Despite the current difficulties confronting the profession, it is possible for practitioners to assume a more proactive role in moving the profession forward. As part of the solution to improving practitioners' low self-esteem and to rekindling their enthusiasm for the profession, the authors propose that continuing professional development programs should go beyond simply assisting practitioners in advancing clinical competence. They should also aim to empower practitioners to develop their reflective skills. Reflection is now widely promoted in healthcare professions as one of the means of enhancing clinical practice and improving healthcare delivery. To this end, educational designers should incorporate reflection into professional development programs as both a learning goal and a strategy. Helping

  20. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  1. Assessment of scientific thinking in basic science questions in the Iranian Fourth National Olympiad for medical sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding to the importance of students Olympiads, and the need for evaluation of quality of questions, the aim of this study was to analyze questions (indices of difficulty coefficient and discrimination coefficient of Fourth Olympiad examination among Iranian medical sciences students in the area of scientific thinking in basic science. Methods: This study was descriptive-analytical study and was conducted in 2013 in the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Tabriz, Iran. The individual phase of this period, comprised from four phase and six parts included: designing conceptual map (CM (three part designing CM, summarizing CM, and designing three questions, hypothesis generating, selecting variables, and analyzing the findings. Data analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests in SPSS for Windows. Results: According to difficulty coefficient of selecting variable (82% and making hypothesis was the easiest part (46%. And according to discriminate coefficient, analyzing the findings had the highest discriminate coefficient (83%, and selecting materials had the lowest discriminate coefficient (34%. Difficulty coefficient of the test was estimated about 63%, and discriminate coefficient was 66%. The results of Spearman correlation coefficient test showed that the correlation between scores related to designing CM with generating hypothesis equals to 85%, with selecting variable was 36% and with analyzing the results equals to 71%. Conclusion: Based on the result of this study, it is necessary for a designer of test to focus on selecting variable part of the test for improvement of quality and validity of the test. Furthermore, regarding to effectiveness of CM, it seems logical to pay more attention to their use.

  2. Bridging radiology and public health: the emerging field of radiologic public health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollura, Daniel J; Carrino, John A; Matuszak, Diane L; Mnatsakanyan, Zaruhi R; Eng, John; Cutchis, Protagoras; Babin, Steven M; Sniegoski, Carol; Lombardo, Joseph S

    2008-03-01

    Radiology and public health have an emerging opportunity to collaborate, in which radiology's vast supply of imaging data can be integrated into public health information systems for epidemiologic assessments and responses to population health problems. Fueling the linkage of radiology and public health include (i) the transition from analog film to digital formats, enabling flexible use of radiologic data; (ii) radiology's role in imaging across nearly all medical and surgical subspecialties, which establishes a foundation for a consolidated and uniform database of images and reports for public health use; and (iii) the use of radiologic data to characterize disease patterns in a population occupying a geographic area at one time and to characterize disease progression over time via follow-up examinations. The backbone for this integration is through informatics projects such as Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms and RadLex constructing terminology libraries and ontologies, as well as algorithms integrating data from the electronic health record and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine Structured Reporting. Radiology's role in public health is being tested in disease surveillance systems for outbreak detection and bioterrorism, such as the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics. Challenges for radiologic public health informatics include refining the systems and user interfaces, adhering to privacy regulations, and strengthening collaborative relations among stakeholders, including radiologists and public health officials. Linking radiology with public health, radiologic public health informatics is a promising avenue through which radiology can contribute to public health decision making and health policy.

  3. Learning and study strategies correlate with medical students' performance in anatomical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Williams, Shanna E; Gregory Hawkins, H

    2017-09-22

    Much of the content delivered during medical students' preclinical years is assessed nationally by such testing as the United States Medical Licensing Examination(®) (USMLE(®) ) Step 1 and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination(®) (COMPLEX-USA(®) ) Step 1. Improvement of student study/learning strategies skills is associated with academic success in internal and external (USMLE Step 1) examinations. This research explores the strength of association between the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) scores and student performance in the anatomical sciences and USMLE Step 1 examinations. The LASSI inventory assesses learning and study strategies based on ten subscale measures. These subscales include three components of strategic learning: skill (Information processing, Selecting main ideas, and Test strategies), will (Anxiety, Attitude, and Motivation) and self-regulation (Concentration, Time management, Self-testing, and Study aid). During second year (M2) orientation, 180 students (Classes of 2016, 2017, and 2018) were administered the LASSI survey instrument. Pearson Product-Moment correlation analyses identified significant associations between five of the ten LASSI subscales (Anxiety, Information processing, Motivation, Selecting main idea, and Test strategies) and students' performance in the anatomical sciences and USMLE Step 1 examinations. Identification of students lacking these skills within the anatomical sciences curriculum allows targeted interventions, which not only maximize academic achievement in an aspect of an institution's internal examinations, but in the external measure of success represented by USMLE Step 1 scores. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Developing a Performance Evaluation Model of Trustees Boards in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences

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    Haniye Sadat Sajadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical role of the boards of trustee in the governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. Despite the importance of such evaluation, evidence demonstrated few studies have been done on the model of board performance evaluation especially in Iran. Aim: This study was aimed to develop a model to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Methodology: The present study was a mix qualitative-quantitative study. The participants were all stakeholders of board performance evaluation. The study, firstly, focused on the world experiences about the models of the board performance evaluation in the universities. Then, this study tried to investigate the current and proposed model of the board performance evaluation in the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Hence, data were collected through interviews, observation and relevant document analysis and analyzed using framework approach. After that, the clustering and rating of the proposed dimensions and indicators of the board performance evaluation was done using the concept mapping method. Finally, the study concentrated on the expert consensus about the initial proposed model of the board performance evaluation. A model was proposed to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences, which had eight parts and sixty-four indicators proposing for the board performance evaluation. This study helped to develop a valid model to evaluate the board performance evaluation in a special kind of university. Such model can be used to produce useful tool for evaluating the performance of the board.

  5. Survey of ownership and use of mobile phones among medical science students in Yazd.

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    Mazloomy Mahmoodabad, S S; Barkhordari, A; Nadrian, H; Moshiri, O; Yavari, M T

    2009-11-01

    As the use of mobile phones is increasing every day, public concern about possible adverse health effects of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (rf-emf) is also growing. Despite the extensive use of mobile phones, little is known about the pattern of mobile phone ownership and its use by the general population and students. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of ownership and use of mobile phones in medical science students and their views about any possible negative effects. The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 309 selected Medical Science students who were selected from Yazd Medical Sciences University using a self administrated questionnaire. The mean talking time and listening to music on the mobile phone was 28.3 +/- 50.5 and 51.9 +/- 81.5 min day(-1), respectively. They also received or sent a mean of 18.8 +/- 37 text messages. Participants reported that location wise, the use of cell phones at home was 87.2% followed by street (79.6%), classroom (37.6%), during driving (18.6%) and in the library (17.8%), respectively. Keeping at pace with changes in community and technology, including mobile phones and their effects on university environments, it seems that responsible departments or managers must predict their possible effects and establish new regulations, accordingly.

  6. The relationship between self-efficacy and academic motivation among students of medical sciences

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    Gh. Roohi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: self-efficacy is referred to individual's beliefs about their abilities to learn and doing significant tasks in life. This study aims to determine the relationship between self-efficacy and academic motivation in a group of medical sciences' students. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 275 students of Golestan University of Medical Sciences (GOUMS were selected using stratified random sampling method. A questionnaire consists of questions regarding demographic, academic motivation, and self-efficacy beliefs were used to collect data. Pearson correlation coefficients, independent T-Test and one way ANOVA were applied on the data. Results: The average of students’ academic motivation was 30.3±4.0. 50.2 percent of students had self-efficacy higher than average. Self-efficacy had significant correlation with intrinsic motivation sub-scale (r=0.196, P=0.001 and total score of academic motivation scale (r=0.155, P=0.01. There were no significant correlations between self-efficacy and extrinsic motivation (r=0.054, P=0.376 and motivation sub-scale (r=0.104, P=0.08. There was no significant difference between two genders in self-efficacy. Conclusion: Improvement in self-efficacy of medical sciences' students could improve their motivation.

  7. Teaching Physiology in integrated basic medical sciences – sharing experiences from Nepal.

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    Pradhan AK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Physiology is the basis of the medical profession [1]. Clear understanding of the mechanisms of the body functions always requires a high level of integration, apart from a descriptive approach [2, 3]. I worked as Professor in the Manipal College of Medical Sciences (MCOMS, Pokhara in the year 2009 -2010. Although my stay in Nepal was relatively short period, but the medical education system in Nepal influenced me. In Nepal, a traditional way of teaching pattern which is lecture-based, teacher-centered, discipline-based, examination-driven, and hospital-oriented is followed. Basic sciences and clinical sciences are the two main part of the medical curriculum in Nepal. The Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree is a four and half year's program, which is followed by one year internship. A large number of new medical colleges are coming up under Nepal Medical Council guidelines. There is a growing demand of Physicians in Nepal. Currently there are 18 medical colleges under Nepal Medical Council [4]. Manipal College of Medical Sciences is under Kathmandu University, one of the best and leading medical institutes in the country. This medical college is located in Pokhara. Students hailing from Nepal, India, Sri Lanka and other countries attend the four and a half year undergraduate medical (MBBS course. The MBBS course in Nepal is divided into nine semesters. Basic science subjects include Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology and Community Medicine which are taught in an integrated manner during the first four semesters (two years period. Community Medicine continues as a part of syllabus till the seventh semester and the clinical subjects like Medicine, Surgery, OBG, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Dermatology etc. are taught during the last five semesters of the MBBS course. At present Tribhuvan University (TU, Kathmandu University (KU, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS and NAMS (National

  8. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

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    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  9. Implications Of Computer Assisted Radiology

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    Lemke, Heinz U.

    1989-10-01

    Within the field of radiology, assistance with computer and communication systems may be applied to generation, storing, transmission, viewing, analyzing and interpreting of images. As a result, digital image management and communication systems will be applied at various levels in the health care system. Four groups of people are somehow involved or affected by this process. These are, first of all, the patients and the medical personnel, but also the scientific-engineering community and the group of professions involved with financing and/or administering these systems. Each group approaches computer assisted radiology from a particular point of view. The paper outlines some aspects as regards the different perceptions of these groups, which need to be clarified in order to successfully realise computer assisted radiology.

  10. A prescription that addresses the decline of basic science education in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel; Thornton, Christina S; Keough, Michael B; Roberts, Jodie I; Yipp, Bryan; Hollenberg, Morley; Bau, Jason T; Peplowski, Michael A; Beck, Paul L

    2014-10-04

    Over 30 years ago a cry rang out through the proverbial halls of academia; "The clinician scientist is an endangered species." These prophetic words have been reverberated in the ears of every specialty and every general medical organization in deafening tones. Why is the role of the clinician scientist or clinician investigator so important that this phrase has been repeated subsequently in medical and educational journals? Simply put, the clinician scientist bridges the ravine between the ever-growing mountain of scientific knowledge and the demanding patient centered clinical care. Here, we describe the current educational model established by the University of Calgary, Leaders in Medicine Program. Our program seeks to train future physicians and clinician scientists by incorporating training in basic science, translational and clinical research with clinical and medical education in a longitudinal program to students of traditional MD/PhD, MD/MSc or MD/MBA stream as well as interested Doctor of Medicine students.

  11. Information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular disease patients in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Maryam; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Mina; Shahrzadi, Leila; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Patients, as one of the most prominent groups requiring health-based information, encounter numerous problems in order to obtain these pieces of information and apply them. The aim of this study was to determine the information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular patients who were hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. This is a survey research. The population consisted of all patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized in the hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences during 2012. According to the statistics, the number of patients was 6000. The sample size was determined based on the formula of Cochran; 400 patients were randomly selected. Data were collected by researcher-made questionnaire. Two-level descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used for analysis. The data showed that the awareness of the probability to recover and finding appropriate medical care centers were the most significant informational needs. The practitioners, television, and radio were used more than the other informational resources. Lack of familiarity to medical terminologies and unaccountability of medical staff were the major obstacles faced by the patients to obtain information. The results also showed that there was no significant relationship between the patients' gender and information-seeking behavior, whereas there was a significant relationship between the demographic features (age, education, place of residence) and information-seeking behavior. Giving information about health to the patients can help them to control their disease. Appropriate methods and ways should be used based on patients' willingness. Despite the variety of information resources, patients expressed medical staff as the best source for getting health information. Information-seeking behavior of the patients was found to be influenced by different demographic and environmental factors.

  12. Assessment of the interns’ ability based on Dundee model in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    MITRA AMINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of medical profession and the role of the physician in society is no secret to anyone. Skills and competencies in clinical practice are necessary for the medical profession. In fact, in patient care, doctors require practical skills in addition to scientific knowledge. This study examines the potentials of medical school students in three areas of doing the right thing, doing the right thing in an intermediate range, and doing the right thing by the right person. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive-analytical and sectional model. The population of this study was all interns of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were passing internship at Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Emergency wards. About 100 persons were selected were selected by simple randomization. In order to collect data, a questionnaire with 12 questions was designed in two parts. The questionnaire was approved by 7 Faculty members of Clinical Medicine and Medical Education, and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 medical students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (82%. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 14 using descriptive statistical methods. Results: Results showed that within the inner circle, interns evaluated their skills in surgery, internal medicine, and gynecology wards, intermediate and at other wards as weak. Also within the center circle, interns evaluated adequate educational evidence-based training in the field of medicine, and sufficiency of educational training in the field of clinical decision making and clinical care as suitable. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that medical interns’ skills in performing most medical skills are moderate. So teaching students by new educational methods and workshop techniques, using experienced teachers will be effective. The use of clinical skills training centers and objective

  13. [Reviewing an article for Radiología: who and how].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Santos, J M

    2011-01-01

    The reviewer's job is fundamental to the editorial process in a scientific journal. The quality of the review will determine the quality of the journal. Therefore, it is very important for the reviewers to make this mission their own and to contribute to the development of science and of the journal. On the other hand, the focus of a review will depend largely on the type of journal for which one is reviewing. In this article, we explain what the journal Radiología, the scientific journal of the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology, expects of its reviewers and their reviews of original articles. We aim to establish some basic rules to lay the groundwork for the development of more detailed guidelines for reviewing articles for the journal Radiología.

  14. Ebola virus disease: radiology preparedness.

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    Bluemke, David A; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2015-02-01

    At present, there is a major emphasis on Ebola virus disease (EVD) preparedness training at medical facilities throughout the United States. Failure to have proper EVD procedures in place was cited as a major reason for infection of medical personnel in the United States. Medical imaging does not provide diagnosis of EVD, but patient assessment in the emergency department and treatment isolation care unit is likely to require imaging services. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of relevant aspects of EVD disease and preparedness relevant to the radiologic community. © RSNA, 2014.

  15. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

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    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft.

  16. EffectiveFactorsonIntegratingtheDigitalLibrariesinIranianUniversitiesofMedical Sciences: A Conceptual Model

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    Faranak Mohsenzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of integration of digital libraries (DL is to utilize various autonomous DLs in concert to provide knowledge from such island-DLs. Integrated digital libraries (IDLs appeared after the emergence of DLs in 1990s, invention of integrated information systems from 2000 and consolidation of them during the recent decade. The Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MHME of Iran has emphasized the integration of health services throughout the country which unavoidably requires the integration of digital libraries in Iranian universities of medical sciences. The main purpose of this investigation was to identify effective factors on such integration. Method: The present research was conducted through analytical-descriptive approach. The related data were gathered from literature, assessed by the Delphi Panel members and analyzed by Fuzzy TOPSIS technique (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Situation. The research population (Delphi Panel consisted of 15 specialists in digital library areas. The snowball method was used to determine the research statistical sampling. The data were gathered through a five-point Likert scale self-made questionnaire after its reliability and validity were evaluated. Results: Study of related published studies in literature revealed that DLs, Integrated Information systems and IDL were three systematic related phenomena, which emerged and developed in a definite and unavoidable order. The findings showed that 34 affecting factors could be considered which influence the integration process of digital libraries in Iran Universities of Medical Sciences. The affecting factors could be classified into five main groups of strategic, technical, digital, organizational and human factors, according to their proximity and importance. Conclusion: IDLs are the outcome of merging the experiences of DLs and integrated information systems, which have led to efficient and remarkable informatics

  17. Knowledge Management Components from the Viewpoint of Departments’ Chairmen Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

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    Faraji Khiavi F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge management is one of the most important success instruments for organizations in the competitive conditions and information era. Setting knowledge management in the organizational system of Medical Sciences’ Universities is required in order to achieve and use the latest research and scientific achievements. So this study aimed to determine the knowledge management components from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional research was performed in the society of department chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (60 persons in 2012 and all of them were studied by census method. Data gathering instrument was a standard questionnaire with 2 parts demographic data and knowledge management. Data were analyzed by SPSS 17 software using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests like Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Findings: The situation of knowledge creation dimension (2.84±0.70 was estimated relatively not appropriate, while knowledge sharing (3.00±0.74, knowledge transfer (3.11±0.61, knowledge application (3.11±0.64, knowledge assessment (3.10±0.77 and general knowledge management (3.01±0.58 were estimated relatively appropriate. There was a significant relationship between samples’ age and the application of knowledge dimension (p=0.009. Conclusion: Knowledge management status seems relatively appropriate from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences.

  18. Peer-assisted learning: filling the gaps in basic science education for preclinical medical students.

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    Sammaraiee, Yezen; Mistry, Ravi D; Lim, Julian; Wittner, Liora; Deepak, Shantal; Lim, Gareth

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to peer-assisted learning (PAL) in clinical training, there is scant literature on the efficacy of PAL during basic medical sciences teaching for preclinical students. A group of senior medical students aimed to design and deliver clinically oriented small-group tutorials after every module in the preclinical curriculum at a United Kingdom medical school. Twenty tutorials were delivered by senior students throughout the year to first- and second-year students. A baseline questionnaire was delivered to inform the development of the program followed by an end-point questionnaire the next year (n = 122). Quizzes were administered before and after five separate tutorials to assess changes in mean student scores. Additionally, each tutorial was evaluated via a questionnaire for participants (n = 949). All five posttutorial quizzes showed a significant improvement in mean student score (P < 0.05). Questionnaires showed students found the program to be relevant and useful for revision purposes and appreciated how tutorials contextualized basic science to clinical medicine. Students appreciated the interactive nature of the sessions and found receiving personalized feedback about their learning and consolidating information with someone familiar with the material to be useful. With the inclusion of the program, students felt there were now an adequate number of tutorials during the year. In conclusion, this study shows that senior medical students can design and deliver a program that adds value to the mostly lecture-based formal preclinical curriculum. We hope that our study can prompt further work to explore the effect of PAL on the teaching of basic sciences during preclinical studies.

  19. [Shared web-based data center for multi-institutional clinical trials: evaluation of UMIN-INDICE (university hospital medical information network-internet data and information center for medical research)in clinical trials of JIVROSG (Japan interventional radiology in oncology study group)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Miyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Kiuchi, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Hirono; Aoki, Noriaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Aramaki, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Osuga, Keigo; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Okusaka, Takushi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Matsui, Osamu; Endo, Keigo

    2012-04-01

    A patient registration system is mandatory for establishing the scientific credibility of the multi-center clinical trials. The Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group (JIVROSG) was organized in 2002 to establish evidence supporting the procedures used in interventional radiology. The Internet Data and Information Center for Medical Research (INDICE), provided by the University Hospital Medical Information Network(UMIN), has been utilized for patient registration in the clinical trials of JIVROSG. In this study, the safety and efficacy of UMIN-INDICE were evaluated. From 2002 to 2010, 18 clinical trials, including one international trial, were conducted. A total of 736 patients were enrolled from 51 institutions. No significant trouble was encountered during this period. A questionnaire survey demonstrated that 90% of participating researchers could use this system without difficulties. UMIN-INDICE may contribute to promoting clinical trials as an infrastructure of multicenter studies.

  20. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular