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Sample records for medicaid managed-care program

  1. An overview of Medicaid managed care litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, S; Teitelbaum, J; Kirby, C; Priebe, L; Klement, T

    1998-11-01

    Since the enactment of Medicaid in 1965, states have had the option of offering beneficiaries enrollment in managed care arrangements. With the advent of mandatory managed care reaching millions of beneficiaries (including a growing proportion of disabled recipients), the amount and scope of litigation involving Medicaid managed care plans can be expected to grow. A review of the current litigation regarding Medicaid managed care reveals two basic types of lawsuits: (1) those that challenge the practices of managed care companies under various federal and state laws that safeguard consumer rights, protect health care quality, and prohibit discrimination; and (2) suits that assert claims arising directly under the Medicaid statute and implementing regulations, as well as claims related to Constitutional safeguards that undergird the program. Lawsuits asserting claims arising under Medicaid tend to raise two basic questions: (1) the extent to which enrollment in a Medicaid managed care plan alters existing Medicaid beneficiary rights and state agency duties under federal or state Medicaid law; and (2) the extent to which managed care companies, as agents of the state, act under "color of law" (i.e., undertaking to perform official duties or acting with the imprimatur of state authority). Additionally, states might see an increase in litigation brought by prospective and current contractors who assert that they have been wrongfully denied contracts or improperly penalized for poor performance. These assertions may involve claims that are grounded in federal and state law, the Medicaid statute, and the Constitution. Moreover, in light of the consumer protection elements of the managed care reforms contained in the Balanced Budget Act, future managed care litigation may focus on the manner in which companies carry out states' obligations toward managed care enrollees. Resolution of Medicaid managed care cases involves the application of general principles of

  2. Medicaid Managed Care Enrollment Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report is composed annually and profiles enrollment statistics on Medicaid managed care programs on a plan-specific level. This report also provides...

  3. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using...... business principles. Most states have insufficient experience in developing managed care plans for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities. Middle-aged adults with physical disabilities present their own constellation of health care issues that is not readily appreciated in health and social services....... The purpose of the study was to understand their experiences in accessing physical health care services and to ascertain the effects of managed care on their health and well-being. This study found beneficiaries encounter numerous barriers in accessing preventative, treatment, and acute care services. Overall...

  4. The Expanding Role of Managed Care in the Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Kyle J.; Long, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    States increasingly use managed care for Medicaid enrollees, yet evidence of its impact on health care outcomes is mixed. This research studies county-level Medicaid managed care (MMC) penetration and health care outcomes among nonelderly disabled and nondisabled enrollees. Results for nondisabled adults show that increased penetration is associated with increased probability of an emergency department visit, difficulty seeing a specialist, and unmet need for prescription drugs, and is not associated with reduced expenditures. We find no association between penetration and health care outcomes for disabled adults. This suggests that the primary gains from MMC may be administrative simplicity and budget predictability for states rather than reduced expenditures or improved access for individuals. PMID:25882616

  5. Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Schpero, William L; Schlesinger, Mark J; Trivedi, Amal N

    2017-06-27

    State Medicaid programs have increasingly contracted with insurers to provide medical care services for enrollees (Medicaid managed care plans). Insurers that provide these plans can exit Medicaid programs each year, with unclear effects on quality of care and health care experiences. To determine the frequency and interstate variation of health plan exit from Medicaid managed care and evaluate the relationship between health plan exit and market-level quality. Retrospective cohort of all comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans (N = 390) during the interval 2006-2014. Plan exit, defined as the withdrawal of a managed care plan from a state's Medicaid program. Eight measures from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set were used to construct 3 composite indicators of quality (preventive care, chronic disease care management, and maternity care). Four measures from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems were combined into a composite indicator of patient experience, reflecting the proportion of beneficiaries rating experiences as 8 or above on a 0-to-10-point scale. Outcome data were available for 248 plans (68% of plans operating prior to 2014, representing 78% of beneficiaries). Of the 366 comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans operating prior to 2014, 106 exited Medicaid. These exiting plans enrolled 4 848 310 Medicaid beneficiaries, with a mean of 606 039 beneficiaries affected by plan exits annually. Six states had a mean of greater than 10% of Medicaid managed care recipients enrolled in plans that exited, whereas 10 states experienced no plan exits. Plans that exited from a state's Medicaid market performed significantly worse prior to exiting than those that remained in terms of preventive care (57.5% vs 60.4%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, 0.3% to 5.5%]), maternity care (69.7% vs 73.6%; difference, 3.8% [95% CI, 1.7% to 6.0%]), and patient experience (73.5% vs 74.8%; difference, 1.3% [95% CI, 0.6% to 1

  6. Health Care Financing Administration--Medicaid program; Medicaid management information systems. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-05

    These regulations set forth a new procedure to improve Medicaid management by explicitly authorizing HCFA to expand or revise State Medicaid Management Information Systems (MMIS) as necessary to meet program needs. Under this procedure, HCFA will publish major new requirements for comment before deciding to adopt them, and will provide increased Federal matching and reasonable phase-in time for their implementation. HCFA will also periodically review ongoing systems to determine whether all system requirements and performance standards are being met and may reduce the level of Federal matching for those MMIS systems which do not meet prescribed standards.

  7. Improving quality in Medicaid: the use of care management processes for chronic illness and preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Robinson, James C

    2006-01-01

    Care management processes (CMPs), tools to improve the efficiency and quality of primary care delivery, are particularly important for low-income patients facing substantial barriers to care. To measure the adoption of CMPs by medical groups, Independent Practice Associations, community clinics, and hospital-based clinics in California's Medicaid program and the factors associated with CMP adoption. Telephone survey of every provider organization with at least 6 primary care physicians and at least 1 Medi-Cal HMO contract, Spring 2003. One hundred twenty-three organizations participated, accounting for 64% of provider organizations serving Medicaid managed care in California. We surveyed 30 measures of CMP use for asthma and diabetes, and for child and adolescent preventive services. The mean number of CMPs used by each organization was 4.5 for asthma and 4.9 for diabetes (of a possible 8). The mean number of CMPs for preventive services was 4.0 for children and 3.5 for adolescents (of a possible 7). Organizations with more extensive involvement in Medi-Cal managed care used more CMPs for chronic illness and preventive service. Community clinics and hospital-based clinics used more CMPs for asthma and diabetes than did Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), and profitable organizations used more CMPs for child and adolescent preventive services than did entities facing severe financial constraints. The use of CMPs by Medicaid HMOs and the presence of external (financial and nonfinancial) incentives for clinical performance were strongly associated with use of care management by provider organizations. Physician and provider organizations heavily involved in California's Medicaid program are extensively engaged in preventive and chronic care management programs.

  8. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net Medicaid managed care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmano, Michael K; Sparer, Michael S; Brown, Lawrence D; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-12-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods, we studied these "safety-net" health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also found that, based on a partnership with providers, safety-net plans are moving toward more sophisticated efforts to manage the care of their enrollees. Our study suggests that, with supportive state policies, safety-net plans are capable of remaining viable. Contracting with safety-net plans may not be an efficient mechanism for enabling Medicaid recipients to "enter the mainstream of American health care," but it may provide states with an effective way to manage and coordinate the care of Medicaid recipients, while helping to maintain the health care safety-net for the uninsured.

  9. Effect of Medicaid Managed Care on racial disparities in health care access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin Lê

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of Medicaid Managed Care (MMC) on racial disparities in access to care consistent with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) definition of racial disparity, which excludes differences stemming from health status but includes socioeconomic status (SES)-mediated differences. Secondary data from the Adult Samples of the 1997-2001 National Health Interview Survey, metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level Medicaid Health Maintenance Organization (MHMO) market share from the 1997 to 2001 InterStudy MSA Trend Dataset, and MSA characteristics from the 1997 to 2001 Area Resource File. I estimate multivariate regression models to compare racial disparities in doctor visits, emergency room (ER) use, and having a usual source of care between enrollees in MMC and Medicaid Fee-for-Service (FFS) plans. To contend with potential selection bias, I use a difference-in-difference analytical strategy and assess the impact of greater MHMO market share at the MSA level on Medicaid enrollees' access measures. To implement the IOM definition of racial disparity, I adjust for health status but not SES factors using a novel method to transform the distribution of health status for minority populations to approximate the white health status distribution. MMC enrollment is associated with lowered disparities in having any doctor visit in the last year for blacks, and in having any usual source of care for both blacks and Hispanics. Increasing Medicaid HMO market share lowered disparities in having any doctor visits in the last year for both blacks and Hispanics. Although disparities in most other measures were not much affected, black-white ER use disparities exist among MMC enrollees and in areas of high MHMO market share. MMC programs' reduction of some disparities suggests that recent shifts in Medicaid policy toward managed care plans have benefited minority enrollees. Future research should investigate whether black-white disparities in ER use within MMC groups

  10. A randomized controlled trial of intensive care management for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with high health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Janice F; Krupski, Antoinette; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Atkins, David C; Court, Beverly; Mancuso, David; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate outcomes of a registered nurse-led care management intervention for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with high health care costs. Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Client Outcomes Database, 2008-2011. In a randomized controlled trial with intent-to-treat analysis, outcomes were compared for the intervention (n = 557) and control groups (n = 563). A quasi-experimental subanalysis compared outcomes for program participants (n = 251) and propensity score-matched controls (n = 251). Administrative data were linked to describe costs and use of health services, criminal activity, homelessness, and death. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the intervention group had higher odds of outpatient mental health service use and higher prescription drug costs than controls in the postperiod. In the subanalysis, participants had fewer unplanned hospital admissions and lower associated costs; higher prescription drug costs; higher odds of long-term care service use; higher drug/alcohol treatment costs; and lower odds of homelessness. We found no health care cost savings for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries randomized to intensive care management. Among participants, care management may have the potential to increase access to needed care, slow growth in the number and therefore cost of unplanned hospitalizations, and prevent homelessness. These findings apply to start-up care management programs targeted at high-cost, high-risk Medicaid populations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Medicaid care management: description of high-cost addictions treatment clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Charles J; Sun, Yi; Yerneni, Rajeev; Tesiny, Ed; Burke, Constance; Bardsley, Leland; McDonald, Rebecca; Morgenstern, Jon

    2013-09-01

    High utilizers of alcohol and other drug treatment (AODTx) services are a priority for healthcare cost control. We examine characteristics of Medicaid-funded AODTx clients, comparing three groups: individuals cost clients in the top decile of AODTx expenditures (HC; n=5,718); and 1760 enrollees in a chronic care management (CM) program for HC clients implemented in 22 counties in New York State. Medicaid and state AODTx registry databases were combined to draw demographic, clinical, social needs and treatment history data. HC clients accounted for 49% of AODTx costs funded by Medicaid. As expected, HC clients had significant social welfare needs, comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions, and use of inpatient services. The CM program was successful in enrolling some high-needs, high-cost clients but faced barriers to reaching the most costly and disengaged individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net medicaid managed care plans

    OpenAIRE

    Gusmano, Michael K.; Sparer, Michael S.; Brown, Lawrence D.; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods we studied these “safety-net” health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also f...

  13. Medicaid/CHIP Program; Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Changes to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality Control and Payment Error Rate Measurement Programs in Response to the Affordable Care Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-05

    This final rule updates the Medicaid Eligibility Quality Control (MEQC) and Payment Error Rate Measurement (PERM) programs based on the changes to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. This rule also implements various other improvements to the PERM program.

  14. Effect of Medicaid disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Matthew S

    2013-08-01

    To determine the impact of state Medicaid diabetes disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs. National InPatient Sample sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Project for the years from 2000 to 2008 using 18 states. A difference-in-difference methodology compares costs and number of emergency admissions for Washington, Texas, and Georgia, which implemented disease management programs between 2000 and 2008, to states that did not undergo the transition to managed care (N = 103). Costs and emergency admissions were extracted for diabetic Medicaid enrollees diagnosed in the reform and non-reform states and collapsed into state and year cells. In the three treatment states, the implementation of disease management programs did not have statistically significant impacts on the outcome variables when compared to the control states. States that implemented disease management programs did not achieve improvements in costs or the number of emergency of admissions; thus, these programs do not appear to be an effective way to reduce the burden of this chronic disease. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Forging community partnerships to improve health care: the experience of four Medicaid managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Rodin, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Some managed care organizations (MCOs) serving Medicaid beneficiaries are actively engaging in community partnerships to meet the needs of vulnerable members and nonmembers. We found that the history, leadership, and other internal factors of four such MCOs primarily drive that focus. However, external factors such as state Medicaid policies and competition or collaboration among MCOs also play a role. The specific strat­egies of these MCOs vary but share common goals: (1) improve care coordination, access, and delivery; (2) strengthen the community and safety-net infrastructure; and (3) prevent illness and reduce disparities. The MCOs use data to identify gaps in care, seek community input in designing interventions, and commit resources to engage community organiza­tions. State Medicaid programs can promote such work by establishing goals, priorities, and guidelines; providing data analysis and technical assistance to evaluate local needs and community engagement efforts; and convening stakeholders to collaborate and share best practices.

  16. 77 FR 17143 - Medicaid Program; Eligiblity Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Medicare and Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 431, 435 and 457 Medicaid Program; Eligibility Changes Under... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 431, 435, and 457 [CMS-2349-F] RIN 0938-AQ62 Medicaid Program; Eligiblity Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  17. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008; the Application of Mental Health Parity Requirements to Coverage Offered by Medicaid Managed Care Organizations, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Alternative Benefit Plans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    This final rule will address the application of certain requirements set forth in the Public Health Service Act, as amended by the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, to coverage offered by Medicaid managed care organizations, Medicaid Alternative Benefit Plans, and Children’s Health Insurance Programs.

  18. Medicaid Managed Care Penetration Rates and Expansion Enr...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid managed care penetration rates and expansion enrollment by state charts are composed annually by the Data and System Group (DSG) of the Centers for...

  19. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Medicaid Beneficiaries: The Role of Physician Payment and Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabik, Lindsay M; Dahman, Bassam; Vichare, Anushree; Bradley, Cathy J

    2018-05-01

    Medicaid-insured women have low rates of cancer screening. There are multiple policy levers that may influence access to preventive services such as screening, including physician payment and managed care. We examine the relationship between each of these factors and breast and cervical cancer screening among nonelderly nondisabled adult Medicaid enrollees. We combine individual-level data on Medicaid enrollment, demographics, and use of screening services from the Medicaid Analytic eXtract files with data on states' Medicaid-to-Medicare fee ratios and estimate their impact on screening services. Higher physician fees are associated with greater screening for comprehensive managed care enrollees; for enrollees in fee-for-service Medicaid, the findings are mixed. Patient participation in primary care case management is a significant moderator of the relationship between physician fees and the rate of screening, as interactions between enrollee primary care case management status and the Medicaid fee ratio are consistently positive across models of screening.

  20. Understanding Medicaid Managed Care Investments in Members' Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura; Ackerman, Sara; Wing, Holly; Manchanda, Rishi

    2017-08-01

    Despite widespread interest in addressing social determinants of health (SDH) as a means to improve health and to reduce health care spending, little information is available about how to develop, sustain, and scale nonmedical interventions in diverse payer environments, including Medicaid Managed Care. This study aimed to explore how Medicaid Managed Care Organization (MMCO) leaders interpret their roles and responsibilities around SDH, how they garner resources to develop and sustain interventions to address SDH, and how they perceive the influences of external organizations on related activities. Semistructured qualitative key informant interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 26 Medicaid Managed Care corporate executives. Data were analyzed with an iterative coding, thematic development and interpretation process. MMCO leaders' interests and activities around interventions to address SDH are described, as well as their perceptions of existing and potential incentives and barriers to expanding these interventions. Despite significant experimentation and programmatic diversity of interventions addressing social determinants, MMCO leaders struggle with clinical integration, financing, and evaluation efforts that could promote sustainability. Though their efforts are nascent, MMCO leaders are investing in tackling social determinants to improve health and to decrease health care spending in managed care settings that serve low-income populations. Results highlight both opportunities and concerns about sustaining and scaling clinical interventions addressing SDH.

  1. Medicaid program; health care-related taxes. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    This rule finalizes our proposal to delay enforcement of certain clarifications regarding standards for determining hold harmless arrangements in the final rule entitled, "Medicaid Program; Health Care-Related Taxes" from the expiration of a Congressional moratorium on enforcement from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010.

  2. Ideologies of aid, practices of power: lessons for Medicaid managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nancy L

    2005-03-01

    The articles in this special issue teach valuable lessons based on what happened in New Mexico with the shift to Medicaid managed care. By reframing these lessons in broader historical and cultural terms with reference to aid programs, we have the opportunity to learn a great deal more about the relationship between poverty, public policy, and ideology. Medicaid as a state and federal aid program in the United States and economic development programs as foreign aid provide useful analogies specifically because they exhibit a variety of parallel patterns. The increasing concatenation of corporate interests with state and nongovernmental interests in aid programs is ultimately producing a less centralized system of power and responsibility. This process of decentralization, however, is not undermining the sources of power behind aid efforts, although it does make the connections between intent, planning, and outcome less direct. Ultimately, the devolution of power produces many unintended consequences for aid policy. But it also reinforces the perspective that aid and the need for it are nonpolitical issues.

  3. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  4. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  5. Documentation of Contraception and Pregnancy Intention In Medicaid Managed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Thiel de Bocanegra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Clinical guidelines recommend the documentation of pregnancy intention and family planning needs during primary care visits. Prior to the 2014 Medicaid expansion and release of these guidelines, the documentation practices of Medicaid managed care providers are unknown. Methods: We performed a chart review of 1054 Medicaid managed care visits of women aged 13 to 49 to explore client, provider, and visit characteristics associated with documentation of immediate or future plans for having children and contraceptive method use. Five managed care plans used Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify providers with at least 15 women who had received family planning or well-woman care in 2013. We conducted multilevel logistic regression analyses with documentation of contraceptive method and pregnancy intention as outcome variables and clinic site as the level 2 random effect. Results: Only 12% of charts had documentation of pregnancy intention and 59% documented contraceptive use. Compared to women with a family planning visit reason, women with an annual, reproductive health, or primary care reason for their visit were significantly less likely to have contraception documented (odds ratio [OR] = 11.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.8-17.7. Age was also a significant predictor with women aged 30 to 49 (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9, and women aged 13 to 19 (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.1-0.6 being less likely to have a note about pregnancy intention in their chart. Pregnancy intention was more likely to be documented in multispecialty clinics (OR = 15.5; 95% CI = 2.7-89.2. Conclusions: Interventions to improve routine medical record documentation of contraception and pregnancy intention regardless of patient age and visit characteristics are needed to facilitate the provision of family planning in managed care visits and, ultimately, achieving better maternal infant health outcomes

  6. Medicaid managed care: disparities in the use of thiazolidinediones compared with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Fadia T; Shin, James Y; Mullins, Daniel; Fatodu, Hugh O; Gu, Anna; Saunders, Elijah

    2005-04-01

    To identify patient characteristics that are associated with the incidence of thiadolidinediones (TZDs) or metformin prescnbing in Medicaid managed care plans. We utilized a retrospective cohort study design. Two-and-one-half years of prescription claims of Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) patients who were new utilizers of metformin or TZDs were analyzed using univariate, bivariate and multivariate models. Multivariate logistic regression models were built to assess the combined effect of all variables on the likelihood of incident use of TZDs or metformin. Claims for 3,041 patients were analyzed for the period between January 15, 2000 and June 15, 2002. African Americans and urban residents were less likely to be started on TZDs (OR = 0.678, 95% C1 = 0.830-1.206; OR = 0.579, 95% CI = 0.479-0.699, respectively). Advanced age, preexisting comorbidities and diabetes complications, and prior use of other oral diabetes drugs or insulin were predictors of increased likelihood of TZD initiation. Race, age, residential setting, preexisting comorbidities and diabetes complications, other oral diabetes drug use, and insulin use are statistically significant predictors of initial prescribing of TZD or metformin in a Medicaid MCO population. Findings can potentially inform the management of diabetes in managed care so as to improve outcomes.

  7. Developing a managed care delivery system in New York State for Medicaid recipients with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, I; Cruz, H; DeLorenzo, J; Hidalgo, J; Plavin, H; Whitaker, J

    1999-11-01

    In the state of New York, models of care known as HIV Special Needs Plans (HIV SNPs) are being developed to meet the unique health and medical needs of Medicaid recipients with HIV. Establishing managed care plans for the 80,000 to 100,000 HIV-infected Medicaid recipients residing in the state has required considerable effort, including distributing planning grants to solicit information and recommendations regarding program and fiscal policy; convening a workgroup to facilitate discussions between the state and the provider and consumer communities; conducting a longitudinal survey to assess the impact of managed care on persons with HIV; and developing a longitudinal, person-based, encounter-level database representing the clinical and service utilization histories of more than 100,000 patients for state fiscal years 1990 to 1996. The key fiscal issues identified and discussed were capitation rates, initial capitalization levels, and risk-adjustment mechanisms. Other pertinent issues included the importance of a benefits package supporting a comprehensive, integrated continuum of state-of-the-art services; marketing and enrollment; attention to provider and consumer training and education needs; and interdependence of financial reimbursement and benefits packages. From our experience in New York State, we conclude that a successful model of Medicaid managed care for persons with HIV should build on the existing infrastructure of services, using a collaborative process among government agencies, healthcare providers, and HIV/AIDS consumer communities. A future challenge lies in the implementation of the HIV SNP model and evaluation of its soundness and ability to ensure quality healthcare services.

  8. Acceptance of New Medicaid Patients by Primary Care Physicians and Experiences with Physician Availability among Children on Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the relationship between physicians' acceptance of new Medicaid patients and access to health care. Data Sources The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) Electronic Health Records Survey and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2011/2012. Study Design Linear probability models estimated the relationship between measures of experiences with physician availability among children on Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) from the NHIS and state-level estimates of the percent of primary care physicians accepting new Medicaid patients from the NAMCS, controlling for other factors. Principal Findings Nearly 16 percent of children with a significant health condition or development delay had a doctor's office or clinic indicate that the child's health insurance was not accepted in states with less than 60 percent of physicians accepting new Medicaid patients, compared to less than 4 percent in states with at least 75 percent of physicians accepting new Medicaid patients. Adjusted estimates and estimates for other measures of access to care were similar. Conclusions Measures of experiences with physician availability for children on Medicaid/CHIP were generally good, though better in states where more primary care physicians accepted new Medicaid patients. PMID:25683869

  9. Medicaid managed care for mental health services: the survival of safety net institutions in rural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Waitzkin, Howard; Nicdao, Ethel

    2008-09-01

    Few accounts document the rural context of mental health safety net institutions (SNIs), especially as they respond to changing public policies. Embedded in wider processes of welfare state restructuring, privatization has transformed state Medicaid systems nationwide. We carried out an ethnographic study in two rural, culturally distinct regions of New Mexico to assess the effects of Medicaid managed care (MMC) and the implications for future reform. After 160 interviews and participant observation at SNIs, we analyzed data through iterative coding procedures. SNIs responded to MMC by nonparticipation, partnering, downsizing, and tapping into alternative funding sources. Numerous barriers impaired access under MMC: service fragmentation, transportation, lack of cultural and linguistic competency, Medicaid enrollment, stigma, and immigration status. By privatizing Medicaid and contracting with for-profit managed care organizations, the state placed additional responsibilities on "disciplined" providers and clients. Managed care models might compromise the rural mental health safety net unless the serious gaps and limitations are addressed in existing services and funding.

  10. Association of State Access Standards With Accessibility to Specialists for Medicaid Managed Care Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Cohen, Michael S; Cleary, Paul D

    2017-10-01

    Medicaid recipients have consistently reported less timely access to specialists than patients with other types of coverage. By 2018, state Medicaid agencies will be required by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to enact time and distance standards for managed care organizations to ensure an adequate supply of specialist physicians for enrollees; however, there have been no published studies of whether these policies have significant effects on access to specialty care. To compare ratings of access to specialists for adult Medicaid and commercial enrollees before and after the implementation of specialty access standards. We used Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data to conduct a quasiexperimental difference-in-differences (DID) analysis of 20 163 nonelderly adult Medicaid managed care (MMC) enrollees and 54 465 commercially insured enrollees in 5 states adopting access standards, and 37 290 MMC enrollees in 5 matched states that previously adopted access standards. Reported access to specialty care in the previous 6 months. Seven thousand six hundred ninety-eight (69%) Medicaid enrollees and 28 423 (75%) commercial enrollees reported that it was always or usually easy to get an appointment with a specialist before the policy implementation (or at baseline) compared with 11 889 (67%) of Medicaid enrollees in states that had previously implemented access standards. Overall, there was no significant improvement in timely access to specialty services for MMC enrollees in the period following implementation of standard(s) (adjusted difference-in-differences, -1.2 percentage points; 95% CI, -2.7 to 0.1), nor was there any impact of access standards on insurance-based disparities in access (0.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -4.3 to 5.4). There was heterogeneity across states, with 1 state that implemented both time and distance standards demonstrating significant improvements in access and reductions in disparities

  11. Can Medicaid Claims Validly Ascertain Foster Care Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T

    2017-08-01

    Medicaid claims have been used to identify populations of children in foster care in the current literature; however, the ability of such an approach to validly ascertain a foster care population is unknown. This study linked children in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being-I to their Medicaid claims from 36 states using their Social Security numbers. Using this match, we examined discordance between caregiver report of foster care placement and the foster care eligibility code contained in the child's Medicaid claims. Only 73% of youth placed in foster care for at least a year displayed a Medicaid code for foster care eligibility. Half of all youth coming into contact with child welfare displayed discordance between caregiver report and Medicaid claims. Children with emergency department utilization, and those in primary care case management health insurance arrangements, had the highest odds of accurate ascertainment. The use of Medicaid claims to identify a cohort of children in foster care results in high rates of underascertainment. Supplementing administrative data with survey data is one way to enhance validity of ascertainment.

  12. Poor program's progress: the unanticipated politics of Medicaid policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence D; Sparer, Michael S

    2003-01-01

    Advocates of U.S. national health insurance tend to share an image that highlights universal standards of coverage, social insurance financing, and national administration--in short, the basic features of Medicare. Such an approach is said to be good (equitable and efficient) policy and equally good politics. Medicaid, by contrast, is often taken to exemplify poor policy and poorer politics: means-tested eligibility, general revenue financing, and federal/state administration, which encourage inequities and disparities of care. This stark juxtaposition fails, however, to address important counterintuitive elements in the political evolution of these programs. Medicare's benefits and beneficiaries have stayed disturbingly stable, but Medicaid's relatively broad benefits have held firm, and its categories of beneficiaries have expanded. Repeated alarms about "bankruptcy" have undermined confidence in Medicare's trust funding, while Medicaid's claims on the taxpayer's dollar have worn well. Medicare's national administration has avoided disparities, but at the price of sacrificing state and local flexibility that can ease such "reforms" as the introduction of managed care. That Medicaid has fared better than a "poor people's program" supposedly could has provocative implications for health reform debates.

  13. The Medicaid personal care services program: implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, J S; Palley, H A

    1991-05-01

    Results of a survey of Medicaid personal care programs in 15 states and the District of Columbia in 1987 show that these programs suffer from many problems. Low wages and slow payment make recruitment and retention of qualified workers difficult. Other problems include lack of coordination among agencies, lack of adequate standards for training or supervision of workers, unequal access to programs, and inequities among states. Implications for social workers are discussed.

  14. The patient perspective: utilizing focus groups to inform care coordination for high-risk medicaid populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheff, Alex; Park, Elyse R; Neagle, Mary; Oreskovic, Nicolas M

    2017-07-25

    Care coordination programs for high-risk, high-cost patients are a critical component of population health management. These programs aim to improve outcomes and reduce costs and have proliferated over the last decade. Some programs, originally designed for Medicare patients, are now transitioning to also serve Medicaid populations. However, there are still gaps in the understanding of what barriers to care Medicaid patients experience, and what supports will be most effective for providing them care coordination. We conducted two focus groups (n = 13) and thematic analyses to assess the outcomes drivers and programmatic preferences of Medicaid patients enrolled in a high-risk care coordination program at a major academic medical center in Boston, MA. Two focus groups identified areas where care coordination efforts were having a positive impact, as well as areas of unmet needs among the Medicaid population. Six themes emerged from the focus groups that clustered in three groupings: In the first group (1) enrollment in an existing medical care coordination programs, and (2) provider communication largely presented as positive accounts of assistance, and good relationships with providers, though participants also pointed to areas where these efforts fell short. In the second group (3) trauma histories, (4) mental health challenges, and (5) executive function difficulties all presented challenges faced by high-risk Medicaid patients that would likely require redress through additional programmatic supports. Finally, in the third group, (6) peer-to-peer support tendencies among patients suggested an untapped resource for care coordination programs. Programs aimed at high-risk Medicaid patients will want to consider programmatic adjustments to attend to patient needs in five areas: (1) provider connection/care coordination, (2) trauma, (3) mental health, (4) executive function/paperwork and coaching support, and (5) peer-to-peer support.

  15. 77 FR 26827 - Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 441 Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option; Final Rule #0... [CMS-2337-F] RIN 0938-AQ35 Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... Affordable Care Act, which establishes a new State option to provide home and community-based attendant...

  16. 75 FR 44971 - Medicaid Program; Request for Comments on Legislative Changes To Provide Quality of Care to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-2480-NC] Medicaid Program; Request for Comments on Legislative Changes To Provide Quality of Care to Children AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with Comments. SUMMARY: This notice...

  17. 76 FR 10735 - Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 441 Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option... Part 441 [CMS-2337-P] RIN 0938-AQ35 Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option AGENCY: Centers for... Section 2401 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) which establishes a new State option to provide home and...

  18. The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid Managed Care, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid...

  19. Access to Transportation and Health Care Visits for Medicaid Enrollees With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leela V; Wedel, Kenneth R; Christopher, Jan E

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires frequent health care visits for its management. Individuals without nonemergency medical transportation often miss appointments and do not receive optimal care. This study aims to evaluate the association between Medicaid-provided nonemergency medical transportation and diabetes care visits. A retrospective analysis was conducted of demographic and claims data obtained from the Oklahoma Medicaid program. Participants consisted of Medicaid enrollees with diabetes who made at least 1 visit for diabetes care in a year. The sample was predominantly female and white, with an average age of 46.38 years. Two zero-truncated Poisson regression models were estimated to assess the independent effect of transportation use on number of diabetes care visits. Use of nonemergency medical transportation is a significant predictor of diabetes care visits. Zero-truncated Poisson regression coefficients showed a positive association between the use of transportation and number of visits (0.6563, P urban; women made fewer visits than men (-0.09312; P transportation to Medicaid populations with diabetes, particularly in the rural areas where the prevalence of diabetes and complications are higher and the availability of medical resources lower than in the urban areas. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  20. Price elasticity and pharmaceutical selection: the influence of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Salkever, David S

    2003-07-01

    State Medicaid programs are turning increasingly to managed care to control expenditures, although the types of managed care programs in use have changed dramatically. Little is known about the influence of the shifting Medicaid managed care arena on treatment decisions. This paper investigates factors affecting the selection of treatments for depression by providers participating in either of two Medicaid managed care programs. Of particular interest is the influence of medication price on the choice of treatment, since one vehicle through which managed care organizations can reduce total expenditures is by increasing the price sensitivity of participating providers. We take a new approach by phrasing the problem as a discrete choice, using a nested multinomial logit model for the analyses. Contrary to earlier literature, we find some evidence that physicians in both programs do take price into consideration when selecting among treatment options. HMO providers in particular demonstrate increased price sensitivity in the two most commonly prescribed categories of antidepressants. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. "Managing" the poor: neoliberalism, Medicaid HMOs and the triumph of consumerism among the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskovsky, J

    2000-10-01

    In order to explore the contradictions of neoliberal health policy, this article examines Medicaid managed care in Philadelphia. At the federal and state levels, government is increasingly promoting private-sector market-based strategies over policies formerly associated with the welfare state, arguing that the former are the most effective means of achieving economic growth and guaranteeing social welfare. A prime example of this shift, Medicaid managed care is a policy by which states contract with private-sector health maintenance organizations to provide health coverage to the poor. Drawing on ethnographic and historical data, this paper shows how Pennsylvania's Medicaid managed care program has created access barriers for poor Philadelphians. It also illustrates how ideologies that justify this policy shift serve to mask its detrimental effects on the poor. By contrasting the state's consumerist model with one group's protest efforts, this article calls into question the neoliberal ideology that undergirds health and welfare "reform."

  2. Expanding Medicaid Access without Expanding Medicaid: Why Did Some Nonexpansion States Continue the Primary Care Fee Bump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Adam S; Evans, Leigh C; Jones, David K

    2018-02-01

    Six states that have rejected the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion nonetheless extended the primary care "fee bump," by which the federal government increased Medicaid fees for primary care services up to 100 percent of Medicare fees during 2013-14. We conducted semistructured interviews with leaders in five of these states, as well as in three comparison states, to examine why they would continue a provision of the ACA that moderately expands access at significant state expense while rejecting the expansion and its large federal match, focusing on relevant economic, political, and procedural factors. We found that fee bump extension proposals were more successful where they were dissociated from major national policy debates, actionable with the input of relatively few stakeholder entities, and well aligned with preexisting policy-making structures and decision trends. Republican proposals to cap or reduce federal funding for Medicaid, if enacted, would compel states to contain program costs. In this context, states' established decision-making processes for updating Medicaid fee schedules, which we elucidate in this study, may shape the future of the Medicaid program. Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press 2018.

  3. Effects of Medicaid disease management programs on medical expenditures: Evidence from a natural experiment in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranker, Keith

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, most states' Medicaid programs have introduced disease management programs for chronically ill beneficiaries. Interventions assist beneficiaries and their health care providers to appropriately manage chronic health condition(s) according to established clinical guidelines. Cost containment has been a key justification for the creation of these programs despite mixed evidence they actually save money. This study evaluates the effects of a disease management program in Georgia by exploiting a natural experiment that delayed the introduction of high-intensity services for several thousand beneficiaries. Expenditures for medical claims decreased an average of $89 per person per month for the high- and moderate-risk groups, but those savings were not large enough to offset the total costs of the program. Impacts varied by the intensity of interventions, over time, and across disease groups. Heterogeneous treatment effect analysis indicates that decreases in medical expenditures were largest at the most expensive tail of the distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. How Managed Care Affects Medicaid Utilization : A Synthetic Difference-in-Difference Zero-Inflated Count Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, D.A.; Kniesner, T.J.; LoSasso, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    We develop a synthetic difference-in-differences statistical design to apply to experimental data for adult women living in Hennepin County, Minnesota, to estimate the impact of Medicaid managed care on various modes of medical care use.Because the outcomes of interest are utilization counts with

  5. Medicaid program; Medicaid Management Information Systems; performance standards--HCFA. General notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-31

    The purpose of this notice is to respond to the comments we received on the Medicaid Management Information Systems Performance Standards that we published in a notice with comment period on June 30, 1981 (46 FR 33653).

  6. Improving the rate and quality of medicaid well child care exams in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katy Duncan; Merchen, Eileen; Turner, Crystal D; Vaught, Cara; Fritz, Terrie; Mold, Jim

    2010-07-01

    Providing recommended well child care to children insured bythe Medicaid Program can be challenging. Members of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine (DFPM) at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center contracted to help practices improve the rates and quality of well child care visits within the Oklahoma Medicaid Program. Sixteen pediatric and family medicine practices in three Oklahoma counties chose to participate in this quality improvement initiative. The records of Sooner Care-insured children age 0-20 were reviewed for both rate and quality of well child care visits made during the previous twelve months. Performance feedback was provided. Practice guidelines, Sooner Care requirements, and tips from exemplary practices were provided. In two of the counties, a case manager helped practices with challenging patients. Practice Enhancement Assistants (PEAs) then helped practices implement a variety of strategies to increase visit rates and improve the quality of early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment (EPSDT) visits. Information technology (IT) support was provided when needed. The average rates of visits, for all counties combined, increased. Visit rates increased more in the younger age groups (birth to two years). There was significant improvement in quality of visits. Rates and quality improved much more in some practices than in others. A combination of academic detailing, performance feedback, practice facilitation, case management, and IT support produced increases in the quality and rates of EPSDT exams.

  7. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  8. Impact of Medicaid Managed Care on Illinois's Acute Health Services Expenditures for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Wing, Coady; Mitchell, Dale; Owen, Randall; Heller, Tamar

    2018-01-01

    States have increasingly transitioned Medicaid enrollees with disabilities from fee-for-service (FFS) to Medicaid Managed Care (MMC), intending to reduce state Medicaid spending and to provide better access to health services. Yet, previous studies on the impact of MMC are limited and findings are inconsistent. We analyzed the impact of MMC on…

  9. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Home › Medicaid › Benefits › Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Related Resources Learn How to Report the ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  10. Pediatric Dentist Density and Preventive Care Utilization for Medicaid Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, James F; Kim, Amy S; Scott, JoAnna M; Chi, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 zero- to 17-year-olds enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for 11-12 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children utilizing preventive dental services. County-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (Slope equals 1.67, 95 percent confidence interval equals 0.02, 3.32, Pchildren who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children.

  11. Medicaid Home Care Services and Survival in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Steven M.; Simone, Bridget; Brassard, Andrea; Stern, Yaakov; Mayeux, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: New York City's Medicaid Home Care Services Program provides an integrated program of housekeeping and personal assistance care along with regular nursing assessments. We sought to determine if this program of supportive care offers a survival benefit to older adults. Design and Methods: Administrative data from New York City's Medicaid…

  12. The effects of a disease management program on self-reported health behaviors and health outcomes: evidence from the "Florida: a healthy state (FAHS)" Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2009-06-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of 15,275 patients with one or more chronic illnesses (congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, or asthma) was undertaken. Control of hypertension improved from baseline to Year 1 (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, p management program benefited in terms of controlling hypertension, asthma symptoms, and cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

  13. Health Care Expenditures for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Medicaid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Leslie, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study trends in health care expenditures associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in state Medicaid programs. Method: Using Medicaid data from 42 states from 2000 to 2003, patients aged 17 years and under who were continuously enrolled in fee-for-service Medicaid were studied. Patients with claims related to autistic disorder…

  14. Medicaid Financial Management Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset reports summary state-by-state total expenditures by program for the Medicaid Program, Medicaid Administration and CHIP programs. These state...

  15. Recent Health Care Use and Medicaid Entry of Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Trivedi, Amal N; Mor, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    To examine the relationship between Medicaid entry and recent health care use among Medicare beneficiaries. We identified Medicare beneficiaries without full Medicaid or use of hospital or nursing home services in 2008 (N = 2,163,387). A discrete survival analysis estimated beneficiaries' monthly likelihood of entry into the full Medicaid program between January 2009 and June 2010. During the 18-month study period, Medicaid entry occurred for 1.1% and 3.7% of beneficiaries who aged into Medicare or originally qualified for Medicare due to disability, respectively. Among beneficiaries who aged into Medicare, 49% of new Medicaid participants had no use of inpatient, skilled nursing facility, or nursing home services during the study period. Individuals who recently used inpatient, skilled nursing facility or nursing home services had monthly rates of 1.9, 14.0, and 38.1 new Medicaid participants per 1,000 beneficiaries, respectively, compared with 0.4 new Medicaid participants per 1,000 beneficiaries with no recent use of these services. Although recent health care use predicted greater likelihood of Medicaid entry, half of new Medicaid participants used no hospital or nursing home care during the study period. These patterns should be considered when designing and evaluating interventions to reform health care delivery for dual-eligible beneficiaries. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Racial Disparities in Orthodontic Service Utilization for Medicaid-Enrolled Children: An Evaluation of the Washington Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jantraveus M.; Greenlee, Geoffrey; Bollen, Anne Marie; Scott, JoAnna M.; Chi, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assess the relationship between race and orthodontic service utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children. Methods This cross-sectional study focused on 570,364 Washington Medicaid-enrolled children ages 6-19 years. The main predictor variable was self-reported race (White versus non-White). The outcome variable was orthodontic service utilization, defined as children who were pre-authorized for orthodontic treatment by Medicaid in 2012 and subsequently received orthodontic records and initiated treatment. Logistic regression models were used to test the hypothesis that non-Whites would be less likely to utilize orthodontic care than Whites. Results A total of 8,223 children were approved by Medicaid for orthodontic treatment and 7,313 received records and initiated treatment. Non-Whites were significantly more likely to utilize orthodontic care than Whites (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.02, 1.36; p=.031). Hispanic non-White children were more likely to utilize orthodontic care than non-Hispanic White children (OR=1.42; 95% CI=1.18, 1.70; porthodontic care than White children. The Washington Medicaid program demonstrates a potential model for addressing racial disparities in orthodontic service utilization. Future research should identify mechanisms underlying these findings and continue to monitor orthodontic service utilization for minority children in Medicaid. PMID:27021456

  17. Disease management: findings from leading state programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Ben

    2002-12-01

    Disease management programs are designed to contain costs by improving health among the chronically ill. More than 20 states are now engaged in developing and implementing Medicaid disease management programs for their primary care case management and fee-for-service populations.

  18. The costs of caring: medical costs of Alzheimer's disease and the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, D L

    2001-01-01

    This review summarizes the medical costs associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, as well as the payers responsible for these medical costs in the US health care system. It is clear from this review that AD and related dementias are associated with substantial medical costs. The payers responsible for a majority of these costs are families of patients with AD and the US government through the Medicare and Medicaid programs. In an attempt to control expenditures, Medicare and Medicaid have turned to managed care principles and managed care organizations. The increase in "managed" dementia care gives rise to several potential problems for patients with AD, along with many opportunities for systematic improvement in the quality of dementia care. Evidence-based disease management programs provide the greatest opportunities for improving managed dementia care but will require the development of dementia-specific quality of care measures to evaluate and continually improve them.

  19. Medicaid Primary Care Physician Fees and the Use of Preventive Services among Medicaid Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Adam; Mortensen, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increases Medicaid physician fees for preventive care up to Medicare rates for 2013 and 2014. The purpose of this paper was to model the relationship between Medicaid preventive care payment rates and the use of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)–recommended preventive care use among Medicaid enrollees. Data Sources/Study Session We used data from the 2003 and 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), a national probability sample of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population, linked to Kaiser state Medicaid benefits data, including the state Medicaid-to-Medicare physician fee ratio in 2003 and 2008. Study Design Probit models were used to estimate the probability that eligible individuals received one of five USPSF-recommended preventive services. A difference-in-difference model was used to separate out the effect of changes in the Medicaid payment rate and other factors. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were linked using state identifiers. Principal Findings Although Medicaid enrollees had a lower rate of use of the five preventive services in univariate analysis, neither Medicaid enrollment nor changes in Medicaid payment rates had statistically significant effects on meeting screening recommendations for the five screenings. The results were robust to a number of different sensitivity tests. Individual and state characteristics were significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that although temporary changes in primary care provider payments for preventive services for Medicaid enrollees may have other desirable effects, they are unlikely to substantially increase the use of these selected USPSTF-recommended preventive care services among Medicaid enrollees. PMID:24628495

  20. Receipt of preventive dental care among special-needs children enrolled in Medicaid: a crisis in need of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2008-10-01

    Although not widely recognized, tooth decay is the most common childhood chronic disease among children ages five to seventeen. Despite higher rates of dental caries and greater needs, low-income minority children enrolled in Medicaid are more likely to go untreated relative to their higher income counterparts. No research has examined this issue for children with special needs. We analyzed Medicaid enrollment and claims data for special-needs children enrolled in the District of Columbia Medicaid program to evaluate receipt of recommended preventive dental care. Use of preventive dental care is abysmally low and has declined over time. Enrollment in managed care rather than fee for service improves the likelihood that special-needs children receive recommended preventive dental services, whereas residing farther from the Metro is an impediment to receipt of dental care.

  1. Incorporating the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition Into a Medicaid Managed Care Plan: Lessons Learned From a Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Pirtle, Robin; Hancock, Catina; Ablan, Michael; Corona-Parra, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This pediatric-to-adult health care transition pilot project describes the process and results of incorporating the "Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition (2.0)" into a Medicaid managed care plan with a group of 35 18-23 year olds who have chronic mental health, developmental, and complex medical conditions. The pilot project demonstrated an effective approach for customizing and delivering recommended transition services. At the start of the 18-month project, the Medicaid plan was at the basic level (1) of transition implementation of the Six Core Elements with no transition policy, member transition readiness assessment results, health care transition plans of care, updated medical summaries, transfer package for the adult-focused provider, and assurance of transfer completion and consumer feedback. At the conclusion of the pilot project, the plan scored at level 3 on each core element. The primary reason for not scoring at the highest level (4) was because the transition elements have not been incorporated into services for all enrollees within the plan. Future efforts in managed care will benefit from starting the transition process much earlier (ages 12-14), expanding the role of nurse care managers and participating pediatric and adult-focused clinicians in transition, and offering payment incentives to clinicians to implement the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Florida Medicaid's State-Mandated Formulary Provision on Prescription Drug Use and Health Plan Costs in a Medicaid Managed Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Kiraat D; Mager, Douglas; Ward, Krista M; Mischel, Brian; Henderson, Rochelle R

    2018-02-01

    Formulary or preferred drug list (PDL) management is an effective strategy to ensure clinically efficient prescription drug management by managed care organizations (MCOs). Medicaid MCOs participating in Florida's Medicaid program were required to use a state-mandated PDL between May and August 2014. To examine differences in prescription drug use and plan costs between a single Florida Medicaid managed care (MMC) health plan that implemented a state-mandated PDL policy on July 1, 2014, and a comparable MMC health plan in another state without a state-mandated PDL, controlling for sociodemographic confounders. A retrospective analysis with a pre-post design was conducted using deidentified administrative claims data from a large pharmacy benefit manager. The prepolicy evaluation period was January 1 through June 30, 2014, and the postpolicy period was January 1 through June 30, 2015. Continuously eligible Florida MMC plan members were matched on sociodemographic and health characteristics to their counterparts enrolled in a comparable MMC health plan in another state without a state-mandated formulary. Outcomes were drug use, measured as the number of 30-day adjusted nonspecialty drug prescriptions per member per period, and total drug plan costs per member per period for all drugs, with separate measures for generic and brand drugs. Bivariate comparisons were conducted using t-tests. Employing a difference-in-differences (DID) analytic approach, multivariate negative binomial regression and generalized estimating equation models were used to analyze prescription drug use and costs. The final analytical sample consisted of 18,372 enrollees, evenly divided between the 2 groups. In the postpolicy evaluation period, overall and generic use declined, while brand use increased for members in the Florida health plan. Drug costs, especially for brands, significantly increased for Florida health plan members. No significant changes were observed over the same time period

  3. Quasi-experimental trial of diabetes Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support (SMARTSteps) in a Medicaid managed care plan: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Handley, Margaret A; Quan, Judy; Sarkar, Urmimala; Pfeifer, Kelly; Soria, Catalina; Schillinger, Dean

    2012-01-26

    Health information technology can enhance self-management and quality of life for patients with chronic disease and overcome healthcare barriers for patients with limited English proficiency. After a randomized controlled trial of a multilingual automated telephone self-management support program (ATSM) improved patient-centered dimensions of diabetes care in safety net clinics, we collaborated with a nonprofit Medicaid managed care plan to translate research into practice, offering ATSM as a covered benefit and augmenting ATSM to promote medication activation. This paper describes the protocol of the Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support Project (SMARTSteps). This controlled quasi-experimental trial used a wait-list variant of a stepped wedge design to enroll 362 adult health plan members with diabetes who speak English, Cantonese, or Spanish and receive care at 4 publicly-funded clinics. Through language-stratified randomization, participants were assigned to four intervention statuses: SMARTSteps-ONLY, SMARTSteps-PLUS, or wait-list for either intervention. In addition to usual primary care, intervention participants received 27 weekly calls in their preferred language with rotating queries and response-triggered education about self-care, medication adherence, safety concerns, psychological issues, and preventive services. Health coaches from the health plan called patients with out-of-range responses for collaborative goal setting and action planning. SMARTSteps-PLUS also included health coach calls to promote medication activation, adherence and intensification, if triggered by ATSM-reported non-adherence, refill non-adherence from pharmacy claims, or suboptimal cardiometabolic indicators. Wait-list patients crossed-over to SMARTSteps-ONLY or -PLUS at 6 months. For participants who agreed to structured telephone interviews at baseline and 6 months (n = 252), primary outcomes will be changes in quality of life and functional status with

  4. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Parts 431, 447, and 457 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to... 431, 447, and 457 [CMS-6150-F] RIN 0938-AP69 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program... final rule implements provisions from the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of...

  5. 77 FR 55479 - Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP Programs: Research and Analysis on Impact of CMS Programs on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ..., Medicaid, and CHIP Programs: Research and Analysis on Impact of CMS Programs on the Indian Health Care System AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Single Source Award. SUMMARY: This notice supports expansion of research on the impact of CMS programs on the Indian health...

  6. Medicaid expansion and access to care among cancer survivors: a baseline overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, Wafa W; Bradley, Cathy J; Harless, David W; Bear, Harry D; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2016-06-01

    Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act facilitates access to care among vulnerable populations, but 21 states have not yet expanded the program. Medicaid expansions may provide increased access to care for cancer survivors, a growing population with chronic conditions. We compare access to health care services among cancer survivors living in non-expansion states to those living in expansion states, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We use the 2012 and 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to estimate multiple logistic regression models to compare inability to see a doctor because of cost, having a personal doctor, and receiving an annual checkup in the past year between cancer survivors who lived in non-expansion states and survivors who lived in expansion states. Cancer survivors in non-expansion states had statistically significantly lower odds of having a personal doctor (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.76, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.63-0.92, p Medicaid could potentially leave many cancer survivors with limited access to routine care. Existing disparities in access to care are likely to widen between cancer survivors in Medicaid non-expansion and expansion states.

  7. Active Redesign of a Medicaid Care Management Strategy for Greater Return on Investment: Predicting Impactability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBard, C Annette; Jackson, Carlos T

    2018-04-01

    Care management of high-cost/high-needs patients is an increasingly common strategy to reduce health care costs. A variety of targeting methodologies have emerged to identify patients with high historical or predicted health care utilization, but the more pertinent question for program planners is how to identify those who are most likely to benefit from care management intervention. This paper describes the evolution of complex care management targeting strategies in Community Care of North Carolina's (CCNC) work with the statewide non-dual Medicaid population, culminating in the development of an "Impactability Score" that uses administrative data to predict achievable savings. It describes CCNC's pragmatic approach for estimating intervention effects in a historical cohort of 23,455 individuals, using a control population of 14,839 to determine expected spending at an individual level, against which actual spending could be compared. The actual-to-expected spending difference was then used as the dependent variable in a multivariate model to determine the predictive contribution of a multitude of demographic, clinical, and utilization characteristics. The coefficients from this model yielded the information required to build predictive models for prospective use. Model variables related to medication adherence and historical utilization unexplained by disease burden proved to be more important predictors of impactability than any given diagnosis or event, disease profile, or overall costs of care. Comparison of this approach to alternative targeting strategies (emergency department super-utilizers, inpatient super-utilizers, or patients with highest Hierarchical Condition Category risk scores) suggests a 2- to 3-fold higher return on investment using impactability-based targeting.

  8. Does Churning in Medicaid Affect Health Care Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric T.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2017-01-01

    Background Transitions into and out of Medicaid, termed churning, may disrupt access to and continuity of care. Low-income, working adults who became eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are particularly susceptible to income and employment changes that lead to churning. Objective To compare health care use among adults who do and do not churn into and out of Medicaid. Data Longitudinal data from 6 panels of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Methods We used differences-in-differences regression to compare health care use when adults reenrolled in Medicaid following a loss of coverage, to utilization in a control group of continuously enrolled adults. Outcome Measures Emergency department (ED) visits, ED visits resulting in an inpatient admission, and visits to office-based providers. Results During the study period, 264 adults churned into and out of Medicaid and 627 had continuous coverage. Churning adults had an average of approximately 0.05 Medicaid-covered office-based visits per month 4 months before reenrolling in Medicaid, significantly below the rate of approximately 0.20 visits in the control group. Visits to office-based providers did not reach the control group rate until several months after churning adults had resumed Medicaid coverage. Our comparisons found no evidence of significantly elevated ED and inpatient admission rates in the churning group following reenrollment. Conclusions Adults who lose Medicaid tend to defer their use of office-based care to periods when they are insured. Although this suggests that enrollment disruptions lead to suboptimal timing of care, we do not find evidence that adults reenroll in Medicaid with elevated acute care needs. PMID:26908088

  9. Evaluating Depression Care Management in a Community Setting: Main Outcomes for a Medicaid HMO Population with Multiple Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette A. Waxmonsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the implementation of a depression care management (DCM program at Colorado Access, a public sector health plan, and describe the program’s clinical and system outcomes for members with chronic medical conditions. High medical risk, high cost Medicaid health plan members were identified and systematically screened for depression. A total of 370 members enrolled in the DCM program. Longitudinal analyses revealed significantly reduced depression severity scores at 3, 6, and 12 months after intervention as compared to baseline depression scores. At 12 months, 56% of enrollees in the DCM program had either a 50% reduction in PHQ-9 scores or a PHQ-9 score < 10. Longitudinal economic analyses comparing 12 months before and after intervention revealed a significant but modest increase in ER visits, outpatient office visits, and overall medical and pharmacy costs when adjusted for months enrolled in DCM. Limitations and recommendations for the integrated depression care management are discussed.

  10. Medicare and Medicaid programs; advance directives--HCFA. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-27

    This final rule responds to public comments on the March 6, 1992 interim final rule with comment period that amended the Medicare and Medicaid regulations governing provider agreements and contracts to establish requirements for States, hospitals, nursing facilities, skilled nursing facilities, providers of home health care or personal care services, hospice programs and managed care plans concerning advance directives. An advance directive is a written instruction, such as a living will or durable power of attorney for health care, recognized under State law, relating to the provision of health care when an individual's condition makes him or her unable to express his or her wishes. The intent of the advance directives provisions is to enhance an adult individual's control over medical treatment decisions. This rule confirms the interim final rule with several minor changes based on our review and consideration of public comments.

  11. Increased Use of Care Management Processes and Expanded Health Information Technology Functions by Practice Ownership and Medicaid Revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; McClellan, Sean R; Bibi, Salma; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    Practice ownership and Medicaid revenue may affect the use of care management processes (CMPs) for chronic conditions and expansion of health information technology (HIT). Using a national cohort of medical practices, we compared the use of CMPs and HIT from 2006/2008 to 2013 by practice ownership and level of Medicaid revenue. Poisson regression models estimated changes in CMP use, and linear regression estimated changes in HIT, by practice ownership and Medicaid patient revenue, controlling for other practice characteristics. Compared with physician-owned practices, system-owned practices adopted a greater number of CMPs and HIT functions over time (p < .001). High Medicaid revenue (≥30.0%) was associated with less adoption of CMPs (p < .001) and HIT (p < .01). System-owned practices (p < .001) and community health centers (p < .001) with high Medicaid revenue were more likely than physician-owned practices with high Medicaid revenue to adopt CMPs over time. System and community health center ownership appear to help high Medicaid practices overcome CMP adoption constraints. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Cole

    2016-09-01

    state Medicaid programs should carefully consider reimbursement policies for long-term acute care hospitals, including bundled payments that cover both the original hospitalization and long-term acute care hospital admission.

  13. 78 FR 32991 - Medicaid Program; Increased Federal Medical Assistance Percentage Changes Under the Affordable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 433 [CMS-2327-CN] RIN 0938-AR38 Medicaid Program; Increased Federal Medical Assistance Percentage Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS...

  14. An evaluation of the impact of maternity care coordination on Medicaid birth outcomes in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, P A; Roth, M S; Williams, D; Goforth, C M

    1991-12-01

    Care coordination is an important component of the enhanced prenatal care services provided under the recent expansions of the Medicaid program. The effect of maternity care coordination services on birth outcomes in North Carolina was assessed by comparing women on Medicaid who did and did not receive these services. Health program data files, including Medicaid claims paid for maternity care coordination, were linked to 1988 and 1989 live birth certificates. Simple comparisons of percentages and rates were supplemented by a logistic regression analysis. Among women on Medicaid who did not receive maternity care coordination services, the low birth weight rate was 21% higher, the very low birth weight rate was 62% higher, and the infant mortality rate was 23% higher than among women on Medicaid who did receive such services. It was estimated that, for each $1.00 spent on maternity care coordination, Medicaid saved $2.02 in medical costs for newborns up to 60 days of age. Among the women who did receive maternity care coordination, those receiving it for 3 or more months had better outcomes than those receiving it for less than 3 months. These results suggest that maternity care coordination can be effective in reducing low birth weight, infant mortality, and newborn medical care costs among babies born to women in poverty.

  15. Practice Innovation, Health Care Utilization and Costs in a Network of Federally Qualified Health Centers and Hospitals for Medicaid Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tricia J; Jones, Art; Lulias, Cheryl; Perry, Anthony

    2018-06-01

    State Medicaid programs need cost-effective strategies to provide high-quality care that is accessible to individuals with low incomes and limited resources. Integrated delivery systems have been formed to provide care across the continuum, but creating a shared vision for improving community health can be challenging. Medical Home Network was created as a network of primary care providers and hospital systems providing care to Medicaid enrollees, guided by the principles of egalitarian governance, practice-level care coordination, real-time electronic alerts, and pay-for-performance incentives. This analysis of health care utilization and costs included 1,189,195 Medicaid enrollees. After implementation of Medical Home Network, a risk-adjusted increase of $9.07 or 4.3% per member per month was found over the 2 years of implementation compared with an increase of $17.25 or 9.3% per member per month, before accounting for the cost of care management fees and other financial incentives, for Medicaid enrollees within the same geographic area with a primary care provider outside of Medical Home Network. After accounting for care coordination fees paid to providers, the net risk-adjusted cost reduction was $11.0 million.

  16. Quasi-experimental trial of diabetes Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support (SMARTSteps in a Medicaid managed care plan: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratanawongsa Neda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health information technology can enhance self-management and quality of life for patients with chronic disease and overcome healthcare barriers for patients with limited English proficiency. After a randomized controlled trial of a multilingual automated telephone self-management support program (ATSM improved patient-centered dimensions of diabetes care in safety net clinics, we collaborated with a nonprofit Medicaid managed care plan to translate research into practice, offering ATSM as a covered benefit and augmenting ATSM to promote medication activation. This paper describes the protocol of the Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support Project (SMARTSteps. Methods/Design This controlled quasi-experimental trial used a wait-list variant of a stepped wedge design to enroll 362 adult health plan members with diabetes who speak English, Cantonese, or Spanish and receive care at 4 publicly-funded clinics. Through language-stratified randomization, participants were assigned to four intervention statuses: SMARTSteps-ONLY, SMARTSteps-PLUS, or wait-list for either intervention. In addition to usual primary care, intervention participants received 27 weekly calls in their preferred language with rotating queries and response-triggered education about self-care, medication adherence, safety concerns, psychological issues, and preventive services. Health coaches from the health plan called patients with out-of-range responses for collaborative goal setting and action planning. SMARTSteps-PLUS also included health coach calls to promote medication activation, adherence and intensification, if triggered by ATSM-reported non-adherence, refill non-adherence from pharmacy claims, or suboptimal cardiometabolic indicators. Wait-list patients crossed-over to SMARTSteps-ONLY or -PLUS at 6 months. For participants who agreed to structured telephone interviews at baseline and 6 months (n = 252, primary outcomes will be

  17. Quasi-experimental trial of diabetes Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support (SMARTSteps) in a Medicaid managed care plan: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Health information technology can enhance self-management and quality of life for patients with chronic disease and overcome healthcare barriers for patients with limited English proficiency. After a randomized controlled trial of a multilingual automated telephone self-management support program (ATSM) improved patient-centered dimensions of diabetes care in safety net clinics, we collaborated with a nonprofit Medicaid managed care plan to translate research into practice, offering ATSM as a covered benefit and augmenting ATSM to promote medication activation. This paper describes the protocol of the Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support Project (SMARTSteps). Methods/Design This controlled quasi-experimental trial used a wait-list variant of a stepped wedge design to enroll 362 adult health plan members with diabetes who speak English, Cantonese, or Spanish and receive care at 4 publicly-funded clinics. Through language-stratified randomization, participants were assigned to four intervention statuses: SMARTSteps-ONLY, SMARTSteps-PLUS, or wait-list for either intervention. In addition to usual primary care, intervention participants received 27 weekly calls in their preferred language with rotating queries and response-triggered education about self-care, medication adherence, safety concerns, psychological issues, and preventive services. Health coaches from the health plan called patients with out-of-range responses for collaborative goal setting and action planning. SMARTSteps-PLUS also included health coach calls to promote medication activation, adherence and intensification, if triggered by ATSM-reported non-adherence, refill non-adherence from pharmacy claims, or suboptimal cardiometabolic indicators. Wait-list patients crossed-over to SMARTSteps-ONLY or -PLUS at 6 months. For participants who agreed to structured telephone interviews at baseline and 6 months (n = 252), primary outcomes will be changes in quality of life and

  18. Child Care Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Medicaid Public Health Centers Temporary "Cash" Assistance Senior Benefits Program the proposed regulation changes, including the potential costs to private persons of complying with Heating Assistance Medicaid Senior Benefits Temporary Assistance Get Help Food Health Care Cash Child Care

  19. Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations and Their Effect on Prenatal Care Utilization Among Medicaid Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Lisa P; Harvey, S Marie; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Previous studies indicate that inadequate prenatal care is more common among women covered by Medicaid compared with private insurance. Increasing the proportion of pregnant women who receive early and adequate prenatal care is a Healthy People 2020 goal. We examined the impact of the implementation of Oregon's accountable care organizations, Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs), for Medicaid enrollees, on prenatal care utilization among Oregon women of reproductive age enrolled in Medicaid. Methods Using Medicaid eligibility data linked to unique birth records for 2011-2013, we used a pre-posttest treatment-control design that compared prenatal care utilization for women on Medicaid before and after CCO implementation to women never enrolled in Medicaid. Additional stratified analyses were conducted to explore differences in the effect of CCO implementation based on rurality, race, and ethnicity. Results After CCO implementation, mothers on Medicaid had a 13% increase in the odds of receiving first trimester care (OR 1.13, CI 1.04, 1.23). Non-Hispanic (OR 1.20, CI 1.09, 1.32), White (OR 1.20, CI 1.08, 1.33) and Asian (OR 2.03, CI 1.26, 3.27) women on Medicaid were more likely to receive initial prenatal care in the first trimester after CCO implementation and only Medicaid women in urban areas were more likely (OR 1.14, CI 1.05, 1.25) to initiate prenatal care in the first trimester. Conclusion Following Oregon's implementation of an innovative Medicaid coordinated care model, we found that women on Medicaid experienced a significant increase in receiving timely prenatal care.

  20. The cost of Medicaid annuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert A; Nyman, John A; Gabay, Mary; Riley, William; Feldman, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Medicaid annuities are annuities that long-term care recipients use to shelter assets, thereby qualifying them early for Medicaid eligibility. As such, these annuities have the potential to increase Medicaid costs. This study estimates the cost of annuities to the Medicaid program. From a sample of Medicaid applications in five states, we found the rate at which annuities were used and simulated their cost to Medicaid. We estimated that in 2004, Medicaid annuities cost Medicaid about 197 million dollars, which represented a small proportion of Medicaid's almost 50 billion dollars cost for nursing home care.

  1. How Medicaid Expansion Affected Out-of-Pocket Health Care Spending for Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry; Chakraborty, Ougni; Russo, Therese

    2017-08-01

    ISSUE. Prior research shows that low-income residents of states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are less likely to experience financial barriers to health care access, but the impact on out-of-pocket spending has not yet been measured. GOAL. Assess how the Medicaid expansion affected out-of-pocket health care spending for low-income families compared to those in states that did not expand and consider whether effects differed in states that expanded under conventional Medicaid rules vs. waiver programs. METHODS. Analysis of the Consumer Expenditure Survey 2010–2015. KEY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS. Compared to families in nonexpansion states, low-income families in states that did expand Medicaid saved an average of $382 in annual spending on health care. In these states, low-income families were less like to report any out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums or medical care than were similar families in nonexpansion states. For families that did have some out-of-pocket spending, spending levels were lower in states that expanded Medicaid. Low-income families in Medicaid expansion states were also much less likely to have catastrophically high spending levels. The form of coverage expansion — conventional Medicaid or waiver rules — did not have a statistically significant effect on these outcomes.

  2. Does Medicaid managed care market penetration impact provider participation, costs, utilization, and access?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, Jenny

    2010-09-01

    Key findings. (1) An increase in commercial plan penetration increased the liklihood [sic] that a physician would accept new Medicaid patients, but this did not significantly impact enrollee costs. (2) An increase in Medicaid-dominant HMO market penetration increased the probability that individuals reported using the ED as their primary source of care.

  3. Medicaid program choice, inertia and adverse selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, James; Yelowitz, Aaron; Talbert, Jeffery C

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, Kentucky implemented Medicaid managed care statewide, auto-assigned enrollees to three plans, and allowed switching. Using administrative data, we find that the state's auto-assignment algorithm most heavily weighted cost-minimization and plan balancing, and placed little weight on the quality of the enrollee-plan match. Immobility - apparently driven by health plan inertia - contributed to the success of the cost-minimization strategy, as more than half of enrollees auto-assigned to even the lowest quality plans did not opt-out. High-cost enrollees were more likely to opt-out of their auto-assigned plan, creating adverse selection. The plan with arguably the highest quality incurred the largest initial profit margin reduction due to adverse selection prior to risk adjustment, as it attracted a disproportionate share of high-cost enrollees. The presence of such selection, caused by differential degrees of mobility, raises concerns about the long run viability of the Medicaid managed care market without such risk adjustment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hospital revenue cycle management and payer mix: do Medicare and Medicaid undermine hospitals' ability to generate and collect patient care revenue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Simone; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-01-01

    The continuing efforts of government payers to contain hospital costs have raised concerns among hospital managers that serving publicly insured patients may undermine their ability to manage the revenue cycle successfully. This study uses financial information from two sources-Medicare cost reports for all US hospitals for 2002 to 2007 and audited financial statements for all bond-issuing, not-for-profit hospitals for 2000 to 2006 to examine the relationship between hospitals' shares of Medicare and Medicaid patients and the amount of patient care revenue they generate as well as the speed with which they collect their revenue. Hospital-level fixed effects regression analysis finds that hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid payer mix collect somewhat higher average patient care revenues than hospitals with more privately insured and self-pay patients. Hospitals with more Medicare patients also collect on this revenue faster; serving more Medicaid patients is not associated with the speed of patient revenue collection. For hospital managers, these findings may represent good news. They suggest that, despite increases in the number of publicly insured patients served, managers have frequently been able to generate adequate amounts of patient revenue and collect it in a timely fashion.

  5. Reimbursement rates and policies for primary molar pit-and-fissure sealants across state Medicaid programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Singh, Jennifer

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about Medicaid policies regarding reimbursement for placement of sealants on primary molars. The authors identified Medicaid programs that reimbursed dentists for placing primary molar sealants and hypothesized that these programs had higher reimbursement rates than did state programs that did not reimburse for primary molar sealants. The authors obtained Medicaid reimbursement data from online fee schedules and determined whether each state Medicaid program reimbursed for primary molar sealants (no or yes). The outcome measure was the reimbursement rate for permanent tooth sealants (calculated in 2012 U.S. dollars). The authors compared mean reimbursement rates by using the t test (α = .05). Seventeen Medicaid programs reimbursed dentists for placing primary molar sealants (34 percent), and the mean reimbursement rate was $27.57 (range, $16.00 [Maine] to $49.68 [Alaska]). All 50 programs reimbursed dentists for placement of sealants on permanent teeth. The mean reimbursement for permanent tooth sealants was significantly higher in programs that reimbursed for primary molar sealants than in programs that did not ($28.51 and $23.67, respectively; P = .03). Most state Medicaid programs do not reimburse dentists for placing sealants on primary molars, but programs that do so have significantly higher reimbursement rates. Medicaid reimbursement rates are related to dentists' participation in Medicaid and children's dental care use. Reimbursement for placement of sealants on primary molars is a proxy for Medicaid program generosity.

  6. Long term care needs and personal care services under Medicaid: a survey of administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, H A; Oktay, J S

    1991-01-01

    Home and community based care services constitute a public initiative in the development of a long term care service network. One such home based initiative is the personal care service program of Medicaid. The authors conducted a national survey of administrators of this program. They received a response from 16 administrators of such programs in 1987-1988. The responses raise significant issues regarding training, access to and equity of services, quality of services, administrative oversight and the coordination of home-based care in a network of available services. Based on administrator responses, the authors draw several conclusions.

  7. Early Childhood Caries and the Impact of Current U.S. Medicaid Program: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussma Ahmed Bugis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric dental caries is the most common chronic disease among children. Above 40% of the U.S. children aged 2–11 years have dental caries; more than 50% of them come from low-income families. Under dental services of the Medicaid program, children enrolled in Medicaid must receive preventive dental services. However, only 1/5 of them utilize preventive dental services. The purpose of this overview is to measure the impact of Medicaid dental benefits on reducing oral health disparities among Medicaid-eligible children. This paper explains the importance of preventive dental care, children at high risk of dental caries, Medicaid dental benefits, utilization of dental preventive services by Medicaid-eligible children, dental utilization influencing factors, and outcome evaluation of Medicaid in preventing dental caries among children. In conclusion, despite the recent increase of children enrolled in Medicaid, utilizing preventive dental care is still a real challenge that faces Medicaid.

  8. 75 FR 23067 - Medicaid Program; State Flexibility for Medicaid Benefit Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... mental illness, children with serious emotional disturbance, the disabled and elderly, individuals with... that children with serious mental and/or physical disorders often qualify for Medicaid on a basis of... that brought about equitable, decent care for Medicaid-eligible individuals experiencing mental illness...

  9. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed... Part 447 [CMS-2345-P] RIN 0938-AQ41 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for... requirements pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the...

  10. Prenatal and Postpartum Care Disparities in a Large Medicaid Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Natasha; Jarlenski, Marian; Kelley, David

    2018-03-01

    Objectives Pennsylvania's maternal mortality, infant mortality, and preterm birth rates rank 24th, 35th, and 25th in the country, and are higher among racial and ethnic minorities. Provision of prenatal and postpartum care represents one way to improve these outcomes. We assessed the extent of disparities in the provision and timeliness of prenatal and postpartum care for women enrolled in Pennsylvania Medicaid. Methods We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of representative samples of women who delivered live births from November 2011 to 2015. Our outcomes were three binary effectiveness-of-care measures: prenatal care timeliness, frequency of prenatal care, and postpartum care timeliness. Pennsylvania's Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) were required to submit these outcomes to the state after reviewing administrative and medical records through a standardized, validated sampling process. We assessed for differences in outcomes by race, ethnicity, region, year, and MCO using logistic regression. Results We analyzed data for 12,228 women who were 49% White, 31% Black/African American, 4% Asian, and 15% Hispanic/Latina. Compared to Black/African American women, white and Asian women had higher odds of prenatal and postpartum care. Hispanic/Latina women had higher frequency of prenatal care than non-Hispanic women. Pennsylvania's Southeast had lower prenatal care and Northwest had lower postpartum care than other regions. Prenatal care significantly decreased in 2014 and increased in 2015. We observed differences between MCOs, and as MCO performance diminished, racial disparities within each plan widened. We explored hypotheses for observed disparities in secondary analyses. Conclusions for Practice Our data demonstrate that interventions should address disparities by race, region, and MCO in equity-promoting measures.

  11. 75 FR 44313 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Payment Calculation for Eligible Hospitals c. Medicare Share d. Charity Care e. Transition Factor f...), eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs...) technology. This final rule specifies--the initial criteria EPs, eligible hospitals, and CAHs must meet in...

  12. 76 FR 60050 - Medicaid Program: Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicaid Program: Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... Medicaid beneficiaries with disabling and chronic conditions from institutions into the community. The...

  13. 75 FR 1843 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Payment Calculation for Eligible Hospitals c. Medicare Share d. Charity Care e. Transition Factor f...) and eligible hospitals participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs that adopt and meaningfully use... an EP and eligible hospital must meet in order to qualify for the incentive payment; calculation of...

  14. Medicaid: taking stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S M

    1993-01-01

    In the last few years, Medicaid has attracted more than casual attention, one reflection of which is the fact that JHPPL has published five papers on the program in its last few issues. This paper, a sixth, takes a broader view of the program than is typically the case. After a critique of the five recent articles, I discuss several questions raised by them and reach the following conclusions: First, the states do not invest enough in producing program data suitable for policy analysis and research. One lesson: Better data and analysis can help the states to avoid expensive mistakes. Second, those policy analyses that have been offered fail to give sufficient attention to the political dimension of policy. That is one reason why policy choices produce unexpected effects. Third, since Medicaid is a relatively small player in the vast medical care market, incentives adopted by Medicaid officials throughout the country rarely have the desired effects. Finally, as long as Medicaid remains the principal mechanism to provide access to health care for the poor, it must be made as efficient and effective as possible. Yet, for both political and economic reasons, Medicaid can never be what its original planners had hoped, the vehicle for providing the poor with reliable access to mainstream medical care.

  15. Medicaid Financial Management Data – National Totals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset reports summary state-by-state total expenditures by program for the Medicaid Program, Medicaid Administration and CHIP programs. These state...

  16. Medicaid reimbursement, prenatal care and infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonchak, Lyudmyla

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of state-level Medicaid reimbursement rates for obstetric care on prenatal care utilization across demographic groups. It also uses these rates as an instrumental variable to assess the importance of prenatal care on birth weight. The analysis is conducted using a unique dataset of Medicaid reimbursement rates and 2001-2010 Vital Statistics Natality data. Conditional on county fixed effects, the study finds a modest, but statistically significant positive relationship between Medicaid reimbursement rates and the number of prenatal visits obtained by pregnant women. Additionally, higher rates are associated with an increase in the probability of obtaining adequate care, as well as a reduction in the incidence of going without any prenatal care. However, the effect of an additional prenatal visit on birth weight is virtually zero for black disadvantaged mothers, while an additional visit yields a substantial increase in birth weight of over 20 g for white disadvantaged mothers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 77 FR 11127 - Medicaid Program; Announcement of Medicaid Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-6034-N] Medicaid Program; Announcement of Medicaid Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces an...

  18. State Medicaid Coverage, ESRD Incidence, and Access to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Mitani, Aya A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of low-income nonelderly adults covered by Medicaid varies widely by state. We sought to determine whether broader state Medicaid coverage, defined as the proportion of each state’s low-income nonelderly adult population covered by Medicaid, associates with lower state-level incidence of ESRD and greater access to care. The main outcomes were incidence of ESRD and five indicators of access to care. We identified 408,535 adults aged 20–64 years, who developed ESRD between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2008. Medicaid coverage among low-income nonelderly adults ranged from 12.2% to 66.0% (median 32.5%). For each additional 10% of the low-income nonelderly population covered by Medicaid, there was a 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0% to 2.6%) decrease in ESRD incidence. Among nonelderly adults with ESRD, gaps in access to care between those with private insurance and those with Medicaid were narrower in states with broader coverage. For a 50-year-old white woman, the access gap to the kidney transplant waiting list between Medicaid and private insurance decreased by 7.7 percentage points in high (>45%) versus low (Medicaid coverage states. Similarly, the access gap to transplantation decreased by 4.0 percentage points and the access gap to peritoneal dialysis decreased by 3.8 percentage points in high Medicaid coverage states. In conclusion, states with broader Medicaid coverage had a lower incidence of ESRD and smaller insurance-related access gaps. PMID:24652791

  19. 42 CFR 455.232 - Medicaid integrity audit program contractor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicaid integrity audit program contractor functions. 455.232 Section 455.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICAID Medicaid...

  20. Does Medicaid Insurance Confer Adequate Access to Adult Orthopaedic Care in the Era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrum, Joseph T; Paziuk, Taylor; Rihn, Theresa C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Rihn, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    .00088-0.23639; p Adult patients with Medicaid insurance had limited access to care in 109 of 342 (32%) orthopaedic practices: 37% of private and 13% of academic practices (p adult patient with Medicaid relative to an academic practice (99243: OR, 0.11, 95% CI, 0.04-0.33, p adult patient with Medicaid. Furthermore, Medicaid expansion has likely realized minimal gains in access to care for the adult orthopaedic patient. Further research is needed in delineating the patient-payer selection criteria used by orthopaedic practices to aid policymakers in reforming the Medicaid program and comprehensibly addressing this access to care disparity. Level II, prognostic study.

  1. Medicaid Participation among Liver Transplant Candidates after the Affordable Care Act Medicaid Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Beal, Eliza W; Mumtaz, Khalid; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Pawlik, Timothy M; Washburn, W Kenneth; Black, Sylvester M

    2017-08-01

    The 2014 Medicaid expansion in participating states increased insurance coverage among people with chronic health conditions, but its implications for access to surgical care remain unclear. We investigated how Medicaid expansion influenced the insurance status of candidates for liver transplantation (LT) and transplant center payor mix. Data on LT candidates aged 18 to 64 years, in 2012 to 2013 (pre-expansion) and 2014 to 2015 (post-expansion), were obtained from the United Network for Organ Sharing registry. Change between the 2 periods in the percent of LT candidates using Medicaid was compared between expansion and nonexpansion states. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine how Medicaid expansion influenced individual LT candidates' likelihood of using Medicaid insurance. The study included 33,017 LT candidates, of whom 29,666 had complete data for multivariable analysis. Medicaid enrollment increased by 4% after Medicaid expansion in participating states. One-quarter of the transplant centers in these states experienced ≥10% increase in the proportion of LT candidates using Medicaid insurance. Multivariable analysis confirmed that Medicaid expansion was associated with increased odds of LT candidates using Medicaid insurance (odds ratio 1.49; 95% CI 1.34, 1.66; p Medicaid expansion states during the post-expansion period. Candidates for LT became more likely to use Medicaid after the 2014 Medicaid expansion policy came into effect. Enactment of this policy did not appear to increase access to LT or address socioeconomic and demographic disparities in access to the LT wait list. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 77 FR 29001 - Medicare and Medicaid Program; Regulatory Provisions to Promote Program Efficiency, Transparency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... Provisions to Promote Program Efficiency, Transparency, and Burden Reduction; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal..., Transparency, and Burden Reduction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Final... on providers of care. CMS has also identified non-regulatory changes to increase transparency and to...

  3. Nonemergency medical transportation and health care visits among chronically ill urban and rural medicaid beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leela V; Wedel, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    Inaccessibility to health care services due to lack of transportation affects the most vulnerable segments of the society. The effect of Medicaid-provided nonemergency medical transportation (NEMT) in Oklahoma on health care visits for the management of chronic illnesses is examined. Analyses of claims data show that African Americans are the highest users of NEMT. Medicaid beneficiaries who use NEMT services are significantly more likely to make the recommended number of annual visits for the management of chronic conditions than those who do not use NEMT. Increased use of NEMT by making the services more accommodating and convenient for beneficiaries is proposed.

  4. Rethinking Medicaid Coverage and Payment Policy to Promote High Value Care: The Case of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Veronica X; Patton, Elizabeth W; Sanghavi, Darshak; Wood, Susan F; Shin, Peter; Rosenbaum, Sara

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is the most effective reversible method to prevent unplanned pregnancies. Variability in state-level policies and the high cost of LARC could create substantial inconsistencies in Medicaid coverage, despite federal guidance aimed at enhancing broad access. This study surveyed state Medicaid payment policies and outreach activities related to LARC to explore the scope of services covered. Using publicly available information, we performed a content analysis of state Medicaid family planning and LARC payment policies. Purposeful sampling led to a selection of nine states with diverse geographic locations, political climates, Medicaid expansion status, and the number of women covered by Medicaid. All nine states' Medicaid programs covered some aspects of LARC. However, only a single state's payment structure incorporated all core aspects of high-quality LARC service delivery, including counseling, device, insertion, removal, and follow-up care. Most states did not explicitly address counseling, device removal, or follow-up care. Some states had strategies to enhance access, including policies to increase device reimbursement, stocking and delivery programs to remove cost barriers, and covering devices and insertion after an abortion. Although Medicaid policy encourages LARC methods, state payment policies frequently fail to address key aspects of care, including counseling, follow-up care, and removal, resulting in highly variable state-level practices. Although some states include payment policy innovations to support LARC access, significant opportunities remain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. 76 FR 48563 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-January Through March 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances... Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-9066-NC] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing... Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with comment period. SUMMARY: This quarterly notice...

  6. Allowing Spouses to Be Paid Personal Care Providers: Spouse Availability and Effects on Medicaid-Funded Service Use and Expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Robert J.; Kang, Taewoon; Doty, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Medicaid service use and expenditure and quality of care outcomes in California's personal care program known as In-Home Supportive Service (IHSS) are described. Analyses investigated Medicaid expenditures, hospital use, and nursing home stays, comparing recipients who have paid spouse caregivers with those having other…

  7. Effect of Teledermatology on Access to Dermatology Care Among Medicaid Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Malsberger, Rosalie; Burgette, Lane; Mulcahy, Andrew; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-08-01

    Access to specialists such as dermatologists is often limited for Medicaid enrollees. Teledermatology has been promoted as a potential solution; however, its effect on access to care at the population level has rarely been assessed. To evaluate the effect of teledermatology on the number of Medicaid enrollees who received dermatology care and to describe which patients were most likely to be referred to teledermatology. Claims data from a large California Medicaid managed care plan that began offering teledermatology as a covered service in April 2012 were analyzed. The plan enrolled 382 801 patients in California's Central Valley, including 108 480 newly enrolled patients who obtained coverage after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Rates of dermatology visits by patients affiliated with primary care practices that referred patients to teledermatology and those that did not were compared. Data were collected from April 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014, and assessed from March 1 to October 15, 2015. The percentage of patients with at least 1 visit to a dermatologist (including in-person and teledermatology visits) and total visits with dermatologists (including in-person and teledermatology visits) per 1000 patients. Of the 382 801 patients enrolled for at least 1 day from 2012 to 2014, 8614 (2.2%) had 1 or more visits with a dermatologist. Of all patients who visited a dermatologist, 48.5% received care via teledermatology. Among the patients newly enrolled in Medicaid, 75.7% (1474 of 1947) of those who visited a dermatologist received care via teledermatology. Primary care practices that engaged in teledermatology had a 63.8% increase in the fraction of patients visiting a dermatologist (vs 20.5% in other practices; P dermatology, teledermatology served more patients younger vs older than 17 years (2600 of 4427 [58.7%] vs 1404 of 4187 [33.5%]), male patients (1849 of 4427 [41.8%] vs 1526 of 4187 [36.4%]), nonwhite patients (2779 of 4188

  8. The relationship of post-acute home care use to Medicaid utilization and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Susan M C; DiGiuseppe, David L; Tilahun, Negussie

    2002-06-01

    lower-cost settings. Controlling for patients' need for services, PAHC utilization was not associated with lower utilization rates or lower total Medicaid expenditures. Medicaid programs are advised to proceed cautiously before expanding PAHC utilization and to monitor its use carefully. Further study, incorporating non-economic outcomes and additional factors influencing PAHC use, is warranted.

  9. 78 FR 4593 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans...-2334-P] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health... 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act), and the Children's Health Insurance Program...

  10. Factors Related to Medicaid Payment Acceptance at Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; Chriqui, Jamie F; McBride, Duane C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine factors associated with Medicaid acceptance for substance abuse (SA) services by outpatient SA treatment programs. Data Sources Secondary analysis of 2003–2006 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services data combined with state Medicaid policy and usage measures and other publicly available data. Study Design We used cross-sectional analyses, including state fixed effects, to assess relationships between SA treatment program Medicaid acceptance and (1) program-level factors, (2) county-level sociodemographics and treatment program density, and (3) state-level population characteristics, SA treatment-related factors, and Medicaid policy and usage. Data Extraction Methods State Medicaid policy data were compiled based on reviews of state Medicaid-related statutes/regulations and Medicaid plans. Other data were publicly available. Principal Findings Medicaid acceptance was significantly higher for programs: (a) that were publicly funded and in states with Medicaid policy allowing SA treatment coverage; (b) with accreditation/licensure and nonprofit/government ownership, as well as mental- and general-health focused programs; and (c) in counties with lower household income. Conclusions SA treatment program Medicaid acceptance related to program-, county, and state-level factors. The data suggest the importance of state policy and licensure/accreditation requirements in increasing SA program Medicaid access. PMID:21105870

  11. Medical Expenditures Associated With Diabetes Among Youth With Medicaid Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sundar S; Zhang, Ping; Thompson, Theodore J; Gregg, Edward W; Albright, Ann; Imperatore, Giuseppina

    2017-07-01

    Information on diabetes-related excess medical expenditures for youth is important to understand the magnitude of financial burden and to plan the health care resources needed for managing diabetes. However, diabetes-related excess medical expenditures for youth covered by Medicaid program have not been investigated recently. To estimate excess diabetes-related medical expenditures among youth aged below 20 years enrolled in Medicaid programs in the United States. We analyzed data from 2008 to 2012 MarketScan multistate Medicaid database for 6502 youths with diagnosed diabetes and 6502 propensity score matched youths without diabetes, enrolled in fee-for-service payment plans. We stratified analysis by Medicaid eligibility criteria (poverty or disability). We used 2-part regression models to estimate diabetes-related excess medical expenditures, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of claims, depression status, asthma status, and interaction terms. For poverty-based Medicaid enrollees, estimated annual diabetes-related total medical expenditure was $9046 per person [$3681 (no diabetes) vs. $12,727 (diabetes); PMedicaid enrollees, the estimated annual diabetes-related total medical expenditure was $9944 per person ($14,149 vs. $24,093; PMedicaid programs are substantial, which is larger among those with disabilities than without disabilities. Identifying cost-effective ways of managing diabetes in this vulnerable segment of the youth population is needed.

  12. The Politics of Medicaid: Most Americans Are Connected to the Program, Support Its Expansion, and Do Not View It as Stigmatizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Colleen M; Park, Sunggeun Ethan

    2017-12-01

    Policy Points: More than half of Americans are connected to the Medicaid program-either through their own coverage or that of a family member or close friend-and are significantly more likely to view Medicaid as important and to support increases in spending, even among conservatives. This finding helps explain why Affordable Care Act repeal efforts faced (and will continue to face) strong public backlash. Policymakers should be aware that although renaming programs within Medicaid may have increased enrollment take-up, this destigmatization effort might have also increased program confusion and reduced support for Medicaid even among enrollees who say the program is important to them. Since the 1980s, Medicaid enrollment has expanded so dramatically that by 2015 two-thirds of Americans had some connection to the program in which either they themselves, a family member, or a close friend is currently or was previously enrolled. Utilizing a nationally representative survey-the Kaiser Family Foundation Poll: Medicare and Medicaid at 50 (n = 1,849)-and employing ordinal and logistic regression analyses, our study examines 3 questions: (1) are individuals with a connection to Medicaid more likely to view the program as important, (2) are they more likely to support an increase in Medicaid spending, and (3) are they more likely to support adoption of the Medicaid expansion offered under the Affordable Care Act? For each of these questions we examine whether partisanship and views of stigma also impact support for Medicaid and, if so, whether these factors overwhelm the impact of connection to the program. Controlling for the strong effect of partisanship, people with any connection to the Medicaid program are more likely to view the program as important than those with no connection. However, when it comes to increasing spending or expanding the program, the type of connection to the program matters. In particular, adults with current and previous Medicaid coverage and

  13. Economic impacts of Medicaid in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Christopher; Hall, William; Garrett, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide estimates of the economic impacts of Medicaid program expenditures in North Carolina in state fiscal year (SFY) 2003. The study uses input-output analysis to estimate the economic impacts of Medicaid expenditures. The study uses North Carolina Medicaid program expenditure data for SFY 2003 as submitted by the North Carolina Division of Medical Assistance to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Industry structure data from 2002 that are part of the IMPLAN input-output modeling software database are also used in the analysis. In SFY 2003 $6.307 billion in Medicaid program expenditures occurred within the state of North Carolina-$3.941 billion federal dollars, $2.014 billion state dollars, and $351 million in local government funds. Each dollar of state and local government expenditures brought $1.67 in federal Medicaid cost-share to the state. The economic impacts within North Carolina of the 2003 Medicaid expenditures included the following: 182,000 jobs supported (including both full-time and some part-time jobs); $6.1 billion in labor income (wages, salaries, sole proprietorship/partnership profits); and $1.9 billion in capital income (rents, interest payments, corporate dividend payments). If the Medicaid program were shut down and the funds returned to taxpayers who saved/spent the funds according to typical consumer expenditure patterns, employment in North Carolina would fall by an estimated 67,400 jobs, and labor income would fall by $2.83 billion, due to the labor-intensive nature of Medicaid expenditures. Medicaid expenditure and economic impact results do not capture the economic value of the improved health and well-being of Medicaid recipients. Furthermore, the results do not capture the savings to society from increased preventive care and reduced uncompensated care resulting from Medicaid. State and local government expenditures do not fully capture the economic consequences of Medicaid

  14. Early Medicaid Expansion In Connecticut Stemmed The Growth In Hospital Uncompensated Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikpay, Sayeh; Buchmueller, Thomas; Levy, Helen

    2015-07-01

    As states continue to debate whether or not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a key consideration is the impact of expansion on the financial position of hospitals, including their burden of uncompensated care. Conclusive evidence from coverage expansions that occurred in 2014 is several years away. In the meantime, we analyzed the experience of hospitals in Connecticut, which expanded Medicaid coverage to a large number of childless adults in April 2010 under the ACA. Using hospital-level panel data from Medicare cost reports, we performed difference-in-differences analyses to compare the change in Medicaid volume and uncompensated care in the period 2007-13 in Connecticut to changes in other Northeastern states. We found that early Medicaid expansion in Connecticut was associated with an increase in Medicaid discharges of 7-9 percentage points, relative to a baseline rate of 11 percent, and an increase of 7-8 percentage points in Medicaid revenue as a share of total revenue, relative to a baseline share of 10 percent. Also, in contrast to the national and regional trends of increasing uncompensated care during this period, hospitals in Connecticut experienced no increase in uncompensated care. We conclude that uncompensated care in Connecticut was roughly one-third lower than what it would have been without early Medicaid expansion. The results suggest that ACA Medicaid expansions could reduce hospitals' uncompensated care burden. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. 75 FR 69037 - Medicaid Program; Recovery Audit Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 455 [CMS-6034-P] RIN 0938-AQ19 Medicaid Program; Recovery Audit Contractors AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This proposed rule would provide guidance to...

  16. 77 FR 23193 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ..., 413, and 495 [CMS-0044-CN] RIN 0938-AQ84 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record... proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage... (77 FR 13698), the proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record...

  17. Do Medicaid home and community based service waivers save money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Ng, Terence; Kitchener, Martin

    2011-10-01

    This article estimates the potential savings to the Medicaid program of using 1915c Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers rather than institutional care. For Medicaid HCBS waiver expenditures of $25 billion in 2006, we estimate the national savings to be over $57 billion, or $57,338 per waiver participant in 2006 compared with the cost of Medicaid institutional care (for which all waiver participants are eligible). When taking into account a potential 50% "woodwork effect" (for people who might have refused institutional services), the saving would be $21 billion. This analysis demonstrates that HCBS waiver programs present significant direct financial savings to Medicaid long-term care (LTC) programs.

  18. Medicare and Medicaid fraud and abuse regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, F Z; Black, B L

    1991-11-01

    Specific business arrangements that are protected under legislation and regulations governing parties doing business with Medicare or Medicaid are discussed. Regulations implementing the Medicare and Medicaid Patient Protection Act of 1987 specify practices and activities that are not subject to criminal penalties under the antikickback provisions of the Social Security Act or to exclusion from Medicare or state health-care programs. As of July 29, 1991, all organized health-care settings that receive payments from either Medicare or state health-care programs must comply with these regulations. The final rule sets forth "safe harbors"--exceptions to prohibitions against (1) kickbacks, bribes, rebates, and other illegal activities involving remunerations for patient referrals and (2) inducements to purchase or lease goods paid for by Medicare or state health-care programs. The safe harbors comprise 11 broad categories--investment interests, space rental, equipment rental, personal services and management contracts, purchase of a medical practice, referral services, warranties, discounts, employees, group purchasing organizations, and waiver of deductibles and coinsurance. Implications for pharmacy are discussed. These regulations will affect the purchase of pharmaceuticals by institutional pharmacies. Each institution should review its current practices to determine whether they are within the safe harbors.

  19. The Affordable Care Act Medicaid Expansions and Personal Finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Kyle J; Waidmann, Timothy A

    2017-09-01

    Using a novel data set from a major credit bureau, we examine the early effects of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions on personal finance. We analyze less common events such as personal bankruptcy, and more common occurrences such as medical collection balances, and change in credit scores. We estimate triple-difference models that compare individual outcomes across counties that expanded Medicaid versus counties that did not, and across expansion counties that had more uninsured residents versus those with fewer. Results demonstrate financial improvements in states that expanded their Medicaid programs as measured by improved credit scores, reduced balances past due as a percent of total debt, reduced probability of a medical collection balance of $1,000 or more, reduced probability of having one or more recent medical bills go to collections, reduction in the probability of experiencing a new derogatory balance of any type, reduced probability of incurring a new derogatory balance equal to $1,000 or more, and a reduction in the probability of a new bankruptcy filing.

  20. MEDICAID FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Better Oversight of State Claims for Federal Reimbursement Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calbom, Linda

    2002-01-01

    .... Developing baseline information on Medicaid issues at greatest risk for improper payments and measuring improvements in program management against that baseline is key to achieving effective financial oversight...

  1. State variation in primary care physician supply: implications for health reform Medicaid expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), Medicaid enrollment is expected to grow by 16 million people by 2019, an increase of more than 25 percent. Given the unwillingness of many primary care physicians (PCPs) to treat new Medicaid patients, policy makers and others are concerned about adequate primary care capacity to meet the increased demand. States with the smallest number of PCPs per capita overall--gen­erally in the South and Mountain West--potentially will see the largest per­centage increases in Medicaid enrollment, according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). In contrast, states with the largest number of PCPs per capita--primarily in the Northeast--will see more modest increases in Medicaid enrollment. Moreover, geograph­ic differences in PCP acceptance of new Medicaid patients reflect differences in overall PCP supply, not geographic differences in PCPs' willingness to treat Medicaid patients. The law also increases Medicaid reimbursement rates for certain services provided by primary care physicians to 100 percent of Medicare rates in 2013 and 2014. However, the reimbursement increases are likely to have the greatest impact in states that already have a large number of PCPs accepting Medicaid patients. In fact, the percent increase of PCPs accepting Medicaid patients in these states is likely to exceed the percent increase of new Medicaid enrollees. The reimbursement increases will have much less impact in states with a relatively small number of PCPs accepting Medicaid patients now because many of these states already reimburse primary care at rates close to or exceeding 100 percent of Medicare. As a result, growth in Medicaid enrollment in these states will greatly outpace growth in the num­ber of primary care physicians willing to treat new Medicaid patients.

  2. 76 FR 11782 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of the...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) about options for selecting health care coverage under these and... needs are for experts in health disparities, State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs), health...

  3. Access to Care for Medicare-Medicaid Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: The Role of State Medicaid Payment Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Haber, Susan; Hoover, Sonja; Feng, Zhanlian

    2017-12-01

    Medicaid programs are not required to pay the full Medicare coinsurance and deductibles for Medicare-Medicaid dually eligible beneficiaries. We examined the association between the percentage of Medicare cost sharing paid by Medicaid and the likelihood that a dually eligible beneficiary used evaluation and management (E&M) services and safety net provider services. Medicare and Medicaid Analytic eXtract enrollment and claims data for 2009. Multivariate analyses used fee-for-service dually eligible and Medicare-only beneficiaries in 20 states. A comparison group of Medicare-only beneficiaries controlled for state factors that might influence utilization. Paying 100 percent of the Medicare cost sharing compared to 20 percent increased the likelihood (relative to Medicare-only) that a dually eligible beneficiary had any E&M visit by 6.4 percent. This difference in the percentage of cost sharing paid decreased the likelihood of using safety net providers, by 37.7 percent for federally qualified health centers and rural health centers, and by 19.8 percent for hospital outpatient departments. Reimbursing the full Medicare cost-sharing amount would improve access for dually eligible beneficiaries, although the magnitude of the effect will vary by state and type of service. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. 75 FR 82397 - Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary [CMS-2420-NC] Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... quality measures recommended for Medicaid-eligible adults, as required by section 2701 of the Affordable...

  5. 77 FR 74381 - Medicaid Program; Payments for Services Furnished by Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 438, 441, and 447 [CMS-2370-CN] RIN 0938-AQ63 Medicaid Program; Payments for Services Furnished by Certain...-26507 of November 6, 2012 (77 FR 66670), there were a number of technical errors that are identified and...

  6. Multimethod Evaluation of Health Policy Change: An Application to Medicaid Managed Care in a Rural State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, Howard; Schillaci, Michael; Willging, Cathleen E

    2008-01-01

    Objective To answer questions about the impacts of Medicaid managed care (MMC) at the individual, organizational/community, and population levels of analysis. Data Sources/Study Setting Multimethod approach to study MMC in New Mexico, a rural state with challenging access barriers. Study Design Individual level: surveys to assess barriers to care, access, utilization, and satisfaction. Organizational/community level: ethnography to determine changes experienced by safety net institutions and local communities. Population level: analysis of secondary databases to examine trends in preventable adverse sentinel events. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Survey: multivariate statistical methods, including factor analysis and logistic regression. Ethnography: iterative coding and triangulation to assess documents, field observations, and in-depth interviews. Secondary databases: plots of sentinel events over time. Principal Findings The survey component revealed no consistent changes after MMC, relatively favorable experiences for Medicaid patients, and persisting access barriers for the uninsured. In the ethnographic component, safety net institutions experienced increased workload and financial stress; mental health services declined sharply. Immunization rate, as an important sentinel event, deteriorated. Conclusions MMC exerted greater effects on safety net providers than on individuals and did not address problems of the uninsured. A multimethod approach can facilitate evaluation of change in health policy. PMID:18384362

  7. The Center For Medicare And Medicaid Innovation's blueprint for rapid-cycle evaluation of new care and payment models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William

    2013-04-01

    The Affordable Care Act established the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to test innovative payment and service delivery models. The goal is to reduce program expenditures while preserving or improving the quality of care provided to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Central to the success of the Innovation Center is a new, rapid-cycle approach to evaluation. This article describes that approach--setting forth how the Rapid Cycle Evaluation Group aims to deliver frequent feedback to providers in support of continuous quality improvement, while rigorously evaluating the outcomes of each model tested. This article also describes the relationship between the group's work and that of the Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which plays a central role in the assessment of new models.

  8. The affordable care act and family planning services: the effect of optional medicaid expansion on safety net programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanese, Bethany G; Oglesby, Willie H

    2016-01-01

    Title X of the Public Health Service Act provides funding for a range of reproductive health services, with a priority given to low-income persons. Now that many of these services are provided to larger numbers of people with low-income since the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, questions remain on the continued need for the Title X program. The current project highlights the importance of these safety net programs. To help inform this policy issue, research was conducted to examine the revenue and service changes for Title X per state and compare those findings to the states' Medicaid expansion and demographics. The dataset include publicly available data from 2013 and 2014 Family Planning Annual Reports (FPAR). Paired samples differences of means t-tests were then used to compare the means of family planning participation rates for 2013 and 2014 across the different categories for Medicaid expansion states and non-expansion states. The ACA has had an impact on Title X services, but the link is not as direct as previously thought. The findings indicate that all states' Title X funded clinics lost revenue; however, expansion states fared better than non-expansion states. While the general statements from the FPAR National surveys certainly are supported in that Title X providers have decreased in number and scope of services, which has led to the decrease in total clients, these variations are not evenly applied across the states. The ACA has very likely had an impact on Title X services, but the link is not as obvious as previously thought. Title X funded clinics have helped increase access to health insurance at a greater rate in expansion states than non-expansion states. There was much concern from advocates that with the projected increased revenue from Medicaid and private insurance, that Title X programs could be deemed unnecessary. However, this revenue increase has yet to actually pan out. Title X still helps fill a much needed

  9. Health care utilization among Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles: a count data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Jaeun

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles are the beneficiaries of both Medicare and Medicaid. Dual eligibles satisfy the eligibility conditions for Medicare benefit. Dual eligibles also qualify for Medicaid because they are aged, blind, or disabled and meet the income and asset requirements for receiving Supplement Security Income (SSI assistance. The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between dual eligibility and health care utilization among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods The household component of the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS 1996–2000 is used for the analysis. Total 8,262 Medicare beneficiaries are selected from the MEPS data. The Medicare beneficiary sample includes individuals who are covered by Medicare and do not have private health insurance during a given year. Zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB regression model is used to analyse the count data regarding health care utilization: office-based physician visits, hospital inpatient nights, agency-sponsored home health provider days, and total dental visits. Results Dual eligibility is positively correlated with the likelihood of using hospital inpatient care and agency-sponsored home health services and the frequency of agency-sponsored home health days. Frequency of dental visits is inversely associated with dual eligibility. With respect to racial differences, dually eligible Afro-Americans use more office-based physician and dental services than white duals. Asian duals use more home health services than white duals at the 5% statistical significance level. The dual eligibility programs seem particularly beneficial to Afro-American duals. Conclusion Dual eligibility has varied impact on health care utilization across service types. More utilization of home healthcare among dual eligibles appears to be the result of delayed realization of their unmet healthcare needs under the traditional Medicare-only program

  10. Medicaid and the politics of groups: recipients, providers, and policy making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronebusch, K

    1997-06-01

    There is a substantial heterogeneity of interests within the Medicaid program. Its major beneficiary groups include the elderly, people with disabilities, children in low-income families, and adults receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Providers who deliver medical services to these recipients represent another set of potential claimants. These groups are likely to be treated differently by the politics that affect the design and management of the Medicaid program. The Medicaid recipient groups vary in several important dimensions: First, the groups differ politically, a dimension that includes their political participation, their relationships to parties and electoral coalitions, the images they present to other political actors, and the legacy of public policies that affect them. Second, the groups have different medical and social needs. Third, the groups differ with respect to economic constraints, including the political economy of labor markets and of government spending programs, and they have differing relationships to the various types of medical providers. The medical providers are themselves political actors with a variety of characteristics that create political advantages relative to recipients, although there is also diversity among providers. The politics of the Medicaid program involves more than simply technical decisions about eligibility, coverage of medical services, reimbursement, and the implementation of managed care initiatives. Instead the differences between the program's multiple claimants are an important element of current Medicaid politics and the likely path of future reforms.

  11. New options to integrate care and financing for persons dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Katherine Jett; Thorpe, Jane Hyatt

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews barriers to clinical and financial integration in services for dual eligibles prior to passage of the ACA, identifies models used by states to integrate care through contract and waiver authorities available to CMS prior to passage of the ACA, describes two new demonstrations proposed by CMS through the Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office and Innovation Center, and discusses several new models available for consideration by federal and state policymakers. These options draw on experience from existing programs and waivers to provide suggested changes to existing programs, as well as a permanent state plan option for a fully integrated, capitated care model. This model could be made available to states prior to the completion of the demonstration process begun by the Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office and Innovation Center.

  12. Medicaid Drug Rebate Program Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Product Data for Drugs in the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. The rebate drug product data file contains the active drugs that have been reported by participating drug...

  13. 42 CFR 460.168 - Reinstatement in other Medicare and Medicaid programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reinstatement in other Medicare and Medicaid programs. 460.168 Section 460.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Reinstatement in other Medicare and Medicaid programs. To facilitate a participant's reinstatement in other...

  14. 77 FR 9931 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-October Through December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-9069-N] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances--October Through December 2011 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This quarterly...

  15. Potential Medicaid Cost Savings from Maternity Care Based..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicaid pays for about half the births in the United States, at very high cost. Compared to usual obstetrical care, care by midwives at a birth center could reduce...

  16. Comparing the Medicaid Retrospective Drug Utilization Review Program Cost-Savings Methods Used by State Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Sergio I

    2017-12-01

    The Medicaid Drug Utilization Review (DUR) program is a 2-phase process conducted by Medicaid state agencies. The first phase is a prospective DUR and involves electronically monitoring prescription drug claims to identify prescription-related problems, such as therapeutic duplication, contraindications, incorrect dosage, or duration of treatment. The second phase is a retrospective DUR and involves ongoing and periodic examinations of claims data to identify patterns of fraud, abuse, underutilization, drug-drug interaction, or medically unnecessary care, implementing corrective actions when needed. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services requires each state to measure prescription drug cost-savings generated from its DUR programs on an annual basis, but it provides no guidance or unified methodology for doing so. To describe and synthesize the methodologies used by states to measure cost-savings using their Medicaid retrospective DUR program in federal fiscal years 2014 and 2015. For each state, the cost-savings methodologies included in the Medicaid DUR 2014 and 2015 reports were downloaded from Medicaid's website. The reports were then reviewed and synthesized. Methods described by the states were classified according to research designs often described in evaluation textbooks. In 2014, the most often used prescription drugs cost-savings estimation methodology for the Medicaid retrospective DUR program was a simple pre-post intervention method, without a comparison group (ie, 12 states). In 2015, the most common methodology used was a pre-post intervention method, with a comparison group (ie, 14 states). Comparisons of savings attributed to the program among states are still unreliable, because of a lack of a common methodology available for measuring cost-savings. There is great variation among states in the methods used to measure prescription drug utilization cost-savings. This analysis suggests that there is still room for improvement in terms of

  17. Cost and Predictors of Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care - Sensitive Conditions Among Medicaid Enrollees in Comprehensive Managed Care Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N. Mkanta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preventable hospitalizations are responsible for increasing the cost of health care and reflect ineffectiveness of the health services in the primary care setting. The objective of this study was to assess expenditure for hospitalizations and utilize expenditure differentials to determine factors associated with ambulatory care - sensitive conditions (ACSCs hospitalizations. Methods: A cross-sectional study of hospitalizations among Medicaid enrollees in comprehensive managed care plans in 2009 was conducted. A total of 25 581 patients were included in the analysis. Expenditures on hospitalizations were examined at the 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th expenditure percentiles both at the bivariate level and in the logistic regression model to determine the impact of differing expenditure on ACSC hospitalizations. Results: Compared with patients without ACSC admissions, a larger proportion of patients with ACSC hospitalizations required advanced treatment or died on admission. Overall mean expenditures were higher for the ACSC group than for non-ACSC group (US$18 070 vs US$14 452. Whites and blacks had higher expenditures for ACSC hospitalization than Hispanics at all expenditure percentiles. Patient’s age remained a consistent predictor of ACSC hospitalization across all expenditure percentiles. Patients with ACSC were less likely to have a procedure on admission; however, the likelihood decreased as expenditure percentiles increased. At the median expenditure, blacks and Hispanics were more likely than other race/ethnic groups to have ACSC hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR]: 1.307, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.013-1.686 and OR 1.252, 95% CI: 1.060-1.479, respectively. Conclusion: Future review of delivery and monitoring of services at the primary care setting should include managed care plans in order to enhance access and overall quality of care for optimal utilization of the resources.

  18. Results of the Medicare Health Support disease-management pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Nancy; Cromwell, Jerry

    2011-11-03

    In the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, Congress required the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to test the commercial disease-management model in the Medicare fee-for-service program. The Medicare Health Support Pilot Program was a large, randomized study of eight commercial programs for disease management that used nurse-based call centers. We randomly assigned patients with heart failure, diabetes, or both to the intervention or to usual care (control) and compared them with the use of a difference-in-differences method to evaluate the effects of the commercial programs on the quality of clinical care, acute care utilization, and Medicare expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries. The study included 242,417 patients (163,107 in the intervention group and 79,310 in the control group). The eight commercial disease-management programs did not reduce hospital admissions or emergency room visits, as compared with usual care. We observed only 14 significant improvements in process-of-care measures out of 40 comparisons. These modest improvements came at substantial cost to the Medicare program in fees paid to the disease-management companies ($400 million), with no demonstrable savings in Medicare expenditures. In this large study, commercial disease-management programs using nurse-based call centers achieved only modest improvements in quality-of-care measures, with no demonstrable reduction in the utilization of acute care or the costs of care.

  19. 75 FR 38748 - Medicaid Program; Premiums and Cost Sharing; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 447 and 457 [CMS-2244-CN] RIN 0938-AP73 Medicaid Program; Premiums and Cost Sharing; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS ACTION: Correction of final rule with comment period...

  20. Medicaid Contradictions: Adding, Subtracting, and Redeterminations in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetting, Michael

    2016-04-01

    States are required to conduct annual Medicaid redeterminations. How these redeterminations are undertaken is crucial to determining the nature of Medicaid coverage. There can be wide variations in the proportion of clients disenrolled, with potentially large numbers of people disenrolled each year. This case study of Illinois Medicaid shows how, as the Affordable Care Act added people, redeterminations were taking people off the rolls-about 25 percent of all Medicaid clients were disenrolled in one year. Many of these people were no longer eligible, but it appears that a larger number were in fact eligible but simply failed to comply with administrative requirements in a timely way. Balancing between the two imperatives of program integrity and continuity of care is a difficult act for Medicaid programs. The Illinois experience also illustrates impacts on information technology and outsourcing of eligibility functions, not to mention budget considerations. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  1. Investigating the Perceptions of Care Coordinators on Using Behavior Theory-Based Mobile Health Technology With Medicaid Populations: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, Brittany Erika

    2017-03-21

    Medicaid populations are less engaged in their health care than the rest of the population, translating to worse health outcomes and increased health care costs. Since theory-based mobile health (mHealth) interventions have been shown to increase patient engagement, mobile phones may be an optimal strategy to reach this population. With increased development of theory-based mHealth technology, these interventions must now be evaluated with these medically underserved populations in a real-world setting. The aim of our study was to investigate care coordinators' perceived value of using a health behavior theory-based mHealth platform with Medicaid clients. In particular, attention was paid to the perceived impact on patient engagement. This research was conducted using the patient-provider text messaging (short message service, SMS) platform, Sense Health (now Wellpass), which integrates the transtheoretical model (TTM), also called the stages of change model; social cognitive theory (SCT); supportive accountability; and motivational interviewing (MI). Interviews based in grounded theory methodology were conducted with 10 care managers to understand perceptions of the relationship between mHealth and patient engagement. The interviews with care managers yielded a foundation for a grounded theory model, presenting themes that suggested 4 intertwined correlative relationships revolving around patient engagement: (1) A text messaging (short message service, SMS) platform supplements the client-care manager dynamic, which is grounded in high quality, reciprocal-communication to increase patient engagement; (2) Texting enhances the relationship between literacy and access to care for Medicaid patients, increasing low-literacy patients' agency to access services; (3) Texting enhances communication, providing care managers with a new means to support their clients; and (4) Reminders augment client accountability, leading to both increased motivation and readiness to change

  2. Managed Care Approaches to Children's Services within Public Systems of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariega, Andres; Fallon, Theodore, Jr.

    This report presents two discussions of conceptual and infrastructure issues that state mental health systems serving children with emotional disturbances must consider to make an effective transition towards a managed care organization of services under Medicaid. The first discussion, "Clinical Experiences in Managed Care Implementation for…

  3. The Medicaid School Program: An Effective Public School and Private Sector Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Privatized service delivery within Medicaid has greatly increased over the past two decades. This public program-private sector collaboration is quite common today, with a majority of Medicaid recipients receiving services in this fashion; yet controversy remains. This article focuses on just one program within Medicaid, school-based services for…

  4. Insurance coverage and prenatal care among low-income pregnant women: an assessment of states' adoption of the "Unborn Child" option in Medicaid and CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian P; Bennett, Wendy L; Barry, Colleen L; Bleich, Sara N

    2014-01-01

    The "Unborn Child" (UC) option provides state Medicaid/Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) programs with a new strategy to extend prenatal coverage to low-income women who would otherwise have difficulty enrolling in or would be ineligible for Medicaid. To examine the association of the UC option with the probability of enrollment in Medicaid/CHIP during pregnancy and probability of receiving adequate prenatal care. We use pooled cross-sectional data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 32 states between 2004 and 2010 (n = 81,983). Multivariable regression is employed to examine the association of the UC option with Medicaid/CHIP enrollment during pregnancy among eligible women who were uninsured preconception (n = 45,082) and those who had insurance (but not Medicaid) preconception (n = 36,901). Multivariable regression is also employed to assess the association between the UC option and receipt of adequate prenatal care, measured by the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index. Residing in a state with the UC option is associated with a greater probability of Medicaid enrollment during pregnancy relative to residing in a state without the policy both among women uninsured preconception (88% vs. 77%, P option is not significantly associated with receiving adequate prenatal care, among both women with and without insurance preconception. The UC option provides states a key way to expand or simplify prenatal insurance coverage, but further policy efforts are needed to ensure that coverage improves access to high-quality prenatal care.

  5. Managed care and the quality of substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Donald S; Daley, Marilyn; Ritter, Grant A; Hodgkin, Dominic; Beinecke, Richard H

    2002-12-01

    In the US, the spiraling costs of substance abuse and mental health treatment caused many state Medicaid agencies to adopt managed behavioral health care (MBHC) plans during the 1990s. Although research suggests that these plans have successfully reduced public sector spending, their impact on the quality of substance abuse treatment has not been established. The Massachusetts Medicaid program started a risk-sharing contract with MHMA, a private, for-profit specialty managed behavioral health care (MBHC) carve-out vendor on July 1, 1992. This paper evaluates the carve-out s impact on spending per inpatient episode and three proxy measures of quality: (i) access to inpatient treatment (ii) 30-day re-admissions and (iii) continuity of care. Medicaid claims for inpatient treatment were collapsed into episodes. Clients were tracked across the five-year period and an interrupted time series design was used to compare the three quality outcomes and spending in the year prior to (FY1992) and the four years during MHMA (FY1993-FY1996). Logistic and linear regression models were used to control for race, disability status, age, gender and primary diagnosis. Despite a 99% reduction in the use of hospital-based settings, access to 24-hour services overall increased by 38%, largely due to an expansion in the use of freestanding detoxification and acute residential services. Continuity improved by 73%. Nevertheless, rates of 7-day (58%) and 30-day (24%) readmission increased significantly, even after controlling for increases in disability status. Per episode spending decreased by 76% ($2,773), characterized by a dramatic spending reduction in FY1993 that was maintained but not augmented in subsequent years. The carve-out had mixed effects on the quality of substance abuse treatment. While one of the three measures (readmission rates) deteriorated, two improved (access and continuity). Rapid re-admissions were strongly associated with shorter lengths of stay, suggesting that

  6. Medicaid and Rural Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State Guides Rural Data Visualizations Rural Data Explorer Chart Gallery Maps Case Studies & Conversations Rural Health Models & ... services provided by state Medicaid programs might include dental care, physical therapy, home and community-based services, ...

  7. Treatment persistence & health care costs of adult MDD patients treated with escitalopram vs. citalopram in a medicaid population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Ben-Hamadi, Rym; Lu, Mei; Beaulieu, Nicolas; Yu, Andrew P; Erder, M Haim

    2012-01-01

    Compare treatment persistence and health care costs of major depressive disorder (MDD) Medicaid patients treated with escitalopram versus citalopram. Retrospective analysis of Medicaid administrative claims data. Analyzed administrative claims data from the Florida Medicaid program (07/2002-06/2006) for patients ages 18-64 years with 21 inpatient claim or 2 independent medical claims for MDD. Outcomes included discontinuation and switching rates and prescription drug, medical, and total health care costs, all-cause and related to mental disorder. Contingency table analysis and survival analysis were used to compare outcomes between treatment groups, using both unadjusted analysis and multivariate analysis adjusting for baseline characteristics. The study included 2,650 patients initiated on escitalopram and 630 patients initiated on citalopram. Patients treated with escitalopram were less likely to discontinue the index drug (63.7% vs. 68.9%, P=0.015) or to switch to another second-generation antidepressant (14.9% vs. 18.4%, P=0.029) over the six months post-index date. Patients treated with escitalopram had $1,014 lower total health care costs (P=0.032) and $519 lower health care costs related to mental disorder (P=0.023). More than half of the total cost difference was attributable to savings in inpatient hospitalizations related to mental disorder ($571, P=0.003) and to outpatient costs ($53, PEscitalopram therapy was also associated with $736 lower medical costs related to mental disorder (P=0.009). In the Florida Medicaid program, compared to adult MDD patients initiated on citalopram, escitalopram patients have better treatment persistence and lower total health care costs due to any cause and due to mental disorder, mostly driven by lower hospitalization costs related to mental disorder.

  8. Saving Lives and Saving Money: The Role of North Carolina Health Departments in Medicaid Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Colleen M; Smith, Steven E; Saunders, Stacie Turpin

    2017-01-01

    A new Medicaid system is emerging in North Carolina in which accountable care organizations will aim to improve both the quality and value of health care. We explore how local health departments can apply their expertise in population health to help achieve these goals. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  9. 78 FR 28551 - Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 [CMS-2367-P] RIN 0938-AR31 Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The statute...

  10. 78 FR 57293 - Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 [CMS-2367-F] RIN 0938-AR31 Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The statute, as...

  11. Fall risk factors in community-dwelling elderly who receive Medicaid-supported home- and community-based care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Jeon, Haesang; Bailer, A John; Nelson, Ian M; Mehdizadeh, Shahla

    2011-06-01

    This study identifies fall risk factors in an understudied population of older people who receive community-based care services. Data were collected from enrollees of Ohio's Medicaid home- and community-based waiver program (preadmission screening system providing options and resources today [PASSPORT]). A total of 23,182 participants receiving PASSPORT services in 2005/2006 was classified as fallers and nonfallers, and a variety of risk factors for falling was analyzed using logistic regressions. The following factors were identified as risk factors for falling: previous fall history, older age, White race, incontinence, higher number of medications, fewer numbers of activity of daily living limitations, unsteady gait, tremor, grasping strength, and absence of supervision. Identifying risk factors for the participants of a Medicaid home- and community-based waiver program are useful for a fall risk assessment, but it would be most helpful if the community-based care service programs incorporate measurements of known fall risk factors into their regular data collection, if not already included.

  12. Social Determinants of Health in Managed Care Payment Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Arlene S; Mick, Eric O; Ellis, Randall P; Kiefe, Catarina I; Allison, Jeroan J; Clark, Melissa A

    2017-10-01

    Managed care payment formulas commonly allocate more money for medically complex populations, but ignore most social determinants of health (SDH). To add SDH variables to a diagnosis-based payment formula that allocates funds to managed care plans and accountable care organizations. Using data from MassHealth, the Massachusetts Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program, we estimated regression models predicting Medicaid spending using a diagnosis-based and SDH-expanded model, and compared the accuracy of their cost predictions overall and for vulnerable populations. MassHealth members enrolled for at least 6 months in 2013 in fee-for-service (FFS) programs (n = 357 660) or managed care organizations (MCOs) (n = 524 607). We built cost prediction models from a fee-for-service program. Predictors in the diagnosis-based model are age, sex, and diagnoses from claims. The SDH model adds predictors describing housing instability, behavioral health issues, disability, and neighborhood-level stressors. Overall model explanatory power and overpayments and underpayments for subgroups of interest for all Medicaid-reimbursable expenditures excepting long-term support services (mean annual cost = $5590 per member). We studied 357 660 people who were FFS participants and 524 607 enrolled in MCOs with a combined 806 889 person-years of experience. The FFS program experience included more men (49.6% vs 43.6%), older patients (mean age of 26.1 years vs 21.6 years), and sicker patients (mean morbidity score of 1.16 vs 0.89) than MCOs. Overall, the SDH model performed well, but only slightly better than the diagnosis-based model, explaining most of the spending variation in the managed care population (validated R2 = 62.4) and reducing underpayments for several vulnerable populations. For example, raw costs for the quintile of people living in the most stressed neighborhoods were 9.6% ($537 per member per year) higher than average. Since greater

  13. 78 FR 72089 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-6051-N] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee Amount... period entitled ``Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening...

  14. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... 7 CFR Parts 210, 215, 220 et al. Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program..., 220, 225, and 226 RIN 0584-AC24 Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program... management and integrity in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), at 67 FR 43447 (June 27, 2002) and...

  15. Reducing Early Childhood Tooth Decay: Strategies for State Medicaid and CHIP Dental Program Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Reusch; Meg Booth; Leslie Foster

    2015-01-01

    Young children who are enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) can be at risk for developing early childhood caries (ECC). ECC is a chronic bacterial infection that causes severe tooth decay and can begin to develop before baby teeth erupt.

  16. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HENKE, RACHEL MOSHER; BIBI, SALMA; RAMSAY, PATRICIA P.; SHORTELL, STEPHEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care.Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population‐level increases in practice use of CMPs over time.Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Context Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Methods Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Findings Over one‐third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one

  17. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Bibi, Salma; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-09-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care. Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population-level increases in practice use of CMPs over time. Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Over one-third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one-third of exnovators, while nurse

  18. 77 FR 27671 - Medicaid Program; Payments for Services Furnished by Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... the Social Security Act, as amended by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (the...: CMS-2370-P, Mail Stop C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244-1850. 4. By hand or... & Medicaid Services, Department of Health and Human Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244...

  19. Using research for successful Medicare and Medicaid risk marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, S; Nelson, A M; Wood, S D

    1996-01-01

    Medicare/Medicaid risk marketing is a vital business challenge, one that countless managed care organizations are facing right now. Early entry into new markets and aggressive participation in existing markets are essential to meet competitive pressures. Health plans intent on success in government risk programs should conduct research to learn the medical needs, wants, and desires of older persons in the geographic area they serve. Original, market-specific research yields critical marketing and clinical data that can be used to improve care and member satisfaction along with customer loyalty and retention.

  20. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Medicaid program; Medicaid Management Information Systems; conditions of approval and reapproval and procedures for reduction of federal financial participation--Health Care Financing Administration. Proposed rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-03

    This proposal adds to regulations new conditions and procedures for initial approval and for reapproval of Medicaid Management Information Systems (MMIS) to update the regulations to reflect additional requirements added by section 901 of the Mental Health Systems Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-398). The proposal specifies procedures for reducing the level of Federal financial participation in a State's administrative expenditures when a State fails to meet the conditions for initial operation, initial approval or reapproval of an MMIS. It also proposes procedures with respect to waivers of the conditions of approval and reapproval and to appeals of adverse decisions. These provisions are intended to improve States' MMIS, and to ensure efficient system operations, and to detect cases of fraud, waste, and abuse effectively.

  2. 78 FR 42159 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... and 156 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative... Secretary 45 CFR Parts 155 and 156 [CMS-2334-F] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance... Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices, delegation of appeals, and...

  3. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ...] Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... organizations to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to... the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative or the application process. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I...

  4. US Health Care Reform and Rural America: Results From the ACA's Medicaid Expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Joseph A; Seiber, Eric E

    2018-03-01

    Medicaid expansions, prompted by the Affordable Care Act, generated generally positive effects on coverage and alleviated much of the financial burden associated with seeking health care. We do not know if these shifts also extend to the nation's rural populations. Using 2011-2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, this study compares trend changes for coverage, access to care, and health care utilization in response to Medicaid expansion among urban and rural residents using a difference-in-differences regression approach. Following Medicaid expansion, low-income rural and urban residents both experienced reductions in uninsurance; however, the coverage uptake in rural settings (8.5 percentage points [pp], P .10). In spite of larger uptakes in coverage among rural residents, reductions in cost-related barriers to medical care were slightly larger among urban residents, and access to a regular source of medical care (5.2 pp, P rural residents than urban residents; however, it appears there remain opportunities to improve access to care among potentially vulnerable rural residents. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  5. Changes in Antipsychotic Medication Use after Implementation of a Medicaid Mental Health Carve-Out in the US

    OpenAIRE

    John Robst

    2012-01-01

    Background:Background: Many Medicaid programmes now offer behavioural healthcare through managed care organizations. Medicaid programmes are concerned about carve-outs because the use of non-included services may rise, limiting the efficiencies anticipated with the implementation of managed care. There also exist concerns that patients with serious mental illness may receive reduced care through managed care and consequently have poorer outcomes. Abstract: Objective:Objective: This study exam...

  6. Medicaid Adult Dental Benefits Increase Use Of Dental Care, But Impact Of Expansion On Dental Services Use Was Mixed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Damiano, Peter; Sabik, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    Dental coverage for adult enrollees is an optional benefit under Medicaid. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia have expanded eligibility for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Millions of low-income adults have gained health care coverage and, in states offering dental benefits, oral health coverage as well. Using data for 2010 and 2014 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the impact of Medicaid adult dental coverage and eligibility expansions on low-income adults' use of dental care. We found that low-income adults in states that provided dental benefits beyond emergency-only coverage were more likely to have had a dental visit in the past year, compared to low-income adults in states without such benefits. Among states that provided dental benefits and expanded their Medicaid program, regression-based estimates suggest that childless adults had a significant increase (1.8 percentage points) in the likelihood of having had a dental visit, while parents had a significant decline (8.1 percentage points). One possible explanation for the disparity is that after expansion, newly enrolled childless adults might have exhausted the limited dental provider capacity that was available to parents before expansion. Additional policy-level efforts may be needed to expand the dental care delivery system's capacity. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Foster Care Involvement among Medicaid-Enrolled Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidav, Zuleyha; Xie, Ming; Mandell, David S.

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence and risk of foster care involvement among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) relative to children with intellectual disability (ID), children with ASD and ID, and typically developing children were examined using 2001-2007 Medicaid data. Children were followed up to the first foster care placement or until the end of 2007;…

  8. 78 FR 46339 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria on... combat fraud, waste, and abuse in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary Enrollment...

  9. In Connecticut: improving patient medication management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie; Giuliano, Margherita R; Starkowski, Michael P

    2011-04-01

    Medications are a cornerstone of the management of most chronic conditions. However, medication discrepancies and medication-related problems-some of which can cause serious harm-are common. Pharmacists have the expertise to identify, resolve, monitor, and prevent these problems. We present findings from a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration project in Connecticut, in which nine pharmacists worked closely with eighty-eight Medicaid patients from July 2009 through May 2010. The pharmacists identified 917 drug therapy problems and resolved nearly 80 [corrected] percent of them after four encounters. The result was an estimated annual saving of $1,123 per patient on medication claims and $472 per patient on medical, hospital, and emergency department expenses-more than enough to pay for the contracted pharmacist services. We recommend that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation support the evaluation of pharmacist-provided medication management services in primary care medical homes, accountable care organizations, and community health and care transition teams, as well as research to explore how to enhance team-based care.

  10. Incentives for healthy behaviors: experience from Florida Medicaid's Enhanced Benefit Rewards program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allyson G; Lemak, Christy Harris; Landry, Amy Yarbrough; Duncan, R Paul

    2013-04-01

    Engaging individuals in their own health care proves challenging for policy makers, health plans, and providers. Florida Medicaid introduced the Enhanced Benefits Rewards (EBR) program in 2006, providing financial incentives as rewards to beneficiaries who engage in health care seeking and healthy behaviors. This study analyzed beneficiary survey data from 2009 to determine predictors associated with awareness of and participation in the EBR program. Non-English speakers, those in a racial and ethnic minority group, those with less than a high school education, and those with limited or no connection to a health care provider were associated with lower awareness of the program. Among those aware of the program, these factors were also associated with reduced likelihood of engaging in the program. Individuals in fair or poor health were also less likely to engage in an approved behavior. Individuals who speak Spanish at home and those without a high school diploma were more likely than other groups to spend their earned program credits. Findings underscore the fact that initial engagement in such a program can prove challenging as different groups are not equally likely to be aware of or participate in an approved activity or redeem a credit. Physicians may play important roles in encouraging participation in programs to incentivize healthy behaviors.

  11. Specialized due diligence called for on Medicare/Medicaid issues in health care acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaglia, Lawrence W; Herman, Dimitry S; Ziegler, Rachel Schneller

    2005-01-01

    A careful and comprehensive due diligence process is mission-critical to the success of any complex business acquisition. In heavily regulated industries such as health care, a buyer's greatest risks can arise from practices relating to Medicare, Medicaid, and other governmental payors. In particular, the rules of "successor liability" for the seller's sins are fundamentally different in a health care transaction than in other traditional corporate acquisitions. These liabilities may attach not only for expected business debts, but also for unexpected and draconian penalties available as remedies under the False Claims Act, Civil Money Penalties Law, and a number of other enforcement authorities. In addition, because critical cash flow depends on accepting certain liabilities of the seller, in the health care context these risks may be voluntarily assumed. Thus, here, due diligence is not just about finding "deal breakers," it is about helping the provider's management team understand the financial and risk-management components of the transaction at hand.

  12. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  13. 75 FR 56946 - Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 431 [CMS-2325-P] RIN 0938-AQ46 Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This...

  14. Measuring Quality of Care Under Medicare and Medicaid

    OpenAIRE

    Jencks, Stephen F.

    1995-01-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) approach to measuring quality of care uses an accepted definition of quality, explicit domains of measurement, and a formal validation procedure that includes face validity, construct validity, reliability, clinical validation, and tests for usefulness. The indicators of quality for Medicare and Medicaid patients span the range of service types, medical conditions, and payment systems and rest on a variety of data systems. Some have already be...

  15. State Medicaid Expansions for Parents Led to Increased Coverage and Prenatal Care Utilization among Pregnant Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Laura R

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate impacts of state Medicaid expansions for low-income parents on the health insurance coverage, pregnancy intention, and use of prenatal care among mothers who became pregnant. Person-level data for women with a live birth from the 1997-2012 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. The sample was restricted to women who were already parents using information on previous live births and combined with information on state Medicaid policies for low-income parents. I used a measure of expanded generosity of state Medicaid eligibility for low-income parents to estimate changes in health insurance, pregnancy intention, and prenatal care for pregnant mothers associated with Medicaid expansion. I found an increase in prepregnancy health insurance coverage and coverage during pregnancy among pregnant mothers, as well as earlier initiation of prenatal care, associated with the expansions. Among pregnant mothers with less education, I found an increase in the adequacy of prenatal care utilization. Expanded Medicaid coverage for low-income adults has the potential to increase a woman's health insurance coverage prior to pregnancy, as well as her insurance coverage and medical care receipt during pregnancy. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. Drug Products in the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Active drugs that have been reported by participating drug manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. All drugs are identified by National Drug Code...

  17. Comparison of Orthodontic Medicaid Funding in the United States 2006 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Minick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionOrthodontic treatment is reimbursed by Medicaid based on orthodontic and financial need with qualifiers determined by individual states. Changes in Medicaid-funded orthodontic treatment following the “Great Recession” in 2007 and the enactment of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 were compared for the 50 United States and the District of Columbia to better understand disparities in access to care. The results from this 2015 survey were compared to data gathered in 2006 (1.Materials and methodsMedicaid officials were contacted by email, telephone, or postal mail regarding the age limit for treatment, practitioner type who can determine eligibility and provide treatment, records required for case review, and rate and frequency of reimbursement. When not attained by direct contact, the information was gleaned from online websites, provider manuals, and state orthodontists.ResultsInformation gathered from 50 states and the District of Columbia documents that Medicaid program characteristics and expenditures continue to vary by state. Expenditures and reimbursement rates have decreased since 2006 and vary widely by geographic region. Some states have tightened restrictions on qualifiers and increased submission requirements by providers.ConclusionThe variation and lack of uniformity that still exists among Medicaid orthodontic programs in different states creates disparities in orthodontic care for US citizens. Barriers to care for Medicaid-funded orthodontic treatment have increased since 2006.

  18. The financial impact of multidisciplinary cleft care: an analysis of hospital revenue to advance program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B; TeBockhorst, Seth; Castro, Darren A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the financial impact of cleft care on the hospital and to evaluate trends in reimbursement over the past 6 years. Medical and accounting records of 327 consecutive infants undergoing cleft repair between 2005 and 2011 were reviewed. Charges, payments, and direct cost data were analyzed to illustrate hospital revenue and margins. Hospital payments for all inpatient services (cleft and noncleft) during the first 24 months of life were $9,483,168. Mean hospital payment varied from $5525 (Medicaid) to $10,274 (managed care) for a cleft lip repair (p < 0.0001) and from $6573 (Medicaid) to $12,933 (managed care) for a cleft palate repair (p < 0.0001). Hospital charges for a definitive lip or palate repair to both Medicaid and managed care more than doubled between 2005 and 2011 (p < 0.0001). Overall, mean hospital margins were $3904 and $3520, respectively, for a cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair. Medicaid physician payments for cleft lip and palate were, respectively, $588 and $646. From 2005 to 2006, 2007 to 2008, and 2009 to 2010, 41 percent, 43 percent, and 63 percent of patients, respectively, were enrolled in Medicaid. Cleft care generates substantial revenue for the hospital. For their mutual benefit, hospitals should join with their cleft teams to provide administrative support. Bolstered reimbursement figures, based on the overall value of cleft care to the hospital system, would better attract and retain skilled clinicians dedicated to cleft care. This may become particularly important if Medicaid enrollment continues to increase.

  19. 78 FR 45231 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-3280-FN] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality's (CIHQ's) Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS. ACTION: Final...

  20. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  1. 76 FR 78741 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Parts 402 and 403 [CMS-5060-P] RIN 0938-AR33 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to report annually to the Secretary certain payments or transfers... State plan under title XIX (Medicaid) or XXI of the Act (the Children's Health Insurance Program, or...

  2. Intergenerational enrollment and expenditure changes in Medicaid: trends from 1991 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Stephen W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From its inception, Medicaid was aimed at providing insurance coverage for low income children, elderly, and disabled. Since this time, children have become a smaller proportion of the US population and Medicaid has expanded to additional eligibility groups. We sought to evaluate relative growth in spending in the Medicaid program between children and adults from 1991-2005. We hypothesize that this shifting demographic will result in fewer resources being allocated to children in the Medicaid program. Methods We utilized retrospective enrollment and expenditure data for children, adults and the elderly from 1991 to 2005 for both Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program Medicaid expansion programs. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services using their Medicaid Statistical Information System. Results From 1991 to 2005, the number of enrollees increased by 83% to 58.7 million. This includes increases of 33% for children, 100% for adults and 50% for the elderly. Concurrently, total expenditures nationwide rose 150% to $273 billion. Expenditures for children increased from $23.4 to $65.7 billion, adults from $46.2 to $123.6 billion, and elderly from $39.2 to $71.3 billion. From 1999 to 2005, Medicaid spending on long-term care increased by 31% to $84.3 billion. Expenditures on the disabled grew by 61% to $119 billion. In total, the disabled account for 43% and long-term care 31%, of the total Medicaid budget. Conclusion Our study did not find an absolute decrease in the overall resources being directed toward children. However, increased spending on adults on a per-capita and absolute basis, particularly disabled adults, is responsible for much of the growth in spending over the past 15 years. Medicaid expenditures have grown faster than inflation and overall national health expenditures. A national strategy is needed to ensure adequate coverage for Medicaid recipients while dealing with the

  3. 78 FR 6275 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430...

  4. Improving access for Medicaid-insured children: focus on front-office personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M; Riedy, C A; Milgrom, P

    1999-03-01

    Access to dental services for low-income children is limited. Front-office personnel play a role regarding dentists' participation in the Medicaid program. Subjects (N = 24) represented general dental offices in Spokane County, Wash., and included participants and nonparticipants in the Access to Baby and Child Dentistry, or ABCD, program, a dental society/community program aimed at expanding dental services provided to Medicaid-insured children. The authors stratified the participants according to the number of claims their practices submitted to Medicaid for ABCD children: non-ABCD, low-ABCD and high-ABCD. Five two-hour focus group sessions were conducted to determine participants' beliefs about, attitudes toward and experiences in serving this population. The authors' data analysis consisted of a comprehensive content review of participants' responses from transcripted audiotapes. They synthesized frequently mentioned concepts and ideas into relevant themes. The major factors affecting practices' participation in Medicaid were office policy on seeing Medicaid-insured patients; staff members' personal connection to Medicaid-insured patients; staff members' attitudes about Medicaid-insured patients; and staff members' perceptions of Medicaid-insured patients' barriers to care. The data suggest that factors affecting dentists' participation in the Medicaid program are more complex than the often-stated dissatisfactions with low reimbursement fees and hassles with paperwork. Efforts to increase dentist participation in serving Medicaid-insured patients will continue to be relatively ineffective until many of the concerns raised by this study's subjects are better understood and addressed.

  5. Medicaid spending on contraceptive coverage and pregnancy-related care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective Up to 50% of pregnancies are unintended in the United States, and the healthcare costs associated with pregnancy are the most expensive among hospitalized conditions. The current study aims to assess Medicaid spending on various methods of contraception and on pregnancy care including unintended pregnancies. Methods We analyzed Medicaid health claims data from 2004 to 2010. Women 14–49 years of age initiating contraceptive methods and pregnant women were included as separate cohorts. Medicaid spending was summarized using mean all-cause and contraceptive healthcare payments per patient per month (PPPM) over a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Medicaid payments were also estimated in 2008 per female member of childbearing age per month (PFCPM) and per member per month (PMPM). Medicaid payments on unintended pregnancies were also evaluated PFCPM and PMPM in 2008. Results For short-acting reversible contraception (SARC) users, all-cause payments and contraceptive payments PPPM were respectively $365 and $18.3 for oral contraceptive (OC) users, $308 and $19.9 for transdermal users, $215 and $21.6 for vaginal ring users, and $410 and $8.8 for injectable users. For long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users (follow-up of 9–10 months), corresponding payments were $194 and $36.8 for IUD users, and $237 and $29.9 for implant users. Pregnancy cohort all-cause mean healthcare payments PPPM were $610. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives were $1.44 and $0.54, while corresponding costs of pregnancies were estimated at $39.91 and $14.81, respectively. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives represented a small fraction at 6.56% ($1.44/$21.95) and 6.63% ($0.54/$8.15), respectively of the estimated payments for unintended pregnancy. Conclusions This study of a large sample of Medicaid beneficiaries demonstrated that, over a follow-up period of 12 months, Medicaid payments for pregnancy were considerably higher than payments for either SARC or

  6. Use of the emergency department for less-urgent care among type 2 diabetics under a disease management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Leann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study analyzed the likelihood of less-urgent emergency department (ED visits among type 2 diabetic patients receiving care under a diabetes disease management (DM program offered by the Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (LSU HCSD. Methods All ED and outpatient clinic visits made by 6,412 type 2 diabetic patients from 1999 to 2006 were extracted from the LSU HCSD Disease Management (DM Evaluation Database. Patient ED visits were classified as either urgent or less-urgent, and the likelihood of a less-urgent ED visit was compared with outpatient clinic visits using the Generalized Estimating Equation methodology for binary response to time-dependent variables. Results Patients who adhered to regular clinic visit schedules dictated by the DM program were less likely to use the ED for less urgent care with odds ratio of 0.1585. Insured patients had 1.13 to 1.70 greater odds of a less-urgent ED visit than those who were uninsured. Patients with better-managed glycated hemoglobin (A1c or HbA1c levels were 82 times less likely to use less-urgent ED visits. Furthermore, being older, Caucasian, or a longer participant in the DM program had a modestly lower likelihood of less-urgent ED visits. The patient's Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI, gender, prior hospitalization, and the admitting facility showed no effect. Conclusion Patients adhering to the DM visit guidelines were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent problems. Maintaining normal A1c levels for their diabetes also has the positive impact to reduce less-urgent ED usages. It suggests that successful DM programs may reduce inappropriate ED use. In contrast to expectations, uninsured patients were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent care. Patients in the DM program with Medicaid coverage were 1.3 times more likely to seek care in the ED for non-emergencies while commercially insured patients were nearly 1.7 times more likely to do so. Further

  7. 78 FR 57857 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application from the Compliance Team for Initial CMS-Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-3287-PN] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application from the Compliance Team for Initial CMS-Approval of its Rural Health Clinic Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS. ACTION...

  8. The impact of changing medicaid enrollments on New Mexico's Immunization Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Schillaci

    Full Text Available Immunizations are an important component to pediatric primary care. New Mexico is a relatively poor and rural state which has sometimes struggled to achieve and maintain its childhood immunization rates. We evaluated New Mexico's immunization rates between 1996 and 2006. Specifically, we examined the increase in immunization rates between 2002 and 2004, and how this increase may have been associated with Medicaid enrollment levels, as opposed to changes in government policies concerning immunization practices.This study examines trends in childhood immunization coverage rates relative to Medicaid enrollment among those receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF in New Mexico. Information on health policy changes and immunization coverage was obtained from state governmental sources and the National Immunization Survey. We found statistically significant correlations varying from 0.86 to 0.93 between immunization rates and Medicaid enrollment.New Mexico's improvement and subsequent deterioration in immunization rates corresponded with changing Medicaid coverage, rather than the state's efforts to change immunization practices. Maintaining high Medicaid enrollment levels may be important for achieving high childhood immunization levels.

  9. The Impact of Changing Medicaid Enrollments on New Mexico's Immunization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Waitzkin, Howard; Sharmen, Tom; Romain, Sandra J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Immunizations are an important component to pediatric primary care. New Mexico is a relatively poor and rural state which has sometimes struggled to achieve and maintain its childhood immunization rates. We evaluated New Mexico's immunization rates between 1996 and 2006. Specifically, we examined the increase in immunization rates between 2002 and 2004, and how this increase may have been associated with Medicaid enrollment levels, as opposed to changes in government policies concerning immunization practices. Methods and Findings This study examines trends in childhood immunization coverage rates relative to Medicaid enrollment among those receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in New Mexico. Information on health policy changes and immunization coverage was obtained from state governmental sources and the National Immunization Survey. We found statistically significant correlations varying from 0.86 to 0.93 between immunization rates and Medicaid enrollment. Conclusions New Mexico's improvement and subsequent deterioration in immunization rates corresponded with changing Medicaid coverage, rather than the state's efforts to change immunization practices. Maintaining high Medicaid enrollment levels may be important for achieving high childhood immunization levels. PMID:19107189

  10. 76 FR 67801 - Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Furnished by Non-Physician Practitioners in the Assignment Process c. Assignment of Beneficiaries to ACOs... Insurance Program CMP Civil Monetary Penalties CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services CNM Certified... the current payment system by rewarding providers for delivering high quality, efficient clinical care...

  11. Effects of managed care on service use and access for publicly insured children with chronic health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Amy; Hill, Ian; Courtot, Brigette; Adams, Emerald

    2007-05-01

    Our goal was to estimate the effects of managed care program type on service use and access for publicly insured children with chronic health conditions. Data on Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program managed care programs were linked by county and year to pooled data from the 1997-2002 National Health Interview Survey. We used multivariate techniques to examine the effects of managed care program type, relative to fee-for-service, on a broad array of service use and access outcomes. Relative to fee-for-service, managed care program assignment was associated with selected reductions in service use but not with deterioration in reported access. Capitated managed care plans with mental health or specialty carve-outs were associated with a 7.4-percentage-point reduction in the probability of a specialist visit, a 6.3-percentage-point reduction in the probability of a mental health specialty visit, and a 5.9-percentage-point decrease in the probability of regular prescription drug use. Reductions in use associated with primary care case management and integrated capitated programs (without carve-outs) were more limited, and integrated capitated plans were associated with a reduction in unmet medical care need. We failed to find significant effects of special managed care programs for children with chronic health conditions. Managed care is associated with reduced service use, particularly when capitated programs carve out services. This finding is of key policy importance, as the proportion of children enrolled in plans with carve-out arrangements has been increasing over time. It is not possible to determine whether reductions in services represent better care management or skimping. However, despite the reductions in use, we did not observe a corresponding increase in perceived unmet need; thus, the net change may represent improved care management.

  12. Comparing the Affordable Care Act's Financial Impact on Safety-Net Hospitals in States That Expanded Medicaid and Those That Did Not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Allen; DaVanzo, Joan E; Haught, Randy; Phap-Hoa, Luu

    2017-11-01

    Safety-net hospitals play a vital role in delivering health care to Medicaid enrollees, the uninsured, and other vulnerable patients. By reducing the number of uninsured Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was also expected to lower these hospitals’ significant uncompensated care costs and shore up their financial stability. To examine how the ACA’s Medicaid expansion affected the financial status of safety-net hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid and in states that did not. Using Medicare hospital cost reports for federal fiscal years 2012 and 2015, the authors compared changes in Medicaid inpatient days as a percentage of total inpatient days, Medicaid revenues as a percentage of total net patient revenues, uncompensated care costs as a percentage of total operating costs, and hospital operating margins. Medicaid expansion had a significant, favorable financial impact on safety-net hospitals. From 2012 to 2015, safety-net hospitals in expansion states, compared to those in nonexpansion states, experienced larger increases in Medicaid inpatient days and Medicaid revenues as well as reduced uncompensated care costs. These changes improved operating margins for safety-net hospitals in expansion states. Margins for safety-net hospitals in nonexpansion states, meanwhile, declined.

  13. Medicaid. Will the public program neglect the poor to pay for the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, T

    1995-05-20

    If the policy-makers trying to fix Medicaid think they've thought of every angle, they should think about the situation of Peggy, a middle-class Illinois widow stricken with Alzheimer's disease, who's being forced to spend down her savings to get Medicaid coverage for her nursing home care. In fact, there are several million Peggys out there, and balancing their needs against those of the hard-core Medicaid poor may break a system that was never resource-blessed to begin with.

  14. German diabetes management programs improve quality of care and curb costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Stephanie; Drabik, Anna; Büscher, Guido; Graf, Christian; Ullrich, Walter; Gerber, Andreas; Lauterbach, Karl W; Lüngen, Markus

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a large-scale analysis of a nationwide disease management program in Germany for patients with diabetes mellitus. The German program differs markedly from "classic" disease management in the United States. Although it combines important hallmarks of vendor-based disease management and the Chronic Care Model, the German program is based in primary care practices and carried out by physicians, and it draws on their personal relationships with patients to promote adherence to treatment goals and self-management. After four years of follow-up, overall mortality for patients and drug and hospital costs were all significantly lower for patients who participated in the program compared to other insured patients with similar health profiles who were not in the program. These results suggest that the German disease management program is a successful strategy for improving chronic illness care.

  15. Changes in Payer Mix and Physician Reimbursement After the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christine D.; Scott, Serena J.; Anoff, Debra L.; Pierce, Read G.; Glasheen, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Although uncompensated care for hospital-based care has fallen dramatically since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, the changes in hospital physician reimbursement are not known. We evaluated if payer mix and physician reimbursement by encounter changed between 2013 and 2014 in an academic hospitalist practice in a Medicaid expansion state. This was a retrospective cohort study of all general medicine inpatient admissions to an academic hospitalist group in 2013 and 2014. The proportion of encounters by payer and reimbursement/inpatient encounter were compared in 2013 versus 2014. A sensitivity analysis determined the relative contribution of different factors to the change in reimbursement/encounter. Among 37 540 and 40 397 general medicine inpatient encounters in 2013 and 2014, respectively, Medicaid encounters increased (17.3% to 30.0%, P reimbursement/encounter increased 4.2% from $79.98/encounter in 2013 to $83.36/encounter in 2014 (P reimbursement for encounter type by payer accounted for −0.7%, 0.8%, 2.0%, and 2.3% of the reimbursement change, respectively. From 2013 to 2014, Medicaid encounters increased, and uninsured and private payer encounters decreased within our hospitalist practice. Reimbursement/encounter also increased, much of which could be attributed to a change in payer mix. Further analyses of physician reimbursement in Medicaid expansion and non-expansion states would further delineate reimbursement changes that are directly attributable to Medicaid expansion. PMID:26310500

  16. The effect of pay-for-performance in nursing homes: evidence from state Medicaid programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting-the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. 2001-2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Association of an Asthma Improvement Collaborative With Health Care Utilization in Medicaid-Insured Pediatric Patients in an Urban Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercsmar, Carolyn M; Beck, Andrew F; Sauers-Ford, Hadley; Simmons, Jeffrey; Wiener, Brandy; Crosby, Lisa; Wade-Murphy, Susan; Schoettker, Pamela J; Chundi, Pavan K; Samaan, Zeina; Mansour, Mona

    2017-11-01

    month by June 30, 2014, a 42.4% (95% CI, 42.2%-42.6%) relative reduction. Improvements were sustained for the subsequent 12 months. The proportion of patients who were rehospitalized or had a return ED visit for asthma within 30 days of an index hospitalization was reduced from 12% to 7%. The proportion of patients with documented well-controlled asthma in this study's primary care population increased from 48% to 54%. An integrated, multilevel approach focused on enhancing availability and accessibility of treatments, removing barriers to adherence, mitigating multidomain risks, augmenting self-management, and creating a collaborative relationship between the family and the health care system was associated with improved asthma outcomes for a population of Medicaid-insured pediatric patients. Similar models used in accountable care organizations or across patient panels and with other chronic conditions could be feasible and warrant evaluation.

  18. 75 FR 5599 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Applications From Hospitals Requesting Waiver for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-1341-NC] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Applications From Hospitals Requesting Waiver for Organ Procurement Service Area AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with...

  19. 78 FR 41013 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 431 [CMS-1450-CN] RIN 0938-AR52 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate... period titled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY...

  20. 77 FR 11677 - Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 431 Department of the Treasury 31 CFR Part 33 Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 155 Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for... Regulations#0;#0; [[Page 11678

  1. Social Effects of Health Care Reform: Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act and changes in Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Heeju; Timmermans, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Do public health policy interventions result in pro-social behaviors? The Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s Medicaid expansions were responsible for the largest gains in public insurance coverage since its inception in 1965. These gains were concentrated in states that opted to expand Medicaid eligibility and provide a unique opportunity to study not just medical but also social consequences of increased public health coverage. This article examines the association between Medicaid and volunteer work. Volunteerism is implicated in individuals’ health and well-being yet it is highly correlated with a person’s existing socioeconomic resources. Medicaid expansions improved financial security and a sense of health—two factors that predict volunteer work—for a socioeconomic group that has had low levels of volunteerism. Difference-in-difference analyses of the Volunteer Supplement of the Current Population Survey (2010–2015) find increased reports of formal volunteering for organizations as well as informal helping behaviors between neighbors for low-income non-elderly adults who would have likely benefited from expansions. Furthermore, increased volunteer work associated with Medicaid was greater among minority groups and narrowed existing ethnic differences in volunteerism in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility. PMID:29142907

  2. Differences in Health Care Needs, Health Care Utilization, and Health Care Outcomes Among Children With Special Health Care Needs in Ohio: A Comparative Analysis Between Medicaid and Private Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Madhurima; Earley, Elizabeth R; Asti, Lindsey; Chisolm, Deena J

    This study explores comparative differentials in health care needs, health care utilization, and health status between Medicaid and private/employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) among a statewide population of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) in Ohio. We used data from the 2012 Ohio Medicaid Assessment Survey to examine CSHCN's health care needs, utilization, status, and health outcomes by insurance type. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations between public and private health insurance, as well as the utilization and health outcome variables. Bivariate analyses indicate that the Medicaid population had higher care coordination needs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.2) as well as need for mental/educational health care services (OR = 1.5; 95% CI; 1.1-2.0). They also reported higher unmet dental care needs (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0), higher emergency department (ED) utilization (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.2), and worse overall health (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.7), oral health (OR = 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5), and vision health (OR = 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6). After controlling for demographic variables, CSHCN with Medicaid insurance coverage were more likely to need mental health and education services (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.8; 95% CI; 1.2-2.6), had significantly more ED visits (AOR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5-3.5), and were less likely to have excellent overall health (AOR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9), oral health (AOR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7), and vision health (AOR = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6) than those with private insurance/ESI. The CSHCN population is a highly vulnerable population. While Ohio's Medicaid provides greater coverage to CSHCN, disparities continue to exist within access and services that Medicaid provides versus the ones provided by private insurance/ESI.

  3. 75 FR 63480 - Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 for Adjustments to the Federal Medical... section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law... Medicaid program and required by Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act...

  4. Large Disparities in Receipt of Glaucoma Care between Enrollees in Medicaid and Those with Commercial Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Angela R; Andrews, Chris; Musch, David C; Lee, Paul P; Stein, Joshua D

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether the type of health insurance a patient possesses and a patient's race/ethnicity affect receipt of common tests to monitor open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Retrospective longitudinal cohort study. A total of 21 766 persons aged ≥40 years with newly diagnosed OAG between 2007 and 2011 enrolled in Medicaid or a large United States managed care network. We determined the proportion of patients with newly diagnosed OAG who underwent visual field (VF) testing, fundus photography (FP), other ocular imaging (OOI), or none of these tests within the first 15 months after initial OAG diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the extent by which health insurance type and race/ethnicity affected the odds of undergoing glaucoma testing. Odds ratios (OR) of undergoing VF testing, FP, OOI, or none of these tests in the 15 months after initial OAG diagnosis with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 18 372 persons with commercial health insurance and 3394 Medicaid recipients met the study inclusion criteria. The proportions of persons with commercial health insurance with newly diagnosed OAG who underwent VF, FP, and OOI were 63%, 22%, and 54%, respectively, whereas the proportions were 35%, 19%, and 30%, respectively, for Medicaid recipients. Compared with those with commercial health insurance, Medicaid recipients were 234% more likely to not receive any glaucoma testing in the 15 months after initial diagnosis (OR = 3.34; 95% CI, 3.07-3.63). After adjustment for confounders, whites with OAG enrolled in Medicaid had 198% higher odds of receiving no glaucoma testing compared with whites possessing commercial health insurance (OR = 2.98; 95% CI, 2.66-3.33). Blacks with Medicaid insurance demonstrated 291% higher odds (OR = 3.91; 95% CI, 3.40-4.49) of not receiving any glaucoma testing compared with blacks with commercial health insurance. Irrespective of race/ethnicity, Medicaid recipients with OAG are receiving substantially less

  5. Discontinuity of Medicaid Coverage: Impact on Cost and Utilization Among Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries With Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xu; Wilk, Adam S; Druss, Benjamin G; Lally, Cathy; Cummings, Janet R

    2017-08-01

    Gaps in Medicaid coverage may disrupt access to and continuity of care. This can be detrimental for beneficiaries with chronic conditions, such as major depression, for whom disruptions in access to outpatient care may lead to increased use of acute care. However, little is known about how Medicaid coverage discontinuities impact acute care utilization among adults with depression. Examine the relationship between Medicaid discontinuities and service utilization among adults with major depression. A total of 139,164 adults (18-64) with major depression was identified using the 2003-2004 Medicaid Analytic eXtract Files. We used generalized linear and two-part models to examine the effect of Medicaid discontinuity on service utilization. To establish causality in this relationship, we used instrumental variables analysis, relying on exogenous variation in a state-level policy for identification. Emergency department (ED) visits, inpatient episodes, inpatient days, and Medicaid-reimbursed costs. Approximately 29.4% of beneficiaries experienced coverage disruptions. In instrumental variables models, those with coverage disruptions incurred an increase of $650 in acute care costs per-person per Medicaid-covered month compared with those with continuous coverage, evidenced by an increase in ED use (0.1 more ED visits per-person-month) and inpatient days (0.6 more days per-person-month). The increase in acute costs contributed to an overall increase in all-cause costs by $310 per-person-month (all P-valuesMedicaid coverage may help prevent acute episodes requiring high-cost interventions.

  6. MEDICAID: HCFA Reversed Its Position and Approved Additional State Financing Schemes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    States have been searching for ways to help finance the $196 billion Medicaid program, a jointly funded federal-state program providing health care services to certain low-income, elderly, and disabled people...

  7. The Medicaid Rebate: Changes in Oncology Drug Prices After the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar Tehrani, Ali; Carroll, Norman V

    2017-08-01

    Prescription drug spending is a significant component of Medicaid total expenditures. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a provision that increases the Medicaid rebate for both brand-name and generic drugs. This study examines the extent to which oncology drug prices changed after the increase in the Medicaid rebate in 2010. A pre-post study design was used to evaluate the correlation between the Medicaid rebate increase and oncology drug prices after 2010 using 2006-2013 State Drug Utilization Data. The results show that the average annual price of top-selling cancer drugs in 2006, adjusted for inflation and secular changes in drug prices, have increased by US$154 and US$235 for branded and competitive brand drugs, respectively, following the 2010 ACA; however, generic oncology drug prices showed no significant changes. The findings from this study indicate that oncology drug prices have increased after the 2010 ACA, and suggest that pharmaceutical companies may have increased their drug prices to offset increases in Medicaid rebates.

  8. CMS Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, Electronic Health Record Products Used for Attestation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Data set merges information about the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs attestations with the Office of the...

  9. Medicaid management information systems performance standards: Health Care Financing Administration. Notice with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    This notice contains performance standards (review elements and factors). We are required by section 1903(r)(6)(E) of the Social Security Act to notify all States of proposed procedures, standards, and other requirements at least one quarter prior to the fiscal year in which the procedures, standards, and other requirements will be used for Medicaid Management Information Systems reapproval reviews. This Notice meets that statutory requirements. By October 1, 1981, we will use the performance standards and existing systems requirements when conducting the annual review of State system performance.

  10. Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform: Interviews with Medicaid Officials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Benjamin D; Arntson, Emily; Kenney, Genevieve M; Epstein, Arnold M

    2013-01-01

    Background The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expands Medicaid in 2014 in participating states. Meanwhile, six states have already expanded Medicaid since 2010 to some or all of the low-income adults targeted under health reform. We undertook an in-depth exploration of these six “early-expander” states—California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Washington—through interviews with high-ranking Medicaid officials. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 high-ranking Medicaid officials in six states and analyzed the interviews using qualitative methods. Interviews explored enrollment outreach, stakeholder involvement, impact on beneficiaries, utilization and costs, implementation challenges, and potential lessons for 2014. Two investigators independently analyzed interview transcripts and iteratively refined the codebook until reaching consensus. Results We identified several themes. First, these expansions built upon pre-existing state-funded insurance programs for the poor. Second, predictions about costs and enrollment were challenging, indicating the uncertainty in projections for 2014. Other themes included greater than anticipated need for behavioral health services in the expansion population, administrative challenges of expansions, and persistent barriers to enrollment and access after expanding eligibility—though officials overall felt the expansions increased access for beneficiaries. Finally, political context—support or opposition from stakeholders and voters—plays a critical role in shaping the success of Medicaid expansions. Conclusions Early Medicaid expansions under the ACA offer important lessons to federal and state policymakers as the 2014 expansions approach. While the context of each state’s expansion is unique, key shared experiences were significant implementation challenges and opportunities for expanding access to needed services. PMID:24834369

  11. Vaccination benefits and cost-sharing policy for non-institutionalized adult Medicaid enrollees in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Alexandra M.; Lindley, Megan C.; Chang, Kristen H.M.; Cox, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Medicaid is the largest funding source of health services for the poorest people in the United States. Medicaid enrollees have greater health care, needs, and higher health risks than other individuals in the country and, experience disproportionately low rates of preventive care. Without, Medicaid coverage, poor uninsured adults may not be vaccinated or would, rely on publicly-funded programs that provide vaccinations. We examined each programs’ policies related to benefit coverage and, copa...

  12. The affordable care ACT on loyalty programs for federal beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentino, Justin J; Williams, Karl G

    2014-02-01

    To discuss changes in the law that allow community pharmacy loyalty programs to include and offer incentives to Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. The retailer rewards exception of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and its change to the definition of remuneration in the civil monetary penalties of the Anti-Kickback Statute now allow incentives to be earned on federal benefit tied prescription out-of-pocket costs. The criteria required to design a compliant loyalty program are discussed. Community pharmacies can now include Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries in compliant customer loyalty programs, where allowed by state law. There is a need for research directly on the influence of loyalty programs and nominal incentives on adherence.

  13. Key Design Considerations When Calculating Cost Savings for Population Health Management Programs in an Observational Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shannon M E; Hough, Douglas E; Sylvia, Martha L; Dunbar, Linda J; Frick, Kevin D

    2018-02-08

    To illustrate the impact of key quasi-experimental design elements on cost savings measurement for population health management (PHM) programs. Population health management program records and Medicaid claims and enrollment data from December 2011 through March 2016. The study uses a difference-in-difference design to compare changes in cost and utilization outcomes between program participants and propensity score-matched nonparticipants. Comparisons of measured savings are made based on (1) stable versus dynamic population enrollment and (2) all eligible versus enrolled-only participant definitions. Options for the operationalization of time are also discussed. Individual-level Medicaid administrative and claims data and PHM program records are used to match study groups on baseline risk factors and assess changes in costs and utilization. Savings estimates are statistically similar but smaller in magnitude when eliminating variability based on duration of population enrollment and when evaluating program impact on the entire target population. Measurement in calendar time, when possible, simplifies interpretability. Program evaluation design elements, including population stability and participant definitions, can influence the estimated magnitude of program savings for the payer and should be considered carefully. Time specifications can also affect interpretability and usefulness. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. The Impact of Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payment on Provision of Hospital Uncompensated Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-Min; Bazzoli, Gloria J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the association between hospital uncompensated care (UC) and reductions in Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments resulting from the 1997 Balanced Budget Act. Data on California hospitals from 1996 to 2003 were examined using two-stage least squares with a first-differencing model to control for potential feedback effects. Our findings suggest that not-for-profit hospitals did reduce UC provision in response to reductions in Medicaid DSH, but the response was inelastic in value. Policy makers need to continue to monitor how UC changes as sources of support for indigent care change with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). PMID:23230705

  15. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  16. Development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Krouse, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality of life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies. PMID:23104143

  17. What Do High-Risk Patients Value? Perspectives on a Care Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Ishani; Orav, E John; Weil, Eric; Ferris, Timothy G; Vogeli, Christine

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in coordinating care for high-risk patients through care management programs despite inconsistent results on cost reduction. Early evidence suggests patient-centered benefits, but we know little about how participants engage with the programs and what aspects they value. To explore care management program participants' awareness and perceived utility of program offerings. Cross-sectional telephone survey administered December 2015-January 2016. Patients enrolled in a Boston-area primary care-based care management program. Our main outcome was the number of topics in which patients reported having "very helpful" interactions with their care team in the past year. We analyzed awareness of one's care manager as an intermediate outcome, and then as a primary predictor of the main outcome, along with patient demographics, years in the program, attitudes, and worries as secondary predictors. The survey response rate was 45.8% (n = 1220); non-respondents were similar to respondents. More respondents reported worrying about family (72.8%) or financial issues (52.5%) than about their own health (41.6%). Seventy-four percent reported care manager awareness, particularly women (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.77) and those with more years in the program (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03-1.30). While interaction rates ranged from 19.8% to 72.4% across topics, 81.3% rated at least one interaction as very helpful. Those who were aware of their care manager reported very helpful interactions on more topics (OR 2.77, 95% CI 2.15-3.56), as did women (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.00-1.55), younger respondents (OR 0.98 for older age, 95% CI 0.97-0.99), and those with higher risk scores (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.06), preference for deferring treatment decisions to doctors (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.60-2.50), and reported control over their health (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.33-2.10). High-risk patients reported helpful interactions with their care team around medical and social determinants of health

  18. MEDICAID and SCHIP: Recent HHS Approvals of Demonstration Waiver Projects Raise Concerns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    States provide health care coverage to about 40 million low-income uninsured adults and children largely through two federal-state programs-Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP...

  19. Using time-series intervention analysis to understand U.S. Medicaid expenditures on antidepressant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Yann; Kelton, Christina M L; Guo, Jeff J; Levy, Martin S; Yu, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Medicaid programs' spending on antidepressants increased from $159 million in 1991 to $2 billion in 2005. The National Institute for Health Care Management attributed this expenditure growth to increases in drug utilization, entry of newer higher-priced antidepressants, and greater prescription drug insurance coverage. Rising enrollment in Medicaid has also contributed to this expenditure growth. This research examines the impact of specific events, including branded-drug and generic entry, a black box warning, direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA), and new indication approval, on Medicaid spending on antidepressants. Using quarterly expenditure data for 1991-2005 from the national Medicaid pharmacy claims database maintained by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a time-series autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) intervention analysis was performed on 6 specific antidepressant drugs and on overall antidepressant spending. Twenty-nine potentially relevant interventions and their dates of occurrence were identified from the literature. Each was tested for an impact on the time series. Forecasts from the models were compared with a holdout sample of actual expenditure data. Interventions with significant impacts on Medicaid expenditures included the patent expiration of Prozac® (P0.05), implying that the expanding market for antidepressants overwhelmed the effect of generic competition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 98 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-1456-NC] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for Organ Procurement Service Area AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with...

  1. 77 FR 51539 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-1452-NC] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for Organ Procurement Service Area AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with...

  2. 78 FR 19269 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-1457-NC] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for Organ Procurement Service Area AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice with...

  3. 75 FR 16149 - Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-April 26, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-2312-N] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-- April 26, 2010 AGENCIES: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of...

  4. 78 FR 26038 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-January Through March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... general questions concerning each of the addenda published in this notice. [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED... Medicaid beneficiaries, health care providers, and the public; and (2) maintaining effective communications... 26040

  5. Utilization of smoking cessation medication benefits among medicaid fee-for-service enrollees 1999-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Kahende

    Full Text Available To assess state coverage and utilization of Medicaid smoking cessation medication benefits among fee-for-service enrollees who smoked cigarettes.We used the linked National Health Interview Survey (survey years 1995, 1997-2005 and the Medicaid Analytic eXtract files (1999-2008 to assess utilization of smoking cessation medication benefits among 5,982 cigarette smokers aged 18-64 years enrolled in Medicaid fee-for-service whose state Medicaid insurance covered at least one cessation medication. We excluded visits during pregnancy, and those covered by managed care or under dual enrollment (Medicaid and Medicare. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine correlates of cessation medication benefit utilization among Medicaid fee-for-service enrollees, including measures of drug coverage (comprehensive cessation medication coverage, number of medications in state benefit, varenicline coverage, individual-level demographics at NHIS interview, age at Medicaid enrollment, and state-level cigarette excise taxes, statewide smoke-free laws, and per-capita tobacco control funding.In 1999, the percent of smokers with ≥1 medication claims was 5.7% in the 30 states that covered at least one Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved cessation medication; this increased to 9.9% in 2008 in the 44 states that covered at least one FDA-approved medication (p<0.01. Cessation medication utilization was greater among older individuals (≥ 25 years, females, non-Hispanic whites, and those with higher educational attainment. Comprehensive coverage, the number of smoking cessation medications covered and varenicline coverage were all positively associated with utilization; cigarette excise tax and per-capita tobacco control funding were also positively associated with utilization.Utilization of medication benefits among fee-for-service Medicaid enrollees increased from 1999-2008 and varied by individual and state-level characteristics. Given that the

  6. ACE Inhibitor and ARB utilization and expenditures in the Medicaid fee-for-service program from 1991 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Boyang; Kelton, Christina M L; Guo, Jeff J; Wigle, Patricia R

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of hypertension and heart failure, as well as for kidney disease prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus and the management of patients after myocardial infarction. To (a) describe ACE inhibitor and ARB utilization and spending in the Medicaid fee-for-service program from 1991 through 2008, and (b) estimate the potential cost savings for the collective Medicaid programs from a higher ratio of generic ACE inhibitor utilization. A retrospective, descriptive analysis was performed using the National Summary Files from the Medicaid State Drug Utilization Data, which are composed of pharmacy claims that are subject to federally mandated rebates from pharmaceutical manufacturers. For the years 1991-2008, quarterly claim counts and expenditures were calculated by summing data for individual ACE inhibitors and ARBs. Quarterly per-claim expenditure as a proxy for drug price was computed for all brand and generic drugs. Market shares were calculated based on the number of pharmacy claims and Medicaid expenditures. In the Medicaid fee-for-service program, ACE inhibitors accounted for 100% of the claims in the combined market for ACE inhibitors and ARBs in 1991, 80.6% in 2000, and 64.7% in 2008. The Medicaid expenditure per ACE inhibitor claim dropped from $37.24 in 1991 to $24.03 in 2008 when generics accounted for 92.5% of ACE inhibitor claims; after adjusting for inflation for the period from 1991 to 2008, the real price drop was 59.2%. Brand ACE inhibitors accounted for only 7.5% of the claims in 2008 for all ACE inhibitors but 32.1% of spending; excluding the effects of manufacturer rebates, Medicaid spending would have been reduced by $28.7 million (9%) in 2008 if all ACE inhibitor claims were generic. The average price per ACE inhibitor claim in 2008 was $24.03 ($17.64 per generic claim vs. $103.45 per brand claim) versus $81.98 per ARB

  7. Modeling the determinants of Medicaid home care payments for children with special health care needs: A structural equation model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Omolola E; Zhang, Yichen; Phillips, Charles D

    2014-10-01

    The management of children with special needs can be very challenging and expensive. To examine direct and indirect cost drivers of home care expenditures for this vulnerable and expensive population. We retrospectively assessed secondary data on children, ages 4-20, receiving Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) (n = 2760). A structural equation model assessed direct and indirect effects of several child characteristics, clinical conditions and functional measures on Medicaid home care payments. The mean age of children was 12.1 years and approximately 60% were female. Almost half of all subjects reported mild, moderate or severe ID diagnosis. The mean ADL score was 5.27 and about 60% of subjects received some type of rehabilitation services. Caseworkers authorized an average of 25.5 h of PCS support per week. The SEM revealed three groups of costs drivers: indirect, direct and direct + indirect. Cognitive problems, health impairments, and age affect expenditures, but they operate completely through other variables. Other elements accumulate effects (externalizing behaviors, PCS hours, and rehabilitation) and send them on a single path to the dependent variable. A few elements exhibit a relatively complex position in the model by having both significant direct and indirect effects on home care expenditures - medical conditions, intellectual disability, region, and ADL function. The most important drivers of home care expenditures are variables that have both meaningful direct and indirect effects. The only one of these factors that may be within the sphere of policy change is the difference among costs in different regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 67153 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-July Through September 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... to answer general questions concerning each of the addenda published in this notice. [GRAPHIC] [TIFF... Medicaid beneficiaries, health care providers, and the public; and (2) maintaining effective communications... [[Page 67155

  9. Assessing Antiretroviral Use During Gaps in HIV Primary Care Using Multisite Medicaid Claims and Clinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Anne K; Fleishman, John A; Voss, Cindy C; Keruly, Jeanne C; Nijhawan, Ank E; Agwu, Allison L; Aberg, Judith A; Rutstein, Richard M; Moore, Richard D; Gebo, Kelly A

    2017-09-01

    Some individuals who appear poorly retained by clinic visit-based retention measures are using antiretroviral therapy (ART) and maintaining viral suppression. We examined whether individuals with a gap in HIV primary care (≥180 days between HIV outpatient clinic visits) obtained ART during that gap after 180 days. HIV Research Network data from 5 sites and Medicaid Analytic Extract eligibility and pharmacy data were combined. Factors associated with having both an HIV primary care gap and a new (ie, nonrefill) ART prescription during a gap were evaluated with multinomial logistic regression. Of 6892 HIV Research Network patients, 6196 (90%) were linked to Medicaid data, and 4275 had any Medicaid ART prescription. Over half (54%) had occasional gaps in HIV primary care. Women, older people, and those with suppressed viral load were less likely to have a gap. Among those with occasional gaps (n = 2282), 51% received a new ART prescription in a gap. Viral load suppression before gap was associated with receiving a new ART prescription in a gap (odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.57 to 2.32), as was number of days in a gap (odds ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.02 to 1.05), and the proportion of months in the gap enrolled in Medicaid. Medicaid-insured individuals commonly receive ART during gaps in HIV primary care, but almost half do not. Retention measures based on visit frequency data that do not incorporate receipt of ART and/or viral suppression may misclassify individuals who remain suppressed on ART as not retained.

  10. 77 FR 31499 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430, 433, 447, and 457 [CMS-2292-F] RIN 0938-AQ32 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) disallowance process to allow States the option to retain...

  11. Changes in Payer Mix and Physician Reimbursement After the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D. Jones MD, MS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although uncompensated care for hospital-based care has fallen dramatically since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, the changes in hospital physician reimbursement are not known. We evaluated if payer mix and physician reimbursement by encounter changed between 2013 and 2014 in an academic hospitalist practice in a Medicaid expansion state. This was a retrospective cohort study of all general medicine inpatient admissions to an academic hospitalist group in 2013 and 2014. The proportion of encounters by payer and reimbursement/inpatient encounter were compared in 2013 versus 2014. A sensitivity analysis determined the relative contribution of different factors to the change in reimbursement/encounter. Among 37 540 and 40 397 general medicine inpatient encounters in 2013 and 2014, respectively, Medicaid encounters increased (17.3% to 30.0%, P < .001, uninsured encounters decreased (18.4% to 6.3%, P < 0.001, and private payer encounters also decreased (14.1% to 13.3%, P = .001. The median reimbursement/encounter increased 4.2% from $79.98/encounter in 2013 to $83.36/encounter in 2014 (P < .001. In a sensitivity analysis, changes in length of stay, proportions in encounter type by payer, payer mix, and reimbursement for encounter type by payer accounted for −0.7%, 0.8%, 2.0%, and 2.3% of the reimbursement change, respectively. From 2013 to 2014, Medicaid encounters increased, and uninsured and private payer encounters decreased within our hospitalist practice. Reimbursement/encounter also increased, much of which could be attributed to a change in payer mix. Further analyses of physician reimbursement in Medicaid expansion and non-expansion states would further delineate reimbursement changes that are directly attributable to Medicaid expansion.

  12. Stakeholder assessment of comparative effectiveness research needs for Medicaid populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael A; Allen-Coleman, Cora; Farrell, Stephen F; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Patients, providers and policy-makers rely heavily on comparative effectiveness research (CER) when making complex, real-world medical decisions. In particular, Medicaid providers and policy-makers face unique challenges in decision-making because their program cares for traditionally underserved populations, especially children, pregnant women and people with mental illness. Because these patient populations have generally been underrepresented in research discussions, CER questions for these groups may be understudied. To address this problem, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality commissioned our team to work with Medicaid Medical Directors and other stakeholders to identify relevant CER questions. Through an iterative process of topic identification and refinement, we developed relevant, feasible and actionable questions based on issues affecting Medicaid programs nationwide. We describe challenges and limitations and provide recommendations for future stakeholder engagement. PMID:26388438

  13. In the Belly of the Beast: A Case Study of Social Work in a Managed Care Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa S. Patchner

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The employment of social workers within managed care organizations is a new phenomenon. As such, this case study utilized an exploratory-descriptive design that assessed social workers as case managers within a Medicaid HMO. The semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and participant observation suggested that the use of case management services, delivered primarily by social workers,was effective in addressing the bio-psychosocial needs of Medicaid consumers within a provider-driven HMO. Study findings recommend specific knowledge and skills that social workers need in order to prepare for practice within managed care environments.

  14. Primary care program improves reimbursement. The Federally Qualified Health Center program helps hospitals improve services to the medically indigent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, T M; Gallitano, D G

    1993-03-01

    Under a program created by Congress in 1989, certain primary care treatment centers serving the medically and economically indigent can become Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). Recently enacted rules and regulations allow participants in the FQHC program to receive 100 percent reasonable cost reimbursement for Medicaid services and 80 percent for Medicare services. An all-inclusive annual cost report is the basis for determining reimbursement rates. The report factors in such expenses as physician and other healthcare and professional salaries and benefits, medical supplies, certain equipment depreciation, and overhead for facility and administrative costs. Both Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement is based on an encounter rate, and states employ various methodologies to determine the reimbursement level. In Illinois, for example, typical reimbursement for a qualified encounter ranges from $70 to $88. To obtain FQHC status, an organization must demonstrate community need, deliver the appropriate range of healthcare services, satisfy management and finance requirements, and function under a community-based governing board. In addition, an FQHC must provide primary healthcare by physicians and (where appropriate) midlevel practitioners; it must also offer its community diagnostic laboratory and x-ray services, preventive healthcare and dental care, case management, pharmacy services, and arrangements for emergency services. Because FQHCs must be freestanding facilities, establishing them can trigger a number of ancillary legal issues, such as those involved in forming a new corporation, complying with not-for-profit corporation regulations, applying for tax-exempt status, and applying for various property and sales tax exemptions. Hospitals that establish FQHCs must also be prepared to relinquish direct control over the delivery of primary care services.

  15. Patient-centered medical homes in Louisiana had minimal impact on Medicaid population's use of acute care and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Evan S; Campbell, Claudia; Diana, Mark L; Webber, Larry; Culbertson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home model of primary care has received considerable attention for its potential to improve outcomes and reduce health care costs. Yet little information exists about the model's ability to achieve these goals for Medicaid patients. We sought to evaluate the effect of patient-centered medical home certification of Louisiana primary care clinics on the quality and cost of care over time for a Medicaid population. We used a quasi-experimental pre-post design with a matched control group to assess the effect of medical home certification on outcomes. We found no impact on acute care use and modest support for reduced costs and primary care use among medical homes serving higher proportions of chronically ill patients. These findings provide preliminary results related to the ability of the patient-centered medical home model to improve outcomes for Medicaid beneficiaries. The findings support a case-mix-adjusted payment policy for medical homes going forward. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Payments and Utilization of Immunization Services Among Children Enrolled in Fee-for-Service Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association between state Medicaid vaccine administration fees and children's receipt of immunization services. The study used the 2008-2012 Medicaid Analytic eXtract data and included children aged 0-17 years and continuously enrolled in a Medicaid fee-for-service plan in each study year. Analyses were restricted to 8 states with a Medicaid managed-care penetration rate Medicaid vaccine administration fees, age group, sex, race/ethnicity, state unemployment rate, state managed-care penetration rate, and state and year-fixed effects. A total of 1,678,288 children were included. In 2008-2012, the average proportion of children making ≥1 vaccination visit per year was 31% and the mean number of vaccination visits was 0.9. State Medicaid reimbursements for vaccine administration was positively associated with immunization service utilization; for every $1 increase in the payment amount, the probability of children making ≥1 vaccination visit increased by 0.72 percentage point (95% confidence interval, 0.23-1.21; P=0.01), representing a 2% increase from the mean and the number of vaccination visits increased by 0.03 (95% confidence interval, -0.00 to 0.06; PMedicaid reimbursements for vaccine administration were associated with increased proportion of children receiving immunization services.

  17. Understanding the recent growth in Medicaid spending, 2000-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, John; Ghosh, Arunabh

    2005-01-01

    Growth in Medicaid spending averaged 10.2 percent per year between 2000 and 2003, resulting in a one-third increase in program spending. Spending growth was lower from 2002 to 2003 because of slower growth in enrollment and in spending per enrollee, particularly for acute care services, and declines in disproportionate-share hospital (DSH) payments and upper payment limit (UPL) programs. For the entire 2000-2003 period, Medicaid spending increases were largely driven by enrollment growth, much of which was attributable to the economic downturn. Increases in spending per enrollee over the period were faster than inflation but slower than increases in private insurance spending.

  18. The Effects of State Medicaid Expansion on Low-Income Individuals' Access to Health Care: Multilevel Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunha; Lee, Sungkyu; Matejkowski, Jason

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to examine how states' Medicaid expansion affected insurance status and access to health care among low-income expansion state residents in 2015, the second year of the expansion. Data from the 2012 and 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were linked to state-level data. A nationally representative sample of 544,307 adults (ages 26-64 years) from 50 states and Washington, DC were analyzed using multilevel modeling. The results indicate substantial increases in health care access between 2012 and 2015 among low-income adults in Medicaid expansion states. The final conditional multilevel models with low-income adults who had income at or below 138% of the poverty line indicate that, after controlling for individual- and state-level covariates, those who resided in the Medicaid expansion states were more likely to have health insurance (OR = 1.97, P income residents in non-expansion states in 2015. Moreover, the significant interaction terms indicate that adults living in non-expansion states with income below 100% of the poverty line are the most vulnerable compared with their counterparts in expansion states and with those with income between 100%-138% of the poverty line. This study demonstrates that state-level Medicaid expansion improved health care access among low-income US residents. However, residents with income below 100% of the poverty line in non-expansion states were disproportionately negatively affected by states' decision to not expand Medicaid coverage.

  19. Effect of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid Expansion on Emergency Department Visits: Evidence From State-Level Emergency Department Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikpay, Sayeh; Freedman, Seth; Levy, Helen; Buchmueller, Tom

    2017-08-01

    We assess whether the expansion of Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) results in changes in emergency department (ED) visits or ED payer mix. We also test whether the size of the change in ED visits depends on the change in the size of the Medicaid population. Using all-capture, longitudinal, state data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Fast Stats program, we implemented a difference-in-difference analysis, which compared changes in ED visits per capita and the share of ED visits by payer (Medicaid, uninsured, and private insurance) in 14 states that did and 11 states that did not expand Medicaid in 2014. Analyses controlled for state-level demographic and economic characteristics. We found that total ED use per 1,000 population increased by 2.5 visits more in Medicaid expansion states than in nonexpansion states after 2014 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 3.9). Among the visit types that could be measured, increases in ED visits were largest for injury-related visits and for states with the largest changes in Medicaid enrollment. Compared with nonexpansion states, in expansion states the share of ED visits covered by Medicaid increased 8.8 percentage points (95% CI 5.0 to 12.6), whereas the uninsured share decreased by 5.3 percentage points (95% CI -1.7 to -8.9). The ACA's Medicaid expansion has resulted in changes in payer mix. Contrary to other studies of the ACA's effect on ED visits, our study found that the expansion also increased use of the ED, consistent with polls of emergency physicians. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... develop and test innovative health care payment and service delivery models that show promise of reducing... test innovative payment and service delivery models that reduce spending under Medicare, Medicaid or...] Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for...

  1. Medicaid Waivers and Public Sector Mental Health Service Penetration Rates for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaf, Genevieve; Snowden, Lonnie

    2018-01-22

    To assist families of youth with serious emotional disturbance in financing youth's comprehensive care, some states have sought and received Medicaid waivers. Medicaid waivers waive or relax the Medicaid means test for eligibility to provide insurance coverage to nonpoor families for expensive, otherwise out-of-reach treatment for youth with Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED). Waivers promote treatment access for the most troubled youth, and the present study investigated whether any of several Medicaid waiver options-and those that completely omit the means test in particular-are associated with higher state-wide public sector treatment penetration rates. The investigators obtained data from the U.S. Census, SAMHSA's Uniform Reporting System, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Analysis employed random intercept and random slope linear regression models, controlling for a variety of state demographic and fiscal variables, to determine whether a relationship between Medicaid waiver policies and state-level public sector penetration rates could be observed. Findings indicate that, whether relaxing or completely waiving Medicaid's qualifying income limits, waivers increase public sector penetration rates, particularly for youth under age 17. However, completely waiving Medicaid income limits did not uniquely contribute to penetration rate increases. States offering Medicaid waivers that either relax or completely waive Medicaid's means test to qualify for health coverage present higher public sector treatment rates for youth with behavioral health care needs. There is no evidence that restricting the program to waiving the means test for accessing Medicaid would increase treatment access. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Financial Incentives for Chronic Disease Management: Results and Limitations of 2 Randomized Clinical Trials With New York Medicaid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEpps, Eric M; Troxel, Andrea B; Villamil, Elizabeth; Saulsgiver, Kathryn A; Zhu, Jingsan; Chin, Jo-Yu; Matson, Jacqueline; Anarella, Joseph; Roohan, Patrick; Gesten, Foster; Volpp, Kevin G

    2018-01-01

    To identify whether financial incentives promote improved disease management in Medicaid recipients diagnosed with hypertension or diabetes, respectively. Four-group, multicenter, randomized clinical trials. Between 2013 and 2016, New York State Medicaid managed care members diagnosed with hypertension (N = 920) or with diabetes (N = 959). Participants in each 6-month trial were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 arms: (1) process incentives-earned by attending primary care visits and/or receiving prescription medication refills, (2) outcome incentives-earned by reducing systolic blood pressure (hypertension) or hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ; diabetes) levels, (3) combined process and outcome incentives, and (4) control (no incentives). Systolic blood pressure (hypertension) and HbA 1c (diabetes) levels, primary care visits, and medication prescription refills. Analysis and Results: At 6 months, there were no statistically significant differences between intervention arms and the control arm in the change in systolic blood pressure, P = .531. Similarly, there were no significant differences in blood glucose control (HbA 1c ) between the intervention arms and control after 6 months, P = .939. The majority of participants had acceptable systolic blood pressure (operational limitations, the majority of recipients had relatively well-controlled diseases at the time of enrollment.

  3. Implementation of a comprehensive pharmaceutical care program for an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascardo, Lisa A; Spading, Kimberly A; Abramowitz, Paul W

    2012-07-15

    The implementation of a prescription benefit program for low-income patients emphasizing clinical pharmacist services and strict formulary control is described, with a review of program expenditures and cost avoidance. In 2006, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) launched a program to provide a limited prescription benefit to indigent patients under the IowaCare Medicaid demonstration waiver. Sudden dramatic growth in IowaCare enrollment, combined with sharp budget cuts, forced UIHC pharmacy leaders to implement creative cost-control strategies: (1) the establishment of an ambulatory care clinic staffed by a clinical pharmacy specialist, (2) increased reliance on an almost exclusively generic formulary, (3) collaboration with social services staff to help secure medication assistance for patients requiring brand-name drugs, (4) optimized purchasing through the federal 340B Drug Pricing Program, and (5) the imposition of medication copayments and mailing fees for prescription refills. Now in its seventh year, the UIHC pharmacy program has expanded indigent patients' access to pharmaceutical care services while reducing their use of hospital and emergency room services and lowering program medication costs by an estimated 50% (from $2.6 million in fiscal year 2009 to $1.3 million in fiscal year 2010). The UIHC ambulatory care pharmacy implemented a prescription program in collaboration with social service workers to address the medication needs of the state's low-income and uninsured patients in a fiscally responsible manner by managing purchasing contracts, revising a generic formulary, implementing copayments and mailing fees, and reviewing medication profiles.

  4. 42 CFR 495.310 - Medicaid provider incentive payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicaid provider incentive payments. 495.310 Section 495.310 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.310 Medicaid provider incentive...

  5. The Economic Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Carter C; Donohue, Julie M; Saltzman, Evan; Woods, Dulani; Eibner, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act is a substantial reform of the U.S. health care insurance system. Using the RAND COMPARE model, researchers assessed the act's potential economic effects on Pennsylvania, factoring in an optional expansion of Medicaid, and found the state would enjoy significant net benefits. With or without the expansion of Medicaid, the act will increase insurance coverage to hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians, but the COMPARE model estimates that the expansion of Medicaid eligibility would cover an additional 350,000 people and bring more than $2 billion in federal spending into the state annually than if the state did not expand. Should the state expand Medicaid, the additional spending will add more than $3 billion a year to the state's GDP and support 35,000 jobs. But Medicaid expansion is not without cost for the state; the estimated cumulative effect on Pennsylvania's Medicaid spending will be $180 million higher with the expansion than without between 2014 and 2020. Substantial reductions in uncompensated care costs for hospitals are possible even without expansion, but savings to hospitals for uncompensated care funding are even larger with the Medicaid expansion, amounting to $550 million or more each year.

  6. The Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, Medicaid, and breast cancer outcomes among Ohio's underserved women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroukian, Siran M; Bakaki, Paul M; Htoo, Phyo Than; Han, Xiaozhen; Schluchter, Mark; Owusu, Cynthia; Cooper, Gregory S; Rose, Johnie; Flocke, Susan A

    2017-08-15

    As an organized screening program, the national Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (BCCEDP) was launched in the early 1990s to improve breast cancer outcomes among underserved women. To analyze the impact of the BCCEDP on breast cancer outcomes in Ohio, this study compared cancer stages and mortality across BCCEDP participants, Medicaid beneficiaries, and "all others." This study linked data across the Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicaid, the BCCEDP database, death certificates, and the US Census and identified 26,426 women aged 40 to 64 years who had been diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer during the years 2002-2008 (deaths through 2010). The study groups were as follows: BCCEDP participants (1-time or repeat users), Medicaid beneficiaries (women enrolled in Medicaid before their cancer diagnosis [Medicaid/prediagnosis] or around the time of their cancer diagnosis [Medicaid/peridiagnosis]), and all others (women identified as neither BCCEDP participants nor Medicaid beneficiaries). The outcomes included advanced-stage cancer at diagnosis and mortality. A multivariable logistic and survival analysis was conducted to examine the independent association between the BCCEDP and Medicaid status and the outcomes. The percentage of women presenting with advanced-stage disease was highest among women in the Medicaid/peridiagnosis group (63.4%) and lowest among BCCEDP repeat users (38.6%). With adjustments for potential confounders and even in comparison with Medicaid/prediagnosis beneficiaries, those in the Medicaid/peridiagnosis group were twice as likely to be diagnosed with advanced-stage disease (adjusted odds ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-2.66). Medicaid/peridiagnosis women are at particularly high risk to be diagnosed with advanced-stage disease. Efforts to reduce breast cancer disparities must target this group of women before they present to Medicaid. Cancer 2017;123:3097-106. © 2017 American Cancer Society

  7. Using prescription monitoring program data to characterize out-of-pocket payments for opioid prescriptions in a state Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Daniel M; Ahmed, Sharia M; Middleton, Luke; Van Otterloo, Joshua; Zhang, Kun; Keast, Shellie; Kim, Hyunjee; Johnston, Kirbee; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Out-of-pocket payment for prescription opioids is believed to be an indicator of abuse or diversion, but few studies describe its epidemiology. Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) collect controlled substance prescription fill data regardless of payment source and thus can be used to study this phenomenon. To estimate the frequency and characteristics of prescription fills for opioids that are likely paid out-of-pocket by individuals in the Oregon Medicaid program. Cross-sectional analysis using Oregon Medicaid administrative claims and PDMP data (2012 to 2013). Continuously enrolled nondually eligible Medicaid beneficiaries who could be linked to the PDMP with two opioid fills covered by Oregon Medicaid. Patient characteristics and fill characteristics for opioid fills that lacked a Medicaid pharmacy claim. Fill characteristics included opioid name, type, and association with indicators of high-risk opioid use. A total of 33 592 Medicaid beneficiaries filled a total of 555 103 opioid prescriptions. Of these opioid fills, 74 953 (13.5%) could not be matched to a Medicaid claim. Hydromorphone (30%), fentanyl (18%), and methadone (15%) were the most likely to lack a matching claim. The 3 largest predictors for missing claims were opioid fills that overlapped with other opioids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-1.4), long-acting opioids (aOR 1.52; 95% CI, 1.47-1.57), and fills at multiple pharmacies (aOR 1.45; 95% CI, 1.39-1.52). Prescription opioid fills that were likely paid out-of-pocket were common and associated with several known indicators of high-risk opioid use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Catching flies with vinegar: a critique of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid self-disclosure program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Jean Wright

    2012-01-01

    This Article argues that the current approach of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to enforcement of the Ethics in Patient Referrals Act (the "Stark Law") is unnecessarily punitive and discourages health-care providers from self-disclosing even very minor violations of the Stark Law. This Article suggests a number of specific changes to encourage provider self-disclosure and proposes that CMS create a demonstration project under the authority of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to test the reforms. A demonstration project provides the perfect vehicle to prove that increased self-disclosure protocols for the Stark Law can decrease the government's costs of enforcement, improve program integrity, and encourage providers to deal responsibly with the inevitable minor lapses in compliance that arise in such an enormous government program as Medicare.

  9. Medicaid CHIP Environmental Scanning and Program Char...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ESPC development is sponsored by the CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in partnership with the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services (CMCS) under the...

  10. Poor oral health as an obstacle to employment for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean P; Chapman, Shawna L Carroll; Kurth, Noelle K

    2013-01-01

    To inform policy with better information about the oral health-care needs of a Medicaid population that engages in employment, that is, people ages 16 to 64 with Social Security-determined disabilities enrolled in a Medicaid Buy-In program. Statistically test for significant differences among responses to a Medicaid Buy-In program satisfaction survey that included oral health questions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) to results for the state's general population and the US general population. All measures of dental care access and oral health were significantly worse for the study population as compared with a state general population or a US general population. Differences were particularly pronounced for the OHIP measure for difficulty doing one's job due to dental problems, which was almost five times higher for the study population. More comprehensive dental benefits for the study population could result in increased oral and overall health, and eventual cost savings to Medicaid as more people work, have improved health, and pay premiums for coverage. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. Can Bundled Payments Be Successful in the Medicaid Population for Primary Joint Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, P Maxwell; Edmiston, Tori; Batko, Brian; Levine, Brett R

    2017-11-01

    Although some bundled payment models have had success in total joint arthroplasty, concerns exist about access to care for higher cost patients who use more resources. The purpose of this study is to determine whether Medicaid patients have increased hospital costs and more resource utilization in a 90-day episode of care than Medicare or privately insured patients. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 7268 primary hip and knee arthroplasty patients at a single institution. Using a propensity score-matching algorithm for demographic variables, we matched the 92 consecutive Medicaid patients with 184 privately insured and 184 Medicare patients. Hospital-specific costs, discharge disposition, complications, and 90-day readmissions were analyzed. Medicaid patients had higher mean inpatient hospital costs than both of the matched Medicare and privately insured groups ($15,396 vs $12,165 vs $13,864, P Medicaid and Medicare patients were more likely to be discharged to a rehabilitation facility than privately insured patients (17% vs 21% vs 1%, P Medicaid insurance was a significant independent risk factor for increased hospital costs (odds ratio 3.64, 95% confidence interval 1.80-7.38, P Medicaid patients because of concerns about patient selection and access to care. Further study is needed to determine whether bundling Medicaid arthroplasty costs in a stand-alone program with a separate target price will result in improved outcomes and decreased costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychotropic Medication Trends among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, Jane R.; Camacho, Fabian; Leslie, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized psychotropic medication use among Medicaid-enrolled children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders by examining trends over time, including length of treatment and polypharmacy using 4 years of administrative claims data from 41 state Medicaid programs (2000-2003). The data set included nearly 3 million children…

  13. Social Work's Role in Medicaid Reform: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Sara S; Wachman, Madeline; Manning, Leticia; Cohen, Alexander M; Seifert, Robert W; Jones, David K; Fitzgerald, Therese; Nuzum, Rachel; Riley, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    To critically analyze social work's role in Medicaid reform. We conducted semistructured interviews with 46 stakeholders from 10 US states that use a range of Medicaid reform approaches. We identified participants using snowball and purposive sampling. We gathered data in 2016 and analyzed them using qualitative methods. Multiple themes emerged: (1) social work participates in Medicaid reform through clinical practice, including care coordination and case management; (2) there is a gap between social work's practice-level and systems-level involvement in Medicaid innovations; (3) factors hindering social work's involvement in systems-level practice include lack of visibility, insufficient clarity on social work's role and impact, and too few resources within professional organizations; and (4) social workers need more training in health transformation payment models and policy. Social workers have unique skills that are valuable to building health systems that promote population health and reduce health inequities. Although there is considerable opportunity for social work to increase its role in Medicaid reform, there is little social work involvement at the systems level.

  14. State Medicaid Coverage for Tobacco Cessation Treatments and Barriers to Accessing Treatments - United States, 2015-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiulio, Anne; Jump, Zach; Yu, Annie; Babb, Stephen; Schecter, Anna; Williams, Kisha-Ann S; Yembra, Debbie; Armour, Brian S

    2018-04-06

    Cigarette smoking prevalence among Medicaid enrollees (25.3%) is approximately twice that of privately insured Americans (11.8%), placing Medicaid enrollees at increased risk for smoking-related disease and death (1). Medicaid spends approximately $39 billion annually on treating smoking-related diseases (2). Individual, group, and telephone counseling and seven Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications* are effective in helping tobacco users quit (3). Although state Medicaid coverage of tobacco cessation treatments improved during 2014-2015, coverage was still limited in most states (4). To monitor recent changes in state Medicaid cessation coverage for traditional (i.e., nonexpansion) Medicaid enrollees, the American Lung Association collected data on coverage of a total of nine cessation treatments: individual counseling, group counseling, and seven FDA-approved cessation medications † in state Medicaid programs during July 1, 2015-June 30, 2017. The American Lung Association also collected data on seven barriers to accessing covered treatments, such as copayments and prior authorization. As of June 30, 2017, 10 states covered all nine of these treatments for all enrollees, up from nine states as of June 30, 2015; of these 10 states, Missouri was the only state to have removed all seven barriers to accessing these cessation treatments. State Medicaid programs that cover all evidence-based cessation treatments, remove barriers to accessing these treatments, and promote covered treatments to Medicaid enrollees and health care providers would be expected to reduce smoking, smoking-related disease, and smoking-attributable federal and state health care expenditures (5-7).

  15. Colorectal cancer: complexities and challenges in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Neil B

    2007-08-01

    Managed care weighs advances and associated costs to determine whether the combination of longer life at sometimes significantly increased cost represents value. The price of treatment is only 1 factor. To review treatment decision processes for oncologic agents in managed care environments. Price can be exceptionally high for individuals. But if the population size is low, the per-member-per-month (PMPM) impact can be almost negligible, unlike treatments that have moderate costs but are used ubiquitously. Cancer therapies have, for the most part, escaped managed care's notice. For 2007, the national Cancer Institute projects that antineoplastic agents will consume almost a quarter of the overall drug spend. The Medicare population is a unique concern with regard to cancer. Traditionally, Medicare reimbursement of chemotherapeutic agents was based on average wholesale price (AWP) discounting, not the oncologist's purchasing cost. This allowed oncologists to use reimbursement for infusions to support their medical practices. The proposed plan of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use average sales price (ASP) plus 6% to reimburse for drugs used in the office setting leads to significant problems. Pharmacy and therapeutics committees will also face challenges: fewer data are available for some agents because they have become available through the U.S. Food and drug administration's Fast Track, Priority review, or accelerated approval processes. Oncology disease management programs must reach out to patients and not necessarily deal with oncology issues directly, but address tangential issues that impact care, especially depression and pain management.

  16. Medicaid program; Medicaid Management Information Systems; conditions of approval and reapproval and procedures for reduction of Federal financial participation--HCFA. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-30

    This final rule provides the additional requirements to the conditions and procedures for initial approval and reapproval of Medicaid Management Information Systems (MMIS) that were added by section 1903(r) of the Social Security Act (as amended by section 901 of the Mental Health Systems Act of 1980, Pub. L. 96-398). These provisions are intended to improve States' MMIS, ensure efficient system operations, and make the procedures for detection of fraud, waste, and abuse more effective. In addition, this final rule specifies the procedures we follow in reducing the level of Federal financial participation in State administrative expenditures if a State fails to meet the conditions for initial operation, initial approval, or reapproval of an MMIS.

  17. Medicaid's Role in Financing Health Care for Children with Behavioral Health Care Needs in the Special Education System: Implications of the Deficit Reduction Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, David S.; Machefsky, Aliza; Rubin, David; Feudtner, Chris; Pita, Susmita; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent changes to Medicaid policy may have unintended consequences in the education system. This study estimated the potential financial impact of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) on school districts by calculating Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care expenditures for school-aged children in general and children in special…

  18. Association Between the 2014 Medicaid Expansion and US Hospital Finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavin, Fredric

    2016-10-11

    The Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid eligibility for millions of low-income adults. The choice for states to expand Medicaid could affect the financial health of hospitals by decreasing the proportion of patient volume and unreimbursed expenses attributable to uninsured patients while increasing revenue from newly covered patients. To estimate the association between the Medicaid expansion in 2014 and hospital finances by assessing differences between hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid and in those states that did not expand Medicaid. Observational study with analysis of data for nonfederal general medical or surgical hospitals in fiscal years 2011 through 2014, using data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Health Care Cost Report Information System from the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Multivariable difference-in-difference regression analyses were used to compare states with Medicaid expansion with states without Medicaid expansion. Hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility before January 2014 were excluded. Medicaid expansion in 2014, accounting for variation in fiscal year start dates. Hospital-reported information on uncompensated care, uncompensated care as a percentage of total hospital expenses, Medicaid revenue, Medicaid as a percentage of total revenue, operating margins, and excess margins. The sample included between 1200 and 1400 hospitals per fiscal year in 19 states with Medicaid expansion and between 2200 and 2400 hospitals per fiscal year in 25 states without Medicaid expansion (with sample size varying depending on the outcome measured). Expansion of Medicaid was associated with a decline of $2.8 million (95% CI, -$4.1 to -$1.6 million; P policy change on hospitals' overall finances.

  19. 42 CFR 431.636 - Coordination of Medicaid with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Program (CHIP). 431.636 Section 431.636 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). (a) Statutory basis. This section implements— (1) Section 2102(b... coordination between a State child health program and other public health insurance programs. (b) Obligations...

  20. Cost Analysis and Policy Implications of a Pediatric Palliative Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Daphna; Hadler, Max W; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Shang-Hua; Dimand, Robert; Abramson, Jill M; Ferrell, Betty; Diamant, Allison L; Kominski, Gerald F

    2016-09-01

    In 2010, California launched Partners for Children (PFC), a pediatric palliative care pilot program offering hospice-like services for children eligible for full-scope Medicaid delivered concurrently with curative care, regardless of the child's life expectancy. We assessed the change from before PFC enrollment to the enrolled period in 1) health care costs per enrollee per month (PEPM), 2) costs by service type and diagnosis category, and 3) health care utilization (days of inpatient care and length of hospital stay). A pre-post analysis compared enrollees' health care costs and utilization up to 24 months before enrollment with their costs during participation in the pilot, from January 2010 through December 2012. Analyses were conducted using paid Medicaid claims and program enrollment data. The average PEPM health care costs of program enrollees decreased by $3331 from before their participation in PFC to the enrolled period, driven by a reduction in inpatient costs of $4897 PEPM. PFC enrollees experienced a nearly 50% reduction in the average number of inpatient days per month, from 4.2 to 2.3. Average length of stay per hospitalization dropped from an average of 16.7 days before enrollment to 6.5 days while in the program. Through the provision of home-based therapeutic services, 24/7 access to medical advice, and enhanced, personally tailored care coordination, PFC demonstrated an effective way to reduce costs for children with life-limiting conditions by moving from costly inpatient care to more coordinated and less expensive outpatient care. PFC's home-based care strategy is a cost-effective model for pediatric palliative care elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing chronic conditions care across primary care and hospital systems: lessons from an Australian Hospital Avoidance Risk Program using the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Zabeen, Sara; Smith, David; Wilson, Ellen; Miller, Cathie; Battersby, Malcolm; Masman, Kevin

    2017-08-24

    Objective The study aimed to determine the impact of the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program for chronic condition self-management care planning and how to improve its use with Bendigo Health's Hospital Admission Risk Program (HARP). Methods A retrospective analysis of hospital admission data collected by Bendigo Health from July 2012 to September 2013 was undertaken. Length of stay during admission and total contacts post-discharge by hospital staff for 253 patients with 644 admissions were considered as outcome variables. For statistical modelling we used the generalised linear model. Results The combination of the HARP and Flinders Program was able to achieve significant reductions in hospital admissions and non-significant reduction in emergency department presentations and length of stay. The generalised linear model predicted that vulnerable patient groups such as those with heart disease (P=0.037) and complex needs (Pmanage chronic conditions through a greater focus on coordination and integration of care across primary care and hospital systems. In support of HARP, self-management interventions such as the Flinders Program aim to help individuals better manage their medical treatment and cope with the impact of the condition on their physical and mental wellbeing and thus reduce health services utilisation. What does this paper add? This paper sheds light on which patients might be more or less likely to benefit from the combination of the HARP and Flinders Program, with regard to their impact on reductions in hospital admissions, emergency department presentations and length of stay. This study also sheds light on how the Flinders Program could be better targeted towards and implemented among high-need and high-cost patients to lessen chronic disease burden on Australia's health system. What are the implications for practitioners? Programs targeting vulnerable populations and applying evidence-based chronic condition management and self-management

  2. 42 CFR 495.304 - Medicaid provider scope and eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicaid provider scope and eligibility. 495.304 Section 495.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.304 Medicaid provider scope and...

  3. Antipsychotic treatment among youth in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosreis, Susan; Yoon, Yesel; Rubin, David M; Riddle, Mark A; Noll, Elizabeth; Rothbard, Aileen

    2011-12-01

    Despite national concerns over high rates of antipsychotic medication use among youth in foster care, concomitant antipsychotic use has not been examined. In this study, concomitant antipsychotic use among Medicaid-enrolled youth in foster care was compared with disabled or low-income Medicaid-enrolled youth. The sample included 16 969 youths younger than 20 years who were continuously enrolled in a Mid-Atlantic state Medicaid program and had ≥1 claim with a psychiatric diagnosis and ≥1 antipsychotic claim in 2003. Antipsychotic treatment was characterized by days of any use and concomitant use with ≥2 overlapping antipsychotics for >30 days. Medicaid program categories were foster care, disabled (Supplemental Security Income), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Multicategory involvement for youths in foster care was classified as foster care/Supplemental Security Income, foster care/TANF, and foster care/adoption. We used multivariate analyses, adjusting for demographics, psychiatric comorbidities, and other psychotropic use, to assess associations between Medicaid program category and concomitant antipsychotic use. Average antipsychotic use ranged from 222 ± 110 days in foster care to only 135 ± 101 days in TANF (P foster care only and 24% in foster care/adoption compared with youths in the foster care system.

  4. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Trend and Expenditure in Louisiana Medicaid, 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroh, Ekwutosi M; Gee, Rebekah E; Jiang, Baogong; McNeil, Melissa B; Hardy-Decuir, Beverly A; Zapata, Amy L

    2017-07-01

    Objectives Determine trends in incidence and expenditure for perinatal drug exposure and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) among Louisiana's Medicaid population. We also describe the maternal characteristics of NAS affected infants. Methods Retrospective cohort analysis using linked Medicaid and vital records data from 2003 to 2013. Conducted incidence and cost trends for drug exposed infants with and without NAS. Also performed comparison statistics among drug exposed infants with and without NAS and those not drug exposed. Results As rate of perinatal drug exposure increased, NAS rate per 1000 live Medicaid births also increased, from 2.1 (2003) to 3.6 (2007) to 8.0 (2013) (P for trend Medicaid also increased from $1.3 million to $3.6 million to $8.7 million (P for trend Medicaid infants quadrupled and the cost for caring for the affected infants increased six-fold. Medicaid, as the predominant payer for pregnant women and children affected by substance use disorders, must play a more active role in expanding access to comprehensive substance abuse treatment programs.

  5. Recent changes in Medicaid policy and their possible effects on mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Jeffrey A

    2009-11-01

    As Medicaid has emerged as the primary funder of public mental health services, its character has affected the organization and delivery of such services. Recent changes to the program, however, promise to further affect the direction of changes in states' mental health service systems. One group of changes will further limit the flexibility of Medicaid mental health funding, while increasing provider accountability and the authority of state Medicaid agencies. Others will increase incentives for deinstitutionalization and community-based care and promote person-centered treatment principles. These changes will likely affect state mental health systems, mental health providers, and the nature of service delivery.

  6. Design and development of a mobile exercise application for home care aides and older adult medicaid home and community-based clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilovich, Margaret K; Diaz, Laura; Saberbein, Gustavo; Healey, William E; Huber, Gail; Corcos, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    We describe a community-engaged approach with Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS), home care aide (HCA), client, and physical therapist stakeholders to develop a mobile application (app) exercise intervention through focus groups and interviews. Participants desired a short exercise program with modification capabilities, goal setting, and mechanisms to track progress. Concerns regarding participation were training needs and feasibility within usual care services. Technological preferences were for simple, easy-to-use, and engaging content. The app was piloted with HCA-client dyads (n = 5) to refine the intervention and evaluate content. Engaging stakeholders in intervention development provides valuable user-feedback on both desired exercise program contents and mobile technology preferences for HCBS recipients.

  7. 78 FR 19917 - Medicaid Program; Increased Federal Medical Assistance Percentage Changes Under the Affordable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Care Act expanded Medicaid eligibility from 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) to 133... FMAP. Although some commenters supported flexibility in concept, the overall position favored in the...

  8. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  9. We've looked at care from both sides now: the effects of alternative evaluation strategies on study conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L; Kane, Rosalie A

    2009-01-01

    This study uses two studies about the role of managed-care programs in serving Medicaid long-term care clients in Florida to illustrate how different research designs can reach divergent conclusions. Two reports from different groups using essentially the same database to assess the impact of managed care on a group of older Medicaid clients served by a Nursing Home Diversion Program reached different conclusions. The report from Florida's Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability concluded that the Diversion program saved money, whereas the report from the Florida Policy Exchange Center on Aging at the University of South Florida reached basically the opposite conclusion. Both agreed that the capitation rate was too high. How the policy questions are framed and analyzed can affect the conclusions reached. A variety of factors can influence the apparent effects of programmatic interventions. Evaluations must take relevant confounding variables into account.

  10. Dental Student, Resident, and Faculty Attitudes Toward Treating Medicaid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying

    2017-11-01

    Failure to receive proper oral health care including both prevention and maintenance is influenced by myriad and complex social, economic, and dental factors, including access to care. Reducing oral health disparities requires changes in the preparation of future dentists as well as measuring and influencing the attitudes and knowledge of practicing dentists. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that future dentists (students and residents) and faculty members at one U.S. dental school would treat Medicaid participants. Attitudes were measured using the Deamonte Driver scenario survey, which assesses factors affecting dentists' participation in Medicaid. In October 2012, all 113 full-time faculty members were invited to participate, and 60 completed the survey, for a response rate of 53.1%. In January and February 2013, all 18 residents in the dental clinics and university hospital were invited to participate, and 16 completed the survey, for a response rate of 88.9%. From 2013 to 2015, all 267 students in three classes were invited to participate: first-year students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 and fourth-year students in the Class of 2015. A total of 255 students completed the survey, for an overall student response rate of 95.5%. The results showed that the students were more likely to participate in caring for Medicaid patients than the faculty and residents. The white and male students had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the females and underrepresented minority students, while residents had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the students and faculty. Overall, the cultural competency skills, beliefs, and attitudes of these faculty members and residents were less developed than those of their students, signaling a need for broad educational and faculty development programs to fully prepare the future dental workforce to care for these patients.

  11. Social Work’s Role in Medicaid Reform: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachman, Madeline; Manning, Leticia; Cohen, Alexander M.; Seifert, Robert W.; Jones, David K.; Fitzgerald, Therese; Nuzum, Rachel; Riley, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To critically analyze social work’s role in Medicaid reform. Methods. We conducted semistructured interviews with 46 stakeholders from 10 US states that use a range of Medicaid reform approaches. We identified participants using snowball and purposive sampling. We gathered data in 2016 and analyzed them using qualitative methods. Results. Multiple themes emerged: (1) social work participates in Medicaid reform through clinical practice, including care coordination and case management; (2) there is a gap between social work’s practice-level and systems-level involvement in Medicaid innovations; (3) factors hindering social work’s involvement in systems-level practice include lack of visibility, insufficient clarity on social work’s role and impact, and too few resources within professional organizations; and (4) social workers need more training in health transformation payment models and policy. Conclusions. Social workers have unique skills that are valuable to building health systems that promote population health and reduce health inequities. Although there is considerable opportunity for social work to increase its role in Medicaid reform, there is little social work involvement at the systems level. PMID:29236537

  12. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self-management

  13. Market characteristics and awareness of managed care options among elderly beneficiaries enrolled in traditional Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittler, Jessica N; Landon, Bruce E; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Cleary, Paul D

    2011-10-14

    Medicare beneficiaries' awareness of Medicare managed care plans is critical for realizing the potential benefits of coverage choices. To assess the relationships of the number of Medicare risk plans, managed care penetration, and stability of plans in an area with traditional Medicare beneficiaries' awareness of the program. Cross-sectional analysis of Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data about beneficiaries' awareness and knowledge of Medicare managed care plan availability. Logistic regression models used to assess the relationships between awareness and market characteristics. Traditional Medicare beneficiaries (n = 3,597) who had never been enrolled in Medicare managed care, but had at least one plan available in their area in 2002, and excluding beneficiaries under 65, receiving Medicaid, or with end stage renal disease. Traditional Medicare beneficiaries' knowledge of Medicare managed care plans in general and in their area. Having more Medicare risk plans available was significantly associated with greater awareness, and having an intermediate number of plans (2-4) was significantly associated with more accurate knowledge of Medicare risk plan availability than was having fewer or more plans. Medicare may have more success engaging consumers in choice and capturing the benefits of plan competition by more actively selecting and managing the plan choice set. Public Domain.

  14. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  15. 42 CFR 460.182 - Medicaid payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicaid payment. 460.182 Section 460.182 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Payment § 460.182 Medicaid payment. (a) Under a PACE program agreement, the State administering agency...

  16. Executive federalism and Medicaid demonstration waivers: implications for policy and democratic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank J; Burke, Courtney

    2007-12-01

    Executive federalism emphasizes collaboration between the executive branches at the national and state levels to transform grant programs through the implementation process. In this regard, Medicaid demonstration waivers loomed large during the presidencies of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. This article documents and compares the volume and substance of section 1115 Medicaid waiver activity under the two presidencies. From the perspective of policy performance, Medicaid demonstration waivers provide modest support for the view that states serve as laboratories for policy learning in the health care arena. More broadly, the waivers have not yielded a major solution to the problem of the uninsured and are unlikely to do so. At the same time, they have not (as some have suggested) been a subterranean force for the erosion of Medicaid. To the contrary, these waivers have often enhanced health services for low-income people; above all, they have helped preserve Medicaid as an entitlement by undercutting support for those seeking to convert the program into a block grant. From the perspective of the democratic process, we find that Congress has been a more significant player in shaping waivers than the executive federalism model suggests. While the decision processes surrounding Medicaid waivers often fall short of democratic standards with respect to transparency and opportunities for public input, they still compare favorably to certain alternatives.

  17. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: essential health benefits in alternative benefit plans, eligibility notices, fair hearing and appeal processes, and premiums and cost sharing; exchanges: eligibility and enrollment. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act. This final rule finalizes new Medicaid eligibility provisions; finalizes changes related to electronic Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices and delegation of appeals; modernizes and streamlines existing Medicaid eligibility rules; revises CHIP rules relating to the substitution of coverage to improve the coordination of CHIP coverage with other coverage; and amends requirements for benchmark and benchmark-equivalent benefit packages consistent with sections 1937 of the Social Security Act (which we refer to as ``alternative benefit plans'') to ensure that these benefit packages include essential health benefits and meet certain other minimum standards. This rule also implements specific provisions including those related to authorized representatives, notices, and verification of eligibility for qualifying coverage in an eligible employer-sponsored plan for Affordable Insurance Exchanges. This rule also updates and simplifies the complex Medicaid premium and cost sharing requirements, to promote the most effective use of services, and to assist states in identifying cost sharing flexibilities. It includes transition policies for 2014 as applicable.

  18. New Medicaid Enrollees See Health and Social Benefits in Pennsylvania's Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Jeffrey K; Wong, Charlene; Stillson, Christian; Zha, Jessica; Cannuscio, Carolyn C; Cahill, Rachel; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how new Medicaid enrollees are approaching their own health and health care in the shifting health care landscape of the Affordable Care Act has implications for future outreach and enrollment efforts, as well as service planning for this population. The objective of this study was to explore the health care experiences and expectations of new Medicaid expansion beneficiaries in the immediate post-enrollment period. We conducted semistructured, qualitative interviews with a random sample of 40 adults in Philadelphia who had completed an application for Medicaid through a comprehensive benefits organization after January 1, 2015, when the Medicaid expansion in Pennsylvania took effect. We conducted an inductive, applied thematic analysis of interview transcripts. The new Medicaid beneficiaries described especially high levels of pent-up demand for care. Dental care was a far more pressing and motivating concern than medical care. Preventive services were also frequently mentioned. Participants anticipated that insurance would reduce both stress and financial strain and improve their experience in the health care system by raising their social standing. Participants highly valued the support of telephone application counselors in the Medicaid enrollment process to overcome bureaucratic obstacles they had encountered in the past. Dental care and preventive services appear to be high priorities for new Medicaid enrollees. Telephone outreach and enrollment support services can be an effective way to overcome past experiences with administrative barriers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Medicaid waivers and negotiated federalism in the US: is there relevance to other federal systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissert, Carol S; Weissert, William G

    2017-01-01

    Medicaid waivers have been a principal tool of innovation in health policy in the US since at least the mid 1970s. As Republicans seek to give the states more flexibility in their implementation and management of both Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act or its replacement, waiver authority is likely to be one of the key work arounds for avoiding political barriers in the US Senate. While block-granting Medicaid may require 60 senate votes, waiver authority already exists in both Medicaid law and the Affordable Care Act. Waivers also have great potential for application in other federal nations. Yet there is no theory to explain the way the application and review process evolves or the factors likely to shape the outcome. After a discussion of the theoretical underpinnings of what we call 'negotiated federalism', we apply it to examples of Medicaid waivers to see if the theory's key elements - politics, party congruence, leverage, credit taking and experience - offer a useful perspective on this federal-state interaction so important to health policy.

  20. 42 CFR 495.320 - FFP for payments to Medicaid providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP for payments to Medicaid providers. 495.320 Section 495.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.320 FFP for payments to Medicaid...

  1. 42 CFR 1000.30 - Definitions specific to Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions specific to Medicaid. 1000.30 Section... Medicaid. As used in connection with the Medicaid program, unless the context indicates otherwise— Applicant means an individual whose written application for Medicaid has been submitted to the agency...

  2. 42 CFR 400.203 - Definitions specific to Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions specific to Medicaid. 400.203 Section 400.203 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Medicaid. As used in connection with the Medicaid program, unless the context indicates otherwise...

  3. Lessons for the new CMS innovation center from the Medicare health support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Michael S; Foote, Sandra M; Krakauer, Randall; Mattingly, Patrick H

    2010-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act establishes a new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The center is intended to enhance the CMS's role in promoting much-needed improvements in payment and service delivery. Lessons from the Medicare Health Support Program, a chronic care pilot program that ran between 2005 and 2008, illustrate the value of drawing on experience in planning for the center and future pilot programs. The lessons include the importance of strong leadership; collaboration and flexibility to foster innovation; receptivity of beneficiaries to care management; and the need for timely data on patients' status. The lessons also highlight pitfalls to be avoided in planning future pilot programs, such as flawed strategies for selecting populations to target when testing payment and service delivery reforms.

  4. Small-area Variation in Hypertension Prevalence among Black and White Medicaid Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kellee; Stewart, John E; Lòpez-DeFede, Ana; Wilkerson, Rebecca C

    2016-07-21

    To examine within-state geographic heterogeneity in hypertension prevalence and evaluate associations between hypertension prevalence and small-area contextual characteristics for Black and White South Carolina Medicaid enrollees in urban vs rural areas. Ecological. South Carolina, United States. Hypertension prevalence. Data representing adult South Carolina Medicaid recipients enrolled in fiscal year 2013 (N=409,907) and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA)-level contextual measures (racial segregation, rurality, poverty, educational attainment, unemployment and primary care physician adequacy) were linked in a spatially referenced database. Optimized Getis-Ord hotspot mapping was used to visualize geographic clustering of hypertension prevalence. Spatial regression was performed to examine the association between hypertension prevalence and small-area contextual indicators. Significant (alpha=.05) hotspot spatial clustering patterns were similar for Blacks and Whites. Black isolation was significantly associated with hypertension among Blacks and Whites in both urban (Black, b=1.34, P<.01; White, b=.66, P<.01) and rural settings (Black, b=.71, P=.02; White, b=.70, P<.01). Primary care physician adequacy was associated with hypertension among urban Blacks (b=-2.14, P<.01) and Whites (b=-1.74, P<.01). The significant geographic overlap of hypertension prevalence hotspots for Black and White Medicaid enrollees provides an opportunity for targeted health intervention. Provider adequacy findings suggest the value of ACA network adequacy standards for Medicaid managed care plans in ensuring health care accessibility for persons with hypertension and related chronic conditions.

  5. Health Care Expenditures After Initiating Long-term Services and Supports in the Community Versus in a Nursing Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Robert J; Ko, Michelle; Kang, Taewoon; Harrington, Charlene; Hulett, Denis; Bindman, Andrew B

    2016-03-01

    Individuals who receive long-term services and supports (LTSS) are among the most costly participants in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. To compare health care expenditures among users of Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) versus those using extended nursing facility care. Retrospective cohort analysis of California dually eligible adult Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries who initiated Medicaid LTSS, identified as HCBS or extended nursing facility care, in 2006 or 2007. Propensity score matching for demographic, health, and functional characteristics resulted in a subsample of 34,660 users who initiated Medicaid HCBS versus extended nursing facility use. Those with developmental disabilities or in managed care plans were excluded. Average monthly adjusted acute, postacute, long-term, and total Medicare and Medicaid expenditures for the 12 months following initiation of either HCBS or extended nursing facility care. Those initiating extended nursing facility care had, on average, $2919 higher adjusted total health care expenditures per month compared with those who initiated HCBS. The difference was primarily attributable to spending on LTSS $2855. On average, the monthly LTSS expenditures were higher for Medicare $1501 and for Medicaid $1344 when LTSS was provided in a nursing facility rather than in the community. The higher cost of delivering LTSS in a nursing facility rather than in the community was not offset by lower acute and postacute spending. Medicare and Medicaid contribute similar amounts to the LTSS cost difference and both could benefit financially by redirecting care from institutions to the community.

  6. High-Expenditure Pharmaceutical Use Among Children in Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eyal; Hall, Matt; Lopert, Ruth; Bruen, Brian; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Bardach, Naomi; Gedney, Jennifer; Zima, Bonnie T; Berry, Jay G

    2017-09-01

    Medication use may be a target for quality improvement, cost containment, and research. We aimed to identify medication classes associated with the highest expenditures among pediatric Medicaid enrollees and to characterize the demographic, clinical, and health service use of children prescribed these medications. Retrospective, cross-sectional study of 3 271 081 Medicaid-enrolled children. Outpatient medication spending among high-expenditure medication classes, defined as the 10 most expensive among 261 mutually exclusive medication classes, was determined by using transaction prices paid to pharmacies by Medicaid agencies and managed care plans among prescriptions filled and dispensed in 2013. Outpatient medications accounted for 16.6% of all Medicaid expenditures. The 10 most expensive medication classes accounted for 63.9% of all medication expenditures. Stimulants (amphetamine-type) accounted for both the highest proportion of expenditures (20.6%) and days of medication use (14.0%) among medication classes. Users of medications in the 10 highest-expenditure classes were more likely to have a chronic condition of any complexity (77.9% vs 41.6%), a mental health condition (35.7% vs 11.9%), or a complex chronic condition (9.8% vs 4.3%) than other Medicaid enrollees (all P costs may benefit from better delineation of the appropriate prescription of these medications. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Community-based home-care program for the management of pre-eclampsia: an alternative.

    OpenAIRE

    Helewa, M; Heaman, M; Robinson, M A; Thompson, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, acceptability and cost of a community-based home-care program for the management of mild pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: A descriptive study of outcomes between Apr. 1, 1985, and Dec. 31, 1989. SETTING: St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg. PATIENTS: Urban Winnipeg residents between 27 and 40 weeks' gestation with mild pre-eclampsia who demonstrated acceptance and compliance with home-care management; 321 patients of 1330 were enrolled in the program. INTERVENTION...

  8. 77 FR 286 - Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Care Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... Program to fund development, testing, and validation of emerging and innovative evidence-based measures..., validation, and consensus process for the development of adult health quality measures. Include in the report to Congress mandated under section 1139A(a)(6) of the Act on the quality of health care of children...

  9. Medicaid program; state plan home and community-based services, 5-year period for waivers, provider payment reassignment, and home and community-based setting requirements for Community First Choice and home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-16

    This final rule amends the Medicaid regulations to define and describe state plan section 1915(i) home and community-based services (HCBS) under the Social Security Act (the Act) amended by the Affordable Care Act. This rule offers states new flexibilities in providing necessary and appropriate services to elderly and disabled populations. This rule describes Medicaid coverage of the optional state plan benefit to furnish home and community based-services and draw federal matching funds. This rule also provides for a 5-year duration for certain demonstration projects or waivers at the discretion of the Secretary, when they provide medical assistance for individuals dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare benefits, includes payment reassignment provisions because state Medicaid programs often operate as the primary or only payer for the class of practitioners that includes HCBS providers, and amends Medicaid regulations to provide home and community-based setting requirements related to the Affordable Care Act for Community First Choice State plan option. This final rule also makes several important changes to the regulations implementing Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS waivers.

  10. 2 CFR 376.147 - Does an exclusion from participation in Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social Security Act affect a person's eligibility to..., Medicaid, and other Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 1320a... Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. 76 FR 51147 - Medicaid Program; Eligibility Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    .../MedicaidEligibility/downloads/CMS-2349-P-PreliminaryRegulatoryImpactAnalysis.pdf . A summary of the... Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 QI Qualifying Individuals QMB Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries SHO... eligibility criteria, such as citizenship or satisfactory immigration status. Children and, in some States...

  12. New Pathways for Primary Care: An Update on Primary Care Programs From the Innovation Center at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Those in practice find that the fee-for-service system does not adequately value the contributions made by primary care. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) was created by the Affordable Care Act to test new models of health care delivery to improve the quality of care while lowering costs. All programs coming out of the Innovation Center are tests of new payment and service delivery models. By changing both payment and delivery models and moving to a payment model that rewards physicians for quality of care instead of volume of care, we may be able to achieve the kind of health care patients want to receive and primary care physicians want to provide. PMID:22412007

  13. 78 FR 9457 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Parts 402 and 403 [CMS-5060-F] RIN 0938-AR33 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to report annually to the Secretary certain payments or transfers... Vol. 78 Friday, No. 27 February 8, 2013 Part II Department of Health and Human Services Centers...

  14. A program of symptom management for improving self-care for patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Piao-Yi; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tiau; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Lin, Li-Chan

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a symptom management program on self-care of medication side effects among AIDS/HIV-positive patients. Sixty-seven patients from a sexually transmitted disease control center, a medical center, and a Catholic AIDS support group in Taipei were randomly assigned to three groups: one-on-one teaching, group teaching, and a control group. All subjects in each teaching group attended a 60- or 90-minute program on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) side effect self-care education and skill training once per week for 3 weeks; subjects also underwent counseling by telephone. A medication side effect self-care knowledge questionnaire, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and unscheduled hospital visits were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the symptom management program. The results revealed there were significant differences in mean difference of knowledge and unscheduled hospital visits between baseline and post-testing at 3 months for symptom management in the two groups. The mean difference of the self-esteem scale was not significant between the two groups. In summary, the symptom management program effectively increased the ability of AIDS/HIV-positive patients to self-care for medication side effects. We recommend that this program be applied in the clinical nursing practice.

  15. 76 FR 46684 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., 433, 447, and 457 [CMS-2292-P] RIN 0938-AQ32 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) disallowance process to allow States the option to retain... [[Page 46685

  16. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... 1995 (Pub. L. 104-04, enacted on March 22, 1995) UTI Urinary tract infection I. Background Title XIX of.... + Secondary Diabetes with Hyperosmolarity. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). Vascular... of Children's Hospitals, the Joint Commission, and State Medicaid Medical Directors. Most of these...

  17. Medicaid: State and Federal Actions Have Been Taken to Improve Children's Access to Dental Services, but Gaps Remain. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-09-723

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Government Accountability Office, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Children's access to Medicaid dental services is a long-standing concern. The tragic case of a 12-year-old boy who died from an untreated infected tooth that led to a fatal brain infection renewed attention to this issue. He was enrolled in Medicaid--a joint federal and state program that provides health care coverage, including dental care, for…

  18. Physician Willingness and Resources to Serve More Medicaid..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Sixteen million people will gain Medicaid under health reform. This study compares primary care physicians (PCPs) on reported acceptance of new Medicaid patients and...

  19. Medicaid provider reimbursement policy for adult immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra M; Lindley, Megan C; Cox, Marisa A

    2015-10-26

    State Medicaid programs establish provider reimbursement policy for adult immunizations based on: costs, private insurance payments, and percentage of Medicare payments for equivalent services. Each program determines provider eligibility, payment amount, and permissible settings for administration. Total reimbursement consists of different combinations of Current Procedural Terminology codes: vaccine, vaccine administration, and visit. Determine how Medicaid programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia approach provider reimbursement for adult immunizations. Observational analysis using document review and a survey. Medicaid administrators in 50 states and the District of Columbia. Whether fee-for-service programs reimburse providers for: vaccines; their administration; and/or office visits when provided to adult enrollees. We assessed whether adult vaccination services are reimbursed when administered by a wide range of providers in a wide range of settings. Medicaid programs use one of 4 payment methods for adults: (1) a vaccine and an administration code; (2) a vaccine and visit code; (3) a vaccine code; and (4) a vaccine, visit, and administration code. Study results do not reflect any changes related to implementation of national health reform. Nine of fifty one programs did not respond to the survey or declined to participate, limiting the information available to researchers. Medicaid reimbursement policy for adult vaccines impacts provider participation and enrollee access and uptake. While programs have generally increased reimbursement levels since 2003, each program could assess whether current policies reflect the most effective approach to encourage providers to increase vaccination services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Medicaid provider reimbursement policy for adult immunizations☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra M.; Lindley, Megan C.; Cox, Marisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background State Medicaid programs establish provider reimbursement policy for adult immunizations based on: costs, private insurance payments, and percentage of Medicare payments for equivalent services. Each program determines provider eligibility, payment amount, and permissible settings for administration. Total reimbursement consists of different combinations of Current Procedural Terminology codes: vaccine, vaccine administration, and visit. Objective Determine how Medicaid programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia approach provider reimbursement for adult immunizations. Design Observational analysis using document review and a survey. Setting and participants Medicaid administrators in 50 states and the District of Columbia. Measurements Whether fee-for-service programs reimburse providers for: vaccines; their administration; and/or office visits when provided to adult enrollees. We assessed whether adult vaccination services are reimbursed when administered by a wide range of providers in a wide range of settings. Results Medicaid programs use one of 4 payment methods for adults: (1) a vaccine and an administration code; (2) a vaccine and visit code; (3) a vaccine code; and (4) a vaccine, visit, and administration code. Limitations Study results do not reflect any changes related to implementation of national health reform. Nine of fifty one programs did not respond to the survey or declined to participate, limiting the information available to researchers. Conclusions Medicaid reimbursement policy for adult vaccines impacts provider participation and enrollee access and uptake. While programs have generally increased reimbursement levels since 2003, each program could assess whether current policies reflect the most effective approach to encourage providers to increase vaccination services. PMID:26403369

  1. Barriers to Medicaid Participation among Florida Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Henrietta L.; Catalanotto, Frank; Guo, Yi; Marks, John; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding dentists who treat Medicaid-enrolled children is a struggle for many parents. The purpose of this study was to identify non-reimbursement factors that influence the decision by dentists about whether or not to participate in the Medicaid program in Florida. Methods Data from a mailed survey was analyzed using a logistic regression model to test the association of Medicaid participation with the Perceived Barriers and Social Responsibility variables. Results General and pediatric dentists (n=882) who identified themselves as either Medicaid (14%) or Non-Medicaid (86%) participants responded. Five items emerged as significant predictors of Medicaid participation, with a final concordance index of 0.905. Two previously unreported barriers to participation in Medicaid emerged: 1) dentists’ perception of social stigma from other dentists for participating in Medicaid, and 2) the lack of specialists to whom Medicaid patients can be referred. Conclusions This study provides new information about non-reimbursement barriers to Medicaid participation. PMID:25702734

  2. States With Medically Needy Pathways: Differences in Long-Term and Temporary Medicaid Entry for Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Trivedi, Amal; Mor, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Medically needy pathways may provide temporary catastrophic coverage for low-income Medicare beneficiaries who do not otherwise qualify for full Medicaid benefits. Between January 2009 and June 2010, states with medically needy pathways had a higher percentage of low-income beneficiaries join Medicaid than states without such programs (7.5% vs. 4.1%, p < .01). However, among new full Medicaid participants, living in a state with a medically needy pathway was associated with a 3.8 percentage point (adjusted 95% confidence interval [1.8, 5.8]) increase in the probability of switching to partial Medicaid and a 4.5 percentage point (adjusted 95% confidence interval [2.9, 6.2]) increase in the probability of exiting Medicaid within 12 months. The predicted risk of leaving Medicaid was greatest when new Medicaid participants used only hospital services, rather than nursing home services, in their first month of Medicaid benefits. Alternative strategies for protecting low-income Medicare beneficiaries' access to care could provide more stable coverage.

  3. Single women and the dynamics of Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, P F; Freedman, V A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate transitions in and out of Medicaid for a cohort of single adult women of childbearing age in order to address questions that arise as policymakers try to encourage transitions from welfare to work. DATA SOURCES: Longitudinal data from Waves 2 through 8 of the 1990 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, a nationally representative survey of American adults covering May 1990-1992. STUDY DESIGN: We estimate a series of discrete-time logit models with duration dependence to obtain transition probabilities among Medicaid, privately insured, and uninsured spells. Explanatory variables in the models include prior insurance history, income limits on Medicaid by state, and important socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We use these models to characterize insurance spells for a cohort of single women. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Most Medicaid spells are relatively short. Over half end in a year or less; only one spell out of seven lasts longer than five years. Two-thirds of Medicaid disenrollees become uninsured. Former welfare recipients are prone to frequent changes in insurance status. In states with more generous income limits for AFDC, women stay on Medicaid longer, but they do not move into the program at a faster rate. CONCLUSIONS: Imposing time limits on Medicaid eligibility would affect only a small proportion of Medicaid spells but would eliminate a significant proportion of the caseload at a point in time. In considering changes in Medicaid that would encourage transitions from welfare to work and would alter the dynamics of Medicaid, policymakers need to consider how transitions both in and out of private insurance and Medicaid would be affected. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9865222

  4. Oregon's medicaid transformation -- observations on organizational structure and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna Marie; Cohen, Deborah J; McCarty, Dennis; Rieckmann, Traci; McConnell, K John

    2015-02-01

    In the Point article, Steven W. Howard et al. argue that the Oregon Health Authority's coordinated care organizations (CCOs) are different from traditional Medicaid managed care organizations in ways designed to improve care coordination and transparency, incorporate greater collaborative governance and community accountability, and reform payment and delivery of care. Although the Point article notes specific challenges to implementing reforms, this Counterpoint article identifies the progress and successes of Oregon's CCOs in each of the aforementioned areas on the basis of empirical research, which suggests that CCOs appear to be viable innovations. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  5. Medicaid prospective payment: Case-mix increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Samuel L.; Kronenfeld, Jennie J.

    1990-01-01

    South Carolina Medicaid implemented prospective payment by diagnosis-related group (DRG) for inpatient care. The rate of complications among newborns and deliveries doubled immediately. The case-mix index for newborns increased 66.6 percent, which increased the total Medicaid hospital expenditure 5.5 percent. Outlier payments increased total expenditure further. DRG distribution change among newborns has a large impact on spending because newborn complication DRGs have high weights. States adopting a DRG-based payment system for Medicaid should anticipate a greater increase in case mix than Medicare experienced. PMID:10113463

  6. Evaluating State Options for Reducing Medicaid Churning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Katherine; Short, Pamela Farley; Graefe, Deborah R.; Uberoi, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    Medicaid churning - the constant exit and re-entry of beneficiaries as their eligibility changes - has long been a problem for both Medicaid administrators and recipients. Churning will continue under the Affordable Care Act, because despite new federal rules, Medicaid eligibility will continue to be based on current monthly income. We developed a longitudinal simulation model to evaluate four policy options for modifying or extending Medicaid eligibility to reduce churning. The simulations suggest that two options, extending Medicaid eligibility either to the end of a calendar year or for twelve months after enrollment, would be far more effective in reducing churning than the other options of a three-month extension or eligibility based on projected annual income. States should consider implementation of the option that best balances costs, including both administration and services, with improved health of Medicaid enrollees. PMID:26153313

  7. Clinicians' awareness of the Affordable Care Act mandate to provide comprehensive tobacco cessation treatment for pregnant women covered by Medicaid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van T. Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act (ACA requires states to provide tobacco-cessation services without cost-sharing for pregnant traditional Medicaid-beneficiaries effective October 2010. It is unknown the extent to which obstetricians–gynecologists are aware of the Medicaid tobacco-cessation benefit. We sought to examine the awareness of the Medicaid tobacco-cessation benefit in a national sample of obstetricians–gynecologists and assessed whether reimbursement would influence their tobacco cessation practice. In 2012, a survey was administered to a national stratified-random sample of obstetricians–gynecologists (n = 252 regarding awareness of the Medicaid tobacco-cessation benefit. Results were stratified by the percentage of pregnant Medicaid patients. Chi-squared tests (p < 0.05 were used to assess significant associations. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Eighty-three percent of respondents were unaware of the benefit. Lack of awareness increased as the percentage of pregnant Medicaid patients in their practices decreased (range = 71.9%–96.8%; P = 0.02. One-third (36.1% of respondents serving pregnant Medicaid patients reported that reimbursement would influence them to increase their cessation services. Four out of five obstetricians–gynecologists surveyed in 2012 were unaware of the ACA provision that required states to provide tobacco cessation coverage for pregnant traditional Medicaid beneficiaries as of October 2010. Broad promotion of the Medicaid tobacco-cessation benefit could reduce treatment barriers.

  8. Health and federal budgetary effects of increasing access to antiretroviral medications for HIV by expanding Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, J G; Haile, B; Kates, J; Chang, S

    2001-09-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study modeled the health and federal fiscal effects of expanding Medicaid for HIV-infected people to improve access to highly active antiretroviral therapy. A disease state model of the US HIV epidemic, with and without Medicaid expansion, was used. Eligibility required a CD4 cell count less than 500/mm3 or viral load greater than 10,000, absent or inadequate medication insurance, and annual income less than $10,000. Two benefits were modeled, "full" and "limited" (medications, outpatient care). Federal spending for Medicaid, Medicare, AIDS Drug Assistance Program, Supplemental Security Income, and Social Security Disability Insurance were assessed. An estimated 38,000 individuals would enroll in a Medicaid HIV expansion. Over 5 years, expansion would prevent an estimated 13,000 AIDS diagnoses and 2600 deaths and add 5,816 years of life. Net federal costs for all programs are $739 million (full benefits) and $480 million (limited benefits); for Medicaid alone, the costs are $1.43 and $1.17 billion, respectively. Results were sensitive to awareness of serostatus, highly active antiretroviral therapy cost, and participation rate. Strategies for federal cost neutrality include Medicaid HIV drug price reductions as low as 9% and private insurance buy-ins. Expansion of the Medicaid eligibility to increase access to antiretroviral therapy would have substantial health benefits at affordable costs.

  9. Outcomes Associated With Early Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A.; Sen, Bisakha

    2017-01-01

    Importance There is a recommendation for children to have a dental home by 6 months of age, but there is limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of early preventive dental care or whether primary care providers (PCPs) can deliver it. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing caries-related treatment visits among Medicaid enrollees. Design, Setting, and Participants High-dimensional propensity scores were used to address selection bias for a retrospective cohort study of children continuously enrolled in coverage from the Alabama Medicaid Agency from birth between 2008 and 2012, adjusting for demographics, access to care, and general health service use. Exposures Children receiving preventive dental care prior to age 2 years from PCPs or dentists vs no preventive dental care. Main Outcome and Measures Two-part models estimated caries-related treatment and expenditures. Results Among 19 658 eligible children, 25.8% (n = 3658) received early preventive dental care, of whom 44% were black, 37.6% were white, and 16.3% were Hispanic. Compared with matched children without early preventive dental care, children with dentist-delivered preventive dental care more frequently had a subsequent caries-related treatment (20.6% vs 11.3%, P dental expenditures ($168 vs $87 per year, P dental care was associated with an increase in the expected number of caries-related treatment visits by 0.14 per child per year (95% CI, 0.11-0.16) and caries-related treatment expenditures by $40.77 per child per year (95% CI, $30.48-$51.07). Primary care provider–delivered preventive dental care did not significantly affect caries-related treatment use or expenditures. Conclusions and Relevance Children with early preventive care visits from dentists were more likely to have subsequent dental care, including caries-related treatment, and greater expenditures than children without preventive dental care. There was no association with subsequent

  10. Foster care, externalizing disorders, and antipsychotic use among Medicaid-enrolled youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwerker, Lauren; Akincigil, Ayse; Olfson, Mark; Gerhard, Tobias; Neese-Todd, Sheree; Crystal, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The authors investigated the extent to which clinical diagnoses of externalizing disorders explain higher rates of antipsychotic use by foster care youths. Medicaid claims data from 44 states for 2009 for youths in foster care (N=301,894) and those not in foster care (N=5,092,574) were analyzed, excluding those with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, and major depressive disorder. Logistic regressions assessed the relationship between foster care, externalizing disorders, and antipsychotic use. Foster care youths had higher rates of externalizing disorders than the comparison group (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, 17.3% versus 6.5%; disruptive behavior disorder, 7.2% versus 2.5%; conduct disorder, 2.3% versus .5%) and greater antipsychotic use (7.4% versus 1.4%). Foster care remained a significant predictor of antipsychotic use after control for demographic and diagnostic covariates, including externalizing disorders (adjusted odds ratio=2.59, 95% confidence interval=2.54-2.63). High rates of externalizing disorder diagnoses only partially explained elevated levels of antipsychotic use in this vulnerable population.

  11. The effect of Medicaid adult vision coverage on the likelihood of appropriate correction of distance vision: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Brandy J; Decker, Sandra L

    2016-02-01

    Medicaid is the main public health insurance program for individuals with low income in the United States. Some state Medicaid programs cover preventive eye care services and vision correction, while others cover emergency eye care only. Similar to other optional benefits, states may add and drop adult vision benefits over time. This article examines whether providing adult vision benefits is associated with an increase in the percentage of low-income individuals with appropriately corrected distance vision as measured during an eye exam. We estimate the effect of Medicaid vision coverage on the likelihood of having appropriately corrected distance vision using examination data from the 2001-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compare vision outcomes for Medicaid beneficiaries (n = 712) and other low income adults not enrolled in Medicaid (n = 4786) before and after changes to state vision coverage policies. Between 29 and 33 states provided Medicaid adult vision benefits during 2001-2008, depending on the year. Our findings imply that Medicaid adult vision coverage is associated with a significant increase in the percentage of Medicaid beneficiaries with appropriately corrected distance vision of up to 10 percentage points. Providing vision coverage to adults on Medicaid significantly increases the likelihood of appropriate correction of distance vision. Further research on the impact of vision coverage on related functional outcomes and the effects of Medicaid coverage of other services may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incentive Design and Quality Improvements: Evidence from State Medicaid Nursing Home Pay-for-Performance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Skira, Meghan M; Werner, Rachel M

    2018-01-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) programs have become a popular policy tool aimed at improving health care quality. We analyze how incentive design affects quality improvements in the nursing home setting, where several state Medicaid agencies have implemented P4P programs that vary in incentive structure. Using the Minimum Data Set and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data from 2001 to 2009, we examine how the weights put on various performance measures that are tied to P4P bonuses, such as clinical outcomes, inspection deficiencies, and staffing levels, affect improvements in those measures. We find larger weights on clinical outcomes often lead to larger improvements, but small weights can lead to no improvement or worsening of some clinical outcomes. We find a qualifier for P4P eligibility based on having few or no severe inspection deficiencies is more effective at decreasing inspection deficiencies than using weights, suggesting simple rules for participation may incent larger improvement.

  13. Patient Experience Of Provider Refusal Of Medicaid Coverage And Its Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Shi, Yunfeng; Jung, Kyoungrae

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies show that many physicians do not accept new patients with Medicaid coverage, but no study has examined Medicaid enrollees' actual experience of provider refusal of their coverage and its implications. Using the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, we estimate provider refusal of health insurance coverage reported by 23,992 adults with continuous coverage for the past 12 months. We find that among Medicaid enrollees, 6.73% reported their coverage being refused by a provider in 2012, a rate higher than that in Medicare and private insurance by 4.07 (p<.01) and 3.68 (p<.001) percentage points, respectively. Refusal of Medicaid coverage is associated with delaying needed care, using emergency room (ER) as a usual source of care, and perceiving current coverage as worse than last year. In view of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion, future studies should continue monitoring enrollees' experience of coverage refusal.

  14. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy community.…

  15. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  16. Leadership development programs for health care middle managers: An exploration of the top management team member perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Alan; Gillis, William E

    Hospitals throughout the United States establish leadership and management programs for their middle managers. Despite their pervasiveness and an increased emphasis on physician leadership, there is limited research regarding the development programs designed for clinical and nonclinical health care middle managers. Using two theoretical lenses, signaling and institutional theory, this exploratory study investigates mid-sized hospital development programs from the perspective of top management team (TMT) members. Our objective is to find out what types of programs hospitals have, how they are developed, and how they are evaluated. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 TMT members in six purposefully selected hospitals and matched these interviews with program curricula. Careful coding of the data allowed us not only to show our data in a meaningful visual representation but also to show the progression of the data from raw form to aggregate themes in the qualitative research process. We identified four types of development programs used in the selected hospitals: (a) ongoing series, (b) curriculum-based, (c) management orientation, and (d) mentoring. Challenges existed in aligning the need for the program with program content. Communication occurred both through direct messaging regarding policies and procedures and through hidden signals. TMT members referenced other programs for guidance but were not always clear about what it is they wanted the programs to accomplish. Finally, there was limited program outcome measurement. Our small sample indicates that specific, structured, and comprehensive programs perform best. The better programs were always trying to improve but that most needed better accountability of tracking outcomes. In setting up a program, a collaborative approach among TMT members to establish what the needs are and how to measure outcomes worked well. Successful programs also tied in their leadership development with overall employee

  17. Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Cardiac Surgery Volume and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Eric J; Johnston, Lily E; Herbert, Morley A; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Yount, Kenan W; Likosky, Donald S; Theurer, Patricia F; Fonner, Clifford E; Rich, Jeffrey B; Speir, Alan M; Ailawadi, Gorav; Prager, Richard L; Kron, Irving L

    2017-10-01

    Thirty-one states approved Medicaid expansion after implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Medicaid expansion on cardiac surgery volume and outcomes comparing one state that expanded to one that did not. Data from the Virginia (nonexpansion state) Cardiac Services Quality Initiative and the Michigan (expanded Medicaid, April 2014) Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality Collaborative were analyzed to identify uninsured and Medicaid patients undergoing coronary bypass graft or valve operations, or both. Demographics, operative details, predicted risk scores, and morbidity and mortality rates, stratified by state and compared across era (preexpansion: 18 months before vs postexpansion: 18 months after), were analyzed. In Virginia, there were no differences in volume between eras, whereas in Michigan, there was a significant increase in Medicaid volume (54.4% [558 of 1,026] vs 84.1% [954 of 1,135], p Medicaid patients, there were no differences in predicted risk of morbidity or mortality or postoperative major morbidities. In Michigan Medicaid patients, a significant decrease in predicted risk of morbidity or mortality (11.9% [8.1% to 20.0%] vs 11.1% [7.7% to 17.9%], p = 0.02) and morbidities (18.3% [102 of 558] vs 13.2% [126 of 954], p = 0.008) was identified. Postexpansion was associated with a decreased risk-adjusted rate of major morbidity (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.51 to 0.91; p = 0.01) in Michigan Medicaid patients. Medicaid expansion was associated with fewer uninsured cardiac surgery patients and improved predicted risk scores and morbidity rates. In addition to improving health care financing, Medicaid expansion may positively affect patient care and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  19. Centers for medicare and medicaid services: using an episode-based payment model to improve oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Ronald M; Bazell, Carol; Smith, Erin; Schumacher, Heidi; Rajkumar, Rahul; Conway, Patrick H

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is a medically complex and expensive disease with costs projected to rise further as new treatment options increase and the United States population ages. Studies showing significant regional variation in oncology quality and costs and model tests demonstrating cost savings without adverse outcomes suggest there are opportunities to create a system of oncology care in the US that delivers higher quality care at lower cost. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have designed an episode-based payment model centered around 6 month periods of chemotherapy treatment. Monthly per-patient care management payments will be made to practices to support practice transformation, including additional patient services and specific infrastructure enhancements. Quarterly reporting of quality metrics will drive continuous quality improvement and the adoption of best practices among participants. Practices achieving cost savings will also be eligible for performance-based payments. Savings are expected through improved care coordination and appropriately aligned payment incentives, resulting in decreased avoidable emergency department visits and hospitalizations and more efficient and evidence-based use of imaging, laboratory tests, and therapeutic agents, as well as improved end of life care. New therapies and better supportive care have significantly improved cancer survival in recent decades. This has come at a high cost, with cancer therapy consuming $124 billion in 2010. CMS has designed an episode-based model of oncology care that incorporates elements from several successful model tests. By providing care management and performance based payments in conjunction with quality metrics and a rapid learning environment, it is hoped that this model will demonstrate how oncology care in the US can transform into a high value, high quality system. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. How Medicaid and Other Public Policies Affect Use of Tobacco Cessation Therapy, United States, 2010–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Erin; Bysshe, Tyler; Steinmetz, Erika; Bruen, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction State Medicaid programs can cover tobacco cessation therapies for millions of low-income smokers in the United States, but use of this benefit is low and varies widely by state. This article assesses the effects of changes in Medicaid benefit policies, general tobacco policies, smoking norms, and public health programs on the use of cessation therapy among Medicaid smokers. Methods We used longitudinal panel analysis, using 2-way fixed effects models, to examine the effects of changes in state policies and characteristics on state-level use of Medicaid tobacco cessation medications from 2010 through 2014. Results Medicaid policies that require patients to obtain counseling to get medications reduced the use of cessation medications by approximately one-quarter to one-third; states that cover all types of cessation medications increased usage by approximately one-quarter to one-third. Non-Medicaid policies did not have significant effects on use levels. Conclusions States could increase efforts to quit by developing more comprehensive coverage and reducing barriers to coverage. Reductions in barriers could bolster smoking cessation rates, and the costs would be small compared with the costs of treating smoking-related diseases. Innovative initiatives to help smokers quit could improve health and reduce health care costs. PMID:27788063

  1. Equity in Medicaid Reimbursement for Otolaryngologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduff, Joseph H; Coelho, Daniel H

    2017-12-01

    Objective To study state Medicaid reimbursement rates for inpatient and outpatient otolaryngology services and to compare with federal Medicare benchmarks. Study Design State and federal database query. Setting Not applicable. Methods Based on Medicare claims data, 26 of the most common Current Procedural Terminology codes reimbursed to otolaryngologists were selected and the payments recorded. These were further divided into outpatient and operative services. Medicaid payment schemes were queried for the same services in 49 states and Washington, DC. The difference in Medicaid and Medicare payment in dollars and percentage was determined and the reimbursement per relative value unit calculated. Medicaid reimbursement differences (by dollar amount and by percentage) were qualified as a shortfall or excess as compared with the Medicare benchmark. Results Marked differences in Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement exist for all services provided by otolaryngologists, most commonly as a substantial shortfall. The Medicaid shortfall varied in amount among states, and great variability in reimbursement exists within and between operative and outpatient services. Operative services were more likely than outpatient services to have a greater Medicaid shortfall. Shortfalls and excesses were not consistent among procedures or states. Conclusions The variation in Medicaid payment models reflects marked differences in the value of the same work provided by otolaryngologists-in many cases, far less than federal benchmarks. These results question the fairness of the Medicaid reimbursement scheme in otolaryngology, with potential serious implications on access to care for this underserved patient population.

  2. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of An Aged Care Specific Leadership and Management Program to Improve Work Environment, Staff Turnover, and Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Li, Zhicheng; Cunich, Michelle M; Thomas, Tamsin H; Chenoweth, Lynn; Kendig, Hal L

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and management program in aged care. Double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve residential and community-aged care sites in Australia. All care staff employed for 6 months or longer at the aged care sites were invited to participate in the surveys at 3 time points: baseline (time 1), 9 months from baseline (time 2), and 9 months after completion of time 2 (time 3) from 2011 to 2013. At each time point, at least 500 care staff completed a survey. At baseline (N = 503) the largest age group was 45 to 54 years (37%), and the majority of care staff were born in Australia (70%), spoke English (94%), and had at least completed secondary education (57%). A 12-month Clinical Leadership in Aged Care (CLiAC) program for middle managers, which aimed to further develop their leadership and management skills in creating positive workplace relationships and in enabling person-centered, evidence-based care. The primary outcomes were care staff ratings of the work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes were care staff's intention to leave their employer and profession, workplace stress, job satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the program. Absenteeism was excluded due to difficulty in obtaining reliable data. Managers' self-rated knowledge and skills in leadership and management are not included in this article, which focuses on care staff perceptions only. At 6 months after its completion, the CLiAC program was effective in improving care staff's perception of management support [mean difference 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.18; P = .04]. Compared with the control sites, care staff at the intervention sites perceived their managers' leadership styles as more transformational (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.51; P = .005), transactional (mean difference 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.39; P = .01), and less passive avoidant (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0

  3. 76 FR 15105 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... Services 42 CFR Part 488 [CMS-2435-F] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing... incentives for quality improvement, and to remove uncertainty for nursing homes, we proposed to set the... Vol. 76 Friday, No. 53 March 18, 2011 Part III Department of Health and Human Services Centers for...

  4. Wait watchers: the application of a waiting list active management program in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Marino, Marta; Avolio, Maria; Pelone, Ferruccio; Basso, Danila; Dei Tos, Gian Antonio; Cinquetti, Sandro; Ricciardi, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This study describes and evaluates the application of a waiting list management program in ambulatory care. Waiting list active management survey (telephone call and further contact); before and after controlled trial. Local Health Trust in Veneto Region (North-East of Italy) in 2008-09. Five hundred and one people on a 554 waiting list for C Class ambulatory care diagnostic and/or clinical investigations (electrocardiography plus cardiology ambulatory consultation, eye ambulatory consultation, carotid vessels Eco-color-Doppler, legs Eco-color-Doppler or colonoscopy, respectively). Active list management program consisting of a telephonic interview on 21 items to evaluate socioeconomic features, self-perceived health status, social support, referral physician, accessibility and patients' satisfaction. A controlled before-and-after study was performed to evaluate anonymously the overall impact on patients' self-perceived quality of care. The rate of patients with deteriorating healthcare conditions; rate of dropout; interviewed degree of satisfaction about the initiative; overall impact on citizens' perceived quality of care. 95.4% patients evaluated the initiative as useful. After the intervention, patients more likely to have been targeted with the program showed a statistically significant increase in self-reported quality of care. Positive impact of the program on some dimensions of ambulatory care quality (health status, satisfaction, willingness to remain in the queue), thus confirming the outstanding value of 'not to leave people alone' and 'not to leave them feeling themselves alone' in healthcare delivery.

  5. 78 FR 45217 - Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... states may make to institutions for mental diseases (IMDs) and other mental health facilities. This... DSH payments to institutions for mental diseases (IMDs) and other mental health facilities is limited... 0938-AR91 Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental...

  6. Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations Increased Timely Prenatal Care Initiation And Decreased Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoto, Ifeoma; Luck, Jeff; Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Policies at the state and federal levels affect access to health services, including prenatal care. In 2012 the State of Oregon implemented a major reform of its Medicaid program. The new model, called a coordinated care organization (CCO), is designed to improve the coordination of care for Medicaid beneficiaries. This reform effort provides an ideal opportunity to evaluate the impact of broad financing and delivery reforms on prenatal care use. Using birth certificate data from Oregon and Washington State, we evaluated the effect of CCO implementation on the probability of early prenatal care initiation, prenatal care adequacy, and disparities in prenatal care use by type of insurance. Following CCO implementation, we found significant increases in early prenatal care initiation and a reduction in disparities across insurance types but no difference in overall prenatal care adequacy. Oregon's reforms could serve as a model for other Medicaid and commercial health plans seeking to improve prenatal care quality and reduce disparities. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Federal Funding Insulated State Budgets From Increased Spending Related To Medicaid Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Benjamin D; Gruber, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    As states weigh whether to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid reform remains a priority for some federal lawmakers, fiscal considerations loom large. As part of the ACA's expansion of eligibility for Medicaid, the federal government paid for 100 percent of the costs for newly eligible Medicaid enrollees for the period 2014-16. In 2017 states will pay some of the costs for new enrollees, with each participating state's share rising to 10 percent by 2020. States continue to pay their traditional Medicaid share (roughly 25-50 percent, depending on the state) for previously eligible enrollees. We used data for fiscal years 2010-15 from the National Association of State Budget Officers and a difference-in-differences framework to assess the effects of the expansion's first two fiscal years. We found that the expansion led to an 11.7 percent increase in overall spending on Medicaid, which was accompanied by a 12.2 percent increase in spending from federal funds. There were no significant increases in spending from state funds as a result of the expansion, nor any significant reductions in spending on education or other programs. States' advance budget projections were also reasonably accurate in the aggregate, with no significant differences between the projected levels of federal, state, and Medicaid spending and the actual expenses as measured at the end of the fiscal year. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. Impact of Maine's Medicaid drug formulary change on non-Medicaid markets: spillover effects of a restrictive drug formulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Richard; Pauly, Mark V; Lin, Y Aileen

    2003-10-01

    Market penetration of HMOs affect physician practice styles for non-HMO patients. To study the impact of a restrictive Medicaid drug formulary on prescribing patterns for other patients, ie, so-called spillover effects. A before-and-after, 3-state comparison study. On January 1, 2001, Maine's Medicaid program implemented a restrictive drug formulary for the proton pump inhibitor class, with pantoprazole as the only preferred drug. The Medicaid and non-Medicaid market shares of pantoprazole in Maine (vs New Hampshire and Vermont and among Maine physicians with different Medicaid share of practice. After 3 months, the market share of pantoprazole in Maine (vs 2 control states) increased 79% among Medicaid prescriptions (vs 1%-2%), 10% among cash prescriptions (vs 3%), and 7% among other third-party payer prescriptions (vs 1%). The market shares increased more among Maine physicians with a higher Medicaid share of practice (high vs middle vs low [market]: 16% vs 8% vs 5% [cash]; 11% vs 5% vs 4% [other third-party payers]). Linear regression results indicate that practicing medicine in Maine leads to a 72% increase in pantoprazole share among Medicaid prescriptions (P markets, with somewhat stronger effects in the cash market.

  9. Affecting culture change and performance improvement in Medicaid nursing homes: the Promote Understanding, Leadership, and Learning (PULL) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliopoulos, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of nursing homes are implementing culture change programming to create a more homelike environment in which residents and direct care staff are empowered with greater participation in care activities. Although nursing homes that have adopted culture change practices have brought about positive transformation in their settings that have improved quality of care and life, as well as increased resident and staff satisfaction, they represent a minority of all nursing homes. Nursing homes that serve primarily a Medicaid population without supplemental sources of funding have been limited in the resources to support such change processes. The purpose of this project was to gain insight into effective strategies to provide culture change and quality improvement programming to low-performing, under-resourced nursing homes that represent the population of nursing homes least likely to have implemented this programming. Factors that interfered with transformation were identified and insights were gained into factors that need to be considered before transformational processes can be initiated. Effective educational strategies and processes that facilitate change in these types of nursing homes were identified. Despite limitations to the study, there was evidence that the experiences and findings can be of value to other low-performing, under-resourced nursing homes. Ongoing clinical work and research are needed to refine the implementation process and increase the ability to help these settings utilize resources and implement high quality cost effective care to nursing home residents. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  11. 78 FR 38594 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities; Hospice Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    .... The LTC facility regulations clearly specify what services the facility is required to provide to... professional caregivers and are often paid by third-party payers, such as Medicaid. These facilities are... benefit. In regulations at 42 CFR 418.112(c), we specify what must be included in a written agreement...

  12. Medicaid in Ohio: The Politics of Expansion, Reauthorization, and Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    When, in 2012, the US Supreme Court held that Medicaid expansion sanctioned by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was essentially optional for states, it ushered in a newly contentious state politics. States led by Republican governors and legislatures opposed to the ACA had to decide whether to accept extensive federal funding to expand Medicaid for citizens in their states who were earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. This Report from the States focuses on Ohio, whose Republican governor successfully navigated the rancorous politics of Medicaid to expand the state's program in 2014. Working at odds with his own party and gaining praise from traditional political opponents for his leadership on the issue, John Kasich circumvented the state legislature, turning to the Controlling Board to bring about initial expansion. In the wake of Kasich's landslide reelection in 2014, the politics of expansion and reauthorization have given way to a pervasive discourse of "reform." In this next phase Kasich has endorsed policy positions (e.g., cost sharing, a focus on "personal responsibility") that reunite him with his party's more traditional view of Medicaid while continuing to emphasize the importance of expansion. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  13. A chronic care ostomy self-management program for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouse, Robert S; Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Wendel, Christopher S; Cobb, Martha D; Tallman, Nancy J; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Sun, Virginia; Hibbard, Judith H; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with ostomies experience extensive changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily routine. Patients and families are typically forced to use trial and error to improve self-management. This is a longitudinal one-group design pilot study of a five-session ostomy self-care curriculum based on the Chronic Care Model to improve HRQOL and self-management for cancer survivors with ostomies. Participants were surveyed to evaluate each session. Multiple instruments were administered to examine outcomes at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month follow-up (Patient Activation Measure, self-efficacy, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Ways of Coping, Group Health Association of America Satisfaction with ostomy care survey, and the City of Hope Quality of Life Ostomy). Changes from pre-intervention to post-intervention and pre-intervention to follow-up were evaluated with paired t-tests. Text responses were coded and evaluated for important themes and recommendations. Thirty-eight subjects participated in the study. Most had a history of rectal cancer (60.5%) or bladder cancer (28.9%). Participants rated the overall program high (4.4-4.8 on 5-point scale). Text feedback indicated that participants enjoyed the group forums, wanted more participants, and more hands-on training. Scores on multiple surveys were shown to be improved and sustained, including patient activation (p = 0.0004), self-efficacy (p = 0.006), total HRQOL (p = 0.01), physical well-being (p = 0.005), and social well-being (p = 0.002). Survivor anxiety was significantly reduced by follow-up (p = 0.047). This self-management ostomy program can help cancer survivors with ostomies adapt to their stoma. Initiating this program in the community setting would be beneficial to many cancer survivors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCU) Annual Spending and Performance Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCU or Unit) investigate and prosecute Medicaid fraud as well as patient abuse and neglect in health care facilities. OIG certifies,...

  16. Beliefs About a Complementary and Alternative Therapy-Based Chronic Pain Management Program for a Medicaid Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Ranney, Megan L; Patry, Emily J; McKenzie, Michelle; Baird, Janette; Green, Traci C

    2017-09-01

    Rhode Island Medicaid offers high emergency department utilizers the opportunity to take part in the Chronic Pain Program, an integrated treatment approach that includes free complementary therapies (massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture). The aim of the current analysis was to understand beliefs about the Rhode Island Chronic Pain Program from the perspective of the patient receiving services, the provider delivering services, and the administrator implementing the program. A qualitative interview-based study. Patients (N = 24), providers (N = 13), and administrators (N = 11) who were already involved, or were eligible to be involved, in the Chronic Pain Program. Semistructured interviews were conducted to elicit information about experiences with the program. Transcriptions of audio recordings were analyzed according to principles of deductive thematic analysis. Patient interviews revealed five themes: 1) relationship between stress and pain, 2) trusting patient-provider relationships, 3) increased quality of life, 4) temporary pain relief, and 5) anxiety and discomfort associated with acupuncture. Provider interviews revealed three themes: 1) a way to reach the disenfranchised, 2) not enough visits with patients, and 3) opportunity to build relationships with patients. Administrator interviews revealed two themes: 1) a means to offer a range of support services to complicated patients and 2) unanswered questions over whether the program adequately serves patients with the greatest needs. Key stakeholders in this new initiative agree that the Rhode Island Chronic Pain Program shows promise and that the holistic approach may be a good match for this hard-to-reach population. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Design Challenges of an Episode-Based Payment Model in Oncology: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Oncology Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Ronald M; Muldoon, L Daniel; Schumacher, Heidi K; Strawbridge, Larisa M; York, Andrew W; Mortimer, Laura K; Falb, Alison F; Cox, Katherine J; Bazell, Carol; Lukens, Ellen W; Kapp, Mary C; Rajkumar, Rahul; Bassano, Amy; Conway, Patrick H

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services developed the Oncology Care Model as an episode-based payment model to encourage participating practitioners to provide higher-quality, better-coordinated care at a lower cost to the nearly three-quarter million fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who receive chemotherapy each year. Episode payment models can be complex. They combine into a single benchmark price all payments for services during an episode of illness, many of which may be delivered at different times by different providers in different locations. Policy and technical decisions include the definition of the episode, including its initiation, duration, and included services; the identification of beneficiaries included in the model; and beneficiary attribution to practitioners with overall responsibility for managing their care. In addition, the calculation and risk adjustment of benchmark episode prices for the bundle of services must reflect geographic cost variations and diverse patient populations, including varying disease subtypes, medical comorbidities, changes in standards of care over time, the adoption of expensive new drugs (especially in oncology), as well as diverse practice patterns. Other steps include timely monitoring and intervention as needed to avoid shifting the attribution of beneficiaries on the basis of their expected episode expenditures as well as to ensure the provision of necessary medical services and the development of a meaningful link to quality measurement and improvement through the episode-based payment methodology. The complex and diverse nature of oncology business relationships and the specific rules and requirements of Medicare payment systems for different types of providers intensify these issues. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services believes that by sharing its approach to addressing these decisions and challenges, it may facilitate greater understanding of the model within the oncology

  18. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities... receipt of a deeming application from the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice also...

  19. The Wound CARE Instrument: the process for developing standards for wound management education and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsted, Heather L; Woodbury, M Gail; Stevenson, Kimberly

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the collaborative process undertaken by the Canadian Association for Enterostomal Therapy and the Canadian Association of Wound Care in an effort to improve the quality of wound prevention and management education and programming. The end result of this process is the Wound CARE Instrument which promotes an interprofessional, collaborative appraisal process to support the development, adoption or adaption of wound management educational events and programs. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  20. Evaluation of a program to improve diabetes care through intensified care management activities and diabetes medication copayment reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Stephen J; Johnson, Scott; Higgins, Tara; Quilliam, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Medication copayment reduction can be integrated with disease management programs to incentivize patient engagement in chronic care management. While disease management programs in diabetes have been evaluated across a range of settings and designs, less is known regarding the effectiveness of copayment reduction as a component of disease management. To evaluate the short-term results of a diabetes-focused disease management program that included copayment reduction, care coordination, and patient goal setting, focusing on rates of evidence-based care processes and all-cause pharmacy and health care costs. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island offered large employer groups the opportunity to participate in a diabetes disease management initiative that featured reduced copayments (from $7/$25/$40 for generic, tier 2, and tier 3 drugs, respectively, to $0 for generic and $0-$2 for brand drugs) for diabetes-related medications. In return for the copayment reduction, participants agreed to the following: (a) participate in care coordination with a case manager, (b) have an annual physical examination, (c) have a hemoglobin A1c blood test at least twice annually, and (d) have a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test at least once annually. Patients received personalized support provided by a registered nurse and dietician, disease-related education provided by nurses, and intensified case management services, including working with a health coach to establish healthy behavioral change goals. All study subjects were aged 18 years or older and had at least 1 ICD-9-CM code for diabetes and at least 1 claim for an antidiabetic drug during a 12-month measurement period, which was each subject's most recent 12-month period of continuous enrollment from January 1, 2008, through May 31, 2010. Administrative claims data were used to determine the percentage of intervention (participating) and nonintervention (nonparticipating) subjects from among all of the plan

  1. Association of Expanded Medicaid Coverage With Hospital Length of Stay After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmacher, Jeremy L; Townsend, Kerry; Seavey, Caleb; Gannon, Stephanie; Schroeder, Mary; Gondek, Stephen; Collins, Lois; Amdur, Richard L; Sarani, Babak

    2017-10-01

    The expansion of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act is a state-level decision that affects how patients with traumatic injury (trauma patients) interact with locoregional health care systems. Washington, DC; Maryland; and Virginia represent 3 unique payer systems with liberal, moderate, and no Medicaid expansion, respectively, under the Affordable Care Act. Characterizing the association of Medicaid expansion with hospitalization after injury is vital in the disposition planning for these patients. To determine the association between expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act and duration of hospitalization after injury. This retrospective cohort study included patients admitted from Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC, to a single level I trauma center. Data were collected from January 1, 2013, through March 6, 2016, in Virginia and Washington, DC, and from May 1, 2013, through March 6, 2016, in Maryland. All patients with Medicare or Medicaid coverage and all uninsured patients were included. Patients with private insurance, patients with severe head or pelvic injuries, and those who died during hospitalization were excluded. Hospital length of stay (LOS) and whether its association with patient insurance status varied by state of residence. A total of 2314 patients (1541 men [66.6%] and 773 women [33.4%]; mean [SD] age, 52.9 [22.8] years) were enrolled in the study. The uninsured rate in the Washington, DC, cohort (190 of 1699 [11.2%]) was significantly lower compared with rates in the Virginia (141 of 296 [47.6%]) or the Maryland (106 of 319 [33.2%]) cohort (P Medicaid vs non-Medicaid recipients varied significantly by state. For Medicaid recipients, mean LOS in Washington, DC, was significantly shorter (2.57 days; 95% CI, 2.36-2.79 days) than in Maryland (3.51 days; 95% CI, 2.81-4.38 days; P = .02) or Virginia (3.9 days; 95% CI, 2.79-5.45 days; P = .05). Expanded Medicaid eligibility is associated with shorter

  2. Using Medicaid and CHIP claims data to support pediatric quality measurement: lessons from 3 centers of excellence in measure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidengil, Courtney; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Bailey, L Charles; Cawthon, Mary Lawrence; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Nakamura, Mari M; Schiff, Jeffrey; Schuster, Mark A; Schneider, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    We sought to explore the claims data-related issues relevant to quality measure development for Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), illustrating the challenges encountered and solutions developed around 3 distinct performance measure topics: care coordination for children with complex needs, quality of care for high-prevalence conditions, and hospital readmissions. Each of 3 centers of excellence presents an example that illustrates the challenges of using claims data for quality measurement. Our Centers of Excellence in pediatric quality measurement used innovative methods to develop algorithms that use Medicaid claims data to identify children with complex needs; overcome some shortcomings of existing data for measuring quality of care for common conditions such as otitis media; and identify readmissions after hospitalizations for lower respiratory infections. Our experience constructing quality measure specifications using claims data suggests that it will be challenging to measure key quality of care constructs for Medicaid-insured children at a national level in a timely and consistent way. Without better data to underpin pediatric quality measurement, Medicaid and CHIP will have difficulty using some existing measures for accountability, value-based purchasing, and quality improvement both across states and within states. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospitalization of nursing home residents: the effects of states' Medicaid payment and bed-hold policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Grabowski, David C; Zinn, Jacqueline; Schleinitz, Mark; Feng, Zhanlian; Miller, Susan; Mor, Vince

    2007-08-01

    Hospitalizations of nursing home residents are costly and expose residents to iatrogenic disease and social and psychological harm. Economic constraints imposed by payers of care, predominantly Medicaid policies, are hypothesized to impact hospitalizations. Federally mandated resident assessments were merged with Medicare claims and eligibility files to determine hospitalizations and death within 150 days of baseline assessment. Nursing home and market characteristics were obtained from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting, and the Area Resource File, respectively. States' average daily Medicaid nursing home payments and bed-hold policies were obtained independently. Prospective cohort study of 570,614 older (> or =65-year-old), non-MCO (Medicare Managed Care), long-stay (> or =90 days) residents in 8,997 urban, freestanding nursing homes assessed between April and June 2000, using multilevel models to test the impact of state policies on hospitalizations controlling for resident, nursing home, and market characteristics. Overall, 99,379 (17.4 percent) residents were hospitalized with rates varying from 8.4 percent in Utah to 24.9 percent in Louisiana. Higher Medicaid per diem was associated with lower odds of hospitalizations (5 percent lower for each $10 above average $103.5, confidence intervals [CI] 0.91-0.99). Hospitalization odds were higher by 36 percent in states with bed-hold policies (CI: 1.12-1.63). State Medicaid bed-hold policy and per-diem payment have important implications for nursing home hospitalizations, which are predominantly financed by Medicare. This study emphasizes the importance of properly aligning state Medicaid and federal Medicare policies in regards to the subsidy of acute, maintenance, and preventive care in the nursing home setting.

  4. Implementation of a diabetes self-management education program in primary care for adults using shared medical appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement diabetes self-management education in primary care using the Chronic Care Model and shared medical appointments (SMA) to provide evidence-based interventions to improve process and measure outcomes. A quality improvement project using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle was implemented in a primary care setting in South Texas to provide diabetes self-management education for adults. Biological measures were evaluated in 70 patients at initiation of the project and thereafter based on current practice guidelines. The results of the project were consistent with the literature regarding the benefits, sustainability, and viability of SMA. As compared with that in studies presented in the literature, the patient population who participated in SMA had similar outcomes regarding improvement in A1C, self-management skills, and satisfaction. SMA are an innovative system redesign concept with the potential to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with multiple and chronic health conditions while still being an efficient, effective, financially viable, and sustainable program. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, innovative models of care can meet the growing demand for access and utilization of diabetes self-management education programs. Programs focusing on chronic conditions to improve outcomes can be replicated by health care providers in primary care settings. SMA can increase revenue and productivity, improve disease management, and increase provider and patient satisfaction.

  5. Medicaid CHIP ESPC Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Environmental Scanning and Program Characteristic (ESPC) Database is in a Microsoft (MS) Access format and contains Medicaid and CHIP data, for the 50 states and...

  6. Innovating in health care management education: development of an accelerated MBA and MPH degree program at Yale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Forman, Howard P; Pistell, Anne F; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges.

  7. 75 FR 69591 - Medicaid Program; Withdrawal of Determination of Average Manufacturer Price, Multiple Source Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ..., Multiple Source Drug Definition, and Upper Limits for Multiple Source Drugs AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... withdrawing the definition of ``multiple source drug'' as it was revised in the ``Medicaid Program; Multiple Source Drug Definition'' final rule published in the October 7, 2008 Federal Register. DATES: Effective...

  8. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirtcliff R Mike

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. Methods As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Results Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93. The mean (SD number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5 in the test population and 1.6 (2.5 in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04. Conclusions The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  9. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Sutherland, Marilynn; Shirtcliff, R Mike; Ludwig, Sharity; Smolen, Darlene

    2010-02-18

    A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid) in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93). The mean (SD) number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5) in the test population and 1.6 (2.5) in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04). The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  10. Prenatal Care: Medicaid Recipients and Uninsured Women Obtain Insufficient Care. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Women who had no health insurance or who were enrolled in Medicaid were interviewed to determine the extent of their prenatal care. Those most likely to obtain insufficient care were the women who were uninsured, poorly educated, Black or Hispanic, or teenagers from large urban areas. Barriers to earlier or more frequent prenatal care were the…

  11. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE... MEDICAID Notification to OIG of State or Local Convictions of Crimes Against Medicaid § 1002.230 Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. (a) The State agency must notify the OIG...

  12. The effect of nursing management development program on clinical competency in coronary care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Vaezi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are the main members in nursing cares and nursing managers can improve their clinical competency by applying better leadership skills. This study carried out to determine the effect of nursing management program on clinical competency of nurses in a coronary care unit (CCU.Methods: A quasi-experimental study was carried out in two educational hospitals in Yazd- Iran. These hospitals were allocated randomly in case and control hospitals. 25 matched nurses were selected by convenience sampling from both case and control hospitals. The clinical competency of nurses was measured by related questioners consisted of two dimensions caring and care management behaviors by self-evaluation and head nurse evaluation in case and control groups. Then, the intervention was implemented in four stages including nurse's development, managers' development, adaptation and supervision period during four months in the case group. After intervention, clinical competency of nurses was measured in both groups.Results: The results showed that before intervention more than 80% of nurses in two groups was in the moderate clinical competency level and they were proficient based on Benner's skill acquisition model. After intervention, nurses' clinical competency improved to higher level in case group but it didn't change in control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Creating necessary modifications in nursing environments through the management development program by head nurses may improve nurses' clinical competency.

  13. An Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist with Children Enrolled in Medicaid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Roger Alan; Armstrong, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The federal Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program requires mental health screening of Medicaid-eligible children as part of primary care medical assessments. However, decisions related to selection of a screening tool remain with the states. States need access to brief, cost effective, easily administered screening…

  14. Closing Kynect and Restructuring Medicaid Threaten Kentucky's Health and Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Charles B; Vanderford, Nathan L

    2017-08-01

    Following passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the United States, the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, Kynect, began operating in Kentucky in October 2013. Kentucky expanded Medicaid eligibility in January 2014. Together, Kynect and Medicaid expansion provided access to affordable health care coverage to hundreds of thousands of individuals in Kentucky. However, following the Kentucky gubernatorial election in 2015, the newly inaugurated governor moved to dismantle Kynect and restructure the Medicaid expansion, jeopardizing public health gains and the state economy. As the first state to announce both the closure and restructuring of a state health insurance marketplace and Medicaid expansion, Kentucky may serve as a test case for the rest of the nation for reversal of ACA-related health policies. This article describes Kynect and the Kentucky Medicaid expansion and examines the potential short-term and long-term impacts that may occur following changes in state health policy. Furthermore, this article will offer potential strategies to ameliorate the expected negative impacts of disruption of both Kynect and the Medicaid expansion, such as the creation of a new state insurance marketplace under a new governor, the implementation of a private option, and increasing the state minimum wage for workers. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  15. Medicaid Crowd-Out of Private Long-Term Care Insurance Demand : Evidence from the Health and Retirement Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.R.; Coe, N.B.; Finkelstein, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence of Medicaid crowd out of demand for private long-term care insurance. Using data on the near- and young-elderly in the Health and Retirement Survey, our central estimate suggests that a $10,000 decrease in the level of assets an individual can keep while

  16. Making fair decisions about financing care for persons with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, W L; Winkenwerder, W

    1988-01-01

    An estimated 40 percent of the nation's 55,000 persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have received care under the Medicaid Program, which is administered by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and funded jointly by the Federal Government and the States. In fiscal year 1988, Medicaid will spend between $700 and $750 million for AIDS care and treatment. Medicaid spending on AIDS is likely to reach $2.4 billion by fiscal year 1992, an estimate that does not include costs of treatment with zidovudine (AZT). Four policy principles are proposed for meeting this new cost burden in a way that is fair, responsive, efficient, and in harmony with our current joint public-private system of health care financing. The four guidelines are to (a) treat AIDS as any other serious disease, without the creation of a disease-specific entitlement program; (b) bring AIDS treatment financing into the mainstream of the health care financing system, making it a shared responsibility and promoting initiatives such as high-risk insurance pools: (c) give States the flexibility to meet local needs, including Medicaid home care and community-based care services waivers; (d) encourage health care professionals to meet their obligation to care for AIDS patients. PMID:3131823

  17. Wisconsins Experience with Medicaid Auto Enrollment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) relies heavily on the expansion of Medicaid eligibility to cover uninsured populations. In February 2008,...

  18. Electronic Fraud Detection in the U.S. Medicaid Healthcare Program: Lessons Learned from other Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travaille, Peter; Mueller, Roland; Thornton, Dallas; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that between $600 and $850 billion annually is lost to fraud, waste, and abuse in the US healthcare system,with $125 to $175 billion of this due to fraudulent activity (Kelley 2009). Medicaid, a state-run, federally-matchedgovernment program which accounts for roughly one-quarter of

  19. Innovating in Health Care Management Education: Development of an Accelerated MBA and MPH Degree Program at Yale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Howard P.; Pistell, Anne F.; Nembhard, Ingrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges. PMID:25706023

  20. Impact of state Medicaid coverage on utilization of inpatient rehabilitation facilities among patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Burke, James F; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Meurer, William J; Adelman, Eric E; Kerber, Kevin A; Callaghan, Brian C; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-08-01

    Poststroke rehabilitation is associated with improved outcomes. Medicaid coverage of inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) admissions varies by state. We explored the role of state Medicaid IRF coverage on IRF utilization among patients with stroke. Working age ischemic stroke patients with Medicaid were identified from the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Medicaid coverage of IRFs (yes versus no) was ascertained. Primary outcome was discharge to IRF (versus other discharge destinations). We fit a logistic regression model that included patient demographics, Medicaid coverage, comorbidities, length of stay, tissue-type plasminogen activator use, state Medicaid IRF coverage, and the interaction between patient Medicaid status and state Medicaid IRF coverage while accounting for hospital clustering. Medicaid did not cover IRFs in 4 (TN, TX, SC, WV) of 42 states. The impact of State Medicaid IRF coverage was limited to Medicaid stroke patients (P for interaction stroke patients in states with Medicaid IRF coverage, Medicaid stroke patients hospitalized in states without Medicaid IRF coverage were less likely to be discharged to an IRF of 11.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.5%-14.7%) versus 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-20.8%), Pstroke patients with Medicaid. Given the increasing stroke incidence among the working age and Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, careful attention to state Medicaid policy for poststroke rehabilitation and analysis of its effects on stroke outcome disparities are warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Medicare and Medicaid Trends in Health Care Sectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides monthly and fiscal-year-to-date income and expenditure trends for Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) and...

  2. Comparing Emergency Department Use Among Medicaid and Commercial Patients Using All-Payer All-Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjee; McConnell, K John; Sun, Benjamin C

    2017-08-01

    The high rate of emergency department (ED) use by Medicaid patients is not fully understood. The objective of this paper is (1) to provide context for ED service use by comparing Medicaid and commercial patients' differences across ED and non-ED health service use, and (2) to assess the extent to which Medicaid-commercial differences in ED use can be explained by observable factors in administrative data. Statistical decomposition methods were applied to ED, mental health, and inpatient care using 2011-2013 Medicaid and commercial insurance claims from the Oregon All Payer All Claims database. Demographics, comorbidities, health services use, and neighborhood characteristics accounted for 44% of the Medicaid-commercial difference in ED use, compared to 83% for mental health care and 75% for inpatient care. This suggests that relative to mental health and inpatient care, a large portion of ED use cannot be explained by administrative data. Models that further accounted for patient access to different primary care physicians explained an additional 8% of the Medicaid-commercial difference in ED use, suggesting that the quality of primary care may influence ED use. The remaining unexplained difference suggests that appropriately reducing ED use remains a credible target for policy makers, although success may require knowledge about patients' perceptions and behaviors as well as social determinants of health.

  3. 42 CFR 1002.3 - Disclosure by providers and State Medicaid agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disclosure by providers and State Medicaid agencies... HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-STATE-INITIATED EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICAID General Provisions § 1002.3 Disclosure by providers and State Medicaid agencies. (a) Information that must be...

  4. Predicting Healthcare Fraud in Medicaid: A Multidimensional Data Model and Analysis Techniques for Fraud Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Dallas; Mueller, Roland; Schoutsen, Paulus; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately $700 billion is lost due to fraud, waste, and abuse in the US healthcare system. Medicaid has been particularly susceptible target for fraud in recent years, with a distributed management model, limited cross- program communications, and a difficult-to-track

  5. Medicaid Expenditures for Fee-for-Service Enrollees with Behavioral Diagnoses: Findings from a 50 State Claims Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martha C; Lally, Cathy; Druss, Benjamin G

    2017-01-01

    Medicaid is an important funder of care for individuals with behavioral (psychiatric and/or substance use) diagnoses, and expenditures will likely increase with expansion of services under the Affordable Care Act. This study provides national estimates of Medicaid expenditures using a comprehensive sample of fee-for-service Medicaid enrollees with behavioral diagnoses. Data for analysis came from 2003 to 2004 Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) files for 50 states and the District of Columbia. Individuals with behavioral diagnoses had high rates of chronic medical comorbidities, and expenditures for medical (non-behavioral) diagnoses accounted for 74 % of their health care expenditures. Total Medicaid expenditure was approximately 15 billion dollars (equivalent to 18.91 billion in 2016 dollars) for individuals with any behavioral diagnosis. Medicaid fee-for-service beneficiaries with behavioral diagnoses have a high treated prevalence of individual medical comorbid conditions, and the majority of health care expenditures in these individuals are for medical, rather than behavioral health, services.

  6. Is Distance to Provider a Barrier to Care for Medicaid Patients with Breast, Colorectal, or Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, John F.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Donahue, Sara M. A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Blough, David K.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distance to provider might be an important barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients who qualify for Medicaid coverage. Whether driving time or driving distance is a better indicator of travel burden is also of interest. Methods: Driving distances and times from patient residence to primary care provider were…

  7. Limits on same-day billing in Medicaid hinders integration of behavioral health into the medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Dylan H; Jones, Erynne E

    2016-02-01

    The potential expansion of insurance coverage through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 can facilitate the reduction of access barriers and improved quality for behavioral health care. More than 5 million of the newly insured are expected to have mental health and substance use disorders. In addition, state and federal efforts to integrate behavioral and medical health needs through patient-centered medical home models and innovations in payment strategies provide an unprecedented opportunity to use federal financial support to improve not only access to care, but also improve quality through active care coordination, use of interdisciplinary teams, colocating services, and engaging in warm hand-offs between providers in the same setting. These potential advances are hindered in 24 different states because of Medicaid payment policy, with 7 explicitly limiting the ability to reimburse for physical health and behavioral health services on the same day for all providers. Without the ability for providers to be reimbursed for different services on the same day to improve behavioral and medical health care coordination, these states could be limited in their ability to improve care via patient-centered approaches and interdisciplinary team-based care that would involve physicians, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals. Limits on same-day billing in Medicaid programs could impact up to 36.7 million people in 24 states, which is approximately 52.6% of all Medicaid enrollees. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP): Implementing Social and Recreational Activity into Case-Managed Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lee-Fay; Baker, Jessica Rose; Harrison, Fleur; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Haertsch, Maggie; Camp, Cameron; Skropeta, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP) incorporates social support and recreational activities into case-managed home care. This study's aim was to evaluate the effect of LEAP on engagement, mood, and behavior of home care clients, and on case managers and care workers. Quasi-experimental. Five Australian aged home care providers, including 2 specializing in care for ethnic minorities. Clients (n = 189) from 5 home care providers participated. The 12-month program had 3 components: (1) engaging support of management and staff; (2) a champion to drive practice change; (3) staff training. Case managers were trained to set meaningful social and/or recreational goals during care planning. Care workers were trained in good communication, to promote client independence and choice, and in techniques such as Montessori activities, reminiscence, music, physical activity, and humor. Data were collected 6 months before program commencement, at baseline, and 6 and 12 months. The Homecare Measure of Engagement Staff report and Client-Family interview were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory; apathy, dysphoria, and agitation subscales of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Clinician Rating; the geriatric depression scale; UCLA loneliness scale; and home care satisfaction scale. Staff provided information on confidence in engaging clients and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Twelve months after program commencement, clients showed a significant increase in self- or family-reported client engagement (b = 5.39, t[113.09] = 3.93, P recreationally engage clients (b = 0.52, t(21.33) = 2.80, P = .011, b = 0.29, t(198.69) = 2.58, P = .011, respectively). There were no significant changes in care worker-rated client engagement or client or family self-complete measures of depression or loneliness (P > .05). Client and family self-rated apathy increased over 12 months (b = 0.04, t(43.36) = 3.06, P = .004; b = 3.63, t(34.70) = 2.20, P

  9. State Medicaid reimbursement for nursing homes, 1978-86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James H.; Harrington, Charlene; Grant, Leslie A.

    1988-01-01

    State Medicaid reimbursement methods and rates are reported for the period 1978-86 for skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities. A cross-sectional time series regression analysis of Medicaid reimbursement rates on methods showed that States using prospective class reimbursement had significantly lower rates for the period 1982-86. States using prospective facility-specific reimbursement methods had lower rates than retrospective methods in 1983-84. PMID:10312516

  10. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Chenoweth, Lynn; Cunich, Michelle; Kendig, Hal

    2013-10-25

    A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care--CLiAC) was developed to improve managers' leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be compared by cluster

  11. Evaluation of a Telephone-Delivered, Community-Based Collaborative Care Management Program for Caregivers of Older Adults with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Wray, Laura O; DiFilippo, Suzanne; Streim, Joel; Oslin, David

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether a community-based, telephone-delivered, brief patient/caregiver-centered collaborative dementia care management intervention is associated with improved caregiver and care recipient (CR) outcomes. Longitudinal program evaluation of a clinical intervention; assessments at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up. General community. Caregivers (N = 440) of older, community-dwelling, low-income CRs prescribed a psychotropic medication by a primary care provider who met criteria for dementia and were enrolled in the SUpporting Seniors Receiving Treatment And INtervention (SUSTAIN) program for older adults. Dementia care management versus clinical evaluation only. Perceived caregiving burden and caregiver general health (primary outcomes); CR neuropsychiatric symptoms and caregiver distress in response to CRs' challenging dementia-related behaviors (secondary outcomes). Caregivers were, on average, 64.0 (SD: 11.8) years old and 62.6% provided care for the CR for 20 or more hours per week. The majority of the sample was female (73.2%), non-Hispanic White (90.2%), and spousal caregivers (72.5%). Adjusted longitudinal models of baseline and 3- and 6-month data suggest that compared with caregivers receiving clinical evaluation only, caregivers receiving care management reported greater reductions in burden over time. Subgroup analyses also showed statistically significant reductions in caregiver-reported frequency of CR dementia-related behaviors and caregiver distress in response to those symptoms at 3-month follow-up. A community-based, telephone-delivered care management program for caregivers of individuals with dementia is associated with favorable caregiver and CR-related outcomes. Findings support replication and further research in the impact of tailored, collaborative dementia care management programs that address barriers to access and engagement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. [Management of heart failure in cardiology and primary care (MICCAP) program: Improving the management of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Pallares, V; Egocheaga, M I; Lobos, J M; Bover, R; Gómez Doblas, J J; Cosín, J

    2018-03-26

    Despite current treatments, morbidity and mortality of patients with heart failure remain high. The late diagnosis of heart failure, the insufficient heart failure treatment (i.e. not using the appropriate drugs, prescribing lower doses of drugs than recommended, etc.), and a poor coordination between different health care levels, may explain, at least in part, these figures. The Management of Heart Failure in Cardiology and Primary Care (MICCAP) program has been developed with the aim of optimising the integrated management of patients with heart failure between Primary Care and Cardiology, through the improvement of coordination between both health care levels. This includes continuous medical education to reinforce the diagnostic and therapeutic skills of general practitioners in the field of heart failure. The rationale and objectives of the MICCAP program are summarised in this article. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large sta...

  14. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management: final report of an eight-year program aimed at reducing care gaps in asthma management in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Dorval, E; Labrecque, M; Turgeon, M; Montague, T; Thivierge, R L

    2008-09-01

    Asthma care in Canada and around the world persistently falls short of optimal treatment. To optimize care, a systematic approach to identifying such shortfalls or 'care gaps', in which all stakeholders of the health care system (including patients) are involved, was proposed. Several projects of a multipartner, multidisciplinary disease management program, developed to optimize asthma care in Quebec, was conducted in a period of eight years. First, two population maps were produced to identify regional variations in asthma-related morbidity and to prioritize interventions for improving treatment. Second, current care was evaluated in a physician-patient cohort, confirming the many care gaps in asthma management. Third, two series of peer-reviewed outcome studies, targeting high-risk populations and specific asthma care gaps, were conducted. Finally, a process to integrate the best interventions into the health care system and an agenda for further research on optimal asthma management were proposed. Key observations from these studies included the identification of specific patterns of noncompliance in using inhaled corticosteroids, the failure of increased access to spirometry in asthma education centres to increase the number of education referrals, the transient improvement in educational abilities of nurses involved with an asthma hotline telephone service, and the beneficial effects of practice tools aimed at facilitating the assessment of asthma control and treatment needs by general practitioners. Disease management programs such as Towards Excellence in Asthma Management can provide valuable information on optimal strategies for improving treatment of asthma and other chronic diseases by identifying care gaps, improving guidelines implementation and optimizing care.

  15. 42 CFR 455.21 - Cooperation with State Medicaid fraud control units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperation with State Medicaid fraud control units... Detection and Investigation Program § 455.21 Cooperation with State Medicaid fraud control units. In a State with a Medicaid fraud control unit established and certified under subpart C of this part, (a) The...

  16. Association of mandated language access programming and quality of care provided by mental health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Snowden, Lonnie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association between language access programming and quality of psychiatric care received by persons with limited English proficiency (LEP). In 1999, the California Department of Mental Health required county Medicaid agencies to implement a "threshold language access policy" to meet the state's Title VI obligations. This policy required Medi-Cal agencies to provide language access programming, including access to interpreters and translated written material, to speakers of languages other than English if the language was spoken by at least 3,000, or 5%, of the county's Medicaid population. Using a longitudinal study design with a nonequivalent control group, this study examined the quality of care provided to Spanish speakers with LEP and a severe mental illness before and after implementation of mandatory language access programming. Quality was measured by receipt of at least two follow-up medication visits within 90 days or three visits within 180 days of an initial medication visit over a period of 38 quarter-years. On average, only 40% of Spanish-speaking clients received at least three medication follow-up visits within 180 days. In multivariate analyses, language access programming was not associated with receipt of at least two medication follow-up visits within 90 days or at least three visits within 180 days. This study found no evidence that language access programming led to increased rates of follow-up medication visits for clients with LEP.

  17. 76 FR 28196 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Opportunities for Alignment Under Medicaid and Medicare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... partner with States, providers, beneficiaries and their caregivers, and other stakeholders to improve... conflicting Medicaid and Medicare requirements. This document represents the first step. We have compiled what.... We will then determine which issues to address and in what order and timeframe. All areas are...

  18. Medicaid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicaid is government health insurance that helps many low-income people in the United States to pay ... You have to meet certain requirements to get Medicaid help. These might involve Your age Whether you ...

  19. Medicaid’s Role in Financing Health Care for Children With Behavioral Health Care Needs in the Special Education System: Implications of the Deficit Reduction Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, David S.; Machefsky, Aliza; Rubin, David; Feudtner, Chris; Pita, Susmita; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent changes to Medicaid policy may have unintended consequences in the education system. This study estimated the potential financial impact of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) on school districts by calculating Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care expenditures for school-aged children in general and children in special education in particular. METHODS Medicaid claims and special education records of youth ages 6 to 18 years in Philadelphia, PA, were merged for calendar year 2002. Behavioral health care volume, type, and expenditures were compared between Medicaid-enrolled children receiving and not receiving special education. RESULTS Significant overlap existed among the 126,533 children who were either Medicaid enrolled (114,257) or received special education (27,620). Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care was used by 21% of children receiving special education (37% of those Medicaid enrolled) and 15% of other Medicaid-enrolled children. Total expenditures were $197.8 million, 40% of which was spent on the 5728 children in special education and 60% of which was spent on 15,092 other children. CONCLUSIONS Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health services disproportionately support special education students, with expenditures equivalent to 4% of Philadelphia’s $2 billion education budget. The results suggest that special education programs depend on Medicaid-reimbursed services, the financing of which the DRA may jeopardize. PMID:18808472

  20. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  1. The Effects of State Medicaid Policies on the Dynamic Savings Patterns and Medicaid Enrollment of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lara; Gilleskie, Donna B.

    2012-01-01

    Medicaid policies that may affect long-term care decisions vary across states and time. Using data from the 1993, 1995, 1998, and 2000 waves of the Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old Survey, we estimate a dynamic empirical model of health insurance coverage, long-term care arrangement, asset and gift behavior, and health transitions…

  2. Changes in North Carolina maternal health service use and outcomes among medicaid-enrolled pregnant women during state budget cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilenti, Dorothy; Kum, Hye-Chung; Wells, Rebecca; Whitmire, J Timothy; Goyal, Ravi K; Hillemeier, Marianne M

    2015-01-01

    The recent recession has weakened the US health and human service safety net. Questions about implications for mothers and children prompted this study, which tested for changes in maternal service use and outcomes among North Carolina women with deliveries covered through Medicaid before and after a year of significant state budget cuts. Data for Medicaid covered deliveries from April-June 2009 (pre) and from April-June 2010 (post) were derived from birth certificates, Medicaid claims and eligibility files, and WIC (Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children) records. These time periods represent the quarter immediately before as well as the final quarter of a state fiscal year 2010 (July 2009-June 2010) characterized by substantial state budget cuts, including an October 2009 reduction in reimbursement rates for maternity care coordination. We examined how often women received medical care, maternity care coordination, family planning services, and the average numbers of obstetrical encounters, as well as the prevalence of excessive pregnancy weight gain, preterm delivery, and low birth weight. By the end of a year of substantial state budget cuts, women covered through Medicaid had fewer obstetrical visits in all trimesters as well as postpartum (P budget cuts. Maternal and infant child health outcomes measured in this study did not change during that year. Future monitoring is warranted to ensure that maternal health service access remains adequate.

  3. Evaluation of a training program to assist care staff to better recognize and manage depression among palliative care patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita R P; Goldhammer, Denisa; Mellor, David; Hallford, David; Davison, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a training program to improve the knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy of palliative care staff and thus enable them to better detect and manage depression among palliative care patients and their families. Participants were 90 professional carers who completed a four-session training program. Knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and barriers to working with depressed patients were assessed preintervention, post-intervention, and at a three-month follow-up. The results demonstrated that compared to the control group, the intervention group had improved in all of these areas. Improvements were maintained at the three-month follow-up in all areas except attitudes. The results of this study indicate the importance of training in managing depression among palliative care staff. Booster sessions will likely be needed to ensure that training program gains are maintained.

  4. 75 FR 30046 - Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-June 14, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ..., Employee Benefits Security Administration, DOL at (202) 693-8335. News media representatives must contact... eligible for benefits under titles XIX or XXI of the Social Security Act (the Act) to enable them to enroll...] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP...

  5. Functional resistance activities to impact frailty: A protocol for a randomized controlled trial involving home care aide and frail older adult dyads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K. Danilovich, PT, DPT, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A growing number of older adults use in-home Medicaid Waiver Home and Community Based services (HCBS to facilitate aging-in-place. A primary service of this program is Home Care Aide assistance with activities of daily living and homemaker needs. Despite the known benefits of exercise, exercise programs are currently not offered to clients in the Medicaid Waiver system. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe a six-month Home Care Aide-led resistance exercise intervention protocol for frail older adults receiving Medicaid waiver services. Methods/design: A randomized controlled trial will be used. We will enroll 126 Home Care Aide-client dyads for a 6-month exercise intervention. The intervention will consist of training phases to promote muscle strength, power, and endurance. We will use an intention to treat principle using mixed effects models for the quantitative outcomes. To analyze qualitative outcomes, we will use conventional content analysis to examine themes from participant program evaluations. Discussion: As greater numbers of adults age in place with frailty and employ Home Care Aides to help manage functional limitations, interventions embedded within usual care services play a critical role in bringing exercise into the home setting. The research described in this protocol will provide important knowledge about the impact of a Home Care Aide-led exercise intervention in reducing frailty in older adults. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02942992; Keywords: Frailty, Dyad, Formal caregivers, Resistance exercise

  6. Quality of life and economic burdens of malocclusion in U.S. patients enrolled in Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Brian W; Kiyak, H Asuman; Masters, Samuel H; McGorray, Susan P; Lincoln, Adam; King, Gregory

    2010-10-01

    Patients enrolled in Medicaid have limited access to orthodontic services in the United States. No studies are available, to the authors' knowledge, regarding the clinical and psychosocial burdens of malocclusion on these patients from an economic perspective. The authors conducted a systematic review of the relevant economic literature. They identified issues from the perspectives of the various stakeholders (dentists, patients and parents, Medicaid programs) and developed a conceptual model for studying decision making focused on the strategy of providing early interceptive and preventive treatment rather than, or in addition to, comprehensive care in the patient's permanent dentition. Medicaid coverage and reimbursement amounts vary nationwide, and decision making associated with obtaining care can be complex. The perspectives of all relevant stakeholders deserve assessment. A conceptual framework of the cost-effectiveness of interceptive orthodontic treatment compared with comprehensive treatment illustrates the issues to be considered when evaluating these strategies. Policymakers and the dental community should identify creative solutions to addressing low-income families' limited access to orthodontic services and compare them from various perspectives with regard to their relative cost-effectiveness. Dentists should be aware of the multiple problems faced by low-income families in obtaining orthodontic services and the impact of stakeholder issues on access to care; they also should be proactive in helping low-income patients obtain needed orthodontic services.

  7. Spillover Effects of Adult Medicaid Expansions on Children's Use of Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Maya; Pollack, Craig Evan; Roberts, Eric T

    2017-12-01

    Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid enrollment has increased by ∼17 million adults, including many low-income parents. One potentially important, but little studied, consequence of expanding health insurance for parents is its effect on children's receipt of preventive services. By using state Medicaid eligibility thresholds linked to the 2001-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we assessed the relationship between changes in adult Medicaid eligibility and children's likelihood of receiving annual well-child visits (WCVs). In instrumental variable analyses, we used these changes in Medicaid eligibility to estimate the relationship between parental enrollment in Medicaid and children's receipt of WCVs. Our analytic sample consisted of 50 622 parent-child dyads in families with incomes Medicaid eligibility (measured relative to the federal poverty level) was associated with a 0.27 percentage point higher probability that a child received an annual WCV (95% confidence interval: 0.058 to 0.48 percentage points, P = .012). Instrumental variable analyses revealed that parental enrollment in Medicaid was associated with a 29 percentage point higher probability that their child received an annual WCV (95% confidence interval: 11 to 47 percentage points, P = .002). In our study, we demonstrate that Medicaid expansions targeted at low-income adults are associated with increased receipt of recommended pediatric preventive care for their children. This finding reveals an important spillover effect of parental insurance coverage that should be considered in future policy decisions surrounding adult Medicaid eligibility. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Exploring Characteristics and Health Care Utilization Trends Among Individuals Who Fall in the Health Insurance Assistance Gap in a Medicaid Nonexpansion State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Jean; Mir, Nageen; Monti, Denise; Shacham, Enbal; Politi, Mary C

    2018-01-01

    States that did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the United States have seen a growth in the number of individuals who fall in the assistance gap, defined as having incomes above the Medicaid eligibility limit (≥44% of the federal poverty level) but below the lower limit (marketplace. The purpose of this article is to present findings from a secondary data analysis examining the characteristics of those who fell in the assistance gap ( n = 166) in Missouri, a Medicaid nonexpansion state, by comparing them with those who did not fall in the assistance gap ( n = 157). Participants completed online demographic questionnaires and self-reported measures of health and insurance status, health literacy, numeracy, and health insurance literacy. A select group completed a 1-year follow-up survey about health insurance enrollment and health care utilization. Compared with the nonassistance gap group, individuals in the assistance gap were more likely to have lower levels of education, have at least one chronic condition, be uninsured at baseline, and be seeking health care coverage for additional dependents. Individuals in the assistance gap had significantly lower annual incomes and higher annual premiums when compared with the nonassistance gap group and were less likely to be insured through the marketplace or other private insurance at the 1-year follow-up. Findings provide several practice and policy implications for expanding health insurance coverage, reducing costs, and improving access to care for underserved populations.

  9. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Methods Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be

  10. Market environment and Medicaid acceptance: What influences the access gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Amelia; Pajerowski, William; Polsky, Daniel; Richards, Michael R

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. health care system is undergoing significant changes. Two prominent shifts include millions added to Medicaid and greater integration and consolidation among firms. We empirically assess if these two industry trends may have implications for each other. Using experimentally derived ("secret shopper") data on primary care physicians' real-world behavior, we observe their willingness to accept new privately insured and Medicaid patients across 10 states. We combine this measure of patient acceptance with detailed information on physician and commercial insurer market structure and show that insurer and provider concentration are each positively associated with relative improvements in appointment availability for Medicaid patients. The former is consistent with a smaller price discrepancy between commercial and Medicaid patients and suggests a beneficial spillover from greater insurer market power. The findings for physician concentration do not align with a simple price bargaining explanation but do appear driven by physician firms that are not vertically integrated with a health system. These same firms also tend to rely more on nonphysician clinical staff. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. 76 FR 26341 - Medicaid Program; Methods for Assuring Access to Covered Medicaid Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... as part of their broader efforts to ``assure that payments are consistent with efficiency, economy... but not limited to, the beneficiaries' health care needs and characteristics, State or local service... care case management). Increasingly, States are developing service delivery models that emphasize...

  12. [The operation of the health program SICALIDAD: the role of managers in primary care and hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Cosme, José Arturo; Tetelboin-Henrion, Carolina; Torres-Cruz, César; Pineda-Pérez, Dayana; Villa-Contreras, Blanca Margarita

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the role of quality managers in health care units and health districts, identifying the constraints they experience in their performance. An interview guide and a questionnaire were carried out and were applied to quality managers in nine states as well as in Mexico City´s Health Services, in a Reference Federal Hospital and in a National Institute of Health. These instruments were analyzed using SPSS and Atlas.ti software. The activities done by the managers depend on the organizational level of services, which can be a care unit or the health jurisdiction. For each of these, we identified different order constraints that affect the performance of the role of management in the strategies to improve the quality of the services for population without social insurance, which together make up the government program called Integrated Quality Health System. Jurisdictional managers are the link between care units and state authorities in the management of information, while the medical units' managers drive operational strategies to improve the quality. Although the health program is implemented with the personal and infrastructure of the health system, it requires a greater institutionalization and strengthening of its structure and integration, as well as greater human and material resources.

  13. The impact of a proactive chronic care management program on hospital admission rates in a German health insurance society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2010-12-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who consented to participate in the chronic care management program. Intervention (n  = 17,319) and Comparison (n  = 5668) groups were defined based on records of participating (or not participating) in telephonic interactions. Changes in admission rates were calculated from the year prior to (Base) and year after program commencement. Comparative analyses were adjusted for age, sex, region of residence, and disease severity (stratification of 3 [least severe] to 1 [most severe]). Overall, the admission rate in the Intervention group decreased by 6.2% compared with a 14.9% increase in the Comparison group (P  management care calls can help reduce hospital admissions among German health insurance members with chronic disease.

  14. Receipt of Preventive Services After Oregon's Randomized Medicaid Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; Hoopes, Megan J; O'Malley, Jean P; Huguet, Nathalie; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; McConnell, K John; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    It is predicted that gaining health insurance via the Affordable Care Act will result in increased rates of preventive health services receipt in the U.S., primarily based on self-reported findings from previous health insurance expansion studies. This study examined the long-term (36-month) impact of Oregon's 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion ("Oregon Experiment") on receipt of 12 preventive care services in community health centers using electronic health record data. Demographic data from adult (aged 19-64 years) Oregon Experiment participants were probabilistically matched to electronic health record data from 49 Oregon community health centers within the OCHIN community health information network (N=10,643). Intent-to-treat analyses compared receipt of preventive services over a 36-month (2008-2011) period among those randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid versus not assigned, and instrumental variable analyses estimated the effect of actually gaining Medicaid coverage on preventive services receipt (data collected in 2012-2014; analysis performed in 2014-2015). Intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences between patients randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid (versus not assigned) for 8 of 12 assessed preventive services. In intent-to-treat analyses, Medicaid coverage significantly increased the odds of receipt of most preventive services (ORs ranging from 1.04 [95% CI=1.02, 1.06] for smoking assessment to 1.27 [95% CI=1.02, 1.57] for mammography). Rates of preventive services receipt will likely increase as community health center patients gain insurance through Affordable Care Act expansions. Continued effort is needed to increase health insurance coverage in an effort to decrease health disparities in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reforming Access: Trends in Medicaid Enrollment for New Medicare Beneficiaries, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Rahman, Momotazur; Mor, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether aligning the Part D low-income subsidy and Medicaid program enrollment pathways in 2010 increased Medicaid participation among new Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare enrollment records for years 2007-2011. We used a multinomial logistic model with state fixed effects to examine the annual change in limited and full Medicaid enrollment among new Medicare beneficiaries for 2 years before and after the reforms (2008-2011). We identified new Medicare beneficiaries in the years 2008-2011 and their participation in Medicaid based on Medicare enrollment records. The percentage of beneficiaries enrolling in limited Medicaid at the start of Medicare coverage increased in 2010 by 0.3 percentage points for individuals aging into Medicare and by 1.3 percentage points for those qualifying due to disability (p < .001). There was no significant difference in the size of enrollment increases between states with and without concurrent limited Medicaid eligibility expansions. Our findings suggest that streamlining financial assistance programs may improve Medicare beneficiaries' access to benefits. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... documentation must also describe how the health status of the recipient at the time of the face-to-face... [CMS 2348-P] RIN 0938-AQ36 Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy... document the existence of a face-to-face encounter (including through the use of telehealth) with the...

  17. Metabolic Testing for Adults in a State Medicaid Program Receiving Antipsychotics: Remaining Barriers to Achieving Population Health Prevention Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrato, Elaine H; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Brewer, Sarah E; Dickinson, L Miriam; Thomas, Deborah S K; Miller, Benjamin F; Dearing, James; Druss, Benjamin G; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid quality indicators track diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease screening in adults receiving antipsychotics and/or those with serious mental illness. To inform performance improvement interventions by evaluating the relative importance of patient, prescriber, and practice factors affecting metabolic testing. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Missouri Medicaid administrative claims data (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012) linked with prescriber market data. The analysis included 9316 adults (age, 18-64 years) who were starting antipsychotic medication. Secondary analysis included the subset of adults (n = 1813) for whom prescriber knowledge, attitudes, and behavior survey data were available. Generalized estimating equations were performed to identify factors associated with failure to receive annual testing during antipsychotic treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6 encounters vs none; 0.33 [0.28-0.39]). Analysis incorporating prescriber practice information found lower failure to receive glucose testing if the patient received care at a CMHC (0.74 [0.64-0.85]) or if the initiating prescriber was a primary care practitioner (0.81 [0.66-1.00]). However, the initiating prescriber specialty-setting was not associated with lipid testing. Compared with prior reports, progress has been made to improve diabetes screening, but lipid screening remains particularly underutilized. Medicaid performance improvement initiatives should target all prescriber settings and not just behavioral health.

  18. Development of a Computerized Medical History Profile for Children in Out-of-Home Placement Using Medicaid Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Deena J.; Scribano, Philip V.; Purnell, Tanjala S.; Kelleher, Kelly J.

    2010-01-01

    Children in out-of-home placements (foster children) often undergo multiple placement changes while under the care of child protective services. This instability can result in lack of health care continuity and poor health outcomes. This brief describes the development of a medical history profile, or passport, developed from Medicaid administrative data. A purposive sample of 25 youths was provided from a county child protective services agency. The patients were systematically matched with data from the state Medicaid agency. Using Medicaid claims/encounter data we generated health care profiles that provided information on historical use of ambulatory care, diagnoses, providers seen, medications used, and inpatient admissions. Profiles were however limited by missing provider information and non-specific diagnostic coding. Despite these limitations, Medicaid data-based profiles show the potential to be a cost efficient method for improving continuity of care for children in out-of-home placement. PMID:19648702

  19. Methods University Health System Can Use to Expand Medicaid Coverage to Uninsured Poor Parents with Medicaid Eligible Children: Policy Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMahon, III, Robert T

    2006-01-01

    .... A 1115 Medicaid waiver requiring a premium cost share with small business, employees, and county indigent care funds is currently the best long-term solution and will increase access and assist...

  20. Evaluating the association between the built environment and primary care access for new Medicaid enrollees in an urban environment using Walk and Transit Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyachati, Krisda H; Hom, Jeffrey K; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Wong, Charlene; Grande, David

    2018-03-01

    Worse health outcomes among those living in poverty are due in part to lower rates of health insurance and barriers to care. As the Affordable Care Act reduced financial barriers, identifying persistent barriers to accessible health care continues to be important. We examined whether the built environment as reflected by Walk Score™ (a measure of walkability to neighborhood resources) and Transit Score™ (a measure of transit access) is associated with having a usual source of care among low-income adults, newly enrolled in Medicaid. We received responses from 312 out of 1000 new Medicaid enrollees in Philadelphia, a large, densely populated urban area, who were surveyed between 2015 and 2016 to determine if they had identified a usual source of outpatient primary care. Respondents living at an address with a low Walk Scores (< 70) had 84% lower odds of having a usual source of care (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.04-0.61). Transit scores were not associated with having a usual source of care. Walk Score may be a tool for policy makers and providers of care to identify populations at risk for worse primary care access.

  1. Evaluating the association between the built environment and primary care access for new Medicaid enrollees in an urban environment using Walk and Transit Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisda H. Chaiyachati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Worse health outcomes among those living in poverty are due in part to lower rates of health insurance and barriers to care. As the Affordable Care Act reduced financial barriers, identifying persistent barriers to accessible health care continues to be important. We examined whether the built environment as reflected by Walk Score™ (a measure of walkability to neighborhood resources and Transit Score™ (a measure of transit access is associated with having a usual source of care among low-income adults, newly enrolled in Medicaid. We received responses from 312 out of 1000 new Medicaid enrollees in Philadelphia, a large, densely populated urban area, who were surveyed between 2015 and 2016 to determine if they had identified a usual source of outpatient primary care. Respondents living at an address with a low Walk Scores (<70 had 84% lower odds of having a usual source of care (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.04–0.61. Transit scores were not associated with having a usual source of care. Walk Score may be a tool for policy makers and providers of care to identify populations at risk for worse primary care access.

  2. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gill Lewin,1 Karyn Concanen,2 David Youens3 1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Silver Chain Group, Osborne Park, WA, Australia; 3Faculty of Health Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: The Home Independence Program (HIP, an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably

  3. CMS Innovation Center Health Care Innovation Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sandra H.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Morganti, Kristy Gonzalez; Auerbach, David I.; Beckett, Megan K.; Chen, Peggy G.; Farley, Donna O.; Han, Bing; Harris, Katherine M.; Jones, Spencer S.; Liu, Hangsheng; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Marsh, Terry; Martsolf, Grant R.; Nelson, Christopher; Okeke, Edward N.; Pearson, Marjorie L.; Pillemer, Francesca; Sorbero, Melony E.; Towe, Vivian; Weinick, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation within the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has funded 108 Health Care Innovation Awards, funded through the Affordable Care Act, for applicants who proposed compelling new models of service delivery or payment improvements that promise to deliver better health, better health care, and lower costs through improved quality of care for Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Program enrollees. CMS is also interested in learning how new models would affect subpopulations of beneficiaries (e.g., those eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and complex patients) who have unique characteristics or health care needs that could be related to poor outcomes. In addition, the initiative seeks to identify new models of workforce development and deployment, as well as models that can be rapidly deployed and have the promise of sustainability. This article describes a strategy for evaluating the results. The goal for the evaluation design process is to create standardized approaches for answering key questions that can be customized to similar groups of awardees and that allow for rapid and comparable assessment across awardees. The evaluation plan envisions that data collection and analysis will be carried out on three levels: at the level of the individual awardee, at the level of the awardee grouping, and as a summary evaluation that includes all awardees. Key dimensions for the evaluation framework include implementation effectiveness, program effectiveness, workforce issues, impact on priority populations, and context. The ultimate goal is to identify strategies that can be employed widely to lower cost while improving care. PMID:28083297

  4. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  5. Risk Factors, Health Care Resource Utilization, and Costs Associated with Nonadherence to Antiretrovirals in Medicaid-Insured Patients with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Keith; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Jiao, Xiaolong; Romdhani, Hela; Emond, Bruno; Woodruff, Kimberly; Pesa, Jacqueline; Tandon, Neeta; Lefebvre, Patrick

    2018-06-07

    Adherence to antiretrovirals (ARVs) is critical to achieving durable virologic suppression. To investigate risk factors of poor adherence and the effect of suboptimal adherence on health care resource utilization (HCRU) and costs in Medicaid patients. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted using Medicaid data. Adults (aged ≥ 18 years) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 initiating selected ARVs (index date) were identified. Adherence was measured using medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) at 6 and 12 months post-index. Risk factors of poor adherence (PDC logistic regression. HCRU and costs were compared between suboptimal (80% ≤ PDC costs (mean monthly cost difference = $339; 95% CI = $153-$536; P costs (mean monthly cost difference = $259; 95% CI = $122-$418; P costs. Age, insurance type and coverage, previous ARV treatment, and HIV symptoms were predictors of adherence. Treatment options that enhance adherence and prevent developing virologic failure with drug resistance should be considered for HIV patients. This study was supported by Janssen Scientific Affairs, which was involved in the study design, data collection, data analysis, manuscript preparation, and publication decisions. Emond, Lafeuille, Romdhani, and Lefebvre are employees of Analysis Group, a consulting company that received research grants from Janssen Scientific Affairs to conduct this study. Dunn, Woodruff, Pesa, and Tandon are current employees and stockholders of Johnson & Johnson, owner of Janssen Scientific Affairs. Jiao was an employee of Janssen at the time of the study. Emond has received grants from Novartis, Regeneron, Aegerion, Lundbeck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bayer, Millennium, Allergan, AbbVie, and GlaxoSmithKline unrelated to this study. Part of the material in this study was presented at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy 2017 Annual Meeting, March 27-30, 2017, in Denver, Colorado, and at the 9th International AIDS Society

  6. Medicaid Reimbursement of Mental Health Peer-Run Organizations: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Laysha; Steinwachs, Donald; Leaf, Philip J; Naeger, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    This study sought to understand whether knowledge of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with willingness of mental health peer-run organizations to become Medicaid providers. Through the 2012 National Survey of Peer-Run Organizations, organizational directors reported their organization's willingness to accept Medicaid reimbursement and knowledge about the ACA. Multinomial logistic regression was used to model the association between willingness to accept Medicaid and the primary predictor of knowledge of the ACA, as well as other predictors at the organizational and state levels. Knowledge of the ACA, Medicaid expansion, and discussions about healthcare reform were not significantly associated with willingness to be a Medicaid provider. Having fewer paid staff was associated with not being willing to be a Medicaid provider, suggesting that current staffing capacity is related to attitudes about becoming a Medicaid provider. Organizations had both ideological and practical concerns about Medicaid reimbursement. Concerns about Medicaid reimbursement can potentially be addressed through alternative financing mechanisms that should be able to meet the needs of peer-run organizations.

  7. Health care utilization and expenditures among Medicaid beneficiaries with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis JM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jay M Margolis,1 Paul Juneau,1 Alesia Sadosky,2 Joseph C Cappelleri,3 Thomas N Bryce,4 Edward C Nieshoff5 1Truven Health Analytics, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA; 3Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, USA; 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Background: The study aimed to evaluate health care resource utilization (HRU and costs for neuropathic pain (NeP secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI among Medicaid beneficiaries. Methods: The retrospective longitudinal cohort study used Medicaid beneficiary claims with SCI and evidence of NeP (SCI-NeP cohort matched with a cohort without NeP (SCI-only cohort. Patients had continuous Medicaid eligibility 6 months pre- and 12 months postindex, defined by either a diagnosis of central NeP (ICD-9-CM code 338.0x or a pharmacy claim for an NeP-related antiepileptic or antidepressant drug within 12 months following first SCI diagnosis. Demographics, clinical characteristics, HRU, and expenditures were compared between cohorts. Results: Propensity score-matched cohorts each consisted of 546 patients. Postindex percentages of patients with physician office visits, emergency department visits, SCI- and pain-related procedures, and outpatient prescription utilization were all significantly higher for SCI-NeP (P<0.001. Using regression models to account for covariates, adjusted mean expenditures were US$47,518 for SCI-NeP and US$30,150 for SCI only, yielding incremental costs of US$17,369 (95% confidence interval US$9,753 to US$26,555 for SCI-NeP. Factors significantly associated with increased cost included SCI type, trauma-related SCI, and comorbidity burden. Conclusion: Significantly higher HRU and total costs were incurred by Medicaid patients with NeP secondary to SCI compared with matched SCI-only patients. Keywords: spinal

  8. Medicaid Expansion Under the Affordable Care Act: Potential Changes in Receipt of Mental Health Treatment Among Low-Income Nonelderly Adults With Serious Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfroerer, Joe; Kuramoto, S. Janet; Ali, Mir; Woodward, Albert M.; Teich, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We designed this study to examine differences in receipt of mental health treatment between low-income uninsured nonelderly adults with serious mental illness (SMI) who were eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and their existing Medicaid counterparts. Assessing these differences might estimate the impact of the Medicaid expansion efforts under the ACA on receipt of mental health treatment among uninsured nonelderly adults with SMI. Methods. We examined data from 2000 persons aged 18 to 64 years who participated in the 2008 to 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, had income below 138% of the federal poverty level, met SMI criteria, and either were uninsured (n = 1000) or had Medicaid-only coverage (n = 1000). We defined SMI according to the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration Reorganization Act. We used descriptive analyses and logistic regression modeling. Results. In the 28 states currently expanding Medicaid, the model-adjusted prevalence (MAP) of receiving mental health treatment among Medicaid-only enrollees with SMI (MAP = 71.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 65.74%, 76.29%) was 30.1% greater than their uninsured counterparts (MAP = 54.8%; 95% CI = 48.16%, 61.33%). In the United States, the MAP of receiving mental health treatment among Medicaid-only enrollees with SMI (MAP = 70.4%; 95% CI = 65.67%, 74.70%) was 35.9% higher than their uninsured counterparts (MAP = 51.8%; 95% CI = 46.98%, 56.65%). Conclusions. Estimated increases in receipt of mental health treatment because of enrolling in Medicaid among low-income uninsured adults with SMI might help inform planning and implementation efforts for the Medicaid expansion under the ACA. PMID:25790424

  9. Medicaid Enrollment Gap Length and Number of Medicaid Enrollment Periods Among US Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoendorf, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined gap length, characteristics associated with gap length, and number of enrollment periods among Medicaid-enrolled children in the United States. Methods. We linked the 2004 National Health Interview Survey to Medicaid Analytic eXtract files for 1999 through 2008. We examined linkage-eligible children aged 5 to 13 years in the 2004 National Health Interview Survey who disenrolled from Medicaid. We generated Kaplan-Meier curves of time to reenrollment. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the effect of sociodemographic variables on time to reenrollment. We compared the percentage of children enrolled 4 or more times across sociodemographic groups. Results. Of children who disenrolled from Medicaid, 35.8%, 47.1%, 63.5%, 70.8%, and 79.1% of children had reenrolled in Medicaid by 6 months, 1, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Children who were younger, poorer, or of minority race/ethnicity or had lower educated parents had shorter gaps in Medicaid and were more likely to have had 4 or more Medicaid enrollment periods. Conclusions. Nearly half of US children who disenrolled from Medicaid reenrolled within 1 year. Children with traditionally high-risk demographic characteristics had shorter gaps in Medicaid enrollment and were more likely to have more periods of Medicaid enrollment. PMID:25033135

  10. Quality management in home care: models for today's practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, M P

    1996-01-01

    In less than a decade, home care providers have been a part of two major transitions in health care delivery. First, because of the advent of managed care and a shift from inpatient to community-based services, home care service delivery systems have experienced tremendous growth. Second, the principles and practices of total quality management and continuous quality improvement have permeated the organization, administration, and practice of home health care. Based on the work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, the basic tenets of the new quality management philosophy involve a focus on the following five key areas: (1) systems and processes rather than individual performance; (2) involvement, collaboration, and empowerment; (3) internal and external "customers"; (4) data and measurement; and (5) standards, guidelines, and outcomes of care. Home care providers are among those in the forefront who are developing and implementing programs that integrate these foci into the delivery of quality home care services. This article provides a summary of current home care programs that address these five key areas of quality management philosophy and provide models for innovative quality management practice in home care. For further information about each program, readers are referred to the original reports in the home care and quality management journal literature, as cited herein.

  11. The impact of managed care in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, H R

    1999-01-01

    Managed care plans attempt to control health care expenditures aggressively. These plans directly influence access to medical care and the type, level, and frequency of care rendered. As a result, hospital stays are reduced, focus shifts from inpatient to outpatient care, and patients are responsible for a larger share of health care costs. Dentistry is not immune from the impact of managed care. The attractiveness of the dental market has drawn many managed care organizations, insurers, and entrepreneurs to encourage dentists to participate in a wide variety of managed care programs. However, the delivery of dental care differs markedly in many respects from that of medical care. Therefore, many of the cost saving aspects of managed care that have been so successful in medicine may not result in similar cost savings in dentistry.

  12. Multiple sclerosis care: an integrated disease-management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, J

    1998-04-01

    A disease-management model must be integrated, comprehensive, individual patient focused and outcome driven. In addition to high quality care, the successful model must reduce variations in care and costs. MS specialists need to be intimately involved in the long-term care of MS patients, while not neglecting primary care issues. A nurse care manager is the "glue" between the managed care company, health care providers and the patient/family. Disease management focuses on education and prevention, and can be cost effective as well as patient specific. To implement a successful program, managed care companies and health care providers must work together.

  13. Receipt of Preventive Services After Oregon’s Randomized Medicaid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Bailey, Steffani R.; Gold, Rachel; Hoopes, Megan J.; O’Malley, Jean P.; Huguet, Nathalie; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; McConnell, K. John; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is predicted that gaining health insurance via the Affordable Care Act will result in increased rates of preventive health services receipt in the U.S, primarily based on self-reported findings from previous health insurance expansion studies. This study examined the long-term (36-month) impact of Oregon’s 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion (“Oregon Experiment”) on receipt of 12 preventive care services in community health centers using electronic health record data. Methods Demographic data from adult (aged 19–64 years) Oregon Experiment participants were probabilistically matched to electronic health record data from 49 Oregon community health centers within the OCHIN community health information network (N=10,643). Intent-to-treat analyses compared receipt of preventive services over a 36-month (2008–2011) period among those randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid versus not assigned, and instrumental variable analyses estimated the effect of actually gaining Medicaid coverage on preventive services receipt (data collected in 2012–2014; analysis performed in 2014–2015). Results Intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences between patients randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid (versus not assigned) for eight of 12 assessed preventive services. In intent-to-treat[MM1] analyses, Medicaid coverage significantly increased the odds of receipt of most preventive services (ORs ranging from 1.04 [95% CI=1.02, 1.06] for smoking assessment to 1.27 [95% CI=1.02, 1.57] for mammography). Conclusions Rates of preventive services receipt will likely increase as community health center patients gain insurance through Affordable Care Act expansions. Continued effort is needed to increase health insurance coverage in an effort to decrease health disparities in vulnerable populations. PMID:26497264

  14. Trends in emergency Medicaid expenditures for recent and undocumented immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBard, C Annette; Massing, Mark W

    2007-03-14

    Undocumented immigrants and legal immigrants who have been in the United States less than 5 years are excluded from Medicaid eligibility, with the exception of limited coverage for emergency conditions (Emergency Medicaid). New immigrant population growth has been rapid in recent years, but little is known about use of health services by this group or the conditions for which Emergency Medicaid coverage has been applied. To describe Emergency Medicaid use by recent and undocumented immigrants including patient characteristics, diagnoses, and recent spending trends in North Carolina, a state with a rapidly increasing population of undocumented immigrants. Descriptive analysis of North Carolina Medicaid administrative data for all claims reimbursed under Emergency Medicaid eligibility criteria 2001 through 2004 in North Carolina, a state with high immigration from Mexico and Latin America. Patients are recent and undocumented immigrants who meet categorical and income criteria for Medicaid coverage, but are excluded from full coverage due to legal status. Patient characteristics, hospitalizations, diagnoses, and Medicaid spending for emergency care. A total of 48,391 individuals received services reimbursed under Emergency Medicaid during the 4-year period of this study. The patient population was 99% undocumented, 93% Hispanic, 95% female, and 89% in the 18- to 40-year age group. Total spending increased by 28% from 2001 through 2004, with more rapid spending increases among elderly (98%) and disabled (82%) patients. In 2004, childbirth and complications of pregnancy accounted for 82% of spending and 91% of hospitalizations. Injury, renal failure, gastrointestinal disease, and cardiovascular conditions were also prevalent. Childbirth and complications of pregnancy account for the majority of Emergency Medicaid spending for undocumented immigrants in North Carolina. Spending for elderly and disabled patients, however, is increasing at a faster rate. Among nonpregnant

  15. Coordinated Care Organizations: Neonatal and Infant Outcomes in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S Marie; Oakley, Lisa P; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff

    2017-11-01

    In 2012, Oregon's Medicaid program implemented a comprehensive accountable care model delivered through coordinated care organizations (CCOs). Because CCOs are expected to improve utilization of services and health outcomes, neonatal and infant outcomes may be important indicators of their impact. Estimating difference-in-differences models, we compared prepost CCO changes in outcomes (e.g., low birth weight, abnormal conditions, 5-minute Apgar score, congenital anomalies, and infant mortality) between Medicaid and non-Medicaid births among 99,924 infants born in Oregon during 2011 and 2013. We further examined differences in the impact of CCOs by ethnicity and rurality. Following CCO implementation the likelihood of low birth weight and abnormal conditions decreased by 0.95% and 1.08%, a reduction of 13.4% and 10.4% compared with the pre-CCO level for Medicaid enrollees, respectively. These reductions could be predictive of lifelong health benefits for infants and lower costs for acute care and are, therefore, important markers of success for the CCO model.

  16. Medicare and Medicaid programs; physicians' referrals to health care entities with which they have financial relationships: partial delay of effective date. Interim final rule with comment period; partial delay in effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-03

    This interim final rule with comment period delays for 1 year the effective date of the last sentence of 42 CFR 411.354(d)(1). Section 411.354(d)(1) was promulgated in the final rule entitled "Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial Relationships," published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2001 (66 FR 856). A 1-year delay in the effective date of the last sentence in Section 411.354(d)(1) will give Department officials the opportunity to reconsider the definition of compensation that is "set in advance" as it relates to percentage compensation methodologies in order to avoid unnecessarily disrupting existing contractual arrangements for physician services. Accordingly, the last sentence of Section 411.354(d)(1), which would have become effective January 4, 2002, will not become effective until January 6,2003.

  17. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  18. Monitoring Resource Utilization in a Health Care Coordination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popejoy, Lori L; Jaddoo, Julie; Sherman, Jan; Howk, Christopher; Nguyen, Raymond; Parker, Jerry C

    2015-01-01

    This initial article describes the development of a health care coordination intervention and documentation system designed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Care Coordination Atlas framework for Centers for Medicare & Medicaid-funded innovation project, Leveraging Information Technology to Guide High-Tech, High-Touch Care (LIGHT). The study occurred at an academic medical center that serves 114 counties. Twenty-five registered nurse care managers (NCMs) were hired to work with 137 providers in 10 family community and internal medicine clinics. Patients were allocated into one of the four tiers on the basis of their chronic medical conditions and health care utilization. Using a documentation system on the basis of the AHRQ domains developed for this study, time and touch data were calculated for 8,593 Medicare, Medicaid, or dual-eligible patients. We discovered through the touch and time analysis that the majority of health care coordination activity occurred in the AHRQ domains of communication, assess needs and goals, and facilitate transitions, accounting for 79% of the NCM time and 61% of the touches. As expected, increasing tier levels resulted in increased use of NCM resources. Tier 3 accounted for roughly 16% of the patients and received 159 minutes/member (33% of total minutes), and Tier 4 accounted for 4% of patients and received 316 minutes/member (17% of all minutes). In contrast Tier 2, which did not require routine touches per protocol, had 5,507 patients (64%), and those patients received 5,246 hours of health care coordination, or 57 minutes/member, and took 48% of NCM time. 1. The AHRQ Care Coordination Atlas offered a systematic way to build a documentation system that allowed for the extraction of data that was used to calculate the amount of time and the number of touches that NCMs delivered per member. 2. Using a framework to systematically guide the work of health care coordination helped NCMs to think strategically

  19. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannou François

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women and 14 care providers (6 women: 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers.

  20. State Medicaid Expansion Tobacco Cessation Coverage and Number of Adult Smokers Enrolled in Expansion Coverage - United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiulio, Anne; Haddix, Meredith; Jump, Zach; Babb, Stephen; Schecter, Anna; Williams, Kisha-Ann S; Asman, Kat; Armour, Brian S

    2016-12-09

    In 2015, 27.8% of adult Medicaid enrollees were current cigarette smokers, compared with 11.1% of adults with private health insurance, placing Medicaid enrollees at increased risk for smoking-related disease and death (1). In addition, smoking-related diseases are a major contributor to Medicaid costs, accounting for about 15% (>$39 billion) of annual Medicaid spending during 2006-2010 (2). Individual, group, and telephone counseling and seven Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications are effective treatments for helping tobacco users quit (3). Insurance coverage for tobacco cessation treatments is associated with increased quit attempts, use of cessation treatments, and successful smoking cessation (3); this coverage has the potential to reduce Medicaid costs (4). However, barriers such as requiring copayments and prior authorization for treatment can impede access to cessation treatments (3,5). As of July 1, 2016, 32 states (including the District of Columbia) have expanded Medicaid eligibility through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA),* ,† which has increased access to health care services, including cessation treatments (5). CDC used data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicaid Budget and Expenditure System (MBES) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to estimate the number of adult smokers enrolled in Medicaid expansion coverage. To assess cessation coverage among Medicaid expansion enrollees, the American Lung Association collected data on coverage of, and barriers to accessing, evidence-based cessation treatments. As of December 2015, approximately 2.3 million adult smokers were newly enrolled in Medicaid because of Medicaid expansion. As of July 1, 2016, all 32 states that have expanded Medicaid eligibility under ACA covered some cessation treatments for all Medicaid expansion enrollees, with nine states covering all nine cessation treatments for all Medicaid expansion

  1. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Background: The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. Methods: In a before–after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group’s second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. Results: We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Interpretation: Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the

  2. Crossing 138: two approaches to churn under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Gabriel; DeSantis, J Angelo

    2014-01-01

    A predicted side effect of the Medicaid expansion and state-based Exchanges under the Affordable Care Act is churn. Churn is the shifting into and out of eligibility for insurance affordability programs due to income changes. Because the line between Medicaid and Exchange eligibility is fine -138% of the federal poverty level -millions of Americans are expected to gain and lose eligibility. Frequently, this churning undermines continuity of care, raises costs, and frustrates those affected. This article explores two proposed programs to mitigate the effects of churn: the Basic Health Program and the Bridge Program. This article evaluates both programs' ability to mitigate the effects of churn, the likely side effects to states' implementing them, and legal and practical obstacles to their implementation. It concludes that the Bridge Program is the better approach.

  3. The Effect of Medicaid Expansion on Utilization in Maryland Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eili Y; Levin, Scott; Toerper, Matthew F; Makowsky, Michael D; Xu, Tim; Cole, Gai; Kelen, Gabor D

    2017-11-01

    A proposed benefit of expanding Medicaid eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was a reduction in emergency department (ED) utilization for primary care needs. Pre-ACA studies found that new Medicaid enrollees increased their ED utilization rates, but the effect on system-level ED visits was less clear. Our objective was to estimate the effect of Medicaid expansion on aggregate and individual-based ED utilization patterns within Maryland. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of ED utilization patterns across Maryland, using data from Maryland's Health Services Cost Review Commission. We also analyzed utilization differences between pre-ACA (July 2012 to December 2013) uninsured patients who returned post-ACA (July 2014 to December 2015). The total number of ED visits in Maryland decreased by 36,531 (-1.2%) between the 6 quarters pre-ACA and the 6 quarters post-ACA. Medicaid-covered ED visits increased from 23.3% to 28.9% (159,004 additional visits), whereas uninsured patient visits decreased from 16.3% to 10.4% (181,607 fewer visits). Coverage by other insurance types remained largely stable between periods. We found no significant relationship between Medicaid expansion and changes in ED volume by hospital. For patients uninsured pre-ACA who returned post-ACA, the adjusted visits per person during 6 quarters was 2.38 (95% confidence interval 2.35 to 2.40) for those newly enrolled in Medicaid post-ACA compared with 1.66 (95% confidence interval 1.64 to 1.68) for those remaining uninsured. There was a substantial increase in patients covered by Medicaid in the post-ACA period, but this did not significantly affect total ED volume. Returning patients newly enrolled in Medicaid visited the ED more than their uninsured counterparts; however, this cohort accounted for only a small percentage of total ED visits in Maryland. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

  5. Effect of Long-term Care Use on Medicare and Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Individuals eligible and enrolled simultaneously for Medicare and Medicaid commonly referred to as dual eligible or duals have often been cited as accounting for a...

  6. Increased use of dental services by children covered by Medicaid: 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Leighton; Sharac, Jessica; Bruen, Brian; Thomas, Megan; Norris, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    This report analyzes the use of dental services by children enrolled in Medicaid from federal fiscal years (FFY) 2000 to 2010. The number and percent of children receiving dental services under Medicaid climbed continuously over the decade. In FFY 2000, 6.3 million children ages 1 to 20 were reported to receive some form of dental care (either preventive or treatment); the number more than doubled to 15.4 million by FFY 2010. Part of the increase was because the overall number of children covered by Medicaid rose by 12 million (50%), but the percentage of children who received dental care climbed appreciably from 29.3% in FFY 2000 to 46.4% in FFY 2010. In that same time period, the number of children ages 1 to 20 receiving preventive dental services climbed from a reported 5.0 million to 13.6 million, while the percentage of children receiving preventive dental services rose from 23.2% to 40.8%. For children ages 1 to 20 who received dental treatment services, the reported number rose from 3.3 million in FFY 2000 to 7.6 million in FFY 2010. The percentage of children who obtained dental treatment services increased from 15.3% to 22.9%. In FFY 2010, about one sixth of children covered by Medicaid (15.7%) ages 6-14 had a dental sealant placed on a permanent molar. While most states have made steady progress in improving children's access to dental care in Medicaid over the past decade, there is still substantial variation across states and more remains to be done.

  7. [The German program for disease management guidelines--implementation with pathways and quality management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Lelgemann, Monika; Kopp, Ina

    2007-07-15

    In Germany, physicians enrolled in disease management programs are legally obliged to follow evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. That is why a Program for National Disease Management Guidelines (German DM-CPG Program) was established in 2002 aiming at implementation of best-practice evidence-based recommendations for nationwide as well as regional disease management programs. Against this background the article reviews programs, methods and tools for implementing DM-CPGs via clinical pathways as well as regional guidelines for outpatient care. Special reference is given to the institutionalized program of adapting DM-CPGs for regional use by primary-care physicians in the State of Hesse.

  8. Medicaid and CHIP: Opportunities Exist to Improve U.S. Insular Area Demographic Data That Could Be Used to Help Determine Federal Funding. GAO-09-558R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Linda T.

    2009-01-01

    The five largest insular areas of the United States--American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands--receive federal funding through Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), joint federal-state programs that finance health care for certain low-income…

  9. Data warehousing in disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramick, D C

    2001-01-01

    Disease management programs offer the benefits of lower disease occurrence, improved patient care, and lower healthcare costs. In such programs, the key mechanism used to identify individuals at risk for targeted diseases is the data warehouse. This article surveys recent warehousing techniques from HMOs to map out critical issues relating to the preparation, design, and implementation of a successful data warehouse. Discussions of scope, data cleansing, and storage management are included in depicting warehouse preparation and design; data implementation options are contrasted. Examples are provided of data warehouse execution in disease management programs that identify members with preexisting illnesses, as well as those exhibiting high-risk conditions. The proper deployment of successful data warehouses in disease management programs benefits both the organization and the member. Organizations benefit from decreased medical costs; members benefit through an improved quality of life through disease-specific care.

  10. Advancing the business creed? The framing of decisions about public sector managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, Howard; Yager, Joel; Santos, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little research has clarified how executives of for-profit healthcare organisations frame their own motivations and behaviour, or how government officials frame their interactions with executives. Because managed care has provided an organisational structure for health services in many countries, we focused our study on executives and government officials who were administering public sector managed care services. Emphasising theoretically the economic versus non-economic motivations that guide economic behaviour, we extended a long-term research project on public sector Medicaid managed care (MMC) in the United States. Our method involved in-depth, structured interviews with chief executive officers of managed care organisations, as well as high-ranking officials of state government. Data analysis involved iterative interpretation of interview data. We found that the rate of profit, which proved relatively low in the MMC programme, occupied a limited place in executives' self-described motivations and in state officials' descriptions of corporation-government interactions. Non-economic motivations included a strong orientation toward corporate social responsibility and a creed in which market processes advanced human wellbeing. Such patterns contradict some of the given wisdom about how corporate executives and government officials construct their reality. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Shift in U.S. payer responsibility for the acute care of violent injuries after the Affordable Care Act: Implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupet, Edouard; Karp, David; Wiebe, Douglas J; Kit Delgado, M

    2018-03-28

    Investment in violence prevention programs is hampered by lack of clearly identifiable stakeholders with a financial stake in prevention. We determined the total annual charges for the acute care of injuries from interpersonal violence and the shift in financial responsibility for these charges after the Medicaid expansion from the Affordable Care Act in 2014. We analyzed all emergency department (ED) visits from 2009 to 2014 with diagnosis codes for violent injury in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS). We used sample weights to estimate total charges with adjusted generalized linear models to estimate charges for the 15% of ED visits with missing charge data. We then calculated the share attributable by payer and determined the difference in proportion by payer from 2013 to 2014. Between 2009 and 2013, the uninsured accounted for 28.2-31.3% of annual charges for the acute care of violent injury, while Medicaid was responsible for a similar amount (29.0-31.0%). In 2014, there were $10.7 billion in total charges for violent injury. Medicaid assumed the greatest share, 39.8% (95% CI: 38.0-41.5%, $3.5-5.1 billion), while the uninsured accounted for 23.6% (95% CI: 22.2-24.9%, $2.0-3.0 billion), and Medicare accounted for 7.8% (95% CI: 7.7-8.0%, $0.7-1.0 billion). After Medicaid expansion, taxpayers are now accountable for nearly half of the $10.7 billion in annual charges for the acute care of violent injury in the U.S. These findings highlight the benefit to state Medicaid programs of preventing interpersonal violence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Augmenting Predictive Modeling Tools with Clinical Insights for Care Coordination Program Design and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracy L; Brewer, Daniel; Estacio, Raymond; Vlasimsky, Tara; Durfee, Michael J; Thompson, Kathy R; Everhart, Rachel M; Rinehart, Deborath J; Batal, Holly

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) awarded Denver Health's (DH) integrated, safety net health care system $19.8 million to implement a "population health" approach into the delivery of primary care. This major practice transformation builds on the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and Wagner's Chronic Care Model (CCM) to achieve the "Triple Aim": improved health for populations, care to individuals, and lower per capita costs. This paper presents a case study of how DH integrated published predictive models and front-line clinical judgment to implement a clinically actionable, risk stratification of patients. This population segmentation approach was used to deploy enhanced care team staff resources and to tailor care-management services to patient need, especially for patients at high risk of avoidable hospitalization. Developing, implementing, and gaining clinical acceptance of the Health Information Technology (HIT) solution for patient risk stratification was a major grant objective. In addition to describing the Information Technology (IT) solution itself, we focus on the leadership and organizational processes that facilitated its multidisciplinary development and ongoing iterative refinement, including the following: team composition, target population definition, algorithm rule development, performance assessment, and clinical-workflow optimization. We provide examples of how dynamic business intelligence tools facilitated clinical accessibility for program design decisions by enabling real-time data views from a population perspective down to patient-specific variables. We conclude that population segmentation approaches that integrate clinical perspectives with predictive modeling results can better identify high opportunity patients amenable to medical home-based, enhanced care team interventions.

  13. Effects of Early Dual-Eligible Special Needs Plans on Health Expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongkang; Diana, Mark L

    2017-10-18

    To examine the effects of the penetration of dual-eligible special needs plans (D-SNPs) on health care spending. Secondary state-level panel data from Medicare-Medicaid Linked Enrollee Analytic Data Source (MMLEADS) public use file and Special Needs Plan Comprehensive Reports, Area Health Resource Files, and Medicaid Managed Care Enrollment Report between 2007 and 2011. A difference-in-difference strategy that adjusts for dual-eligibles' demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, state health resources, beneficiaries' health risk factors, Medicare/Medicaid enrollment, and state- and year-fixed effects. Data from MMLEADS were summarized from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)'s Chronic Conditions Data Warehouse, which contains 100 percent of Medicare enrollment data, claims for beneficiaries who are enrolled in the fee-for-service (FFS) program, and Medicaid Analytic Extract files. The MMLEADS public use file also includes payment information for managed care. Data in Special Needs Plan Comprehensive Reports were from CMS's Health Plan Management System. Results indicate that D-SNPs penetration was associated with reduced Medicare spending per dual-eligible beneficiary. Specifically, a 1 percent increase in D-SNPs penetration was associated with 0.2 percent reduction in Medicare spending per beneficiary. We found no association between D-SNPs penetration and Medicaid or total spending. Involving Medicaid services in D-SNPs may be crucial to improve coordination between Medicare and Medicaid programs and control Medicaid spending among dual-eligible beneficiaries. Starting from 2013, D-SNPs were mandated to have contracts with state Medicaid agencies. This change may introduce new effects of D-SNPs on health care spending. More research is needed to examine the impact of D-SNPs on dual-eligible spending. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. The Affordable Care Act, Accountable Care Organizations, and Mental Health Care for Older Adults: Implications and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Gill, Lydia; Naslund, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) represents the most significant legislative change in the United States health care system in nearly half a century. Key elements of the ACA include reforms aimed at addressing high-cost, complex, vulnerable patient populations. Older adults with mental health disorders are a rapidly growing segment of the population and are among the most challenging subgroups within health care, and they account for a disproportionate amount of costs. What does the ACA mean for geriatric mental health? We address this question by highlighting opportunities for reaching older adults with mental health disorders by leveraging the diverse elements of the ACA. We describe nine relevant initiatives: (1) accountable care organizations, (2) patient-centered medical homes, (3) Medicaid-financed specialty health homes, (4) hospital readmission and health care transitions initiatives, (5) Medicare annual wellness visit, (6) quality standards and associated incentives, (7) support for health information technology and telehealth, (8) Independence at Home and 1915(i) State Plan Home and Community-Based Services program, and (9) Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. We also consider potential challenges to full implementation of the ACA and discuss novel solutions for advancing geriatric mental health in the context of projected workforce shortages and the opportunities afforded by the ACA. PMID:25811340

  15. Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission - statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MACStats includes state-specific information about program enrollment, spending, eligibility levels, optional Medicaid benefits covered, and the federal medical...

  16. Self-care management of Thai Buddhists and Muslims with type 2 diabetes after an empowerment education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Pranee C; Thrakul, Supunnee

    2018-04-23

    The aim of the present study was to explore self-care management of Thai Buddhists and Muslims with type 2 diabetes and inadequate blood glucose levels, after they had been subjected to a 6-month diabetes empowerment education program. Twenty-seven participants (male and female) were selected through purposive convenience sampling for an explorative qualitative study. Semistructured focus group interviews with four open-ended questions were used to study the participants' self-care behavior at the beginning and the end of the program, and the data obtained were subjected to content analysis. At the end, one third of the participants had been able to reduce their blood glucose to acceptable levels. Most of the others had achieved reduced but irregular blood glucose levels; however, some did not achieve any reduction. Diet was the most difficult problem, and economic difficulties, incorrect knowledge, and misleading beliefs were barriers. In conclusion, an empowerment education program can substantially improve the outcome of self-care management for many people with type 2 diabetes. In the planning of such programs, barriers should be taken into account. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. More Rhode Island Adults Have Dental Coverage After the Medicaid Expansion: Did More Adults Receive Dental Services? Did More Dentists Provide Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Oh, Junhie

    2017-10-02

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion since 2014, 68,000 more adults under age 65 years were enrolled in Rhode Island Medicaid as of December 2015, a 78% increase from 2013 enrollment. This report assesses changes in dental utilization associated with this expansion. Medicaid enrollment and dental claims for calendar years 2012-2015 were extracted from the RI Medicaid Management Information System. Among adults aged 18-64 years, annual numbers and percentages of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental service were summarized. Additionally, dental service claims were assessed by provider type (private practice or health center). Although 15,000 more adults utilized dental services by the end of 2015, the annual percentage of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental services decreased over the reporting periods, compared to pre-ACA years (2012-13: 39%, 2014: 35%, 2015: 32%). From 2012 to 2015, dental patient increases in community health centers were larger than in private dental offices (78% vs. 34%). Contrary to the Medicaid population increase, the number of dentists that submitted Medicaid claims decreased, particularly among dentists in private dental offices; the percentage of RI private dentists who provided any dental service to adult Medicaid enrollees decreased from 29% in 2012 to 21% in 2015. Implementation of Medicaid expansion has played a critical role in increasing the number of Rhode Islanders with dental coverage, particularly among low-income adults under age 65. However, policymakers must address the persistent and worsening shortage of dental providers that accept Medicaid to provide a more accessible source of oral healthcare for all Rhode Islanders. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-10.asp].

  18. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  20. Comparison of Project Management Software Tool Use in Healthcare and Other Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Isabelle E.

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals, clinics, and physicians' offices are being mandated to implement health information technology to support electronic health records or receive reduced government reimbursements for the treatment of Medicare and Medicaid patients. The EHR Medicare and Medicaid Incentive Program, managed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services,…

  1. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  2. Senate, 59-40, defeats move to strike limits on Medicaid abortion coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-05

    On September 24 1993, the US Senate voted to limit access to abortion services for poor women under Medicaid to cases of rape, incest, or where pregnancy poses a risk to a woman's health. The US House of Representatives had earlier adopted a similar amendment, so now the bill will be sent to the President. The original amendment limited abortion access under Medicaid to only poor women whose life was endangered. Its sponsor proposed to expand coverage to cases of rape and incest based on pragmatic political grounds and knowing that this expansion would include fewer than 100 abortions. Abortion rights groups considered this 1993 expansion of the amendment as a step toward restoring real equity in access to abortion. Nevertheless, like the antiabortion groups, they do not consider it progress. The 5 female Senators vowed to fight to obtain full abortion coverage under Medicaid. The also pointed out to their male colleagues that this amendment discriminates against poor women. Many senators voted for the amendment because they chose the lesser of 2 evils. Many people are concerned that this bill indicates how Congress will treat poor women when health care reform legislation arrives and its concern for all women's right to access to abortion services under government-sponsored programs. More than 40 Senators can clearly see the difference between direct federal funding of abortion and other forms of government involvement. Further, Congress did approve the bill granting federal employees access to abortion services, but it passed by only 1 vote. Abortion rights proponents and abortion opponents should consider these aforementioned facts when preparing for the debate over abortion coverage under health care reform.

  3. Medicaid eligibility policy in the 1980s: medical utilitarianism and the "deserving" poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, S J

    1995-01-01

    Between 1981 and the early 1990s, the Medicaid program grew substantially, in part because, for the first time in the program's history, eligibility for medical assistance was severed from eligibility for income-maintenance payments. Program participation had always been reserved for the "deserving poor," and these were originally defined as persons excluded from market relationships through no fault of their own. The Medicaid expansion of the 1980s, however, created a new constituency of poor, and not-so-poor, persons whose actual or predictable medical problems promised a calculable return on program funds.

  4. Commentary: the importance of Medicaid expansion for criminal justice populations in the south.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Nickolas D; Cloud, David H; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Martino, Sarah; Bouvier, Benjamin; Brockmann, Brad

    2017-12-01

    Though the full implications of a Trump presidency for ongoing health care and criminal justice reform efforts remain uncertain, whatever policy changes are made will be particularly salient for the South, which experiences the highest incarceration rates, highest uninsured rates, and worst health outcomes in the United States. The passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 was a watershed event and many states have taken advantage of opportunities created by the ACA to expand healthcare coverage to their poorest residents, and to develop partnerships between health and justice systems. Yet to date, only four have taken advantage of the benefits of healthcare reform. Expanding Medicaid would provide Southern states with the opportunity to significantly impact health outcomes for criminal justice-involved individuals. In the context of an uncertain policy landscape, we suggest the use of three strategies, focusing on advancing incremental change while safeguarding existing gains, rebranding Medicaid as a local or statewide initiative, and linking Medicaid expansion to criminal justice reform, in order to implement Medicaid expansion across the South.

  5. Factors associated with integrating self-management support into primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Richard; Shrewsberry, Molly

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to expand the understanding of self-management support by describing factors that contribute to implementing a comprehensive self-management program in primary care. Four rural health centers in medically underserved areas participated in a study to document the implementation of a self-management program. This program consisted of a social marketing plan and decision-making tools to guide patients in making self-management behavior changes. The stages of change constructs of the transtheoretical model were used to design the social marketing plan. Key informant interviews were conducted at 6-month and 9-month intervals to document the implementation process. A standardized set of questions was used in the interviews. The data from the interviews were analyzed using content analysis techniques. One of the principle findings is that self-management support requires putting a system in place, not just adding a new component to primary care. The health centers that fully implemented the self-management program made an organizational commitment to keep self-management on the agenda in management meetings, clinical staff set the example by adopting self-management behaviors, and patient self-management support was implemented in multiple patient care venues. Primary care centers with limited financial resources are able to integrate self-management support into their system of chronic illness care.

  6. 42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and strategic plan for the next 5 years. (2) A description of how the State Medicaid HIT plan will be... processes that enable improved program administration for the Medicaid enterprise; (ii) Includes business... used certified EHR technology during the EHR reporting period, and that they have adopted, implemented...

  7. 76 FR 65909 - Medicare and Medicaid Program; Regulatory Provisions To Promote Program Efficiency, Transparency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... Efficiency, Transparency, and Burden Reduction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS...-regulatory changes to increase transparency and to become a better business partner. As explained in the plan...

  8. Transforming the Primary Care Training Clinic: New York State's Hospital Medical Home Demonstration Pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelotti, Marietta; Bliss, Kathryn; Schiffman, Dana; Weaver, Erin; Graham, Laura; Lemme, Thomas; Pryor, Veronica; Gesten, Foster C

    2015-06-01

    Training in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) settings may prepare new physicians to measure quality of care, manage the health of populations, work in teams, and include cost information in decision making. Transforming resident clinics to PCMHs requires funding for additional staff, electronic health records, training, and other resources not typically available to residency programs. Describe how a 1115 Medicaid waiver was used to transform the majority of primary care training sites in New York State to the PCMH model and improve the quality of care provided. The 2013-2014 Hospital Medical Home Program provided awards to 60 hospitals and 118 affiliated residency programs (training more than 5000 residents) to transform outpatient sites into PCMHs and provide high-quality, coordinated care. Site visits, coaching calls, resident surveys, data reporting, and feedback were used to promote and monitor change in resident continuity and quality of care. Descriptive analyses measured improvements in these areas. A total of 156 participating outpatient sites (100%) received PCMH recognition. All sites enhanced resident education using PCMH principles through patient empanelment, development of quality dashboards, and transforming resident scheduling and training. Clinical quality outcomes showed improvement across the demonstration, including better performance on colorectal and breast cancer screening rates (rate increases of 13%, P≤.001, and 11%, P=.011, respectively). A 1115 Medicaid waiver is a viable mechanism for states to transform residency clinics to reflect new primary care models. The PCMH transformation of 156 sites led to improvements in resident continuity and clinical outcomes.

  9. Medicaid program; premiums and cost sharing. Final rule; delay of effective date and reopening of comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-27

    This action temporarily delays the effective date of the November 25, 2008 final rule entitled, Medicaid Program; Premiums and Cost Sharing" (73 FR 71828) until December 31, 2009. In addition, this action reopens the comment period on the policies set out in the November 25, 2008 final rule, and specifically solicits comments on the effect of certain provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  10. Collaborative effort in Washington state slashes non-essential use of the ED by Medicaid patients, delivering millions in projected savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Early data suggest a coordinated, state-wide effort has reduced non-essential use of the ED by 10% among Medicaid recipients in Washington state, and is projected to save the state an estimated $31 million in the first year of the approach. The effort includes the adoption of seven best practices by hospitals across the state.These include the creation of an Emergency Department Information Exchange, so that EDs can immediately access a patient's utilization history, strict narcotic prescribing guidelines, and regular feedback reports to hospitals regarding ED utilization patterns. The effort was prompted by threats by the state legislature to limit Medicaid payments for ED visits deemed not medically necessary in the emergency setting. The legislature backed down when emergency physicians in the state countered with their own proposal to reduce nonessential use of the ED. They worked with other health care groups in the state to develop the plan. Data on the first six months of the effort are included in a report to the state legislature by the Washington State Health Care Authority. Among the findings are a 23% reduction in ED visits among Medicaid recipients with five or more visits, a 250% increase in providers who have registered with the state's Prescription Monitoring Program, aimed at identifying patients with narcotic-seeking behavior, and a doubling in the number of shared care plans, intended to improve care coordination. Emergency providers say big challenges remain, including a need for more resources for patients with mental health and dental care needs.

  11. Express Lane Eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — States may rely on eligibility information from "Express Lane" agency programs to streamline and simplify enrollment and renewal in Medicaid and CHIP. Express Lane...

  12. Medicaid Disenrollment Patterns Among Children Coming into Contact with Child Welfare Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Allaire, Benjamin T; Brown, Derek S; Ross, Raven E

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To examine retention of Medicaid coverage over time for children in the child welfare system. Methods We linked a national survey of children with histories of abuse and neglect to their Medicaid claims files from 36 states, and followed these children over a 4 year period. We estimated a Cox proportional hazards model on time to first disenrollment from Medicaid. Results Half of our sample (50 %) retained Medicaid coverage across 4 years of follow up. Most disenrollments occurred in year 4. Being 3-5 years of age and rural residence were associated with increased hazard of insurance loss. Fee-for-service Medicaid and other non-managed insurance arrangements were associated with a lower hazard of insurance loss. Conclusions for Practice A considerable number of children entering child environments seem to retain Medicaid coverage over multiple years. Finding ways to promote entry of child welfare-involved children into health insurance coverage will be critical to assure services for this highly vulnerable population.

  13. Impact of an educational program on knowledge and practice of health care staff toward pharmaceutical waste management in Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash, Mohammed I; Hussein, Rim A; Mahmoud, Aleya H; El-Borgy, Mohamed D; Abu-Hamad, Bassam A

    2016-04-01

    In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. Poor knowledge about their potential downstream impacts may be a primary factor for improper disposal behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an intervention program on knowledge and practice of health care staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management. The study was designed as a pre/posttest intervention study. Total sample size was 530 in the pre-intervention phase, and then a subsample of 69 individuals was selected for the intervention and the post-intervention phases. Paired-sample t test was used to assess the difference between pretest and follow-up test results. A statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice was achieved (Ppharmaceutical waste management. In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. A lack of knowledge about the potential impacts of this type of waste may be a leading factor in improper disposal behavior. Following an educational program, statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice of health care staff as regards to pharmaceutical waste management (PWM) was achieved. It is thus recommended that authorities implement training-of-trainers (TOT) programs to educate health care staff on PWM and organize refreshment workshops regularly.

  14. How Differences Between Manager and Clinician Perceptions of Safety Culture Impact Hospital Processes of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jason; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Ford, Eric W

    2017-11-04

    Evidenced-based processes of care improve patient outcomes, yet universal compliance is lacking, and perceptions of the quality of care are highly variable. The purpose of this study is to examine how differences in clinician and management perceptions on teamwork and communication relate to adherence to hospital processes of care. Hospitals submitted identifiable data for the 2012 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare. The dependent variable was a composite, developed from the scores on adherence to acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia process of care measures. The primary independent variables reflected 4 safety culture domains: communication openness, feedback about errors, teamwork within units, and teamwork between units. We assigned each hospital into one of 4 groups based on agreement between managers and clinicians on each domain. Each hospital was categorized as "high" (above the median) or "low" (below) for clinicians and managers in communication and teamwork. We found a positive relationship between perceived teamwork and communication climate and processes of care measures. If managers and clinicians perceived the communication openness as high, the hospital was more likely to adhere with processes of care. Similarly, if clinicians perceived teamwork across units as high, the hospital was more likely to adhere to processes of care. Manager and staff perceptions about teamwork and communications impact adherence to processes of care. Policies should recognize the importance of perceptions of both clinicians and managers on teamwork and communication and seek to improve organizational climate and practices. Clinician perceptions of teamwork across units are more closely linked to processes of care, so managers should be cognizant and try to improve their perceptions.

  15. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cary

    2008-07-23

    This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH) Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers in Nampula reported

  16. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Cary

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH. Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH. The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers

  17. Medicaid Coverage Expansions and Cigarette Smoking Cessation Among Low-income Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koma, Jonathan W; Donohue, Julie M; Barry, Colleen L; Huskamp, Haiden A; Jarlenski, Marian

    2017-12-01

    Expanding Medicaid coverage to low-income adults may have increased smoking cessation through improved access to evidence-based treatments. Our study sought to determine if states' decisions to expand Medicaid increased recent smoking cessation. Using pooled cross-sectional data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey for the years 2011-2015, we examined the association between state Medicaid coverage and the probability of recent smoking cessation among low-income adults without dependent children who were current or former smokers (n=36,083). We used difference-in-differences estimation to examine the effects of Medicaid coverage on smoking cessation, comparing low-income adult smokers in states with Medicaid coverage to comparable adults in states without Medicaid coverage, with ages 18-64 years to those ages 65 years and above. Analyses were conducted for the full sample and stratified by sex. Residence in a state with Medicaid coverage among low-income adult smokers ages 18-64 years was associated with an increase in recent smoking cessation of 2.1 percentage points (95% confidence interval, 0.25-3.9). In the comparison group of individuals ages 65 years and above, residence in a state with Medicaid coverage expansion was not associated with a change in recent smoking cessation (-0.1 percentage point, 95% confidence interval, -2.1 to 1.8). Similar increases in smoking cessation among those ages 18-64 years were estimated for females and males (1.9 and 2.2 percentage point, respectively). Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that Medicaid coverage expansions may have increased smoking cessation among low-income adults without dependent children via greater access to preventive health care services, including evidence-based smoking cessation services.

  18. Incremental Effect of the Addition of Prescriber Restrictions on a State Medicaid's Pharmacy-Only Patient Review and Restriction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, Shellie L; Pham, Timothy; Teel, Ashley; Nesser, Nancy J

    2017-08-01

    Patient review and restriction programs (PRRPs), used by state Medicaid programs to limit potential abuse and misuse of opioids and related controlled medications, often restrict members to a single pharmacy for controlled medications. While most states use a restricted pharmacy access model, not all states include restricted prescriber access. Oklahoma Medicaid (MOK) added a restricted prescriber access feature to its PRRP in July 2014. To evaluate the incremental effect that the addition of a prescriber restriction to MOK's pharmacy-only PRRP had on the pharmacy and resource utilization of the enrolled members. MOK members with at least 6 months of enrollment in the pharmacy-only PRRP were restricted to a maximum of 3 prescribers for controlled substances in July 2014 and were identified as "cases." Using a propensity score method, cases were matched to controls from the MOK non-PRRP enrolled population based on demographics and baseline health care utilization. Data from January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2014, were evaluated. Each member's monthly health care resource utilization, defined in terms of medical and pharmacy costs, prescription counts, and opioid use per member per month (PMPM), was analyzed. A difference-indifferences (DID) regression estimated the change in resource utilization following the July 2014 policy change. This study included 378 controls and 126 cases after propensity matching. No differences were noted for daily morphine equivalents, benzodiazepine prescriptions, or maintenance prescriptions. There were decreases in mean PMPM use for both groups for short-acting opioid (SAO) claims (P evidence that overall opioid claims were affected, the addition of prescriber restrictions may have resulted in an incremental change to SAO, prescriber, and pharmacy use in the PRPP population. Use of PRRPs may be an effective tool in reducing inappropriate use of prescription opioids within payer systems. The question remains whether these changes

  19. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  20. What Works In Chronic Care Management : The Case Of Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sochalski, Julie; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Laramee, Ann; McMurray, John J. V.; Naylor, Mary D.; Rich, Michael W.; Riegel, Barbara; Stewart, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The evidence base of what works in chronic care management programs is underdeveloped. To fill the gap, we pooled and reanalyzed data from ten randomized clinical trials of heart failure care management programs to discern how program delivery methods contribute to patient outcomes. We found that

  1. Can medicaid reimbursement help give female condoms a second chance in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Susan S; Stefano, Kyle; Hawkins, Courtney

    2010-10-01

    The female condom is the only other barrier contraception method besides the male condom, and it is the only "woman-initiated" device for prevention of sexually transmitted infections. Although studies demonstrate high acceptability and effectiveness for this device, overall use in the United States remains low. The female condom has been available through Medicaid in many states since 1994. We provide the first published summary of data on Medicaid reimbursement for the female condom. Our findings demonstrate low rates of claims for female condoms but high rates of reimbursement. In light of the 2009 approval of a new, cheaper female condom and the recent passage of comprehensive health care reform, we call for research examining how health care providers can best promote consumer use of Medicaid reimbursement to obtain this important infection-prevention device.

  2. The Role of Medicare's Inpatient Cost-Sharing in Medicaid Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Trivedi, Amal N; Mor, Vincent

    2018-04-01

    To isolate the effect of greater inpatient cost-sharing on Medicaid entry among Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare administrative data (years 2007-2010) were linked to nursing home assessments and area-level socioeconomic indicators. Medicare beneficiaries who are readmitted to a hospital must pay an additional deductible ($1,100 in 2010) if their readmission occurs more than 59 days following discharge. In a regression discontinuity analysis, we take advantage of this Medicare benefit feature to test whether beneficiaries with greater cost-sharing have higher rates of Medicaid enrollment. We identified 221,248 Medicare beneficiaries with an initial hospital stay and a readmission 53-59 days later (no deductible) or 60-66 days later (charged a deductible). Among beneficiaries in low-socioeconomic areas with two hospitalizations, those readmitted 60-66 days after discharge were 21 percent more likely to join Medicaid compared with those readmitted 53-59 days following their initial hospitalization (absolute difference in adjusted risk of Medicaid entry: 3.7 percent vs. 3.1 percent, p = .01). Increasing Medicare cost-sharing requirements may promote Medicaid enrollment among low-income beneficiaries. Potential savings from an increased cost-sharing in the Medicare program may be offset by increased Medicaid participation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. NASA and the Federal Management Intern Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Jack K.; Slack, Vivian M.

    A review of NASA Federal Management Intern (MI) programs indicates potential for identification, attraction, and early development of successful administrative management employees, but suggests that successful development of managers is a function of the long-term care with which an agency pursues MI programs. A recent study of separations in…

  4. Identifying potentially cost effective chronic care programs for people with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M G Steuten

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available L M G Steuten1, K M M Lemmens2, A P Nieboer2, H JM Vrijhoef31Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Health, Organisation, Policy and Economics, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Institute of Health Policy and Management, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Integrated Care, Maastricht, The NetherlandsObjective: To review published evidence regarding the cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs and to illustrate how potentially cost effective programs can be identified.Methods: Systematic search of Medline and Cochrane databases for evaluations of multi-component disease management or chronic care programs for adults with COPD, describing process, intermediate, and end results of care. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers and descriptively summarized.Results: Twenty articles describing 17 unique COPD programs were included. There is little evidence for significant improvements in process and intermediate outcomes, except for increased provision of patient self-management education and improved disease-specific knowledge. Overall, the COPD programs generate end results equivalent to usual care, but programs containing ≥3 components show lower relative risks for hospitalization. There is limited scope for programs to break-even or save money.Conclusion: Identifying cost effective multi-component COPD programs remains a challenge due to scarce methodologically sound studies that demonstrate significant improvements on process, intermediate and end results of care. Estimations of potential cost effectiveness of specific programs illustrated in this paper can, in the absence of ‘perfect data’, support timely decision-making regarding these programs. Nevertheless, well-designed health economic studies are needed to decrease the current decision

  5. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Improved Gout Outcomes in Primary Care Using a Novel Disease Management Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbin, David; Denio, Alfred E; Berger, Andrea; Brown, Jason; Maynard, Carson; Sharma, Tarun; Kirchner, H Lester; Ayoub, William T

    2018-02-13

    To pilot a primary care gout management improvement intervention. Two large primary care sites were selected: one underwent the intervention, the other, a control, underwent no intervention. The intervention consisted of: engagement of intervention site staff, surveys of provider performance improvement preferences, and onsite live and enduring online education. Electronic Health Record reminders were constructed. Both the intervention and control sites had 3 quality measures assessed monthly: percent of gout patients treated with urate lowering therapy, percent of treated patients monitored with serum urate, and percent of treated patients at target serum urate ≤ 6.0 mg/dl. The intervention site providers received monthly reports comparing their measures against their peers. By 6 months, the intervention site significantly improved all 3 gout performance measures. Percentage treated increased from 54.4 to 61.1%, OR 1.19 (95% CI 1.08, 1.31 and p-value management program can significantly improve primary care gout management performance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased Use of Dental Services by Children Covered by Medicaid: 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Leighton; Sharac, Jessica; Bruen, Brian; Thomas, Megan; Norris, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    This report analyzes the use of dental services by children enrolled in Medicaid from federal fiscal years (FFY) 2000 to 2010. The number and percent of children receiving dental services under Medicaid climbed continuously over the decade. In FFY 2000, 6.3 million children ages 1 to 20 were reported to receive some form of dental care (either preventive or treatment); the number more than doubled to 15.4 million by FFY 2010. Part of the increase was because the overall number of children covered by Medicaid rose by 12 million (50%), but the percentage of children who received dental care climbed appreciably from 29.3% in FFY 2000 to 46.4% in FFY 2010. In that same time period, the number of children ages 1 to 20 receiving preventive dental services climbed from a reported 5.0 million to 13.6 million, while the percentage of children receiving preventive dental services rose from 23.2% to 40.8%. For children ages 1 to 20 who received dental treatment services, the reported number rose from 3.3 million in FFY 2000 to 7.6 million in FFY 2010. The percentage of children who obtained dental treatment services increased from 15.3% to 22.9%. In FFY 2010, about one sixth of children covered by Medicaid (15.7%) ages 6-14 had a dental sealant placed on a permanent molar. While most states have made steady progress in improving children's access to dental care in Medicaid over the past decade, there is still substantial variation across states and more remains to be done. PMID:24753975

  8. The impact of care management information technology model on quality of care after percutaneous coronary intervention: "Bridging the Divides".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, William S; Fanari, Zaher; Elliott, Daniel; Ostertag-Stretch, Jennifer; Muther, Ann; Lynahan, Margaret; Kerzner, Roger; Salam, Tabassum; Scherrer, Herbert; Anderson, Sharon; Russo, Carla A; Kolm, Paul; Steinberg, Terri H

    2017-07-03

    Reducing readmissions and improving metrics of care are a national priority. Supplementing traditional care with care management may improve outcomes. The Bridges program was an initial evaluation of a care management platform (CareLinkHub), supported by information technology (IT) developed to improve the quality and transition of care from hospital to home after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and reduce readmissions. CareLink is comprised of care managers, patient navigators, pharmacists and physicians. Information to guide care management is guided by a middleware layer to gather information, PLR (ColdLight Solutions, LLC) and presented to CareLink staff on a care management platform, Aerial™ (Medecision). An additional analytic engine [Neuron™ (ColdLight Solutions, LLC)] helps, evaluates and guide care. The "Bridges" program enrolled a total of 2054 PCI patients with 2835 admission from April, 1st 2013 through March 1st, 2015. The data of the program was compared with those of 3691 PCI patients with 4414 admissions in the 3years prior to the program. No impact was seen with respect to inpatient and observation readmission, or emergency department visits. Similarly no change was noticed in LDL control. There was minimal improvement in BP control and only in the CTM-3 and SAQ-7 physical limitation scores in the patients' reported outcomes. Patient follow-up with physicians within 1week of discharge improved during the Bridges years. The CareLink hub platform was successfully implemented. Little or no impact on outcome metrics was seen in the short follow-up time. The Bridges program suggests that population health management must be a long-term goal, improving preventive care in the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Principles of Child Health Care Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Mark L; Helm, Mark E; White, Patience H

    2017-09-01

    After passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more children and young adults have become insured and have benefited from health care coverage than at any time since the creation of the Medicaid program in 1965. From 2009 to 2015, the uninsurance rate for children younger than 19 years fell from 9.7% to 5.3%, whereas the uninsurance rate for young adults 19 to 25 years of age declined from 31.7% to 14.5%. Nonetheless, much work remains to be done. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that the United States can and should ensure that all children, adolescents, and young adults from birth through the age of 26 years who reside within its borders have affordable access to high-quality and comprehensive health care, regardless of their or their families' incomes. Public and private health insurance should safeguard existing benefits for children and take further steps to cover the full array of essential health care services recommended by the AAP. Each family should be able to afford the premiums, deductibles, and other cost-sharing provisions of the plan. Health plans providing these benefits should ensure, insofar as possible, that families have a choice of professionals and facilities with expertise in the care of children within a reasonable distance of their residence. Traditional and innovative payment methodologies by public and private payers should be structured to guarantee the economic viability of the pediatric medical home and of other pediatric specialty and subspecialty practices to address developing shortages in the pediatric specialty and subspecialty workforce, to promote the use of health information technology, to improve population health and the experience of care, and to encourage the delivery of evidence-based and quality health care in the medical home, as well as in other outpatient, inpatient, and home settings. All current and future health care insurance plans should incorporate the principles for child

  10. Medicaid Expenditures for Children Remaining at Home After a First Finding of Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristine A; Telford, S Russell; Cook, Lawrence J; Waitzman, Norman J; Keenan, Heather T

    2016-09-01

    Child maltreatment is associated with physical and mental health problems. The objective of this study was to compare Medicaid expenditures based on a first-time finding of child maltreatment by Child Protective Services (CPS). This retrospective cohort study included children aged 0 to 14 years enrolled in Utah Medicaid between January 2007 and December 2009. The exposed group included children enrolled in Medicaid during the month of a first-time CPS finding of maltreatment not resulting in out-of-home placement. The unexposed group included children enrolled in Medicaid in the same months without CPS involvement. Quantile regression was used to describe differences in average nonpharmacy Medicaid expenditures per child-year associated with a first-time CPS finding of maltreatment. A total of 6593 exposed children and 39 181 unexposed children contributed 20 670 and 105 982 child-years to this analysis, respectively. In adjusted quantile regression, exposed children at the 50th percentile of health care spending had annual expenditures $78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 65 to 90) higher than unexposed children. This difference increased to $336 (95% CI, 283 to 389) and $1038 (95% CI, 812 to 1264) at the 75th and 90th percentiles of health care spending. Differences were higher among older children, children with mental health diagnoses, and children with repeated episodes of CPS involvement; differences were lower among children with severe chronic health conditions. Maltreatment is associated with increased health care expenditures, but these costs are not evenly distributed. Better understanding of the reasons for and outcomes associated with differences in health care costs for children with a history of maltreatment is needed. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. [The hospital perspective: disease management and integrated health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management is a transsectoral, population-based form of health care, which addresses groups of patients with particular clinical entities and risk factors. It refers both to an evidence-based knowledge base and corresponding guidelines, evaluates outcome as a continuous quality improvement process and usually includes active participation of patients. In Germany, the implementation of disease management is associated with financial transactions for risk adjustment between health care assurances [para. 137 f, Book V of Social Code (SGB V)] and represents the second kind of transsectoral care, besides a program designed as integrated health care according to para. 140 a ff f of Book V of Social Code. While in the USA and other countries disease management programs are made available by several institutions involved in health care, in Germany these programs are offered by health care insurers. Assessment of disease management from the hospital perspective will have to consider three questions: How large is the risk to compensate inadequate quality in outpatient care? Are there synergies in internal organisational development? Can the risk of inadequate funding of the global "integrated" budget be tolerated? Transsectoral quality assurance by valid performance indicators and implementation of a quality improvement process are essential. Internal organisational changes can be supported, particularly in the case of DRG introduction. The economic risk and financial output depends on the kind of disease being focussed by the disease management program. In assessing the underlying scientific evidence of their cost effectiveness, societal costs will have to be precisely differentiated from hospital-associated costs.

  12. The Nordic maintenance care program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Stefan; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    of maintenance care. Previous studies have identified chiropractors' choices of case management strategies in response to different case scenarios. However, the rationale for these management strategies is not known. In other words, when presented with both the case, and different management strategies......Maintenance care is a well known concept among chiropractors, although there is little knowledge about its exact definition, its indications and usefulness. As an initial step in a research program on this phenomenon, it was necessary to identify chiropractors' rationale for their use......, there was consensus on how to match these, but if only the management strategies were provided, would chiropractors be able to define the cases to fit these strategies? The objective with this study was to investigate if there is a common pattern in Finnish chiropractors' case management of patients with low back...

  13. Care for children with special health care needs in a managed care system: a patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J M; Bravo, C J; Reyes, O

    2001-09-01

    In 1994 the government of Puerto Rico adopted a capitated managed health care system for the medically indigent. The new law has been implemented in most municipalities. A survey of children with special health care needs treated at a tertiary pediatric center under the capitated managed care system and the prior non-capitated system was analyzed using the Consumer Assessments of Health Plan Survey (CHAPS) instrument. One third of the patients who were under the new capitated managed care system were not satisfied with the medial care they were receiving. The parents of children with multidisciplinary conditions found it much more difficult to access care at the tertiary center. It took parents two years to learn to navigate within the capitated managed care system. Studies to measure outcome and health quality of children with special health care needs in capitated managed health care programs must be developed to learn how the potential benefits of managed care can be maximized and the potential harms minimized. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accessibility and satisfaction of caretakers of children with special health care needs under a capitated managed health care system.

  14. Managing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, Q D

    1997-09-01

    The terms 'managed care' and 'disease management' are gaining common usage in the health service but their meaning is not widely understood. Managed care is a generic term describing any health care system that integrates the financing and delivery of medical care. Its growth in the United States has been driven by pressure to control costs, and there is circumstantial evidence that costs are slowing as a result of better management of resources. However, it is not clear how much of this is due to managed care, the selection of more favourable enrollees to health plans or other factors. Research evidence is limited, and that available is constrained by the rapidly changing nature of managed care. In the United States a bewildering variety of managed care arrangements have emerged, although several common characteristics can be identified: limited choice of physician providers; controlled access to secondary care; selective contracting; financial incentives; quality management; and utilization management. All are present in the National Health Service (NHS), which exemplifies a nationalized managed care system. Disease management is an extension of managed care that takes a global approach to patient care by attempting to co-ordinate resources across the entire health care delivery system throughout the life cycle of the disease. This is poorly developed in the NHS, so that the attention of commercial organizations has been attracted. However, concern has been expressed about the implications of commercial involvement: the fragmentation of general medical services; effect of for-profit status; and use of patient-based data. Recent policy developments could allow disease management to develop within the NHS.

  15. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness and Substance Misuse Within a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacchione, Pamela Z; Eible, Lisa; Gill, Le'Roi L; Huege, Steven F

    2016-05-01

    Providing person-centered care (PCC) to older adults with dual diagnosis, co-occurring serious mental illness (SMI), and substance misuse is complex and requires an interprofessional team. Older adults, who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare (i.e., dual-eligibles) are overrepresented in the population of older adults with SMI and substance misuse. Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) exist to support community living needs of nursing home-eligible older adults and are increasingly in a position to serve older adults with SMI and substance misuse issues. PACE programs provide integrated person-centered mental health care to address the serious medical, social, and emotional complications posed by having SMI and substance misuse disorders. The case study presented illustrates PCC provided to a dual-diagnosis PACE participant, illustrating the impact of recent and past trauma on current psychopathology and substance misuse. Finally, recommendations for addressing PCC of dual diagnosis within the PACE model are provided. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(5), 11-17.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Strategies to Recruit a Diverse Low-Income Population to Child Weight Management Programs From Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Sarah E; Butte, Nancy F; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Salahuddin, Meliha; Pont, Stephen J

    2017-12-21

    Primary care practices can be used to engage children and families in weight management programs. The Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (TX CORD) study targeted patients at 12 primary care practices in diverse and low-income areas of Houston, Texas, and Austin, Texas for recruitment to a trial of weight management programs. This article describes recruitment strategies developed to benefit both families and health care practices and the modification of electronic health records (EHRs) to reflect recruitment outcomes. To facilitate family participation, materials and programs were provided in English and Spanish, and programs were conducted in convenient locations. To support health care practices, EHRs and print materials were provided to facilitate obesity recognition, screening, and study referral. We provided brief training for providers and their office staffs that covered screening patients for obesity, empathetic communication, obesity billing coding, and use of counseling materials. We collected EHR data from 2012 through 2014, including demographics, weight, and height, for all patients aged 2 to 12 years who were seen in the 12 provider practices during the study's recruitment phase. The data of patients with a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 85th percentile were compared with the same data for patients who were referred to the study and patients who enrolled in the study. We also examined reasons that patients referred to the study declined to participate. Overall, 26% of 7,845 patients with a BMI at or above the 85th percentile were referred to the study, and 27% of referred patients enrolled. Enrollment among patients with a BMI at or above the 85th percentile was associated with being Hispanic and with more severe obesity than with patients of other races/ethnicities or less severe obesity, respectively. Among families of children aged 2 to 5 years who were referred, 20% enrolled, compared with 30% of families of older children (>5 y

  17. Cancer Care Ontario and integrated cancer programs: portrait of a performance management system and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Siu Mee; Thompson, Leslee J

    2006-01-01

    A performance management system has been implemented by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). This system allows for the monitoring and management of 11 integrated cancer programs (ICPs) across the Province of Ontario. The system comprises of four elements: reporting frequency, reporting requirements, review meetings and accountability and continuous improvement activities. CCO and the ICPs have recently completed quarterly performance review exercises for the last two quarters of the fiscal year 2004-2005. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the key lessons learned. The paper provides an outline of the CCO performance management system. These lessons included: data must be valid and reliable; performance management requires commitments from both parties in the performance review exercises; streamlining performance reporting is beneficial; technology infrastructure which allows for cohesive management of data is vital for a sustainable performance management system; performance indicators need to stand up to scrutiny by both parties; and providing comparative data across the province is valuable. Critical success factors which would help to ensure a successful performance management system include: corporate engagement from various parts of an organization in the review exercises; desire to focus on performance improvement and avoidance of blaming; and strong data management systems. The performance management system is a practical and sustainable system that allows for performance improvement of cancer care services. It can be a vital tool to enhance accountability within the health care system. The paper demonstrates that the performance management system supports accountability in the cancer care system for Ontario, and reflects the principles of the provincial governments commitment to continuous improvement of healthcare.

  18. Results from a national survey on chronic care management by health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattke, Soeren; Higgins, Aparna; Brook, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The growing burden of chronic disease necessitates innovative approaches to help patients and to ensure the sustainability of our healthcare system. Health plans have introduced chronic care management models, but systematic data on the type and prevalence of different approaches are lacking. Our goal was to conduct a systematic examination of chronic care management programs offered by health plans in the commercial market (ie, in products sold to employers and individuals. We undertook a national survey of a representative sample of health plans (70 plans, 36% response rate) and 6 case studies on health plans' programs to improve chronic care in the commercial market. The data underwent descriptive and bivariate analyses. All plans, regardless of size, location, and ownership, offer chronic care management programs, which identify eligible members from claims data and match them to interventions based on overall risk and specific care gaps. Plans then report information on care gaps to providers and offer self-management support to their members. While internal evaluations suggest that the interventions improve care and reduce cost, plans report difficulties in engaging members and providers. To overcome those obstacles, plans are integrating their programs into provider work flow, collaborating with providers on care redesign and leveraging patient support technologies. Our study shows that chronic care management programs have become a standard component of the overall approach used by health plans to manage the health of their members.

  19. Two-year mortality, complications, and healthcare use in children with medicaid following tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Karen; O'Neill, Margaret; Zhu, Hannah; Graham, Robert J; Hall, Matthew; Berry, Jay

    2016-11-01

    To assess patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes in the first 2 years following tracheostomy, and to report healthcare utilization and cost of caring for these children. Retrospective cohort study. Children (0-16 years) in Medicaid from 10 states undergoing tracheostomy in 2009, identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes and followed through 2011, were selected using the Truven Health Medicaid Marketscan Database (Truven Health Analytics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI). Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed with likelihood of death and tracheostomy complication using chi-square tests and logistic regression. Healthcare use and spending across the care continuum (hospital, outpatient, community, and home) were reported. A total of 502 children underwent tracheostomy in 2009, with 34.1% eligible for Medicaid because of disability. Median age at tracheostomy was 8 years (interquartile range 1-16 years), and 62.7% had a complex chronic condition. Two-year rates of in-hospital mortality and tracheostomy complication were 8.9% and 38.8%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, the highest likelihood of mortality occurred in children age tracheostomy complication was in children with a complex chronic condition versus those without a complex chronic condition (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.1-9.9). Total healthcare spending in the 2 years following tracheostomy was $53.3 million, with hospital, home, and primary care constituting 64.4%, 9.4%, and 0.5% of total spending, respectively. Mortality and morbidity are high, and spending on primary and home care is small following tracheostomy in children with Medicaid. Future studies should assess whether improved outpatient and community care might improve their health outcomes. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2611-2617, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Counterproductive Consequences of a Conservative Ideology: Medicaid Expansion and Personal Responsibility Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Allison M; Hunt, Linda M

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid expansion, a key part of the Affordable Care Act, has been opposed by conservative politicians despite its fiscal and public health benefits. In response, some Republican-led states have expanded Medicaid with new reforms, including requirements for cost sharing and behavioral incentives, that promote conservative political values tied to an ideology of personal responsibility. We examine this trend using Michigan's Medicaid expansion as a case example. We explore the origins, evidence base, and possible consequences of these reforms. We argue that these reforms prioritize ideology over sound public health knowledge, deflecting attention away from the social, economic, and structural factors that influence the health of the poor, and may ultimately contribute to counterproductive public health and fiscal outcomes.

  1. First German disease management program for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The first disease management program contract for breast cancer in Germany was signed in 2002 between the Association of Regional of Physicians in North-Rhine and the statutory health insurance companies in Rhineland. At the heart of this unique breast cancer disease management program is a patient-centered network of health care professionals. The program's main objectives are: (1) to improve the quality of treatment and post-operative care for breast cancer patients, (2) to provide timely information and consultation empowering the patient to participate in decisionmaking, (3) to improve the interface between inpatient and outpatient care, and (4) to increase the number of breast-conserving surgeries.

  2. Use of quality measurement across US dental delivery systems: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrqiq, Hosam M; Edelstein, Burton L

    2016-03-01

    Dentistry is increasingly challenged by payers and the public to demonstrate quality measurement (QM) activities that substantiate value. Unknown is how various components of the US oral health-care financing and delivery systems have adopted QM. The objective of this study is to explore QM activities by US dental delivery, management, financing, and related organizations. Using a structured interview guide based on a novel conceptual framework that incorporates factors influencing QM intention, adoption, and implementation, 19 key informant interviews were conducted. Informants represented safety net delivery programs (health center, nonprofit mobile, hospital-based, Veterans Administration, and tribal dental programs), private delivery organizations (private practice, closed panel HMO, and for-profit mobile dental programs), training programs that deliver care (dental and dental therapy programs), management organizations (private and Medicaid group practice management companies), care financing organizations (Medicaid managed care plan, state Medicaid program, dental benefits companies), and dental quality organizations (institute and dental professional organization). Interviews were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively. Informants report wide variation in the intensity of QM efforts with organizational leadership cited as most influential. Motivation to adopt QM efforts is more often internal than imposed. Data management and information technology both facilitate and limit QM activities. QM activities are associated with operational improvements including use of guidelines and refinements of mission. Organizational type and size appear to influence QM programs. The current status of QM is highly variable across dental organizations because organizational leadership, needs, and requirements vary according to mission and structure. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. TRICARE Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Benefit: Comparison with Medicaid and Commercial Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Margaret; Kadiyala, Srikanth; Kress, Amii; Hastings, Jaime L; O'Hanlon, Claire E

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) benefit provided by TRICARE as an early intervention for autism spectrum disorder with similar benefits in Medicaid and commercial health insurance plans. The sponsor, the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, was particularly interested in how a proposed TRICARE reimbursement rate decrease from $125 per hour to $68 per hour for ABA services performed by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst compared with reimbursement rates (defined as third-party payment to the service provider) in Medicaid and commercial health insurance plans. Information on ABA coverage in state Medicaid programs was collected from Medicaid state waiver databases; subsequently, Medicaid provider reimbursement data were collected from state Medicaid fee schedules. Applied Behavior Analysis provider reimbursement in the commercial health insurance system was estimated using Truven Health MarketScan® data. A weighted mean U.S. reimbursement rate was calculated for several services using cross-state information on the number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Locations of potential provider shortages were also identified. Medicaid and commercial insurance reimbursement rates varied considerably across the United States. This project concluded that the proposed $68-per-hour reimbursement rate for services provided by a board certified analyst was more than 25 percent below the U.S. mean.

  4. 77 FR 13697 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ..., decreases in length of stay, increased patient safety, and reduced medical errors. There is evidence to... Medicaid section of this proposed rule (which relate to calculations of patient volume and hospital... Building is not readily available to persons without Federal government identification, commenters are...

  5. Medicaid Expansion And Grant Funding Increases Helped Improve Community Health Center Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinxin; Luo, Qian; Ku, Leighton

    2017-01-01

    Through the expansion of Medicaid eligibility and increases in core federal grant funding, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) sought to increase the capacity of community health centers to provide primary care to low-income populations. We examined the effects of the ACA Medicaid expansion and changes in federal grant levels on the centers' numbers of patients, percentages of patients by type of insurance, and numbers of visits from 2012 to 2015. In the period after expansion (2014-15), health centers in expansion states had a 5 percent higher total patient volume, larger shares of Medicaid patients, smaller shares of uninsured patients, and increases in overall visits and mental health visits, compared to centers in nonexpansion states. Increases in federal grant funding levels were associated with increases in numbers of patients and of overall, medical, and preventive service visits. If federal grant levels are not sustained after 2017, there could be marked reductions in health center capacity in both expansion and nonexpansion states. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M; Graff, Maud J L; Zuidema, Sytse U; Hermsen, Pieter G J M; Teerenstra, Steven; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2013-10-07

    Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for seniors who acquired dual sensory impairment at old age. In a cluster randomized, single-blind controlled trial, with aged care settings as the unit of randomization, the effectiveness of a self-management program will be compared to usual care. A minimum of 14 and maximum of 20 settings will be randomized to either the intervention cluster or the control cluster, aiming to include a total of 132 seniors with dual sensory impairment. Each senior will be linked to a licensed practical nurse working at the setting. During a five to six month intervention period, nurses at the intervention clusters will be trained in a self-management program to support and empower seniors to use self-management strategies. In two separate diaries, nurses keep track of the interviews with the seniors and their reflections on their own learning process. Nurses of the control clusters offer care as usual. At senior level, the primary outcome is the social participation of the seniors measured using the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire and the Activity Card Sort, and secondary outcomes are mood, autonomy and quality of life. At nurse level, the outcome is job satisfaction. Effectiveness will be evaluated using linear mixed model analysis. The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of the Self-Management Program for seniors with dual sensory impairment living in aged care settings. The findings are expected to contribute to the knowledge on the program's potential to enhance social participation and autonomy of the seniors, as well as increasing the job satisfaction of the licensed practical nurses. Furthermore, an

  7. Early Experience of Financial Performance and Solvency of Medicaid-Focused Insurers Under ACA Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J

    2017-12-01

    To allow for greater coverage of the uninsured, the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid coverage in 2014. Accessing financial data of state health insurers from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, this data trend study compares the financial performance and solvency of Medicaid-focused health insurers prior to and after the first year expansion of Medicaid coverage. After the first year of Medicaid expansion, there was a significant increase in operating profit margin ratio for Medicaid-focused health insurers within expansion states. Lower medical loss ratio as well as no change in administrative costs contributed to this profitable position. The risk-based capital ratio for solvency increased significantly for health insurers in nonexpansion states while there was no change in this ratio for health insurers in expansion states. Conversely, the other important solvency ratio of cash flow margin increased significantly for health insurers in expansion states but not for insurers in nonexpansion states.

  8. Experiences of three states implementing the Medicaid health home model to address opioid use disorder-Case studies in Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Wishner, Jane B; Allen, Eva H; Lallemand, Nicole; Epstein, Marni; Spillman, Brenda C

    2017-12-01

    The United States is facing an unprecedented opioid epidemic. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) included several provisions designed to increase care coordination in state Medicaid programs and improve outcomes for those with chronic conditions, including substance use disorders. Three states-Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont - adopted the ACA's optional Medicaid health home model for individuals with opioid use disorder. The model coordinates opioid use disorder treatment that features opioid agonist therapy provided at opioid treatment programs (OTPs) and Office-based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with medical and behavioral health care and other services, including those addressing social determinants of health. This study examines state approaches to opioid health homes (OHH) and uses a retrospective analysis to identify facilitators and barriers to the program's implementation from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. We conducted 28 semi-structured discussions with 70 discussants across the three states, including representatives from state agencies, OHH providers (OTPs and OBOTs), Medicaid health plans, and provider associations. Discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo. In addition, we reviewed state health home applications, policies, regulatory guidance, reporting, and other available OHH materials. We adapted the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) model as a guiding framework to examine the collected data, helping us to identify key factors affecting each stage of the OHH implementation. Overall, discussants reported that the OHH model was implemented successfully and was responsible for substantial improvements in patient care. Contextual factors at both the state level (e.g., legislation, funding, state leadership, program design) and provider level (OHH provider characteristics, leadership, adaptability) affected each stage of implementation of the OHH model. States took a variety of approaches in

  9. After The Demonstration: What States Sustained After the End of Federal Grants to Improve Children's Health Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireys, Henry T; Brach, Cindy; Anglin, Grace; Devers, Kelly J; Burton, Rachel

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Under the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant Program, CMS awarded $100 million through 10 grants that 18 state Medicaid agencies implemented between 2010 and 2015. The program's legislatively-mandated purpose was to evaluate promising ideas for improving the quality of children's health care provided through Medicaid and CHIP. As part of the program's multifaceted evaluation, this study examined the extent to which states sustained key program activities after the demonstration ended. Methods We identified 115 potentially sustainable elements within states' CHIPRA demonstrations and analyzed data from grantee reports and key informant interviews to assess sustainment outcomes and key influential factors. We also assessed sustainment of the projects' intellectual capital. Results 56% of potentially sustainable elements were sustained. Sustainment varied by topic area: Elements related to quality measure reporting and practice facilitation were more likely to be sustained than others, such as parent advisors. Broad contextual factors, the state's Medicaid environment, implementation partners' resources, and characteristics of the demonstration itself all shaped sustainment outcomes. Discussion Assessing sustainment of key elements of states' CHIPRA quality demonstration projects provides insight into the fates of the "promising ideas" that the grant program was designed to examine. As a result of the federal government's investment in this grant program, many demonstration states are in a strong position to extend and spread specific strategies for improving the quality of care for children in Medicaid and CHIP. Our findings provide insights for policymakers and providers working to improve the quality of health care for low income children.

  10. Integrating interdisciplinary pain management into primary care: development and implementation of a novel clinical program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorflinger, Lindsey M; Ruser, Christopher; Sellinger, John; Edens, Ellen L; Kerns, Robert D; Becker, William C

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and implement an interdisciplinary pain program integrated in primary care to address stakeholder-identified gaps. Program development and evaluation project utilizing a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to address the identified problem of insufficient pain management resources within primary care. A large Healthcare System within the Veterans Health Administration, consisting of two academically affiliated medical centers and six community-based outpatients clinics. An interprofessional group of stakeholders participated in a Rapid Process Improvement Workshop (RPIW), a consensus-building process to identify systems-level gaps and feasible solutions and obtain buy-in. Changes were implemented in 2012, and in a 1-year follow-up, we examined indicators of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services as well as patient and provider satisfaction. In response to identified barriers, RPIW participants proposed and outlined two readily implementable, interdisciplinary clinics embedded within primary care: 1) the Integrated Pain Clinic, providing in-depth assessment and triage to targeted resources; and 2) the Opioid Reassessment Clinic, providing assessment and structured monitoring of patients with evidence of safety, efficacy, or misuse problems with opioids. Implementation of these programs led to higher rates of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services; patients and providers reported satisfaction with these services. Our PDSA cycle engaged an interprofessional group of stakeholders that recommended introduction of new systems-based interventions to better integrate pain resources into primary care to address reported barriers. Early data suggest improved outcomes; examination of additional outcomes is planned. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Medicare managed care. How physicians can make it better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggin, G M

    1997-12-01

    The federal government is attempting to control anticipated, increased Medicare health care costs by providing the senior population with incentives to encourage their movement into managed care programs. For-profit corporate HMOs that currently dominate the managed care arena are coming under increased competitive pressure at a time when their perception of profiteering is undergoing increased public scrutiny. If physicians are to take advantage of this window of opportunity and successfully enter the Medicare managed care marketplace, they must identify the major deficiencies existing in the current model, and fashion a new product that divests itself of the profit orientation of current corporate HMOs. A nonprofit version of a highly integrated, multispecialty provider service organization (PSO) provides an appropriate model to effectively compete with the corporate HMO. The ideal physician-controlled managed care model must: develop a responsive policy board structure; create practice guidelines that decrease variation in physician practice; achieve an appropriate balance between primary and specialty medical care; and adopt a quality-assurance program that effectively addresses both process and outcome data.