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Sample records for mediating cell surface

  1. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  2. Adhesion to the host cell surface is sufficient to mediate Listeria monocytogenes entry into epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Fabian E.; Rengarajan, Michelle; Chavez, Natalie; Radhakrishnan, Prathima; Gloerich, Martijn; Bianchini, Julie; Siemers, Kathleen; Luckett, William S.; Lauer, Peter; Nelson, W. James; Theriot, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the first physiological barrier breached by the Gram-positive facultative pathogen Listeria monocytogenes during an in vivo infection. Listeria monocytogenes binds to the epithelial host cell receptor E-cadherin, which mediates a physical link between the bacterium and filamentous actin (F-actin). However, the importance of anchoring the bacterium to F-actin through E-cadherin for bacterial invasion has not been tested directly in epithelial cells. Here we demonstrate that depleting αE-catenin, which indirectly links E-cadherin to F-actin, did not decrease L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells in tissue culture. Instead, invasion increased due to increased bacterial adhesion to epithelial monolayers with compromised cell–cell junctions. Furthermore, expression of a mutant E-cadherin lacking the intracellular domain was sufficient for efficient L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells. Importantly, direct biotin-mediated binding of bacteria to surface lipids in the plasma membrane of host epithelial cells was sufficient for uptake. Our results indicate that the only requirement for L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells is adhesion to the host cell surface, and that E-cadherin–mediated coupling of the bacterium to F-actin is not required. PMID:28877987

  3. Area-Specific Cell Stimulation via Surface-Mediated Gene Transfer Using Apatite-Based Composite Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Yazaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using biocompatible calcium phosphate (CaP-based composite layers have attracted attention as a tool for controlling cell behaviors. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the potential of CaP-based composite layers to mediate area-specific dual gene transfer and to stimulate cells on an area-by-area basis in the same well. For this purpose we prepared two pairs of DNA–fibronectin–apatite composite (DF-Ap layers using a pair of reporter genes and pair of differentiation factor genes. The results of the area-specific dual gene transfer successfully demonstrated that the cells cultured on a pair of DF-Ap layers that were adjacently placed in the same well showed specific gene expression patterns depending on the gene that was immobilized in theunderlying layer. Moreover, preliminary real-time PCR results indicated that multipotential C3H10T1/2 cells may have a potential to change into different types of cells depending on the differentiation factor gene that was immobilized in the underlying layer, even in the same well. Because DF-Ap layers have a potential to mediate area-specific cell stimulation on their surfaces, they could be useful in tissue engineering applications.

  4. Identification of a regulatory T cell specific cell surface molecule that mediates suppressive signals and induces Foxp3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wan, Qi; Kozhaya, Lina; Fujii, Hodaka; Unutmaz, Derya

    2008-07-16

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells control immune activation and maintain tolerance. How T(regs) mediate their suppressive function is unclear. Here we identified a cell surface molecule, called GARP, (or LRRC32), which within T cells is specifically expressed in T(regs) activated through the T cell receptor (TCR). Ectopic expression of GARP in human naïve T (T(N)) cells inhibited their proliferation and cytokine secretion upon TCR activation. Remarkably, GARP over-expression in T(N) cells induced expression of T(reg) master transcription factor Foxp3 and endowed them with a partial suppressive function. The extracellular but not the cytoplasmic region of GARP, was necessary for these functions. Silencing Foxp3 in human T(reg) cells reduced expression of GARP and attenuated their suppressive function. However, GARP function was not affected when Foxp3 was downregulated in GARP-overexpressing cells, while silencing GARP in Foxp3-overexpressing cells reduced their suppressive activity. These findings reveal a novel cell surface molecule-mediated regulatory mechanism, with implications for modulating aberrant immune responses.

  5. Identification of a regulatory T cell specific cell surface molecule that mediates suppressive signals and induces Foxp3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (T(reg cells control immune activation and maintain tolerance. How T(regs mediate their suppressive function is unclear. Here we identified a cell surface molecule, called GARP, (or LRRC32, which within T cells is specifically expressed in T(regs activated through the T cell receptor (TCR. Ectopic expression of GARP in human naïve T (T(N cells inhibited their proliferation and cytokine secretion upon TCR activation. Remarkably, GARP over-expression in T(N cells induced expression of T(reg master transcription factor Foxp3 and endowed them with a partial suppressive function. The extracellular but not the cytoplasmic region of GARP, was necessary for these functions. Silencing Foxp3 in human T(reg cells reduced expression of GARP and attenuated their suppressive function. However, GARP function was not affected when Foxp3 was downregulated in GARP-overexpressing cells, while silencing GARP in Foxp3-overexpressing cells reduced their suppressive activity. These findings reveal a novel cell surface molecule-mediated regulatory mechanism, with implications for modulating aberrant immune responses.

  6. A cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, immunologically related to CD44, is involved in type I collagen-mediated melanoma cell motility and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faassen, A E; Schrager, J A; Klein, D J

    1992-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells occurs through a complex series of events, one of which involves the adhesion of tumor cells to extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Multiple interactions between cell surface receptors of an adherent tumor cell and the surrounding ECM contribute to cell...... collagen could also be inhibited by removing cell surface chondroitin sulfate with chondroitinase. In contrast, type I collagen-mediated melanoma cell adhesion and spreading were not affected by either beta-D-xyloside or chondroitinase treatments. These results suggest that mouse melanoma CSPG...... was shown to be mediated, at least in part, by chondroitin sulfate. Additionally we have determined that mouse melanoma CSPG is composed of a 110-kD core protein that is recognized by anti-CD44 antibodies on Western blots. Collectively, our data suggests that interactions between a cell surface CD44-related...

  7. Plant cell surface receptor-mediated signaling - a common theme amid diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunxia; Zhou, Jinggeng; Shan, Libo; Meng, Xiangzong

    2018-01-29

    Sessile plants employ a diverse array of plasma membrane-bound receptors to perceive endogenous and exogenous signals for regulation of plant growth, development and immunity. These cell surface receptors include receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that harbor different extracellular domains for perception of distinct ligands. Several RLK and RLP signaling pathways converge at the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs), which function as shared co-receptors. A repertoire of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs) associate with the receptor complexes to relay intracellular signaling. Downstream of the receptor complexes, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are among the key signaling modules at which the signals converge, and these cascades regulate diverse cellular and physiological responses through phosphorylation of different downstream substrates. In this Review, we summarize the emerging common theme that underlies cell surface receptor-mediated signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana : the dynamic association of RLKs and RLPs with specific co-receptors and RLCKs for signal transduction. We further discuss how signaling specificities are maintained through modules at which signals converge, with a focus on SERK-mediated receptor signaling. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  9. Surface receptor Toso controls B cell-mediated regulation of T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinbo; Duong, Vu Huy Hoang; Westphal, Katrin; Westphal, Andreas; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Grassl, Guntram A; Brand, Korbinian; Chan, Andrew C; Föger, Niko; Lee, Kyeong-Hee

    2018-05-01

    The immune system is tightly controlled by regulatory processes that allow for the elimination of invading pathogens, while limiting immunopathological damage to the host. In the present study, we found that conditional deletion of the cell surface receptor Toso on B cells unexpectedly resulted in impaired proinflammatory T cell responses, which led to impaired immune protection in an acute viral infection model and was associated with reduced immunopathological tissue damage in a chronic inflammatory context. Toso exhibited its B cell-inherent immunoregulatory function by negatively controlling the pool of IL-10-competent B1 and B2 B cells, which were characterized by a high degree of self-reactivity and were shown to mediate immunosuppressive activity on inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Our results indicate that Toso is involved in the differentiation/maintenance of regulatory B cells by fine-tuning B cell receptor activation thresholds. Furthermore, we showed that during influenza A-induced pulmonary inflammation, the application of Toso-specific antibodies selectively induced IL-10-competent B cells at the site of inflammation and resulted in decreased proinflammatory cytokine production by lung T cells. These findings suggest that Toso may serve as a novel therapeutic target to dampen pathogenic T cell responses via the modulation of IL-10-competent regulatory B cells.

  10. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage. PMID:25069006

  11. Interaction between tumor cell surface receptor RAGE and proteinase 3 mediates prostate cancer metastasis to bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Sergeeva, Anna; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Smith, Tracey L.; Tarleton, Christy A.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Marchiò, Serena; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2017-01-01

    Human prostate cancer often metastasizes to bone, but the biological basis for such site-specific tropism remains largely unresolved. Recent work led us to hypothesize that this tropism may reflect pathogenic interactions between RAGE, a cell surface receptor expressed on malignant cells in advanced prostate cancer, and proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease present in inflammatory neutrophils and hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we establish that RAGE-PR3 interaction mediates homing of prostate cancer cells to the bone marrow. PR3 bound to RAGE on the surface of prostate cancer cells in vitro, inducing tumor cell motility through a non-proteolytic signal transduction cascade involving activation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In preclinical models of experimental metastasis, ectopic expression of RAGE on human prostate cancer cells was sufficient to promote bone marrow homing within a short time frame. Our findings demonstrate how RAGE-PR3 interactions between human prostate cancer cells and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate bone metastasis during prostate cancer progression, with potential implications for prognosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:28428279

  12. Functional Elements on SIRPα IgV domain Mediate Cell Surface Binding to CD47

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuan; Tong, Qiao; Zhou, Yubin; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Jenny J.; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Chen, Yi-Tien; Ha, Binh; Chen, Celia X-J.; Zen, Ke

    2006-01-01

    SIRPα and SIRPβ1, the two major isoforms of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) family, are co-expressed in human leukocytes but mediate distinct extracellular binding interactions and divergent cell signaling responses. Previous studies have demonstrated that binding of SIRPα with CD47, another important cell surface molecule, through the extracellular IgV domain regulates important leukocyte functions including macrophage recognition, leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Although SIRPβ1 ...

  13. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  14. Glycosaminoglycans mediate retention of the poxvirus type I interferon binding protein at the cell surface to locally block interferon antiviral responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanuy, Imma; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox was accomplished 30 yr ago, but poxviral infections still represent a public health concern due to the potential release of variola virus or the emergence of zoonotic poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus. A critical determinant of poxvirus virulence is the inhibition of interferons (IFNs) by the virus-encoded type I IFN-binding protein (IFNα/βBP). This immunomodulatory protein is secreted and has the unique property of interacting with the cell surface in order to prevent IFN-mediated antiviral responses. However, the mechanism of its attachment to the cell surface remains unknown. Using surface plasmon resonance and cell-binding assays, we report that the IFNα/βBP from vaccinia virus, the smallpox vaccine, interacts with cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Analysis of the contribution of different regions of the protein to cell surface binding demonstrated that clusters of basic residues in the first immunoglobulin domain mediate GAG interactions. Furthermore, mutation of the GAG-interaction motifs does not affect its IFN-binding and -blocking capacity. Functional conservation of GAG-binding sites is demonstrated for the IFNα/βBP from variola and monkeypox viruses, extending our understanding of immune modulation by the most virulent human poxviruses. These results are relevant for the design of improved vaccines and intervention strategies.—Montanuy, I., Alejo, A., Alcami, A. Glycosaminoglycans mediate retention of the poxvirus type I interferon binding protein at the cell surface to locally block interferon antiviral responses. PMID:21372110

  15. Regulated internalization of NMDA receptors drives PKD1-mediated suppression of the activity of residual cell-surface NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao-Qian; Qiao, Haifa; Groveman, Bradley R; Feng, Shuang; Pflueger, Melissa; Xin, Wen-Kuan; Ali, Mohammad K; Lin, Shuang-Xiu; Xu, Jindong; Duclot, Florian; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Wang, Wei; Ding, Xin-Sheng; Santiago-Sim, Teresa; Jiang, Xing-Hong; Salter, Michael W; Yu, Xian-Min

    2015-11-19

    Constitutive and regulated internalization of cell surface proteins has been extensively investigated. The regulated internalization has been characterized as a principal mechanism for removing cell-surface receptors from the plasma membrane, and signaling to downstream targets of receptors. However, so far it is still not known whether the functional properties of remaining (non-internalized) receptor/channels may be regulated by internalization of the same class of receptor/channels. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a principal subtype of glutamate-gated ion channel and plays key roles in neuronal plasticity and memory functions. NMDARs are well-known to undergo two types of regulated internalization - homologous and heterologous, which can be induced by high NMDA/glycine and DHPG, respectively. In the present work, we investigated effects of regulated NMDAR internalization on the activity of residual cell-surface NMDARs and neuronal functions. In electrophysiological experiments we discovered that the regulated internalization of NMDARs not only reduced the number of cell surface NMDARs but also caused an inhibition of the activity of remaining (non-internalized) surface NMDARs. In biochemical experiments we identified that this functional inhibition of remaining surface NMDARs was mediated by increased serine phosphorylation of surface NMDARs, resulting from the activation of protein kinase D1 (PKD1). Knockdown of PKD1 did not affect NMDAR internalization but prevented the phosphorylation and inhibition of remaining surface NMDARs and NMDAR-mediated synaptic functions. These data demonstrate a novel concept that regulated internalization of cell surface NMDARs not only reduces the number of NMDARs on the cell surface but also causes an inhibition of the activity of remaining surface NMDARs through intracellular signaling pathway(s). Furthermore, modulating the activity of remaining surface receptors may be an effective approach for treating receptor

  16. Ultrasound-mediated method for rapid delivery of nano-particles into cells for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and cancer cell screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Guannan; Huang, Shaohua; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongzeng; Lin, Juqiang; Chen, Rong; Lin, Duo; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technology for providing finger-printing information of cells. A big challenge has been the long time duration and inefficient uptake of metal nano-particles into living cells as substrate for SERS analysis. Herein, a simple method (based on ultrasound) for the rapid transfer of silver nanoparticles (NPs) into living cells for intracellular SERS spectroscopy was presented. In this study, the ultrasound-mediated method for NP delivery overcame the shortcoming of ‘passive uptake’, and achieved quick acquisition of reproducible SERS spectra from living human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines (C666 and CNE1) and normal nasopharyngeal cell line (NP69). Tentative assignment of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra showed cancer cell specific biomolecular differences, including significantly lower DNA concentrations and higher protein concentrations in cancerous nasopharyngeal cells as compared to those of normal cells. Combined with PCA–LDA multivariate analysis, ultrasound-mediated cell SERS spectroscopy differentiated the cancerous cells from the normal nasopharyngeal cells with high diagnostic accuracy (98.7%), demonstrating great potential for high-throughput cancer cell screening applications. (paper)

  17. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  18. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1 + endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin + vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin + , EEA1 + , Rab11 + , Rab5 + , and Rab7 + vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore, CMTM

  19. Functional Elements on SIRPα IgV domain Mediate Cell Surface Binding to CD47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tong, Qiao; Zhou, Yubin; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Jenny J.; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Chen, Yi-Tien; Ha, Binh; Chen, Celia X-J.; Zen, Ke

    2007-01-01

    Summary SIRPα and SIRPβ1, the two major isoforms of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) family, are co-expressed in human leukocytes but mediate distinct extracellular binding interactions and divergent cell signaling responses. Previous studies have demonstrated that binding of SIRPα with CD47, another important cell surface molecule, through the extracellular IgV domain regulates important leukocyte functions including macrophage recognition, leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Although SIRPβ1 shares highly homologous extracellular IgV structure with SIRPα, it does not bind to CD47. In this study, we defined key amino acid residues exclusively expressing in the IgV domain of SIRPα, but not SIRPβ1, which determine the extracellular binding interaction of SIRPα to CD47. These key residues include Gln67, a small hydrophobic amino acid (Ala or Val) at the 57th position and Met102. We found that Gln67 and Ala/Val57 are critical. Mutation of either of these residues abates SIRPα directly binding to CD47. Functional cell adhesion and leukocyte transmigration assays further demonstrated central roles of Gln67 and Ala/Val57 in SIRPα extracellular binding mediated cell interactions and cell migration. Another SIRPα-specific residue, Met102, appears to assist SIRPα IgV binding through Gln67 and Ala/Val57. An essential role of these amino acids in SIRPα binding to CD47 was further confirmed by introducing these residues into the SIRPβ1 IgV domain, which dramatically converts SIRPβ1 into a CD47-binding molecule. Our results thus revealed the molecular basis by which SIRPα selectively binds to CD47 and shed new light into the structural mechanisms of SIRP isoform mediated distinctive extracellular interactions and cellular responses. PMID:17070842

  20. Functional elements on SIRPalpha IgV domain mediate cell surface binding to CD47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tong, Qiao; Zhou, Yubin; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Jenny J; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Chen, Yi-Tien; Ha, Binh; Chen, Celia X-J; Yang, Yang; Zen, Ke

    2007-01-19

    SIRPalpha and SIRPbeta1, the two major isoforms of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) family, are co-expressed in human leukocytes but mediate distinct extracellular binding interactions and divergent cell signaling responses. Previous studies have demonstrated that binding of SIRPalpha with CD47, another important cell surface molecule, through the extracellular IgV domain regulates important leukocyte functions including macrophage recognition, leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Although SIRPbeta1 shares highly homologous extracellular IgV structure with SIRPalpha, it does not bind to CD47. Here, we defined key amino acid residues exclusively expressing in the IgV domain of SIRPalpha, but not SIRPbeta1, which determine the extracellular binding interaction of SIRPalpha to CD47. These key residues include Gln67, a small hydrophobic amino acid (Ala or Val) at the 57th position and Met102. We found that Gln67 and Ala/Val57 are critical. Mutation of either of these residues abates SIRPalpha directly binding to CD47. Functional cell adhesion and leukocyte transmigration assays further demonstrated central roles of Gln67 and Ala/Val57 in SIRPalpha extracellular binding mediated cell interactions and cell migration. Another SIRPalpha-specific residue, Met102, appears to assist SIRPalpha IgV binding through Gln67 and Ala/Val57. An essential role of these amino acid residues in SIRPalpha binding to CD47 was further confirmed by introducing these residues into the SIRPbeta1 IgV domain, which dramatically converts SIRPbeta1 into a CD47-binding molecule. Our results thus revealed the molecular basis by which SIRPalpha binds to CD47 and shed new light into the structural mechanisms of SIRP isoform mediated distinctive extracellular interactions and cellular responses.

  1. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  2. Single-cell analysis reveals a link between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways in Jurkat T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is a key signal during T cell activation and is commonly used as a read-out parameter for stimulation of T cell signaling. Upon T cell stimulation a variety of calcium signals is produced by individual cells of the T cell population and the type of calcium signal strongly influences cell fate decisions. The heterogeneous nature of T cells is masked in ensemble measurements, which highlights the need for single-cell measurements. In this study we used single-cell calcium measurements in Jurkat cells to investigate signaling pathways, which are triggered by different proteins, namely CD3 and CD59. By application of an automated cluster algorithm the presented assay provides unbiased analysis of a large data set of individual calcium time traces generated by the whole cell population. By using this method we could demonstrate that the Jurkat population generates heterogeneous calcium signals in a stimulus-dependent manner. Furthermore, our data revealed the existence of a link between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways. Single-cell calcium measurements in Jurkat cells expressing different levels of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex indicated that CD59-mediated calcium signaling is critically dependent on TCR surface expression levels. In addition, triggering CD59-mediated calcium signaling resulted in down-regulation of TCR surface expression levels, which is known to happen upon direct TCR triggering too. Moreover, by using siRNA-mediated protein knock-downs and protein knock-out Jurkat mutants we could show that CD3- and CD59-mediated calcium signaling require identical key proteins. We therefore explored by which mechanism CD59-mediated signaling couples into TCR-mediated signaling. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and live-cell protein-protein interaction assays provided no evidence of a direct physical interaction between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways

  3. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles surface modified with folic acid presenting cell uptake mediated by endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuser, Paulo Emilio [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering (Brazil); Jacques, Amanda Virtuoso [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Clinical Analyses (Brazil); Arévalo, Juan Marcelo Carpio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin [Federal University of Paraná, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Brazil); Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia dos [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Clinical Analyses (Brazil); Sayer, Claudia; Araújo, Pedro H. Hermes de, E-mail: pedro.h.araujo@ufsc.br [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    The encapsulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) with modified surfaces can improve targeted delivery and induce cell death by hyperthermia. The goals of this study were to synthesize and characterize surface modified superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) with folic acid (FA) prepared by miniemulsion polymerization (MNPsPMMA-FA) and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in non-tumor cells, murine fibroblast (L929) cells and tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR) β, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells in blast crisis (K562). Lastly, hemolysis assays were performed on human red blood cells. MNPsPMMA-FA presented an average mean diameter of 135 nm and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 37 emu/g of iron oxide, as well as superparamagnetic behavior. The MNPsPMMA-FA did not present cytotoxicity in L929 and K562 cells. Cellular uptake assays showed a higher uptake of MNPsPMMA-FA than MNPsPMMA in K562 cells when incubated at 37 °C. On the other hand, MNPsPMMA-FA showed a low uptake when endocytosis mechanisms were blocked at low temperature (4 °C), suggesting that the MNPsPMMA-FA uptake was mediated by endocytosis. High concentrations of MNPsPMMA-FA showed hemocompatibility when incubated for 24 h in human red blood cells. Therefore, our results suggest that these carrier systems can be an excellent alternative in targeted drug delivery via FR.

  4. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles surface modified with folic acid presenting cell uptake mediated by endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuser, Paulo Emilio; Jacques, Amanda Virtuoso; Arévalo, Juan Marcelo Carpio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia dos; Sayer, Claudia; Araújo, Pedro H. Hermes de

    2016-01-01

    The encapsulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) with modified surfaces can improve targeted delivery and induce cell death by hyperthermia. The goals of this study were to synthesize and characterize surface modified superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) with folic acid (FA) prepared by miniemulsion polymerization (MNPsPMMA-FA) and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in non-tumor cells, murine fibroblast (L929) cells and tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR) β, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells in blast crisis (K562). Lastly, hemolysis assays were performed on human red blood cells. MNPsPMMA-FA presented an average mean diameter of 135 nm and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 37 emu/g of iron oxide, as well as superparamagnetic behavior. The MNPsPMMA-FA did not present cytotoxicity in L929 and K562 cells. Cellular uptake assays showed a higher uptake of MNPsPMMA-FA than MNPsPMMA in K562 cells when incubated at 37 °C. On the other hand, MNPsPMMA-FA showed a low uptake when endocytosis mechanisms were blocked at low temperature (4 °C), suggesting that the MNPsPMMA-FA uptake was mediated by endocytosis. High concentrations of MNPsPMMA-FA showed hemocompatibility when incubated for 24 h in human red blood cells. Therefore, our results suggest that these carrier systems can be an excellent alternative in targeted drug delivery via FR.

  5. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles surface modified with folic acid presenting cell uptake mediated by endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuser, Paulo Emilio; Jacques, Amanda Virtuoso; Arévalo, Juan Marcelo Carpio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin; dos Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia; Sayer, Claudia; de Araújo, Pedro H. Hermes

    2016-04-01

    The encapsulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) with modified surfaces can improve targeted delivery and induce cell death by hyperthermia. The goals of this study were to synthesize and characterize surface modified superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) with folic acid (FA) prepared by miniemulsion polymerization (MNPsPMMA-FA) and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in non-tumor cells, murine fibroblast (L929) cells and tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR) β, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells in blast crisis (K562). Lastly, hemolysis assays were performed on human red blood cells. MNPsPMMA-FA presented an average mean diameter of 135 nm and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 37 emu/g of iron oxide, as well as superparamagnetic behavior. The MNPsPMMA-FA did not present cytotoxicity in L929 and K562 cells. Cellular uptake assays showed a higher uptake of MNPsPMMA-FA than MNPsPMMA in K562 cells when incubated at 37 °C. On the other hand, MNPsPMMA-FA showed a low uptake when endocytosis mechanisms were blocked at low temperature (4 °C), suggesting that the MNPsPMMA-FA uptake was mediated by endocytosis. High concentrations of MNPsPMMA-FA showed hemocompatibility when incubated for 24 h in human red blood cells. Therefore, our results suggest that these carrier systems can be an excellent alternative in targeted drug delivery via FR.

  6. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ndjamen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG. gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB, a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  7. Genetic analysis of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein functional domains involved in cell-surface expression and cell-to-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Chad M.; Melancon, Jeffrey M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G.

    2005-01-01

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. To delineate functional domains of the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein, single point mutations, cluster-to-lysine and cluster-to-alanine mutations, as well as carboxyl-terminal truncations were investigated in transient expression experiments. Mutagenesis of either the coiled-coil domain of the S glycoprotein amino terminal heptad repeat, the predicted fusion peptide, or an adjacent but distinct region, severely compromised S-mediated cell-to-cell fusion, while intracellular transport and cell-surface expression were not adversely affected. Surprisingly, a carboxyl-terminal truncation of 17 amino acids substantially increased S glycoprotein-mediated cell-to-cell fusion suggesting that the terminal 17 amino acids regulated the S fusogenic properties. In contrast, truncation of 26 or 39 amino acids eliminating either one or both of the two endodomain cysteine-rich motifs, respectively, inhibited cell fusion in comparison to the wild-type S. The 17 and 26 amino-acid deletions did not adversely affect S cell-surface expression, while the 39 amino-acid truncation inhibited S cell-surface expression suggesting that the membrane proximal cysteine-rich motif plays an essential role in S cell-surface expression. Mutagenesis of the acidic amino-acid cluster in the carboxyl terminus of the S glycoprotein as well as modification of a predicted phosphorylation site within the acidic cluster revealed that this amino-acid motif may play a functional role in the retention of S at cell surfaces. This genetic analysis reveals that the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein contains extracellular domains that regulate cell fusion as well as distinct endodomains that function in intracellular transport, cell-surface expression, and cell fusion

  8. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved molecules, which support folding of proteins under physiological conditions and mediate protection against lethal damage after various stress stimuli. Five HSP families exist defined by their molecular size (i.e. HSP100, HSP90, HSP70, HSP60, and the......Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved molecules, which support folding of proteins under physiological conditions and mediate protection against lethal damage after various stress stimuli. Five HSP families exist defined by their molecular size (i.e. HSP100, HSP90, HSP70, HSP60...... clinically applied reagents, such as alkyl-lysophospholipides, chemotherapeutic agents, and anti-inflammatory reagents, have been found to enhance Hsp70 surface expression on cancer cells. We have found that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various...... hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC-inhibitor mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V positive cells and blocked by inhibition of apoptosis. Other chemotherapeutic inducers of apoptosis...

  9. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  10. Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redegeld, Frank A; Yu, Yingxin; Kumari, Sangeeta; Charles, Nicolas; Blank, Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are innate immune cells that are scattered in tissues throughout the organism being particularly abundant at sites exposed to the environment such as the skin and mucosal surfaces. Generally known for their role in IgE-mediated allergies, they have also important functions in the maintenance of tissue integrity by constantly sensing their microenvironment for signals by inflammatory triggers that can comprise infectious agents, toxins, hormones, alarmins, metabolic states, etc. When triggered their main function is to release a whole set of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, chemokines, and lipid products. This allows them to organize the ensuing innate immune and inflammatory response in tight coordination with resident tissue cells, other rapidly recruited immune effector cells as well as the endocrine and exocrine systems of the body. To complete these tasks, MCs are endowed with a large repertoire of receptors allowing them to respond to multiple stimuli or directly interact with other cells. Here we review some of the receptors expressed on MCs (ie, receptors for Immunoglobulins, pattern recognition receptors, nuclear receptors, receptors for alarmins, and a variety of other receptors) and discuss their functional implication in the immune and inflammatory response focusing on non-IgE-mediated activation mechanisms. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  12. Electrical pulse – mediated enhanced delivery of silver nanoparticles into living suspension cells for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J; Li, B; Feng, S; Chen, G; Li, Y; Huang, Z; Chen, R; Yu, Y; Huang, H; Lin, S; Li, C; Su, Y; Zeng, H

    2012-01-01

    Electrical pulse-mediated enhanced silver nanoparticles delivery is a much better method for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements of suspension cells. Robust and high-quality SERS spectra of living suspension cells were obtained based on an electroporation-SERS method, which can overcomes the shortcoming of non-uniform distribution of silver nanoparticles localized in the cell cytoplasm after electroporation and reduces the amount variance of silver nanoparticles delivered into different cells. The electroporation parameters include three 150 V (375 V/cm) electric pulses of 1, 5, and 5 ms durations respectively. Our results indicate that considerable amount of silver nanoparticles can be rapidly delivered into the human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells, and the satisfied SERS spectra were obtained while the viability of the treated cells was highly maintained (91.7%). The electroporation-SERS method offers great potential approach in delivering silver nanoparticles into living suspension cells, which is useful for widely biomedical applications including the real-time intracellular SERS analysis of living cells

  13. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilynskij, B.T.; Vasil'ev, N.V.; Volod'ko, N.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Tomsk. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  14. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  15. Feline glycoprotein A repetitions predominant anchors transforming growth factor beta on the surface of activated CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells and mediates AIDS lentivirus-induced T cell immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle M; Fogle, Jonathan E; Ross, Peter; Tompkins, Mary B

    2013-04-01

    Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for AIDS-lentivirus infection, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that T regulatory (Treg) cell-mediated immune T and B cell dysfunction contributes to lentivirus persistence and chronic disease through membrane bound transforming growth factor beta (mTGFb). Studying Treg cells in the context of infection has been problematic as no inducible marker for activated Treg cells had been identified. However, recent reports in human Treg studies have described a novel protein, glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), as a unique marker of activated human Treg cells that anchors mTGFb. Herein we extend these studies to the feline Treg system, identifying feline GARP and demonstrating that human and feline GARP proteins are homologous in structure, expression pattern, and ability to form a complex with TGFb. We further demonstrate that GARP and TGFb form a complex on the surface of activated Treg cells and that these GARP(+)TGFb(+) Treg cells are highly efficient suppressor cells. Analysis of expression of this Treg activation marker in the FIV-AIDS model reveals an up-regulation of GARP expressing Treg cells during chronic FIV infection. We demonstrate that the GARP(+) Treg cells from FIV-infected cats suppress T helper cells in vivo and that blocking GARP or TGFb eliminates this suppression. These data suggest that GARP is expressed in complex with TGFb on the surface of activated Treg cells and plays an important role in TGFb(+) Treg-mediated T cell immune suppression during lentivirus infection.

  16. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  17. Cre-mediated cell ablation contests mast cell contribution in models of antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Weiser, Anne; Tietz, Annette; Stassen, Michael; Harris, Nicola; Kopf, Manfred; Radermacher, Peter; Möller, Peter; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2011-11-23

    Immunological functions of mast cells remain poorly understood. Studies in Kit mutant mice suggest key roles for mast cells in certain antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. However, Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin. Here, we show that targeted insertion of Cre-recombinase into the mast cell carboxypeptidase A3 locus deleted mast cells in connective and mucosal tissues by a genotoxic Trp53-dependent mechanism. Cre-mediated mast cell eradication (Cre-Master) mice had, with the exception of a lack of mast cells and reduced basophils, a normal immune system. Cre-Master mice were refractory to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, and this defect was rescued by mast cell reconstitution. This mast cell-deficient strain was fully susceptible to antibody-induced autoimmune arthritis and to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Differences comparing Kit mutant mast cell deficiency models to selectively mast cell-deficient mice call for a systematic re-evaluation of immunological functions of mast cells beyond allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrin-mediated adhesion of human mesenchymal stem cells to extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dånmark, S; Mustafa, K; Finne-Wistrand, A; Albertsson, A-C; Patarroyo, M

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, degradable aliphatic polyesters are widely used as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering, despite their lack of biological cues. Their biological active surface is rather determined by an adsorbed layer of proteins from the surrounding media. Initial cell fate, including adhesion and proliferation, which are key properties for efficient cell carriers, is determined by the adsorbed layer of proteins. Herein we have investigated the ability of human bone marrow derived stem cells (hBMSC) to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin which are present in plasma and serum. hBMSC expressed integrins for collagens, laminins, fibronectin and vitronectin. Accordingly, hBMSC strongly adhered to these purified ECM proteins by using the corresponding integrins. Although purified fibronectin and vitronectin adsorbed to aliphatic polyesters to a lower extent than to cell culture polystyrene, these low levels were sufficient to mediate adhesion of hBMSC. It was found that plasma- and serum-coated polystyrene adsorbed significant levels of both fibronectin and vitronectin, and fibronectin was identified as the major adhesive component of plasma for hBMSC; however, aliphatic polyesters adsorbed minimal levels of fibronectin under similar conditions resulting in impaired cell adhesion. Altogether, the results suggest that the efficiency of aliphatic polyesters cell carriers could be improved by increasing their ability to adsorb fibronectin. (paper)

  19. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G.

    2007-01-01

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of 3 H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion

  20. Investigating the feasibility of stem cell enrichment mediated by immobilized selectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Nichola; Liesveld, Jane L; King, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell therapy is used to treat both malignant and non-malignant diseases, and enrichment of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) has the potential to reduce the likelihood of graft vs host disease or relapse, potentially fatal complications associated with the therapy. Current commercial HSPC isolation technologies rely solely on the CD34 surface marker, and while they have proven to be invaluable, they can be time-consuming with variable recoveries reported. We propose that selectin-mediated enrichment could prove to be a quick and effective method for recovering HSPCs from adult bone marrow (ABM) on the basis of differences in rolling velocities and independently of CD34 expression. Purified CD34+ ABM cells and the unselected CD34- ABM cells were perfused over immobilized P-, E-, and L-selectin-IgG at physiologic wall shear stresses, and rolling velocities and cell retention data were collected. CD34+ ABM cells generally exhibited lower rolling velocities and higher retention than the unselected CD34- ABM cells on all three selectins. For initial CD34+ ABM cell concentrations ranging from 1% to 5%, we predict an increase in purity ranging from 5.2% to 36.1%, depending on the selectin used. Additionally, selectin-mediated cell enrichment is not limited to subsets of cells with inherent differences in rolling velocities. CD34+ KG1a cells and CD34- HL60 cells exhibited nearly identical rolling velocities on immobilized P-selectin-IgG over the entire range of shear stresses studied. However, when anti-CD34 antibody was co-immobilized with the P-selectin-IgG, the rolling velocity of the CD34+ KG1a cells was significantly reduced, making selectin-mediated cell enrichment a feasible option. Optimal cell enrichment in immobilized selectin surfaces can be achieved within 10 min, much faster than most current commercially available systems.

  1. Cell surface N-glycans influence the level of functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kristen Hall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is crucial for adhesion of cells to each other and thereby development and maintenance of tissue. While it is has been established that N-glycans inside the cell impact the level of E-cadherin at the cell surface of epithelial-derived cells, it is unclear whether N-glycans outside the cell control the clustering of E-cadherin at the cell–cell border. Here, we demonstrate reduction of N-glycans at the cell surface weakened the recruitment and retention of E-cadherin at the cell–cell border, and consequently reduced the strength of cell–cell interactions. We conclude that N-glycans at the cell surface are tightly linked to the placement of E-cadherin at the cell–cell border and thereby control E-cadherin mediated cell–cell adhesion.

  2. Studies of cell biomechanics with surface micro-/nano-technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dong; Zhang Wei; Jiang Xingyu

    2011-01-01

    We report the recent progress in our studies of cell biology using micro-/nano-technology. Cells have a size of several to tens of microns, which makes them easily manipulated by micro-/nano-technology. The shape of the cell influences the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton, which bears the main forces of the cell, maintains the shape,and mediates a series of biochemical reactions. We invented a stretching device and studied the real-time actin filament dynamics under stretch. We found that one stretch cycle shortened the actin filaments and promoted their reassemble process. Cell migration is a complex mechanical process. We found that cell geometry determines the cell polarity and migration direction. We fabricated three-dimensional surfaces to mimic the topography in vivo, and further built a cell culture model by integrating the three-dimensional surface, microfluidics, cell patterning,and coculturing of multiple cell types. We also investigated the neuronal guidance by surface patterning. (authors)

  3. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  4. The Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immune-Mediated Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meifang; Zhang, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified group of innate immune cells lacking antigen-specific receptors that can mediate immune responses and regulate tissue homeostasis and inflammation. ILCs comprise group 1 ILCs, group 2 ILCs, and group 3 ILCs. These ILCs usually localize at mucosal surfaces and combat pathogens by the rapid release of certain cytokines. However, the uncontrolled activation of ILCs can also lead to damaging inflammation, especially in the gut, lung, and skin. Although the physiological and pathogenic roles of ILCs in liver diseases have been attracting increasing attention recently, there has been no systematic review regarding the roles of ILCs in immune-mediated liver diseases. Here, we review the relationships between the ILC subsets and their functions in immune-mediated liver diseases, and discuss their therapeutic potential based on current knowledge about the functional roles of these cells in liver diseases. PMID:28659927

  5. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Rebeca; Martín, Carla; Escobedo, Susana; Suárez, Juan E; Quirós, Luis M

    2013-09-17

    The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process.

  7. Hypoxia Decreases Invasin-Mediated Yersinia enterocolitica Internalization into Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a major cause of human yersiniosis, with enterocolitis being a typical manifestation. These bacteria can cross the intestinal mucosa, and invade eukaryotic cells by binding to host β1 integrins, a process mediated by the bacterial effector protein invasin. This study examines the role of hypoxia on the internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells, since the gastrointestinal tract has been shown to be physiologically deficient in oxygen levels (hypoxic), especially in cases of infection and inflammation. We show that hypoxic pre-incubation of Caco-2 cells resulted in significantly decreased bacterial internalization compared to cells grown under normoxia. This phenotype was absent after functionally blocking host β1 integrins as well as upon infection with an invasin-deficient Y. enterocolitica strain. Furthermore, downstream phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was also reduced under hypoxia after infection. In good correlation to these data, cells grown under hypoxia showed decreased protein levels of β1 integrins at the apical cell surface whereas the total protein level of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) alpha was elevated. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the HIF-1 α stabilizer dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) also reduced invasion and decreased β1 integrin protein levels compared to control cells, indicating a potential role for HIF-1α in this process. These results suggest that hypoxia decreases invasin-integrin-mediated internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells by reducing cell surface localization of host β1 integrins.

  8. Isthmin is a novel vascular permeability inducer that functions through cell-surface GRP78-mediated Src activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Shruthi; Chen, Mo; Liao, Wupeng; Er, Shi Yin; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Ge, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    Isthmin (ISM) is a recently identified 60 kDa secreted angiogenesis inhibitor. Two cell-surface receptors for ISM have been defined, the high-affinity glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) and the low-affinity αvβ5 integrin. As αvβ5 integrin plays an important role in pulmonary vascular permeability (VP) and ISM is highly expressed in mouse lung, we sought to clarify the role of ISM in VP. Recombinant ISM (rISM) dose-dependently enhances endothelial monolayer permeability in vitro and local dermal VP when administered intradermally in mice. Systemic rISM administration through intravenous injection leads to profound lung vascular hyperpermeability but not in other organs. Mechanistic investigations using molecular, biochemical approaches and specific chemical inhibitors revealed that ISM-GRP78 interaction triggers a direct interaction between GRP78 and Src, leading to Src activation and subsequent phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins and loss of junctional proteins from inter-endothelial junctions, resulting in enhanced VP. Dynamic studies of Src activation, VP and apoptosis revealed that ISM induces VP directly via Src activation while apoptosis contributes indirectly only after prolonged treatment. Furthermore, ISM is significantly up-regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mouse lung. Blocking cell-surface GRP78 by systemic infusion of anti-GRP78 antibody significantly attenuates pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability in LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ISM is a novel VP inducer that functions through cell-surface GRP78-mediated Src activation as well as induction of apoptosis. It induces a direct GRP78-Src interaction, leading to cytoplasmic Src activation. ISM contributes to pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability of LPS-induced ALI in mice. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  10. Fluorescent polymeric nanocomposite films generated by surface-mediated photoinitiation of polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, Heather J.; Chang, Erin L.; May, Allison M.; Berron, Brad J.; Seedorf, Gregory J.; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into polymer films represents a valuable strategy for achieving a variety of desirable physical, optical, mechanical, and electrical attributes. Here, we describe and characterize the creation of highly fluorescent polymer films by entrapment of fluorescent NPs into polymer matrices through surface-mediated eosin photoinitiation reactions. Performing surface-mediated polymerizations with NPs combines the benefits of a covalently anchored film with the unique material properties afforded by NPs. The effects of monomer type, crosslinker content, NP size, and NP surface chemistry were investigated to determine their impact on the relative amount of NPs entrapped in the surface-bound films. The density of entrapped NPs was increased up to 6-fold by decreasing the NP diameter. Increasing the crosslinking agent concentration enabled a greater than 2-fold increase in the amount of NPs entrapped. Additionally, the monomer chemistry played a significant role as poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA)-based monomer formulations entrapped a 10-fold higher density of carboxy-functionalized NPs than did acrylamide/bisacrylamide formulations, though the latter formulations ultimately immobilized more fluorophores by generating thicker films. In the context of a polymerization-based microarray biodetection platform, these findings enabled tailoring of the monomer and NP selection to yield a 200-fold improvement in sensitivity from 31 (±1) to 0.16 (±0.01) biotinylated target molecules per square micron. Similarly, in polymerization-based cell staining applications, appropriate monomer and NP selection enabled facile visualization of microscale, sub-cellular features. Careful consideration of monomer and NP selection is critical to achieve the desired properties in applications that employ surface-mediated polymerization to entrap NPs.

  11. Cell-cell adhesion mediated by binding of membrane-anchored transforming growth factor α to epidermal growth factor receptors promotes cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anklesaria, P.; Greenberger, J.S.; Teixido, J.; Laiho, M.; Massague, J.; Pierce, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The precursor for transforming growth factor α, pro-TGF-α, is a cell surface glycoprotein that can establish contact with epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on adjacent cells. To examine whether the pro-TGF-α/EGF receptor pair can simultaneously mediate cell adhesion and promote cell proliferation, the authors have expressed pro-TGF-α in a bone marrow stromal cell line labeled with [ 35 S] cysteine. Expression of pro-TGF-α allows these cells to support long-term attachment of an EGF/interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line that expresses EGF receptors but is unable to adhere to normal stroma. This interaction is inhibited by soluble EGF receptor ligands. Further, the hematopoietic progenitor cells replicate their DNA while they are attached to the stromal cell layer and become foci of sustained cell proliferation. Thus, pro-TGF-α and the EGF receptor can function as mediators of intercellular adhesion and this interaction may promote a mitogenic response. They propose the term juxtacrine to designate this form of stimulation between adjacent cells

  12. ALA-PDT mediated DC vaccine for skin squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jie; Fan, Zhixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Peiru; Yang, Degang; Zhang, Linglin; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine has emerged as a promising immunotherapy for cancers. However, most DC vaccines so far have only achieved limited success in cancer treatment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established cancer treatment strategy, can cause immunogenic apoptosis to induce an effective antitumor immune response. In this study, we developed a DC-based cancer vaccine using immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT. The maturation of DCs induced by PDT-treated apoptotic cells was evaluated. The anti-tumor immunity of ALA-PDT-DC vaccine was tested with mouse model. We observed the maturations of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, DC80, and CD86), and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secret INF-Υ and IL-12). ALA-PDT-DC vaccine mediated by apoptotic cells provided protection against tumor in mice, far stronger than that of DC vaccine obtained from freeze/thaw treated tumor cells. Our results indicate that immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells can be more effective in enhancing DC-based cancer vaccine, which could improve the clinical application of PDT- DC vaccines.

  13. Receptor-like kinases as surface regulators for RAC/ROP-mediated pollen tube growth and interaction with the pistil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yanjiao; Aggarwal, Mini; Zheng, Wen-Guang; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background RAC/ROPs are RHO-type GTPases and are known to play diverse signalling roles in plants. Cytoplasmic RAC/ROPs are recruited to the cell membrane and activated in response to extracellular signals perceived and mediated by cell surface-located signalling assemblies, transducing the signals to regulate cellular processes. More than any other cell types in plants, pollen tubes depend on continuous interactions with an extracellular environment produced by their surrounding tissues as they grow within the female organ pistil to deliver sperm to the female gametophyte for fertilization. Scope We review studies on pollen tube growth that provide compelling evidence indicating that RAC/ROPs are crucial for regulating the cellular processes that underlie the polarized cell growth process. Efforts to identify cell surface regulators that mediate extracellular signals also point to RAC/ROPs being the molecular switches targeted by growth-regulating female factors for modulation to mediate pollination and fertilization. We discuss a large volume of work spanning more than two decades on a family of pollen-specific receptor kinases and some recent studies on members of the FERONIA family of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). Significance The research described shows the crucial roles that two RLK families play in transducing signals from growth regulatory factors to the RAC/ROP switch at the pollen tube apex to mediate and target pollen tube growth to the female gametophyte and signal its disintegration to achieve fertilization once inside the female chamber. PMID:22476487

  14. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Jensen, B. M.; Søndergaard, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Background: Yeast surface display is a technique, where the proteins of interest are expressed as fusions with yeast surface proteins and thus remain attached to the yeast cell wall after expression. Our purpose was to study whether allergens expressed on the cell surface of baker's yeast...... were expressed on the surface as fusions with a-agglutinin complex protein AGA2. The expression was confirmed by fluorescent cytometry (FACS) after staining the cells with antibody against a C-tag attached to the C-terminal end of the allergens. Phospholipase A1 and hyaluronidase retained...... their enzymatic activities. Phospholipase A1 severely inhibited the growth of the yeast cells. Antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells bound IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patient sera but not from control sera as demonstrated by FACS. Moreover, antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells were capable of mediating...

  15. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Huang, Xiaohua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Laboratory Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); An, Yue [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Feng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta [Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Xiao, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); Ma, Keli, E-mail: makeli666@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Li, Yali, E-mail: yalilipaper@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119078 (Singapore)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  16. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression

  17. Cell surface clustering of Cadherin adhesion complex induced by antibody coated beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cadherin receptors mediate cell-cell adhesion, signal transduction and assembly of cytoskeletons. How a single transmembrane molecule Cadherin can be involved in multiple functions through modulating its binding activities with many membrane adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal components is an unanswered question which can be elucidated by clues from bead experiments. Human lung cells expressing N-Cadherin were examined. After co-incubation with anti-N-Cadherin monoclonal antibody coated beads, cell surface clustering of N-Cadherin was induced. Immunofluorescent detection demonstrated that in addition to Cadherin, β-Catenin, α-Catenin, α-Actinin and Actin fluorescence also aggregated respectively at the membrane site of bead attachment. Myosin heavy chain (MHC), another major component of Actin cytoskeleton, did not aggregate at the membrane site of bead attachment. Adhesion unrelated protein Con A and polylysine conjugated beads did not induce the clustering of adhesion molecules. It is indicated that the Cadherin/Catenins/α-Actinin/Actin complex is formed at Cadherin mediated cell adherens junction; occupancy and cell surface clustering of Cadherin is crucial for the formation of Cadherin adhesion protein complexes.

  18. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  19. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alan M.; Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L.; Grover, Liam M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity

  20. Characterization of cell-surface receptors for monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF) is a lymphokine derived from murine T cell hybridoma. The target tissues are both LPS-stimulated B cells and Con A-stimulated T cells. Since the action of MNSF may be mediated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, we characterized the mode of this binding. The purified MNSF was labeled with 125 I, using the Bolton-Hunter reagent. The labeled MNSF bound specifically to a single class of receptor (300 receptors per cell) on mitogen-stimulated murine B cells or T cells with an affinity of 16 pM at 24 degrees C, in the presence of sodium azide. Competitive experiments showed that MNSF bound to the specific receptor and that the binding was not shared with IL2, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Various cell types were surveyed for the capacity to specifically bind 125 I-MNSF. 125 I-MNSF bound to MOPC-31C (a murine plasmacytoma line) and to EL4 (a murine T lymphoma line). The presence of specific binding correlates with the capacity of the cells to respond to MNSF. These data support the view that like other polypeptide hormones, the action of MNSF is mediated by specific cell surface membrane receptor protein. Identification of these receptors will provide insight into the apparently diverse activities of MNSF

  1. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  2. Distinct roles for dystroglycan, beta1 integrin and perlecan in cell surface laminin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henry, M D; Satz, J S; Brakebusch, C

    2001-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell surface receptor for several extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules including laminins, agrin and perlecan. Recent data indicate that DG function is required for the formation of basement membranes in early development and the organization of laminin on the cell surface...... integrin-deficient ES cells, laminin-1 binds to the cell surface, but fails to organize into more morphologically complex structures. This result indicates that beta1 integrin function is required after DG function in the cell surface-mediated laminin assembly process. In perlecan-deficient ES cells......, the formation of complex laminin-1 structures is defective, implicating perlecan in the laminin matrix assembly process. Moreover, laminin and perlecan reciprocally modulate the organization of the other on the cell surface. Taken together, the data support a model whereby DG serves as a receptor essential...

  3. Papillae formation on trichome cell walls requires the function of the mediator complex subunit Med25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornero, Christy; Suo, Bangxia; Zahde, Mais; Juveland, Katelyn; Kirik, Viktor

    2017-11-01

    Glassy Hair 1 (GLH1) gene that promotes papillae formation on trichome cell walls was identified as a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex MED25. The MED25 gene is shown to be expressed in trichomes. The expression of the trichome development marker genes GLABRA2 (GL2) and Ethylene Receptor2 (ETR2) is not affected in the glh1 mutant. Presented data suggest that Arabidopsis MED25 mediator component is likely involved in the transcription of genes promoting papillae deposition in trichomes. The plant cell wall plays an important role in communication, defense, organization and support. The importance of each of these functions varies by cell type. Specialized cells, such as Arabidopsis trichomes, exhibit distinct cell wall characteristics including papillae. To better understand the molecular processes important for papillae deposition on the cell wall surface, we identified the GLASSY HAIR 1 (GLH1) gene, which is necessary for papillae formation. We found that a splice-site mutation in the component of the transcriptional mediator complex MED25 gene is responsible for the near papillae-less phenotype of the glh1 mutant. The MED25 gene is expressed in trichomes. Reporters for trichome developmental marker genes GLABRA2 (GL2) and Ethylene Receptor2 (ETR2) were not affected in the glh1 mutant. Collectively, the presented results show that MED25 is necessary for papillae formation on the cell wall surface of leaf trichomes and suggest that the Arabidopsis MED25 mediator component is likely involved in the transcription of a subset of genes that promote papillae deposition in trichomes.

  4. Antigen-specific and nonspecific mediators of T cell/B cell cooperation. III. Characterization of the nonspecific mediator(s) from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, L; Kappler, J W; Marrack, P

    1976-05-01

    T cell-containing lymphoid populations produce a nonantigen-specific mediator(s) (NSM) which can replace T cell helper function in vitro in the response of B cells to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), but not to the hapten-protein conjugate, trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin, (TNP-KLH). NSM produced under three conditions: 1) stimulation of KLH-primed cells with KLH; 2) allogeneic stimulation of normal spleen cells; and 3) stimulation of normal spleen cells with Con A (but not PHA) are indistinguishable on the basis of their biologic activity and m.w., estimated as 30 to 40,000 daltons by G-200 chromatography. Production of NSM is dependent on the presence of T cells. The action of NSM on B cells responding to SRBC in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol is unaffected by severe macrophage depletion. Extensive absorption of NSM with SRBC failed to remove its activity, confirming its nonantigen-specific nature.

  5. Transition Metal Polypyridine Complexes: Studies of Mediation in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells and Charge Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, C. Michael [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Prieto, Amy L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-02-08

    The Elliott group has long been supported by DOE for studies of cobalt(II/III) trisbypiridine (DTB) mediator complexes in dye sensitized solar cells. Previous work demonstrated that Co(II/III) chemistry is sensitive to the environment, showing unprecedented electrode-surface and electrolyte dependant voltammetry. In electrolytes that have large lipophilic cations, voltammetry of the [Co(DTB)3]2+/3+ couple is nearly Nernstian in appearance on nominally oxide-free metal surfaces. In contrast, on semiconductor electrodes in electrolytes with small, hard cations such as Li+, the electron transfer rates are so slow that it is difficult to measure any Faradaic current even at overpotentials of ±1 V. These studies are of direct relevance to the operation of cobalt-based mediators in solar cells. The research has also shown that these mediators are compatible with copper phenantroline based dyes, in contrast to I- due to the insolubility of CuI.

  6. SNAP23-Dependent Surface Translocation of Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) Receptor 1 Is Essential for NOX2-Mediated Exocytotic Degranulation in Human Mast Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Secreted LTB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes vaginitis in women and itself secretes lipid mediator leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ). Mast cells are important effector cells of tissue inflammation during infection with parasites. Membrane-bridging SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes are critical for fusion during exocytosis. Although T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP) have been shown to induce exocytosis in mast cells, information regarding the signaling mechanisms between mast cell activation and TvSP is limited. In this study, we found that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of LTB 4 receptor 1 (BLT1) is required for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2)-mediated exocytotic degranulation of mast cells induced by TvSP. First, stimulation with TvSP induced exocytotic degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HMC-1 cells. Next, TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytosis were strongly inhibited by transfection of BLT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). TvSP induced trafficking of BLT1 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. We also found that knockdown of SNAP23 abrogated TvSP-induced ROS generation, exocytosis, and surface trafficking of BLT1 in HMC-1 cells. By coimmunoprecipitation, there was a physical interaction between BLT1 and SNAP23 in TvSP-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of BLT1 is essential for exocytosis in human mast cells induced by T. vaginalis-secreted LTB 4 Our data collectively demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism for SNAP23-dependent mast cell activation of T. vaginalis-secreted LTB 4 involving surface trafficking of BLT1. These results can help to explain how the cross talk mechanism between parasite and host can govern deliberately tissue inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  8. Electrospun fiber surface nanotopography influences astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D; D'Amato, Anthony R; Puhl, Devan L; Wich, Douglas M; Vespermann, Amanda; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2018-05-15

    Aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds provide topographical guidance for regenerating neurons and glia after central nervous system injury. To date, no study has explored how fiber surface nanotopography affects astrocyte response to fibrous scaffolds. Astrocytes play important roles in the glial scar, the blood brain barrier, and in maintaining homeostasis in the central nervous system. In this study, electrospun poly L-lactic acid fibers were engineered with smooth, pitted, or divoted surface nanotopography. Cortical or spinal cord primary rat astrocytes were cultured on the surfaces for either 1 or 3 days to examine the astrocyte response over time. The results showed that cortical astrocytes were significantly shorter and broader on the pitted and divoted fibers compared to those on smooth fibers. However, spinal cord astrocyte morphology was not significantly altered by the surface features. These findings indicate that astrocytes from unique anatomical locations respond differently to the presence of nanotopography. Western Blot results show that the differences in morphology were not associated with significant changes in GFAP or vinculin in either astrocyte population, suggesting that surface pits and divots do not induce a reactive phenotype in either cortical or spinal cord astrocytes. Finally, astrocytes were co-cultured with dorsal root ganglia to determine how the surfaces affected astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth. Astrocytes cultured on the fibers for shorter periods of time (1 day) generally supported longer neurite outgrowth. Pitted and divoted fibers restricted spinal cord astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth, while smooth fibers increased 3 day spinal cord astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth. In total, fiber surface nanotopography can influence astrocyte elongation and influence the capability of astrocytes to direct neurites. Therefore, fiber surface characteristics should be carefully controlled to optimize astrocyte-mediated axonal

  9. Nucleolin inhibits Fas ligand binding and suppresses Fas-mediated apoptosis in vivo via a surface nucleolin-Fas complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Jillian F; Berkova, Zuzana; Mathur, Rohit; Zhu, Haifeng; Braun, Frank K; Tao, Rong-Hua; Sabichi, Anita L; Ao, Xue; Maeng, Hoyoung; Samaniego, Felipe

    2013-06-06

    Resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis is associated with poor cancer outcomes and chemoresistance. To elucidate potential mechanisms of defective Fas signaling, we screened primary lymphoma cell extracts for Fas-associated proteins that would have the potential to regulate Fas signaling. An activation-resistant Fas complex selectively included nucleolin. We confirmed the presence of nucleolin-Fas complexes in B-cell lymphoma cells and primary tissues, and the absence of such complexes in B-lymphocytes from healthy donors. RNA-binding domain 4 and the glycine/arginine-rich domain of nucleolin were essential for its association with Fas. Nucleolin colocalized with Fas on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells. Nucleolin knockdown sensitized BJAB cells to Fas ligand (FasL)-induced and Fas agonistic antibody-induced apoptosis through enhanced binding, suggesting that nucleolin blocks the FasL-Fas interaction. Mice transfected with nucleolin were protected from the lethal effects of agonistic anti-mouse Fas antibody (Jo2) and had lower rates of hepatocyte apoptosis, compared with vector and a non-Fas-binding mutant of nucleolin. Our results show that cell surface nucleolin binds Fas, inhibits ligand binding, and thus prevents induction of Fas-mediated apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas and may serve as a new therapeutic target.

  10. Sorafenib suppresses TGF-β responses by inducing caveolae/lipid raft-mediated internalization/degradation of cell-surface type II TGF-β receptors: Implications in development of effective adjunctive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Ling; Wang, Shih-Wei; Sun, Wei-Chih; Shu, Chih-Wen; Kao, Yu-Chen; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Chen, Chun-Lin

    2018-04-18

    Sorafenib is the only FDA approved drug for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and other malignancies. Studies indicate that TGF-β signalling is associated with tumour progression in HCC. Autocrine and paracrine TGF-β promotes tumour growth and malignancy by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Sorafenib is believed to antagonize tumour progression by inhibiting TGF-β-induced EMT. It improves survival of patients but HCC later develops resistance and relapses. The underlying mechanism of resistance is unknown. Understanding of the molecular mechanism of sorafenib inhibition of TGF-β-induced signalling or responses in HCC may lead to development of adjunctive effective therapy for HCC. In this study, we demonstrate that sorafenib suppresses TGF-β responsiveness in hepatoma cells, hepatocytes, and animal liver, mainly by downregulating cell-surface type II TGF-β receptors (TβRII) localized in caveolae/lipid rafts and non-lipid raft microdomains via caveolae/lipid rafts-mediated internalization and degradation. Furthermore, sorafenib-induced downregulation and degradation of cell-surface TβRII is prevented by simultaneous treatment with a caveolae disruptor or lysosomal inhibitors. On the other hand, sorafenib only downregulates cell-surface TβRII localized in caveolae/lipid rafts but not localized in non-lipid raft microdomains in hepatic stellate cells. These results suggest that sorafenib inhibits TGF-β signalling mainly by inducing caveolae/lipid raft-mediated internalization and degradation of cell-surface TβR-II in target cells. They may also imply that treatment with agents which promote formation of caveolae/lipid rafts, TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors (e.g., LY2157299) or TGF-β peptide antagonists (by liver-targeting delivery) may be considered as effective adjunct therapy with sorafenib for HCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells

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    Liu X

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoxia Liu, Guiling Sun, Xiuju Sun Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP gene on renal cell cancer (RCC cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were significantly decreased in the siRNA-SPOP group. The protein microarray screening showed that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the siRNA group was significantly decreased and that the expression of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and E-cadherin was significantly increased (P<0.05. The relevant signaling pathways were the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions pathway and extracellular matrix organization signal pathway. SPOP gene silencing induced cell apoptosis, decreased cell viability, colony formation, and migration ability, and elevated the drug sensitivity in the RCC cells. A possible mechanism is that silencing SPOP induces the differential expression of E-cadherin, vascular endothelial

  12. The S-layer Associated Serine Protease Homolog PrtX Impacts Cell Surface-Mediated Microbe-Host Interactions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

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    Brant R. Johnson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-promoting aspects attributed to probiotic microorganisms, including adhesion to intestinal epithelia and modulation of the host mucosal immune system, are mediated by proteins found on the bacterial cell surface. Notably, certain probiotic and commensal bacteria contain a surface (S- layer as the outermost stratum of the cell wall. S-layers are non-covalently bound semi-porous, crystalline arrays of self-assembling, proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (SLPs. Recent evidence has shown that multiple proteins are non-covalently co-localized within the S-layer, designated S-layer associated proteins (SLAPs. In Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, SLP and SLAPs have been implicated in both mucosal immunomodulation and adhesion to the host intestinal epithelium. In this study, a S-layer associated serine protease homolog, PrtX (prtX, lba1578, was deleted from the chromosome of L. acidophilus NCFM. Compared to the parent strain, the PrtX-deficient strain (ΔprtX demonstrated increased autoaggregation, an altered cellular morphology, and pleiotropic increases in adhesion to mucin and fibronectin, in vitro. Furthermore, ΔprtX demonstrated increased in vitro immune stimulation of IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to wild-type, when exposed to mouse dendritic cells. Finally, in vivo colonization of germ-free mice with ΔprtX led to an increase in epithelial barrier integrity. The absence of PrtX within the exoproteome of a ΔprtX strain caused morphological changes, resulting in a pleiotropic increase of the organisms’ immunomodulatory properties and interactions with some intestinal epithelial cell components.

  13. Leptospira surface adhesin (Lsa21) induces Toll like receptor 2 and 4 mediated inflammatory responses in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Syed M. Faisal; Vivek P. Varma; M. Subathra; Sarwar Azam; Anil K. Sunkara; Mohd Akif; Mirza. S. Baig; Yung-Fu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is zoonotic and emerging infectious disease of global importance. Little is understood about Leptospira pathogenesis and host immune response. In the present work we have investigated how Leptospira modulates the host innate immune response mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) via surface exposed proteins. We screened Leptospira outer membrane/surface proteins for their ability to activate/inhibit TLR2/4 signaling in HEK293 cell lines. Of these the 21?kDa Leptospira surface ad...

  14. Microenvironmental cues enhance mesenchymal stem cell-mediated immunomodulation and regulatory T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadle, Rohini L; Abdou, Salma A; Villarreal-Ponce, Alvaro P; Soares, Marc A; Sultan, Darren L; David, Joshua A; Massie, Jonathan; Rifkin, William J; Rabbani, Piul; Ceradini, Daniel J

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to both have powerful immunosuppressive properties and promote allograft tolerance. Determining the environmental oxygen tension and inflammatory conditions under which MSCs are optimally primed for this immunosuppressive function is essential to their utilization in promoting graft tolerance. Of particular interest is the mechanisms governing the interaction between MSCs and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which is relatively unknown. We performed our experiments utilizing rat bone marrow derived MSCs. We observed that priming MSCs in hypoxia promotes maintenance of stem-like characteristics, with greater expression of typical MSC cell-surface markers, increased proliferation, and maintenance of differentiation potential. Addition of autologous MSCs to CD4+/allogeneic endothelial cell (EC) co-culture increases regulatory T cell (Treg) proliferation, which is further enhanced when MSCs are primed in hypoxia. Furthermore, MSC-mediated Treg expansion does not require direct cell-cell contact. The expression of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a mediator of MSC immunomodulation, increases when MSCs are primed in hypoxia, and inhibition of IDO significantly decreases the expansion of Tregs. Priming with inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα increases also expression of markers associated with MSC immunomodulatory function, but decreases MSC proliferation. The expression of IDO also increases when MSCs are primed with inflammatory cytokines. However, there is no increase in Treg expansion when MSCs are primed with IFNγ, suggesting an alternate mechanism for inflammatory-stimulated MSC immunomodulation. Overall, these results suggest that MSCs primed in hypoxia or inflammatory conditions are optimally primed for immunosuppressive function. These results provide a clearer picture of how to enhance MSC immunomodulation for clinical use.

  15. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  16. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of trichosanthin in choriocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, W.Y.; Huang Hai; Tam, S.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP). It is generally believed that its many biological activities act through inhibition of ribosomes resulting in a decrease in protein synthesis. It has been hypothesized that the rate of entry of TCS into cells to reach ribosomes is an important factor in determining its biological activity. To prove this hypothesis, we have mapped out and compared the intracellular routing of TCS in two cell lines, namely the choriocarcinoma JAR cell line, which is known to be highly sensitive to the toxic effects of TCS, and the hepatoma H35 cell line, to which TCS shows minimal toxicity. Results from laser scanning confocal microscopy indicated that fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled TCS quickly accumulated inside JAR cells within 4 h of incubation while only a low level of fluorescent signals was detected in H35 cells during the same period of time. When TCS was conjugated with gold particles (Au) and its intracellular locations were traced with a transmission electron microscope, it was found that most of TCS were bound to coated pits on the JAR cell surface and were rapidly internalized within an hour. By 4 h, TCS reached almost every cytoplasmic region including ribosomes, and the JAR cell began to degenerate. In H35 cells, however, the binding of TCS to coated pits was not observed, but instead, a small amount of TCS was found to penetrate the cell non-specifically by direct diffusion across the cell membrane. Our observations suggest that most of TCS enter JAR cells via a specific receptor mediated pathway, which allows a swift transport of TCS across the membrane and a rapid accumulation of intracellular TCS, while in H35 cells, TCS takes a slow and non-specific route. The receptor-mediated uptake together with the specific intracellular routing of TCS may partly account for the differential vulnerability of the choriocarcinoma cell line towards the toxicity of TCS

  17. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of α3β1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor

  18. Interaction of Uranium with Bacterial Cell Surfaces: Inferences from Phosphatase-Mediated Uranium Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Gupta, Alka; Ballal, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli expressing either PhoN, a periplasmic acid phosphatase, or PhoK, an extracellular alkaline phosphatase, were evaluated for uranium (U) bioprecipitation under two specific geochemical conditions (GCs): (i) a carbonate-deficient condition at near-neutral pH (GC1), and (ii) a carbonate-abundant condition at alkaline pH (GC2). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that recombinant cells expressing PhoN/PhoK formed cell-associated uranyl phosphate precipitate under GC1, whereas the same cells displayed extracellular precipitation under GC2. These results implied that the cell-bound or extracellular location of the precipitate was governed by the uranyl species prevalent at that particular GC, rather than the location of phosphatase. MINTEQ modeling predicted the formation of predominantly positively charged uranium hydroxide ions under GC1 and negatively charged uranyl carbonate-hydroxide complexes under GC2. Both microbes adsorbed 6- to 10-fold more U under GC1 than under GC2, suggesting that higher biosorption of U to the bacterial cell surface under GC1 may lead to cell-associated U precipitation. In contrast, at alkaline pH and in the presence of excess carbonate under GC2, poor biosorption of negatively charged uranyl carbonate complexes on the cell surface might have resulted in extracellular precipitation. The toxicity of U observed under GC1 being higher than that under GC2 could also be attributed to the preferential adsorption of U on cell surfaces under GC1. This work provides a vivid description of the interaction of U complexes with bacterial cells. The findings have implications for the toxicity of various U species and for developing biological aqueous effluent waste treatment strategies. IMPORTANCE The present study provides illustrative insights into the interaction of uranium (U) complexes with recombinant bacterial cells overexpressing phosphatases. This work demonstrates the effects of aqueous

  19. CELLISA: reporter cell-based immunization and screening of hybridomas specific for cell surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter; Mesci, Aruz; Carlyle, James R

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for cell surface antigens are an invaluable tool to study immune receptor expression and function. Here, we outline a generalized reporter cell-based approach to the generation and high-throughput screening of mAbs specific for cell surface antigens. Termed CELLISA, this technology hinges upon the capture of hybridoma supernatants in mAb arrays that facilitate ligation of an antigen of interest displayed on BWZ reporter cells in the form of a CD3ζ-fusion chimeric antigen receptor (zCAR); in turn, specific mAb-mediated cross-linking of zCAR on BWZ cells results in the production of β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal), which can be assayed colorimetrically. Importantly, the BWZ reporter cells bearing the zCAR of interest may be used for immunization as well as screening. In addition, serial immunizations employing additional zCAR- or native antigen-bearing cell lines can be used to increase the frequency of the desired antigen-specific hybridomas. Finally, the use of a cohort of epitope-tagged zCAR (e.g., zCAR(FLAG)) variants allows visualization of the cell surface antigen prior to immunization, and coimmunization using these variants can be used to enhance the immunogenicity of the target antigen. Employing the CELLISA strategy, we herein describe the generation of mAb directed against an uncharacterized natural killer cell receptor protein.

  20. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  1. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  3. Chemokine receptors CCR6 and CXCR3 are necessary for CD4(+) T cell mediated ocular surface disease in experimental dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursey, Terry G; Gandhi, Niral B; Volpe, Eugene A; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2013-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells are essential to pathogenesis of ocular surface disease in dry eye. Two subtypes of CD4(+) T cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, function concurrently in dry eye to mediate disease. This occurs in spite of the cross-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-17A, the prototypical cytokines Th1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Essential to an effective immune response are chemokines that direct and summon lymphocytes to specific tissues. T cell trafficking has been extensively studied in other models, but this is the first study to examine the role of chemokine receptors in ocular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that the chemokine receptors, CCR6 and CXCR3, which are expressed on Th17 and Th1 cells, respectively, are required for the pathogenesis of dry eye disease, as CCR6KO and CXCR3KO mice do not develop disease under desiccating stress. CD4(+) T cells from CCR6KO and CXCR3KO mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) do not migrate to the ocular surface, but remain in the superficial cervical lymph nodes. In agreement with this, CD4(+) T cells from CCR6 and CXCR3 deficient donors exposed to DS, when adoptively transferred to T cell deficient recipients manifest minimal signs of dry eye disease, including significantly less T cell infiltration, goblet cell loss, and expression of inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase expression compared to wild-type donors. These findings highlight the important interaction of chemokine receptors on T cells and chemokine ligand expression on epithelial cells of the cornea and conjunctiva in dry eye pathogenesis and reveal potential new therapeutic targets for dry eye disease.

  4. Chemokine Receptors CCR6 and CXCR3 Are Necessary for CD4+ T Cell Mediated Ocular Surface Disease in Experimental Dry Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursey, Terry G.; Gandhi, Niral B.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are essential to pathogenesis of ocular surface disease in dry eye. Two subtypes of CD4+ T cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, function concurrently in dry eye to mediate disease. This occurs in spite of the cross-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-17A, the prototypical cytokines Th1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Essential to an effective immune response are chemokines that direct and summon lymphocytes to specific tissues. T cell trafficking has been extensively studied in other models, but this is the first study to examine the role of chemokine receptors in ocular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that the chemokine receptors, CCR6 and CXCR3, which are expressed on Th17 and Th1 cells, respectively, are required for the pathogenesis of dry eye disease, as CCR6KO and CXCR3KO mice do not develop disease under desiccating stress. CD4+ T cells from CCR6KO and CXCR3KO mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) do not migrate to the ocular surface, but remain in the superficial cervical lymph nodes. In agreement with this, CD4+ T cells from CCR6 and CXCR3 deficient donors exposed to DS, when adoptively transferred to T cell deficient recipients manifest minimal signs of dry eye disease, including significantly less T cell infiltration, goblet cell loss, and expression of inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase expression compared to wild-type donors. These findings highlight the important interaction of chemokine receptors on T cells and chemokine ligand expression on epithelial cells of the cornea and conjunctiva in dry eye pathogenesis and reveal potential new therapeutic targets for dry eye disease. PMID:24223818

  5. Diverse exocytic pathways for mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Bin, Na-Ryum; Sugita, Shuzo

    2018-04-17

    Mast cells play pivotal roles in innate and adaptive immunities but are also culprits in allergy, autoimmunity, and cardiovascular diseases. Mast cells respond to environmental changes by initiating regulated exocytosis/secretion of various biologically active compounds called mediators (e.g. proteases, amines, and cytokines). Many of these mediators are stored in granules/lysosomes and rely on intricate degranulation processes for release. Mast cell stabilizers (e.g. sodium cromoglicate), which prevent such degranulation processes, have therefore been clinically employed to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis. However, it has become increasingly clear that different mast cell diseases often involve multiple mediators that rely on overlapping but distinct mechanisms for release. This review illustrates existing evidence that highlights the diverse exocytic pathways in mast cells. We also discuss strategies to delineate these pathways so as to identify unique molecular components which could serve as new drug targets for more effective and specific treatments against mast cell-related diseases. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Cell-cell interactions mediate cytoskeleton organization and collective endothelial cell chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the role of cell-cell and cell-ligand interactions in cytoskeleton organization of endothelial cells (ECs) and their directional migration within a microfluidic device. The migration of ECs in response to a biochemical factor was studied. Mathematical analysis of the cell migration pathways and cellular cytoskeleton revealed that directional migration, migration persistence length, migration speed, and cytoskeletal stress fiber alignment can be mediated by the level of cell contacts as well as the presence or absence of a biochemical polarizing factor. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, higher cell density and more frequent cell contacts has a reinforcing effect on collective cell chemotaxis. In contrast, in the absence of a polarizing factor, high cell density can decrease or suppress the ability of the cells to migrate. Also, the correlation of actin stress fiber organization and alignment with directional migration of ECs was investigated. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, stress fibers within the cytoskeleton of ECs can be significantly aligned parallel to the gradient direction when the cells have higher level of contacts. The results also show that the organization and alignment of actin stress fibers is mediated by cell adhesion junctions during collective cell migration and introduce cell-cell interactions as a key factor during collective cell chemotaxis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Heparanase facilitates cell adhesion and spreading by clustering of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flonia Levy-Adam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys(158-Asp(171, termed KKDC was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity.

  8. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  9. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  10. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown...... to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...... rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept...

  11. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng, E-mail: quanshengzhou@yahoo.com; Cao, Zhifei, E-mail: hunancao@163.com

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  12. Integrin and glycocalyx mediated contributions to cell adhesion identified by single cell force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, D; Wehrle-Haller, B

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of cell adhesion using single cell force spectroscopy methods was compared with earlier methods for measuring cell adhesion. This comparison provided a means and rationale for separating components of the measurement retract curve that were due to interactions between the substrate and the glycocalyx, and interactions that were due to cell surface integrins binding to a substrate-bound ligand. The glycocalyx adhesion was characterized by multiple jumps with dispersed jump sizes that extended from 5 to 30 μm from the origin. The integrin mediated adhesion was represented by the F max (maximum detachment force), was generally within the first 5 μm and commonly detached with a single rupture cascade. The integrin peak (F max ) increases with time and the rate of increase shows large cell to cell variability with a peak ∼ 50 nN s -1 and an average rate of increase of 75 pN s -1 . This is a measure of the rate of increase in the number of adhesive integrin-ligand bonds/cell as a function of contact time.

  13. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK cell-mediated recognition of missing-self targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying “missing-self” recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ENU mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell-mediated recognition and elimination of “missing-self” targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a missense mutation [Thr428Ile] in the SH2 domain of Slp-76—a critical adapter molecule downstream of ITAM-containing surface receptors. The Slp-76 Ace mutation behaved as a hypomorphic allele—while no major defects were observed in conventional T cell development/function, a marked defect in NK cell-mediated elimination of β2-Microglobulin (β2M)-deficient target cells was observed. Further studies revealed Slp-76 to control NK cell receptor expression and maturation, however, activation of Slp-76ace/ace NK cells through ITAM-containing NK cell receptors or allogeneic/tumor target cells appeared largely unaffected. Imagestream analysis of the NK-β2M−/− target cell synapse, revealed a specific defect in actin recruitment to the conjugate synapse in Slp-76ace/ace NK cells. Overall these studies establish Slp-76 as a critical determinant of NK cell development and NK cell-mediated elimination of missing-self target cells. PMID:25929249

  14. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK-cell mediated recognition of missing-self targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-07-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying "missing-self" recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell mediated recognition and elimination of "missing-self" targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a missense mutation (Thr428Ile) in the SH2 domain of Slp-76-a critical adapter molecule downstream of ITAM-containing surface receptors. The Slp-76 Ace mutation behaved as a hypomorphic allele-while no major defects were observed in conventional T-cell development/function, a marked defect in NK cell mediated elimination of β2-microglobulin (β2M) deficient target cells was observed. Further studies revealed Slp-76 to control NK-cell receptor expression and maturation; however, activation of Slp-76(ace/ace) NK cells through ITAM-containing NK-cell receptors or allogeneic/tumor target cells appeared largely unaffected. Imagestream analysis of the NK-β2M(-/-) target cell synapse revealed a specific defect in actin recruitment to the conjugate synapse in Slp-76(ace/ace) NK cells. Overall these studies establish Slp-76 as a critical determinant of NK-cell development and NK cell mediated elimination of missing-self target cells in mice. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  16. Sodium arsenite accelerates TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in melanoma cells through upregulation of TRAIL-R1/R2 surface levels and downregulation of cFLIP expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2006-01-01

    AP-1/cJun, NF-κB and STAT3 transcription factors control expression of numerous genes, which regulate critical cell functions including proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Sodium arsenite is known to suppress both the IKK-NF-κB and JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathways and to activate the MAPK/JNK-cJun pathways, thereby committing some cancers to undergo apoptosis. Indeed, sodium arsenite is an effective drug for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with little nonspecific toxicity. Malignant melanoma is highly refractory to conventional radio- and chemotherapy. In the present study, we observed strong effects of sodium arsenite treatment on upregulation of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human and mouse melanomas. Arsenite treatment upregulated surface levels of death receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, through increased translocation of these proteins from cytoplasm to the cell surface. Furthermore, activation of cJun and suppression of NF-κB by sodium arsenite resulted in upregulation of the endogenous TRAIL and downregulation of the cFLIP gene expression (which encodes one of the main anti-apoptotic proteins in melanomas) followed by cFLIP protein degradation and, finally, by acceleration of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Direct suppression of cFLIP expression by cFLIP RNAi also accelerated TRAIL-induced apoptosis in these melanomas, while COX-2 suppression substantially increased levels of both TRAIL-induced and arsenite-induced apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of permanently active AKTmyr inhibited TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via downregulation of TRAIL-R1 levels. Finally, AKT overactivation increased melanoma survival in cell culture and dramatically accelerated growth of melanoma transplant in vivo, highlighting a role of AKT suppression for effective anticancer treatment

  17. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  18. Maintaining the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells on gold nanoparticle layers with nanoscale but not microscale surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Zhonglin; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Yanyun; Ding, Kaiguo; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Lin; Shi, Xiujuan; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Yanwei; Chen, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient control of the self-renewal and pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem cell (ESC) is a prerequisite for translating stem cell technologies to clinical applications. Surface topography is one of the most important factors that regulates cell behaviors. In the present study, micro/nano topographical structures composed of a gold nanoparticle layer (GNPL) with nano-, sub-micro-, and microscale surface roughnesses were used to study the roles of these structures in regulating the behaviors of mouse ESCs (mESCs) under feeder-free conditions. The distinctive results from Oct-4 immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) demonstrate that nanoscale and low sub-microscale surface roughnesses (Rq less than 392 nm) are conducive to the long-term maintenance of mESC pluripotency, while high sub-microscale and microscale surface roughnesses (Rq greater than 573 nm) result in a significant loss of mESC pluripotency and a faster undirectional differentiation, particularly in long-term culture. Moreover, the likely signalling cascades engaged in the topological sensing of mESCs were investigated and their role in affecting the maintenance of the long-term cell pluripotency was discussed by analyzing the expression of proteins related to E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesions and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Additionally, the conclusions from MTT, cell morphology staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays show that the surface roughness can provide a potent regulatory signal for various mESC behaviors, including cell attachment, proliferation and osteoinduction.Efficient control of the self-renewal and pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem cell (ESC) is a prerequisite for translating stem cell technologies to clinical applications. Surface topography is one of the most important factors that regulates cell behaviors. In the present study, micro/nano topographical structures composed of a gold

  19. A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ngo, Hoan; Bhalla, Manmeet; Chen, Da-Yuan; Ireton, Keith

    2017-11-01

    The bacterial surface protein InlB mediates internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes into human cells through interaction with the host receptor tyrosine kinase, Met. InlB-mediated entry requires localised polymerisation of the host actin cytoskeleton. Apart from actin polymerisation, roles for other host processes in Listeria entry are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exocytosis in the human cell promotes InlB-dependent internalisation. Using a probe consisting of VAMP3 with an exofacial green fluorescent protein tag, focal exocytosis was detected during InlB-mediated entry. Exocytosis was dependent on Met tyrosine kinase activity and the GTPase RalA. Depletion of SNARE proteins by small interfering RNA demonstrated an important role for exocytosis in Listeria internalisation. Depletion of SNARE proteins failed to affect actin filaments during internalisation, suggesting that actin polymerisation and exocytosis are separable host responses. SNARE proteins were required for delivery of the human GTPase Dynamin 2, which promotes InlB-mediated entry. Our results identify exocytosis as a novel host process exploited by Listeria for infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine polymer-immobilized surface by simple tyrosinase-mediated grafting for enhanced antifouling property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho Joon; Lee, Yunki; Phuong, Le Thi; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Kim, Eunsuk; Park, Jong Chul; Yoon, Hyunjin; Park, Ki Dong

    2017-10-01

    Introducing antifouling property to biomaterial surfaces has been considered an effective method for preventing the failure of implanted devices. In order to achieve this, the immobilization of zwitterions on biomaterial surfaces has been proven to be an excellent way of improving anti-adhesive potency. In this study, poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine), a tyramine-conjugated sulfobetaine polymer, was synthesized and simply grafted onto the surface of polyurethane via a tyrosinase-mediated reaction. Surface characterization by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the zwitterionic polymer was successfully introduced onto the surface of polyurethane and remained stable for 7days. In vitro studies revealed that poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine)-coated surfaces dramatically reduced the adhesion of fibrinogen, platelets, fibroblasts, and S. aureus by over 90% in comparison with bare surfaces. These results proved that polyurethane surfaces grafted with poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine) via a tyrosinase-catalyzed reaction could be promising candidates for an implantable medical device with excellent bioinert abilities. Antifouling surface modification is one of the key strategy to prevent the thrombus formation or infection which occurs on the surface of biomaterial after transplantation. Although there are many methods to modify the surface have been reported, necessity of simple modification technique still exists to apply for practical applications. The purpose of this study is to modify the biomaterial's surface by simply immobilizing antifouling zwitterion polymer via enzyme tyrosinase-mediated reaction which could modify versatile substrates in mild aqueous condition within fast time period. After modification, pSBTA grafted surface becomes resistant to various biological factors including proteins, cells, and bacterias. This approach appears to be a promising method to impart antifouling property on

  1. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  2. Functionalized PDMS with versatile and scalable surface roughness gradients for cell culture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2015-07-21

    This manuscript describes a simple and versatile approach to engineering surface roughness gradients via combination of microfluidics and photo-polymerization. Through UV-mediated polymerization, N-isopropylacrylamide with concentration gradients are successfully grafted onto PDMS surface, leading to diverse roughness degrees on the obtained PDMS substrate. Furthermore, the extent of surface roughness can be controllably regulated via tuning the flow rate ratio between the monomer solution and deionized water. Average roughness ranging from 8.050 nm to 151.68 nm has well been achieved in this work. Such PDMS samples are also demonstrated to be capable of working as supporting substrates for controlling cell adhesion or detachment. Due to the different degrees of surface roughness on a single substrate, our method provides an effective approach for designing advanced surafecs for cell culture. Finally, the thermosensitive property of N-isopropylacrylamide makes our sample furnish as another means for controlling the cell detachment from the substrates with correspondence to the surrounding temperature.

  3. Functionalized PDMS with versatile and scalable surface roughness gradients for cell culture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu; Gao, Xinghua; Wang, Cong; Ye, Ziran; Gao, Yibo; Xie, Jiao; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript describes a simple and versatile approach to engineering surface roughness gradients via combination of microfluidics and photo-polymerization. Through UV-mediated polymerization, N-isopropylacrylamide with concentration gradients are successfully grafted onto PDMS surface, leading to diverse roughness degrees on the obtained PDMS substrate. Furthermore, the extent of surface roughness can be controllably regulated via tuning the flow rate ratio between the monomer solution and deionized water. Average roughness ranging from 8.050 nm to 151.68 nm has well been achieved in this work. Such PDMS samples are also demonstrated to be capable of working as supporting substrates for controlling cell adhesion or detachment. Due to the different degrees of surface roughness on a single substrate, our method provides an effective approach for designing advanced surafecs for cell culture. Finally, the thermosensitive property of N-isopropylacrylamide makes our sample furnish as another means for controlling the cell detachment from the substrates with correspondence to the surrounding temperature.

  4. A robust and scalable TCR-based reporter cell assay to measure HIV-1 Nef-mediated T cell immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anmole, Gursev; Kuang, Xiaomei T; Toyoda, Mako; Martin, Eric; Shahid, Aniqa; Le, Anh Q; Markle, Tristan; Baraki, Bemuluyigza; Jones, R Brad; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ueno, Takamasa; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 evades cytotoxic T cell responses through Nef-mediated downregulation of HLA class I molecules from the infected cell surface. Methods to quantify the impact of Nef on T cell recognition typically employ patient-derived T cell clones; however, these assays are limited by the cost and effort required to isolate and maintain primary cell lines. The variable activity of different T cell clones and the limited number of cells generated by re-stimulation can also hinder assay reproducibility and scalability. Here, we describe a heterologous T cell receptor reporter assay and use it to study immune evasion by Nef. Induction of NFAT-driven luciferase following co-culture with peptide-pulsed or virus-infected target cells serves as a rapid, quantitative and antigen-specific measure of T cell recognition of its cognate peptide/HLA complex. We demonstrate that Nef-mediated downregulation of HLA on target cells correlates inversely with T cell receptor-dependent luminescent signal generated by effector cells. This method provides a robust, flexible and scalable platform that is suitable for studies to measure Nef function in the context of different viral peptide/HLA antigens, to assess the function of patient-derived Nef alleles, or to screen small molecule libraries to identify novel Nef inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeting Cellular Calcium Homeostasis to Prevent Cytokine-Mediated Beta Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy L; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Lavagnino, Zeno; Spears, Larry D; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Yagi, Takuya; Semenkovich, Clay F; Piston, David W; Urano, Fumihiko

    2017-07-17

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of islet inflammation, leading to beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Although alterations in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosolic free calcium levels are known to play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death, there are currently no treatments targeting cellular calcium homeostasis to combat type 1 diabetes. Here we show that modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis can mitigate cytokine- and ER stress-mediated beta cell death. The calcium modulating compounds, dantrolene and sitagliptin, both prevent cytokine and ER stress-induced activation of the pro-apoptotic calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, and partly suppress beta cell death in INS1E cells and human primary islets. These agents are also able to restore cytokine-mediated suppression of functional ER calcium release. In addition, sitagliptin preserves function of the ER calcium pump, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA), and decreases levels of the pro-apoptotic protein thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Supporting the role of TXNIP in cytokine-mediated cell death, knock down of TXNIP in INS1-E cells prevents cytokine-mediated beta cell death. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of dynamic cellular calcium homeostasis and TXNIP suppression present viable pharmacologic targets to prevent cytokine-mediated beta cell loss in diabetes.

  6. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane-mediated surface functionalization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vitro toxicity assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shige Wang1, Shihui Wen2, Mingwu Shen2, Rui Guo2, Xueyan Cao2, Jianhua Wang3, Xiangyang Shi1,2,41State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Centro de Química da Madeira, Universidade da Madeira, Campus da Penteada, Funchal, PortugalBackground: We report on aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS-mediated surface modification of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface functional groups for potential biomedical applications. In this study, nanohydroxyapatite covalently linked with APTS (n-HA-APTS was reacted with acetic anhydride or succinic anhydride to produce neutralized (n-HA-APTS.Ac or negatively charged (n-HA-APTS.SAH nanohydroxyapatite, respectively. Nanohydroxyapatite formed with amine, acetyl, and carboxyl groups was extensively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements.Results: In vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay revealed that the slight toxicity of the amine-functionalized n-HA-APTS could be eliminated by post-functionalization of APTS amines to form acetyl and carboxyl groups. Blood compatibility assessment demonstrated that the negligible hemolytic activity of the pristine nanohydroxyapatite particles did not appreciably change after APTS-mediated surface functionalization.Conclusion: APTS-mediated functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface groups may be useful for further functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with biologically active materials, thereby providing possibilities for a broad range of

  7. Mast cell function modulating IgE-mediated allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Pawankar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases, such as atopic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and urticaria, are prevalent and increasing in frequency. Mast cells are known to play a central role in the immediate phase reaction of allergic diseases through the IgE-mediated release of a variety of chemical mediators, such as histamine, leukotrienes and prostaglandins. In contrast, T lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils are thought to be responsible for inducing the late phase response. However, whether the mast cell can be simplistically assigned a role in the immediate phase allergic response and whether mast cells are necessary for the ongoing allergic response, including the development of hyperresponsiveness, remains to be completely studied. In the present article, the author will discuss the integrated roles of mast cells in IgE-mediated allergic inflammation, with specific emphasis on the roles of mast cell-derived cytokines in the late phase allergic response and chronic allergic inflammation.

  8. Surfactant protein D delays Fas- and TRAIL-mediated extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiadeu, Pascal; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Sweezey, Neil; Palaniyar, Nades

    2017-05-01

    Only a few extracellular soluble proteins are known to modulate apoptosis. We considered that surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D), an innate immune collectin present on many mucosal surfaces, could regulate apoptosis. Although SP-D is known to be important for immune cell homeostasis, whether SP-D affects apoptosis is unknown. In this study we aimed to determine the effects of SP-D on Jurkat T cells and human T cells dying by apoptosis. Here we show that SP-D binds to Jurkat T cells and delays the progression of Fas (CD95)-Fas ligand and TRAIL-TRAIL receptor induced, but not TNF-TNF receptor-mediated apoptosis. SP-D exerts its effects by reducing the activation of initiator caspase-8 and executioner caspase-3. SP-D also delays the surface exposure of phosphatidylserine. The effect of SP-D was ablated by the presence of caspase-8 inhibitor, but not by intrinsic pathway inhibitors. The binding ability of SP-D to dying cells decreases during the early stages of apoptosis, suggesting the release of apoptotic cell surface targets during apoptosis. SP-D also delays FasL-induced death of primary human T cells. SP-D delaying the progression of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis could have important implications in regulating immune cell homeostasis at mucosal surfaces.

  9. CD83 Antibody Inhibits Human B Cell Responses to Antigen as well as Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD4 T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kuan Y; Baron, Rebecca; Seldon, Therese A; Jones, Martina L; Rice, Alison M; Munster, David J

    2018-05-15

    Anti-CD83 Ab capable of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can deplete activated CD83 + human dendritic cells, thereby inhibiting CD4 T cell-mediated acute graft-versus-host disease. As CD83 is also expressed on the surface of activated B lymphocytes, we hypothesized that anti-CD83 would also inhibit B cell responses to stimulation. We found that anti-CD83 inhibited total IgM and IgG production in vitro by allostimulated human PBMC. Also, Ag-specific Ab responses to immunization of SCID mice xenografted with human PBMC were inhibited by anti-CD83 treatment. This inhibition occurred without depletion of all human B cells because anti-CD83 lysed activated CD83 + B cells by Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and spared resting (CD83 - ) B cells. In cultured human PBMC, anti-CD83 inhibited tetanus toxoid-stimulated B cell proliferation and concomitant dendritic cell-mediated CD4 T cell proliferation and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A, with minimal losses of B cells (80% of B cells but had no effect on CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine expression. By virtue of the ability of anti-CD83 to selectively deplete activated, but not resting, B cells and dendritic cells, with the latter reducing CD4 T cell responses, anti-CD83 may be clinically useful in autoimmunity and transplantation. Advantages might include inhibited expansion of autoantigen- or alloantigen-specific B cells and CD4 T cells, thus preventing further production of pathogenic Abs and inflammatory cytokines while preserving protective memory and regulatory cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    Endocytosed protein antigens are believed to be fragmented in what appears to be a balance between proteolysis and MHC-mediated epitope protection, and the resulting peptide-MHC complexes are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cells (APC) and presented to T cells. The events tha...

  11. Impacts of papain and neuraminidase enzyme treatment on electrohydrodynamics and IgG-mediated agglutination of type A red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyono, Atsushi; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Mazda, Toshio; Takata, Youichi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2009-09-15

    The stability of native and enzyme-treated human red blood cells of type A (Rh D positive) against agglutination is investigated under conditions where it is mediated by immunoglobuline G (IgG) anti-D antibody binding. The propensity of cells to agglutinate is related to their interphasic (electrokinetic) properties. These properties significantly depend on the concentration of proteolytic papain enzyme and protease-free neuraminidase enzyme that the cells are exposed to. The analysis is based on the interpretation of electrophoretic data of cells by means of the numerical theory for the electrokinetics of soft (bio)particles. A significant reduction of the hydrodynamic permeability of the external soft glycoprotein layer of the cells is reported under the action of papain. This reflects a significant decrease in soft surface layer thickness and a loss in cell surface integrity/rigidity, as confirmed by nanomechanical AFM analysis. Neuraminidase action leads to an important decrease in the interphase charge density by removing sialic acids from the cell soft surface layer. This is accompanied by hydrodynamic softness modulations less significant than those observed for papain-treated cells. On the basis of these electrohydrodynamic characteristics, the overall interaction potential profiles between two native cells and two enzyme-treated cells are derived as a function of the soft surface layer thickness in the Debye-Hückel limit that is valid for cell suspensions under physiological conditions (approximately 0.16 M). The thermodynamic computation of cell suspension stability against IgG-mediated agglutination then reveals that a decrease in the cell surface layer thickness is more favorable than a decrease in interphase charge density for inducing agglutination. This is experimentally confirmed by agglutination data collected for papain- and neuraminidase-treated cells.

  12. Commensal microbiota and NKT cells in the control of inflammatory diseases at mucosal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a phenotypically and functionally diverse subset of T cells, which recognizes self- and microbial lipids in the context of the atypical MHC class I molecule CD1d. NKT cells exhibit potent effector functions and play critical roles in antimicrobial defense, cancer immunosurveillance and the modulation of immune-mediated disorders. Recent evidence has revealed extensive cross-regulation between the mucosal microbiota and CD1d as well as NKT cells. Microbial exposure at mucosal surfaces, particularly during early postnatal development, regulates NKT cell trafficking and function in the intestine and the lung and determines the susceptibility to NKT cell-mediated inflammatory disorders. Conversely, CD1d controls the composition of the intestinal microbiota; perhaps through the regulation of Paneth cell function. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings on the crosstalk between the microbiota and NKT cells and discuss the implication for mucosal homeostasis and its dysregulation in inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ProFASTA: a pipeline web server for fungal protein scanning with integration of cell surface prediction software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Brandt, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    Surface proteins, such as those located in the cell wall of fungi, play an important role in the interaction with the surrounding environment. For instance, they mediate primary host-pathogen interactions and are crucial to the establishment of biofilms and fungal infections. Surface localization of

  14. Human anti-CAIX antibodies mediate immune cell inhibition of renal cell carcinoma in vitro and in a humanized mouse model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, De-Kuan; Moniz, Raymond J; Xu, Zhongyao; Sun, Jiusong; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-06-11

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is a surface-expressed protein that is upregulated by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and represents a prototypic tumor-associated antigen that is overexpressed on renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therapeutic approaches targeting CAIX have focused on the development of CAIX inhibitors and specific immunotherapies including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, current in vivo mouse models used to characterize the anti-tumor properties of fully human anti-CAIX mAbs have significant limitations since the role of human effector cells in tumor cell killing in vivo is not directly evaluated. The role of human anti-CAIX mAbs on CAIX(+) RCC tumor cell killing by immunocytes or complement was tested in vitro by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) as well as on CAIX(+) RCC cellular motility, wound healing, migration and proliferation. The in vivo therapeutic activity mediated by anti-CAIX mAbs was determined by using a novel orthotopic RCC xenograft humanized animal model and analyzed by histology and FACS staining. Our studies demonstrate the capacity of human anti-CAIX mAbs that inhibit CA enzymatic activity to result in immune-mediated killing of RCC, including nature killer (NK) cell-mediated ADCC, CDC, and macrophage-mediated ADCP. The killing activity correlated positively with the level of CAIX expression on RCC tumor cell lines. In addition, Fc engineering of anti-CAIX mAbs was shown to enhance the ADCC activity against RCC. We also demonstrate that these anti-CAIX mAbs inhibit migration of RCC cells in vitro. Finally, through the implementation of a novel orthotopic RCC model utilizing allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice, we show that anti-CAIX mAbs are capable of mediating human immune response in vivo including tumor infiltration of NK cells and activation of T cells, resulting in

  15. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4 + T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3 + Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3 + Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3 + Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1 V12 or Cdc42 V12 could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA L63 decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors as modulators of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Denis M; Gately, Kathy; Hughes, Clare; Edwards, Connla; Davies, Anthony; Madden, Stephen F; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and used in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Through interactions with FcƴR+ immune cell subsets, trastuzumab functions as a passive immunotherapy. The EGFR/HER2-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib and the next generation TKIs afatinib and neratinib, can alter HER2 levels, potentially modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab. Using LDH-release assays, we investigated the impact of antigen modulation, assay duration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activity on trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in breast cancer models of maximal (SKBR3) and minimal (MCF-7) target antigen expression to determine if modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab using TKIs may be a viable approach for enhancing tumor immune reactivity. HER2 levels were determined in lapatinib, afatinib and neratinib-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7 using high content analysis (HCA). Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was assessed following treatment with TKIs utilising a colorimetric LDH release-based protocol at 4 and 12h timepoints. PBMC activity was assessed against non-MHC-restricted K562 cells. A flow cytometry-based method (CFSE/7-AAD) was also used to measure trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in medium-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7. HER2 antigen levels were significantly altered by the three TKIs in both cell line models. The TKIs significantly reduced LDH levels directly in SKBR3 cells but not MCF-7. Lapatinib and neratinib augment trastuzumab-related ADCC in SKBR3 but the effect was not consistent with antigen expression levels and was dependent on volunteer PBMC activity (vs. K562). A 12h assay timepoint produced more consistent results. Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC (PBMC:target cell ratio of 10:1) was measured at 7.6±4.7% (T12) by LDH assay and 19±3.2 % (T12) using the flow cytometry-based method in the antigen-low model MCF-7. In the presence of effector cells with high

  18. Neuropilin-2 mediated β-catenin signaling and survival in human gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaija Samuel

    Full Text Available NRP-2 is a high-affinity kinase-deficient receptor for ligands belonging to the class 3 semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor families. NRP-2 has been detected on the surface of several types of human cancer cells, but its expression and function in gastrointestinal (GI cancer cells remains to be determined. We sought to determine the function of NRP-2 in mediating downstream signals regulating the growth and survival of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. In human gastric cancer specimens, NRP-2 expression was detected in tumor tissues but not in adjacent normal mucosa. In CNDT 2.5 cells, shRNA mediated knockdown NRP-2 expression led to decreased migration and invasion in vitro (p<0.01. Focused gene-array analysis demonstrated that loss of NRP-2 reduced the expression of a critical metastasis mediator gene, S100A4. Steady-state levels and function of β-catenin, a known regulator of S100A4, were also decreased in the shNRP-2 clones. Furthermore, knockdown of NRP-2 sensitized CNDT 2.5 cells in vitro to 5FU toxicity. This effect was associated with activation of caspases 3 and 7, cleavage of PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2. In vivo growth of CNDT 2.5 cells in the livers of nude mice was significantly decreased in the shNRP-2 group (p<0.05. Intraperitoneal administration of NRP-2 siRNA-DOPC decreased the tumor burden in mice (p = 0.01. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor cell-derived NRP-2 mediates critical survival signaling in gastrointestinal cancer cells.

  19. Elaeocarpusin Inhibits Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jong Kim

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are major effector cells for allergic responses that act by releasing inflammatory mediators, such as histamine and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, different strategies have been pursued to develop anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory candidates by regulating the function of mast cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of elaeocarpusin (EL on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation. We isolated EL from Elaeocarpus sylvestris L. (Elaeocarpaceae, which is known to possess anti-inflammatory properties. For this study, various sources of mast cells and mouse anaphylaxis models were used. EL suppressed the induction of markers for mast cell degranulation, such as histamine and β-hexosaminidase, by reducing intracellular calcium levels. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-4, was significantly decreased in activated mast cells by EL. This inhibitory effect was related to inhibition of the phosphorylation of Fyn, Lyn, Syk, and Akt, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB. To confirm the effect of EL in vivo, immunoglobulin E-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA and ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA models were induced. EL reduced the PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner. In addition, EL attenuated ASA reactions such as hypothemia, histamine release, and IgE production. Our results suggest that EL is a potential therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts via the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of proinflammatory cytokines.

  20. Interleukin-15 stimulates natural killer cell-mediated killing of both human pancreatic cancer and stellate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Audenaerde, Jonas R.M.; De Waele, Jorrit; Marcq, Elly; Van Loenhout, Jinthe; Lion, Eva; Van den Bergh, Johan M.J.; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Masamune, Atsushi; Roeyen, Geert; Pauwels, Patrick; Lardon, Filip; Peeters, Marc; Smits, Evelien L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. One of the hallmarks of this cancer is the strong desmoplastic reaction within the tumor microenvironment (TME), orchestrated by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). This results in a functional and mechanical shield which causes resistance to conventional therapies. Aiming to overcome this resistance by tackling the stromal shield, we assessed for the first time the capacity of IL-15 stimulated natural killer (NK) cells to kill PSC and pancreatic cancer cells (PCC). The potency of IL-15 to promote NK cell-mediated killing was evaluated phenotypically and functionally. In addition, NK cell and immune checkpoint ligands on PSC were charted. We demonstrate that IL-15 activated NK cells kill both PCC and PSC lines (range 9-35% and 20-50%, respectively) in a contact-dependent manner and significantly higher as compared to resting NK cells. Improved killing of these pancreatic cell lines is, at least partly, dependent on IL-15 induced upregulation of TIM-3 and NKG2D. Furthermore, we confirm significant killing of primary PSC by IL-15 activated NK cells in an ex vivo autologous system. Screening for potential targets for immunotherapeutic strategies, we demonstrate surface expression of both inhibitory (PD-L1, PD-L2) and activating (MICA/B, ULBPs and Galectin-9) ligands on primary PSC. These data underscore the therapeutic potential of IL-15 to promote NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity as a treatment of pancreatic cancer and provide promising future targets to tackle remaining PSC. PMID:28915646

  1. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-08

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  3. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit β1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, β1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, β1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in β1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the β1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  4. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  5. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC.Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology.These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  6. Cylindromatosis mediates neuronal cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjam, Goutham K; Terpolilli, Nicole Angela; Diemert, Sebastian; Eisenbach, Ina; Hoffmann, Lena; Reuther, Christina; Herden, Christiane; Roth, Joachim; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Culmsee, Carsten

    2018-01-19

    The tumor-suppressor cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitinating enzyme and key regulator of cell proliferation and inflammation. A genome-wide siRNA screen linked CYLD to receptor interacting protein-1 (RIP1) kinase-mediated necroptosis; however, the exact mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the precise role of CYLD in models of neuronal cell death in vitro and evaluated whether CYLD deletion affects brain injury in vivo. In vitro, downregulation of CYLD increased RIP1 ubiquitination, prevented RIP1/RIP3 complex formation, and protected neuronal cells from oxidative death. Similar protective effects were achieved by siRNA silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 or by pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 with necrostatin-1. In vivo, CYLD knockout mice were protected from trauma-induced brain damage compared to wild-type littermate controls. These findings unravel the mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death signaling in damaged neurons in vitro and suggest a cell death-mediating role of CYLD in vivo.

  7. Regulatory CD4 T cells inhibit HIV-1 expression of other CD4 T cell subsets via interactions with cell surface regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingce; Robinson, Tanya O; Duverger, Alexandra; Kutsch, Olaf; Heath, Sonya L; Cron, Randy Q

    2018-03-01

    During chronic HIV-1 infection, regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) frequently represent the largest subpopulation of CD4 T cell subsets, implying relative resistant to HIV-1. When HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells was explored in vitro and ex vivo from patient samples, Tregs possessed lower levels of HIV-1 DNA and RNA in comparison with conventional effector and memory CD4 T cells. Moreover, Tregs suppressed HIV-1 expression in other CD4 T cells in an in vitro co-culture system. This suppression was mediated in part via multiple inhibitory surface proteins expressed on Tregs. Antibody blockade of CTLA-4, PD-1, and GARP on Tregs resulted in increased HIV-1 DNA integration and mRNA expression in neighboring CD4 T cells. Moreover, antibody blockade of Tregs inhibitory proteins resulted in increased HIV-1 LTR transcription in co-cultured CD4 T cells. Thus, Tregs inhibit HIV-1 infection of other CD4 T cell subsets via interactions with inhibitory cell surface proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    Naive CD4(+) T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4(+) T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4(+) T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4(+) T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lanlan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Results Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP or beta-galactosidase (Gal was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. Conclusion The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological

  10. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nicole M.; Ceresa, Brian P., E-mail: brian.ceresa@louisville.edu

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway.

  11. Glycoprotein on cell surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, T.

    1975-01-01

    There are conjugated polysaccharides in cell membranes and outside of animal cells, and they play important role in the control of cell behavior. In this paper, the studies on the glycoprotein on cell surfaces are reported. It was found that the glycoprotein on cell surfaces have both N-glycoside type and O-glycoside type saccharic chains. Therefore it can be concluded that the basic structure of the saccharic chains in the glycoprotein on cell surfaces is similar to that of blood serum and body fluid. The main glycoprotein in the membranes of red blood corpuscles has been studied most in detail, and it also has both types of saccharic chains. The glycoprotein in liver cell membranes was found to have only the saccharic chains of acid type and to be in different pattern from that in endoplasmic reticula and nuclear membranes, which also has the saccharic chains of neutral type. The structure of the saccharic chains of H-2 antigen, i.e. the peculiar glycoprotein on the surfaces of lymph system cells, has been studied, and it is similar to the saccharic chains of glycoprotein in blood serum. The saccharic chain structures of H-2 antigen and TL antigen are different. TL, H-2 (D), Lna and H-2 (K) are the glycoprotein on cell surfaces, and are independent molecules. The analysis of the saccharic chain patterns on cell surfaces was carried out, and it was shown that the acid type saccharic chains were similar to those of ordinary glycoprotein, because the enzyme of pneumococci hydrolyzed most of the acid type saccharic chains. The change of the saccharic chain patterns of glycoprotein on cell surfaces owing to canceration and multiplication is complex matter. (Kako, I.)

  12. Role of ROS in Aβ42 Mediated Activation of Cerebral Endothelial Cells

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    Andrey Tsoy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There is substantial evidence that the deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in brain parenchyma and brain vessels is the main cause of neuronal dysfunction and death in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Aβ exhibits multiple cytotoxic effects on neurons and glial cells and causes dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB. In AD brains, an increased deposition of Aβ in the cerebral vasculature has been found to be correlated with increased transmigration of blood-borne inflammatory cells and neurovascular inflammation. However, regulatory mediators of these processes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the role of ROS in actin polymerization and expression of adhesion molecules (P-selectin on the surface of the cerebral endothelial cells (CECs that are activated by Aβ42.Materials and methods. Mouse BEnd3 line (ATCC was used in this research. BEnd3 cells respond to Aβ treatment similarly to human primary CECs and are a common model to investigate CECs’ function. We used immortalized bEnd3 cells as the following: controls; cells incubated with Aβ42 for 10, 30, and 60 minutes; cells incubated with 30 mM of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC for 1 hr; and, cells pre-treated with NAC followed by Aβ42 exposure. We measured DHE fluorescence to investigate intracellular ROS production. Immunofluorescent microscopy of anti-P-selectin and oregon green phalloidin was used to quantify the surface P-selectin expression and actin polymerization, and Western blot analysis was used to analyze total P-selectin expression.Results. The results of this study have demonstrated a significant time-dependent ROS accumulation after 10 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes of Aβ42 treatment, while Aβ42 stimulated ROS production in CECs was attenuated by pre-treatment with the NAC antioxidant. We also found that Aβ42 increased P-selectin fluorescence at the surface of bEnd3 cells in a time dependent manner in parallel to ROS

  13. Ultraviolet radiation-induced interleukin 6 release in HeLa cells is mediated via membrane events in a DNA damage-independent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulms, D; Pöppelmann, B; Schwarz, T

    2000-05-19

    Evidence exists that ultraviolet radiation (UV) affects molecular targets in the nucleus or at the cell membrane. UV-induced apoptosis was found to be mediated via DNA damage and activation of death receptors, suggesting that nuclear and membrane effects are not mutually exclusive. To determine whether participation of nuclear and membrane components is also essential for other UV responses, we studied the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by UV. Exposing HeLa cells to UV at 4 degrees C, which inhibits activation of surface receptors, almost completely prevented IL-6 release. Enhanced repair of UV-mediated DNA damage by addition of the DNA repair enzyme photolyase did not affect UV-induced IL-6 production, suggesting that in this case membrane events predominant over nuclear effects. UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated via NFkappaB since the NFkappaB inhibitor MG132 or transfection of cells with a super-repressor form of the NFkappaB inhibitor IkappaB reduced IL-6 release. Transfection with a dominant negative mutant of the signaling protein TRAF-2 reduced IL-6 release upon exposure to UV, indicating that UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated by activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1. These data demonstrate that UV can exert biological effects mainly by affecting cell surface receptors and that this is independent of its ability to induce nuclear DNA damage.

  14. The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles on cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ilknur; Altunbek, Mine; Kahraman, Mehmet; Culha, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on p53 mediated cell death was evaluated using human dermal fibroblast (HDF) and lung cancer (A549) cells. The citrate reduced AgNPs (C-AgNPs) were modified with either lactose (L-AgNPs) or a 12-base long oligonucleotide (O-AgNPs). Both unmodified and modified AgNPs showed increased concentration and time dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity causing an increased p53 up-regulation within 6 h and led to apoptotic or necrotic cell deaths. The C-AgNPs induced more cytotoxicity and cellular DNA damage than the surface modified AgNPs. Modifying the C-AgNPs with lactose or the oligonucleotide reduced both necrotic and apoptotic cell deaths in the HDF cells. The C-AgNPs caused an insignificant necrosis in A549 cells whereas the modified AgNPs caused necrosis and apoptosis in both cell types. Compared to the O-AgNPs, the L-AgNPs triggered more cellular DNA damage, which led to up-regulation of p53 gene inducing apoptosis in A549 cells compared to HDF cells. This suggests that the different surface chemistries of the AgNPs cause different cellular responses that may be important not only for their use in medicine but also for reducing their toxicity. (paper)

  15. SGLT1-mediated transport in Caco-2 cells is highly dependent on cell bank origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, B; Pedersen, Maria; Laghmoch, A M

    2017-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, for substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression and limited knowledge about...... transporter function during multiple cell passaging and cell thawings. In the case of SGLT1, a key transporter of oral absorption of D-glucose, one reason for compromised prediction could be inadequate expression of SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells and thereby limited sensitivity in the determination of SGLT1-mediated...... permeability (PSGLT1). Here, the objective was to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, α-MDG, in Caco-2 cells was shown to be highly dependent on cell bank origin. The most robust and reliable...

  16. Unique ζ-chain motifs mediate a direct TCR-actin linkage critical for immunological synapse formation and T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Yair; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Ish-Shalom, Eliran; Pato, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Barda-Saad, Mira; Wang, Lynn; Baniyash, Michal

    2014-01-01

    TCR-mediated activation induces receptor microclusters that evolve to a defined immune synapse (IS). Many studies showed that actin polymerization and remodeling, which create a scaffold critical to IS formation and stabilization, are TCR mediated. However, the mechanisms controlling simultaneous TCR and actin dynamic rearrangement in the IS are yet not fully understood. Herein, we identify two novel TCR ζ-chain motifs, mediating the TCR's direct interaction with actin and inducing actin bundling. While T cells expressing the ζ-chain mutated in these motifs lack cytoskeleton (actin) associated (cska)-TCRs, they express normal levels of non-cska and surface TCRs as cells expressing wild-type ζ-chain. However, such mutant cells are unable to display activation-dependent TCR clustering, IS formation, expression of CD25/CD69 activation markers, or produce/secrete cytokine, effects also seen in the corresponding APCs. We are the first to show a direct TCR-actin linkage, providing the missing gap linking between TCR-mediated Ag recognition, specific cytoskeleton orientation toward the T-cell-APC interacting pole and long-lived IS maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  18. Vitamin A Transport Mechanism of the Multitransmembrane Cell-Surface Receptor STRA6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riki Kawaguchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A has biological functions as diverse as sensing light for vision, regulating stem cell differentiation, maintaining epithelial integrity, promoting immune competency, regulating learning and memory, and acting as a key developmental morphogen. Vitamin A derivatives have also been used in treating human diseases. If vitamin A is considered a drug that everyone needs to take to survive, evolution has come up with a natural drug delivery system that combines sustained release with precise and controlled delivery to the cells or tissues that depend on it. This “drug delivery system” is mediated by plasma retinol binding protein (RBP, the principle and specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood, and STRA6, the cell-surface receptor for RBP that mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. The mechanism by which the RBP receptor absorbs vitamin A from the blood is distinct from other known cellular uptake mechanisms. This review summarizes recent progress in elucidating the fundamental molecular mechanism mediated by the RBP receptor and multiple newly discovered catalytic activities of this receptor, and compares this transport system with retinoid transport independent of RBP/STRA6. How to target this new type of transmembrane receptor using small molecules in treating diseases is also discussed.

  19. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

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    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  20. Mechanotransduction across the cell surface and through the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Butler, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin beta 1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  1. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...... remarkable phenotypic discrepancies exhibited by oval cells in stem cell-mediated liver regeneration between rats and mice and underline the importance of careful extrapolation between individual species....

  2. CD4+ T cell-mediated rejection of MHC class II-positive tumor cells is dependent on antigen secretion and indirect presentation on host APCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Fauskanger, Marte; Manzke, Melanie; Lundin, Katrin U; Corthay, Alexandre; Bogen, Bjarne; Tveita, Anders Aune

    2018-05-11

    Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells have been shown to mediate efficient anti-tumor immune responses against cancer. Such responses can occur through direct binding to MHC class II (MHC II)-expressing tumor cells or indirectly via activation of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that take up and present the tumor antigen. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells reactive against an epitope within the Ig light chain variable region of a murine B cell lymphoma can reject established tumors. Given the presence of MHC II molecules at the surface of lymphoma cells, we investigated whether MHC II-restricted antigen presentation on tumor cells alone was required for rejection. Variants of the A20 B lymphoma cell line that either secreted or intracellularly retained different versions of the tumor-specific antigen revealed that antigen secretion by the MHC II-expressing tumor cells was essential both for the priming and effector phase of CD4+ T cell-driven anti-tumor immune responses. Consistent with this, genetic ablation of MHC II in tumor cells, both in the case of B lymphoma and B16 melanoma, did not preclude rejection of tumors by tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. These findings demonstrate that MHC class II expression on tumor cells themselves is not required for CD4+ T cell-mediated rejection, and that indirect display on host APC is sufficient for effective tumor elimination. These results support the importance of tumor-infiltrating APC as mediators of tumor cell killing by CD4+ T cells. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Ciliary metachronal wave propagation on the compliant surface of Paramecium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narematsu, Naoki; Quek, Raymond; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Ciliary movements in protozoa exhibit metachronal wave-like coordination, in which a constant phase difference is maintained between adjacent cilia. It is at present generally thought that metachronal waves require hydrodynamic coupling between adjacent cilia and the extracellular fluid. To test this hypothesis, we aspirated a Paramecium cell using a micropipette which completely sealed the surface of the cell such that no fluid could pass through the micropipette. Thus, the anterior and the posterior regions of the cell were hydrodynamically decoupled. Nevertheless, we still observed that metachronal waves continued to propagate from the anterior to the posterior ends of the cell, suggesting that in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, there are other mechanisms that can also transmit the metachronal waves. Such transmission was also observed in computational modeling where the fluid was fully decoupled between two partitions of a beating ciliary array. We also imposed cyclic stretching on the surface of live Paramecium cells and found that metachronal waves persisted in the presence of cyclic stretching. This demonstrated that, in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, a compliant substrate can also play a critical role in mediating the propagation of metachronal waves. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. CD4 T cell-mediated protection from lethal influenza: perforin and antibody-mediated mechanisms give a one-two punch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah M; Dilzer, Allison M; Meents, Dana L; Swain, Susan L

    2006-09-01

    The mechanisms whereby CD4 T cells contribute to the protective response against lethal influenza infection remain poorly characterized. To define the role of CD4 cells in protection against a highly pathogenic strain of influenza, virus-specific TCR transgenic CD4 effectors were generated in vitro and transferred into mice given lethal influenza infection. Primed CD4 effectors conferred protection against lethal infection over a broad range of viral dose. The protection mediated by CD4 effectors did not require IFN-gamma or host T cells, but did result in increased anti-influenza Ab titers compared with untreated controls. Further studies indicated that CD4-mediated protection at high doses of influenza required B cells, and that passive transfer of anti-influenza immune serum was therapeutic in B cell-deficient mice, but only when CD4 effectors were present. Primed CD4 cells also acquired perforin (Pfn)-mediated cytolytic activity during effector generation, suggesting a second mechanism used by CD4 cells to confer protection. Pfn-deficient CD4 effectors were less able to promote survival in intact BALB/c mice and were unable to provide protection in B cell-deficient mice, indicating that Ab-independent protection by CD4 effectors requires Pfn. Therefore, CD4 effectors mediate protection to lethal influenza through at least two mechanisms: Pfn-mediated cytotoxicity early in the response promoted survival independently of Ab production, whereas CD4-driven B cell responses resulted in high titer Abs that neutralized remaining virus.

  5. High hydrostatic pressure inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum cells in (O/W)-emulsions is independent from cell surface hydrophobicity and lipid phase parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, T. A.; Reitermayer, D.; Lenz, C. A.; Vogel, R. F.

    2017-07-01

    Inactivation efficiency of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing of food is strongly affected by food matrix composition. We investigated effects of fat on HHP inactivation of spoilage-associated Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum strains using defined oil-in-water (O/W)-emulsion model systems. Since fat-mediated effects on HHP inactivation could be dependent on interactions between lipid phase and microbial cells, three major factors possibly influencing such interactions were considered, that is, cell surface hydrophobicity, presence and type of surfactants, and oil droplet size. Pressure tolerance varied noticeably among L. plantarum strains and was independent of cell surface hydrophobicity. We showed that HHP inactivation of all strains tended to be more effective in presence of fat. The observation in both, surfactant-stabilized and surfactant-free (O/W)-emulsion, indicates that cell surface hydrophobicity is no intrinsic pressure resistance factor. In contrast to the presence of fat per se, surfactant type and oil droplet size did not affect inactivation efficiency.

  6. Development of a general-purpose method for cell purification using Cre/loxP-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Shunsuke; Akiyoshi, Mika; Ideguchi, Ko; Kitano, Satsuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Hirose, Michiko; Mise, Nathan; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo; Tachibana, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    A mammalian body is composed of more than 200 different types of cells. The purification of a certain cell type from tissues/organs enables a wide variety of studies. One popular cell purification method is immunological isolation, using antibodies against specific cell surface antigens. However, this is not a general-purpose method, since suitable antigens have not been found in certain cell types, including embryonic gonadal somatic cells and Sertoli cells. To address this issue, we established a knock-in mouse line, named R26 KI, designed to express the human cell surface antigen hCD271 through Cre/loxP-mediated recombination. First, we used the R26 Kl mouse line to purify embryonic gonadal somatic cells. Gonadal somatic cells were purified from the R26 KI; Nr5a1-Cre-transgenic (tg) embryos almost equally as efficiently as from Nr5a1-hCD271-tg embryos. Second, we used the R26 KI mouse line to purify Sertoli cells successfully from R26 KI; Amh-Cre-tg testes. In summary, we propose that the R26 KI mouse line is a powerful tool for the purification of various cell types. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate interstitial flow mechanotransduction regulating MMP-13 expression and cell motility via FAK-ERK in 3D collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial flow directly affects cells that reside in tissues and regulates tissue physiology and pathology by modulating important cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the structures that cells utilize to sense interstitial flow in a 3-dimensional (3D environment have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that interstitial flow upregulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts via activation of an ERK1/2-c-Jun pathway, which in turn promotes cell migration in collagen. Herein, we focused on uncovering the flow-induced mechanotransduction mechanism in 3D.Cleavage of rat vascular SMC surface glycocalyx heparan sulfate (HS chains from proteoglycan (PG core proteins by heparinase or disruption of HS biosynthesis by silencing N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1 suppressed interstitial flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, interstitial collagenase (MMP-13 expression, and SMC motility in 3D collagen. Inhibition or knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK also attenuated or blocked flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility. Interstitial flow induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr925, and this activation was blocked when heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs were disrupted. These data suggest that HSPGs mediate interstitial flow-induced mechanotransduction through FAK-ERK. In addition, we show that integrins are crucial for mechanotransduction through HSPGs as they mediate cell spreading and maintain cytoskeletal rigidity.We propose a conceptual mechanotransduction model wherein cell surface glycocalyx HSPGs, in the presence of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and cytoskeleton organization, sense interstitial flow and activate the FAK-ERK signaling axis, leading to upregulation of MMP expression and cell motility in 3D. This is the first study to describe a flow-induced mechanotransduction

  8. Influence of polymer architecture on antigens camouflage, CD47 protection and complement mediated lysis of surface grafted red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanian, Rafi; Constantinescu, Iren; Rossi, Nicholas A A; Medvedev, Nadia; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-11-01

    Hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers with similar hydrodynamic sizes in solution were grafted to red blood cells (RBCs) to investigate the impact of polymer architecture on the cell structure and function. The hydrodynamic sizes of polymers were calculated from the diffusion coefficients measured by pulsed field gradient NMR. The hydration of the HPG and PEG was determined by differential scanning calorimetry analyses. RBCs grafted with linear PEG had different properties compared to the compact HPG grafted RBCs. HPG grafted RBCs showed much higher electrophoretic mobility values than PEG grafted RBCs at similar grafting concentrations and hydrodynamic sizes indicating differences in the structure of the polymer exclusion layer on the cell surface. PEG grafting impacted the deformation properties of the membrane to a greater degree than HPG. The complement mediated lysis of the grafted RBCs was dependent on the type of polymer, grafting concentration and molecular size of grafted chains. At higher molecular weights and graft concentrations both HPG and PEG triggered complement activation. The magnitude of activation was higher with HPG possibly due to the presence of many hydroxyl groups per molecule. HPG grafted RBCs showed significantly higher levels of CD47 self-protein accessibility than PEG grafted RBCs at all grafting concentrations and molecular sizes. PEG grafted polymers provided, in general, a better shielding and protection to ABO and minor antigens from antibody recognition than HPG polymers, however, the compact HPGs provided greater protection of certain antigens on the RBC surface. Our data showed that HPG 20 kDa and HPG 60 kDa grafted RBCs exhibited properties that are more comparable to the native RBC than PEG 5 kDa and PEG 10 kDa grafted RBCs of comparable hydrodynamic sizes. The study shows that small compact polymers such as HPG 20 kDa have a greater potential in the generation of functional RBC for therapeutic

  9. Mast cell chymase induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskinen, Markus J.; Heikkilae, Hanna M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Hakala, Jukka K.; Laine, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T.; Lindstedt, Ken A.

    2006-01-01

    Chymase released from activated mast cells induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vitro by degrading the pericellular matrix component fibronectin, so causing disruption of focal adhesion complexes and Akt dephosphorylation, which are necessary for cell adhesion and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of chymase-mediated apoptosis downstream of Akt have remained elusive. Here, we show by means of RT-PCR, Western blotting, EMSA, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, that chymase induces SMC apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling. Following chymase treatment, the translocation of active NF-κB/p65 to the nucleus was partly abolished and the amount of nuclear p65 was reduced. Pretreatment of SMCs with chymase also inhibited LPS- and IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of p65. The chymase-induced degradation of p65 was mediated by active caspases. Loss of NF-κB-mediated transactivation resulted in downregulation of bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, leading to mitochondrial swelling and release of cytochrome c. The apoptotic process involved activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8. The results reveal that, by disrupting the NF-κB-mediated survival-signaling pathway, activated chymase-secreting mast cells can mediate apoptosis of cultured arterial SMCs. Since activated mast cells colocalize with apoptotic SMCs in vulnerable areas of human atherosclerotic plaques, they may participate in the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques

  10. A new sensitive and quantitative HTLV-I-mediated cell fusion assay in T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pare, Marie-Eve; Gauthier, Sonia; Landry, Sebastien; Sun Jiangfeng; Legault, Eric; Leclerc, Denis; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Marriott, Susan J.; Tremblay, Michel J.; Barbeau, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    Similar to several other viruses, human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells (also known as syncytium) when amplified in tissue culture. These syncytia result from the fusion of infected cells with uninfected cells. Due to the intrinsic difficulty of infecting cells with cell-free HTLV-I virions, syncytium formation has become an important tool in the study of HTLV-I infection and transmission. Since most HTLV-I-based cell fusion assays rely on the use of non-T cells, the aim of this study was to optimize a new HTLV-I-induced cell fusion assay in which HTLV-I-infected T cell lines are co-cultured with T cells that have been transfected with an HTLV-I long terminal repeat (LTR) luciferase reporter construct. We demonstrate that co-culture of various HTLV-I-infected T cells with different transfected T cell lines resulted in induction of luciferase activity. Cell-to-cell contact and expression of the viral gp46 envelope protein was crucial for this induction while other cell surface proteins (including HSC70) did not have a significant effect. This quantitative assay was shown to be very sensitive. In this assay, the cell fusion-mediated activation of NF-κB and the HTLV-I LTR occurred through previously described Tax-dependent signaling pathways. This assay also showed that cell fusion could activate Tax-inducible cellular promoters. These results thus demonstrate that this new quantitative HTLV-I-dependent cell fusion assay is versatile, highly sensitive, and can provide an important tool to investigate cellular promoter activation and intrinsic signaling cascades that modulate cellular gene expression

  11. Vulnerability of cultured canine lung tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Kohr, J.M.; Kelly, G.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five cell lines, designated as canine lung epithelial cell (CLEP), derived from radiation induced canine lung tumors and canine thyroid adeno-carcinoma (CTAC) cells were compared for their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytolysis using peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal, healthy Beagle dogs as effector cells. Effector cells and chromium 51 radiolabeled target cells were incubated for 16 h at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1, 50:1, and 100:1. Increasing cytolysis was observed for all cell lines as the effector-to-target-cell ratios increased from 12.5:1 to 100:1. The percent cytotoxicity was significantly less for all lung tumor cell lines as compared to CTAC at the 100:1 ratio. One lung tumor cell line, CLEP-9, had 85% of the lytic vulnerability of the CTAC cell line and significantly greater susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis than all of the other lung tumor cell lines. Susceptibility to NK cell cytolysis did not correlate with in vivo malignant behavior of the original tumor. These data suggest that cultured canine lung tumor cells are susceptible to NK cell cytolytic activity in vitro and that at least one of these cell lines (CLEP-9) is a candidate for substitution of the standard canine NK cell target, CTAC, in NK cell assays. The use of lung tumor cells in NK cell assays may provide greater insight into the control of lung tumors by immune mechanisms. (author)

  12. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Liu, L; Chen, J; Zhao, Z; Peng, Y; Li, P; Gao, N

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  13. Cell-mediated immunity during syphilis. A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, Charles S.; Folds, James D.; Baseman, Joel B.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence is presented which reinforces the complexity of the host-parasite interaction during the course of syphilis. Infection with Treponema pallidum evokes a complicated antibody response and an assortment of cell-mediated immune reactions in the host. It appears that humoral immunity plays a minor role towards the complete elimination of syphilitic infection while the cellular limb of the immune response may be an important host defence mechanism. Information now available indicates that a state of anergy, or immunosuppression, exists in the early stages of human and experimental rabbit syphilis based upon negative skin reactions to T. pallidum antigen(s), the abnormal histological appearance of lymphoid organs, and impaired in vitro lymphocyte reactivity. It is also evident that in the later stages of the disease cellular immunity becomes activated as delayed type skin reactions can normally be elicited in tertiary syphilitics and lymphocyte behaviour in cell culture appears normal. Several mechanisms have been invoked to explain the delay in an effective immune response against syphilitic infection and the duration of the disease: (1) a capsule-like substance on the outer surface of virulant T. pallidum may act as a barrier against treponemicidal antibody; (2) this material and other biological properties of virulent treponemes could enable spirochaetes to escape being engulfed by macrophages and other phagocytic cells; (3) antigenic competition among different treponemal antigens causing partial tolerance; (4) T. pallidum infection may bring about the elaboration of immunosuppressive substances of host or treponemal origin which inhibit the proper function of lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cell types. PMID:350348

  14. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM

  15. Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells by altering CD1d trafficking through the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Carey, Gregory B; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-09-01

    NKT cells are a unique subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid Ags presented in the context of CD1d molecules. NKT cells mount strong antitumor responses and are a major focus in developing effective cancer immunotherapy. It is known that CD1d molecules are constantly internalized from the cell surface, recycled through the endocytic compartments, and re-expressed on the cell surface. However, little is known about the regulation of CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation in B cell lymphoma. Prosurvival factors of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-xL, are often upregulated in B cell lymphomas and are intimately linked to sphingolipid metabolism, as well as the endocytic compartments. We hypothesized that Bcl-xL can regulate CD1d-mediated Ag presentation to NKT cells. We found that overexpression or induction of Bcl-xL led to increased Ag presentation to NKT cells. Conversely, the inhibition or knockdown of Bcl-xL led to decreased NKT cell activation. Furthermore, knockdown of Bcl-xL resulted in the loss of CD1d trafficking to lysosome-associated membrane protein 1(+) compartments. Rab7, a late endosomal protein, was upregulated and CD1d molecules accumulated in the Rab7(+) late endosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation to NKT cells by altering the late endosomal compartment and changing the intracellular localization of CD1d. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. The interaction between LYVE-1 with hyaluronan on the cell surface may play a role in the diversity of adhesion to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan; Liu, Hua; He, Yiqing; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Cuixia; Zhou, Muqing; Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Lian; Hu, Jiajie; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a simple disaccharide unit, can polymerize and is considered a primary component of the extracellular matrix, which has a wide range of biological functions. In recent years, HA was found on the surface of tumor cells. According to previous reports, differing HA content on the cell surface of tumor cells is closely related to lymph node metastases, but the mechanisms mediating this process remained unclear. This research intended to study the surface content of HA on tumor cells and analyze cell adhesive changes caused by the interaction between HA and its lymphatic endothelial receptor (LYVE-1). We screened and observed high HA content on HS-578T breast cells and low HA content on MCF-7 breast cells through particle exclusion, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry experiments. The expression of LYVE-1, the lymph-vessel specific HA receptor, was consistent with our previous report and enhanced the adhesion of HA(high)-HS-578T cells to COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) through HA in cell static adhesion and dynamic parallel plate flow chamber experiments. MCF-7 breast cells contain little HA on the surface; however, our results showed little adhesion difference between MCF-7 cells and COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) and COS-7(LYVE-1(-)) cells. Similar results were observed concerning the adhesion of HS-578T cells or MCF-7 cells to SVEC4-10 cells. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that the cell surface HA content of high transfer tumor cells was rich, and we visualized the cross-linking of HA cable structures, which may activate LYVE-1 on lymphatic endothelial cells, promoting tumor adhesion. In summary, high-low cell surface HA content of tumor cells through the interaction with LYVE-1 leads to adhesion differences.

  17. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  18. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from oxidant-mediated apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Andrea; Zhu Aiping; Sun Kai; Petty, Howard R.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic nanoparticles that de-toxify ROS. In the present study, we directly compare these two classes of catalytic nanoparticles. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles were found to be 16 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.2 nm in diameter, respectively. Using surface plasmon-enhanced microscopy, we find that these nanoparticles associate with cells. Furthermore, cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles demonstrated superoxide dismutase catalytic activity, but did not promote hemolytic or cytolytic pathways in living cells. Importantly, both cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles reduce oxidant-mediated apoptosis in target cells as judged by the activation of caspase 3. The ability to diminish apoptosis may contribute to maintaining healthy tissues.

  19. ER-mitochondria contacts control surface glycan expression and sensitivity to killer lymphocytes in glioma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Kasahara, Atsuko; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Boydell, Emma; Zamorano, Sebastian; Riccadonna, Cristina; Pellegatta, Serena; Hulo, Nicolas; Dutoit, Valérie; Derouazi, Madiha; Dietrich, Pierre Yves; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly heterogeneous aggressive primary brain tumor, with the glioma stem-like cells (GSC) being more sensitive to cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing than glioma differentiated cells (GDC). However, the mechanism behind this higher sensitivity is unclear. Here, we found that the mitochondrial morphology of GSCs modulates the ER-mitochondria contacts that regulate the surface expression of sialylated glycans and their recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. GSCs displayed diminished ER-mitochondria contacts compared to GDCs. Forced ER-mitochondria contacts in GSCs increased their cell surface expression of sialylated glycans and reduced their susceptibility to cytotoxic lymphocytes. Therefore, mitochondrial morphology and dynamism dictate the ER-mitochondria contacts in order to regulate the surface expression of certain glycans and thus play a role in GSC recognition and elimination by immune effector cells. Targeting the mitochondrial morphology, dynamism, and contacts with the ER could be an innovative strategy to deplete the cancer stem cell compartment to successfully treat glioblastoma. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  1. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of low density lipoproteins in aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanan, D.A.

    1986-04-01

    Lipoprotein binding and metabolism in actively-dividing (subconfluent) and quiescent (postconfluent) bovine aortic endothelial cells (ECs) were qualitatively investigated by fluorescence microscopy using dioctadecylindocarbocyanine-labelled lipoproteins and by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. LDL and acetylated-LDL (AcLDL) were seen bound to the surfaces of subconfluent ECs (at 4 degrees C or at 37 degrees C), as a random distribution of punctate foci. ECs therefore closely resembled fibroblasts in the distribution of LDL receptors on their surfaces. No binding of LDL was seen on postconfluent EC surfaces by either direct or indirect fluorescence microscopy. The patterns of AcLDL binding on postconfluent ECs resembled those on subconfluent ECs. Intracellular LDL and AcLDL occurred as perinuclear accumulations of large fluorescent disc-shaped profiles in subconfluent ECs. These accumulations were shown to arise from surface-bound material by pulse-chase experiments. Intracellular LDL was absent in the majority of postconfluent ECs, while AcLDL accumulation was massive. 'Wounding' of cultures allowed simultaneous assessment of lipoprotein metabolism in quiescent and actively-dividing areas of the same culture. It is concluded that postconfluent quiescent bovine aortic ECs in vitro metabolise virtually no LDL via the LDL-receptor pathway due to a vanishingly low number of LDL receptors. This contrasts with the ability of postconfluent cells to metabolise relatively large amounts of AcLDL via a receptor-mediated mechanism. The significance of these conclusions is discussed with respect to the interaction of plasma lipoproteins with the endothelium in vivo. 301 refs

  2. TIM-1 glycoprotein binds the adhesion receptor P-selectin and mediates T cell trafficking during inflammation and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiari, Stefano; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Rossi, Barbara; Dusi, Silvia; Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Toffali, Lara; Piacentino, Gennj; Budui, Simona; Rennert, Paul; Xiao, Sheng; Laudanna, Carlo; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Constantin, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Selectins play a central role in leukocyte trafficking by mediating tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces. Here we have reported that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a P-selectin ligand. We have shown that human and murine TIM-1 binds to P-selectin, and that TIM-1 mediates tethering and rolling of T helper-1 (Th1) and Th17, but not Th2 and regulatory T cells on P-selectin. Th1 and Th17 cells lacking the TIM-1 mucin domain showed reduced rolling in thrombin-activated mesenteric venules and inflamed brain microcirculation. Inhibition of TIM-1 had no effect on naive T cell homing, but reduced T cell recruitment in a skin hypersensitivity model and blocked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Uniquely, the TIM-1 IgV domain was also required for P-selectin binding. Our data demonstrate that TIM-1 is a major P-selectin ligand with a specialized role in T cell trafficking during inflammatory responses and the induction of autoimmune disease. PMID:24703780

  3. Isthmin targets cell-surface GRP78 and triggers apoptosis via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Zhang, Y; Yu, V C; Chong, Y-S; Yoshioka, T; Ge, R

    2014-05-01

    Isthmin (ISM) is a secreted 60-kDa protein that potently induces endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. It suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in mice when stably overexpressed in cancer cells. Although αvβ5 integrin serves as a low-affinity receptor for ISM, the mechanism by which ISM mediates antiangiogenesis and apoptosis in ECs remain to be fully resolved. In this work, we report the identification of cell-surface glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) as a high-affinity receptor for ISM (Kd=8.6 nM). We demonstrated that ISM-GRP78 interaction triggers apoptosis not only in activated ECs but also in cancer cells expressing high level of cell-surface GRP78. Normal cells and benign tumor cells tend to express low level of cell-surface GRP78 and are resistant to ISM-induced apoptosis. Upon binding to GRP78, ISM is internalized into ECs through clathrin-dependent endocytosis that is essential for its proapoptotic activity. Once inside the cell, ISM co-targets with GRP78 to mitochondria where it interacts with ADP/ATP carriers on the inner membrane and blocks ATP transport from mitochondria to cytosol, thereby causing apoptosis. Hence, ISM is a novel proapoptotic ligand that targets cell-surface GRP78 to trigger apoptosis by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction. The restricted and high-level expression of cell-surface GRP78 on cancer cells and cancer ECs make them uniquely susceptible to ISM-targeted apoptosis. Indeed, systemic delivery of recombinant ISM potently suppressed subcutaneous 4T1 breast carcinoma and B16 melanoma growth in mice by eliciting apoptosis selectively in the cancer cells and cancer ECs. Together, this work reveals a novel ISM-GRP78 apoptosis pathway and demonstrates the potential of ISM as a cancer-specific and dual-targeting anticancer agent.

  4. Isthmin targets cell-surface GRP78 and triggers apoptosis via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Zhang, Y; Yu, V C; Chong, Y-S; Yoshioka, T; Ge, R

    2014-01-01

    Isthmin (ISM) is a secreted 60-kDa protein that potently induces endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. It suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in mice when stably overexpressed in cancer cells. Although αvβ5 integrin serves as a low-affinity receptor for ISM, the mechanism by which ISM mediates antiangiogenesis and apoptosis in ECs remain to be fully resolved. In this work, we report the identification of cell-surface glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) as a high-affinity receptor for ISM (Kd=8.6 nM). We demonstrated that ISM-GRP78 interaction triggers apoptosis not only in activated ECs but also in cancer cells expressing high level of cell-surface GRP78. Normal cells and benign tumor cells tend to express low level of cell-surface GRP78 and are resistant to ISM-induced apoptosis. Upon binding to GRP78, ISM is internalized into ECs through clathrin-dependent endocytosis that is essential for its proapoptotic activity. Once inside the cell, ISM co-targets with GRP78 to mitochondria where it interacts with ADP/ATP carriers on the inner membrane and blocks ATP transport from mitochondria to cytosol, thereby causing apoptosis. Hence, ISM is a novel proapoptotic ligand that targets cell-surface GRP78 to trigger apoptosis by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction. The restricted and high-level expression of cell-surface GRP78 on cancer cells and cancer ECs make them uniquely susceptible to ISM-targeted apoptosis. Indeed, systemic delivery of recombinant ISM potently suppressed subcutaneous 4T1 breast carcinoma and B16 melanoma growth in mice by eliciting apoptosis selectively in the cancer cells and cancer ECs. Together, this work reveals a novel ISM-GRP78 apoptosis pathway and demonstrates the potential of ISM as a cancer-specific and dual-targeting anticancer agent. PMID:24464222

  5. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exhibit Heterogeneous CD52 Expression Levels and Show Differential Sensitivity to Alemtuzumab Mediated Cytolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sambasiva P.; Sancho, Jose; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Boutin, Paula M.; Severy, Peter B.; Weeden, Timothy; Shankara, Srinivas; Roberts, Bruce L.; Kaplan, Johanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) display the highest number while natural killer (NK) cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC) studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs) on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact. PMID:22761788

  6. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibit heterogeneous CD52 expression levels and show differential sensitivity to alemtuzumab mediated cytolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasiva P Rao

    Full Text Available Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs display the highest number while natural killer (NK cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact.

  7. Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0380 TITLE: Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias 5b. GRANT NUMBER...leukemias still have poor prognosis, particularly in the elderly, and require hematopoietic cell transplants to fully kill the tumor, which is both

  8. A comparative study on inhibition of total astragalus saponins and astragaloside IV on TNFR1-mediated signaling pathways in arterial endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-she Liu

    Full Text Available Both total astragalus saponins (AST and it's main component astragaloside IV (ASIV have been used in China as cardiovascular protective medicines. However, the anti-inflammatory activities that are beneficial for cardiovascular health have never been compared directly and the molecular mechanisms remain unresolved. This study was conducted to compare the inhibitory effects of these drugs on TNFα-induced cell responses, related signaling pathways, and the underlying mechanisms in mouse arterial endothelial cells.Real-time qRT-PCR was performed to determine the expression of cell adhesion molecule (CAM genes. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the nuclear translocation of transcription factor NF-κB-p65. Western Blot analysis was used to identify TNFα-induced NF-κB-p65 phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and caspase-3 cleavage. Cell surface proteins were isolated and TNFα receptor-1(TNFR1 expression was determined. The results suggest that both AST and ASIV attenuate TNFα-induced up-regulation of CAMs mRNA and upstream nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65. However, TNFR1-mediated IκBα degradation, cleavage of caspase-3 and apoptosis were inhibited only by AST. These differences in the actions of AST and ASIV could be explained by the presence of other components in AST, such as ASII and ASIII, which also had an inhibitory effect on TNFR1-induced IκBα degradation. Moreover, AST, but not ASIV, was able to reduce TNFR1 protein level on the cell surface. Furthermore, mechanistic investigation demonstrated that TNFR1-mediated IκBα degradation was reversed by the use of TAPI-0, an inhibitor of TNFα converting enzyme (TACE, suggesting the involvement of TACE in the modulation of surface TNFR1 level by AST.ASIV was not a better inhibitor than AST, at least on the inhibition of TNFα-induced inflammatory responses and TNFR1-mediated signaling pathways in AECs. The inhibitory effect of AST was caused by the

  9. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2016-06-07

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC.

  10. Bulk-mediated surface diffusion: non-Markovian desorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge A; Budde, Carlos E; Prato, Domingo; Wio, Horacio S

    2005-01-01

    Here we analyse the dynamics of adsorbed molecules within the bulk-mediated surface diffusion framework, when the particle's desorption mechanism is characterized by a non-Markovian process, while the particle's adsorption as well as its motion in the bulk is governed by Markovian dynamics. We study the diffusion of particles in both semi-infinite and finite cubic lattices, analysing the conditional probability to find the system on the reference absorptive plane as well as the surface dispersion as functions of time. The results are compared with known Markovian cases showing the differences that can be exploited to distinguish between Markovian and non-Markovian desorption mechanisms in experimental situations

  11. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  13. Surface contact stimulates the just-in-time deployment of bacterial adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Brown, Pamela J B; Tang, Jay X; Xu, Jing; Quardokus, Ellen M; Fuqua, Clay; Brun, Yves V

    2012-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to surfaces provides advantages such as increasing nutrient access and resistance to environmental stress. Attachment begins with a reversible phase, often mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a transition to irreversible attachment, typically mediated by polysaccharides. Here we show that the interplay between pili and flagellum rotation stimulates the rapid transition between reversible and polysaccharide-mediated irreversible attachment. We found that reversible attachment of Caulobacter crescentus cells is mediated by motile cells bearing pili and that their contact with a surface results in the rapid pili-dependent arrest of flagellum rotation and concurrent stimulation of polar holdfast adhesive polysaccharide. Similar stimulation of polar adhesin production by surface contact occurs in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Therefore, single bacterial cells respond to their initial contact with surfaces by triggering just-in-time adhesin production. This mechanism restricts stable attachment to intimate surface interactions, thereby maximizing surface attachment, discouraging non-productive self-adherence, and preventing curing of the adhesive. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Itk tyrosine kinase substrate docking is mediated by a nonclassical SH2 domain surface of PLCgamma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Lie; Joseph, Raji E; Fulton, D Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H

    2009-12-15

    Interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase (Itk) is a Tec family tyrosine kinase that mediates signaling processes after T cell receptor engagement. Activation of Itk requires recruitment to the membrane via its pleckstrin homology domain, phosphorylation of Itk by the Src kinase, Lck, and binding of Itk to the SLP-76/LAT adapter complex. After activation, Itk phosphorylates and activates phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), leading to production of two second messengers, DAG and IP(3). We have previously shown that phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 by Itk requires a direct, phosphotyrosine-independent interaction between the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of PLC-gamma1 and the kinase domain of Itk. We now define this docking interface using a combination of mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy and show that disruption of the Itk/PLCgamma1 docking interaction attenuates T cell signaling. The binding surface on PLCgamma1 that mediates recognition by Itk highlights a nonclassical binding activity of the well-studied SH2 domain providing further evidence that SH2 domains participate in important signaling interactions beyond recognition of phosphotyrosine.

  15. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN).

  16. Organic composite-mediated surface coating of human acellular bone matrix with strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Jing-Jing; Huang, Yong-Can; Wu, Cheng-Guang; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chao-Liang; Bai, Lin; Xie, Hui-Qi; Li, Zhao-Yang; Deng, Li

    2018-03-01

    Acellular bone matrix (ACBM) provides an osteoconductive scaffold for bone repair, but its osteoinductivity is poor. Strontium (Sr) improves the osteoinductivity of bone implants. In this study, we developed an organic composite-mediated strontium coating strategy for ACBM scaffolds by using the ion chelating ability of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and the surface adhesion ability of dopamine (DOPA). The organic coating composite, termed the CMC-DOPA-Sr composite, was synthesized under a mild condition, and its chemical structure and strontium ion chelating ability were then determined. After surface decoration, the physicochemical properties of the strontium-coated ACBM (ACBM-Sr) scaffolds were characterized, and their biocompatibility and osteoinductivity were determined in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the CMC-DOPA-Sr composite facilitated strontium coating on the surface of ACBM scaffolds. The ACBM-Sr scaffolds possessed a sustained strontium ion release profile, exhibited good cytocompatibility, and enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. Furthermore, the ACBM-Sr scaffolds showed good histocompatibility after subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Taken together, this study provided a simple and mild strategy to realize strontium coating for ACBM scaffolds, which resulted in good biocompatibility and improved osteoinductivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  18. Delivery of folates to the cytoplasm of MA104 cells is mediated by a surface membrane receptor that recycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamen, B.A.; Wang, M.T.; Streckfuss, A.J.; Peryea, X.; Anderson, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    MA104 cells, as well as several other rapidly dividing tissue culture cells, have a folate-binding protein associated with their cell surface. The protein has the properties of a membrane receptor: (a) 5-methyl[ 3 H]tetrahydrofolic acid binds with high affinity (Kd approximately equal to 3 nM); (b) the protein is an integral membrane protein; (c) it appears to deliver physiological concentrations of 5-methyl[ 3 H]tetrahydrofolic acid to the inside of the cell; (d) binding activity is regulated by the concentration of folate within the cell. To better understand the mechanism of action of this receptor, we have studied the pathway of folate internalization. We present evidence that during internalization: (a) folate binds to the membrane receptor; (b) the ligand-receptor complex moves into the cell; (c) the ligand is released from the receptor in an acidic intracellular compartment and moves into the cytoplasm; and (d) the unoccupied receptor returns to the cell surface

  19. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface: versatile coordinators of cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of a core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. While the protein part determines localization of the proteoglycan on the cell surfaces or in the extracellular matrix, the glycosaminoglycan component, heparan sulfate......, mediates interactions with a variety of extracellular ligands such as growth factors and adhesion molecules. Through these interactions, heparan sulfate proteoglycans participate in many events during cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. We are determining the multitude...... of proteoglycan functions, as their intricate roles in many pathways are revealed. They act as coreceptors for growth factors, participate in signalling during cell adhesion, modulate the activity of a broad range of molecules, and partake in many developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis...

  20. THE STATE OF CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY AMONG HEPATITIS B SURFACE ,ANTGENI CARRIERS IN IRAN,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MASSOUD

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune (CMI s t a t us and sub- popul at i ons o f pe r ipheral b l ood lymphocytes were investigated in one hundre d volunt a ry blood donors who were car r ier s of Ag • HE S A signi f i c ant decr e ase of t otal T-cells observed in HB Ag carri e rs as compared t o normal controls. The percenS t age o f active T-cells a nd B-lymphocytes did not d i f f e r signi f icant ly between the t wo groups ."nAddi t ion of aut ologous serum from HE Ag c a r r iers t o s t heir l ymphocyt e s reduced the numbe r of detectabl e cells in HE Ag carriers . This reduction coul d be due to the s presence of a r osette i nhi bitory f actor in their serum. Our studies demonstrated a failur e o f CMI among HB Ags car r i ers detected by the l e ukocyte migr ation i nhibition (LMI test. This failure cannot be attributed to the presence of HE Ag-AB complexes in their serum. It is s possible that specific failure of CMI allows the hepatitis B virus to remain harmless in carriers a Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HE Ag; Hepatitis Bs coreantigen (HE Ag and Hepatitis Be-antigen (HE Ag, c e have been established as indicating ineffectivity in viral hepatitis B ({I, 6 , 20, 28."nA number of infected individuals also developed clini cal evidence of disease and HE Ag may s the serum of some subjects for a long rema•ln present I•n time (18. It has been suggested that to a defect in CMI, the persistence of HB Ag s whether liver disease is is related present or not, and impairment of the lymphocyte response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA in this group is presented in evide•"nnee (8, •9 , 13, 24, 25 .In contrast, other workers report a normal respons e t o PHA in healthy carriers of HE Ag and s they concludE that the defective T-cell response is relat ed to the live!' disease rather than the immune system (31. Dudley et al (8 have suggested that liver damage occurring after hepatitis B infection, may be an effect of thymus-dependent lymphocytes (12."n

  1. Selective Modulation of Integrin-mediated Cell Migration by Distinct ADAM Family MembersV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Bridges, Lance C.; White, Judith M.

    2005-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloprotease (ADAM) family members have been implicated in many biological processes. Although it is recognized that recombinant ADAM disintegrin domains can interact with integrins, little is known about ADAM-integrin interactions in cellular context. Here, we tested whether ADAMs can selectively regulate integrin-mediated cell migration. ADAMs were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells that express defined integrins (α4β1, α5β1, or both), and cell migration on full-length fibronectin or on its α4β1 or α5β1 binding fragments was studied. We found that ADAMs inhibit integrin-mediated cell migration in patterns dictated by the integrin binding profiles of their isolated disintegrin domains. ADAM12 inhibited cell migration mediated by the α4β1 but not the α5β1 integrin. ADAM17 had the reciprocal effect; it inhibited α5β1- but not α4β1-mediated cell migration. ADAM19 and ADAM33 inhibited migration mediated by both α4β1 and α5β1 integrins. A point mutation in the ADAM12 disintegrin loop partially reduced the inhibitory effect of ADAM12 on cell migration on the α4β1 binding fragment of fibronectin, whereas mutations that block metalloprotease activity had no effect. Our results indicate that distinct ADAMs can modulate cell migration mediated by specific integrins in a pattern dictated, at least in part, by their disintegrin domains. PMID:16079176

  2. A new approach to the problem of bulk-mediated surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Dagdug, Leonardo; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-08-28

    This paper is devoted to bulk-mediated surface diffusion of a particle which can diffuse both on a flat surface and in the bulk layer above the surface. It is assumed that the particle is on the surface initially (at t = 0) and at time t, while in between it may escape from the surface and come back any number of times. We propose a new approach to the problem, which reduces its solution to that of a two-state problem of the particle transitions between the surface and the bulk layer, focusing on the cumulative residence times spent by the particle in the two states. These times are random variables, the sum of which is equal to the total observation time t. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it allows for a simple exact analytical solution for the double Laplace transform of the conditional probability density of the cumulative residence time spent on the surface by the particle observed for time t. This solution is used to find the Laplace transform of the particle mean square displacement and to analyze the peculiarities of its time behavior over the entire range of time. We also establish a relation between the double Laplace transform of the conditional probability density and the Fourier-Laplace transform of the particle propagator over the surface. The proposed approach treats the cases of both finite and infinite bulk layer thicknesses (where bulk-mediated surface diffusion is normal and anomalous at asymptotically long times, respectively) on equal footing.

  3. Th17 cell-mediated immune responses promote mast cell proliferation by triggering stem cell factor in keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung-Ah; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Woo, So-Youn

    2017-01-01

    Although mast cells are traditionally thought to function as effector cells in allergic responses, they have increasingly been recognized as important regulators of various immune responses. Mast cells mature locally; thus, tissue-specific influences are important for promoting mast cell accumulation and survival in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we determined the effects of keratinocytes on mast cell accumulation during Th17-mediated skin inflammation. We observed increases in dermal mast cells in imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis in mice accompanied by the expression of epidermal stem cell factor (SCF), a critical mast cell growth factor. Similar to mouse epidermal keratinocytes, SCF was highly expressed in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line following stimulation with IL−17. Further, keratinocytes promoted mast cell proliferation following stimulation with IL−17 in vitro. However, the effects of keratinocytes on mast cells were significantly diminished in the presence of anti−CD117 (stem cell factor receptor) blocking antibodies. Taken together, our results revealed that the Th17-mediated inflammatory environment promotes mast cell accumulation through keratinocyte-derived SCF. - Highlights: • Psoriasis-like skin inflammation increase dermal mast cells. • Keratinocyte produce stem cell factor in psoriasis-like skin inflammation. • Keratinocyte promote mast cell proliferation by stem cell factor dependent manner

  4. DNA fragmentation: manifestation of target cell destruction mediated by cytotoxic T-cell lines, lymphotoxin-secreting helper T-cell clones, and cell-free lymphotoxin-containing supernatant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, D.S.; Tite, J.P.; Ruddle, N.H.

    1986-01-01

    A Lyt-2 + , trinitrophenyl-specific, lymphotoxin-secreting, cytotoxic T-cell line, PCl 55, mediates the digestion of target cell DNA into discretely sized fragments. This phenomenon manifests itself within 30 min after effector cell encounter as measured by the release of 3 H counts from target cells prelabeled with [ 3 H]deoxythymidine and occurs even at very low effector to target cell ratios (0.25:1). A Lyt-1 + , ovalbumin-specific, lymphotoxin-secreting T-helper cell clone, 5.9.24, is also able to mediate fragmentation of target cell DNA over a time course essentially indistinguishable from the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated hit. Cell-free lymphotoxin-containing supernatants also cause release of DNA from targets, although they require a longer time course, on the order of 24 hr. In contrast, lysis of cells by antibody plus complement or Triton X-100 does not result in DNA release even after extended periods of incubation (24 hr). All three treatments that result in the release of DNA from cells cause fragmentation of that DNA into discretely sized pieces that are multiples of 200 base pairs. The results thus suggest that cytotoxic T cells, lymphotoxin-secreting helper clones with cytolytic activity, and lymphotoxin all effect target cell destruction by means of a similar mechanism and that observed differences in time course and the absence of target cell specificity in killing mediated by lymphotoxin may simply reflect differences in the mode of toxin delivery

  5. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...... are important regulators of the antigen-specific cell-mediated responses during active C trachomatis infection. We conclude that impaired cell-mediated response to C trachomatis is associated with IL-10 genotype in subjects with high IL-10 producing capacity. A comparison of immune markers between subjects...

  6. Curcumin Attenuates Staurosporine-Mediated Death of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Burugula, Balabharathi; Ganesh, Bhagyalaxmi S.; Chintala, Shravan K.

    2011-01-01

    The functional effect of curcumin, a free radical scavenger and an herbal medicine from Indian yellow curry spice, Curcuma longa, on protease-mediated retinal ganglion cell death was investigated. These results show, for the first time, that curcumin indeed prevents the protease-mediated death of RGCs, both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Regulation of stem-cell mediated host immunity by the sphingolipid ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Regulation of stem-cell mediated host immunity by the sphingolipid pathway ... in the generation of mature immune cells and the functioning of the surrounding ... methods with human cells and genetically engineered mice to examine how the ...

  8. Thioredoxin is involved in endothelial cell extracellular transglutaminase 2 activation mediated by celiac disease patient IgA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Antonella Nadalutti

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the role of thioredoxin (TRX, a novel regulator of extracellular transglutaminase 2 (TG2, in celiac patients IgA (CD IgA mediated TG2 enzymatic activation. METHODS: TG2 enzymatic activity was evaluated in endothelial cells (HUVECs under different experimental conditions by ELISA and Western blotting. Extracellular TG2 expression was studied by ELISA and immunofluorescence. TRX was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Serum immunoglobulins class A from healthy subjects (H IgA were used as controls. Extracellular TG2 enzymatic activity was inhibited by R281. PX12, a TRX inhibitor, was also employed in the present study. RESULTS: We have found that in HUVECs CD IgA is able to induce the activation of extracellular TG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Particularly, we noted that the extracellular modulation of TG2 activity mediated by CD IgA occurred only under reducing conditions, also needed to maintain antibody binding. Furthermore, CD IgA-treated HUVECs were characterized by a slightly augmented TG2 surface expression which was independent from extracellular TG2 activation. We also observed that HUVECs cultured in the presence of CD IgA evinced decreased TRX surface expression, coupled with increased secretion of the protein into the culture medium. Intriguingly, inhibition of TRX after CD IgA treatment was able to overcome most of the CD IgA-mediated effects including the TG2 extracellular transamidase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether our findings suggest that in endothelial cells CD IgA mediate the constitutive activation of extracellular TG2 by a mechanism involving the redox sensor protein TRX.

  9. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  10. Cell behaviour on chemically microstructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, Agnese; Priamo, Alfredo; Pasqui, Daniela; Barbucci, Rolando

    2003-01-01

    Micropatterned surfaces with different chemical topographies were synthesised in order to investigate the influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell behaviour. The microstructured materials were synthesised by photoimmobilising natural Hyaluronan (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS), both adequately functionalised with a photorective moiety, on glass substrates. Four different grating patterns (10, 25, 50 and 100 μm) were used to pattern the hyaluronan. The micropatterned samples were analysed by Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate the chemistry and the topography of the surfaces. The spectroscopic and microscopic analysis of the microstructured surfaces revealed that the photoimmobilisation process was successful, demonstrating that the photomask patterns were well reproduced on the sample surface. The influence of chemical topographies on the cell behaviour was then analysed. Human and 3T3 fibroblasts, bovine aortic and human (HGTFN line) endothelial cells were used and their behaviour on the micropatterned surfaces was analysed in terms of adhesion, proliferation, locomotion and orientation. Both chemical and topographical controls were found to be important for cell guidance. By decreasing the stripe dimensions, a more fusiform shape of cell was observed. At the same time, the cell locomotion and orientation parallel to the structure increased. However, differences in cell behaviour were detected according to both cell type and micropattern dimensions

  11. Intrathymic laminin-mediated interactions: role in T cell migration and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson eSavino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intrathymic T cell differentiation is a key process for the development and maintenance of cell-mediated immunity, and occurs concomitantly to highly regulated migratory events. We have proposed a multivectorial model for describing intrathymic thymocyte migration. One of the individual vectors comprises interactions mediated by laminins, a heterotrimeric protein family of the extracellular matrix. Several laminins are expressed in the thymus, being produced by microenvironmental cells, particularly thymic epithelial cells. Also, thymocytes and epithelial cells express integrin-type laminin receptors. Functionally, it has been reported that the dy/dy mutant mouse (lacking the laminin isoform 211 exhibits defective thymocyte differentiation. Several data show haptotactic effects of laminins upon thymocytes, as well as their adhesion on thymic epithelial cells; both effects being prevented by anti-laminin or anti-laminin receptor antibodies. Interestingly, laminin synergizes with chemokines to enhance thymocyte migration, whereas classe-3 semaphorins and B ephrins, which exhibit chemorepulsive effects in the thymus, downregulate laminin-mediated migratory responses of thymocytes. More recently, we showed that knocking down the ITGA6 gene (which encodes the α6 integrin chain of laminin receptors in human thymic epithelial cells, modulates a large number of cell-migration related genes, and results in changes of adhesion pattern of thymocytes onto the thymic epithelium. Overall, laminin-mediated interactions can be placed at the cross-road of the multivectorial process of thymocyte migration, with a direct influence per se, as well as by modulating other molecular interactions associated with the intrathymic trafficking events.

  12. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with

  13. Fundamental studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) of human peripheral blood leukocytes using sheep red blood cells as target cells, and the effect of erythrophagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    We investigated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human peripheral blood leukocytes by using 51 Cr-labelled sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells and anti-SRBC rabbit antibody. Lysis of SRBC was mediated by either human peripheral lymphoid cells or phagocytes (Monocytes and granulocytes). SRBC were useful as target cells in ADCC assay against human lymphoid cells, since decreased cytotoxic activity of phagocyte-contaminated crude lymphocyte fraction was recovered by elimination of contaminating phagocytes. The monocytes inhibited ADCC of lymphoid cells through phagocytosis of SRBC. This assay system may be useful for estimating not only Fc receptor-mediated cytotoxicity but also Fc receptor-mediated phagocytic activity of human peripheral blood leukocytes. (author)

  14. JNK1 protects against glucolipotoxicity-mediated beta-cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, Michala; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Billestrup, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction is central to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Prolonged elevated levels of circulating free-fatty acids and hyperglycemia, also termed glucolipotoxicity, mediate β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis associated with increased c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) activity. Endoplas......Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction is central to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Prolonged elevated levels of circulating free-fatty acids and hyperglycemia, also termed glucolipotoxicity, mediate β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis associated with increased c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) activity....... Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are elicited by palmitate and high glucose concentrations further potentiating JNK activity. Our aim was to determine the role of the JNK subtypes JNK1, JNK2 and JNK3 in palmitate and high glucose-induced β-cell apoptosis. We established insulin-producing INS1...... INS1 cells showed increased apoptosis and cleaved caspase 9 and 3 compared to non-sense shRNA expressing control INS1 cells when exposed to palmitate and high glucose associated with increased CHOP expression, ROS formation and Puma mRNA expression. JNK2 shRNA expressing INS1 cells did not affect...

  15. Role of the mitochondria in immune-mediated apoptotic death of the human pancreatic β cell line βLox5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaíma L Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are indispensable in the life and death of many types of eukaryotic cells. In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondria play an essential role in the secretion of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. Unregulated blood glucose is a hallmark symptom of diabetes. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmune-mediated destruction of beta cells. However, the exact role of mitochondria has not been assessed in beta cell death. In this study, we examine the role of mitochondria in both Fas- and proinflammatory cytokine-mediated destruction of the human beta cell line, βLox5. IFNγ primed βLox5 cells for apoptosis by elevating cell surface Fas. Consequently, βLox5 cells were killed by caspase-dependent apoptosis by agonistic activation of Fas, but only after priming with IFNγ. This beta cell line undergoes both apoptotic and necrotic cell death after incubation with the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. Additionally, both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms that require proper mitochondrial function are involved. Mitochondrial contributions to βLox5 cell death were analyzed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depleted βLox5 cells, or βLox5 ρ(0 cells. βLox5 ρ(0 cells are not sensitive to IFNγ and TNFα killing, indicating a direct role for the mitochondria in cytokine-induced cell death of the parental cell line. However, βLox5 ρ(0 cells are susceptible to Fas killing, implicating caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptotic death is the mechanism by which these human beta cells die after Fas ligation. These data support the hypothesis that immune mediators kill βLox5 cells by both mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic and caspase-dependent extrinsic pathways.

  16. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  17. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. ► Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. ► Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Decreased expression of IL-7Rα, IL-2Rα and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7Rα and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2Rα expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  18. Extracellular Electron Uptake: Among Autotrophs and Mediated by Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Angenent, Largus T.; Zhang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron-transfer mechan......Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron......; or (iii) mediator-generating enzymes detached from cells. This review explores the interactions of autotrophs with solid electron donors and their importance in nature and for biosustainable technologies....

  19. In wound repair vimentin mediates the transition of mesenchymal leader cells to a myofibroblast phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J L; Bleaken, B M; Romisher, A R; Alnwibit, A A; Menko, A S

    2018-05-02

    Following injury, mesenchymal repair cells are activated to function as leader cells that modulate wound healing. These cells have the potential to differentiate to myofibroblasts, resulting in fibrosis and scarring. The signals underlying these differing pathways are complex and incompletely understood. The ex vivo mock cataract surgery cultures are an attractive model with which to address this question. With this model we study, concurrently, the mechanisms that control mesenchymal leader cell function in injury repair within their native microenvironment, and the signals that induce this same cell population to acquire a myofibroblast phenotype when these cells encounter the environment of the adjacent tissue culture platform. Here, we show that upon injury, the cytoskeletal protein vimentin is released into the extracellular space, binds to the cell surface of the mesenchymal leader cells located at the wound edge in the native matrix environment, and supports wound closure. In pro-fibrotic environments, the extracellular vimentin pool also links specifically to the mesenchymal leader cells, and has an essential role in signaling their fate change to a myofibroblast. These findings suggest a novel role for extracellular, cell-surface-associated vimentin in mediating repair-cell function in wound repair and in transitioning these cells to a myofibroblast phenotype. Movie S1 Movie S1 Collective movement of mesenchymal leader and epithelial follower cells across the tissue culture substrate (ECZ) in response to injury was followed by time-lapse imaging from D0-D3. The mesenchymal cells at the leading edge were easily distinguished morphologically from the lens epithelial follower cells.

  20. Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy of Lipid-Encapsulated Fluorescent Nanodiamonds for Nanometric Localization of Cell Surface Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Chen, Yen-Wei; Huang, Yao-Kuan; Lee, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2018-02-06

    Containing an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in crystal matrices, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are a new type of photostable markers that have found wide applications in light microscopy. The nanomaterial also has a dense carbon core, making it visible to electron microscopy. Here, we show that FNDs encapsulated in biotinylated lipids (bLs) are useful for subdiffraction imaging of antigens on cell surface with correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM). The lipid encapsulation enables not only good dispersion of the particles in biological buffers but also high specific labeling of live cells. By employing the bL-encapsulated FNDs to target CD44 on HeLa cell surface through biotin-mediated immunostaining, we obtained the spatial distribution of these antigens by CLEM with a localization accuracy of ∼50 nm in routine operations. A comparative study with dual-color imaging, in which CD44 was labeled with FND and MICA/MICB was labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, demonstrated the superior performance of FNDs as fluorescent fiducial markers for CLEM of cell surface antigens.

  1. Artificial Niches for Stromal Stem Cells as a Potential Instrument for the Design of the Surface of Biomimetic Osteogenic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlusov, I. A.; Khlusova, M. Yu.; Pichugin, V. F.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Legostaeva, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    A relationship between the topography of rough calcium phosphate surfaces having osteogenic niche-reliefs and the electrostatic potential of these surfaces as a possible instrument to control stromal stem cells has been investigated. The in vitro culture of human lung prenatal stromal cells on nanostructured/ultrafine-grained VT1.0 titanium alloy plates with bilateral rough calcium phosphate (CaP) microarc coating was used. It was established that the amplitude of the electret CaP surface potential linearly increased with increasing area of valleys (sockets), and the negative charge is formed on the socket surface. The area of alkaline phosphatase staining (the marker of osteoblast maturation and differentiation) of adherent CD34- CD44+ cells increases linearly with increasing area of artificial microterritory (socket) of the CaP surface occupied with each cell. The negative electret potential in valleys (sockets) of microarc CaP coatings can be the physical mechanism mediating the influence of the surface topography on osteogenic maturation and differentiation of cells in vitro. This mechanism can be called "niche-potential" and can be used as an instrument for biomimetic modification of smooth CaP surfaces to strengthen their integration with the bone tissue.

  2. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  3. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  4. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  5. Layer-by-Layer Heparinization of the Cell Surface by Using Heparin-Binding Peptide Functionalized Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guowei; Hu, Yaning; Liu, Yusheng; Jiang, Rui

    2018-05-20

    Layer-by-layer heparinization of therapeutic cells prior to transplantation is an effective way to inhibit the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reactions (IBMIRs), which are the major cause of early cell graft loss during post-transplantation. Here, a conjugate of heparin-binding peptide (HBP) and human serum albumin (HSA), HBP-HSA, was synthesized by using heterobifunctional crosslinker. After the first heparin layer was coated on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by means of the HBP-polyethylene glycol-phospholipid conjugate, HBP-HSA and heparin were then applied to the cell surface sequentially to form multiple layers. The immobilization and retention of heparin were analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively, and the cytotoxity of HBP-HSA was further evaluated by cell viability assay. Results indicated that heparin was successfully introduced to the cell surface in a layer-by-layer way and retained for at least 24 h, while the cytotoxity of HBP-HSA was negligible at the working concentration. Accordingly, this conjugate provides a promising method for co-immobilization of heparin and HSA to the cell surface under physiological conditions with improved biocompatibility.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates pleiotropic responses in skeletal muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, Gael; Yang Zhao; Khoury, Chamel; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent modulator of growth, cell survival, and apoptosis. Although all four LPA receptors are expressed in skeletal muscle, very little is known regarding the role they play in this tissue. We used RT-PCR to demonstrate that cultured skeletal muscle C2C12 cells endogenously express multiple LPA receptor subtypes. The demonstration that LPA mediates the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase and Akt/PKB in C2C12 cells is consistent with the widely observed mitogenic properties of LPA. In spite of these observations, LPA did not induce proliferation in C2C12 cells. Paradoxically, we found that prolonged treatment of C2C12 cells with LPA led to caspase 3 and PARP cleavage as well as the activation of stress-associated MAP kinases JNK and p38. In spite of these typically pro-apoptotic responses, LPA did not induce cell death. Blocking ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB activation with specific pharmacological inhibitors, nevertheless, stimulated LPA-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that both mitogenic and apoptotic responses serve to counterbalance the effects of LPA in cultured C2C12 cells

  7. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  8. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Guiling; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) gene on renal cell cancer (RCC) cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA)-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were significantly decreased in the siRNA-SPOP group. The protein microarray screening showed that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the siRNA group was significantly decreased and that the expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and E-cadherin was significantly increased (Pmatrix organization signal pathway. SPOP gene silencing induced cell apoptosis, decreased cell viability, colony formation, and migration ability, and elevated the drug sensitivity in the RCC cells. A possible mechanism is that silencing SPOP induces the differential expression of E-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, which are related to the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions and extracellular matrix organization signaling pathway.

  9. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  10. A surface-mediated siRNA delivery system developed with chitosan/hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lijuan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Wu, Changlin, E-mail: Ph.Dclwu1314@sina.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Liu, Guangwan [Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Liao, Nannan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Zhao, Fang; Yang, Xuxia; Qu, Hongyuan [Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Peng, Bo [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chen, Li [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Yang, Guang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We prepared Chitosan/Hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer as carrier to effectively load and protect siRNAs. • The stability and integrity of the siRNA was verified in the siRNA-loaded films. • The siRNA-loaded films showed good cells adhesion and gene silencing effect in eGFP-HEK 293T cells. • This is a new type of surface-mediated non-viral multilayer films. - Abstract: siRNA delivery remains highly challenging because of its hydrophilic and anionic nature and its sensitivity to nuclease degradation. Effective siRNA loading and improved transfection efficiency into cells represents a key problem. In our study, we prepared Chitosan/Hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly, in which siRNAs can be effectively loaded and protected. The construction process was characterized by FTIR, {sup 13}C NMR (CP/MAS), UV–vis spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented the controlled-release performance of the films during incubation in 1 M NaCl solution for several days through UV–vis spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Additionally, we verified the stability and integrity of the siRNA loaded on multilayer films. Finally, the biological efficacy of the siRNA delivery system was evaluated via cells adhesion and gene silencing analyses in eGFP-HEK 293T cells. This new type of surface-mediated non-viral multilayer films may have considerable potential in the localized and controlled-release delivery of siRNA in mucosal tissues, and tissue engineering application.

  11. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  12. Tracking Cell Surface GABAB Receptors Using an α-Bungarotoxin Tag*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G.

    2008-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABAB receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABAB receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. By using the α-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABAB R1a subunit (R1aBBS), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, α-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABAB receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:18812318

  13. Cell behavior on microparticles with different surface morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sha; Fu Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the cell aggregation to the site of the defect for tissue regeneration. To develop favorable microparticles for cell delivery application, we fabricated and evaluated three types of microparticles that differ in surface properties. The microparticles with varied surface morphology (smooth, pitted and multicavity) were created from chemically crosslinked gelatin particles that underwent various drying treatments. Three types of microparticles were characterized and assessed in terms of the cell behavior of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts seeded on them. The cells could attach, spread and proliferate on all types of microparticles but spread and populated more slowly on the microparticles with smooth surfaces than on those with pitted or multicavity surfaces. Microparticles with a multicavity surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment and growth rate. Furthermore, cells tested on microparticles with a multicavity surface exhibited better morphology and induced the earlier formation of extracellular-based cell-microparticle aggregation than those on microparticles with other surface morphology (smooth and pitted). Thus, microparticles with a multicavity surface show promise for attachment and proliferation of cells in tissue engineering.

  14. Roles for SH2 and SH3 domains in Lyn kinase association with activated FcepsilonRI in RBL mast cells revealed by patterned surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Stephanie; Wagenknecht-Wiesner, Alice; Veatch, Sarah L; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    In mast cells, antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE bound to its high-affinity surface receptor, FcepsilonRI, initiates a signaling cascade that culminates in degranulation and release of allergic mediators. Antigen-patterned surfaces, in which the antigen is deposited in micron-sized features on a silicon substrate, were used to examine the spatial relationship between clustered IgE-FcepsilonRI complexes and Lyn, the signal-initiating tyrosine kinase. RBL mast cells expressing wild-type Lyn-EGFP showed co-redistribution of this protein with clustered IgE receptors on antigen-patterned surfaces, whereas Lyn-EGFP containing an inhibitory point mutation in its SH2 domain did not significantly accumulate with the patterned antigen, and Lyn-EGFP with an inhibitory point mutation in its SH3 domain exhibited reduced interactions. Our results using antigen-patterned surfaces and quantitative cross-correlation image analysis reveal that both the SH2 and SH3 domains contribute to interactions between Lyn kinase and cross-linked IgE receptors in stimulated mast cells.

  15. Recent Advances in Type-2-Cell-Mediated Immunity: Insights from Helminth Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicola L; Loke, P'ng

    2017-12-19

    Type-2-cell-mediated immune responses play a critical role in mediating both host-resistance and disease-tolerance mechanisms during helminth infections. Recently, type 2 cell responses have emerged as major regulators of tissue repair and metabolic homeostasis even under steady-state conditions. In this review, we consider how studies of helminth infection have contributed toward our expanding cellular and molecular understanding of type-2-cell-mediated immunity, as well as new areas such as the microbiome. By studying how these successful parasites form chronic infections without overt pathology, we are gaining additional insights into allergic and inflammatory diseases, as well as normal physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiei, Shahrzad; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2013-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  17. Polycystin-1 promotes PKCα-mediated NF-κB activation in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, Manuela; Aguiari, Gianluca; Trimi, Viky; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Witzgall, Ralph; Rizzuto, Rosario; Senno, Laura del

    2006-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC1), the PKD1 gene product, is a membrane receptor which regulates many cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis, both typically increased in cyst lining cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here we show that PC1 upregulates the NF-κB signalling pathway in kidney cells to prevent cell death. Human embryonic kidney cell lines (HEK293 CTT ), stably expressing a PC1 cytoplasmic terminal tail (CTT), presented increased NF-κB nuclear levels and NF-κB-mediated luciferase promoter activity. This, consistently, was reduced in HEK293 cells in which the endogenous PC1 was depleted by RNA interference. CTT-dependent NF-κB promoter activation was mediated by PKCα because it was blocked by its specific inhibitor Ro-320432. Furthermore, it was observed that apoptosis, which was increased in PC1-depleted cells, was reduced in HEK293 CTT cells and in porcine kidney LtTA cells expressing a doxycycline-regulated CTT. Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, and parthenolide, a NF-κB inhibitor, significantly reduced the CTT-dependent antiapoptotic effect. These data reveal, therefore, a novel pathway by which polycystin-1 activates a PKCα-mediated NF-κB signalling and cell survival

  18. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  19. Hexamethylenetetramine-mediated growth of grain-boundary-passivation CH3NH3PbI3 for highly reproducible and stable perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Li, Xi-Tao; Zhao, Er-Fei; Lv, Xin-Ding; Meng, Fan-Li; Peng, Chao; Lai, Xue-Sen; Huang, Meilan; Cao, Guozhong; Tao, Xia; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2018-02-01

    Simultaneously achieving the long-term device stability and reproducibility has proven challenging in perovskite solar cells because solution-processing produced perovskite film with grain boundary is sensitive to moisture. Herein, we develop a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA)-mediated one-step solution-processing deposition strategy that leads to the formation of high-purity and grain-boundary-passivation CH3NH3PbI3 film and thereby advances cell optoelectronic performance. Through morphological and structural characterizations and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that HMTA fully occupies the moisture-exposed surface to build a bridge across grain boundary and coordinates with Pb ions to inhibit the formation of detrimental PbI2. Such HMTA-mediated grown CH3NH3PbI3 films achieves a decent augmentation of power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 12.70% to 17.87%. A full coverage of PbI2-free CH3NH3PbI3 surface on ZnO also boosts the device's stability and reproducibility.

  20. Matrix-immobilized BMP-2 on microcontact printed fibronectin as in vitro tool to study BMP-mediated signaling and cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eHauff

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During development, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs exert important functions in several tissues by regulating signaling for cell differentiation and migration. In vivo the extracellular matrix (ECM not only provides a support for adherent cells, but also presents a reservoir of growth factors (GFs. Several constituents of the ECM provide adhesive cues, which serve as binding sites for cell transmembrane receptors, such as integrins, which convey adhesion-mediated signaling to the intracellular compartment. Integrins do not function alone but rather crosstalk and cooperate with other receptors, such as GF receptors, in regulating cell responses to extracellular signals. To this, we present here the immobilization of BMP-2 onto cellular fibronectin (cFN, a key protein of the ECM, to investigate their impact on GF-mediated signaling and migration.Following biotinylation, BMP-2 was linked to biotinylated cFN using NeutrAvidin (NA as cross-linker. Characterization with QCM-D and ELISA confirmed the efficient immobilization of BMP-2 on cFN over a period of 24 h.To validate the bioactivity of matrix-immobilized BMP-2 (iBMP-2 we investigated short- and long-term responses of C2C12 myoblasts in comparison to soluble BMP-2 (sBMP-2 or in absence of GFs. Similarly to sBMP-2, iBMP-2 triggered Smad 1/5 phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus corresponding to the activation of BMP-mediated Smad-dependent pathway. Additionally, successful suppression of myotube formation was observed after six days.We next implemented this approach to fabricate cFN micro patterned stripes by soft lithography. These stripes only allowed cell-surface interaction on the pattern due to passivation of the surface in between, thus serving as platform for studies on directed cell migration. During a 10 h-period, cells showed an increased migratory activity upon BMP-2 exposure.Thus, this versatile tool retains the GF's bioactivity and allows the presentation of ECM

  1. Mpl traffics to the cell surface through conventional and unconventional routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleyrat, Cédric; Darehshouri, Anza; Steinkamp, Mara P; Vilaine, Mathias; Boassa, Daniela; Ellisman, Mark H; Hermouet, Sylvie; Wilson, Bridget S

    2014-09-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are often characterized by JAK2 or calreticulin (CALR) mutations, indicating aberrant trafficking in pathogenesis. This study focuses on Mpl trafficking and Jak2 association using two model systems: human erythroleukemia cells (HEL; JAK2V617F) and K562 myeloid leukemia cells (JAK2WT). Consistent with a putative chaperone role for Jak2, Mpl and Jak2 associate on both intracellular and plasma membranes (shown by proximity ligation assay) and siRNA-mediated knockdown of Jak2 led to Mpl trapping in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Even in Jak2 sufficient cells, Mpl accumulates in punctate structures that partially colocalize with ER-tracker, the ER exit site marker (ERES) Sec31a, the autophagy marker LC3 and LAMP1. Mpl was fused to miniSOG, a genetically encoded tag for correlated light and electron microscopy. Results suggest that a fraction of Mpl is taken up into autophagic structures from the ER and routed to autolyososomes. Surface biotinylation shows that both immature and mature Mpl reach the cell surface; in K562 cells Mpl is also released in exosomes. Both forms rapidly internalize upon ligand addition, while recovery is primarily attributed to immature Mpl. Mpl appears to reach the plasma membrane via both conventional ER-Golgi and autolysosome secretory pathways, as well as recycling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, D; Kalies, S; Schomaker, M; Ertmer, W; Meyer, H; Ripken, T; Murua Escobar, H

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking. (papers)

  3. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus cell entry is dependent on CD163 and uses a clathrin-mediated endocytosis-like pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caì, Yíngyún; Postnikova, Elena N; Bernbaum, John G; Yú, Shu Qìng; Mazur, Steven; Deiuliis, Nicole M; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; Haucke, Volker; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Bailey, Adam L; Lauck, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Goldberg, Tony L; Jahrling, Peter B; Kuhn, Jens H

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes a severe and almost uniformly fatal viral hemorrhagic fever in Asian macaques but is thought to be nonpathogenic for humans. To date, the SHFV life cycle is almost completely uncharacterized on the molecular level. Here, we describe the first steps of the SHFV life cycle. Our experiments indicate that SHFV enters target cells by low-pH-dependent endocytosis. Dynamin inhibitors, chlorpromazine, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chloroquine, and concanamycin A dramatically reduced SHFV entry efficiency, whereas the macropinocytosis inhibitors EIPA, blebbistatin, and wortmannin and the caveolin-mediated endocytosis inhibitors nystatin and filipin III had no effect. Furthermore, overexpression and knockout study and electron microscopy results indicate that SHFV entry occurs by a dynamin-dependent clathrin-mediated endocytosis-like pathway. Experiments utilizing latrunculin B, cytochalasin B, and cytochalasin D indicate that SHFV does not hijack the actin polymerization pathway. Treatment of target cells with proteases (proteinase K, papain, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin) abrogated entry, indicating that the SHFV cell surface receptor is a protein. Phospholipases A2 and D had no effect on SHFV entry. Finally, treatment of cells with antibodies targeting CD163, a cell surface molecule identified as an entry factor for the SHFV-related porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, diminished SHFV replication, identifying CD163 as an important SHFV entry component. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes highly lethal disease in Asian macaques resembling human illness caused by Ebola or Lassa virus. However, little is known about SHFV's ecology and molecular biology and the mechanism by which it causes disease. The results of this study shed light on how SHFV enters its target cells. Using electron microscopy and inhibitors for various cellular pathways, we demonstrate that SHFV invades cells by low-pH-dependent, actin

  4. Surface-state mediated three-adsorbate interaction: exact and numerical results and simple asymptotic expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Einstein, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction energy of three adsorbates on a surface consists of the sum of the three-pair interactions plus a trio contribution produced primarily by interference of electrons which traverse the entire perimeter, d 123 , of the three-adsorbate cluster. Here, we investigate this three-adatom interaction when mediated by the isotropic Shockley surface-state band found on noble-metal (1 1 1) surfaces, extending work on pair interactions. Our experimentally testable result depends on the s-wave phase-shift, characterizing the standing-wave patterns seen in scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) images. Compared with the adsorbate-pair interactions, and in contrast to bulk-mediated interactions, the trio contribution exhibits a slightly weaker amplitude and a slightly faster asymptotic envelope decay, d 123 -5/2 . It also has a different but well-defined oscillation period dependent on d 123 and little dependence on the shape of the cluster. We finally compare the asymptotic description with exact model calculations assuming short-range interactions, which are viable even in the non-asymptotic range (when not outweighed by bulk-mediated interactions)

  5. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  6. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John Tanner

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of ultrathin conformal coatings that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Significantly, this work provides novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Encapsulation of cells and tissue offers a rational approach for attenuating deleterious host responses towards transplanted cells, but a need exists to develop cell encapsulation strategies that minimize transplant volume. Towards this end, we endeavored to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties on the extracellular surface of individual pancreatic islets through a process of layer-by-layer (LbL) self assembly. We first describe the formation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich conformal coatings on islets via LbL self assembly of poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG(biotin) and streptavidin. Multilayer thin films conformed to the geometrically and chemically heterogeneous islet surface, and could be assembled without loss of islet viability or function. Significantly, coated islets performed comparably to untreated controls in a murine model of allogenic intraportal islet transplantation, and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells or cell aggregates. Based on these findings, we next postulated that structurally similar PLL-g-PEG copolymers comprised of shorter PEG grafts might be used to initiate and propagate the assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on pancreatic islets, while simultaneously preserving islet viability. Through control of PLL

  7. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A nucleation theory of cell surface capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Wester, M.J.; Perelson, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new theory of cell surface capping based on the principles of nucleation. When antibody interacts with cell surface molecules, the molecules initially form small aggregates called patches that later coalesce into a large aggregate called a cap. While a cap can form by patches being pulled together by action of the cell''s cytoskeleton, in the case of some molecules, disruption of the cytoskeleton does not prevent cap formation. Diffusion of large aggregates on a cell surface is slow, and thus we propose that a cap can form solely through the diffusion of small aggregates containing just one or a few cell surface molecules. Here we consider the extreme case in which single molecules are mobile, but aggregates of all larger sizes are immobile. We show that a set of patches in equilibrium with a open-quotes seaclose quotes of free cell surface molecules can undergo a nucleation-type phase transition in which the largest patch will bind free cell surface molecules, deplete the concentration of such molecules in the open-quotes seaclose quotes and thus cause the other patches to shrink in size. We therefore show that a cap can form without patches having to move, collide with each other, and aggregate

  9. Differential presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B surface antigens influences priming of CD8(+) T cells in an epitope-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Petra; Reiser, Michael; Stifter, Katja; Krieger, Jana; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about whether presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigens on APCs targeted by vaccination and/or virus-harboring hepatocytes influences de novo priming of CD8(+) T cells. We showed that surface antigen-expressing transfectants exclusively display a K(b) /S190 epitope, whereas cells pulsed with recombinant surface particles (rSPs) exclusively present a K(b) /S208 epitope to CD8(+) T cells. The differential presentation of these epitopes largely reflects the selective, but not exclusive, priming of K(b) /S190- and K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice by endogenous/DNA- or exogenous/protein-based vaccines, respectively. Silencing the K(b) /S190 epitope (K(b) /S190V194F ) in antigen-expressing vectors rescued the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope in stable transfectants and significantly enhanced priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice. A K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance operating in surface antigen-expressing cells, but not in rSP-pulsed cells, led to an efficient suppression in the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope and a consequent decrease in the priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells. This K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance also operated in 1.4HBV-S(mut) transgenic (tg) hepatocytes selectively expressing endogenous surface antigens and allowed priming of K(b) /S208- but not K(b) /S190-specific T cells in 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. However, IFN-γ(+) K(b) /S208-specific T cells could not inhibit HBV replication in the liver of 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. These results have practical implications for the design of T-cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccines. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Miho; Shimomura, Takashi; Murai, Rie; Hashiguchi, Koichi; Saeki, Toshiya; Yoshida, Yoko; Kanbe, Takamasa; Tanabe, Naotada; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Norimasa; Tajima, Fumihito; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Shiota, Goshi

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  11. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance.

  12. Cytokine-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation suppresses FasL expression in hemopoietic cell lines: investigations of the role of Fas in apoptosis due to cytokine starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Jamil, Sarwat; Denny, Trisha A; Duronio, Vincent

    2007-05-01

    We have investigated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent survival signalling pathways using several cytokines in three different hemopoietic cell lines, MC/9, FDC-P1, and TF-1. Cytokines caused PI3K- and PKB-dependent phosphorylation of FOXO3a (previously known as FKHRL1) at three distinct sites. Following cytokine withdrawal or PI3K inhibition, both of which are known to lead to apoptosis, there was a loss of FOXO3a phosphorylation, and a resulting increase in forkhead transcriptional activity, along with increased expression of Fas Ligand (FasL), which could be detected at the cell surface. Concurrently, an increase in cell surface expression of Fas was also detected. Despite the presence of both FasL and Fas, there was no detectable evidence that activation of Fas-mediated apoptotic events was contributing to apoptosis resulting from cytokine starvation or inhibition of PI3K activity. Thus, inhibition of FOXO3a activity is mediated by the PI3K-PKB pathway, but regulation of FasL is not the primary means by which cell survival is regulated in cytokine-dependent hemopoietic cells. We were also able to confirm increased expression of known FOXO3a targets, Bim and p27kip1. Together, these results support the conclusion that mitochondrial-mediated signals play the major role in apoptosis of hemopoietic cells due to loss of cytokine signalling.

  13. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Ivey A.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  14. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivey A Geoghegan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs, and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms

  15. Inflammatory impact of IFN-γ in CD8+ T cell-mediated lung injury is mediated by both Stat1-dependent and -independent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; DeBerge, Matthew P.; Kumar, Aseem; Alia, Christopher S.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infection results in considerable pulmonary pathology, a significant component of which is mediated by CD8+ T cell effector functions. To isolate the specific contribution of CD8+ T cells to lung immunopathology, we utilized a nonviral murine model in which alveolar epithelial cells express an influenza antigen and injury is initiated by adoptive transfer of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells. We report that IFN-γ production by adoptively transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells is a significant contributor to acute lung injury following influenza antigen recognition, in isolation from its impact on viral clearance. CD8+ T cell production of IFN-γ enhanced lung epithelial cell expression of chemokines and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airways. Surprisingly, Stat1 deficiency in the adoptive-transfer recipients exacerbated the lung injury that was mediated by the transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells but was still dependent on IFN-γ production by these cells. Loss of Stat1 resulted in sustained activation of Stat3 signaling, dysregulated chemokine expression, and increased infiltration of the airways by inflammatory cells. Taken together, these data identify important roles for IFN-γ signaling and Stat1-independent IFN-γ signaling in regulating CD8+ T cell-mediated acute lung injury. This is the first study to demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect of Stat1 on CD8+ T cell-mediated lung immunopathology without the complication of differences in viral load. PMID:25617378

  16. Hsc70 regulates cell surface ASIC2 expression and vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, Samira C; McKey, Susan E; Drummond, Heather A

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies suggest members of the degenerin (DEG)/epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)/acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) protein family play an important role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration. In a previous investigation, we found suppression of a certain DEG/ENaC/ASIC member, ASIC2, increased VSMC chemotactic migration, raising the possibility that ASIC2 may play an inhibitory role. Because ASIC2 protein was retained in the cytoplasm, we reasoned increasing surface expression of ASIC2 might unmask the inhibitory role of ASIC2 in VSMC migration so we could test the hypothesis that ASIC2 inhibits VSMC migration. Therefore, we used the chemical chaperone glycerol to enhance ASIC2 expression. Glycerol 1) increased cytoplasm ASIC2 expression, 2) permitted detection of ASIC2 at the cell surface, and 3) inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-bb mediated VSMC migration. Furthermore, ASIC2 silencing completely abolished the inhibitory effect of glycerol on migration, suggesting upregulation of ASIC2 is responsible for glycerol-induced inhibition of VSMC migration. Because other investigators have shown that glycerol regulates ENaC/ASIC via interactions with a certain heat shock protein, heat shock protein 70 (Hsc70), we wanted to determine the importance of Hsc70 on ASIC2 expression in VSMCs. We found that Hsc70 silencing increases ASIC2 cell surface expression and inhibits VSMC migration, which is abolished by cosilencing ASIC2. These data demonstrate that Hsc70 inhibits ASIC2 expression, and, when the inhibitory effect of Hsc70 is removed, ASIC2 expression increases, resulting in reduced VSMC migration. Because VSMC migration contributes to vasculogenesis and remodeling following vascular injury, our findings raise the possibility that ASIC2-Hsc70 interactions may play a role in these processes.

  17. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, MJA; Tio, RA; Harmsen, MC

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy

  18. A collapsin response mediator protein 2 isoform controls myosin II-mediated cell migration and matrix assembly by trapping ROCK II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wait, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) is known as a regulator of neuronal polarity and differentiation through microtubule assembly and trafficking. Here, we show that CRMP-2 is ubiquitously expressed and a splice variant (CRMP-2L), which is expressed mainly in epithelial cells among...... nonneuronal cells, regulates myosin II-mediated cellular functions, including cell migration. While the CRMP-2 short form (CRMP-2S) is recognized as a substrate of the Rho-GTP downstream kinase ROCK in neuronal cells, a CRMP-2 complex containing 2L not only bound the catalytic domain of ROCK II through two......-2L but not -2S inhibited fibronectin matrix assembly in fibroblasts. Underlying these responses, CRMP-2L regulated the kinase activity of ROCK II but not ROCK I, independent of GTP-RhoA levels. This study provides a new insight into CRMP-2 as a controller of myosin II-mediated cellular functions...

  19. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, A.L.; Cubellis, M.V.; Masucci, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    , and therefore the capacity of cells to migrate and invade neighboring tissues. We have isolated a 1.4 kb cDNA clone coding for the entire human uPAR. An oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein was used to screen a cDNA library made from SV40 transformed human......, a size very close to that of the cloned cDNA. Expression of the uPAR cDNA in mouse cells confirms that the clone is complete and expresses a functional uPA binding protein, located on the cell surface and with properties similar to the human uPAR. Caseinolytic plaque assay, immunofluorescence analysis......The surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) has been recognized in recent years as a key molecule in regulating plasminogen mediated extracellular proteolysis. Surface plasminogen activation controls the connections between cells, basement membrane and extracellular matrix...

  20. Crystal structure mediates mode of cell death in TiO2 nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Murdock, Richard C.; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2009-01-01

    Certain properties that nanoparticles possess differentiate them from their bulk counterparts, and these characteristics must be evaluated prior to nanoparticle studies and include: size, shape, dispersion, physical and chemical properties, surface area, and surface chemistry. Early nanotoxicity studies evaluating TiO 2 have yielded conflicting data which identify either size or crystal structure as the mediating property for nano-TiO 2 toxicity. However, it is important to note that none of these studies examined size with the crystal structure composition controlled for or examined crystal structure while controlling the nanoparticle size. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of size and crystal structure in TiO 2 nanotoxicity while controlling for as many other nanoproperties as possible using the HEL-30 mouse keratinocyte cell line as a model for dermal exposure. In the size-dependent studies, all the nanoparticles are 100% anatase, and aggregate sizes were determined in order to take into account the effect of agglomeration on size-dependent toxicity. In addition, varying crystal structures were assessed while the size of the nanoparticles was controlled. We were able to identify that both size and crystal structure contribute to cytotoxicity and that the mechanism of cell death varies based on crystal structure. The 100% anatase TiO 2 nanoparticles, regardless of size, induced cell necrosis, while the rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles initiated apoptosis through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  1. Increased cell surface metallopeptidase activity in cells undergoing UV-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piva, T.J.; Davern, C.M.; Ellem, K.A.O.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We have previously shown that UVC irradiation activated a range of cell surface peptidases (CSP) in HeLa cell monolayer cultures 20 h post-irradiation (1). In cells undergoing apoptosis there is an increase in CSP activity compared to control viable cells in cultures which have been treated by a wide range of agents including UV-irradiation (2). In order to further understand the mechanism involved in this process, we induced apoptosis in HeLa cells using 500 Jm -2 UVB. The separation of viable, apoptotic and necrotic cells of irradiated HeLa cell cultures was made by FACS analysis and sorting. The three populations were distinguished by their staining with PI and Hoechst 33342 dyes. CSP activity was measured using the P9 assay developed in this laboratory (1-3). The viable fraction of the irradiated cells had a higher level of CSP activity compared to unirradiated controls. The level of CSP activity in the apoptotic fraction was higher than that of the viable fraction, however that of the necrotic fraction was significantly lower. This finding agreed with that seen in UVC-irradiated (50 Jm -2 ) cultures (2). In order to elucidate the mechanism by which CSP activity was increased in UVB-irradiated cells undergoing apoptosis, the cultures were treated with the following agents: bestatin, aminopeptidase inhibitor, DEVD, caspase 3 inhibitor, and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), PARP activation inhibitor. Bestatin and DEVD did not affect the level of CSP activity in the different cell subpopulations following UVB-irradiation. Treatment with 3AB abolished the increased CSP activity seen in the viable and apoptotic fraction following UVB-irradiation. All treated cells had the same morphology as observed under EM. The degree of phosphatidylserine eversion on the cell membrane was similar as were the cleavage profiles of PARP and actin. Only DEVD-treated cells had reduced caspase 3 activity which confirmed that the activation of CSP activity in apoptotic cells is

  2. A Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 Isoform Controls Myosin II-Mediated Cell Migration and Matrix Assembly by Trapping ROCK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wait, Robin; Couchman, John R.; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2012-01-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) is known as a regulator of neuronal polarity and differentiation through microtubule assembly and trafficking. Here, we show that CRMP-2 is ubiquitously expressed and a splice variant (CRMP-2L), which is expressed mainly in epithelial cells among nonneuronal cells, regulates myosin II-mediated cellular functions, including cell migration. While the CRMP-2 short form (CRMP-2S) is recognized as a substrate of the Rho-GTP downstream kinase ROCK in neuronal cells, a CRMP-2 complex containing 2L not only bound the catalytic domain of ROCK II through two binding domains but also trapped and inhibited the kinase. CRMP-2L protein levels profoundly affected haptotactic migration and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton of carcinoma cells as well as nontransformed epithelial cell migration in a ROCK activity-dependent manner. Moreover, the ectopic expression of CRMP-2L but not -2S inhibited fibronectin matrix assembly in fibroblasts. Underlying these responses, CRMP-2L regulated the kinase activity of ROCK II but not ROCK I, independent of GTP-RhoA levels. This study provides a new insight into CRMP-2 as a controller of myosin II-mediated cellular functions through the inhibition of ROCK II in nonneuronal cells. PMID:22431514

  3. Electron Transfer Mediator Effects in Water Oxidation Catalysis by Solution and Surface-Bound Ruthenium Bpy-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, Matthew V.; Sherman, Benjamin D.; Marquard, Seth L.; Fang, Zhen; Ashford, Dennis L.; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Gold, Alexander S.; Alibabaei, Leila; Rudd, Jennifer A.; Coggins, Michael K.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-12

    Electrocatalytic water oxidation by the catalyst, ruthenium 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) bis-isoquinoline (isoq), [Ru(bda)(isoq)2], 1, was investigated at metal oxide electrodes surface-derivatized with electron transfer (ET) mediators. At indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) in pH 7.2 in H2PO4–/HPO42– buffers in 0.5 M NaClO4 with added acetonitrile (MeCN), the catalytic activity of 1 is enhanced by the surface-bound redox mediators [Ru (4,4'-PO3H2-bpy)(4,4'-R-bpy)2]2+ (RuPbpyR22+, R = Br, H, Me, or OMe, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Rate-limiting ET between the Ru3+ form of the mediator and the RuIV(O) form in the [RuV/IV(O)]+/0 couple of 1 is observed at relatively high concentrations of HPO42– buffer base under conditions where O···O bond formation is facilitated by atom-proton transfer (APT). For the solution [Ru(bpy)3]3+/2+ mediator couple and 1 as the catalyst, catalytic currents vary systematically with the concentration of mediator and the HPO42– buffer base concentration. Electron transfer mediation of water oxidation catalysis was also investigated on nanoparticle TiO2 electrodes co-loaded with catalyst [Ru(bda)(py-4-O(CH2)3-PO3H2)2], 2, (py = pyridine) and RuPbpyR22+ (R = H, Me, or OMe) with an interplay between rate-limiting catalyst oxidation and rate-limiting O···O bond formation by APT. Lastly, the co-loaded assembly RuPbpyR22+ + 2 has been investigated in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell for water splitting.

  4. Cell mediated immunity in patients with osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Henning, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    Because of the difficulty of obtaining suitable material, earlier studies on cell mediated immunity in the radium patients failed to include positive controls. Recently we were fortunate in obtaining samples of lymphocytes from two suitable patients who had had amputations for spontaneous osteosarcoma six months previously. Lymphocytes from both of these patients showed cytotoxicity to cultured cells derived from a human osteogenic sarcoma but not to normal fibroblasts. These results help to validate our test for early detection of osteosarcoma in the radium patients using measurements of cytotoxicity

  5. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    on the polyelectrolyte modified HA scaffolds. The mineralized scaffolds stimulated osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells compared with the control HA scaffolds. Therefore, the surface modification through vapor deposition of polyelectrolytes and polymer-controlled mineralization can improve osteoinduction of bone materials. In summary, the iCVD-mediated surface modification is a simple and promising approach to biofunctionalizing various structured substrates and generating antimicrobial and biocompatible biomaterials.

  6. Biodiesel exhaust-induced cytotoxicity and proinflammatory mediator production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Kicic, Anthony; Ling, Kak-Ming; Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Larcombe, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Increasing use of biodiesel has prompted research into the potential health effects of biodiesel exhaust exposure. Few studies directly compare the health consequences of mineral diesel, biodiesel, or blend exhaust exposures. Here, we exposed human epithelial cell cultures to diluted exhaust generated by the combustion of Australian ultralow-sulfur-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100% canola biodiesel (B100), and a blend of 20% canola biodiesel mixed with 80% ULSD. The physicochemical characteristics of the exhaust were assessed and we compared cellular viability, apoptosis, and levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) in exposed cultured cells. Different fuel types produced significantly different amounts of exhaust gases and different particle characteristics. All exposures resulted in significant apoptosis and loss of viability when compared with control, with an increasing proportion of biodiesel being correlated with a decrease in viability. In most cases, exposure to exhaust resulted in an increase in mediator production, with the greatest increases most often in response to B100. Exposure to pure canola oil (PCO) exhaust did not increase mediator production, but resulted in a significant decrease in IL-8 and RANTES in some cases. Our results show that canola biodiesel exhaust exposure elicits inflammation and reduces viability of human epithelial cell cultures in vitro when compared with ULSD exhaust exposure. This may be related to an increase in particle surface area and number in B100 exhaust when compared with ULSD exhaust. Exposure to PCO exhaust elicited the greatest loss of cellular viability, but virtually no inflammatory response, likely due to an overall increase in average particle size. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ROS accumulation by PEITC selectively kills ovarian cancer cells via UPR-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-hee eHong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfolded protein response (UPR is crucial for both survival and death of mammalian cells, which is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS and nutrient depletion. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ROS-accumulation, induced by β-phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC, on UPR mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. We used ovarian cancer cell lines, PA-1 and SKOV-3, with different p53 status (wild- and null- type, respectively. PEITC caused increased ROS-accumulation and inhibited proliferation selectively in ovarian cancer cells, and glutathione (GSH depletion in SKOV-3. However, PEITC did not cause any effect in normal ovarian epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After 48 h of PEITC treatment (5 µM, apoptotic cell death was shown to increase significantly in the ovarian cancer cells and not in the normal cells. The key regulator of UPR-mediated apoptosis, CHOP/GADD153 and ER resident chaperone BiP/GRP78 were parallely up-regulated with activation of two major sensors of the UPR (PERK and ATF-6 in PA-1; PERK, and IRE1α in SKOV-3 in response to ROS accumulation induced by PEITC (5 µM. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, attenuated the effect of PEITC on UPR signatures (P-PERK, IRE1α, CHOP/GADD153, and BiP/GRP78, suggesting the involvement of ROS in UPR-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, PEITC induces UPR-mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via accumulation of ROS in a cancer-specific manner.

  8. HOIP Deficiency Causes Embryonic Lethality by Aberrant TNFR1-Mediated Endothelial Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Peltzer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Linear ubiquitination is crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, consisting of HOIL-1, HOIP, and SHARPIN, is the only known ubiquitin ligase that generates linear ubiquitin linkages. HOIP is the catalytically active LUBAC component. Here, we show that both constitutive and Tie2-Cre-driven HOIP deletion lead to aberrant endothelial cell death, resulting in defective vascularization and embryonic lethality at midgestation. Ablation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1 prevents cell death, vascularization defects, and death at midgestation. HOIP-deficient cells are more sensitive to death induction by both tumor necrosis factor (TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LT-α, and aberrant complex-II formation is responsible for sensitization to TNFR1-mediated cell death in the absence of HOIP. Finally, we show that HOIP’s catalytic activity is necessary for preventing TNF-induced cell death. Hence, LUBAC and its linear-ubiquitin-forming activity are required for maintaining vascular integrity during embryogenesis by preventing TNFR1-mediated endothelial cell death. : HOIP is the main catalytic subunit of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, a crucial regulator of TNF and other immune signaling pathways. Peltzer et al. find that HOIP deficiency results in embryonic lethality at midgestation due to endothelial cell death mediated by TNFR1. Aberrant formation of a TNF-mediated cell-death-inducing complex in HOIP-deficient (but not -proficient cells underlies the phenotype, with the catalytic activity of HOIP required for the control of cell death in response to TNF.

  9. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. ► Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. ► Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  10. Tracking cell surface GABAB receptors using an alpha-bungarotoxin tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-12-12

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABA(B) receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABA(B) receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, alpha-bungarotoxin. By using the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABA(B) R1a subunit (R1a(BBS)), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, alpha-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABA(B) receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors.

  11. Basic Surface Properties of Mononuclear Cells from Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacife Valéria Pereira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic surface charge and surface tension of mononuclear cells/monocytes obtained from young and adult marsupials (Didelphis marsupialis were investigated by using cationized ferritin and colloidal iron hydroxyde, whole cell electrophoresis, and measurements of contact angles. Anionic sites were found distributed throughout the entire investigated cell surfaces. The results revealed that the anionic character of the cells is given by electrostatic charges corresponding to -18.8 mV (cells from young animals and -29.3 mV (cells from adult animals. The surface electrostatic charge decreased from 10 to 65.2% after treatment of the cells with each one of trypsin, neuraminidase and phospholipase C. The hydrophobic nature of the mononuclear cell surfaces studied by using the contact angle method revealed that both young and adult cells possess cell surfaces of high hidrofilicity since the angles formed with drops of saline water were 42.5°and 40.8°, respectively. Treatment of the cells with trypsin or neuraminidase rendered their surfaces more hydrophobic, suggesting that sialic acid-containing glycoproteins are responsible for most of the hydrophilicity observed in the mononuclear cell surfaces from D. marsupialis.

  12. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  13. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  14. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  15. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Attachment of Salmonella strains to a plant cell wall model is modulated by surface characteristics and not by specific carbohydrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle Sze-Fan; Moore, Sean C; Tabor, Rico F; Fegan, Narelle; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-09-15

    Processing of fresh produce exposes cut surfaces of plant cell walls that then become vulnerable to human foodborne pathogen attachment and contamination, particularly by Salmonella enterica. Plant cell walls are mainly composed of the polysaccharides cellulose, pectin and hemicelluloses (predominantly xyloglucan). Our previous work used bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models to study the interaction between Salmonella and the various plant cell wall components. We demonstrated that Salmonella attachment was favoured in the presence of pectin while xyloglucan had no effect on its attachment. Xyloglucan significantly increased the attachment of Salmonella cells to the plant cell wall model only when it was in association with pectin. In this study, we investigate whether the plant cell wall polysaccharides mediate Salmonella attachment to the bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models through specific carbohydrate interactions or through the effects of carbohydrates on the physical characteristics of the attachment surface. We found that none of the monosaccharides that make up the plant cell wall polysaccharides specifically inhibit Salmonella attachment to the bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that Salmonella cells can penetrate and attach within the tightly arranged bacterial cellulose network. Analysis of images obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed that the bacterial cellulose-pectin-xyloglucan composite with 0.3 % (w/v) xyloglucan, previously shown to have the highest number of Salmonella cells attached to it, had significantly thicker cellulose fibrils compared to other composites. Scanning electron microscopy images also showed that the bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-xyloglucan composites were more porous when compared to the other composites containing pectin. Our study found that the attachment of Salmonella cells to cut plant cell walls was not mediated by

  17. Periodontal Bioengineering: A Discourse in Surface Topographies, Progenitor Cells and Molecular Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangaria, Smit J.

    2011-12-01

    Stem/progenitor cells are a population of cells capable of providing replacement cells for a given differentiated cell type. We have applied progenitor cell-based technologies to generate novel tissue-engineered implants that use biomimetic strategies with the ultimate goal of achieving full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues. Mesenchymal periodontal tissues such as cementum, alveolar bone (AB), and periodontal ligament (PDL) are neural crest-derived entities that emerge from the dental follicle (DF) at the onset of tooth root formation. Using a systems biology approach we have identified key differences between these periodontal progenitors on the basis of global gene expression profiles, gene cohort expression levels, and epigenetic modifications, in addition to differences in cellular morphologies. On an epigenetic level, DF progenitors featured high levels of the euchromatin marker H3K4me3, whereas PDL cells, AB osteoblasts, and cementoblasts contained high levels of the transcriptional repressor H3K9me3. Secondly, we have tested the influence of natural extracellular hydroxyapatite matrices on periodontal progenitor differentiation. Dimension and structure of extracellular matrix surfaces have powerful influences on cell shape, adhesion, and gene expression. Here we show that natural tooth root topographies induce integrin-mediated extracellular matrix signaling cascades in tandem with cell elongation and polarization to generate physiological periodontium-like tissues. In this study we replanted surface topography instructed periodontal ligament progenitors (PDLPs) into rat alveolar bone sockets for 8 and 16 weeks, resulting in complete attachment of tooth roots to the surrounding alveolar bone with a periodontal ligament fiber apparatus closely matching physiological controls along the entire root surface. Displacement studies and biochemical analyses confirmed that progenitor-based engineered periodontal tissues were similar to control teeth and

  18. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to Prevent Antibody Mediated Rejection After Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0664 TITLE: Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to Prevent Antibody-Mediated Rejection after...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2016 – 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to...sensitization, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, antibody mediated rejection, donor specific antibodies 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  19. Enhanced B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation contributes to ABCC1-mediated chemoresistance and glutathione-mediated survival in acquired topoisomerase II poison-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huang-Hui; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Chang, Jang-Yang; Tang, Ya-Chu; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Lin, Li-Mei; Cheng, Shu-Ying; Huang, Chih-Hsiang; Sun, Man-Wu; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Kuo, Ching-Chuan

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2) mainly regulates transcriptional activation through antioxidant-responsive elements (AREs) present in the promoters of NRF2 target genes. Recently, we found that NRF2 was overexpressed in a KB-derived drug-resistant cancer cell panel. In this panel, KB-7D cells, which show acquired resistance to topoisomerase II (Top II) poisons, exhibited the highest NRF2 activation. To investigate whether NRF2 directly contributed to acquired resistance against Top II poisons, we manipulated NRF2 by genetic and pharmacological approaches. The result demonstrated that silencing of NRF2 by RNA interference increased the sensitivity and treatment with NRF2 activator decreased the sensitivity of KB and KB-7D cells toward Top II poisons. Further, increased B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation activated NRF2 signaling in KB-7D cells. Moreover, increased binding of NRF2 to an ARE in the promoter of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 1 (ABCC1) directly contributed to Top II poison resistance. In addition, activation of NRF2 increased glutathione level and antioxidant capacity in KB-7D cells compared with that in KB cells; moreover, high glutathione level provided survival advantage to KB-7D cells. Our study is the first to show that aberrant NRF2 activation is via increased B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation, which increases the acquired resistance and promote the survival of Top II poison-resistant cancer cells. Importantly, NRF2 downstream effectors ABCC1 and glutathione directly contribute to acquired resistance and survival, respectively. These results suggest that blockade of NRF2 signaling may enhance therapeutic efficacy and reduce the survival of Top II poison-refractory tumors in clinical. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Separate Developmental Programs for HLA-A and -B Cell Surface Expression during Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells to Lymphocytes, Adipocytes and Osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabir, Hardee J; Nehlin, Jan O; Qanie, Diyako

    2013-01-01

    -A, but not -B) is seen on some multipotent stem cells, and this raises the question how this is in other stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to investigate the cell surface expression of HLA-A and -B on human embryonic stem cells (hESC), human...... hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC), human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and their fully-differentiated progenies such as lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts. hESC showed extremely low levels of HLA-A and no -B. In contrast, multipotent hMSC and hHSC generally expressed higher levels of HLA-A and clearly HLA......A major problem of allogeneic stem cell therapy is immunologically mediated graft rejection. HLA class I A, B, and Cw antigens are crucial factors, but little is known of their respective expression on stem cells and their progenies. We have recently shown that locus-specific expression (HLA...

  1. Comparison of Oxidative Stresses Mediated by Different Crystalline Forms and Surface Modification of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Samy El-Said

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs are manufactured worldwide for use in a wide range of applications. There are two common crystalline forms of TiO2 anatase and rutile with different physical and chemical characteristics. We previously demonstrated that an increased DNA damage response is mediated by anatase crystalline form compared to rutile. In the present study, we conjugated TiO2 NPs with polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to reduce the genotoxicity and we evaluated some oxidative stress parameters to obtain information on the cellular mechanisms of DNA damage that operate in response to TiO2 NPs different crystalline forms exposure in hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2. Our results indicated a significant increase in oxidative stress mediated by the anatase form of TiO2 NPs compared to rutile form. On the other hand, PEG modified TiO2 NPs showed a significant decrease in oxidative stress as compared to TiO2 NPs. These data suggested that the genotoxic potential of TiO2 NPs varies with crystalline form and surface modification.

  2. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of silicon-mediated cadmium tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Sheng, Huachun; Li, Xiuli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) can alleviate cadmium (Cd) stress in rice (Oryza sativa) plants, however, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the single-cell level remains limited. To address these questions, we investigated suspension cells of rice cultured in the dark environment in the absence and presence of Si with either short- (12 h) or long-term (5 d) Cd treatments using a combination of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), fluorescent staining, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). We identified 100 proteins differentially regulated by Si under the short- or long-term Cd stress. 70% of these proteins were down-regulated, suggesting that Si may improve protein use efficiency by maintaining cells in the normal physiological status. Furthermore, we showed two different mechanisms for Si-mediated Cd tolerance. Under the short-term Cd stress, the Si-modified cell walls inhibited the uptake of Cd ions into cells and consequently reduced the expressions of glycosidase, cell surface non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs), and several stress-related proteins. Under the long-term Cd stress, the amount of Cd in the cytoplasm in Si-accumulating (+Si) cells was decreased by compartmentation of Cd into vacuoles, thus leading to a lower expression of glutathione S-transferases (GST). These results provide protein-level insights into the Si-mediated Cd detoxification in rice single cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Charging a Li-O₂ battery using a redox mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhui; Freunberger, Stefan A; Peng, Zhangquan; Fontaine, Olivier; Bruce, Peter G

    2013-06-01

    The non-aqueous Li-air (O2) battery is receiving intense interest because its theoretical specific energy exceeds that of Li-ion batteries. Recharging the Li-O2 battery depends on oxidizing solid lithium peroxide (Li2O2), which is formed on discharge within the porous cathode. However, transporting charge between Li2O2 particles and the solid electrode surface is at best very difficult and leads to voltage polarization on charging, even at modest rates. This is a significant problem facing the non-aqueous Li-O2 battery. Here we show that incorporation of a redox mediator, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), enables recharging at rates that are impossible for the cell in the absence of the mediator. On charging, TTF is oxidized to TTF(+) at the cathode surface; TTF(+) in turn oxidizes the solid Li2O2, which results in the regeneration of TTF. The mediator acts as an electron-hole transfer agent that permits efficient oxidation of solid Li2O2. The cell with the mediator demonstrated 100 charge/discharge cycles.

  4. A novel photosensitization treatment for the inactivation of fungal spores and cells mediated by curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Fahad; Mereddy, Ram; Sultanbawa, Yasmina

    2017-08-01

    The global concerns regarding the emergence of fungicide-resistant strains and the impact of the excessive use of fungicidal practises on our health, food, and environment have increased, leading to a demand for alternative clean green technologies as treatments. Photosensitization is a treatment that utilises a photosensitiser, light and oxygen to cause cell damage to microorganisms. The effect of photosensitization mediated by curcumin on Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium griseofulvum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Fusarium oxysporum, Candida albicans and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was investigated using three methods. The viability of spores/cells suspended in aqueous buffer using different concentrations of curcumin solution (100-1000μM) and light dose (0, 24, 48, 72 and 96J/cm 2 ) were determined. Spraying curcumin solution on inoculated surfaces of agar plates followed by irradiation and soaking spores/cells in curcumin solution prior to irradiation was also investigated. In aqueous mixtures, photosensitised spores/cells of F. oxysporum and C. albicans were inhibited at all light doses and curcumin concentrations, while inactivation of A. niger, A. flavus P. griseofulvum, P. chrysogenum and Z. bailii were highly significant (Pcurcumin at 800μM showed complete inhibition for A. niger, F. oxysporum, C. albicans and Z. bailii, while A. flavus P. griseofulvum, and P. chrysogenum reduced by 75%, 80.4% and 88.5% respectively. Soaking spores/cells with curcumin solution prior to irradiation did not have a significant effect on the percentage reduction. These observations suggest that a novel photosensitization mediated curcumin treatment is effective against fungal spores/cells and the variation of percentage reduction was dependent on curcumin concentration, light dosage and fungal species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  6. Distinct mechanisms of loss of IFN-gamma mediated HLA class I inducibility in two melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Teresa; Méndez, Rosa; Del Campo, Ana; Jiménez, Pilar; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Garrido, Federico; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The inability of cancer cells to present antigen on the cell surface via MHC class I molecules is one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade anti-tumor immunity. Alterations of Jak-STAT components of interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling can contribute to the mechanism of cell resistance to IFN, leading to lack of MHC class I inducibility. Hence, the identification of IFN-γ-resistant tumors may have prognostic and/or therapeutic relevance. In the present study, we investigated a mechanism of MHC class I inducibility in response to IFN-γ treatment in human melanoma cell lines. Basal and IFN-induced expression of HLA class I antigens was analyzed by means of indirect immunofluorescence flow cytometry, Western Blot, RT-PCR, and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan ® Gene Expression Assays). In demethylation studies cells were cultured with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to assay whether IRF-1 promoter binding activity is induced in IFN-γ-treated cells. Altered IFN-γ mediated HLA-class I induction was observed in two melanoma cells lines (ESTDAB-004 and ESTDAB-159) out of 57 studied, while treatment of these two cell lines with IFN-α led to normal induction of HLA class I antigen expression. Examination of STAT-1 in ESTDAB-004 after IFN-γ treatment demonstrated that the STAT-1 protein was expressed but not phosphorylated. Interestingly, IFN-α treatment induced normal STAT-1 phosphorylation and HLA class I expression. In contrast, the absence of response to IFN-γ in ESTDAB-159 was found to be associated with alterations in downstream components of the IFN-γ signaling pathway. We observed two distinct mechanisms of loss of IFN-γ inducibility of HLA class I antigens in two melanoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that loss of HLA class I induction in ESTDAB-004 cells results from a defect in the earliest steps of the IFN-γ signaling pathway due to absence of STAT-1 tyrosine-phosphorylation, while absence

  7. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niehage

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2% or high (10% serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention.

  8. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...

  9. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1 -/- recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1 -/- recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved.

  10. Generation of herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM)-restricted herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant viruses: resistance of HVEM-expressing cells and identification of mutations that rescue nectin-1 recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroaki; Shah, Waris A; Ozuer, Ali; Frampton, Arthur R; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-04-01

    Both initial infection and cell-to-cell spread by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) require the interaction of the viral glycoprotein D (gD) with an entry receptor on the cell surface. The two major HSV entry receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, mediate infection independently but are coexpressed on a variety of cells. To determine if both receptors are active in these instances, we have established mutant viruses that are selectively impaired for recognition of one or the other receptor. In plaque assays, these viruses showed approximately 1,000-fold selectivity for the matched receptor over the mismatched receptor. Separate assays showed that each virus is impaired for both infection and spread through the mismatched receptor. We tested several human tumor cell lines for susceptibility to these viruses and observed that HT29 colon carcinoma cells are susceptible to infection by nectin-1-restricted virus but are highly resistant to HVEM-restricted virus infection, despite readily detectable HVEM expression on the cell surface. HVEM cDNA isolated from HT29 cells rendered HSV-resistant cells permissive for infection by the HVEM-restricted virus, suggesting that HT29 cells lack a cofactor for HVEM-mediated infection or express an HVEM-specific inhibitory factor. Passaging of HVEM-restricted virus on nectin-1-expressing cells yielded a set of gD missense mutations that each restored functional recognition of nectin-1. These mutations identify residues that likely play a role in shaping the nectin-1 binding site of gD. Our findings illustrate the utility of these receptor-restricted viruses in studying the early events in HSV infection.

  11. Membrane microparticles mediate transfer of P-glycoprotein to drug sensitive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebawy, M; Combes, V; Lee, E; Jaiswal, R; Gong, J; Bonhoure, A; Grau, G E R

    2009-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), a significant impediment to the successful treatment of cancer clinically, has been attributed to the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a plasma membrane multidrug efflux transporter. P-gp maintains sublethal intracellular drug concentrations by virtue of its drug efflux capacity. The cellular regulation of P-gp expression is currently known to occur at either pre- or post-transcriptional levels. In this study, we identify a 'non-genetic' mechanism whereby microparticles (MPs) serve as vectors in the acquisition and spread of MDR. MPs isolated from drug-resistant cancer cells (VLB(100)) were co-cultured with drug sensitive cells (CCRF-CEM) over a 4 h period to allow for MP binding and P-gp transfer. Presence of P-gp on MPs was established using flow cytometry (FCM) and western blotting. Whole-cell drug accumulation assays using rhodamine 123 and daunorubicin (DNR) were carried out to validate the transfer of functional P-gp after co-culture. We establish that MPs shed in vitro from drug-resistant cancer cells incorporate cell surface P-gp from their donor cells, effectively bind to drug-sensitive recipient cells and transfer functional P-gp to the latter. These findings serve to substantially advance our understanding of the molecular basis for the emergence of MDR in cancer clinically and lead to new treatment strategies which target and inhibit MP mediated transfer of P-gp during the course of treatment.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mediated release of MMP-9 resistant stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) from surface modified polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Max; Hoffmeister, Peter-Georg; Nordsieck, Karoline; Hötzel, Rudi; Baumann, Lars; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2014-04-23

    Preparation of smart materials by coatings of established surfaces with biomolecules will lead to the next generation of functionalized biomaterials. Rejection of implants is still a major problem in medical applications but masking the implant material with protein coatings is a promising approach. These layers not only disguise the material but also equip it with a certain biological function. The anti-inflammatory chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) is well suited to take over this function, because it efficiently attracts stem cells and promotes their differentiation and proliferation. At least the initial stem cell homing requires the formation of a concentration gradient. Thus, a reliable and robust release mechanism of SDF-1α from the material is essential. Several proteases, most notably matrix metalloproteinases, are upregulated during inflammation, which, in principle, can be exploited for a tightly controlled release of SDF-1α. Herein, we present the covalent immobilization of M-[S4V]-SDF-1α on novel biodegradable polymer films, which consist of heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) and oligolactide-based functionalized macromers. A peptidic linker with a trimeric matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) cleavage site (MCS) was used as connection and the linkage between the three components was achieved by combination of expressed protein ligation and Cu(I) catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition. The MCS was used for MMP-9 mediated release of M-[S4V]-SDF-1α from the biomaterial and the released SDF-1α derivative was biologically active and induced strong cell migration, which demonstrates the great potential of this system.

  13. The healthy donor profile of immunoregulatory soluble mediators is altered by stem cell mobilization and apheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Paulsen Rye, Kristin; Bushra Ahmed, Aymen; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Hervig, Tor; Reikvam, Håkon; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and thereafter harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Plasma levels of 38 soluble mediators (cytokines, soluble adhesion molecules, proteases, protease inhibitors) were analyzed in samples derived from healthy stem cell donors before G-CSF treatment and after 4 days, both immediately before and after leukapheresis. Donors could be classified into two main subsets based on their plasma mediator profile before G-CSF treatment. Seventeen of 36 detectable mediators were significantly altered by G-CSF; generally an increase in mediator levels was seen, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble adhesion molecules and proteases. Several leukocyte- and platelet-released mediators were increased during apheresis. Both plasma and graft mediator profiles were thus altered and showed correlations to graft concentrations of leukocytes and platelets; these concentrations were influenced by the apheresis device used. Finally, the mediator profile of the allotransplant recipients was altered by graft infusion, and based on their day +1 post-transplantation plasma profile our recipients could be divided into two major subsets that differed in overall survival. G-CSF alters the short-term plasma mediator profile of healthy stem cell donors. These effects together with the leukocyte and platelet levels in the graft determine the mediator profile of the stem cell grafts. Graft infusion also alters the systemic mediator profile of the recipients, but further studies are required to clarify whether such graft-induced alterations have a prognostic impact. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. NK-cell-dependent killing of colon carcinoma cells is mediated by natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and stimulated by parvovirus infection of target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Investigating how the immune system functions during malignancies is crucial to developing novel therapeutic strategies. Natural killer (NK) cells, an important component of the innate immune system, play a vital role in immune defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. The poor survival rate in colon cancer makes it particularly important to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Oncolytic viruses, in addition to lysing tumor cells, may have the potential to augment antitumor immune responses. In the present study, we investigate the role of NK cells and how parvovirus H-1PV can modulate NK-cell mediated immune responses against colon carcinoma. Human NK cells were isolated from the blood of healthy donors. The cytotoxicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of NK cells were measured in chromium release assays. Phenotypic assessment of colon cancer and dendritic cells was done by FACS. The statistical significance of the results was calculated with Student’s t test (*p <0.05; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001). We show that IL-2-activated human NK cells can effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Killing of colon carcinoma cells by NK cells was further enhanced upon infection of the former cells with parvovirus H-1PV. H-1PV has potent oncolytic activity against various tumors, yet its direct killing effect on colon carcinoma cells is limited. The cytotoxicity of NK cells towards colon carcinoma cells, both mock- and H-1PV-infected, was found to be mostly mediated by a combination of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs), namely NKp30, 44, and 46. Colon carcinoma cells displayed low to moderate expression of NK cell ligands, and this expression was modulated upon H-1PV infection. Lysates of H-1PV-infected colon carcinoma cells were found to increase MHC class II expression on dendritic cells. Altogether, these data suggest that IL-2-activated NK cells actively kill colon carcinoma cells and that this killing is mediated by several natural cytotoxicity receptors

  15. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  16. Cells of the J774 macrophage cell line are primed for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity following exposure to γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerst, R.; Werberig, K.

    1991-01-01

    Activation of macrophages (M phi) for host defense against tumor cells follows a sequence of priming events followed by an initiating stimulus that results in production and release of cytotoxic molecules that mediate target cell killing. The authors have developed a model to study specific macrophage cytotoxicity in vitro utilizing a cultured murine M phi cell line, J774. Specific cytotoxicity of cultured human gastrointestinal tumor cells is achieved in the presence of murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1-A. The ability of these cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is greatly enhanced following gamma-irradiation. ADCC can be demonstrated at mAb 17-1-A concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml and effector/target cell ratios greater than or equal to 2. Exposure to doses greater than or equal to 10 Gy of gamma-irradiation increases ADCC threefold. Varying the duration from J774 M phi exposure to γ-irradiation until addition of antibody-coated target cells showed that the primed state for ADCC is stable for at least 8 days but approximately 24 hr is required for complete development of the primed state. mAb-dependent target cell death begins 8 hr after addition of mAb and labeled target cells to primed effector cells and is complete by 24 hr. Incubation of unirradiated J774 M phi effector cells with recombinant murine interferon-γ (rmIFN-γ) also results in enhanced ADCC, but the extent of target cell killing achieved is less than that following priming by γ-irradiation. Concomitant priming of γ-irradiated J774 M phi with rmIFN-γ increases the extent of ADCC. Further study of irradiated J774 cells may elucidate the molecular pathways utilized by M phi for achieving and maintaining the primed state for ADCC

  17. Surface display of the receptor-binding region of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein in Lactococcus lactis provides nonadhesive lactococci with the ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Lindholm, Agneta; Palva, Airi

    2003-04-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a promising lactic acid bacterium for use as a probiotic dietary adjunct and a vaccine vector. The N-terminal region of the S-layer protein (SlpA) of L. brevis ATCC 8287 was recently shown to mediate adhesion to various human cell lines in vitro. In this study, a surface display cassette was constructed on the basis of this SlpA receptor-binding domain, a proteinase spacer, and an autolysin anchor. The cassette was expressed under control of the nisA promoter in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Western blot assay of lactococcal cell wall extracts with anti-SlpA antibodies confirmed that the SlpA adhesion domain of the fusion protein was expressed and located within the cell wall layer. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence microscopy verified that the SlpA adhesion-mediating region was accessible on the lactococcal cell surface. In vitro adhesion assays with the human intestinal epithelial cell line Intestine 407 indicated that the recombinant lactococcal cells had gained an ability to adhere to Intestine 407 cells significantly greater than that of wild-type L. lactis NZ9000. Serum inhibition assay further confirmed that adhesion of recombinant lactococci to Intestine 407 cells was indeed mediated by the N terminus-encoding part of the slpA gene. The ability of the receptor-binding region of SlpA to adhere to fibronectin was also confirmed with this lactococcal surface display system. These results show that, with the aid of the receptor-binding region of the L. brevis SlpA protein, the ability to adhere to gut epithelial cells can indeed be transferred to another, nonadhesive, lactic acid bacterium.

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Expression Mediates Capsaicin-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ramírez-Barrantes

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential (TRP ion channel family consists of a broad variety of non-selective cation channels that integrate environmental physicochemical signals for dynamic homeostatic control. Involved in a variety of cellular physiological processes, TRP channels are fundamental to the control of the cell life cycle. TRP channels from the vanilloid (TRPV family have been directly implicated in cell death. TRPV1 is activated by pain-inducing stimuli, including inflammatory endovanilloids and pungent exovanilloids, such as capsaicin (CAP. TRPV1 activation by high doses of CAP (>10 μM leads to necrosis, but also exhibits apoptotic characteristics. However, CAP dose–response studies are lacking in order to determine whether CAP-induced cell death occurs preferentially via necrosis or apoptosis. In addition, it is not known whether cytosolic Ca2+ and mitochondrial dysfunction participates in CAP-induced TRPV1-mediated cell death. By using TRPV1-transfected HeLa cells, we investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in CAP-induced TRPV1-mediated cell death, the dependence of CAP dose, and the participation of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic Ca2+ increase. Together, our results contribute to elucidate the pathophysiological steps that follow after TRPV1 stimulation with CAP. Low concentrations of CAP (1 μM induce cell death by a mechanism involving a TRPV1-mediated rapid and transient intracellular Ca2+ increase that stimulates plasma membrane depolarization, thereby compromising plasma membrane integrity and ultimately leading to cell death. Meanwhile, higher doses of CAP induce cell death via a TRPV1-independent mechanism, involving a slow and persistent intracellular Ca2+ increase that induces mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane depolarization, plasma membrane loss of integrity, and ultimately, cell death.

  19. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  20. Signaling at the cell surface in the circulatory and ventilatory systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms when the vessel lumen caliber varies markedly. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volume 3 is devoted to the set of mediators of the cell surface, especially ion and molecular carriers and catalytic receptors that, once liganded and activated, initiat...

  1. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K, E-mail: Jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology and Institute for Cancer Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-11-04

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high ({approx}97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  2. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2011-11-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (~97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  3. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (∼97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  4. Cell surface of sea urchin micromeres and primary mesenchyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSimone, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) of the sea urchin embryo were studied during the early morphogenetic events involved in the differentiation of the micromere cell lineage. Sixteen-cell and early cleavage stage blastomeres were isolated and the protein composition of their cell surfaces examined by 125 I-labelling followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Micromere-specific cell surface proteins are reported for Arbacia punctulata, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Cell surface glycoproteins were characterized on the basis of lectin binding specificity with a novel lectin affinity transfer technique. Using this procedure, cell-type specific surface proteins, which are also lectin-binding specific, can be detected. In addition, fluorescein conjugated lectins were microinjected into the blastocoels of living S. drobachiensis and Lytechinus pictus embryos and the patterns of lectin bindings observed by fluorescence microscopy. The evidence presented in this thesis suggests that the differentiation of the primary mesenchyme cells is correlated with changes in the molecular composition of the cell-surface and the ECM

  5. Challenges and opportunities for T cell-mediated strategies to eliminate HIV reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Brockman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. Shock and kill methods consisting of latency reversing agents (LRAs followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T-cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T-cells towards appropriate viral antigens following latency.

  6. Osteoblast cell response to surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Faming; Weidmann, Arne; Nebe, J. Barbara; Burkel, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the interaction of cells with modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential biomedical applications, the MWCNTs were chemically modified with carboxylic acid groups (–COOH), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer and biomimetic apatite on their surfaces. Additionally, human osteoblast MG-63 cells were cultured in the presence of the surface-modified MWCNTs. The metabolic activities of osteoblastic cells, cell proliferation properties, as well as cell morphology were studied. The surface modification of MWCNTs with biomimetic apatite exhibited a significant increase in the cell viability of osteoblasts, up to 67.23%. In the proliferation phases, there were many more cells in the biomimetic apatite-modified MWCNT samples than in the MWCNTs–COOH. There were no obvious changes in cell morphology in osteoblastic MG-63 cells cultured in the presence of these chemically-modified MWCNTs. The surface modification of MWCNTs with apatite achieves an effective enhancement of their biocompatibility.

  7. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  8. 3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-Reductase on the Surface of Hepatitis C Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Can Be a Target for Molecular Targeting Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makoto; Takano, Takashi; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb), we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody) to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy. PMID:25875901

  9. Covalent attachment of cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) to poly(etheretherketone) surface by tailored silanization layers technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The carbonyl groups on PEEK surface were effectively reduced to hydroxyl groups using sodium borohydride. • Silanization layers technique was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK sheet surface by covalent chemical attachment. • XPS, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements proved the presence of GRGD on PEEK surface. • Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment and proliferation were improved effectively on GRGD-modified PEEK surface. - Abstract: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, PEEK is naturally bioinert, leading to limited biomedical applications, especially when a direct bone-implant osteointegration is desired. In this study, a three-step reaction procedure was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on the surface of PEEK sheet by covalent chemical attachment to favor cell adhesion and proliferation. First, hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surfaces were silanized with 7-Oct-1-enyltrichlorosilane (OETS) in dry cyclohexane, resulting in a silanization layer with terminal ethenyl. Second, the terminal ethylenic double bonds of the silanization layer on PEEK surface were converted to carboxyl groups through acidic potassium manganate oxidation. Finally, GRGD was covalently attached by carbodiimide mediated condensation between the carboxyl on PEEK surface and amine presents in GRGD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements were applied to characterize the modified surfaces. The effect of cells attachment and proliferation on each specimen was investigated. Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation

  10. Covalent attachment of cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) to poly(etheretherketone) surface by tailored silanization layers technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • The carbonyl groups on PEEK surface were effectively reduced to hydroxyl groups using sodium borohydride. • Silanization layers technique was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK sheet surface by covalent chemical attachment. • XPS, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements proved the presence of GRGD on PEEK surface. • Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment and proliferation were improved effectively on GRGD-modified PEEK surface. - Abstract: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, PEEK is naturally bioinert, leading to limited biomedical applications, especially when a direct bone-implant osteointegration is desired. In this study, a three-step reaction procedure was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on the surface of PEEK sheet by covalent chemical attachment to favor cell adhesion and proliferation. First, hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surfaces were silanized with 7-Oct-1-enyltrichlorosilane (OETS) in dry cyclohexane, resulting in a silanization layer with terminal ethenyl. Second, the terminal ethylenic double bonds of the silanization layer on PEEK surface were converted to carboxyl groups through acidic potassium manganate oxidation. Finally, GRGD was covalently attached by carbodiimide mediated condensation between the carboxyl on PEEK surface and amine presents in GRGD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements were applied to characterize the modified surfaces. The effect of cells attachment and proliferation on each specimen was investigated. Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation

  11. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R.; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Heery, Christopher R.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 ch...

  12. Scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis by sinusoidal cells in rat bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoffroy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Endocytosis of serum albumin by sinusoidal endothelial cells in rat bone marrow was investigated initially at the ultrastructural level with subsequent biochemical investigation of the specificity mediating this event. Bovine serum albumin adsorbed to 20nm colloidal gold particles (AuBSA) was chosen as the electron microscopic probe. Morphological data strongly suggested that a receptor was involved in uptake of AuBSA. Confirmation of receptor involvement in the uptake of AuBSA by marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells was achieved utilizing an in situ isolated hind limb perfusion protocol in conjunction with unlabeled, radiolabeled, and radio-/colloidal gold labeled probes. The major findings of competition and saturation experiments were: (1) endocytosis of AuBSA was mediated by a receptor for modified/treated serum albumin; (2) endocytosis of formaldehyde-treated serum albumin was mediated by a binding site which may be the same or closely related to the site responsible for the uptake of AuBSA; and (3) endocytosis of native untreated albumin was not mediated by receptor and probably represents fluid-phase pinocitosis

  13. Crystal structure mediates mode of cell death in TiO{sub 2} nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Murdock, Richard C. [Wright-Patterson AFB, Applied Biotechnology Branch, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering (United States); Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M., E-mail: Saber.Hussain@wpafb.af.mi [Wright-Patterson AFB, Applied Biotechnology Branch, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Certain properties that nanoparticles possess differentiate them from their bulk counterparts, and these characteristics must be evaluated prior to nanoparticle studies and include: size, shape, dispersion, physical and chemical properties, surface area, and surface chemistry. Early nanotoxicity studies evaluating TiO{sub 2} have yielded conflicting data which identify either size or crystal structure as the mediating property for nano-TiO{sub 2} toxicity. However, it is important to note that none of these studies examined size with the crystal structure composition controlled for or examined crystal structure while controlling the nanoparticle size. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of size and crystal structure in TiO{sub 2} nanotoxicity while controlling for as many other nanoproperties as possible using the HEL-30 mouse keratinocyte cell line as a model for dermal exposure. In the size-dependent studies, all the nanoparticles are 100% anatase, and aggregate sizes were determined in order to take into account the effect of agglomeration on size-dependent toxicity. In addition, varying crystal structures were assessed while the size of the nanoparticles was controlled. We were able to identify that both size and crystal structure contribute to cytotoxicity and that the mechanism of cell death varies based on crystal structure. The 100% anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, regardless of size, induced cell necrosis, while the rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles initiated apoptosis through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  14. Human recombinant interleukin-1 beta- and tumor necrosis factor alpha-mediated suppression of heparin-like compounds on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Shimada, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines are known to tip the balance of the coagulant-anticoagulant molecules on the endothelial cell surface toward intravascular coagulation. Their effects on endothelial cell surface-associated heparin-like compounds have not been examined yet. Incorporation of [35S]sulfate into heparan sulfate on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells was suppressed by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little effect on cell number, protein content, and [3H]leucine incorporation of cells. Maximal inhibition was achieved by incubation of cells with 100 ng/ml of rIL-1 beta or 5 ng/ml of rTNF alpha for 12-24 hours, resulting in a reduction of the synthesis of heparan sulfate on the cell surface by approximately 50%. The dose dependency was consistent with that seen in the stimulation of endothelial cell procoagulant activity by each cytokine. The suppression of heparan sulfate synthesis was sustained for at least 48 hours after pretreatment of cells with cytokines and was unchanged after the addition of indomethacin or polymyxin B. The rate of degradation of prelabeled 35S-heparan sulfate on the cell surface was not altered by cytokine treatments. Neither the size, the net negative charge, nor the proportion of the molecule with high affinity for antithrombin III of endothelial cell heparan sulfate was changed by cytokines. Furthermore, specific binding of 125I-labeled antithrombin III to the endothelial cell surface was reduced to 40-60% of control by cytokines. In parallel with reduction in binding, antithrombin III cofactor activity was partially diminished in cytokine-treated endothelial cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated suppression of heparin-like substance on endothelial cells appears to be another cytokine-inducible endothelial effects affecting coagulation

  15. Ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation of plant cells: effects on morphology and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Zhong, Wenjing; Yu, Alfred C H

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between ultrasound pulses and microbubbles is known to generate acoustic cavitation that may puncture biological cells. This work presents new experimental findings on the bioeffects of ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation in plant cells with emphasis on direct observations of morphological impact and analysis of viability trends in tobacco BY-2 cells that are widely studied in higher plant physiology. The tobacco cell suspensions were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound pulses in the presence of 1% v/v microbubbles (10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 70 mm between probe and cells; 1-min exposure time). Few bioeffects were observed at low peak negative pressures (cavitation presumably occurred. In contrast, at 0.9 MPa peak negative pressure (with more inertial cavitation activities according to our passive cavitation detection results), random pores were found on tobacco cell wall (observed via scanning electron microscopy) and enhanced exogenous uptake into the cytoplasm was evident (noted in our fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran uptake analysis). Also, instant lysis was observed in 23.4% of cells (found using trypan blue staining) and programmed cell death was seen in 23.3% of population after 12 h (determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling [TUNEL]). These bioeffects generally correspond in trend with those for mammalian cells. This raises the possibility of developing ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation into a targeted gene transfection paradigm for plant cells and, conversely, adopting plant cells as experimental test-beds for sonoporation-based gene therapy in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem cell mediation of functional recovery after stroke in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ramos-Cabrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regenerative strategies of stem cell grafting have been demonstrated to be effective in animal models of stroke. In those studies, the effectiveness of stem cells promoting functional recovery was assessed by behavioral testing. These behavioral studies do, however, not provide access to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the observed functional outcome improvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to address the underlying mechanisms of stem cell mediated functional improvement, this functional improvement after stroke in the rat was investigated for six months after stroke by use of fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials by electrophysiology, and sensorimotor behavior testing. Stem cells were grafted ipsilateral to the ischemic lesion. Rigorous exclusion of spontaneous recovery as confounding factor permitted to observe graft-related functional improvement beginning after 7 weeks and continuously increasing during the 6-month observation period. The major findings were i functional improvement causally related to the stem cells grafting; ii tissue replacement can be excluded as dominant factor for stem cell mediated functional improvement; iii functional improvement occurs by exclusive restitution of the function in the original representation field, without clear contributions from reorganization processes, and iv stem cells were not detectable any longer after six months. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A delayed functional improvement due to stem cell implantation has been documented by electrophysiology, fMRI and behavioral testing. This functional improvement occurred without cells acting as a tissue replacement for the necrotic tissue after the ischemic event. Combination of disappearance of grafted cells after six months on histological sections with persistent functional recovery was interpreted as paracrine effects by the grafted stem cells being the dominant mechanism of cell activity underlying the observed

  17. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  18. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  19. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  20. Lunatic fringe-mediated Notch signaling regulates adult hippocampal neural stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerci, Fatih; Choi, William Tin-Shing; Bajic, Aleksandar; Thakkar, Aarohi; Encinas, Juan Manuel; Depreux, Frederic; Segil, Neil; Groves, Andrew K; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2017-07-12

    Hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate inputs from multiple sources to balance quiescence and activation. Notch signaling plays a key role during this process. Here, we report that Lunatic fringe ( Lfng), a key modifier of the Notch receptor, is selectively expressed in NSCs. Further, Lfng in NSCs and Notch ligands Delta1 and Jagged1, expressed by their progeny, together influence NSC recruitment, cell cycle duration, and terminal fate. We propose a new model in which Lfng-mediated Notch signaling enables direct communication between a NSC and its descendants, so that progeny can send feedback signals to the 'mother' cell to modify its cell cycle status. Lfng-mediated Notch signaling appears to be a key factor governing NSC quiescence, division, and fate.

  1. Cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex in humans: lymphocyte cytotoxicity measured by 51Cr release from infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Percy, J.S.; Kovithavongs, T.

    1975-01-01

    We assessed cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex virus type 1 antigen in patients suffering from recurrent cold sores and in a series of healthy controls. Paradoxically, all those subject to recurrent herpetic infections had, without exception, evidence of cell-mediated immunity to herpes antigens. This was demonstrated by lymphocyte transformation and specific 51 Cr release from infected human amnion cells after incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Where performed, skin tests with herpes antigen were also positive. In addition, serum from these patients specifically sensitized herpes virus-infected cells to killing by nonimmune, control mononuclear cells. These tests were negative in the control patients except in a few cases, and it is suggested that these latter may be the asymptomatic herpes virus carriers previously recognized or that they may have experienced a genital infection. (U.S.)

  2. 20(S-Protopanaxatriol inhibits release of inflammatory mediators in immunoglobulin E-mediated mast cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yong Kim

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: PPT reduces the release of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting multiple cellular signaling pathways comprising the Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, and PLA2, which are propagated by Syk activation upon allergic stimulation of mast cells.

  3. Biomarkers for evaluation of mast cell and basophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashima, Kenji; Nakashima, Chisa; Nonomura, Yumi; Otsuka, Atsushi; Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; De Feo, Giulia; Triggiani, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    Mast cells and basophils play a pathogenetic role in allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. These cells have different development, anatomical location and life span but share many similarities in mechanisms of activation and type of mediators. Mediators secreted by mast cells and basophils correlate with clinical severity in asthma, chronic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and other diseases. Therefore, effective biomarkers to measure mast cell and basophil activation in vivo could potentially have high diagnostic and prognostic values. An ideal biomarker should be specific for mast cells or basophils, easily and reproducibly detectable in blood or biological fluids and should be metabolically stable. Markers of mast cell and basophil include molecules secreted by stimulated cells and surface molecules expressed upon activation. Some markers, such as histamine and lipid mediators are common to mast cells and basophils whereas others, such as tryptase and other proteases, are relatively specific for mast cells. The best surface markers of activation expressed on mast cells and basophils are CD63 and CD203. While these mediators and surface molecules have been associated to a variety of diseases, none of them fulfills requirements for an optimal biomarker and search for better indicators of mast cell/basophil activation in vivo is ongoing. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. B Cell Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Salmonella: A Novel Pathway for Autonomous B Cell Activation and Antibody Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2009-01-01

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and

  5. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, E. J.; van Zanten, A. P.; van den Brink, W.; van Ree, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who

  6. Response of cells on surface-induced nanopatterns: fibroblasts and mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Hwei Ling; Kuan, Yujun; Kukula, Hildegard; Tamada, Kaoru; Knoll, Wolfgang; Moeller, Martin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-05-01

    Ultrathin films of a poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyrindine) diblock copolymer (PS-b-P2VP) and poly(styrene)-block-poly(4-vinylpyrindine) diblock copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) were used to form surface-induced nanopattern (SINPAT) on mica. Surface interaction controlled microphase separation led to the formation of chemically heterogeneous surface nanopatterns on dry ultrathin films. Two distinct nanopatterned surfaces, namely, wormlike and dotlike patterns, were used to investigate the influence of topography in the nanometer range on cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Atomic force microscopy was used to confirm that SINPAT was stable under cell culture conditions. Fibroblasts and mesenchymal progenitor cells were cultured on the nanopatterned surfaces. Phase contrast and confocal laser microscopy showed that fibroblasts and mesenchymal progenitor cells preferred the densely spaced wormlike patterns. Atomic force microscopy showed that the cells remodelled the extracellular matrix differently as they migrate over the two distinctly different nanopatterns.

  7. Age-related changes in humoral and cell-mediated immunity in Down syndrome children living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockitch, G; Singh, V K; Puterman, M L; Godolphin, W J; Sheps, S; Tingle, A J; Wong, F; Quigley, G

    1987-11-01

    Abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been described in Down syndrome but reported findings have been inconsistent. Confounding factors have included age, institutional versus home life, hepatitis B antigenemia, and zinc deficiency. To clarify this problem, we studied 64 children with Down syndrome (DS) compared with an age-matched control group. All children had always lived at home. All the DS children were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen. Serum zinc concentration in the DS group was on average 12 micrograms/dl lower than age-matched control children. They also had significantly lower levels of immunoglobulin M, total lymphocyte count, T and B lymphocytes, and T helper and suppressor cells. In vitro lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A was significantly reduced at all ages in the DS group. Lymphocyte response to pokeweed mitogen increased with age in control children but decreased in the DS children. By 18 yr, the mean response for DS was 60000 cpm lower than controls. The DS group had significantly higher concentrations of immunoglobulins A and G than controls and the difference increased with age. Complement fractions C3 and C4 were also higher in the DS group at all ages. The number of HNK-1 positive cells was higher in the DS group than controls at all ages. When hepatitis and institutionalization are excluded as confounding factors, DS children still differ in both humoral and cell-mediated immunity from an age-matched control group.

  8. Evidence of functional cell-mediated immune responses to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in otitis-prone children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppanen, Elke; Tan, Dino; Corscadden, Karli J.; Currie, Andrew J.; Richmond, Peter C.; Thornton, Ruth B.

    2018-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) remains a common paediatric disease, despite advances in vaccinology. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM (rAOM) has been postulated to involve defective cell-mediated immune responses to common otopathogenic bacteria. We compared the composition of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 children with a history of rAOM (otitis-prone) and 20 healthy non-otitis-prone controls, and assessed innate and cell-mediated immune responses to the major otopathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). NTHi was a potent stimulator of inflammatory cytokine secretion from PBMC within 4 hours, with no difference in cytokine levels produced between PBMC from cases or controls. In the absence of antigen stimulation, otitis-prone children had more circulating Natural Killer (NK) cells (potitis-prone and non-otitis-prone children (potitis-prone children are functional and respond to NTHi. CD8+ T cells and NK cells from both cases and controls produced IFNγ in response to polyclonal stimulus (Staphylococcal enterotoxin B; SEB), with more IFNγ+ CD8+ T cells present in cases than controls (pOtitis-prone children had more circulating IFNγ-producing NK cells (potitis-prone children mounted innate and T cell-mediated responses to NTHi challenge that were comparable to healthy children. These data provide evidence that otitis-prone children do not have impaired functional cell mediated immunity. PMID:29621281

  9. Substrate-mediated delivery of gene complex nanoparticles via polydopamine coating for enhancing competitiveness of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo-Chao; Chang, Hao; Ren, Ke-Feng; Ji, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Substrate-mediated delivery of functional plasmid DNA (pDNA) has been proven to be a promising strategy to promote competitiveness of endothelial cells (ECs) over smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which is beneficial to inducing fast endothelialization of implanted vascular devices. Thus, it is of great importance to develop universal approaches with simplicity and easiness to immobilize DNA complex nanoparticles on substrates. In this study, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) coating was employed in immobilization of DNA complex nanoparticles, which were composed of protamine (PrS) and plasmid DNA encoding with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-pDNA) gene. We demonstrated that the DNA complex nanoparticles can be successfully immobilized onto the PDA surface. Consequently, the HGF expression of both ECs and SMCs were significantly improved when they cultured on the DNA complex nanoparticles-immobilized substrates. Furthermore, EC proliferation was specifically promoted due to bioactivity of HGF, leading to an enhancement of EC competitiveness over SMCs. Our findings demonstrated the substrate-mediated functional gene nanoparticle delivery through PDA coating as a simple and efficient approach. It may hold great potential in the field of interventional cardiovascular implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 mediates cell migration signaling of EGFR in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Genbao; Wang, Ranran; Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Peng, Ke; Dai, Qian; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2018-02-19

    EGFR-dependent cell migration plays an important role in lung cancer progression. Our previous study observed that the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is significantly correlated with tumor metastasis and required for migration and invasion signaling of EGFR in gastric cancer cells. However, how NEDD4 promotes the EGFR-dependent lung cancer cell migration is unknown. This study is to elucidate the mechanism by which NEDD4 mediates the EGFR lung cancer migration signaling. Lentiviral vector-loaded NEDD4 shRNA was used to deplete endogenous NEDD4 in lung cancer cell lines. Effects of the NEDD4 knockdown on the EGFR-dependent or independent lung cancer cell migration were determined using the wound-healing and transwell assays. Association of NEDD4 with activated EGFR was assayed by co-immunoprecipitation. Co-expression of NEDD4 with EGFR or PTEN was determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 63 lung adenocarcinoma tissue samples. Effects of NEDD4 ectopic expression or knockdown on PTEN ubiquitination and down-regulation, AKT activation and lysosomal secretion were examined using the GST-Uba pulldown assay, immunoblotting, immunofluorescent staining and a human cathepsin B ELISA assay respectively. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me was used for assessing the role of cathepsin B in lung cancer cell migration. Knockdown of NEDD4 significantly reduced EGF-stimulated cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assay found that NEDD4 is associated with EGFR complex upon EGF stimulation, and IHC staining indicates that NEDD4 is co-expressed with EGFR in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues, suggesting that NEDD4 might mediate lung cancer cell migration by interaction with the EGFR signaling complex. Interestingly, NEDD4 promotes the EGF-induced cathepsin B secretion, possibly through lysosomal exocytosis, as overexpression of the ligase-dead mutant of NEDD4 impedes lysosomal secretion, and knockdown of NEDD4

  11. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily required for the growth, differentiation, and survival of mast cells, Kit ligand (stem cell factor) is also required for optimal antigen-mediated mast cell activation. Therefore, concurrent inhibition of Kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling would be an attractive approach...... characterized Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate (imatinib). In contrast to imatinib, however, hypothemycin also effectively inhibited FcepsilonRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production in addition to the potentiation of these responses via Kit. The effect of hypothemycin on Kit-mediated responses could...... be explained by its inhibition of Kit kinase activity, whereas the inhibitory effects on FcepsilonRI-dependent signaling were at the level of Btk activation. Because hypothemycin also significantly reduced the mouse passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response in vivo, these data provide proof of principle...

  12. Surface Transmission or Polarized Egress? Lessons Learned from HTLV Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Sherer, Nathan; Mothes, Walther

    2010-01-01

    Commentary on Pais-Correia, A.M.; Sachse, M.; Guadagnini, S.; Robbiati, V.; Lasserre, R.; Gessain, A.; Gout, O.; Alcover, A.; Thoulouze, M.I. Biofilm-like extracellular viral assemblies mediate HTLV-1 cell-to-cell transmission at virological synapses. Nat. Med. 2010, 16, 83–89. PMID:21994650

  13. Aptamer-Mediated Polymeric Vehicles for Enhanced Cell-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kei X; Danquah, Michael K; Sidhu, Amandeep; Yon, Lau Sie; Ongkudon, Clarence M

    2018-02-08

    The search for smart delivery systems for enhanced pre-clinical and clinical pharmaceutical delivery and cell targeting continues to be a major biomedical research endeavor owing to differences in the physicochemical characteristics and physiological effects of drug molecules, and this affects the delivery mechanisms to elicit maximum therapeutic effects. Targeted drug delivery is a smart evolution essential to address major challenges associated with conventional drug delivery systems. These challenges mostly result in poor pharmacokinetics due to the inability of the active pharmaceutical ingredients to specifically act on malignant cells thus, causing poor therapeutic index and toxicity to surrounding normal cells. Aptamers are oligonucleotides with engineered affinities to bind specifically to their cognate targets. Aptamers have gained significant interests as effective targeting elements for enhanced therapeutic delivery as they can be generated to specifically bind to wide range of targets including proteins, peptides, ions, cells and tissues. Notwithstanding, effective delivery of aptamers as therapeutic vehicles is challenged by cell membrane electrostatic repulsion, endonuclease degradation, low pH cleavage, and binding conformation stability. The application of molecularly engineered biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric particles with tunable features such as surface area and chemistry, particulate size distribution and toxicity creates opportunities to develop smart aptamer-mediated delivery systems for controlled drug release. This article discusses opportunities for particulate aptamer-drug formulations to advance current drug delivery modalities by navigating active ingredients through cellular and biomolecular traffic to target sites for sustained and controlled release at effective therapeutic dosages while minimizing systemic cytotoxic effects. A proposal for a novel drug-polymer-aptamer-polymer (DPAP) design of aptamer-drug formulation with

  14. HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris AJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alison J Harris, AA Roger Thompson, Moira KB Whyte, Sarah R Walmsley Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Leukocytes recruited to infected, damaged, or inflamed tissues during an immune response must adapt to oxygen levels much lower than those in the circulation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia and, as in other cell types, HIFs are critical for the upregulation of glycolysis, which enables innate immune cells to produce adenosine triphosphate anaerobically. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that hypoxia also regulates many other innate immunological functions, including cell migration, apoptosis, phagocytosis of pathogens, antigen presentation and production of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic and antimicrobial factors. Many of these functions are mediated by HIFs, which are not only stabilized posttranslationally by hypoxia, but also transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory signals. Here, we review the role of HIFs in the responses of innate immune cells to hypoxia, both in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on myeloid cells, on which the majority of studies have so far been carried out. Keywords: hypoxia, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages

  15. A repeatedly refuelable mediated biofuel cell based on a hierarchical porous carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shuji; Yamanoi, Shun; Murata, Kenichi; Mita, Hiroki; Samukawa, Tsunetoshi; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Sakai, Hideki; Tokita, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Biofuel cells that generate electricity from renewable fuels, such as carbohydrates, must be reusable through repeated refuelling, should these devices be used in consumer electronics. We demonstrate the stable generation of electricity from a glucose-powered mediated biofuel cell through multiple refuelling cycles. This refuelability is achieved by immobilizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an electron-transfer mediator, and redox enzymes in high concentrations on porous carbon particles constituting an anode while maintaining their electrochemical and enzymatic activities after the immobilization. This bioanode can be refuelled continuously for more than 60 cycles at 1.5 mA cm-2 without significant potential drop. Cells assembled with these bioanodes and bilirubin-oxidase-based biocathodes can be repeatedly used to power a portable music player at 1 mW cm-3 through 10 refuelling cycles. This study suggests that the refuelability within consumer electronics should facilitate the development of long and repeated use of the mediated biofuel cells as well as of NAD-based biosensors, bioreactors, and clinical applications.

  16. Pheochromocytoma (PC12 Cell Response on Mechanobactericidal Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason V. Wandiyanto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is a biocompatible material that is frequently used for making implantable medical devices. Nanoengineering of the surface is the common method for increasing material biocompatibility, and while the nanostructured materials are well-known to represent attractive substrata for eukaryotic cells, very little information has been documented about the interaction between mammalian cells and bactericidal nanostructured surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effect of bactericidal titanium nanostructures on PC12 cell attachment and differentiation—a cell line which has become a widely used in vitro model to study neuronal differentiation. The effects of the nanostructures on the cells were then compared to effects observed when the cells were placed in contact with non-structured titanium. It was found that bactericidal nanostructured surfaces enhanced the attachment of neuron-like cells. In addition, the PC12 cells were able to differentiate on nanostructured surfaces, while the cells on non-structured surfaces were not able to do so. These promising results demonstrate the potential application of bactericidal nanostructured surfaces in biomedical applications such as cochlear and neuronal implants.

  17. Mouse mannose-binding lectin-A and ficolin-A inhibit lipopolysaccharide-mediated pro-inflammatory responses on mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...... cytokine production by LPS-mediated TLR4 in mBMMCs appears to be down-regulated, indicating that mouse MBL and ficolin may have an inhibitory function toward mouse TLR4-mediated excessive inflammation on the mast cells.......It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of Epstein-Barr virus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Nok-Hei Mickey; Ho, Chau-Ha; Ho, Ting-Hin; Lei, Ting; Deng, Wen; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a highly efficient and powerful tool for RNA-guided editing of the cellular genome. Whether CRISPR/Cas9 can also cleave the genome of DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergo episomal replication in human cells, remains to be established. Here, we reported on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome in human cells. Two guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used to direct a targeted deletion of 558 bp in the promoter region of BART (BamHI A rightward transcript) which encodes viral microRNAs (miRNAs). Targeted editing was achieved in several human epithelial cell lines latently infected with EBV, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma C666-1 cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome was efficient. A recombinant virus with the desired deletion was obtained after puromycin selection of cells expressing Cas9 and gRNAs. No off-target cleavage was found by deep sequencing. The loss of BART miRNA expression and activity was verified, supporting the BART promoter as the major promoter of BART RNA. Although CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the multicopy episome of EBV in infected HEK293 cells was mostly incomplete, viruses could be recovered and introduced into other cells at low m.o.i. Recombinant viruses with an edited genome could be further isolated through single-cell sorting. Finally, a DsRed selectable marker was successfully introduced into the EBV genome during the course of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing. Taken together, our work provided not only the first genetic evidence that the BART promoter drives the expression of the BART transcript, but also a new and efficient method for targeted editing of EBV genome in human cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  19. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D'Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding [125I] ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound [125I]ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized [125I]ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yosuke, E-mail: cynagata@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  2. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Nazarul; Hu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of α5β1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed β1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface α5β1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of α5β1, without altering cell surface expression of α2β1 integrin or α3β1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  3. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I Novobrantseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells.

  4. A Simple Hydrophilic Treatment of SU-8 Surfaces for Cell Culturing and Cell Patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Stangegaard, Michael; Dufva, Hans Martin

    2005-01-01

    SU-8, an epoxy-based photoresist, widely used in constitution different mTAS systems, is incompatible with mammalian cell adhesion and culture in its native form. Here, we demonstrate a simple, cheap and robust two-step method to render a SU-8 surface hydrophilic and compatible with cell culture........ The contact angle of SU-8 surface was significantly reduced from 90° to 25° after the surface modification. The treated SU-8 surfaces provided a cell culture environment that was comparable with cell culture flask surface in terms of generation time and morphology....

  5. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity-Cell-mediated Immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 6. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity - Cell-mediated Immunity. Asma Ahmed Banishree Saha Anand Patwardhan Shwetha Shivaprasad Dipankar Nandi. General Article Volume 14 Issue 6 June 2009 pp 610-621 ...

  6. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Lin, Liwei; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm 2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of −1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions

  7. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  8. Proteinaceous molecules mediating Bifidobacterium-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Ruiz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract.Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs.

  9. Seeking effective dyes for a mediated glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustis, Ross; Tsang, Tsz Ming; Yang, Brigham; Scott, Daniel; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2014-02-01

    A significant level of power generation from an abiotic, air breathing, mediated reducing sugar-air alkaline battery/fuel cell has been achieved in our laboratories at room temperature without complicated catalysis or membrane separation in the reaction chamber. Our prior studies suggested that mass transport limitation by the mediator is a limiting factor in power generation. New and effective mediators were sought here to improve charge transfer and power density. Forty-five redox dyes were studied to identify if any can facilitate mass transport in alkaline electrolyte solution; namely, by increasing the solubility and mobility of the dye, and the valence charge carried per molecule. Indigo dyes were studied more closely to understand the complexity involved in mass transport. The viability of water-miscible co-solvents was also explored to understand their effect on solubility and mass transport of the dyes. Using a 2.0 mL solution, 20% methanol by volume, with 100 mM indigo carmine, 1.0 M glucose and 2.5 M sodium hydroxide, the glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell attained 8 mA cm-2 at short-circuit and 800 μW cm-2 at the maximum power point. This work shall aid future optimization of mediated charge transfer mechanism in batteries or fuel cells.

  10. Host cell virus entry mediated by Australian bat lyssavirus G envelope glycoprotein occurs through a clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway that requires actin and Rab5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Dawn L; Laing, Eric D; Smith, Ina L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Broder, Christopher C

    2014-02-27

    Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV), a rhabdovirus of the genus Lyssavirus which circulates in both pteropid fruit bats and insectivorous bats in mainland Australia, has caused three fatal human infections, the most recent in February 2013, manifested as acute neurological disease indistinguishable from clinical rabies. Rhabdoviruses infect host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent pH-dependent fusion mediated by their single envelope glycoprotein (G), but the specific host factors and pathways involved in ABLV entry have not been determined. ABLV internalization into HEK293T cells was examined using maxGFP-encoding recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) that express ABLV G glycoproteins. A combination of chemical and molecular approaches was used to investigate the contribution of different endocytic pathways to ABLV entry. Dominant negative Rab GTPases were used to identify the endosomal compartment utilized by ABLV to gain entry into the host cell cytosol. Here we show that ABLV G-mediated entry into HEK293T cells was significantly inhibited by the dynamin-specific inhibitor dynasore, chlorpromazine, a drug that blocks clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and the actin depolymerizing drug latrunculin B. Over expression of dominant negative mutants of Eps15 and Rab5 also significantly reduced ABLV G-mediated entry into HEK293T cells. Chemical inhibitors of caveolae-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis and dominant negative mutants of Rab7 and Rab11 had no effect on ABLV entry. The predominant pathway utilized by ABLV for internalization into HEK293T cells is clathrin-and actin-dependent. The requirement of Rab5 for productive infection indicates that ABLV G-mediated fusion occurs within the early endosome compartment.

  11. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  12. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  13. Mechanisms of Coronavirus Cell Entry Mediated by the Viral Spike Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary R. Whittaker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. To deliver their nucleocapsid into the host cell, they rely on the fusion of their envelope with the host cell membrane. The spike glycoprotein (S mediates virus entry and is a primary determinant of cell tropism and pathogenesis. It is classified as a class I fusion protein, and is responsible for binding to the receptor on the host cell as well as mediating the fusion of host and viral membranes—A process driven by major conformational changes of the S protein. This review discusses coronavirus entry mechanisms focusing on the different triggers used by coronaviruses to initiate the conformational change of the S protein: receptor binding, low pH exposure and proteolytic activation. We also highlight commonalities between coronavirus S proteins and other class I viral fusion proteins, as well as distinctive features that confer distinct tropism, pathogenicity and host interspecies transmission characteristics to coronaviruses.

  14. Improving cytoactive of endothelial cell by introducing fibronectin to the surface of poly L-Lactic acid fiber mats via dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wufeng; Zhang, Xiazhi; Wu, Keke; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Yanpeng, E-mail: tjiaoyp@jnu.edu.cn; Zhou, Changren

    2016-12-01

    A simple but straightforward approach was reported to prepare fiber mats modified with fibronectin (Fn) protein for endothelial cells activity study. Based on the self-polymerization and strong adhesion feature of dopamine, poly L-Lactic acid (PLLA) fibers mat was modified via simply immersing them into dopamine solution for 16 h. Subsequently, Fn was immobilized onto the fiber mats surface by the coupling reactive polydopamine (PDA) layer and Fn. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the chemical compositions of fiber mats surface, which confirmed the successful immobilization of PDA and Fn molecules on the fiber surface. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface morphology changes after modification with PDA and Fn. The data of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of the fiber mats was improved after surface modification. The data of in vitro cell culture proved that the PDA and Fn modified surface significantly enhanced the adhesion, proliferation and cell activity of endothelial cells on the fiber mats. And the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by endothelial cells on the modified surface was suppressed compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2 and 4 days, while the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was increased compared to that on culture plate and PLLA film at 2 days. - Highlights: • Fibronectin (Fn) was grafted on PLLA fiber surface mediated by polydopamine coating. • Fn modified PLLA fiber enhanced the adhesion, proliferation of endothelial cells. • Fn and polydopamine modified PLLA fiber could adjust the release of inflammatory factor.

  15. Cell Surface Trafficking of TLR1 Is Differentially Regulated by the Chaperones PRAT4A and PRAT4B*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bryan E.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    The subcellular localization of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is critical to their ability to function as innate immune sensors of microbial infection. We previously reported that an I602S polymorphism of human TLR1 is associated with aberrant trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface, loss of responses to TLR1 agonists, and differential susceptibility to diseases caused by pathogenic mycobacteria. Through an extensive analysis of receptor deletion and point mutants we have discovered that position 602 resides within a short 6 amino acid cytoplasmic region that is required for TLR1 surface expression. This short trafficking motif, in conjunction with the adjacent transmembrane domain, is sufficient to direct TLR1 to the cell surface. A serine at position 602 interrupts this trafficking motif and prevents cell surface expression of TLR1. Additionally, we have found that ER-resident TLR chaperones, PRAT4A and PRAT4B, act as positive and negative regulators of TLR1 surface trafficking, respectively. Importantly, either over-expression of PRAT4A or knock-down of PRAT4B rescues cell surface expression of the TLR1 602S variant. We also report that IFN-γ treatment of primary human monocytes derived from homozygous 602S individuals rescues TLR1 cell surface trafficking and cellular responses to soluble agonists. This event appears to be mediated by PRAT4A whose expression is strongly induced in human monocytes by IFN-γ. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism for the differential trafficking of TLR1 I602S variants, and highlight the distinct roles for PRAT4A and PRAT4B in the regulation of TLR1 surface expression. PMID:22447933

  16. AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis causes acquired radioresistance by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Noma, Naoto; Sano, Yui; Ochiai, Yasushi; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Fukumoto, Manabu; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cellular radioresistance is a major impediment to effective radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to fractionated radiation conferred acquired radioresistance to tumor cells due to AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Material and methods: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were established by long-term exposure to fractionated radiation with 0.5 Gy of X-rays. Glucose uptake was inhibited using 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a non-metabolizable glucose analog. Aerobic glycolysis was assessed by measuring lactate concentrations. Cells were then used for assays of ROS generation, survival, and cell death as assessed by annexin V staining. Results: Enhanced aerobic glycolysis was shown by increased glucose transporter Glut1 expression and a high lactate production rate in acquired radioresistant cells compared with parental cells. Inhibiting the AKT pathway using the AKT inhibitor API-2 abrogated these phenomena. Moreover, we found that inhibiting glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose suppressed acquired tumor cell radioresistance. Conclusions: Long-term fractionated radiation confers acquired radioresistance to tumor cells by AKT-mediated alterations in their glucose metabolic pathway. Thus, tumor cell metabolic pathway is an attractive target to eliminate radioresistant cells and improve radiotherapy efficacy

  17. Inhibition of oxidative stress-elicited AKT activation facilitates PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of stem cell character and tumor growth of liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanlan Liu

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor-initiating cells (TICs are the most malignant cell subpopulation in tumors because of their resistance to chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Targeting TICs may be a key innovation for cancer treatment. In this study, we found that PPARγ agonists inhibited the cancer stem cell-like phenotype and attenuated tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS initiated by NOX2 upregulation were partially responsible for the inhibitory effects mediated by PPARγ agonists. However, PPARγ agonist-mediated ROS production significantly activated AKT, which in turn promoted TIC survival by limiting ROS generation. Inhibition of AKT, by either pharmacological inhibitors or AKT siRNA, significantly enhanced PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and stem cell-like properties in HCC cells. Importantly, in nude mice inoculated with HCC Huh7 cells, we demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone and the AKT inhibitor triciribine on tumor growth. In conclusion, we observed a negative feedback loop between oxidative stress and AKT hyperactivation in PPARγ agonist-mediated suppressive effects on HCCs. Combinatory application of an AKT inhibitor and a PPARγ agonist may provide a new strategy for inhibition of stem cell-like properties in HCCs and treatment of liver cancer.

  18. New Monoclonal Antibodies to Defined Cell Surface Proteins on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Carmel M; Chy, Hun S; Zhou, Qi; Blumenfeld, Shiri; Lambshead, Jack W; Liu, Xiaodong; Kie, Joshua; Capaldo, Bianca D; Chung, Tung-Liang; Adams, Timothy E; Phan, Tram; Bentley, John D; McKinstry, William J; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Rossello, Fernando J; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Chen, Di; Jarde, Thierry; Clark, Amander T; Abud, Helen E; Visvader, Jane E; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M; Loring, Jeanne F; Laslett, Andrew L

    2017-03-01

    The study and application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) will be enhanced by the availability of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) detecting cell-surface epitopes. Here, we report generation of seven new mAbs that detect cell surface proteins present on live and fixed human ES cells (hESCs) and human iPS cells (hiPSCs), confirming our previous prediction that these proteins were present on the cell surface of hPSCs. The mAbs all show a high correlation with POU5F1 (OCT4) expression and other hPSC surface markers (TRA-160 and SSEA-4) in hPSC cultures and detect rare OCT4 positive cells in differentiated cell cultures. These mAbs are immunoreactive to cell surface protein epitopes on both primed and naive state hPSCs, providing useful research tools to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying human pluripotency and states of cellular reprogramming. In addition, we report that subsets of the seven new mAbs are also immunoreactive to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), normal human breast subsets and both normal and tumorigenic colorectal cell populations. The mAbs reported here should accelerate the investigation of the nature of pluripotency, and enable development of robust cell separation and tracing technologies to enrich or deplete for hPSCs and other human stem and somatic cell types. Stem Cells 2017;35:626-640. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  19. Electricity generation by Enterobacter cloacae SU-1 in mediator less microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samrot, Antony V.; Senthilkumar, P.; Pavankumar, K.; Akilandeswari, G.C. [Department of Biotechnology, Sathyabama University, Rajiv Gandhi Salai, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Rajalakshmi, N.; Dhathathreyan, K.S. [Center for Fuel Cell Technology ARCI, IITM Research Park, Phase I, 2nd Floor, 6 Kanagam Road, Tharamani, Chennai 600 113, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-08-15

    We have investigated a Enterobacter cloacae SU-1, bacteria for mediator less microbial fuel cell with different carbon sources and is found to be more effective as the microorganism is able to transfer electrons directly (exo-electrogenic organism) via the cytochromes or the ubiquinone. These carriers of electrons are in form of stable reversible redox couples, not biologically degraded and not toxic to cell. The major advantage of mediator less microbial fuel cells emphasize that additives in the anolyte is not compatible with the purpose of water purification. The anode chamber with the bacteria is maintained under anaerobic conditions so that the bacteria will undergo anaerobic biochemical pathways like Glycolysis, TCA cycle, Electron Transport Chain (ETC) where electrons and protons are released. Here protons are released in TCA cycle and whereas electrons are released from ETC. The mediator less microbial fuel cell delivered an open circuit potential (OCP) of 0.93 V and power of 3 mW/sq cm. During power generation from the microbes, there was a drop in coulombic efficiency in terms of fluctuations during drawing power, as the carbon source is being utilized for the cell growth. (author)

  20. 3β-hydroxysterol δ24-reductase on the surface of hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be a target for molecular targeting therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Saito

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24 was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb, we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy.

  1. The substrate strain mediated magnetotransport properties of surface states in topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ning, E-mail: maning@stu.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shengli, E-mail: zhangsl@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu, Daqing, E-mail: liudq@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2016-10-14

    Recent experiments reveal that the strained bulk HgTe can be regarded as a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI). We further explore the strain effects on magnetotransport in HgTe at magnetic field. We find that the substrate strain associated with the surface index of carriers, can remove the surfaces degeneracy in Landau levels. This accordingly induces the well separated surface quantum Hall plateaus and Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations. These results can be used to generate and detect surface polarization, not only in HgTe but also in a broad class of TIs, which would be very great news for electronic applications of TIs. - Highlights: • We explore the strain mediated magnetotransport in topological insulators. • We analytically derive the zero frequency magnetoconductivity. • The strain removes the surface degeneracy in Landau levels. • The strain gives rise to the splitting and mixture of Landau levels. • The strain leads to the surface asymmetric spectrum of conductivity.

  2. Tailoring Novel PTFE Surface Properties: Promoting Cell Adhesion and Antifouling Properties via a Wet Chemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Matthias; Niederer, Kerstin; Becker, Marc; Raynaud, Christophe Michel; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Frey, Holger

    2016-05-18

    Many biomaterials used for tissue engineering applications lack cell-adhesiveness and, in addition, are prone to nonspecific adsorption of proteins. This is especially important for blood-contacting devices such as vascular grafts and valves where appropriate surface properties should inhibit the initial attachment of platelets and promote endothelial cell colonization. As a consequence, the long-term outcome of the implants would be improved and the need for anticoagulation therapy could be reduced or even abolished. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a frequently used polymer for various medical applications, was wet-chemically activated and subsequently modified by grafting the endothelial cell (EC) specific peptide arginine-glutamic acid-aspartic acid-valine (REDV) using a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG)-spacer (known to reduce platelet and nonspecific protein adhesion). Modified and control surfaces were both evaluated in terms of EC adhesion, colonization, and the attachment of platelets. In addition, samples underwent bacterial challenges. The results strongly suggested that PEG-mediated peptide immobilization renders PTFE an excellent substrate for cellular growth while simultaneously endowing the material with antifouling properties.

  3. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singaravelu, Ragunath [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Lyn, Rodney K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Srinivasan, Prashanth [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Delcorde, Julie [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta (Canada); Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, Katz Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada); Pezacki, John P., E-mail: John.Pezacki@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1α and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1α, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1α/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

  4. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singaravelu, Ragunath; Lyn, Rodney K.; Srinivasan, Prashanth; Delcorde, Julie; Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne; Pezacki, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1α and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1α, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1α/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway

  5. Epidermal growth factor-mediated effects on equine vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosenbaugh, D.A.; Amoss, M.S.; Hood, D.M.; Morgan, S.J.; Williams, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding kinetics and EGF-mediated stimulation of DNA synthesis and cellular proliferation were studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the equine thoracic aorta. Binding studies, using murine 125 I-labeled EGF, indicate the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites, with an estimated maximal binding capacity of 5,800 sites/cells. EGF stimulated [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in confluent quiescent monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, half-maximal stimulation occurring at 7.5 x 10 -11 M. Likewise, EGF-mediated cellular proliferation was dose dependent under reduced serum concentrations. Equine VSMC contain specific receptors for EGF, and EGF can stimulate DNA synthesis and proliferation in these cultured cells, which suggests that EGF may participate in the proliferative changes observed in equine distal digital peripheral vascular disease

  6. Heterotypic contact reveals a COX-2-mediated suppression of osteoblast differentiation by endothelial cells: A negative modulatory role for prostanoids in VEGF-mediated cell: cell communication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkin, Claire E.; Garonna, Elena; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P.D.

    2008-01-01

    In bone, angiogenesis must be initiated appropriately, but limited once remodelling or repair is complete. Our recent findings have supported a role for prostaglandins (PG), known modulators of osteoblast (OB) and endothelial cell (EC) behaviour, in facilitating VEGF-mediated paracrine communication from OBs to 'remotely located' ECs, but the mechanism(s) regulating OB:EC crosstalk when these cells are closely opposed are undefined. In this study we have examined: (i) the effects of exogenous PGE 2 on VEGF-driven events in ECs, and (ii) the role of endogenous COX-2-derived prostanoids in mediating communication between intimately opposed OBs and ECs in direct contact. Exposure of ECs to PGE 2 increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, COX-2 induction, 6-keto-PGF 1α release and EC proliferation. In contrast, PGE 2 attenuated VEGF 165 -induced VEGFR2/Flk1 phosphorylation, ERK1/2 activation and proliferation of ECs, suggesting that exogenous PGE 2 restricts the actions of VEGF. However, the COX-2-selective inhibitor, NS398, also attenuated VEGF-induced proliferation, implying a distinct role for endogenous COX-2 activity in regulating EC behaviour. To examine the effect of OB:EC proximity and the role of COX-2 products further, we used a confrontational co-culture model. These studies showed that COX-2 blockade with NS398 enhanced EC-dependent increases in OB differentiation, that this effect was reversed by exogenous PGH 2 (immediate COX-2 product), and that exogenous VEGF did not influence EC-dependent OB differentiation under these conditions. Our findings indicate that locally produced prostanoids may serve distinct roles depending on OB:EC proximity and negatively modulate VEGF-mediated changes in EC behaviour when these cells are closely opposed to control angiogenesis during bone (re)modelling

  7. Regulation of CD93 cell surface expression by protein kinase C isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikewaki, Nobunao; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2006-01-01

    Human CD93, also known as complement protein 1, q subcomponent, receptor (C1qRp), is selectively expressed by cells with a myeloid lineage, endothelial cells, platelets, and microglia and was originally reported to be involved in the complement protein 1, q subcomponent (C1q)-mediated enhancement of phagocytosis. The intracellular molecular events responsible for the regulation of its expression on the cell surface, however, have not been determined. In this study, the effect of protein kinases in the regulation of CD93 expression on the cell surface of a human monocyte-like cell line (U937), a human NK-like cell line (KHYG-1), and a human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C) was investigated using four types of protein kinase inhibitors, the classical protein kinase C (cPKC) inhibitor Go6976, the novel PKC (nPKC) inhibitor Rottlerin, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 and the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A at their optimum concentrations for 24 hr. CD93 expression was analyzed using flow cytometry and glutaraldehyde-fixed cellular enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) techniques utilizing a CD93 monoclonal antibody (mAb), mNI-11, that was originally established in our laboratory as a CD93 detection probe. The nPKC inhibitor Rottlerin strongly down-regulated CD93 expression on the U937 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the other inhibitors had little or no effect. CD93 expression was down-regulated by Go6976, but not by Rottlerin, in the KHYG-1 cells and by both Rottlerin and Go6976 in the HUV-EC-C cells. The PKC stimulator, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), strongly up-regulated CD93 expression on the cell surface of all three cell-lines and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production by the U937 cells and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by the KHYG-1 cells. In addition, both Go6976 and Rottlerin inhibited the up-regulation of CD93 expression induced by PMA and IL-8 or IFN-gamma production in the respective cell

  8. Lymphocyte mediators of delayed hypersensitivity; the early phase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefford, M J; McGregor, D D [Trudeau Inst., Saranac Lake, N.Y. (USA)

    1978-04-01

    Inbred rats were immunized with living Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and lymphocytes which mediate tuberculin DTH and anti-tuberculosis immunity were found 10 days later in the draining lymph nodes, thoracic duct, blood, spleen, and acute peritoneal exudates. The lymphocytes that mediated DTH incorporated /sup 3/HT in vitro, were large in size, sensitive to vinblastine but relatively resistant to irradiation, and had a short effective lifespan in syngeneic recipients. These properties characterize the cells as short-lived, nonrecirculating immunoblasts. In some experimental situations it was possible to dissociate the expression of DTH and immunity following the transfer of sensitized lymphocytes.

  9. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  10. Scaffold protein JLP mediates TCR-initiated CD4+T cell activation and CD154 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Yang, Cheng; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Shan; Fu, Dou; Rahman, Rahmat N; Nakazato, Ryota; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kung, Sam K P; Ding, Guohua; Wang, Huiming

    2017-07-01

    CD4 + T-cell activation and its subsequent induction of CD154 (CD40 ligand, CD40L) expression are pivotal in shaping both the humoral and cellular immune responses. Scaffold protein JLP regulates signal transduction pathways and molecular trafficking inside cells, thus represents a critical component in maintaining cellular functions. Its role in regulating CD4 + T-cell activation and CD154 expression, however, is unclear. Here, we demonstrated expression of JLP in mouse tissues of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, and also CD4 + T cells. Using CD4+ T cells from jlp-deficient and jlp-wild-type mice, we demonstrated that JLP-deficiency impaired T-cell proliferation, IL-2 production, and CD154 induction upon TCR stimulations, but had no impacts on the expression of other surface molecules such as CD25, CD69, and TCR. These observed impaired T-cell functions in the jlp-/- CD4 + T cells were associated with defective NF-AT activation and Ca 2 + influx, but not the MAPK, NF-κB, as well as AP-1 signaling pathways. Our findings indicated that, for the first time, JLP plays a critical role in regulating CD4 + T cells response to TCR stimulation partly by mediating the activation of TCR-initiated Ca 2+ /NF-AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  12. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  13. Nanowire arrays as cell force sensors to investigate adhesin-enhanced holdfast of single cell bacteria and biofilm stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahoo, P.K.; Janissen, R.; Monteiro, M.P.; Cavalli, A.; Murillo, D.M.; Merfa, M.V.; Cesar, C.L.; Carvalho, H.F.; de Souza, A.A.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Cotta, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Surface attachment of a planktonic bacteria, mediated by adhesins and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), is a crucial step for biofilm formation. Some pathogens can modulate cell adhesiveness, impacting host colonization and virulence. A framework able to quantify cell-surface interaction

  14. Menadione induces the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH-mediated apoptosis and inhibits the FAK-mediated cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-09-01

    Menadione induces apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the mechanism of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exposed to menadione is not clear. In addition, it is unclear whether menadione-induced apoptosis is mediated by the depletion of glutathione (GSH) contents that is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the effect of menadione on the invasion and migration of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of menadione exposure on apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell migration using the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3. The results suggest that menadione may induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian carcinoma cell lines by activating the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The apoptotic effect of menadione appears to be mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of GSH. Menadione inhibited fetal-bovine-serum-induced cell adhesion and migration of OVCAR-3 cells, possibly through the suppression the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-dependent activation of cytoskeletal-associated components. Therefore, menadione might be beneficial in the treatment of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma and combination therapy.

  15. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  16. Peptide-mediated lipofection is governed by lipoplex physical properties and the density of surface-displayed amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Jennifer C; Barron, Annelise E; Shea, Lonnie D

    2008-11-01

    Peptides can potentiate lipid-mediated gene delivery by modifying lipoplex physiochemical properties to overcome rate-limiting steps to gene transfer. The objectives of this study were to determine the regimes over which cationic peptides enhance lipofection and to investigate the mechanism of action, such as increased cellular association resulting from changes in lipoplex physical properties. Short, cationic peptides were incorporated into lipoplexes by mixing peptide, lipid and DNA. Lipoplexes were characterized using gel retardation, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescent microscopy, and the amount of surface-displayed amines was quantified by fluorescamine. Size, zeta potential, and surface amines for lipoplexes were dependent on peptide/DNA ratio. Inclusion of peptides in lipoplexes resulted in up to a 13-fold increase in percentage of cells transfected, and up to a 76-fold increase in protein expression. This transfection enhancement corresponded to a small particle diameter and positive zeta potential of lipoplexes, as well as increased amount of surface-displayed amines. Relative to lipid alone, these properties of the peptide-modified lipoplexes enhanced cellular association, which has been reported as a rate-limiting step for transfection with lipoplexes. The addition of peptides is a simple method of lipofection enhancement, as direct chemical modification of lipids is not necessary for increased transfection.

  17. Cyclosporine-resistant, Rab27a-independent Mobilization of Intracellular Preformed CD40L Mediates Antigen-specific T Cell Help In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Yoshinobu; Gardell, Jennifer L.; Thauland, Timothy J.; Parker, David C.

    2011-01-01

    CD40L is critically important for the initiation and maintenance of adaptive immune responses. It is generally thought that CD40L expression in CD4+ T cells is regulated transcriptionally and made from new mRNA following antigen recognition. However, recent studies with two-photon microscopy revealed that the majority of cognate interactions between effector CD4+ T cells and APCs are too short for de novo synthesis of CD40L. Given that effector and memory CD4+ T cells store preformed CD40L (pCD40L) in lysosomal compartments and that pCD40L comes to the cell surface within minutes of antigenic stimulation, we and others have proposed that pCD40L might mediate T cell-dependent activation of cognate APCs during brief encounters in vivo. However, it has not been shown that this relatively small amount of pCD40L is sufficient to activate APCs, owing to the difficulty of separating the effects of pCD40L from those of de novo CD40L and other cytokines in vitro. Here we show that pCD40L surface mobilization is resistant to cyclosporine or FK506 treatment, while de novo CD40L and cytokine expression are completely inhibited. These drugs thus provide a tool to dissect the role of pCD40L in APC activation. We find that pCD40L mediates selective activation of cognate but not bystander APCs in vitro and that mobilization of pCD40L does not depend on Rab27a, which is required for mobilization of lytic granules. Therefore, effector CD4+ T cells deliver pCD40L specifically to APCs on the same time scale as the lethal hit of CTLs but with distinct molecular machinery. PMID:21677130

  18. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescenzi, M.; Pulciani, S.; Carbonari, M.; Tedesco, L.; Russo, G.; Gaetano, C.; Fiorilli, M.

    1986-01-01

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  19. Interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Thomas; Schnell, Anne; Walter, Christian; Kämmerer, Peer W; Pabst, Andreas; Lehmann, Karl M; Ziebart, Johanna; Klein, Marc O; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in peri-implant angiogenesis during early bone formation. Therefore, interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and titanium dental implant surfaces are of crucial interest. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the reactions of EPCs in contact with different commercially available implant surfaces. EPCs from buffy coats were isolated by Ficoll density gradient separation. After cell differentiation, EPC were cultured for a period of 7 days on different titanium surfaces. The test surfaces varied in roughness and hydrophilicity: acid-etched (A), sand-blasted-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Plastic and fibronectin-coated plastic surfaces served as controls. Cell numbers and morphology were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressions of iNOS and eNOS were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell numbers were higher in the control groups compared to the cells of titanium surfaces. Initially, hydrophilic titanium surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed lower cell numbers than hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). After 7 days smoother surfaces (A and modA) showed increased cell numbers compared to rougher surfaces (SLA and modSLA). Cell morphology of A, modA, and control surfaces was characterized by a multitude of pseudopodia and planar cell soma architecture. SLA and modSLA promoted small and plump cell soma with little quantity of pseudopodia. The lowest VEGF level was measured on A, the highest on modSLA. The highest eNOS and iNOS expressions were found on modA surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that biological behaviors of EPCs can be influenced by different surfaces. The modSLA surface promotes an undifferentiated phenotype of EPCs that has the ability to secrete growth factors in great quantities. In

  20. Mechanisms of pancreatic islet cell destruction. Dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of soluble blood mononuclear cell mediators on isolated islets of Langerhans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Bendtzen, K; Nerup, J

    1986-01-01

    Supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy human donors stimulated with recall antigen (purified protein derivative of tuberculin) or lectin (phytohaemagglutinin) markedly inhibited the insulin release from isolated human and rat islets of Langerhans, and decreased rat islet...... reconstituted with tuberculin or phytohaemagglutinin did not impair islet function. Electron microscopy demonstrated that supernatants were cytotoxic to islet cells. The cytotoxic mononuclear cell mediator(s) was non-dialysable, sensitive to heating to 56 degrees C, labile even when stored at -70 degrees C...

  1. Membrane/mediator-free rechargeable enzymatic biofuel cell utilizing graphene/single-wall carbon nanotube cogel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alan S; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Geier, Steven M; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-02-25

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) utilize enzymes to convert chemical energy present in renewable biofuels into electrical energy and have shown much promise in the continuous powering of implantable devices. Currently, however, EBFCs are greatly limited in terms of power and operational stability with a majority of reported improvements requiring the inclusion of potentially toxic and unstable electron transfer mediators or multicompartment systems separated by a semipermeable membrane resulting in complicated setups. We report on the development of a simple, membrane/mediator-free EBFC utilizing novel electrodes of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube cogel. These cogel electrodes had large surface area (∼ 800 m(2) g(-1)) that enabled high enzyme loading, large porosity for unhindered glucose transport and moderate electrical conductivity (∼ 0.2 S cm(-1)) for efficient charge collection. Glucose oxidase and bilirubin oxidase were physically adsorbed onto these electrodes to form anodes and cathodes, respectively, and the EBFC produced power densities up to 0.19 mW cm(-2) that correlated to 0.65 mW mL(-1) or 140 mW g(-1) of GOX with an open circuit voltage of 0.61 V. Further, the electrodes were rejuvenated by a simple wash and reloading procedure. We postulate these porous and ultrahigh surface area electrodes will be useful for biosensing applications, and will allow reuse of EBFCs.

  2. Gold nanoparticle-mediated laser stimulation induces a complex stress response in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Kalies, Stefan; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2018-04-25

    Stimulation of neuronal cells generally resorts to electric signals. Recent advances in laser-based stimulation methods could present an alternative with superior spatiotemporal resolution. The avoidance of electronic crosstalk makes these methods attractive for in vivo therapeutic application. In particular, nano-mediators, such as gold nanoparticles, can be used to transfer the energy from a laser pulse to the cell membrane and subsequently activate excitable cells. Although the underlying mechanisms of neuronal activation have been widely unraveled, the overall effect on the targeted cell is not understood. Little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological impact of a laser pulse targeted onto nanoabsorbers on the cell membrane. Here, we analyzed the reaction of the neuronal murine cell line Neuro-2A and murine primary cortical neurons to gold nanoparticle mediated laser stimulation. Our study reveals a severe, complex and cell-type independent stress response after laser irradiation, emphasizing the need for a thorough assessment of this approach's efficacy and safety.

  3. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CDI Systems Are Stably Maintained by a Cell-Contact Mediated Surveillance Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary C Ruhe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI systems are widespread amongst Gram-negative bacteria where they play important roles in inter-cellular competition and biofilm formation. CDI+ bacteria use cell-surface CdiA proteins to bind neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains. CDI+ cells also express CdiI immunity proteins that specifically neutralize toxins delivered from adjacent siblings. Genomic analyses indicate that cdi loci are commonly found on plasmids and genomic islands, suggesting that these Type 5 secretion systems are spread through horizontal gene transfer. Here, we examine whether CDI toxin and immunity activities serve to stabilize mobile genetic elements using a minimal F plasmid that fails to partition properly during cell division. This F plasmid is lost from Escherichia coli populations within 50 cell generations, but is maintained in ~60% of the cells after 100 generations when the plasmid carries the cdi gene cluster from E. coli strain EC93. By contrast, the ccdAB "plasmid addiction" module normally found on F exerts only a modest stabilizing effect. cdi-dependent plasmid stabilization requires the BamA receptor for CdiA, suggesting that plasmid-free daughter cells are inhibited by siblings that retain the CDI+ plasmid. In support of this model, the CDI+ F plasmid is lost rapidly from cells that carry an additional cdiI immunity gene on a separate plasmid. These results indicate that plasmid stabilization occurs through elimination of non-immune cells arising in the population via plasmid loss. Thus, genetic stabilization reflects a strong selection for immunity to CDI. After long-term passage for more than 300 generations, CDI+ plasmids acquire mutations that increase copy number and result in 100% carriage in the population. Together, these results show that CDI stabilizes genetic elements through a toxin-mediated surveillance mechanism in which cells that lose the CDI system are detected and eliminated by

  5. Loss of Mel-18 enhances breast cancer stem cell activity and tumorigenicity through activating Notch signaling mediated by the Wnt/TCF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Kong, Gu

    2012-12-01

    Mel-18 has been proposed as a negative regulator of Bmi-1, a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker, but it is still unclear whether Mel-18 is involved in CSC regulation. Here, we examined the effect of Mel-18 on the stemness of human breast CSCs. In Mel-18 small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-transduced MCF-7 cells, side population (SP) cells and breast CSC surface marker (CD44(+)/CD24(-)/ESA(+))-expressing cells, which imply a CSC population, were enriched. Moreover, the self-renewal of CSCs was enhanced by Mel-18 knockdown, as measured by the ability for tumorsphere formation in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo. Similarly, Mel-18 overexpression inhibited the number and self-renewal activity of breast CSCs in SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, our data showed that Mel-18 blockade up-regulated the expression of the Wnt/TCF target Jagged-1, a Notch ligand, and consequently activated the Notch pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Notch and Wnt pathways abrogated Mel-18 knockdown-mediated tumorsphere formation ability. Taken together, our findings suggest that Mel-18 is a novel negative regulator of breast CSCs that inhibits the stem cell population and in vitro and in vivo self-renewal through the inactivation of Wnt-mediated Notch signaling.

  6. Multivalent Soluble Antigen Arrays Exhibit High Avidity Binding and Modulation of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Signaling to Drive Efficacy against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Pickens, Chad J; Leon, Martin; Berkland, Cory

    2017-06-12

    A pressing need exists for antigen-specific immunotherapies (ASIT) that induce selective tolerance in autoimmune disease while avoiding deleterious global immunosuppression. Multivalent soluble antigen arrays (SAgA PLP:LABL ), consisting of a hyaluronic acid (HA) linear polymer backbone cografted with multiple copies of autoantigen (PLP) and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) peptides, are designed to induce tolerance to a specific multiple sclerosis (MS) autoantigen. Previous studies established that hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , employing a degradable linker to codeliver PLP and LABL, was therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in vivo and exhibited antigen-specific binding with B cells, targeted the B cell receptor (BCR), and dampened BCR-mediated signaling in vitro. Our results pointed to sustained BCR engagement as the SAgA PLP:LABL therapeutic mechanism, so we developed a new version of the SAgA molecule using nonhydrolyzable conjugation chemistry, hypothesizing it would enhance and maintain the molecule's action at the cell surface to improve efficacy. "Click SAgA" (cSAgA PLP:LABL ) uses hydrolytically stable covalent conjugation chemistry (Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC)) rather than a hydrolyzable oxime bond to attach PLP and LABL to HA. We explored cSAgA PLP:LABL B cell engagement and modulation of BCR-mediated signaling in vitro through flow cytometry binding and calcium flux signaling assays. Indeed, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited higher avidity B cell binding and greater dampening of BCR-mediated signaling than hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL . Furthermore, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited significantly enhanced in vivo efficacy compared to hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , achieving equivalent efficacy at one-quarter of the dose. These results indicate that nonhydrolyzable conjugation increased the avidity of cSAgA PLP:LABL to drive in vivo efficacy through modulated BCR-mediated signaling.

  7. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.E.; Graham, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125 I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  8. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2014-01-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na+-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na+-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS. PMID:24904078

  9. Multiscale modeling of bacterial colonies: how pili mediate the dynamics of single cells and cellular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph A.; Juckeland, Guido; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, gonorrhea. Over the past two decades there has been an alarming increase of reported gonorrhea cases where the bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics thus prompting for alternative antimicrobial treatment strategies. The crucial step in this and many other bacterial infections is the formation of microcolonies, agglomerates consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The attachment and motility of cells on solid substrates as well as the cell-cell interactions are primarily mediated by type IV pili, long polymeric filaments protruding from the surface of cells. While the crucial role of pili in the assembly of microcolonies has been well recognized, the exact mechanisms of how they govern the formation and dynamics of microcolonies are still poorly understood. Here, we present a computational model of individual cells with explicit pili dynamics, force generation and pili-pili interactions. We employ the model to study a wide range of biological processes, such as the motility of individual cells on a surface, the heterogeneous cell motility within the large cell aggregates, and the merging dynamics and the self-assembly of microcolonies. The results of numerical simulations highlight the central role of pili generated forces in the formation of bacterial colonies and are in agreement with the available experimental observations. The model can quantify the behavior of multicellular bacterial colonies on biologically relevant temporal and spatial scales and can be easily adjusted to include the geometry and pili characteristics of various bacterial species. Ultimately, the combination of the microbiological experimental approach with the in silico model of bacterial colonies might provide new qualitative and quantitative insights on the development of bacterial infections and thus pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments.

  10. Mast cells and their mediators in cutaneous wound healing--active participants or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artuc, M; Hermes, B; Steckelings, U M; Grützkau, A; Henz, B M

    1999-02-01

    Mast cells are traditionally viewed as effector cells of immediate type hypersensitivity reactions. There is, however, a growing body of evidence that the cells might play an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and repair. We here present our own data and those from the literature elucidating the possible role of mast cells during wound healing. Studies on the fate of mast cells in scars of varying ages suggest that these cells degranulate during wounding, with a marked decrease of chymase-positive cells, although the total number of cells does not decrease, based on SCF-receptor staining. Mast cells contain a plethora of preformed mediators like heparin, histamine, tryptase, chymase, VEGF and TNF-alpha which, on release during the initial stages of wound healing, affect bleeding and subsequent coagulation and acute inflammation. Various additional vasoactive and chemotactic, rapidly generated mediators (C3a, C5a, LTB4, LTC4, PAF) will contribute to these processes, whereas mast cell-derived proinflammatory and growth promoting peptide mediators (VEGF, FGF-2, PDGF, TGF-beta, NGF, IL-4, IL-8) contribute to neoangiogenesis, fibrinogenesis or re-epithelization during the repair process. The increasing number of tryptase-positive mast cells in older scars suggest that these cells continue to be exposed to specific chemotactic, growth- and differentiation-promoting factors throughout the process of tissue remodelling. All these data indicate that mast cells contribute in a major way to wound healing. their role as potential initiators of or as contributors to this process, compared to other cell types, will however have to be further elucidated.

  11. Prostate cancer cell-stromal cell crosstalk via FGFR1 mediates antitumor activity of dovitinib in bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Tapia, Elsa M Li-Ning; Zurita, Amado J; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Navone, Nora M

    2014-09-03

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell-bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in serum prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. The Rac Activator DOCK2 Mediates Plasma Cell Differentiation and IgG Antibody Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Miho; Uruno, Takehito; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Kamikaseda, Yasuhisa; Kunimura, Kazufumi; Sakata, Daiji; Okada, Takaharu; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2018-01-01

    A hallmark of humoral immune responses is the production of antibodies. This process involves a complex cascade of molecular and cellular interactions, including recognition of specific antigen by the B cell receptor (BCR), which triggers activation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs). Although activation of the small GTPase Rac has been implicated in BCR-mediated antigen recognition, its precise role in humoral immunity and the upstream regulator remain elusive. DOCK2 is a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells. We found that BCR-mediated Rac activation was almost completely lost in DOCK2-deficient B cells, resulting in defects in B cell spreading over the target cell-membrane and sustained growth of BCR microclusters at the interface. When wild-type B cells were stimulated in vitro with anti-IgM F(ab') 2 antibody in the presence of IL-4 and IL-5, they differentiated efficiently into PCs. However, BCR-mediated PC differentiation was severely impaired in the case of DOCK2-deficient B cells. Similar results were obtained in vivo when DOCK2-deficient B cells expressing a defined BCR specificity were adoptively transferred into mice and challenged with the cognate antigen. In addition, by generating the conditional knockout mice, we found that DOCK2 expression in B-cell lineage is required to mount antigen-specific IgG antibody. These results highlight important role of the DOCK2-Rac axis in PC differentiation and IgG antibody responses.

  13. Kindlin-3 Is Essential for the Resting α4β1 Integrin-mediated Firm Cell Adhesion under Shear Flow Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Lin, ChangDong; Yan, ZhanJun; Wang, Shu; Zhang, YouHua; Wang, ShiHui; Wang, JunLei; Liu, Cui; Chen, JianFeng

    2016-05-06

    Integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion are two critical steps in leukocyte trafficking. Integrin α4β1 mediates a mixture of rolling and firm cell adhesion on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) when in its resting state but only supports firm cell adhesion upon activation. The transition from rolling to firm cell adhesion is controlled by integrin activation. Kindlin-3 has been shown to bind to integrin β tails and trigger integrin activation via inside-out signaling. However, the role of kindlin-3 in regulating resting α4β1-mediated cell adhesion is not well characterized. Herein we demonstrate that kindlin-3 was required for the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion but not rolling adhesion. Knockdown of kindlin-3 significantly decreased the binding of kindlin-3 to β1 and down-regulated the binding affinity of the resting α4β1 to soluble VCAM-1. Notably, it converted the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion to rolling adhesion on VCAM-1 substrates, increased cell rolling velocity, and impaired the stability of cell adhesion. By contrast, firm cell adhesion mediated by Mn(2+)-activated α4β1 was barely affected by knockdown of kindlin-3. Structurally, lack of kindlin-3 led to a more bent conformation of the resting α4β1. Thus, kindlin-3 plays an important role in maintaining a proper conformation of the resting α4β1 to mediate both rolling and firm cell adhesion. Defective kindlin-3 binding to the resting α4β1 leads to a transition from firm to rolling cell adhesion on VCAM-1, implying its potential role in regulating the transition between integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Kindlin-3 Is Essential for the Resting α4β1 Integrin-mediated Firm Cell Adhesion under Shear Flow Conditions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Lin, ChangDong; Yan, ZhanJun; Wang, Shu; Zhang, YouHua; Wang, ShiHui; Wang, JunLei; Liu, Cui; Chen, JianFeng

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion are two critical steps in leukocyte trafficking. Integrin α4β1 mediates a mixture of rolling and firm cell adhesion on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) when in its resting state but only supports firm cell adhesion upon activation. The transition from rolling to firm cell adhesion is controlled by integrin activation. Kindlin-3 has been shown to bind to integrin β tails and trigger integrin activation via inside-out signaling. However, the role of kindlin-3 in regulating resting α4β1-mediated cell adhesion is not well characterized. Herein we demonstrate that kindlin-3 was required for the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion but not rolling adhesion. Knockdown of kindlin-3 significantly decreased the binding of kindlin-3 to β1 and down-regulated the binding affinity of the resting α4β1 to soluble VCAM-1. Notably, it converted the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion to rolling adhesion on VCAM-1 substrates, increased cell rolling velocity, and impaired the stability of cell adhesion. By contrast, firm cell adhesion mediated by Mn2+-activated α4β1 was barely affected by knockdown of kindlin-3. Structurally, lack of kindlin-3 led to a more bent conformation of the resting α4β1. Thus, kindlin-3 plays an important role in maintaining a proper conformation of the resting α4β1 to mediate both rolling and firm cell adhesion. Defective kindlin-3 binding to the resting α4β1 leads to a transition from firm to rolling cell adhesion on VCAM-1, implying its potential role in regulating the transition between integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion. PMID:26994136

  15. Radiation Response of Cancer Stem-Like Cells From Established Human Cell Lines After Sorting for Surface Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Assar, Osama; Muschel, Ruth J.; Mantoni, Tine S.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A subpopulation of cancer stem-like cells (CSLC) is hypothesized to exist in different cancer cell lines and to mediate radioresistance in solid tumors. Methods and Materials: Cells were stained for CSLC markers and sorted (fluorescence-activated cell sorter/magnetic beads) to compare foci and radiosensitivity of phosphorylated histone H2AX at Ser 139 (γ-H2AX) in sorted vs. unsorted populations in eight cell lines from different organs. CSLC properties were examined using anchorage-independent growth and levels of activated Notch1. Validation consisted of testing tumorigenicity and postirradiation enrichment of CSLC in xenograft tumors. Results: The quantity of CSLC was generally in good agreement with primary tumors. CSLC from MDA-MB-231 (breast) and Panc-1 and PSN-1 (both pancreatic) cells had fewer residual γ-H2AX foci than unsorted cells, pointing to radioresistance of CSLC. However, only MDA-MB-231 CSLC were more radioresistant than unsorted cells. Furthermore, MDA-MB-231 CSLC showed enhanced anchorage-independent growth and overexpression of activated Notch1 protein. The expression of cancer stem cell surface markers in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model was increased after exposure to fractionated radiation. In contrast to PSN-1 cells, a growth advantage for MDA-MB-231 CSLC xenograft tumors was found compared to tumors arising from unsorted cells. Conclusions: CSLC subpopulations showed no general radioresistant phenotype, despite the quantities of CSLC subpopulations shown to correspond relatively well in other reports. Likewise, CSLC characteristics were found in some but not all of the tested cell lines. The reported problems in testing for CSLC in cell lines may be overcome by additional techniques, beyond sorting for markers.

  16. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL. This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  17. Control of cell behavior on PTFE surface using ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akane; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Meguro, Takashi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface is smooth and biologically inert, so that cells cannot attach to it. Ion beam irradiation of the PTFE surface forms micropores and a melted layer, and the surface is finally covered with a large number of small protrusions. Recently, we found that cells could adhere to this irradiated PTFE surface and spread over the surface. Because of their peculiar attachment behavior, these surfaces can be used as biological tools. However, the factors regulating cell adhesion are still unclear, although some new functional groups formed by irradiation seem to contribute to this adhesion. To control cell behavior on PTFE surfaces, we must determine the effects of the outermost irradiated surface on cell adhesion. In this study, we removed the thin melted surface layer by postirradiation annealing and investigated cell behavior on the surface. On the surface irradiated with 3 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 , cells spread only on the remaining parts of the melted layer. From these results, it is clear that the melted layer had a capacity for cell attachment. When the surface covered with protrusions was irradiated with a fluence of 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 , the distribution of cells changed after the annealing process from 'sheet shaped' into multicellular aggregates with diameters of around 50 μm. These results indicate that we can control cell behavior on PTFE surfaces covered with protrusions using irradiation and subsequent annealing. Multicellular spheroids can be fabricated for tissue engineering using this surface.

  18. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-12-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages.

  19. In Situ Investigation of Electrochemically Mediated Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization by Electrochemical Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daqun; Hu, Weihua

    2017-04-18

    Electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) initiates/controls the controlled/living ATRP chain propagation process by electrochemically generating (regenerating) the activator (lower-oxidation-state metal complex) from deactivator (higher-oxidation-state metal complex). Despite successful demonstrations in both of the homogeneous polymerization and heterogeneous systems (namely, surface-initiated ATRP, SI-ATRP), the eATRP process itself has never been in situ investigated, and important information regarding this process remains unrevealed. In this work, we report the first investigation of the electrochemically mediated SI-ATRP (eSI-ATRP) by rationally combining the electrochemical technique with real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the experiment, the potential of a SPR gold chip modified by the self-assembled monolayer of the ATRP initiator was controlled to electrochemically reduce the deactivator to activator to initiate the SI-ATRP, and the whole process was simultaneously monitored by SPR with a high time resolution of 0.1 s. It is found that it is feasible to electrochemically trigger/control the SI-ATRP and the polymerization rate is correlated to the potential applied to the gold chip. This work reveals important kinetic information for eSI-ATRP and offers a powerful platform for in situ investigation of such complicated processes.

  20. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells through ROS-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ngoc, Tam Dan; Son, Young-Ok; Lim, Shin-Saeng; Shi, Xianglin; Kim, Jong-Ghee; Heo, Jung Sun; Choe, Youngji; Jeon, Young-Mi; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2012-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) is used as a source of fluoride ions in diverse applications. Fluoride salt is an effective prophylactic for dental caries and is an essential element required for bone health. However, fluoride is known to cause cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, no information is available on the effects of NaF on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We investigated the mode of cell death induced by NaF and the mechanisms involved. NaF treatment greater than 1 mM reduced viability and DNA synthesis in mESCs and induced cell cycle arrest in the G 2 /M phase. The addition of NaF induced cell death mainly by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Catalase (CAT) treatment significantly inhibited the NaF-mediated cell death and also suppressed the NaF-mediated increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pre-treatment with SP600125 or z-VAD-fmk significantly attenuated the NaF-mediated reduction in cell viability. In contrast, intracellular free calcium chelator, but not of sodium or calcium ion channel blockers, facilitated NaF-induced toxicity in the cells. A JNK specific inhibitor (SP600125) prevented the NaF-induced increase in growth arrest and the DNA damage-inducible protein 45α. Further, NaF-mediated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was apparently inhibited by pifithrin-α or CAT inhibitor. These findings suggest that NaF affects viability of mESCs in a concentration-dependent manner, where more than 1 mM NaF causes apoptosis through hydroxyl radical-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways. -- Highlights: ► The mode of NaF-induced cell death and the mechanisms involved were examined. ► NaF induced mainly apoptotic death of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). ► NaF induced mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. ► JNK- and p53-mediated pathways are involved in NaF-mediated apoptosis in the cells. ► ROS are the up-stream effector in NaF-mediated activation of JNK and p53 in mESCs.

  1. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells through ROS-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Ngoc, Tam Dan [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lim, Shin-Saeng [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Kim, Jong-Ghee [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jung Sun [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Youngji [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Young-Mi, E-mail: young@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Chae, E-mail: leejc88@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) is used as a source of fluoride ions in diverse applications. Fluoride salt is an effective prophylactic for dental caries and is an essential element required for bone health. However, fluoride is known to cause cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, no information is available on the effects of NaF on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We investigated the mode of cell death induced by NaF and the mechanisms involved. NaF treatment greater than 1 mM reduced viability and DNA synthesis in mESCs and induced cell cycle arrest in the G{sub 2}/M phase. The addition of NaF induced cell death mainly by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Catalase (CAT) treatment significantly inhibited the NaF-mediated cell death and also suppressed the NaF-mediated increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pre-treatment with SP600125 or z-VAD-fmk significantly attenuated the NaF-mediated reduction in cell viability. In contrast, intracellular free calcium chelator, but not of sodium or calcium ion channel blockers, facilitated NaF-induced toxicity in the cells. A JNK specific inhibitor (SP600125) prevented the NaF-induced increase in growth arrest and the DNA damage-inducible protein 45α. Further, NaF-mediated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was apparently inhibited by pifithrin-α or CAT inhibitor. These findings suggest that NaF affects viability of mESCs in a concentration-dependent manner, where more than 1 mM NaF causes apoptosis through hydroxyl radical-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways. -- Highlights: ► The mode of NaF-induced cell death and the mechanisms involved were examined. ► NaF induced mainly apoptotic death of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). ► NaF induced mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. ► JNK- and p53-mediated pathways are involved in NaF-mediated apoptosis in the cells. ► ROS are the up-stream effector in NaF-mediated activation of JNK and p53 in mESCs.

  2. Proanthocyanidin-rich Pinus radiata bark extract inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Ho; Song, Chang Ho; Mun, Sung Phil

    2018-02-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in the effector phase of immediate hypersensitivity and allergic reactions. Pinus radiata bark extract exerts multiple biological effects and exhibits immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. However, its role in mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of proanthocyanidin-rich water extract (PAWE) isolated from P. radiata bark on compound 48/80-induced or antidinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions in vivo. In addition, we evaluated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of PAWE on mast cell activation, with a specific focus on histamine release, using rat peritoneal mast cells. PAWE attenuated compound 48/80-induced or anti-DNP IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reactions in mice, and it inhibited histamine release triggered by compound 48/80, ionophore A23187, or anti-DNP IgE in rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. Moreover, PAWE suppressed compound 48/80-elicited calcium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted a transient increase in intracellular cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate levels. Together, these results suggest that proanthocyanidin-rich P. radiata bark extract effectively inhibits anaphylaxis-like reactions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Human prealbumin fraction: effects on cell-mediated immunity and tumor rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.H.; Ehrke, M.J.; Bercsenyi, K.; Mihich, E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of human prealbumin fraction as allogeneic cell-mediated immunity in primary sensitization cultures of murine spleen cells was studied by 3H-thymidine uptake and specific 51Cr release assays. Prealbumin caused a dose-dependent augmentation of these responses. Human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and calf-thymosin fraction 5 had little effect. Prealbumin was active when added on day 0 or 1 but not thereafter. Prealbumin added to effector cells from immunized mice did not change their lytic activity. Prealbumin, but not human serum albumin or thymosin fraction 5, augmented secondary cell-mediated immunity in culture after primary immunization in mice. A slow growing mammary tumor line, which originated as a spontaneous mammary tumor in a DBA/2 HaDD breeder mouse, initially grows in 100% of DBA/2J mice but is then rejected in 10 to 20% of them. When prealbumin (59 microgram/day) was given subcutaneously for 2 weeks to DBA/2J mice and the tumor implanted 2 weeks later. 78% of the mice rejected the tumor and were then resistant to a rechallenge

  4. Caveolin-1 and CDC42 mediated endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bohmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field in nanotechnology, which has great potential in the development of new therapies for numerous diseases. For example iron oxide nanoparticles are in clinical use already in the thermotherapy of brain cancer. Although it has been shown, that tumor cells take up these particles in vitro, little is known about the internalization routes. Understanding of the underlying uptake mechanisms would be very useful for faster and precise development of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This study aims at the identification of key proteins, which are crucial for the active uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by HeLa cells (human cervical cancer as a model cell line. Cells were transfected with specific siRNAs against Caveolin-1, Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin, PIP5Kα and CDC42. Knockdown of Caveolin-1 reduces endocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (SCIONs between 23 and 41%, depending on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles and the experimental design. Knockdown of CDC42 showed a 46% decrease of the internalization of PEGylated SPIONs within 24 h incubation time. Knockdown of Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin and PIP5Kα caused no or only minor effects. Hence endocytosis in HeLa cells of iron oxide nanoparticles, used in this study, is mainly mediated by Caveolin-1 and CDC42. It is shown here for the first time, which proteins of the endocytotic pathway mediate the endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells in vitro. In future studies more experiments should be carried out with different cell lines and other well-defined nanoparticle species to elucidate possible general principles.

  5. Let-7b-mediated suppression of basigin expression and metastasis in mouse melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Tzu-Yen; Chang, Chia-Che; Lin, Chun-Ting; Lai, Cong-Hao; Peng, Shao-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ju; Tang, Pin-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Basigin (Bsg), also called extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells and stimulates adjacent fibroblasts or tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (mmps). It has been shown that Bsg plays an important role in growth, development, cell differentiation, and tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short endogenous non-protein coding RNAs of 20-25 nucleotides (nt) that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by base-pairing to their target mRNAs and thereby mediate cleavage of target mRNAs or translational repression. In this study, let-7b, one of the let-7 family members, was investigated for its effect on the growth and invasiveness of the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F10. We have shown that let-7b can suppress the expression of Bsg in B16-F10 cells and also provided evidence that this suppression could result in the indirect suppression of mmp-9. The ability of B16-F10 cells transfected with let-7b to invade or migrate was significantly reduced. In addition, let-7b transfected B16-F10 cells displayed an inhibition of both cellular proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, it was shown that the overexpression of let-7b in B16-F10 cells could reduce lung metastasis. Taken together, the present study identifies let-7b as a tumor suppressor that represses cancer cell proliferation and migration as well as tumor metastasis in mouse melanoma cells.

  6. Let-7b-mediated suppression of basigin expression and metastasis in mouse melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Tzu-Yen [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Ting [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lai, Cong-Hao [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Peng, Shao-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ju [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Tang, Pin-Chi, E-mail: pctang@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Basigin (Bsg), also called extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells and stimulates adjacent fibroblasts or tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (mmps). It has been shown that Bsg plays an important role in growth, development, cell differentiation, and tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short endogenous non-protein coding RNAs of 20-25 nucleotides (nt) that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by base-pairing to their target mRNAs and thereby mediate cleavage of target mRNAs or translational repression. In this study, let-7b, one of the let-7 family members, was investigated for its effect on the growth and invasiveness of the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F10. We have shown that let-7b can suppress the expression of Bsg in B16-F10 cells and also provided evidence that this suppression could result in the indirect suppression of mmp-9. The ability of B16-F10 cells transfected with let-7b to invade or migrate was significantly reduced. In addition, let-7b transfected B16-F10 cells displayed an inhibition of both cellular proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, it was shown that the overexpression of let-7b in B16-F10 cells could reduce lung metastasis. Taken together, the present study identifies let-7b as a tumor suppressor that represses cancer cell proliferation and migration as well as tumor metastasis in mouse melanoma cells.

  7. Detachment of Chain-Forming Neuroblasts by Fyn-Mediated Control of cell-cell Adhesion in the Postnatal Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikake, Kazuma; Sawada, Masato; Hikita, Takao; Seto, Yayoi; Kaneko, Naoko; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Dohi, Natsuki; Homma, Natsumi; Osaga, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Akaike, Toshihiro; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Sobue, Kazuya; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2018-05-09

    In the rodent olfactory system, neuroblasts produced in the ventricular-subventricular zone of the postnatal brain migrate tangentially in chain-like cell aggregates toward the olfactory bulb (OB) through the rostral migratory stream (RMS). After reaching the OB, the chains are dissociated and the neuroblasts migrate individually and radially toward their final destination. The cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling cell-cell adhesion during this detachment remain unclear. Here we report that Fyn, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, regulates the detachment of neuroblasts from chains in the male and female mouse OB. By performing chemical screening and in vivo loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments, we found that Fyn promotes somal disengagement from the chains and is involved in neuronal migration from the RMS into the granule cell layer of the OB. Fyn knockdown or Dab1 (disabled-1) deficiency caused p120-catenin to accumulate and adherens junction-like structures to be sustained at the contact sites between neuroblasts. Moreover, a Fyn and N-cadherin double-knockdown experiment indicated that Fyn regulates the N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion between neuroblasts. These results suggest that the Fyn-mediated control of cell-cell adhesion is critical for the detachment of chain-forming neuroblasts in the postnatal OB. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the postnatal brain, newly born neurons (neuroblasts) migrate in chain-like cell aggregates toward their destination, where they are dissociated into individual cells and mature. The cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the detachment of neuroblasts from chains are not understood. Here we show that Fyn, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, promotes the somal detachment of neuroblasts from chains, and that this regulation is critical for the efficient migration of neuroblasts to their destination. We further show that Fyn and Dab1 (disabled-1) decrease the cell-cell adhesion between chain-forming neuroblasts

  8. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Bäckström, T; Lauritsen, J P

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR and the ......The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed....

  9. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu, E-mail: nemoto@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hironori [Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro [Department of Medicinal Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji 192-0392 (Japan); Ohizumi, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Laboratory of Kampo Medicines, Yokohama College of Pharmacy, 601 Matano-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0066 (Japan); Degawa, Masakuni [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  10. Cyclophilin B mediates cyclosporin A incorporation in human blood T-lymphocytes through the specific binding of complexed drug to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, F; Denys, A; Spik, G

    1996-07-15

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is a cyclosporin A (CsA)-binding protein located within intracellular vesicles and released in biological fluids. We recently reported the specific binding of this protein to T-cell surface receptor which is internalized even in the presence of CsA. These results suggest that CyPB might target the drug to lymphocytes and consequently modify its activity. To verify this hypothesis, we have first investigated the binding capacity and internalization of the CsA-CyPB complex in human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes and secondly compared the inhibitory effect of both free and CyPB-complexed CsA on the CD3-induced activation and proliferation of T-cells. Here, we present evidence that both the CsA-CyPB complex and free CyPB bind to the T-lymphocyte surface, with similar values of Kd and number of sites. At 37 degrees C, the complex is internalized but, in contrast to the protein, the drug is accumulated within the cell. Moreover, CyPB receptors are internalized together with the ligand and rapidly recycled to the cell surface. Finally, we demonstrate that CyPB-complexed CsA remains as efficient as uncomplexed CsA and that CyPB enhances the immunosuppressive activity of the drug. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that surface CyPB receptors may be related to the selective and variable action of CsA, through specific binding and targeting of the CyPB-CsA complex to peripheral blood T-lymphocytes.

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  12. Chirality in microbial biofilms is mediated by close interactions between the cell surface and the substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauffred, Liselotte; Munk Vejborg, Rebecca; Korolev, Kirill S; Brown, Stanley; Oddershede, Lene B

    2017-01-01

    From microbial biofilms to human migrations, spatial competition is central to the evolutionary history of many species. The boundary between expanding populations is the focal point of competition for space and resources and is of particular interest in ecology. For all Escherichia coli strains studied here, these boundaries move in a counterclockwise direction even when the competing strains have the same fitness. We find that chiral growth of bacterial colonies is strongly suppressed by the expression of extracellular features such as adhesive structures and pili. Experiments with other microbial species show that chiral growth is found in other bacteria and exclude cell wall biosynthesis and anisotropic shape as the primary causes of chirality. Instead, intimate contact with the substratum is necessary for chirality. Our results demonstrate that through a handful of surface molecules cells can fundamentally reorganize their migration patterns, which might affect intra- and interspecific competitions through colony morphology or other mechanisms. PMID:28362723

  13. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells by V. cholerae hemagglutinin protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial toxins have emerged as promising agents in cancer treatment strategy. Hemagglutinin (HAP) protease secreted by Vibrio cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and regresses tumor growth in mice model. The success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity for normal tissues. Increased expression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) has been reported in different malignant cells. In this study we report that HAP induced activation and over expression of PAR-1 in breast cancer cells (EAC). Immunoprecipitation studies have shown that HAP specifically binds with PAR-1. HAP mediated activation of PAR-1 caused nuclear translocation of p50-p65 and the phosphorylation of p38 which triggered the activation of NFκB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These signaling pathways enhanced the cellular ROS level in malignant cells that induced the intrinsic pathway of cell apoptosis. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis by HAP of malignant breast cells without effecting normal healthy cells in the same environment makes it a good therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer.

  14. Activated integrin VLA-4 localizes to the lamellipodia and mediates T cell migration on VCAM-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Young-Min; Chung, Hung-Li; McGrath, James L.; Waugh, Richard E.; Kim, Minsoo

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocyte migration from blood into lymphoid tissues or to sites of inflammation occurs through interactions between cell surface integrins and their ligands expressed on the vascular endothelium and the extracellular matrix. Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4, α4β1) is a key integrin in the effective trafficking of lymphocytes. Although it has been well established that integrins undergo functionally significant conformational changes to mediate cell adhesion, there is no mechanistic information that explains how these are dynamically and spatially regulated during lymphocyte polarization and migration. Using dynamic fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis of a novel VLA-4 FRET sensor under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we show that VLA-4 activation localizes to the lamellipodium in living cells. During T cell migration on VCAM-1, VLA-4 activation concurs with spatial redistribution of chemokine receptor and active Rap1 at the leading edge. Selective inhibition of the activated VLA-4 at leading edge with a small molecule inhibitor is sufficient to block T cell migration. These data suggest that a subpopulation of activated VLA-4 is mainly localized to the leading edge of polarized human T cells, and is critical for T cell migration on VCAM-1. PMID:19542447

  15. Cadmium promotes the proliferation of triple-negative breast cancer cells through EGFR-mediated cell cycle regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhengxi; Song, Xiulong; Shaikh, Zahir A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal which is implicated in breast cancer by epidemiological studies. It is reported to promote breast cancer cell growth in vitro through membrane receptors. The study described here examined Cd-mediated growth of non-metastatic human breast cancer derived cells that lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and HER2. Treatment of triple-negative HCC 1937 cells with 0.1–0.5 μM Cd increased cell growth by activation of AKT and ERK. Accelerated cell cycle progression was achieved by increasing the levels of cyclins A, B, and E, as well as those of CDKs 1 and 2. Although triple negative cells lack estrogen receptor, they express high levels of EGFR. Therefore, further studies on HCC 1937 and another triple-negative cell line, HCC 38, were conducted using specific siRNA and an inhibitor of EGFR to determine whether EGFR was responsible for mediating the effect of Cd. The results revealed that in both cell types EGFR was not only activated upon Cd treatment, but was also essential for the downstream activation of AKT and ERK. Based on these observations, it is concluded that, in breast cancer cells lacking estrogen receptor, sub-micromolar concentration of Cd can promote cell proliferation. Furthermore, that EGFR plays a critical role in this process. - Highlights: • Sub-micromolar concentrations of Cd promote cell growth in breast cancer cells that lack ER, PR, and HER2. • The increase in cell number is not due to reduction in apoptosis. • Growth promotion involves AKT and ERK signaling and downstream stimulation of cell cycle progression. • Initiation of cell growth by Cd occurs at the cell membrane and requires the activation of EGFR.

  16. Are mast cells important in diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Duraisamy Kempuraj; Alessandro Caraffa; Gianpaolo Ronconi; Gianfranco Lessiani; Pio Conti

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with microvascular and macrovascular syndromes mediated by mast cells. Mast cells are activated through cross-linking of their surface high affinity receptors for IgE (FcRI) or other antigens, leading to degranulation and release of stored inflammatory mediators, and cytokines/chemokines without degranulation. Mast cells are implicated in innate and acquired immunity, inflammation and metabolic disorders such as d...

  17. Epimorphin mediates mammary luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Yohei; Radisky, Derek; Boudreau, Rosanne; Simian, Marina; Stevens, Mary E.; Oka, Yumiko; Takebe, Kyoko; Niwa, Shinichiro; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that epimorphin, a protein expressed on the surface of myoepithelial and fibroblast cells of the mammary gland, acts as a multifunctional morphogen of mammary epithelial cells. Here, we present the molecular mechanism by which epimorphin mediates luminal morphogenesis. Treatment of cells with epimorphin to induce lumen formation greatly increases the overall expression of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) and alters the relative expression of its two principal isoforms, LIP and LAP. These alterations were shown to be essential for the morphogenetic activities, as constitutive expression of LIP was sufficient to produce lumen formation, while constitutive expression of LAP blocked epimorphin-mediated luminal morphogenesis. Furthermore, in a transgenic mouse model in which epimorphin expression was expressed in an apolar fashion on the surface of mammary epithelial cells, we found increased expression of C/EBPbeta, increased relative expression of LIP to LAP, and enlarged ductal lumina. Together, our studies demonstrate a role for epimorphin in luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta expression

  18. Surface deformation during an action potential in pearled cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussel, Matan; Fillafer, Christian; Ben-Porath, Gal; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2017-11-01

    Electric pulses in biological cells (action potentials) have been reported to be accompanied by a propagating cell-surface deformation with a nanoscale amplitude. Typically, this cell surface is covered by external layers of polymer material (extracellular matrix, cell wall material, etc.). It was recently demonstrated in excitable plant cells (Chara braunii) that the rigid external layer (cell wall) hinders the underlying deformation. When the cell membrane was separated from the cell wall by osmosis, a mechanical deformation, in the micrometer range, was observed upon excitation of the cell. The underlying mechanism of this mechanical pulse has, to date, remained elusive. Herein we report that Chara cells can undergo a pearling instability, and when the pearled fragments were excited even larger and more regular cell shape changes were observed (˜10 -100 μ m in amplitude). These transient cellular deformations were captured by a curvature model that is based on three parameters: surface tension, bending rigidity, and pressure difference across the surface. In this paper these parameters are extracted by curve-fitting to the experimental cellular shapes at rest and during excitation. This is a necessary step to identify the mechanical parameters that change during an action potential.

  19. A potential therapy for chordoma via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing NK or high-affinity NK cells in combination with cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Rika; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Chordoma is a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord and is resistant to conventional therapies such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and targeting therapeutics. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a large proportion of chordoma specimens indicates a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In this study the authors investigated the potential role of the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab in immunotherapy for chordoma. METHODS Since cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody of the IgG1 isotype, it has the potential to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) employing natural killer (NK) cells as effectors. Polymorphisms in the CD16 allele expressed on NK cells have been shown to influence the degree of ADCC of tumor cells, with the high-affinity valine (V)/V allele being responsible for more lysis than the V/phenylalanine (F) or FF allele. Unfortunately, however, only approximately 10% of the population expresses the VV allele on NK cells. An NK cell line, NK-92, has now been engineered to endogenously express IL-2 and the high-affinity CD16 allele. These irradiated high-affinity (ha)NK cells were analyzed for lysis of chordoma cells with and without cetuximab, and the levels of lysis observed in ADCC were compared with those of NK cells from donors expressing the VV, VF, and FF alleles. RESULTS Here the authors demonstrate for the first time 1) that cetuximab in combination with NK cells can mediate ADCC of chordoma cells; 2) the influence of the NK CD16 polymorphism in cetuximab-mediated ADCC for chordoma cell lysis; 3) that engineered haNK cells-that is, cells transduced to express the CD16 V158 FcγRIIIa receptor-bind cetuximab with similar affinity to normal NK cells expressing the high-affinity VV allele; and 4) that irradiated haNK cells induce ADCC with cetuximab in chordoma cells. CONCLUSIONS These studies provide rationale for the use of cetuximab in combination with irradiated haNK cells for therapy for

  20. Visfatin Reduces Gap Junction Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the current study we examined if the adipocytokine, visfatin, alters connexin-mediated intercellular communication in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells. Methods: The effects of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on cell viability and cytotoxicity in HK2-cells were assessed by MTT, crystal violet and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Western blot analysis was used to confirm expression of Cx26, Cx40 and Cx43. The effect of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on TGF-β1 secretion was confirmed by ELISA, and the effects of both TGF-β1 (2-10ng/mL and visfatin (10-200ng/mL on connexin expression were assessed by western blot. Functional intercellular communication was determined using transfer of Lucifer Yellow and paired-whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Results: In low glucose (5mM, visfatin (10-200ng/mL did not affect membrane integrity, cytotoxicity or cell viability at 48hrs, but did evoke a concentration-dependent reduction in Cx26 and Cx43 expression. The expression of Cx40 was unaffected. At 48hrs, visfatin (10-200ng/mL increased the secretion of TGF-β1 and the visfatin-evoked changes in connexin expression were mimicked by exogenous application of the pro-fibrotic cytokine (2-10ng/ml. Visfatin reduced dye transfer between coupled cells and decreased functional conductance, with levels falling by 63% as compared to control. Although input resistance was increased following visfatin treatment by 166%, the change was not significant as compared to control. The effects of visfatin on Cx-expression and cell-coupling were blocked in the presence of a TGF-β1 specific neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: The adipocytokine visfatin selectively evoked a non-toxic reduction in connexin expression in HK2-cells. The loss in gap-junction associated proteins was mirrored by a loss in functional conductance between coupled cells. Visfatin increased TGF-β secretion and the pattern of change for connexins expression was mimicked by exogenous

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  2. SET mediates TCE-induced liver cell apoptosis through dephosphorylation and upregulation of nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaohu; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Xifei; Liu, Yungang; Liu, Wei; Huang, Haiyan; Wu, Desheng; Zou, Fei; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-06-20

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an occupational and environmental chemical that can cause severe hepatotoxicity. While our previous studies showed that the phosphatase inhibitor SET is a key mediator of TCE-induced liver cell apoptosis, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Using quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis, we report here that nucleolin is a SET-regulated phosphoprotein in human liver HL-7702 cells. Functional analysis suggested that SET promoted dephosphorylation of nucleolin, decreased its binding to its transcriptional activator, c-myc, and upregulated nucleolin expression in TCE-treated cells. Importantly, TCE-induced hepatocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated when nucleolin was downregulated with specific siRNAs. These findings indicate that TCE may induce hepatocyte apoptosis via SET-mediated dephosphorylation and overexpression of nucleolin.

  3. siRNA - Mediated LRP/LR knock-down reduces cellular viability of malignant melanoma cells through the activation of apoptotic caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Thalia M; Vania, Leila; Ferreira, Eloise; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2018-07-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is over-expressed in tumor cells and has been implicated in several tumourigenic processes such as metastasis and telomerase activation, however, more importantly the focus of the present study is on the maintenance of cellular viability and the evasion of apoptosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of LRP/LR on the cellular viability of early (A375) and late stage (A375SM) malignant melanoma cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed that A375SM cells contain more cell-surface and total LRP/LR levels in comparison to the A375 cells, respectively. In order to determine the effect of LRP/LR on cell viability and apoptosis, LRP was down-regulated via siRNA technology. MTT assays revealed that LRP knock-down led to significant reductions in the viability of A375 and A375SM cells. Confocal microscopy indicated nuclear morphological changes suggestive of apoptotic induction in both cell lines and Annexin-V FITC/PI assays confirmed this observation. Additionally, caspase-3 activity assays revealed that apoptosis was induced in both cell lines after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of LRP. Caspase-8 and -9 activity assays suggested that post LRP knock-down; A375 cells undergo apoptosis solely via the extrinsic pathway, while A375SM cells undergo apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway. siRNAs mediated LRP knock-down might represent a powerful alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant melanoma through the induction of apoptosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. SPRY4-mediated ERK1/2 signaling inhibition abolishes 17β-estradiol-induced cell growth in endometrial adenocarcinoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjiang; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Xingbo; Yan, Lei; Wang, Chong; Li, Chunyan; Li, Changzhong

    2014-08-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2)-mediated Extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling is a critical modulator in angiogenesis. SPRY4 has been reported to be a feedback negative regulator of FGFs-induced ERK1/2 signaling. The aim of this study was to explore the role of SPRY4 in endometrial adenocarcinoma cell. The effect of SPRY4 expression on FGF2-mediated ERK1/2 signaling was detected by luciferase assay and Western blot analysis. The growth of Ishikawa cells was detected using colony formation assay and cell number counting experiment. We found that plasmid-driven SPRY4 expression efficiently blocked the activity of FGF2-induced ERK1/2 signaling in Ishikawa cells. SPRY4 expression significantly reduced the proliferation and 17β-estradiol-induced proliferation of Ishikawa cells. SPRY4 may function as a tumor suppressor in endometrial adenocarcinoma.

  5. IL-9-producing cells in the development of IgE-mediated food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shik, Dana; Tomar, Sunil; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Smith, Andrew; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is a harmful immune reaction driven by uncontrolled type 2 immune responses. Considerable evidence demonstrates the key roles of mast cells, IgE, and TH2 cytokines in mediating food allergy. However, this evidence provides limited insight into why only some, rather than all,