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Sample records for medial coronary ligament

  1. Meniscotibial (coronary) ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Usta, H.Y.; Berger, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Preservation of the meniscus whenever possible is essential in maintaining knee stability and preventing premature osteoarthritis. Peripheral meniscal tears are the most amenable to surgical repair. This study evaluates the peripheral attachments of the medial meniscus and focuses on a specific tear limited to the meniscotibial ligament (coronary ligament). The diagnosis is made arthrographically when the medial meniscus floats above the tibial plateau without separating completely from the capsule. The lateral meniscus is rarely involved in this type of injury. (orig.)

  2. Medial collateral ligament healing one year after a concurrent medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament injury: an interdisciplinary study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, T; Levine, R E; Woo, S L; Niyibizi, C; Kavalkovich, K W; Weaver-Green, C M

    1996-03-01

    The optimal treatment for concurrent injuries to the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligaments has not been determined, despite numerous clinical and laboratory studies. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of surgical repair of the medial collateral ligament on its biomechanical and biochemical properties 52 weeks after such injuries. In the left knee of 12 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, the medial collateral ligament was torn and the anterior cruciate ligament was transected and then reconstructed. This is an experimental model previously developed in our laboratory. In six rabbits, the torn ends of the medial collateral ligament were repaired, and in the remaining six rabbits, the ligament was not repaired. Fifty-two weeks after injury, we examined varus-valgus and anterior-posterior knee stability; structural properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex; and mechanical properties, collagen content, and mature collagen crosslinking of the medial collateral ligament. We could not detect significant differences between repair and nonrepair groups for any biomechanical or biochemical property. Our data support clinical findings that when the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligaments are injured concurrently and the anterior cruciate ligament is reconstructed, conservative treatment of the ruptured medial collateral ligament can result in successful healing.

  3. Atraumatic medial collateral ligament oedema in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, D.; Keogh, C.; O'Connell, M.; Zoga, A.; Rowe, D.; Shah, B.; Eustace, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and determine the prevalence of atraumatic medial collateral oedema identified in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Design and patients: Sixty patients, 30 patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 to 4) and 30 age-matched patients with atraumatic knee pain without osteoarthritis, referred for MR imaging over a 2 year period were included in the study. In each case, severity of osteoarthritis was recorded on radiographs and correlated with the presence or absence of medial collateral ligament oedema at MR imaging. Results: Medial collateral oedema was identified in 27 of the 30 patients with osteoarthritis, of whom 14 had grade 1 oedema and 13 had grade 2 oedema compared with the presence of medial collateral ligament oedema (grade 1) in only two of the 30 control patients without osteoarthritis (P<<0.0001). Conclusion: Medial collateral oedema is common in patients with osteoarthritis in the absence of trauma. When identified, medial collateral ligament oedema should be considered to be a feature of osteoarthritis and should not be incorrectly attributed to an acute traumatic injury. (orig.)

  4. The medial collateral ligament of the elbow joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floris, S; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Dalstra, Michel

    1998-01-01

    Eighteen osteoligamentous elbow joint specimens were included in a study of the medial collateral ligament complex (MCL). The morphologic characteristics of the MCL were examined, and three-dimensional kinematic measurements were taken after selective ligament dissections were performed. On morph......Eighteen osteoligamentous elbow joint specimens were included in a study of the medial collateral ligament complex (MCL). The morphologic characteristics of the MCL were examined, and three-dimensional kinematic measurements were taken after selective ligament dissections were performed...

  5. Trochleoplasty and medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation

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    K Raghuveer Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recurrent patellar dislocation with high-grade trochlear dysplasia which persisted despite two previous operations. We did a Dejour′s sulcus deepening trochleoplasty, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, and lateral retinacular release. Trochleoplasty and medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction is required in patients with high grade trochlear dysplasia.

  6. The "moving valgus stress test" for medial collateral ligament tears of the elbow.

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    O'Driscoll, Shawn W M; Lawton, Richard L; Smith, Adam M

    2005-02-01

    The diagnosis of a painful partial tear of the medial collateral ligament in overhead-throwing athletes is challenging, even for experienced elbow surgeons and despite the use of sophisticated imaging techniques. The "moving valgus stress test" is an accurate physical examination technique for diagnosis of medial collateral ligament attenuation in the elbow. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Twenty-one patients underwent surgical intervention for medial elbow pain due to medial collateral ligament insufficiency or other abnormality of chronic valgus overload, and they were assessed preoperatively with an examination called the moving valgus stress test. To perform the moving valgus stress test, the examiner applies and maintains a constant moderate valgus torque to the fully flexed elbow and then quickly extends the elbow. The test is positive if the medial elbow pain is reproduced at the medial collateral ligament and is at maximum between 120 degrees and 70 degrees. The moving valgus stress test was highly sensitive (100%, 17 of 17 patients) and specific (75%, 3 of 4 patients) when compared to assessment of the medial collateral ligament by surgical exploration or arthroscopic valgus stress testing. The mean shear range (ie, the arc within which pain was produced with the moving valgus stress test) was 120 degrees to 70 degrees. The mean angle at which pain was at a maximum was 90 degrees of elbow flexion. The moving valgus stress test is an accurate physical examination technique that, when performed and interpreted correctly, is highly sensitive for medial elbow pain arising from the medial collateral ligament.

  7. Kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eygendaal, D; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Jensen, Steen Lund

    2000-01-01

    In this study the kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow are investigated. After selective transection of the medial collateral ligament of 8 osteoligamentous intact elbow preparations was performed, 3-dimensional measurements of angular displacement......, increase in medial joint opening, and translation of the radial head were examined during application of relevant stress. Increase in joint opening was significant only after complete transection of the anterior part of the medial collateral ligament was performed. The joint opening was detected during...... valgus and internal rotatory stress only. After partial transection of the anterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament was performed, there was an elbow laxity to valgus and internal rotatory force, which became significant after transection of 100% of the anterior bundle of the medial collateral...

  8. Outside-In Deep Medial Collateral Ligament Release During Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Surgery.

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    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel

    2016-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is a very common orthopaedic procedure performed for symptomatic, irreparable meniscus tears. It is usually associated with a very good outcome and minimal complications. In some patients with tight medial compartment, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be difficult to visualize, and access in this area with instruments may be challenging. To increase the opening of the medial compartment, after valgus-extension stress position of the knee, different techniques of deep medial collateral ligament release have been described. The outside-in pie-crusting technique shown in this technical note has documented effectiveness and good outcomes with minimal or no morbidity.

  9. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF ANKLE

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    Neelu Prasad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The ankle joint is one of the most frequently injured joint. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. The talocrural joint is a major weight bearing joint of the body. The weight of the body is transmitted from the tibia and fibula to the talus which distributes the weight anteriorly and posteriorly within the foot. One sixth of the static load of the leg is carried by the fibula at the tibiofibular joint. These require a high degree of stability which is determined by the passive and dynamic factors. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. Conventionally, X-ray techniques have been used to diagnose ligament injuries. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has opened new horizons in the diagnosis and treatment of many musculoskeletal diseases of the ankle and foot. It demonstrates abnormalities in the bones and soft tissues before they become evident at other imaging modalities. The anatomy of the deltoid ligament

  10. Rigid immobilization alters matrix organization in the injured rat medial collateral ligament.

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    Padgett, L R; Dahners, L E

    1992-11-01

    The effects of mobilization on matrix reorganization and density after ligament injury were studied in rat medial collateral ligaments using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both medial collateral ligaments of 14 Sprague-Dawley rats were sharply incised transversely at their midpoint. A 1.14-mm threaded Kirschner wire was driven through the tibia and into the femur of the right leg (through the knee) to immobilize that knee at 90 degrees of flexion. Four additional rats were used as controls. The right medial collateral ligament of the control rats was exposed in the same manner as the experimental rats and the wound closed without damaging the ligament. Rats were sacrificed on the 7th and 14th days postinjury and the ligaments evaluated by SEM. The electron micrographs from this study demonstrated that early on, the tissue at the injury site is disorganized on a gross scale with large bundles of poorly organized matrix. Large "defects" were present between bundles in the substance of the ligament and appeared as holes in the ligament around the injury site. As healing progressed, the matrix in the mobilized specimens appeared to bridge the injury site more rapidly and completely with fewer "defects" and thus higher density than the immobilized specimens.

  11. Surgical Stabilization of the Medial Capsulo-Ligamentous Envelope in Total Knee Arthroplasty

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    Brandon Green, DO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study will evaluate an alternative method in which a four prong bone staple was used to repair the medial collateral ligament following over-release or avulsion injuries in (#6 cases during a total knee arthroplasty. The use of a four prong bone staple to repair medial collateral ligament injuries status post total knee replacement will provide satisfactory results with respect to post-operative knee stability and range of motion. Our retrospective review revealed that all six patients improved with regards to range of motion following the total knee arthroplasty. We feel that repair of the medial collateral ligament with a four-prong bone staple is a viable option after an over-release or avulsion injury sustained during a total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Medial patellofemoral ligament: Research progress in anatomy and injury imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Lei; Zhao Bin

    2013-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is considered as the most important soft tissue restraint providing medial stability of the patellofemoral joint. During patellar dislocation, the MPFL is subjected to severe stretching forces, resulting in injuries of the ligament in the most patients. With the development of medical imaging technology, a variety of non-invasive diagnostic imaging methods have been becoming important means in diagnosis of MPFL injury. In this paper, MPFL anatomy, the applications of medical imaging technology in diagnosis of MPFL injury and the distributions of MPFL injury site were reviewed. (authors)

  13. Incarceration of the medial collateral ligament in the intercondylar notch following proximal avulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Edward [Fiona Stanley Hospital, Department of Radiology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Martin [North Bristol NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Robinson, James R. [Bristol Knee Group, Avon Orthopaedic Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    Intra-articular entrapment of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a rare but recognised complication of traumatic injury to the posteromedial corner (PMC) of the knee. Considering the MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee this complication is extremely rare with only a handful of cases describing MCL entrapment following distal avulsion of the MCL. We present the first known case of MCL entrapment following proximal avulsion of the MCL and posterior oblique ligament (POL) with the mid-substance of the MCL becoming entrapped in the joint, lying on the superior surface of the medial meniscus and extending up into the intercondylar notch. In addition, the medial patellar retinaculum was also entrapped in the medial aspect of the medial patellofemoral joint. MCL entrapment is best treated with expeditious surgical intervention and it is therefore crucial that the MRI findings are not overlooked. Details of the clinical assessment, MRI and operative findings are presented with a literature review of MCL entrapment. (orig.)

  14. Incarceration of the medial collateral ligament in the intercondylar notch following proximal avulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Edward; Williams, Martin; Robinson, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Intra-articular entrapment of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a rare but recognised complication of traumatic injury to the posteromedial corner (PMC) of the knee. Considering the MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee this complication is extremely rare with only a handful of cases describing MCL entrapment following distal avulsion of the MCL. We present the first known case of MCL entrapment following proximal avulsion of the MCL and posterior oblique ligament (POL) with the mid-substance of the MCL becoming entrapped in the joint, lying on the superior surface of the medial meniscus and extending up into the intercondylar notch. In addition, the medial patellar retinaculum was also entrapped in the medial aspect of the medial patellofemoral joint. MCL entrapment is best treated with expeditious surgical intervention and it is therefore crucial that the MRI findings are not overlooked. Details of the clinical assessment, MRI and operative findings are presented with a literature review of MCL entrapment. (orig.)

  15. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

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    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  16. Combined medial and lateral anatomic ligament reconstruction for chronic rotational instability of the ankle.

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    Buchhorn, Tomas; Sabeti-Aschraf, Manuel; Dlaska, Constantin E; Wenzel, Florian; Graf, Alexandra; Ziai, Pejman

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to extend knowledge on the arthroscopic evaluation of the unstable ankle joint and the outcome of ligament reconstruction on rotational instability. In contrast to previous studies, we investigated the combined repair of lateral and medial ligaments. Ninety-six patients underwent medial and lateral ligament reconstruction between 2006 and 2008, 81 of whom, with a mean age of 31.9 (range, 14 to 44) years, completed the 12-month followup and were therefore included in this study (Table 1). Clinical, radiographic, and concomitant arthroscopic examination was performed prior to the ligament stabilization. Postoperative followup included clinical and radiographic evaluation after 3, 6, and 12 months. Arthroscopy showed a lesion of the anterior fibulotalar ligament (AFTL), calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and tibiocalcanear ligament (TCL) (Deep part of deltoid ligament complex) in 67 patients. An avulsion of the proximal insertion point of the ATTL was additionally found in 14 cases. Clinical results 3 months after surgery showed a significant increase in the AOFAS-Hindfoot Score as well as a significant decrease of the Visual Analogue-Scale for pain (VAS) (p ankle joint in most cases has an injury of the lateral ligaments and a component of the deltoid, the TCL, but rarely with a combined lesion of the TCL and the anterior tibiotalar ligament (ATTL) (Superficial part of deltoid ligament complex). The combined lateral and medial ligament reconstruction with an anchor technique had a good clinical outcome with high patient satisfaction with few complications.

  17. Severe Degeneration of the Medial Collateral Ligament in Hallux Valgus: A Histopathologic Study in 12 Consecutive Patients

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    Prasitdumrong, Ittipol; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Reeboonlarb, Nitit; Poonpracha, Tara; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the degree and location of degenerative changes of the medial collateral ligament of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, using the lateral collateral ligament as a control, in patients undergoing hallux valgus correction. Materials and Methods A strip of medial and lateral collateral ligaments were biopsied from 12 consecutive patients (age 45 ± 4.8 years) with symptomatic hallux valgus. A blinded analysis of histopathology was performed by an experienced pathologist. Results The medial collateral ligament was significantly more degenerated compared to the lateral collateral ligament (x2 = 23.41, DF = 2, p hallux valgus correction. The Authors received no financial support for this study. PMID:24027461

  18. Development of Tissue-Engineered Ligaments: Elastin Promotes Regeneration of the Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament.

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    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kageyama, Satoshi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yoshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2017-12-21

    When ligaments are injured, reconstructive surgery is sometimes required to restore function. Methods of reconstructive surgery include transplantation of an artificial ligament and autotransplantation of a tendon. However, these methods have limitations related to the strength of the bone-ligament insertion and biocompatibility of the transplanted tissue after surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new reconstruction methods and pursue the development of artificial ligaments. Elastin is a major component of elastic fibers and ligaments. However, the role of elastin in ligament regeneration has not been described. Here, we developed a rabbit model of a medial collateral ligament (MCL) rupture and treated animal knees with exogenous elastin [100 µg/(0.5 mL·week)] for 6 or 12 weeks. Elastin treatment increased gene expression and protein content of collagen and elastin (gene expression, 6-fold and 42-fold, respectively; protein content, 1.6-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively), and also increased the elastic modulus of MCL increased with elastin treatment (2-fold) compared with the controls. Our data suggest that elastin is involved in the regeneration of damaged ligaments. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

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    Paul Della Torre, MD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medial collateral ligament injury during primary total knee arthroplasty is a recognised complication potentially resulting in valgus instability, suboptimal patient outcomes and a higher rate of revision or reoperation. Options for management include primary repair with or without augmentation, reconstruction or immediate conversion to prosthesis with greater constraint, in conjunction with various postoperative rehabilitation protocols. Inconsistent recommendations throughout the orthopaedic literature have made the approach to managing this complication problematic. The objective of this study was to review the available literature to date comparing intraoperative and postoperative management options for primary total knee arthroplasty complicated by recognised injury to the medial collateral ligament. This systematic literature review was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (#CRD42014008866 and performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines including a PRISMA flow diagram. Five articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. Each was a retrospective, observational cohort or case series with small numbers reported, inconsistent methodology and incompletely reported outcomes. Four of the five studies managing medial collateral ligament injury during total knee arthroplasty (47/84 patients with direct repair with or without autograft augmentation reported good outcomes with no revision or reoperation required for symptomatic instability over a follow-up period of 16 months to almost 8 years. The fifth study with a follow-up to 10 years and a high rate of conversion to unlinked semi constrained total knee arthroplasty implant (30/37 patients reported a greater incidence of revision due to instability, in patients in whom the medial collateral ligament injury was directly repaired without added constraint. Overall balance of evidence is in favour of satisfactory outcomes without symptomatic instability following direct repair with or without

  20. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: patient selection and perspectives

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    Baer MR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael R. Baer, Jeffrey A. Macalena Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Patellofemoral instability is a painful and often recurring disorder with many negative long-term consequences. After a period of failed nonoperative management, surgical intervention has been used to reduce the incidence of patellar subluxation and dislocations. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL reconstruction successfully addresses patellofemoral instability by restoring the deficient primary medial patellar soft tissue restraint. When planning MPFL reconstruction for instability, it is imperative to consider the patient’s unique anatomy including the tibial tuberosity–trochlear groove (TT–TG distance, trochlear dysplasia, and patella alta. Additionally, it is important to individualize surgical treatment in the skeletally immature, hypermobile, and athletic populations. Keywords: MPFL, indications, considerations, contraindications

  1. Patellofemoral pressure changes after static and dynamic medial patellofemoral ligament reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, A.; Hannink, G.; Lenting, A.; Groenen, K.; Koëter, S.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Kampen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue

  2. Patellofemoral Pressure Changes After Static and Dynamic Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, A.; Hannink, G.; Lenting, A.; Groenen, K.; Koeter, S.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue

  3. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

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    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2015-12-16

    The evaluation of viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament is fundamental to understand its physiological function and contribution as stabilizer for the selection of the methods of repair and reconstruction and for the development of scaffolds with adequate mechanical properties. In this work, 12 human specimens were tested to evaluate the time- and history-dependent non linear viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory formulated by Fung et al. (1972) and modified by Abramowitch and Woo (2004). The five constant of the QLV theory, used to describe the instantaneous elastic response and the reduced relaxation function on stress relaxation experiments, were successfully evaluated. It was found that the constant A was 1.21±0.96MPa and the dimensionless constant B was 26.03±4.16. The magnitude of viscous response, the constant C, was 0.11±0.02 and the initial and late relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2 were 6.32±1.76s and 903.47±504.73s respectively. The total stress relaxation was 32.7±4.7%. To validate our results, the obtained constants were used to evaluate peak stresses from a cyclic stress relaxation test on three different specimens. The theoretically predicted values fit the experimental ones demonstrating that the QLV theory could be used to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anchor proximal migration in the medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in skeletally immature patients

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    Fabiano Kupczik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL injury has been considered instrumental in lateral patellar instability after patellar dislocation. Consequently, the focus on the study of this ligament reconstruction has increased in recent years. The MPFL femoral anatomical origin point has great importance at the moment of reconstruction surgery, because a graft fixation in a non anatomical position may result in medial overload, medial subluxation of the patella or excessive tensioning of the graft with subsequent failure. In the pediatric population, the location of this point is highlighted by the presence of femoral physis. The literature is still controversial regarding the best placement of the graft. We describe two cases of skeletally immature patients in whom LPFM reconstruction was performed. The femoral fixation was through anchors that were placed above the physis. With the growth and development of the patients, the femoral origin point of the graft moved proximally, resulting in failure in these two cases.

  5. Clinical and radiological evaluation of the integrity of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments of the elbow in dogs

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    Montavon, P.M.; Savoldelli, D.

    1995-01-01

    In most cases of luxation of the elbow closed reduction constitutes the therapy of choice. Clinical retrospective studies showed signs of arthrosis in 50 % of the cases treated with this therapy, and persisting medial instability after the reduction in more than 50 % of the cases. In the present study the biomechanics of both the medial and the lateral collateral ligaments were analysed after selective severing. Severing of the medial collateral ligament led to an average increase of 30 deg of the pronation with the presence of crepitus on the lateral aspect of the elbow during passive motion. The medial instability of the elbow could be evidenced both clinically and radiographically. Severing of the lateral collateral ligament resulted in an average increase of 15 deg of the supination. Neither palpation nor radiological examination showed any evidence of subluxation

  6. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo-Eduardo; Monllau García, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical ...

  7. [Treatment of complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation with transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Wei; Shi, Zeng-Yuan; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Mao, Hai-Jiao

    2015-04-01

    To explore the operation methods and clinical effects of transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament in treating complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2006 to June 2012,26 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation underwent surgery. Transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament, additional clavical hoot plate and Kirschner wires fixation, were performed in all the patients. Among the patients, 18 patients were male and 8 patients were female, with an average age of 36.7 years old (ranged from 25 to 51 years). The duration from injury to operation was from 3 to 12 days with an average of 5 days. According to the Rockwood classification, 4 cases were grade III and 22 cases were grade V . Clinical manifestation included local swelling, tenderness with snapping, limitation of shoulder joint motion. In preoperative bilateral shoulder joint X-rays, the injured coracoclavicular distance was (16.2 ± 5.0) mm which was significantly wider than that of uninjured sides (7.6 ± 1.0) mm. Clinical results were evaluated according to X-rays and Constant-Murley score. All incisions obtained primary healing after operation without complication of infection, internal fixation breakage, redislocation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 30 months with an average of 18 months. Kirschner wires and internal fixation plate were removed at 1 month and 8-10 months after operation, respectively. At final follow-up, the motion of shoulder joint recovered to normal and a no pain joint was obtained. According to Constant-Murley score, 24 cases got excellent results and 2 cases good. There was no significant difference after operation between the injured coracoclavicular distance and the uninjured contralateral side [(7.7 ± 1.2) mm vs (7.6 ± 1.0) mm), P > 0.05]. Transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to

  8. Treatment of Medial Malleolus or Pure Deltoid Ligament Injury in Patients with Supination-External Rotation Type IV Ankle Fractures.

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    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-Zhang; Ma, Xin; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Xue

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of internal fixation on postoperative ankle function in patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures, including medial malleolus fractures and deltoid ligament injury. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients with medial structure injuries were enrolled in this study and assigned to the medial malleolus fracture group or the deltoid ligament group. The surgical procedures for the two groups were documented. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate or screw was removed from the lateral ankle. The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was used to assess ankle function. A total of 84 patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures had complete medical records and were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 44.16 years (range, 15-75). The patient sample included 39 males and 45 females. Overall, 49 patients (19 males and 30 females) suffered a medial malleolus fracture. The average age of these patients was 40.20 years (range, 15-75). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 81.6% (40 patients) of these patients. Overall, 35 patients (20 males and 15 females) experienced a deltoid ligament injury. The average age of these patients was 44.21 years (range, 17-73). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 11.5% (four patients) of these patients. Open reduction was performed in patients with medial malleolus fractures, and two 4.0-mm cannulated screws were used to fixate the posterior malleolus and the medial malleolus. The suture-anchor technique was used to repair the ligaments in patients with deltoid ligament injuries. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate and screws were removed from the lateral ankle in patients. The average follow-up period was 13.4 months (range, 11-17). The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was

  9. Dynamic Failure Properties of the Porcine Medial Collateral Ligament-Bone Complex for Predicting Injury in Automotive Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Louis; Billiar, Kristen; Ray, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to model the dynamic failure properties of ligaments and their attachment sites to facilitate the development of more realistic dynamic finite element models of the human lower extremities for use in automotive collision simulations. Porcine medial collateral ligaments were chosen as a test model due to their similarities in size and geometry with human ligaments. Each porcine medial collateral ligament-bone complex (n = 12) was held in a custom test fixture placed in a drop tower to apply an axial impulsive impact load, applying strain rates ranging from 0.005 s-1 to 145 s-1. The data from the impact tests were analyzed using nonlinear regression to construct model equations for predicting the failure load of ligament-bone complexes subjected to specific strain rates as calculated from finite element knee, thigh, and hip impact simulations. The majority of the ligaments tested failed by tibial avulsion (75%) while the remaining ligaments failed via mid-substance tearing. The failure load ranged from 384 N to 1184 N and was found to increase with the applied strain rate and the product of ligament length and cross-sectional area. The findings of this study indicate the force required to rupture the porcine MCL increases with the applied bone-to-bone strain rate in the range expected from high speed frontal automotive collisions. PMID:20461229

  10. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  11. MR imaging of medial collateral ligament injury and associated internal knee joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chae Ha; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee

    1996-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee, we used MR imaging to evaluate the characteristic findings in MCL tears and the frequency of associated knee joint injury. We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients within four weeks of MCL injury, analysed MR findings and correlated them with surgical findings. We evaluated discontinuity, heterogeneous signal intensity of MCL, thin band- like low signal intensity at MCL, facial edema, loss of clear demarcation of adjacent fat also combined bone injury, meniscus injury and other ligament injury. Complete MCL tears were present in 14 patients and partial tears in 12. Complete tears showed discontinuity of MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in 11 patients(79%);proximal MCL tears are more common than distal tears. Partial tears showed thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in seven patients (58%);all patient s with MCL injury showed fascial edema;in 12 patients there was loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. We could not, however, distinguish between complete tears and partial tears when MCL showed heterogeneous high signal intensity. Combined bone injury in MCL tears was found in eight patients(62%);the most common sites of this were the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau. There was associated injury involving other ligaments(ACL:50%;PCL:27%). Combined meniscus injury in MCL tears was present in 17 patients and the most common meniscus site(50%) is the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Complete MCL tears showed discontinuity of MCL and partial tears showed a thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL. All patients with MCL injury showed fascial edema, and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. Various other injuries combine with MCL tears. MR imaging is therefore useful in the evaluation of medial collateral ligament injury and

  12. Opening the medial tibiofemoral compartment by pie-crusting the superficial medial collateral ligament at its tibial insertion: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussignol, X; Gauthe, R; Rahali, S; Mandereau, C; Courage, O; Duparc, F

    2015-09-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of tears in the middle and posterior parts of the medial meniscus can be difficult when the medial tibiofemoral compartment is tight. Passage of the instruments may damage the cartilage. The primary objective of this cadaver study was to perform an arthroscopic evaluation of medial tibiofemoral compartment opening after pie-crusting release (PCR) of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL) at its distal insertion on the tibia. The secondary objective was to describe the anatomic relationships at the site of PCR (saphenous nerve, medial saphenous vein). We studied 10 cadaver knees with no history of invasive procedures. The femur was held in a vise with the knee flexed at 45°, and the medial aspect of the knee was dissected. PCR of the sMCL was performed under arthroscopic vision, in the anteroposterior direction, at the distal tibial insertion of the sMCL, along the lower edge of the tibial insertion of the semi-tendinosus tendon. Continuous 300-N valgus stress was applied to the ankle. Opening of the medial tibiofemoral compartment was measured arthroscopically using graduated palpation hooks after sequential PCR of the sMCL. The compartment opened by 1mm after release of the anterior third, 2.3mm after release of the anterior two-thirds, and 3.9mm after subtotal release. A femoral fracture occurred in 1 case, after completion of all measurements. Both the saphenous nerve and the medial saphenous vein were located at a distance from the PCR site in all 10 knees. PCR of the sMCL is chiefly described as a ligament-balancing method during total knee arthroplasty. This procedure is usually performed at the joint line, where it opens the compartment by 4-6mm at the most, with some degree of unpredictability. PCR of the sMCL at its distal tibial insertion provides gradual opening of the compartment, to a maximum value similar to that obtained with PCR at the joint space. The lower edge of the semi-tendinosus tendon is a valuable landmark

  13. Patellar dislocations in children, adolescents and adults: A comparative MRI study of medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and trochlear groove anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcarek, Peter; Walde, Tim Alexander; Frosch, Stephan; Schuettrumpf, Jan P.; Wachowski, Martin M.; Stuermer, Klaus M.; Frosch, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The first aim was to compare medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns in children and adolescents after first-time lateral patellar dislocations with the injury patterns in adults. The second aim was to evaluate the trochlear groove anatomy at different developmental stages of the growing knee joint. Materials and methods: Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were collected from 22 patients after first-time patellar dislocations. The patients were aged 14.2 years (a range of 11-15 years). The injury pattern of the medial patellofemoral ligament was analysed, and trochlear dysplasia was evaluated with regard to sulcus angle, trochlear depth and trochlear asymmetry. The control data consisted of MR images from 21 adult patients who were treated for first-time lateral patellar dislocation. Results: After patellar dislocation, injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament was found in 90.2% of the children and in 100% of the adult patients. Injury patterns of the medial patellofemoral ligament were similar between the study group and the control group with regard to injury at the patellar attachment site (Type I), to the midsubstance (Type II) and to injury at the femoral origin (Type III) (all p > 0.05). Combined lesions (Type IV) were significantly less frequently observed in adults when compared to the study group (p = 0.02). The magnitude of trochlear dysplasia was similar in children, adolescents and adults with regard to all three of the measured parameter-values (all p > 0.05). In addition, the articular cartilage had a significant effect on the distal femur geometry in both paediatrics and adults. Conclusion: First, the data from our study indicated that the paediatric medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns, as seen on MR images, were similar to those in adults. Second, the trochlear groove anatomy and the magnitude of trochlear dysplasia, respectively, did not differ between adults and paediatrics with patellar instability. Thus

  14. Patellar dislocations in children, adolescents and adults: A comparative MRI study of medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and trochlear groove anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcarek, Peter, E-mail: peter.balcarek@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Walde, Tim Alexander; Frosch, Stephan; Schuettrumpf, Jan P.; Wachowski, Martin M.; Stuermer, Klaus M. [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Frosch, Karl-Heinz [Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Asklepios Clinic St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The first aim was to compare medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns in children and adolescents after first-time lateral patellar dislocations with the injury patterns in adults. The second aim was to evaluate the trochlear groove anatomy at different developmental stages of the growing knee joint. Materials and methods: Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were collected from 22 patients after first-time patellar dislocations. The patients were aged 14.2 years (a range of 11-15 years). The injury pattern of the medial patellofemoral ligament was analysed, and trochlear dysplasia was evaluated with regard to sulcus angle, trochlear depth and trochlear asymmetry. The control data consisted of MR images from 21 adult patients who were treated for first-time lateral patellar dislocation. Results: After patellar dislocation, injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament was found in 90.2% of the children and in 100% of the adult patients. Injury patterns of the medial patellofemoral ligament were similar between the study group and the control group with regard to injury at the patellar attachment site (Type I), to the midsubstance (Type II) and to injury at the femoral origin (Type III) (all p > 0.05). Combined lesions (Type IV) were significantly less frequently observed in adults when compared to the study group (p = 0.02). The magnitude of trochlear dysplasia was similar in children, adolescents and adults with regard to all three of the measured parameter-values (all p > 0.05). In addition, the articular cartilage had a significant effect on the distal femur geometry in both paediatrics and adults. Conclusion: First, the data from our study indicated that the paediatric medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns, as seen on MR images, were similar to those in adults. Second, the trochlear groove anatomy and the magnitude of trochlear dysplasia, respectively, did not differ between adults and paediatrics with patellar instability. Thus

  15. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  16. Treatment of recurrent patellar dislocation via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Hongbo; He, Yun; Si, Yu; Zhou, Hongyu; Wang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocations were treated via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy, and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligaments. Between October 2013 and March 2017, 52 cases of recurrent patellar dislocation [27 males and 25 females; age, 16-47 years (mean, 21.90 years)] were treated. Arthroscopic exploration was performed and patellofemoral joint cartilage injuries were repaired. It was subsequently determined whether it was necessary to release the lateral patellofemoral support belt. Pre-operative measurements were used to decide whether tibial tubercle osteotomy was required. Medial patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed using autologous semitendinosus tendons. Smith and Nephew model 3.5 line anchors were used to double-anchor the medial patellofemoral margin. On the femoral side, the medial patellofemoral ligament was fixed using 7-cm, absorbable, interfacial compression screws. All cases were followed for 1-40 months (average, 21 months). The Q angle, tibial tuberosity trochlear groove distance, Insall-Salvati index, patellofemoral angle, lateral patellofemoral angle and lateral shift were evaluated on X-Ray images using the picture archiving and communication system. Subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee joint functional scores and Lysholm scores were recorded. Post-operative fear was absent, and no patellar re-dislocation or re-fracture was noted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patellofemoral angle (0.22±4.23°), lateral patellofemoral angle (3.44±1.30°), and lateral shift (0.36+0.14°) differed significantly from the pre-operative values (all, Ppatellofemoral ligament was effective.

  17. Avaliação ultraestrutural do colágeno do ligamento colateral medial associado ao ligamento oblíquo da articulação do cotovelo de cão SRD após ensaio de tração - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1324 Collagen ultra-structural evaluation of the mongrel dog’s medial collateral ligament associated with the oblique ligament after strain - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1324

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Regina Rossi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou observar a disposição das fibras colágenas do ligamento colateral medial da articulação do cotovelo do cão, quando associado ao ligamento oblíquo submetido a ensaio de tração. Para tanto, foram utilizadas 18 articulações, divididas em três grupos, em que um grupo teve o ligamento colateral medial coletado e não tracionado, outro teve o ligamento colateral medial testado isoladamente e o outro grupo teve ambos os ligamentos (colateral medial e oblíquo testados associadamente. O ligamento colateral medial, verificado por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura, apresentou um padrão ondulado e reticular das fibras colágenas quando não submetidos ao ensaio de tração, o qual não foi destruído totalmente quando associado ao ligamento oblíquo, após o ensaio. Quando analisado isoladamente, o ligamento colateral medial após ensaio de tração perde totalmente o padrão reticular, demonstrando o desgaste das fibras por resistir à tensão. O ligamento oblíquo, portanto, contribui para a integridade da arquitetura das fibras colágenas do ligamento colateral medialUltrastructural evaluation of the collagen of the mongrel dog medial collateral ligament associated to the oblique ligament after strain. The present work aimed to observe the disposition of the collagen fibres of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow joint of the dog, when associated to the oblique ligament. Thus, 18 articulations were used, divided in three groups. A group had the medial collateral ligament collected and not stretched, other group had the collateral medial ligament stretched separately and the other group had both ligaments (medial collateral and oblique stretched associately. The medial collateral ligament examined by scanning electron microscopy presented a wavy and reticular pattern of the collagen fibres when not submitted to strain, which was not totally destroyed when it was associated to the oblique

  18. An Isolated Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Witoński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of the medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction with a medial strip of patellar tendon autograft after a minimum 2-year followup. Ten patients (10 knees were operated on by one surgeon, according to the modified technique, described by Camanho, without any bone plug at free graft end. The mean age of the patients was 27.2 years (ranging from 18 to 42 years. The mean follow-up period was 3 years and 7 months. All patients were reviewed prospectively. At the last follow-up visit, all the patients demonstrated a significant improvement in terms of patellofemoral joint stability, all aspects of the KOOS questionnaire, and Kujala et al.’s score (59.7 points preoperatively and 84.4 points at the last followup. No patient revealed recurrent dislocation. The SF-36 score revealed a significant improvement in bodily pain, general health, physical role functioning, social role functioning, and physical functioning domains. The described MPFL reconstruction with the use of the medial 1/3rd of patella tendon is an effective procedure that gives satisfactorily patellofemoral joint functions, improves the quality of life, and provides much pain relief. It is relatively simple, surgically not extensive, and economically cost-effective procedure.

  19. Quadriceps Tendon Autograft Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian; Steensen, Robert; Gföller, Peter; Lawton, Robert

    2018-06-01

    Critically evaluate the published literature related to quadriceps tendon (QT) medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Hamstring tendon (HT) MPFL reconstruction techniques have been shown to successfully restore patella stability, but complications including patella fracture are reported. Quadriceps tendon (QT) reconstruction techniques with an intact graft pedicle on the patella side have the advantage that patella bone tunnel drilling and fixation are no longer needed, reducing risk of patella fracture. Several QT MPFL reconstruction techniques, including minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches, have been published with promising clinical results and fewer complications than with HT techniques. Parallel laboratory studies have shown macroscopic anatomy and biomechanical properties of QT are more similar to native MPFL than hamstring (HS) HT, suggesting QT may more accurately restore native joint kinematics. Quadriceps tendon MPFL reconstruction, via both open and MIS techniques, have promising clinical results and offer valuable alternatives to HS grafts for primary and revision MPFL reconstruction in both children and adults.

  20. Structure and function, injury, pathology, and treatment of the medial collateral ligament of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Aaron; Matcuk, George; Patel, Dakshesh; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Hartshorn, Timothy; Forrester, Deborah; White, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. There is a spectrum of injury severity, and injuries may be acute or chronic. The MCL is also frequently injured in conjunction with other knee structures. Clinical evaluation of the knee is important to assess the degree of surgical acuity, but magnetic resonance imaging can provide details about the injury that may not be obvious clinically. In addition to injury, MCL bursitis can occur and may be treated with needle aspiration and corticosteroid injection. This review article covers the anatomy and biomechanics of the MCL, its injury patterns and approach to management, and MCL bursitis.

  1. Treatment of peroneal tendon dislocation and coexisting medial and lateral ligamentous laxity in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, Pejman; Sabeti-Aschraf, Manuel; Fehske, Kai; Dlaska, Constantin E; Funovics, Philipp; Wenzel, Florian; Graf, Alexandra; Buchhorn, Tomas

    2011-06-01

    Acute dislocation of the peroneal tendon is caused by massive combined flexion-torsion trauma supported by preexisting ligamentous laxity of the ankle joint. This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcome of combined treatment of peroneal tendon dislocation and lateral and medial ligamentous laxity. Between 2005 and 2007, forty-two patients with peroneal tendon dislocation and coexisting ligamentous laxity were treated. The superior extensor retinaculum was reconstructed using anchor technique and periosteal flap repair, whereas the preexisting ligamentous laxity with regard to the extensor inferior retinaculum was addressed using anchor reconstruction. All patients underwent arthroscopy prior to surgery. Thirty-eight of a total of 42 patients (aged 17-31) completed the 24-month follow-up. Clinical and arthroscopic examination was accomplished consistently by always the same two surgeons. Postoperative follow-up comprised clinical evaluation after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Clinical results showed a significant (Pankle joint following arthroscopy results in good clinical outcome and high patient satisfaction. Case series, Level IV.

  2. Biomechanical and histologic evaluation of tissue engineered ligaments using chitosan and hyaluronan hybrid polymer fibers: a rabbit medial collateral ligament reconstruction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Toru; Majima, Tokifumi; Sawaguchi, Naohiro; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Minami, Akio

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we used a rabbit medial collateral ligament reconstruction model to evaluate a novel chitosan-based hyaluronan hybrid polymer fiber scaffold for ligament tissue engineering and to examine whether mechanical forces exerted in an in vivo model increased extracellular matrix production by seeded fibroblasts. Scaffolds were used 2 weeks after incubation with fibroblasts obtained from the same rabbit in a cell-seeded scaffold (CSS) group and without cells in a noncell-seeded scaffold (NCSS) group. At 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, the failure loads of the engineered ligaments in the CSS groups were significantly greater than those in the NCSS groups. At 6 weeks after surgery, the reconstructed tissue of the CSS group was positive for type I collagen, whereas that in the NCSS group was negative for type I collagen. At 12 weeks after surgery, the reconstructed tissue stained positive for type I collagen in the CSS group, but negative in the NCSS group. Our results indicate that the scaffold material enhanced the production of type I collagen and led to improved mechanical strength in the engineered ligament in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  4. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Resorlu Mustafa; Doner Davut; Karatag Ozan; Toprak Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed al...

  5. Morphology of the medial collateral ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Thomas J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative knowledge on the anatomy of the medial collateral ligament (MCL is important for treatment of MCL injury and for MCL release during total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The objective of this study was to quantitatively determine the morphology of the MCL of human knees. Methods 10 cadaveric human knees were dissected to investigate the MCL anatomy. The specimens were fixed in full extension and this position was maintained during the dissection and morphometric measurements. The outlines of the insertion sites of the superficial MCL (sMCL and deep MCL (dMCL were digitized using a 3D digitizing system. Results The insertion areas of the superficial MCL (sMCL were 348.6 ± 42.8 mm2 and 79.7 ± 17.6 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The insertion areas of the deep MCL (dMCL were 63.6 ± 13.4 mm2 and 71.9 ± 14.8 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The distances from the centroids of the tibial and femoral insertions of the sMCL to the tibial and femoral joint line were 62.4 ± 5.5 mm and 31.1 ± 4.6 mm, respectively. The distances from the centroids of dMCL in the tibial insertion and the femoral insertion to the tibial and femoral joint line were 6.5 ± 1.3 mm and 20.5 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The distal portion of the dMCL (meniscotibial ligament - MTL was approximately 1.7 times wider than the proximal portion of the dMCL (meniscofemoral ligament - MFL, whereas the MFL was approximately 3 times longer than the MTL. Conclusions The morphologic data on the MCL may provide useful information for improving treatments of MCL-related pathology and performing MCL release during TKA.

  6. O papel do ligamento oblíquo no comportamento mecânico do ligamento colateral medial da articulação do cotovelo de cães SRD – alguns aspectos biomecânicos - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1323 The role of the oblique ligament in the mechanical behavior of the medial collateral ligament of the mongrel dog elbow joint – some biomechanical aspects - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1323

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Regina Rossi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste trabalho foi analisar a contribuição mecânica do ligamento oblíquo frente ao ligamento colateral medial na articulação do cotovelo do cão. Quinze cães foram utilizados para a realização de ensaio de tração para a análise da carga, alongamento e tenacidade dos ligamentos colateral medial e oblíquo, isolados ou associados. A carga máxima e o valor da tenacidade suportada pelo ligamento colateral medial isolado foram significativamente maiores em relação ao ligamento oblíquo isolado. Quando associados, apresentaram um incremento na carga máxima, no alongamento e na tenacidade em relação aos ligamentos analisados isoladamente. Concluiu-se, portanto, que o ligamento oblíquo tem um importante papel na estabilidade da articulação do cotovelo do cão, já que aumenta a resistência à tração do ligamento colateral medial, um dos principais estabilizadores da referida articulaçãoThis study investigated the oblique ligament mechanical contribution to the medial collateral ligament of the canine elbow joint. Fifteen dogs were used for the study of the failure load, displacement, and energy absorption of the medial collateral and oblique ligaments of the canine elbow joint, associate and separately in the joint. Medial collateral ligament failure load and energy absorption were significantly higher in relation to the isolated oblique ligament. When the ligaments were associated in the joint, they presented an increment in failure load, displacement and energy absorption in relation to the ligaments analyzed separately. It was concluded, therefore, that the oblique ligament could have an important paper in the stability of the canine elbow joint, as it favors the medial collateral ligament resistance to the tensile load, one of the main stabilizer of the elbow joint

  7. Case report - calcification of the medial collateral ligament of the knee with simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamawal, Yama; Steinert, Andre F; Holzapfel, Boris M; Rudert, Maximilian; Barthel, Thomas

    2016-07-13

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is a very rare disease. We report on a case of a patient with a calcifying lesion within the MCL and simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff in both shoulders. Calcification of the MCL was diagnosed both via x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was successfully treated surgically. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff was successfully treated applying conservative methods. This is the first case report of a patient suffering from both a calcifying lesion within the medial collateral ligament and calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff in both shoulders. Clinical symptoms, radio-morphological characteristics and macroscopic features were very similar and therefore it can be postulated that the underlying pathophysiology is the same in both diseases. Our experience suggests that magnetic resonance imaging and x-ray are invaluable tools for the diagnosis of this inflammatory calcifying disease of the ligament, and that surgical repair provides a good outcome if conservative treatment fails. It seems that calcification of the MCL is more likely to require surgery than calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. However, the exact reason for this remains unclear to date.

  8. Clinical Outcomes After Isolated Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Patellar Instability Among Patients With Trochlear Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joseph N; Brady, Jacqueline M; Kalbian, Irene L; Strickland, Sabrina M; Ryan, Claire Berdelle; Nguyen, Joseph T; Shubin Stein, Beth E

    2018-03-01

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction has become one of the most common and widely used procedures to regain stability among patients with recurrent lateral patellar dislocation. While recent studies demonstrated low recurrence rates, improved patient-reported outcome measures, and a high rate of return to sports, limited literature explored its effectiveness as an isolated intervention in the context of trochlear dysplasia. To determine the efficacy of isolated MPFL reconstruction in treating patellar instability in the setting of trochlear dysplasia. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent uni- or bilateral medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for patellofemoral instability with a minimum 2-year follow-up. No osteotomies were included. Pre- and postoperative assessment included ligamentous laxity, patellar crepitus, tilt, translation, apprehension, and radiographic features, including tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance, Dejour classification, and Caton-Deschamps index. A total of 121 MPFL reconstructions were included. Mean age at surgery was 23.8 years, and 4.4 dislocation events occurred before surgery. Mean follow-up was 44 months; 76% of patients were female. Mean preoperative TT-TG ratio was 13.5, and mean Caton-Deschamps ratio was 1.2; 92% of patients had Dejour B, C, or D trochlear dysplasia. Kujala score improved from 55.0 preoperatively to 90.0 ( P patellofemoral instability, despite the presence of trochlear dysplasia. Most patients are able to return to sports by 1 year postoperatively at the same or higher level of play.

  9. Laxity of the elbow after experimental excision of the radial head and division of the medial collateral ligament. Efficacy of ligament repair and radial head prosthetic replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S.L.; Deutch, S.R.; Olsen, B.S.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the stabilising effect of prosthetic replacement of the radial head and repair of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) after excision of the radial head and section of the MCL in five cadaver elbows. Division of the MCL increased valgus angulation (mean 3.9 +/- 1.5 degrees) and internal...

  10. Rupture of posterior cruciate ligament leads to radial displacement of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Deng, Zhenhan; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Wenfeng; Hu, Yihe; Liao, Zhan; Li, Kanghua; He, Hongbo

    2017-07-11

    To explore the association between the rupture of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the radial displacement of medial meniscus under the conditions of different flexion and various axial loads. The radial displacement value of medial meniscus was measured for the specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle (ALB), 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle (PMB), and 12 complete ruptures. The measurement was conducted at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion angles under 200 N, 400 N, 600 N, 800 N and 1000 N of axial loads respectively. The displacement values of medial meniscus of the ALB rupture group increased at 0° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N, and at 30°, 60° and 90° flexion under all loads in comparison with the PCL intact group. The displacement values of the PMB rupture group was higher at 0° and 90° flexion under all loads, and at 30° and 60° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N loads. The displacement of the PCL complete rupture group increased at all flexion angles under all loads. Either partial or complete rupture of the PCL can increase in the radial displacement of the medial meniscus, which may explain the degenerative changes that occuring in the medial meniscus due to PCL injury. Therefore, early reestablishment of the PCL is necessarily required in order to maintain stability of the knee joint after PCL injury.

  11. Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The medial collateral ligament of the ankle joint also known as the deltoid ligament, is a multifascicular group of ligaments. It can be divided into a superficial and deep group of fibers originating from the medial malleolus to insert in the talus, calcaneus, and navicular bones. Wide variations have been noted in ...

  12. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo E; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical indication or inappropriate surgical technique/patient selection; (2) a technical error; and (3) an incorrect assessment of the concomitant risk factors for instability. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the MPFL and cautiousness with the imaging techniques while favoring clinical over radiological findings and the use of common sense to determine the adequate surgical technique for each particular case, are critical to minimizing MPFL surgery failure. Additionally, our approach to dealing with failure after primary MPFL reconstruction is also presented. PMID:28251062

  13. [Application of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release in arthroscopic surgery for posterior horn of 
medial meniscus in knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihong; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele; Li, Ding; Yang, Yang; Chen, You

    2017-09-28

    To explore the effectiveness and safety of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release (MCL) in treating posterior horn of medial meniscus (PHMM) tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint.
 Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients with PHMM tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint were admitted to our department from January, 2013 to December, 2014. All patients were performed pie-crusting the MCL release at its tibial insertion with 18-gauge intravenous needle. All patients were evaluated by valgus stress test and bilateral valgus stress radiograph at postoperative 1st day, 4th week and 12th week. Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Lysholm scores, Tegner scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were recorded at the 1st, 3th, 6th month follow-up, then follow-up every 6 months.
 Results: The mean follow-up was 28 (24-36) months. All cases were negative in valgus stress test. MCL rupture, femoral fracture, articular cartilage lesion and neurovascular injury were not found at the last follow-up. The median medial joint space width of affected side and unaffected side for valgus stress radiographs were 6.8 mm and 4.3 mm (P0.05) at the 12th week, respectively. VAS scores was changed from 4.5±1.5 preoperatively to 1.7±1.0 at the final follow-up (t=16.561, Pjoint.

  14. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  15. Medial collateral ligament tear entrapped within a proximal tibial physeal separation: imaging findings and operative reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAnally, James L.; Eberhardt, Steven C.; Mlady, Gary W. [University of New Mexico, Department of Radiology, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jennifer; Bosch, Patrick [University of New Mexico, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Entrapped soft tissues such as periosteum and tendons have been described within joints and physeal fractures in the literature and frequently result in irreducible fractures and posttraumatic growth disturbances. We believe this case represents a novel presentation of acute, preoperative, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging diagnosis of a torn medial collateral ligament entrapped within a proximal tibial physeal separation. This case is presented with MR imaging and operative correlation of the findings. (orig.)

  16. Medial collateral ligament tear entrapped within a proximal tibial physeal separation: imaging findings and operative reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAnally, James L.; Eberhardt, Steven C.; Mlady, Gary W.; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer; Bosch, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Entrapped soft tissues such as periosteum and tendons have been described within joints and physeal fractures in the literature and frequently result in irreducible fractures and posttraumatic growth disturbances. We believe this case represents a novel presentation of acute, preoperative, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging diagnosis of a torn medial collateral ligament entrapped within a proximal tibial physeal separation. This case is presented with MR imaging and operative correlation of the findings. (orig.)

  17. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  18. Biomechanical study using fuzzy systems to quantify collagen fiber recruitment and predict creep of the rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A F; Taha, M M Reda; Thornton, G M; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    2005-06-01

    In normal daily activities, ligaments are subjected to repeated loads, and respond to this environment with creep and fatigue. While progressive recruitment of the collagen fibers is responsible for the toe region of the ligament stress-strain curve, recruitment also represents an elegant feature to help ligaments resist creep. The use of artificial intelligence techniques in computational modeling allows a large number of parameters and their interactions to be incorporated beyond the capacity of classical mathematical models. The objective of the work described here is to demonstrate a tool for modeling creep of the rabbit medial collateral ligament that can incorporate the different parameters while quantifying the effect of collagen fiber recruitment during creep. An intelligent algorithm was developed to predict ligament creep. The modeling is performed in two steps: first, the ill-defined fiber recruitment is quantified using the fuzzy logic. Second, this fiber recruitment is incorporated along with creep stress and creep time to model creep using an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system. The model was trained and tested using an experimental database including creep tests and crimp image analysis. The model confirms that quantification of fiber recruitment is important for accurate prediction of ligament creep behavior at physiological loads.

  19. Anatomic feature of deltoid ligament attachment in posteromedial osteochondral lesion of talar dome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Sawa, Mikiya; Ikuta, Yasunari; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsuyuguchi, Yusuke; Adachi, Nobuo

    2018-03-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) are recognized as being commonly associated with trauma. However, the etiology of OLT remains unclear. In the case of a posteromedial lesion of OLT (medial OLT), the deep layer of the deltoid ligament is located close to the medial OLT, and this relationship between a medial lesion and deltoid ligament could be a risk factor for medial OLT. The purpose of this study is to investigate the unique anatomic feature of the deep deltoid attachment to the talus in patients with medial OLT compared with patients with non-medial OLT. Forty ankles with medial OLT and 40 ankles without medial OLT were retrospectively reviewed in this study. On the coronal images of MRI, the attachment of deltoid ligament was measured. The continuity of the osteochondral fragment and its bed was evaluated on MRI and arthroscopic findings. Coronal MRI images showed that the attachment of the deep deltoid ligament to the medial OLT was broader and located more proximally than in non-medial OLT. The continuity of fibers from the insertion site of deltoid ligament to the talus to the osteochondral fragment was observed (76.7%). In the arthroscopic findings, the osteochondral fragment was obviously connected to the talus at the medial site in 85.2% of feet. The location of the deep deltoid ligament attachment to the medial OLT was more proximal and there was the possibility of these anatomic feature might contribute to the pathogenesis of medial OLT. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A quantitative comparison of morphological and histological characteristics of collagen in the rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu

    2013-12-01

    Collagen fiber is one of the critical factors in determining mechanical properties of ligaments and both the morphological and histological characteristics of collagen have been widely studied. However, there was still no consensus about whether the morphological characteristics of collagen correlated with its histological characteristics in physiological ligaments. Rabbit medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) were measured under a transmission electron microscope and a polarized light microscope plus picrosirius red-staining to obtain the distributions of collagen fibril diameters and types at different anatomical sites of rabbit MCLs, respectively. The correlation between the fibril diameter and type was determined by a correlation analysis. The collagen fibril diameters at the different anatomical sites had different distributions (unimodal or bimodal) and mean fibril diameters were found to increase significantly from the anterior part to the posterior part (P=0.0482) as well as from the proximal to the distal sections (P=0.0208). Type I collagen in the core portion of MCLs was significantly less than at the other four peripheral areas (P0.05). The low coefficient in the correlation analysis (r=0.3759) demonstrated collagen fibril diameters had no correlation with collagen types. This may provide a new view of collagen types in studying the mechanical behavior of ligaments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Medial tibial “spackling” to lessen chronic medial tibial soft tissue irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Martin, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique, utilitarian reconstructive treatment option known as tibial “spackling” for chronic, localized medial joint line pain corresponding with progressive radiographic peripheral medial tibial bone loss beneath a well-fixed revision total knee arthroplasty tibial baseplate. It is believed that this localized pain is due to chronic irritation of the medial capsule and collateral ligament from the prominent medial edge of the tibial component. In the setting of failed nonoperative treatment, our experience with utilizing bone cement to reconstruct the medial tibial bone defect and create a smooth medial tibial surface has been successful in eliminating chronic medial soft tissue irritation.

  2. Enhanced Medial Collateral Ligament Healing using Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Dosage Effects on Cellular Response and Cytokine Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saether, Erin E.; Chamberlain, Connie S.; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn R.; Li, Wan Ju; Brickson, Stacey L.; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential therapeutic applications for musculoskeletal injuries due to their ability to differentiate into several tissue cell types and modulate immune and inflammatory responses. These immune-modulatory properties were examined in vivo during early stage rat medial collateral ligament healing. Two different cell doses (low dose 1×106 or high dose 4×106 MSCs) were administered at the time of injury and compared with normal ligament healing at days 5 and 14 post-injury. At both times, the high dose MSC group demonstrated a significant decrease in M2 macrophages compared to controls. At day 14, fewer M1 macrophages were detected in the low dose group compared to the high dose group. These results, along with significant changes in procollagen I, proliferating cells, and endothelialization suggest that MSCs can alter the cellular response during healing in a dose-dependent manner. The higher dose ligaments also had increased expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines at day 5 (IL-1β, IFNγ, IL-2) and increased expression of IL-12 at day 14. Mechanical testing at day 14 revealed increased failure strength and stiffness in low dose ligaments compared to controls. Based on these improved mechanical properties, MSCs enhanced functional healing when applied at a lower dose. Different doses of MSCs uniquely affected the cellular response and cytokine expression in healing ligaments. Interestingly, the lower dose of cells proved to be most effective in improving functional properties. PMID:24174129

  3. Fibril deformation under load of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick, Johnathan L; Abusara, Ziad; Andrews, Stephen H; Xu, Minjia; Khurshid, Saad; Chatha, Jansher; Hart, David A; Shrive, Nigel G

    2018-04-10

    Microscopic visualization under load of the region connecting ligaments/tendons to bone, the enthesis, has been performed previously; however, specific investigation of individual fibril deformation may add insight to such studies. Detailed visualization of fibril deformation would inform on the mechanical strategies employed by this tissue in connecting two mechanically disparate materials. Clinically, an improved understanding of enthesis mechanics may help guide future restorative efforts for torn or injured ligaments/tendons, where the enthesis is often a point of weakness. In this study, a custom ligament/tendon enthesis loading device was designed and built, a unique method of sample preparation was devised, and second harmonic and two-photon fluorescence microscopy were used to capture the fibril-level load response of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses. A focus was given to investigation of the mechanical problem of fibril embedment. Resultant images indicate a rapid (occurring over approximately 60 μm) change in fibril orientation at the interface of ligament/tendon and calcified fibrocartilage early in the loading regime, before becoming relatively constant. Such a change in fibril angle helps confirm the materially graded region demonstrated by others, while, in this case, providing additional insight into fibril bending. We speculate that the scale of the mechanical problem (i.e., fibril diameters being on the order of 250 nm) allows fibrils to bend over the small (relative to the imaging field of view, but large relative to fibril diameter) distances observed; thus, potentially lessening required embedment lengths. Nevertheless, this behavior merits further investigation to be confirmed. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Medial Malleolar "Fleck Sign" May Predict Ankle Instability in Ligamentous Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Kenneth; Schneiderman, Brian Andrew; Shymon, Stephen Joseph; Harris, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Ankle joint stability dictates treatment in ligamentous supination external rotation ankle injuries (LSERAI). Investigation of the medial structures that support the ankle mortise is critical, and a small avulsion fracture, or "fleck", of the medial malleolus is occasionally encountered. This study aimed to assess the utility of this medial malleolus fleck sign (MMFS) in diagnosing instability requiring surgery in LSERAI. This retrospective observational study examined 166 LSERAI at a single level I trauma center. A standardized diagnostic and treatment protocol for ankle fractures was followed. LSERAI at presentation were reported as having a normal, dynamically wide, or statically wide medial clear space. Patient demographics, MMFS characteristics, and the use of operative management were recorded. MMFS incidence in the cohort was 16 (10%) of 166 and was present in 25% of patients with unstable LSERAI. Fifteen (94%) of 16 patients with a MMFS were deemed to have an unstable LSERAI (P < .005). MMFS had a 25% sensitivity and 99% specificity in diagnosing an unstable LSERAI. For the subgroup of patients without a statically wide medial clear space, MMFS had a 50% sensitivity and 99% specificity in determining instability. A MMFS may be indicative of an unstable LSERAI. With previous MRI studies demonstrating complete deltoid disruption in unstable LSERAI, we deduce the MMFS may be associated with extensive deltoid incompetence. The MMFS may help to diagnose a complete deltoid injury in LSERAI with a normal medial clear space, which could influence treatment and reduce patient morbidity, radiation exposure, and healthcare costs. Level III: Retrospective Cohort Study.

  5. Elastin governs the mechanical response of medial collateral ligament under shear and transverse tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Heath B; Valdez, William R; Scott, Sara A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Elastin is a highly extensible structural protein network that provides near-elastic resistance to deformation in biological tissues. In ligament, elastin is localized between and along the collagen fibers and fascicles. When ligament is stretched along the primary collagen axis, elastin supports a relatively high percentage of load. We hypothesized that elastin may also provide significant load support under elongation transverse to the primary collagen axis and shear along the collagen axis. Quasi-static transverse tensile and shear material tests were performed to quantify the mechanical contributions of elastin during deformation of porcine medial collateral ligament. Dose response studies were conducted to determine the level of elastase enzymatic degradation required to produce a maximal change in the mechanical response. Maximal changes in peak stress occurred after 3h of treatment with 2U/ml porcine pancreatic elastase. Elastin degradation resulted in a 60-70% reduction in peak stress and a 2-3× reduction in modulus for both test protocols. These results demonstrate that elastin provides significant resistance to elongation transverse to the collagen axis and shear along the collagen axis while only constituting 4% of the tissue dry weight. The magnitudes of the elastin contribution to peak transverse and shear stress were approximately 0.03 MPa, as compared to 2 MPa for axial tensile tests, suggesting that elastin provides a highly anisotropic contribution to the mechanical response of ligament and is the dominant structural protein resisting transverse and shear deformation of the tissue. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  7. Repair of Medial Patellofemoral, Ligament Improves Patellar, Tracking in Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, R Michael; Ziemba-Davis, Mary; Smits, Shelly; Bicos, James

    2015-11-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is essential to maintain patella stability; however, its role in total knee replacement (TKR) has not been studied. Forty-six consecutive TKRs in 40 patients were reviewed. Standard closure was performed in 29 TKRs. The MPFL was isolated and anatomically re-approximated in 17 subsequent TKRs. Blinded radiographic evaluation of patellar tilt and subluxation was performed preoperatively and 4 months postoperatively. Despite greater preoperative lateral tilt, the MPFL repair group demonstrated greater correction in patellar tilt compared with the standard closure group (p = 0.02). Patellar tracking also was optimized in the MPFL group, despite equivalent preoperative lateral patellar subluxation in the two groups. Simple repair of the MPFL at arthrotomy closure appears to optimize patellar stability radiographically and may improve long-term results by minimizing patellar complications and wear.

  8. Novel magnetic resonance imaging evaluation for valgus instability of the knee caused by medial collateral ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuma, Hisanori; Abe, Nobuhiro; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Uchida, Youichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    Instability of the knee after the medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is usually assessed with the manual valgus stress test, even though, in recent years, it has become possible to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the assessment of the damage of the ligament. The valgus instability of 24 patients (12 isolated injuries and 12 multiple ligament injuries) who suffered MCL injury between 1993 and 1998 was evaluated with the Hughston and Eilers classification, which involves radiographic assessment under manual valgus stress to the injured knees. We developed a novel system for classifying the degree of injury to the MCL by calculating the percentage of injured area based on MRI and investigated the relationship between this novel MRI classification and the magnitude of valgus instability by the Hughston and Eilers classification. There was a significant correlation between the 2 classifications (p=0.0006). On the other hand, the results using other MRI based classification systems, such as the Mink and Deutsch classification and the Petermann classification, were not correlated with the findings by the Hughston and Eilers classification in these cases (p>0.05). Since MRI is capable of assessing the injured ligament in clinical practice, this novel classification system would be useful for evaluating the stability of the knee and choosing an appropriate treatment following MCL injury. (author)

  9. A mini-invasive adductor magnus tendon transfer technique for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Petri J; Mäenpää, Heikki M; Mattila, Ville M; Visuri, Tuomo; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2009-05-01

    Patellar dislocations are associated with injuries to the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Several techniques for MPFL reconstruction have been recently published with some disadvantages involved, including large skin incisions and donor site morbidity. Arthroscopic stabilizing techniques carry the potential of inadequate restoration of MPFL function. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using adductor magnus tendon autograft. This technique is easily performed, safe, and provides a stabilizing effect equal to current MPFL reconstructions. Skin incision of only 3-4 cm is located at the level of the proximal half of the patella. After identifying the distal insertion of the adductor magnus tendon, a tendon harvester is introduced to harvest the medial two-thirds of the tendon, while the distal insertion is left intact. The adductor magnus tendon is cut at 12-14 cm from its distal insertion and transferred into the patellar medial margin. Two suture anchors are inserted through the same incision at the superomedial aspect of the patella in the anatomic MPFL origin. The graft is tightened at 30 degrees knee flexion. Aftercare includes 4 weeks of brace treatment with restricted range of motion.

  10. A biomechanical assessment to evaluate breed differences in normal porcine medial collateral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germscheid, Niccole M; Thornton, Gail M; Hart, David A; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2011-02-24

    Little information is available on the role of genetic factors and heredity in normal ligament behaviour and their ability to heal. Assessing these factors is challenging because of the lack of suitable animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a porcine model in order to evaluate and compare the biomechanical differences of normal medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) between Yorkshire (YK) and red Duroc (RD) breeds. It was hypothesized that biomechanical differences would not exist between normal YK and RD MCLs. Comparisons between porcine and human MCL were also made. A biomechanical testing apparatus and protocol specific to pig MCL were developed. Ligaments were subjected to cyclic and static creep tests and then elongated to failure. Pig MCL morphology, geometry, and low- and high-load mechanical behaviour were assessed. The custom-designed apparatus and protocol were sufficiently sensitive to detect mechanical property differences between breeds as well as inter-leg differences. The results reveal that porcine MCL is comparable in both shape and size to human MCL and exhibits similar structural and material failure properties, thus making it a feasible model. Comparisons between RD and YK breeds revealed that age-matched RD pigs weigh more, have larger MCL cross-sectional area, and have lower MCL failure stress than YK pigs. The effect of weight may have influenced MCL geometrical and biomechanical properties, and consequently, the differences observed may be due to breed type and/or animal weight. In conclusion, the pig serves as a suitable large animal model for genetic-related connective tissue studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament with transposition of great adductor muscular tendon for the treatment of teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chuan-Qiang; Chen, Chang-Chun; Zhao, Chun-Cheng; Yang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yan-Zhong

    2017-06-25

    To investigate surgical method and clinical curative effects of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction with great adductor muscular tendon in treating teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation. From May 2012 to September 2014, 19 patients with recurrent dislocation of patellar, including 6 males and 13 females with an average of 16 years old (ranged from 13 to 17 years), the courses of disease ranged from 3 to 18 months(averaged 6 months). All patients were underwent great adductor muscular tendon transposition to reconstruct medial patellofemoral ligament. The curative effects were evaluated by preoperative and postoperative with Lysholm scores and Patellofemoral angle and Q angle. All patients were followed up from 12 to 18 months with an average of 16.5 months. Primary healing was achieved at stage I. No pain, swelling and patellar dislocation or subluxation occurred. Patellofemoral angle increased from preoperative (-3.8±4.9)° to (10.3±4.1)° postoperatively. Q angle decreased from preoperative(16.4±3.1)° to(10.5±1.2)° postoperatively; Lysholm scores were improved from preoperative (68.6±8.5) to (93.7±6.5) final follow-up ( P teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation.

  12. Relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament during simulated jump landing and sidestep cutting tasks: implications for injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Nesbitt, Rebecca J; Shearn, Jason T; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-09-01

    The medial collateral (MCL) and anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are, respectively, the primary and secondary ligamentous restraints against knee abduction, which is a component of the valgus collapse often associated with ACL rupture during athletic tasks. Despite this correlation in function, MCL ruptures occur concomitantly in only 20% to 40% of ACL injuries. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how athletic tasks load the knee joint in a manner that could lead to ACL failure without concomitant MCL failure. It was hypothesized that (1) the ACL would provide greater overall contribution to intact knee forces than the MCL during simulated motion tasks and (2) the ACL would show greater relative peak strain compared with the MCL during simulated motion tasks. Controlled laboratory study. A 6-degrees-of-freedom robotic manipulator articulated 18 cadaveric knees through simulations of kinematics recorded from in vivo drop vertical jump and sidestep cutting tasks. Specimens were articulated in the intact-knee and isolated-ligament conditions. After simulation, each ACL and MCL was failed in uniaxial tension along its fiber orientations. During a drop vertical jump simulation, the ACL experienced greater peak strain than the MCL (6.1% vs 0.4%; P < .01). The isolated ACL expressed greater peak anterior force (4.8% vs 0.3% body weight; P < .01), medial force (1.6% vs 0.4% body weight; P < .01), flexion torque (8.4 vs 0.4 N·m; P < .01), abduction torque (2.6 vs 0.3 N·m; P < .01), and adduction torque (0.5 vs 0.0 N·m; P = .03) than the isolated MCL. During failure testing, ACL specimens preferentially loaded in the anteromedial bundle failed at 637 N, while MCL failure occurred at 776 N. During controlled physiologic athletic tasks, the ACL provides greater contributions to knee restraint than the MCL, which is generally unstrained and minimally loaded. Current findings support that multiplanar loading during athletic tasks preferentially loads the ACL

  13. Feasibility study of simultaneous physical examination and dynamic MR imaging of medial collateral ligament knee injuries in a 1.5-T large-bore magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studler, Ueli; White, Lawrence M.; Deslandes, Melanie; Sussman, Marshall S.; Geddes, Christopher; Theodoropoulos, John

    2011-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of evaluating medial knee joint laxity with dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and simultaneous physical joint examination in a large-bore 1.5-T system. The study included 10 patients (5 women, 5 men; mean age 35 years) with clinically diagnosed and categorized acute injuries of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). Intermittent valgus stress was applied separately to both the affected and the contralateral knee joint during dynamic MR imaging with a two-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence. The width of the medial joint space and the opening angle between the femoral condyles and the tibial plateau were measured. Results obtained from dynamic MR imaging of the affected knee were compared with morphological MCL changes on static MRI, to kinematics of the contralateral side and to the clinical grading of MCL injuries. On clinical examination, all patients had grade 2 MCL injuries except one, who had a grade 1 lesion. Using morphological MRI criteria, 9 grade II and 1 grade III injuries were seen. Mean medial joint space width and opening angles of all affected knees were 2.8 mm and 2.7 respectively, compared with 1.7 mm and 2.1 on the contralateral side. The Wilcoxon signed rank test indicated that the differences in width (P = 0.005) and opening angle (P = 0.037) between the affected and contralateral knees were significant. Dynamic MR imaging and simultaneous physical joint examination is feasible. Our results suggest that this technique might enable the imaging documentation of medial ligamentous knee instability. (orig.)

  14. Radiologic analysis of the medical collateral ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Che; Lee, Chang Jun; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung

    1979-01-01

    The medical collateral ligament rupture is the most common injury involving the knee joint ligaments. The ruptured medical collateral ligaments of 73 cases with clinical and surgical confirmations were radiologically analyzed. The results were obtained as follows: 1. The most risky age for tearing of the medical collateral ligament was third to fifth decades (50 cases of male and 23 of females). 2. The most common cause of the medical collateral ligament rupture was traffic accident (82.2%). 3. The mean distance of medial knee joint space was 7.9 ± 2.0 mm on the normal side and 13.7 ± 4.2 mm on the affected side. 4. The mean degree of knee joint space was 10.1 ± 2.5 on the normal side and 14.7 ± 3.8 on the affected side. 5. The fibula was the bone fractured most frequently in association with the medial collateral ligament rupture (30.6%).

  15. Case report - calcification of the medial collateral ligament of the knee with simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    OpenAIRE

    Kamawal, Yama; Steinert, Andre F; Holzapfel, Boris M; Rudert, Maximilian; Barthel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is a very rare disease. We report on a case of a patient with a calcifying lesion within the MCL and simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff in both shoulders. Case presentation Calcification of the MCL was diagnosed both via x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was successfully treated surgically. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff was successfully treated applying conservative method...

  16. Short-term results of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for patellar dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuraba, Koji; Miura, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shuichi; Okazaki, Ken; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fukuoka, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The short-term results of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction were reviewed. MPFL reconstruction surgery was performed on 13 patients (13 knees, three male, five female, mean age 24.1 years) with recurrent and habitual dislocation of the patella. After average 18.5 month follow-up, there has been no recurrence of dislocation and limitation of range of motion except for one case. The mean Kujula score was 60±20.2 preoperatively and 91±15 postoperatively. According to the Crosby and Insall grading system, six ceses were excellent, six cases were good, and one case was fair to poor. On axial radiographs, the mean congruence angle was 31.3±21.4deg preoperatively and -3.65±20.72deg postoperatively. The mean tilting angle was 32.1±7.9deg preoperatively and 21.9±8.39deg postoperatively. The mean lateral shift was 41.6±9.7% preoperatively and 24.5±9.9% postoperatively. These results demonstrate the short-term effectiveness of MPFL reconstruction. (author)

  17. Unilateral aplasia of both cruciate ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aplasia of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 28-year-old male presented with pain and the feeling of instability of his right knee after trauma. The provided MRI and previous arthroscopy reports did not indicate any abnormalities except cruciate ligament tears. He was referred to us for reconstruction of both cruciate ligaments. The patient again underwent arthroscopy which revealed a hypoplasia of the medial trochlea and an extremely narrow intercondylar notch. The tibia revealed a missing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL footprint and a single bump with a complete coverage with articular cartilage. There was no room for an ACL graft. A posterior cruciate ligament could not be identified. The procedure was ended since a ligament reconstruction did not appear reasonable. A significant notch plasty if not a partial resection of the condyles would have been necessary to implant a ligament graft. It is most likely that this would not lead to good knee stability. If the surgeon would have retrieved the contralateral hamstrings at the beginning of the planned ligament reconstruction a significant damage would have occurred to the patient. Even in seemingly clear diagnostic findings the arthroscopic surgeon should take this rare abdnormality into consideration and be familiar with the respective radiological findings. We refer the abnormal finding of only one tibial spine to as the "dromedar-sign" as opposed to the two (medial and a lateral tibial spines in a normal knee. This may be used as a hint for aplasia of the cruciate ligaments.

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage of calcific bursitis of the medial collateral ligament of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is rare. The literature reports no positive outcomes when conservative treatment has been followed. This paper reports a case of such calcification and its treatment using ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL). A 66-year-old patient presented with medial knee pain. X-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations revealed calcific bursitis of the MCL, which was treated by UGPL. One month after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. X-ray, ultrasound, and MR examinations confirmed the almost complete disappearance of the calcification; only very tiny fragments remained. Calcific bursitis of the MCL of the knee is very uncommon, but should be taken into account in differential diagnoses for medial knee pain. UGPL is proposed as a treatment for this condition.

  19. A elasticidade do ligamento colateral medial da articulação do cotovelo de cão não advém de elastina The elasticity of the medial collateral ligament of the canine elbow joint does not come from elastin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Souza Costa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A literatura relata que ligamentos consistem de tecido conjuntivo denso, composto por água, colágeno tipos I e III, diversas proteoglicanas, pouca elastina e várias outras substâncias. Além disso, os ligamentos, quando testados in vitro com tensão longitudinal e unidirecional, apresentam um comportamento mecânico não-linear, ou seja, as fibras colágenas são alongadas aos poucos, perdendo seu padrão ondulado, até que todas estejam no limite máximo de tração e iniciem o rompimento. Portanto, no presente estudo avaliou-se a presença de fibras elásticas (elastina no ligamento colateral medial do cotovelo de cães adultos para ponderar se a elasticidade do referido ligamento deve-se à presença de fibras elásticas ou às propriedades elásticas do colágeno ou à combinação de ambas. Foram utilizadas quatro articulações, de machos e fêmeas em igual proporção, das quais foram adquiridas as amostras das porções médias dos ligamentos colaterais mediais para a rotina histológica. Os cortes foram corados pela técnica de Weigert, e não foi observada a presença de fibras elásticas, detectável por esta técnica à microscopia de luz. Concluiu-se que a elasticidade do ligamento colateral medial do cotovelo de cão deve-se, principalmente, ao padrão ondulado das fibras colágenas, devido à quantidade ínfima ou até à inexistência de fibras elásticas nesta estrutura.The literature reports that ligaments consist of connective tissue, composed by water, Type I and III collagen, several proteoglycans, some elastin and other substances. Ligaments tested in vitro with longitudinal and unidirectional tension exhibit non-linear mechanical behavior; the collagen fibers are stretched little by little, losing their undulating pattern, until reaching the maximum limit of traction and failure begins. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of elastin in the medial collateral ligament of the elbow in adult dogs to

  20. A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between the Distribution of Different Types of Collagen and the Mechanical Behavior of Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu; Leng, Huijie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ligaments are key contributors to the stability and function of musculoskeletal joints. Ligaments are generally composed of ground substance, collagen (mainly type I and III collagen), and minimal elastin fibers. However, no consensus has been reached about whether the distribution of different types of collagen correlates with the mechanical behaviors of ligaments. The main objective of this study was to determine whether the collagen type distribution is correlated with the mechanical properties of ligaments. Using axial tensile tests and picrosirius red staining-polarization observations, the mechanical behaviors and the ratios of the various types of collagen were investigated for twenty-four rabbit medial collateral ligaments from twenty-four rabbits of different ages, respectively. One-way analysis of variance was used in the comparison of the Young's modulus in the linear region of the stress-strain curves and the ratios of type I and III collagen for the specimens (the mid-substance specimens of the ligaments) with different ages. A multiple linear regression was performed using the collagen contents (the ratios of type I and III collagen) and the Young's modulus of the specimens. During the maturation of the ligaments, the type I collagen content increased, and the type III collagen content decreased. A significant and strong correlation () was identified by multiple linear regression between the collagen contents (i.e., the ratios of type I and type III collagen) and the mechanical properties of the specimens. The collagen content of ligaments might provide a new perspective for evaluating the linear modulus of global stress-strain curves for ligaments and open a new door for studying the mechanical behaviors and functions of connective tissues. PMID:25062068

  1. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  2. Effect of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Method on Patellofemoral Contact Pressures and Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanna M; Kittl, Christoph; Williams, Andy; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Fink, Christian; Amis, Andrew A

    2016-05-01

    There remains a lack of evidence regarding the optimal method when reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and whether some graft constructs can be more forgiving to surgical errors, such as overtensioning or tunnel malpositioning, than others. The null hypothesis was that there would not be a significant difference between reconstruction methods (eg, graft type and fixation) in the adverse biomechanical effects (eg, patellar maltracking or elevated articular contact pressure) resulting from surgical errors such as tunnel malpositioning or graft overtensioning. Controlled laboratory study. Nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were placed on a customized testing rig, where the femur was fixed but the tibia could be moved freely from 0° to 90° of flexion. Individual quadriceps heads and the iliotibial tract were separated and loaded to 205 N of tension using a weighted pulley system. Patellofemoral contact pressures and patellar tracking were measured at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using pressure-sensitive film inserted between the patella and trochlea, in conjunction with an optical tracking system. The MPFL was transected and then reconstructed in a randomized order using a (1) double-strand gracilis tendon, (2) quadriceps tendon, and (3) tensor fasciae latae allograft. Pressure maps and tracking measurements were recorded for each reconstruction method in 2 N and 10 N of tension and with the graft positioned in the anatomic, proximal, and distal femoral tunnel positions. Statistical analysis was undertaken using repeated-measures analyses of variance, Bonferroni post hoc analyses, and paired t tests. Anatomically placed grafts during MPFL reconstruction tensioned to 2 N resulted in the restoration of intact medial joint contact pressures and patellar tracking for all 3 graft types investigated (P > .050). However, femoral tunnels positioned proximal or distal to the anatomic origin resulted in significant increases in the mean

  3. Effect of Elastin Digestion on the Quasi-static Tensile Response of Medial Collateral Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Heath B.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Romney, Steven J.; Davis, Grant L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin is a structural protein that provides resilience to biological tissues. We examined the contributions of elastin to the quasi-static tensile response of porcine medial collateral ligament through targeted disruption of the elastin network with pancreatic elastase. Elastase concentration and treatment time were varied to determine a dose response. Whereas elastin content decreased with increasing elastase concentration and treatment time, the change in peak stress after cyclic loading reached a plateau above 1 U/ml elastase and 6 hr treatment. For specimens treated with 2 U/ml elastase for 6 hr, elastin content decreased approximately 35%. Mean peak tissue strain after cyclic loading (4.8%, p≥0.300), modulus (275 MPa, p≥0.114) and hysteresis (20%, p≥0.553) were unaffected by elastase digestion, but stress decreased significantly after treatment (up to 2 MPa, p≤0.049). Elastin degradation had no effect on failure properties, but tissue lengthened under the same pre-stress. Stiffness in the linear region was unaffected by elastase digestion, suggesting that enzyme treatment did not disrupt collagen. These results demonstrate that elastin primarily functions in the toe region of the stress-strain curve, yet contributes load support in the linear region. The increase in length after elastase digestion suggests that elastin may pre-stress and stabilize collagen crimp in ligaments. PMID:23553827

  4. A Scapholunate Ligament-Sparing Technique Utilizing the Medial Femoral Condyle Corticocancellous Free Flap to Reconstruct Scaphoid Nonunions With Proximal Pole Avascular Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Thibaudeau, Stephanie; Levin, L Scott

    2016-09-01

    This article demonstrates a technique for the treatment of scaphoid fracture waist and proximal pole nonunions with avascular necrosis using a free vascularized medial femoral condyle flap. We present our surgical technique and representative case examples in which the scapholunate ligament, a key structure required to preserve carpal kinematics, is spared. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  6. A quantitative study of the relationship between the distribution of different types of collagen and the mechanical behavior of rabbit medial collateral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu; Leng, Huijie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ligaments are key contributors to the stability and function of musculoskeletal joints. Ligaments are generally composed of ground substance, collagen (mainly type I and III collagen), and minimal elastin fibers. However, no consensus has been reached about whether the distribution of different types of collagen correlates with the mechanical behaviors of ligaments. The main objective of this study was to determine whether the collagen type distribution is correlated with the mechanical properties of ligaments. Using axial tensile tests and picrosirius red staining-polarization observations, the mechanical behaviors and the ratios of the various types of collagen were investigated for twenty-four rabbit medial collateral ligaments from twenty-four rabbits of different ages, respectively. One-way analysis of variance was used in the comparison of the Young's modulus in the linear region of the stress-strain curves and the ratios of type I and III collagen for the specimens (the mid-substance specimens of the ligaments) with different ages. A multiple linear regression was performed using the collagen contents (the ratios of type I and III collagen) and the Young's modulus of the specimens. During the maturation of the ligaments, the type I collagen content increased, and the type III collagen content decreased. A significant and strong correlation (R2 = 0.839, P < 0.05) was identified by multiple linear regression between the collagen contents (i.e., the ratios of type I and type III collagen) and the mechanical properties of the specimens. The collagen content of ligaments might provide a new perspective for evaluating the linear modulus of global stress-strain curves for ligaments and open a new door for studying the mechanical behaviors and functions of connective tissues.

  7. A quantitative study of the relationship between the distribution of different types of collagen and the mechanical behavior of rabbit medial collateral ligaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wan

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of ligaments are key contributors to the stability and function of musculoskeletal joints. Ligaments are generally composed of ground substance, collagen (mainly type I and III collagen, and minimal elastin fibers. However, no consensus has been reached about whether the distribution of different types of collagen correlates with the mechanical behaviors of ligaments. The main objective of this study was to determine whether the collagen type distribution is correlated with the mechanical properties of ligaments. Using axial tensile tests and picrosirius red staining-polarization observations, the mechanical behaviors and the ratios of the various types of collagen were investigated for twenty-four rabbit medial collateral ligaments from twenty-four rabbits of different ages, respectively. One-way analysis of variance was used in the comparison of the Young's modulus in the linear region of the stress-strain curves and the ratios of type I and III collagen for the specimens (the mid-substance specimens of the ligaments with different ages. A multiple linear regression was performed using the collagen contents (the ratios of type I and III collagen and the Young's modulus of the specimens. During the maturation of the ligaments, the type I collagen content increased, and the type III collagen content decreased. A significant and strong correlation (R2 = 0.839, P < 0.05 was identified by multiple linear regression between the collagen contents (i.e., the ratios of type I and type III collagen and the mechanical properties of the specimens. The collagen content of ligaments might provide a new perspective for evaluating the linear modulus of global stress-strain curves for ligaments and open a new door for studying the mechanical behaviors and functions of connective tissues.

  8. Traumatic posterior root tear of the medial meniscus in patients with severe medial instability of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Ho Jong; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jang, Ho Su; Kim, Jin Goo

    2015-10-01

    To examine the incidence and diagnostic rate of traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear associated with severe medial instability and to evaluate the effectiveness of pullout repair. From 2007 to 2011, 51 patients who underwent operation due to multiple ligament injuries including medial collateral ligament rupture were reviewed retrospectively. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective and Lysholm score were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and if indicated, a second-look arthroscopic examination was conducted. Fourteen out of 51 patients were associated with severe medial instability. Seven patients were diagnosed with traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear and underwent arthroscopic pullout repair. Five of them were missed at initial diagnosis using MRI. In seven patients, the mean Lysholm and IKDC subjective scores improved from 74.6 ± 10.3 and 47.6 ± 7.3 to 93.0 ± 3.7 and 91.6 ± 2.6, respectively. All showed complete healing of meniscus root on follow-up MRI and second-look arthroscopy. Medial meniscus posterior root tear may occur in severe medial instability from trauma. It is a common mistake that surgeons may not notice on the diagnosis of those injuries using MRI. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of medial meniscus posterior root tear in this type of injuries. The traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear could be healed successfully using arthroscopic pullout repair technique. The possibility of the medial meniscus posterior root tear should be considered in severe medial instability and arthroscopic pullout repair can be an effective option for treatment. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  9. Should the Ipsilateral Hamstrings Be Used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Case of Medial Collateral Ligament Insufficiency? Biomechanical Investigation Regarding Dynamic Stabilization of the Medial Compartment by the Hamstring Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Mirco; Michel, Philipp; Raschke, Michael J; Vogel, Nils; Schulze, Martin; Zoll, Alexander; Fink, Christian; Petersen, Wolf; Domnick, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Semitendinosus and gracilis muscles are frequently harvested for autologous tendon grafts for cruciate ligament reconstruction. This study investigated the joint-stabilizing effects of these hamstring muscles in cases of insufficiency of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). First, both the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles can actively stabilize the joint against valgus moments in the MCL-deficient knee. Second, the stabilizing influence of these muscles decreases with an increasing knee flexion angle. Controlled laboratory study. The kinematics was examined in 10 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees using a robotic/universal force moment sensor system and an optical tracking system. The knee kinematics under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments were determined in the different flexion angles of the (1) MCL-intact and (2) MCL-deficient knee using the following simulated muscle loads: (1) 0-N (idle) load, (2) 200-N semitendinosus (ST) load, and (3) 280-N (200/80-N) combined semitendinosus/gracilis (STGT) load. Cutting the MCL increased the valgus angle under all tested conditions and angles compared with the MCL-intact knee by 4.3° to 8.1° for the 5-N·m valgus moment and 6.5° to 11.9° for the 10-N·m valgus moment ( P .05). The combined 280-N simulated STGT load significantly reduced the valgus angle in 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments ( P .05). In 60° and 90° of flexion, ST and STGT loads did not decrease the resulting valgus angle of the MCL-deficient knee without hamstring loads ( P > .05 vs deficient; P = .0001 vs intact). In this human cadaveric study, semitendinosus and gracilis muscles successfully stabilize valgus moments applied to the MCL-insufficient knee when the knee is near extension. In the valgus-unstable knee, these data suggest that the hamstring muscles should be preserved in (multi-) ligament surgery when possible.

  10. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  11. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, M. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden); Thuomas, K.Aa. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Messner, K. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.).

  12. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, M.; Thuomas, K.Aa.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.)

  13. Medial arcuate ligament: a new anatomic landmark facilitates the location of the renal artery in retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Hong Zhao; Zhang, Xu; Song, Yong; Ma, Xin; Dong, Jun; Chen, Wenzheng; Chen, Guang-Fu; Xu, Yong; Lu, Jin Shan; Wang, Bao-Jun; Shi, Tao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a new method for locating the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. The medial arcuate ligament (MAL) is a tendinous arch in the fascia under the diaphragm that arches across the psoas major muscle and is attached medially to the side of the first or the second lumbar vertebra. The renal artery arises at the level of the intervertebral disc between the L1 and L2 vertebrae. We evaluate the role of the MAL that serves as an anatomic landmark for locating the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. There is a reproducible consistent anatomic relationship between MAL and the renal artery in 210 cases of retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. Two main types of the MAL, the "narrow arch" and the "fascial band" types, can be observed. MAL can serve as an accurate and reproducible anatomic landmark for the identification of the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery.

  14. Patellofemoral Pressure Changes After Static and Dynamic Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Akkie; Hannink, Gerjon; Lenting, Anke; Groenen, Karlijn; Koëter, Sander; Verdonschot, Nico; van Kampen, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue fixation. Static MPFL reconstruction is most commonly used. However, dynamic reconstruction deforms more easily and presumably functions more like the native MPFL. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the different MPFL fixation techniques on patellofemoral pressures compared with the native situation. The hypothesis was that dynamic reconstruction would result in patellofemoral pressures closer to those generated in an intact knee. Controlled laboratory study. Seven fresh-frozen knee specimens were tested in an in vitro knee joint loading apparatus. Tekscan pressure-sensitive films fixed to the retropatellar cartilage measured mean patellofemoral and peak pressures, contact area, and location of the center of force (COF) at fixed flexion angles from 0° to 110°. Four different conditions were tested: intact, dynamic, partial dynamic, and static MPFL reconstruction. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Static MPFL reconstruction resulted in higher peak and mean pressures from 60° to 110° of flexion (P .05). The COF in the static reconstruction group moved more medially on the patella from 50° to 110° of flexion compared with the other conditions. The contact area showed no significant differences between the test conditions. After static MPFL reconstruction, the patellofemoral pressures in flexion angles from 60° to 110° were 3 to 5 times higher than those in the intact situation. The pressures after dynamic MPFL reconstruction were similar as compared with those in the intact situation, and therefore, dynamic MPFL reconstruction could be a safer option than static reconstruction for stabilizing the patella. This study showed that static MPFL reconstruction

  15. Spring ligament complex: Illustrated normal anatomy and spectrum of pathologies on 3T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Hythem [Musculoskeletal Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Saini, Vikram [Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [Department of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Liu, George [Orthopaedic Surgery, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh, E-mail: avneesh.chhabra@utsouthwestern.edu [Musculoskeletal Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Spring ligament complex is an important stabilizer of medial arch of foot. • Of all SLC components, the integrity of Supero-Medial band is the most important. • Associated pathologies with SLC instability include PTT injury, pes planovalgus and sinus tarsi syndrome. • Conservative and operative management are viable depending on pes planovalgus progression. - Abstract: The spring (plantar calcaneonavicular) ligament complex connects the calcaneus and navicular bone of the foot and serves as the primary static stabilizer of the medial longitudinal arch of the foot. In this article, we describe the normal anatomy of the spring ligament complex, illustrate 3T magnetic resonance imaging appearances in its normal and abnormal states, and discuss the pathological associations with relevant case examples.

  16. Isolated and combined medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in revision surgery for patellofemoral instability: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Ludwig M; Meidinger, Gebhart; Beitzel, Knut; Banke, Ingo J; Hensler, Daniel; Imhoff, Andreas B; Schöttle, Philip B

    2013-09-01

    Persistent pain and redislocations after surgical treatment of patellofemoral instability are described in up to 40% of patients. However, prospective outcome data about revision surgery are missing. To evaluate the clinical outcome after revision medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using isolated and combined procedures, with a follow-up of 24 months. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Study participants were 42 patients (median age, 22 years; range, 13-46 years) who underwent revision surgery between January 2007 and December 2009 because of persistent patellofemoral instability after a mean of 1.8 previous failed surgical interventions (lateral release, medial imbrication/vastus medialis obliquus distalization, medialization of the tuberosity). An isolated MPFL reconstruction was performed in 15 cases, while a combination procedure was performed in 27 cases. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Kujala, and Tegner scores as well as a subjective questionnaire. Patellar shift, tilt, and height, as well as level of degeneration, were defined preoperatively and at the latest follow-up on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. At 24-month follow-up, 87% of the patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the treatment. No apprehension or redislocation was reported at follow-up, and there was a significant decrease in pain during daily activities. There were significant improvements (P instability is a multifactorial problem, revision surgery should be indicated only after a comprehensive examination. The results of this study show that MPFL reconstruction, alone or in combination, seems to be an effective treatment for recurrent patellar dislocations after a failed previous surgery, leading to significant increases in stability and functionality as well as a reduction in pain.

  17. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R.; Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B.

    1992-01-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T 1 - and T 2 weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.) [de

  19. Gait Mechanics in Those With/Without Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis 5 Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandha, Ashutosh; Manal, Kurt; Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Capin, Jacob; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in gait mechanics 5 years after unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery, for non-osteoarthritic (n = 24) versus osteoarthritic (n = 9) subjects. For the involved knee, the osteoarthritic group demonstrated significantly lower peak knee flexion angles (non-osteoarthritic = 24.3 ± 4.6°, osteoarthritic = 19.1 ± 2.9°, p = 0.01) and peak knee flexion moments (non-osteoarthritic = 5.3 ± 1.2% Body Weight × Height, osteoarthritic = 4.4 ± 1.2% Body Weight × Height, p = 0.05). Differences in peak knee adduction moment approached significance, with a higher magnitude for the osteoarthritic group (non-osteoarthritic = 2.4 ±0.8% Body Weight × Height, osteoarthritic = 2.9 ± 0.5% Body Weight × Height, p = 0.09). Peak medial compartment joint load was evaluated using electromyography-informed neuromusculoskeletal modeling. Peak medial compartment joint load in the involved knee for the two groups was not different (non-osteoarthritic = 2.4 ± 0.4 Body Weight, osteoarthritic = 2.3 ± 0.6 Body Weight). The results suggest that subjects with dissimilar peak knee moments can have similar peak medial compartment joint load magnitudes. There was no evidence of inter-limb asymmetry for either group. Given the presence of inter-group differences (non-osteoarthritic vs. osteoarthritic) for the involved knee, but an absence of inter-limb asymmetry in either group, it may be necessary to evaluate how symmetry is achieved, over time, and to differentiate between good versus bad inter-limb symmetry, when evaluating knee gait parameters. PMID:27082166

  20. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin R; Vignos, Michael F; Lenhart, Rachel L; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization technique was used to simultaneously predict muscle forces, secondary knee kinematics, ligament forces, and joint contact pressures from standard gait analysis data collected on the subject. The nominal knee model predictions of medial, lateral, and total contact forces during gait agreed well with TKR measures, with root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.23, 0.22, and 0.33 body weight (BW), respectively. Coronal plane component alignment did not affect total knee contact loads, but did alter the medial-lateral load distribution, with 4 deg varus and 4 deg valgus rotations in component alignment inducing +17% and -23% changes in the first peak medial tibiofemoral contact forces, respectively. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that uncertainties in ligament stiffness and reference strains induce ±0.2 BW uncertainty in tibiofemoral force estimates over the gait cycle. Ligament properties had substantial influence on the TKR load distributions, with the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial band (ITB) properties having the largest effects on medial and lateral compartment loading, respectively. The computational framework provides a viable approach for virtually designing TKR components, considering parametric uncertainty and predicting the effects of joint alignment and soft tissue balancing procedures on TKR function during movement.

  1. New thoughts on the origin of Pellegrini-Stieda: the association of PCL injury and medial femoral epicondylar periosteal stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAnally, James L.; Southam, Samuel L.; Mlady, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 100 years, Pellegrini-Stieda disease has been described as calcification and ossification within the tibial collateral ligament, although these typical radiographic findings are often located more superior than the most proximal extent of the ligament. In this article, we demonstrate four magnetic resonance imaging cases of knee trauma with complete posterior cruciate ligament tear or avulsion, each demonstrating that injury to the medial collateral ligamentous complex can involve significant stripping of the tissue proximal to the medial epicondyle. Classic radiographic findings of Pellegrini-Stieda calcifications can be caused by stripping of the femoral periosteum proximal to the femoral attachment of the tibial collateral ligament, which appears to be associated with a complete posterior cruciate ligament injury. (orig.)

  2. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  3. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  4. Incidence and treatment of intra-articular lesions associated with anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Nistor, Dan; Buescu, Cristian; Pojar, Adina; Lucaciu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to retrospectively review the patients admitted and treated in the "Alexandru Rădulescu" Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic, Cluj-Napoca for an anterior cruciate ligament tear over a 2-year period and document the intra-articular lesions found at arthroscopy as well as the treatment used for these associated lesions. The case records of 88 patients operated for anterior cruciate ligament tear over a period of 2 years were reviewed. There were 67 males and 21 females with a mean age of 28.9 years, ranging from 14 to 49 years. After recording the patient demographics, we documented all the intra-articular lesions found during knee arthroscopy, as well as all procedures undertaken concomitant with the ACL reconstruction. 50 of the 88 patients (56.8%) had associated intra-articular lesions at the time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The most common injury found was a meniscus tear, 48 patients (54.5%) had a meniscal pathology at the time of ligament reconstruction, medial meniscus being the most frequent injured one, found in 37 patients. Meniscectomy and meniscus suture were the procedures performed for these lesions, meniscectomy being more frequent. Chondral defects were the next associated injuries found with an incidence of 15.9% of the cases. The medial side of the knee was the most common site of chondral pathology. ACL tears are frequently associated with other intra-articular lesions, especially medial meniscus tears and chondral defects affecting the medial compartment. Such pathology most often needs surgical attention during the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  5. Atypically thick and high location of the Wrisberg ligament in patients with a complete lateral discoid meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Jong Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the relationship between a discoid lateral meniscus and a thickened Wrisberg ligament with a higher location on the medial femoral condyle. Between July 2002 and February 2006, 100 consecutive patients who had a complete lateral discoid meniscus and another 100 patients without a discoid lateral meniscus (control group) were included. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all of the magnetic resonance images, paying particular attention to the presence and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament and the location of the attachment of the Wrisberg ligament to the medial femoral condyle (types I, II, or III). We assumed that type I Wrisberg ligaments had a higher location. All 141 patients had a Wrisberg ligament (71%). There were 73 patients (73%) in the discoid group and 68 patients (68%) in the non-discoid group. The mean thickness of the Wrisberg ligament in the patients in the discoid and non-discoid groups was 2.1 mm (range, 0.4-4.7 mm; median, 2.1 mm) and 1.6 mm (range, 0.4-4.5 mm; median, 1.3 mm), respectively. The Wrisberg ligaments of the discoid group were thicker than the non-discoid group (p=0.0002). The Wrisberg ligament was attached to the upper part of the medial femoral condyle in the discoid group more often than in the non-discoid group (p<0.0001). (orig.)

  6. The effects of medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction on Major League pitching performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Steffes, Matthew J; Zhuo, David; Bey, Michael J; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2014-11-01

    Medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) reconstruction is commonly performed on Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers. Previous studies have reported that most pitchers return to presurgical statistical performance levels after MUCL reconstruction. Pitching performance data--specifically, earned run average (ERA), walks and hits per inning pitched (WHIP), winning percentage, and innings pitched--were acquired for 168 MLB pitchers who had undergone MUCL reconstruction. These data were averaged over the 3 years before surgery and the 3 years after surgery and also acquired from 178 age-matched, uninjured MLB pitchers. Of the pitchers who had MUCL reconstruction surgery, 87% returned to MLB pitching. However, compared with presurgical data, pitching performance declined in terms of ERA (P = .001), WHIP (P = .011), and innings pitched (P = .026). Pitching performance also declined in the season before the surgery compared with previous years (ERA, P = .014; WHIP, P = .036; innings pitched, P risk factor for requiring surgery. In addition, there is an increased risk of MUCL reconstruction for pitchers who enter the major leagues at a younger age. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Collateral ligament strains during knee joint laxity evaluation before and after TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delport, Hendrik; Labey, Luc; De Corte, Ronny; Innocenti, Bernardo; Vander Sloten, Jos; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-08-01

    Passive knee stability is provided by the soft tissue envelope. There is consensus among orthopedic surgeons that good outcome in Total Knee Arthroplasty requires equal tension in the medial/lateral compartment of the knee joint, as well as equal tension in the flexion/extension gap. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ligament laxity in the normal non-arthritic knee before and after Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty. We hypothesized that the Medial/Lateral Collateral Ligament shows minimal changes in length when measured directly by extensometers in the native human knee during varus/valgus laxity testing. We also hypothesized that due to differences in material properties and surface geometry, native laxity is difficult to reconstruct using a Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee. Six specimens were used to perform this in vitro cadaver test using extensometers to provide numerical values for laxity and varus-valgus tilting in the frontal plane. This study enabled a precise measurement of varus-valgus laxity as compared with the clinical assessment. The strains in both ligaments in the replaced knee were different from those in the native knee. Both ligaments were stretched in extension, in flexion the Medial Collateral Ligament tends to relax and the Lateral Collateral Ligament remains tight. As material properties and surface geometry of the replaced knee add stiffness to the joint, we recommend to avoid overstuffing the joint, when using this type of Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty, in order to obtain varus/valgus laxity close to the native joint. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  9. The effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) on healing of medial collateral ligament of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Kanamori, Akihiro; Washio, Toshikatsu; Aoto, Katsuya; Uemura, Kenta; Sakane, Masataka; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2013-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been increasingly used in sports-related injuries for therapeutic applications. However, there are numerous manufacturing procedures and treatment protocols of PRP use, which make difficult to assess its real efficacy for tissue healing. This study addressed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of locally delivered plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) on the early healing of medial collateral ligament (MCL) in rabbit knees. Thirty-one Japanese white rabbits were subjected to a mop-end tear in the MCL of the left knee. PRGF-Endoret was prepared using Anitua's technique. Two groups were set up. In 17 knees, prepared 1.0 ml of PRGF-Endoret after clotting was applied on the tear site, while in 14 knees the tear site was untreated serving as a control. Quantitative aspects of PRGF-Endoret, the concentration of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes and therapeutic growth factors such as PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 were measured. Rabbits were sacrificed at 3 and 6 weeks after the operation and histological and biomechanical evaluation were performed. No leukocytes were measured and certain amount of growth factors such as PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 were confirmed in the PRGF-Endoret. PRGF-Endoret stimulated proliferation of fibroblasts and neovascularization, and induced statistically better structural properties in repaired MCL. Our findings provide evidence that local administration of PRGF-Endoret promotes early steps in ligament healing and the repair of structural properties in a rabbit model. PRGF-Endoret would be a useful product in clinical treatment of ligament injuries.

  10. Development of a Tissue-Engineered Artificial Ligament: Reconstruction of Injured Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament With Elastin-Collagen and Ligament Cell Composite Artificial Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Inoue, Kota; Niwa, Kosuke; Ito, Naoya; Hattori, Tetsuya; Hosoi, Takashi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2018-04-16

    Ligament reconstruction using a tissue-engineered artificial ligament (TEAL) requires regeneration of the ligament-bone junction such that fixation devices such as screws and end buttons do not have to be used. The objective of this study was to develop a TEAL consisting of elastin-coated polydioxanone (PDS) sutures covered with elastin and collagen fibers preseeded with ligament cells. In a pilot study, a ring-type PDS suture with a 2.5 mm (width) bone insertion was constructed with/without elastin coating (Ela-coat and Non-coat) and implanted into two bone tunnels, diameter 2.4 mm, in the rabbit tibia (6 cases each) to access the effect of elastin on the bond strength. PDS specimens taken together with the tibia at 6 weeks after implantation indicated growth of bone-like hard tissues around bone tunnels accompanied with narrowing of the tunnels in the Ela-coat group and not in the Non-coat group. The drawout load of the Ela-coat group was significantly higher (28.0 ± 15.1 N, n = 4) than that of the Non-coat group (7.6 ± 4.6 N, n = 5). These data can improve the mechanical bulk property of TEAL through extracellular matrix formation. To achieve this TEAL model, 4.5 × 10 6 ligament cells were seeded on elastin and collagen fibers (2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 80 µm) prior to coil formation around the elastin-coated PDS core sutures having ball-shape ends with a diameter of 2.5 mm. Cell-seeded and cell-free TEALs were implanted across the femur and the tibia through bone tunnels with a diameter of 2.4 mm (6 cases each). There was no incidence of TEAL being pulled in 6 weeks. Regardless of the remarkable degradation of PDS observed in the cell-seeded group, both the elastic modulus and breaking load of the cell-seeded group (n = 3) were comparable to those of the sham-operation group (n = 8) (elastic modulus: 15.4 ± 1.3 MPa and 18.5 ± 5.7 MPa; breaking load: 73.0 ± 23.4 N and 104.8 ± 21.8 N, respectively) and higher than those

  11. Injuries of the Medial Clavicle: A Cohort Analysis in a Level-I-Trauma-Center. Concomitant Injuries. Management. Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Mustafa Sinan; Merschin, David; Unterkofler, Jan; Guembel, Denis; Langenbach, Andreas; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Schulz-Drost, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although shoulder girdle injuries are frequent, those of the medial clavicle are widely unexplored. An applied classification is less used just as a standard management. Methods: A retrospective analysis of medial clavicle injuries (MCI) during a 5-year-term in a Level-1-Trauma-Center. We analyzed amongst others concomitant injuries, therapy strategies and the classification following the AO standards. Results: 19 (2.5%) out of 759 clavicula injuries were medial ones (11 A, 6 B and 2 C-Type fractures) thereunder 27,8% were displaced and thus operatively treated Locked plate osteosynthesis was employed in unstable fractures and a reconstruction of the ligaments at the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) in case of their disruption. 84,2% of the patients sustained relevant concomitant injuries. Numerous midshaft fractures were miscoded as medial fracture, which limited the study population. Conclusions: MCI resulted from high impact mechanisms of injury, often with relevant dislocation and concomitant injuries. Concerning medial injury's complexity, treatment should occur in specialized hospitals. Unstable fractures and injuries of the SCJ ligaments should be considered for operative treatment. Midshaft fractures should be clearly distinguished from the medial ones in ICD-10-coding. Further studies are required also regarding a subtyping of the AO classification for medial clavicle fractures including ligamental injuries. Celsius.

  12. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  13. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  14. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin R.; Vignos, Michael F.; Lenhart, Rachel L.; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization technique was used to simultaneously predict muscle forces, secondary knee kinematics, ligament forces, and joint contact pressures from standard gait analysis data collected on the subject. The nominal knee model predictions of medial, lateral, and total contact forces during gait agreed well with TKR measures, with root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.23, 0.22, and 0.33 body weight (BW), respectively. Coronal plane component alignment did not affect total knee contact loads, but did alter the medial–lateral load distribution, with 4 deg varus and 4 deg valgus rotations in component alignment inducing +17% and −23% changes in the first peak medial tibiofemoral contact forces, respectively. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that uncertainties in ligament stiffness and reference strains induce ±0.2 BW uncertainty in tibiofemoral force estimates over the gait cycle. Ligament properties had substantial influence on the TKR load distributions, with the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial band (ITB) properties having the largest effects on medial and lateral compartment loading, respectively. The computational framework provides a viable approach for virtually designing TKR components, considering parametric uncertainty and predicting the effects of joint alignment and soft tissue balancing procedures on TKR function during movement. PMID:26769446

  15. Meniscofibular Ligament: Morphology and Functional Significance of a Relatively Unknown Anatomical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Natsis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A relatively unknown ligamentous structure of the posterolateral corner of the knee joint, the so-called meniscofibular ligament (MFL, was investigated as regards its macroscopic morphology, its histological features, and its reaction to knee movements. Material and Methods. MFL was exposed on 21 fresh-frozen unpaired knee joints. Its microscopic morphology was examined utilizing for comparison the fibular collateral and the popliteofibular ligament. Results. MFL was encountered in 100% of the specimens as a thin striplike fibrous band extending between the lower border of the lateral meniscus and the head of the fibula. MFL was tense during knee extension and external rotation of the tibia, whereas its histological features were similar to those of fibular collateral and popliteofibular ligament. Discussion. Its precise histological nature is studied as well as its tension alterations during knee movements. The potential functional significance of the MFL with respect to its role in avoidance of lateral meniscus and lateral coronary ligament tears is discussed. Conclusions. MFL presumably provides an additional protection to the lateral meniscus during the last stages of knee extension, as well as to the lateral coronary ligament reducing the possibility of a potential rupture.

  16. Medial joint line bone bruising at MRI complicating acute ankle inversion injury: What is its clinical significance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.O.; Moran, D.E.; Shine, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the incidence and clinical significance of medial joint line bone bruising following acute ankle inversion injury. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 weeks of acute ankle inversion injury were included in this prospective study. Integrity of the lateral collateral ligament complex, presence of medial joint line bone bruising, tibio-talar joint effusion, and soft-tissue swelling were documented. Clinical follow-up at 6 months was carried out to determine the impact of injury on length of time out of work, delay in return to normal walking, delay in return to sports activity, and persistence of medial joint line pain. Results: Thirty-seven patients had tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Twenty-six patients had medial joint line bone bruising with altered marrow signal at the medial aspect of the talus and congruent surface of the medial malleolus. A complete ATFL tear was seen in 92% of the patients with medial joint line bone bruising (p = 0.05). Patients with an ATFL tear and medial joint line bone bruising had a longer delay in return to normal walking (p = 0.0002), longer delay in return to sports activity (p = 0.0001), and persistent medial joint line pain (p = 0.0003). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome for the eight patients without ATFL tears. Conclusion: Medial joint line bone bruising following an acute ankle inversion injury was significantly associated with a complete ATFL tear, longer delay in the return to normal walking and sports activity, as well as persistent medial joint line pain. Its presence should prompt detailed assessment of the lateral collateral ligament complex, particularly the ATFL

  17. Role of pathophysiology of patellofemoral instability in the treatment of spontaneous medial patellofemoral subluxation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doğruyol Dağhan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medial patellar subluxation is usually seen after lateral retinacular release. Spontaneous medial subluxation of the patella is a very rare condition. There are few reports in the literature on the pathophysiology of iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation. To our knowledge, there are no reports of the pathophysiology of non-iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation in the English literature. In this study we present a case of spontaneous medial patellar instability that is more prominent in extension during weight bearing. We also try to define the treatment protocol based on pathophsiology. Case presentation We report the case of a 21-year-old Turkish man with spontaneous medial patellar instability. He had suffered right knee pain, clicking and popping sensation in the affected knee for three months prior to presentation. Clinical examination demonstrated medial patellar subluxation that is more prominent in extension during the weight bearing phase of gait and while standing. Increased medial tilt was observed when the patella was stressed medially. Conventional anterior to posterior, lateral and Merchant radiographs did not reveal any abnormalities. After three months of physical therapy, our patient was still suffering from right knee pain which disturbed his gait pattern. Throughout the surgery, medial patellar translation was tested following the imbrication of lateral structures. He still had a medial patellar translation that was more than 50% of his patellar width. Patellotibial ligament augmentation using an iliotibial band flap was added. When examined after surgery, the alignment of the patella was effectively corrected. Conclusions Chronic imbalance between the strengths of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis results in secondary changes in passive ligamentous structures and causes additional instability. Physical therapy modalities that aim to strengthen the vastus lateralis might be sufficient for the

  18. Ligamentous and capsular restraints to experimental posterior elbow joint dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, S.R.; Olsen, B.S.; Jensen, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    the anterior capsule and the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC), whereas in the flexed elbow the anterior capsule did not have a stabilizing effect. In flexed joint positions, the LCLC seems to be the only immediate stabilizer against PEFR, and thereby against posterolateral instability and possibly...... against posterior dislocation. The medial collateral ligament did not have any immediate stabilizing effect, but it prevented the final step of the posterior dislocation....

  19. 踝关节内侧韧带损伤及其病理机制初探%Preliminary investigation on the medial ankle ligament injury and its pathomechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐向阳; 刘津浩; 朱渊; 王碧菠

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨踝关节内韧带损伤后内侧不稳定的病理机制.方法 患者15例,男8例,女7例;年龄22~58岁,平均40岁.其中踝关节急性扭伤患者2例,踝关节慢性损伤3例,先天性平足3例,胫后肌腱失能5例,旋前外旋骨折1例,陈旧性的内踝撕脱骨折1例.所有患者均行三角韧带修补术,同时行跟骨延长术8例,内侧楔骨闭合截骨5例,跟骨截骨内移术1例.全部患者术后随访7~56个月,运用美国足踝外科协会(America Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society,AOFAS)踝-后足功能评分进行评估,统计学分析采用t检验.结果 1例踝关节急性骨折患者,由于术前无法评分,不放在统计分析内.其余14例患者术前评分为(42.4±10.6)分,术后评分(89.8±6.2)分(P<0.05).结论 三角韧带是一个重要的解剖结构,在以下几种情况下须注意其修复:(1)三角韧带损伤范围较广,涉及前部的胫弹簧韧带和胫舟韧带.(2)先天性的平足以及获得性的胫后肌腱失能患者.(3)以往有经常的踝关节扭伤,有外侧韧带的损伤,此次发生了伴有内侧韧带损伤的骨折.%Objective To discuss the pathomechanism of medial ankle instability after medial ligament injury. Methods The study involved 15 patients including eight males and seven females, at average age of 40 years (range 22-58 years). There were two patients with acute ankle sprain, three with chronic ankle injury, three with congenital pes planus, five with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, one with pronation external rotation ankle fracture and one with old avulsion medial malleolus. All patients were treated surgically with deltoid ligament repair, when eight patients further received calcaneal lengthing osteotomy, five received medial cuneiform close wedge osteotomy and one received medial shift calcaneal osteotomy. All patients were followed up for 7-56 months. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale was used for pre- and post

  20. Sonography of injury of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Theodore T.; Adler, Ronald S.; Friedman, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the sonographic appearance of injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow. Eight non-professional male baseball pitchers, ages 13-35 years, with medial elbow pain and clinical suspicion of ulnar collateral ligament injury, were referred for imaging. All eight underwent sonography of the affected and contralateral asymptomatic elbow, and six also underwent MR imaging. Neither valgus stress nor power Doppler was used during the sonographic examinations. Time from onset of symptoms to imaging was 1.5 weeks to 6 months. Three patients had surgical confirmation of their injuries, with time from imaging to surgery of 2 days to 9 months. In four patients, the UCL was ruptured, manifest sonographically in three cases as discontinuity of the normally hyperechoic ligament with anechoic fluid in the gap and in one case as non-visualization of the ligament with heterogeneous echogenicity in the expected location of the ligament. Two adolescent patients had avulsions of the UCL from the medial epicondyle, with sonographic demonstration of the avulsed echogenic bony fragment in both cases. One patient had a mild sprain, manifest as mild thickening and decreased echogenicity of the ligament sonographically compared with the contralateral normal elbow, with mild surrounding hypoechoic edema. The eighth patient had a small partial tear of the deep surface of the distal aspect of the ligament, visualized as a hypoechoic focus between the deep surface of the ligament and its ulnar attachment. Tears of the ulnar collateral ligament are manifested sonographically as non-visualization of the ligament or alteration of the normal morphology. (orig.)

  1. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  2. Concurrent patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion as a result of trauma in three horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Jonathan; Plevin, Sarah; Taylor, Elizabeth

    2012-05-15

    3 horses were evaluated because of lameness and swelling of the stifle joint subsequent to trauma. All horses had characteristic clinical signs of stifle joint pain and effusion. A medial patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion fracture were visible ultrasonographically in each. Radiography, including standard as well as flexed lateromedial, cranioproximal-craniodistal oblique (skyline patellar), and laterally stressed caudocranial views, revealed similar findings. Arthroscopic surgery to remove the patellar fracture was attempted in 1 horse with severe desmitis of the lateral collateral ligament; it remained lame afterward. The other 2 horses, with less severe collateral ligament damage, were managed conservatively and returned to athletic use, despite the lack of surgical intervention to repair the patellar fractures. Special radiographic views were necessary for diagnosis of medial patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion fracture in the 3 horses. Ultrasonographic findings pertaining to the collateral ligament may be prognostically important in such situations. The severity of a fracture involving ligament avulsion may be the limiting factor in horses with this combined injury, and this factor should be considered prior to attempting surgical correction of patellar fractures.

  3. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  4. Simultaneous MPFL and LPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocation with medial patellofemoral instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kusano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an extremely rare case of both recurrent lateral patella dislocation and medial patellofemoral instability, following prior operations to correct patella maltracking. Manual translation of the patella revealed medial and lateral instability with a positive apprehension sign. 3-D computer modelling of kinematics based on MRI data demonstrated that the patella deviated laterally at full extension and translated medially with knee flexion. The medial and lateral patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed simultaneously with hamstring tendons, alleviating peripatellar pain and patellar instability in both directions.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells have high chondrogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Hachioji, Motomi; Saiga, Kenta; Takata, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cells have a character different from medial collateral ligament (MCL)-derived cells. However, the critical difference between ACL and MCL is still unclear in their healing potential and cellular response. The objective of this study was to investigate the mesenchymal differentiation property of each ligament-derived cell. Both ligament-derived cells differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In chondrogenesis, ACL-derived cells had the higher chondrogenic property than MCL-derived cells. The chondrogenic marker genes, Sox9 and alpha1(II) collagen (Col2a1), were induced faster in ACL-derived pellets than in MCL-derived pellets. Sox9 expression preceded the increase of Col2a1 in both pellet-cultured cells. However, the expression level of Sox9 and a ligament/tendon transcription factor Scleraxis did not parallel the increase of Col2a1 expression along with chondrogenic induction. The present study demonstrates that the balance between Sox9 and Scleraxis have an important role in the chondrogenic differentiation of ligament-derived cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regional fibrocartilage variations in human anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion: a histological three-dimensional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Guo, Lin; Yang, Liu; Wu, Yi; Gou, Jingyue; Li, Bangchun

    2015-02-01

    We studied anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion architecture in humans and investigated regional differences that could suggest unequal force transmission from ligament to bone. ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software for three-dimensional reconstruction. The uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF) layer was divided into three regions: lateral, medial and posterior according to the architecture. The UF zone was significantly thicker laterally than medially or posteriorly (p fibrocartilage (CF) thickness was significantly greater in the lateral part of the enthesis compared to the medial and posterior parts (p < 0.05). The UF quantity (more UF laterally) corresponding to the CF quantity (more CF laterally) at the ACL tibial insertion provides further evidence suggesting that the load transferred from the ACL to the tibia was greater laterally than medially and posteriorly.

  7. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Tibionavicular part. Medial (deltoid) ligament of ankle {. Table I. Differential diagnosis of acute ankle injury. ATFL sprain. CFL sprain. Syndesmosis sprain. Anterior process calcaneus fracture. Lateral process talus fracture. Fifth metatarsal base fracture. Subtalar injury. Peroneal tendon injury. Osteochondral injury of the talus.

  8. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  9. Correlation between bone contusion and ligament, menisci injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lijuan; Li Pei; Tu Changzhuo; Wu Guangren; Qi Yuliang; Yan Xiaoqun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between bone contusion and ligament, meniscus injury of knee joint with MR imaging. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute trauma of knee joint were studied retrospectively. All eases showed negative on X-ray and bone cont, -sion on MR imaging. Results: in all patients, ligament and meniscus injury were seen in 25 cases (71%), incorporate anterior cruciate ligament injury in 12 cases, posterior cruciate ligament in 6, tibial collateral ligament in 8 cases, fibular collateral ligament in 6 cases, medial meniscus tear in 4 cases, lateral meniscus tear in 5 cases, and hydrops in 29 cases. There were only 3 patients with ligament or meniscus injury but no bone contusion during the same period. Conclusion: It is necessary to check by MR for the patients with acute trauma of knee joint, who have clinical symptom such as ache, swelling, move un-freely showing bone contusion on MR Imaging but without any abnormality on X-ray in order to avoid failure in diagnosing injury of ligament and meniscus. (authors)

  10. “Basket weave technique” for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Clinical outcome of a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodkani, Pranjal S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone tunneling and implants with rigid fixations for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction are known to compromise results and are avoidable, especially in skeletally immature subjects. This study was to assess if these deficiencies were overcome with the technique devised by the author which avoids implants and bone tunnels. Results were assessed for complication rate and outcome. Materials and Methods: Fifty six knees of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation were treated in the past 49 months by MPFL reconstruction. Thirty nine were female and 17 male knees. The mean age was 20.6 years (range 9-48 years). Mean followup was 26 months. Five knees had previously failed stabilization procedures. Thirty one cases had Dejours Type A or B and 12 had Type C trochlear dysplasia. Arthroscopy was performed for associated injuries and loose bodies. Seven knees required loose body removal. Five knees underwent lateral retinacular release. Four knees had tibial tuberosity transfer. One knee had an associated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. An anatomical MPFL reconstruction was performed using hamstring autograft without the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy. Only soft tissue fixation was necessary with this newly devised technique and suturing. A rapid rehabilitation protocol was implemented with monthly followup until normalcy and 6 monthly thereafter. Results: All achieved full range of motion and normal mediolateral stability. There was no recurrence of dislocation. No major surgery related complications. One patella fracture at 8 months was due to a fall developed terminal restriction of flexion. Those in sports could return to their sporting activities (Tegner 1–9). Cases with osteochondral fractures had occasional pain that subsided in 1 year. Mean Kujala score improved from 64.3 to 99.69 with KOOS score near normal in all. Conclusion: This new method of MPFL reconstruction gives excellent results. It avoids complications

  11. A rare type of ankle fracture : Syndesmotic rupture combined with a high fibular fracture without medial injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wessem, K. J P; Leenen, L. P H

    High fibular spiral fractures are usually caused by pronation-external rotation mechanism. The foot is in pronation and the talus externally rotates, causing a rupture of the medial ligaments or a fracture of the medial malleolus. With continued rotation the anterior and posterior tibiofibular

  12. Ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload: biomechanical correlation for posteromedial chondromalacia of the elbow in throwing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Dines, Joshua S; Breazeale, Nathan M; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Altchek, David W

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have documented increased posteromedial contact forces with the elbow at lower flexion angles associated with valgus extension overload; however, the authors believe that posteromedial elbow impingement in association with valgus laxity is a complex pathological process that may occur throughout the entire throwing motion in the form of ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload. Valgus laxity with the elbow at 90° of flexion may lead to chondromalacia secondary to a subtle shift in the contact point between the tip of the olecranon and the distal humeral trochlea. Controlled laboratory study. Six fresh human cadaveric elbows were dissected and subjected to a static valgus load. Pressure-sensitive Fuji film measured the contact pressure, contact area, and shift in contact area across the posteromedial elbow before and after sectioning the anterior bundle of the ulnar collateral ligament. The contact pressure between the tip of the olecranon process and the medial crista of the posterior humeral trochlea significantly increased, from an average of 0.27 ± 0.06 kg/cm² to 0.40 ± 0.08 kg/cm². The contact area also significantly decreased, from an average of 30.34 ± 9.17 mm² to 24.59 ± 6.44 mm², and shifted medially on the medial humeral crista, which corresponds to the position of the posteromedial chondral lesions that was observed in throwing athletes in the authors' clinical practice. While simulating the early acceleration phase of the throwing motion with the elbow in 90° of flexion, the results illustrate that abnormal contact may occur as a result of valgus laxity through increased contact pressures across the posteromedial elbow between the medial tip of the olecranon and medial crista of the humeral trochlea. In addition, congruency of the ulnohumeral joint changed, as there was a statistically significant medial shift of the olecranon on the posterior humeral trochlea with the elbow at 90° of flexion after sectioning the anterior

  13. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  14. A rare type of ankle fracture: Syndesmotic rupture combined with a high fibular fracture without medial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wessem, K J P; Leenen, L P H

    2016-03-01

    High fibular spiral fractures are usually caused by pronation-external rotation mechanism. The foot is in pronation and the talus externally rotates, causing a rupture of the medial ligaments or a fracture of the medial malleolus. With continued rotation the anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligament will rupture, and finally, the energy leaves the fibula by creating a spiral fracture from anterior superior to posterior inferior. In this article we demonstrate a type of ankle fracture with syndesmotic injury and high fibular spiral fractures without a medial component. This type of ankle fractures cannot be explained by the Lauge-Hansen classification, since it lacks injury on the medial side of the ankle, but it does have the fibular fracture pattern matching the pronation external rotation injury (anterior superior to posterior inferior fracture). We investigated the mechanism of this injury illustrated by 3 cases and postulate a theory explaining the biomechanics behind this type of injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reliability and precision of stress sonography of the ulnar collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, David; Armen, Joseph; Kulas, Anthony S; Youngs, Kevin; Womack, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    Musculoskeletal sonography has emerged as an additional diagnostic tool that can be used to assess medial elbow pain and laxity in overhead throwers. It provides a dynamic, rapid, and noninvasive modality in the evaluation of ligamentous structural integrity. Many studies have demonstrated the utility of dynamic sonography for medial elbow and ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) integrity. However, evaluating the reliabilityand precision of these measurements is critical if sonography is ultimately used as a clinical diagnostic tool. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and precision of stress sonography applied to the medial elbow. We conducted a cross-sectional study during the 2011 baseball off-season. Eighteen National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I pitchers were enrolled, and 36 elbows were studied. Using sonography, the medial elbow was assessed, and measurements of the UCL length and ulnohumeral joint gapping were performed twice under two conditions (unloaded and loaded) and bilaterally. Intraclass correlation coefficients (0.72-0.94) and standard errors of measurements (0.3-0.9 mm) for UCL length and ulnohumeral joint gapping were good to excellent. Mean differences between unloaded and loaded conditions for the dominant arms were 1.3 mm (gapping; P < .001) and 1.4 mm (UCL length; P < .001). Medial elbow stress sonography is a reliable and precise method for detecting changes in ulnohumeral joint gapping and UCL lengthening. Ultimately, this method may provide clinicians valuable information regarding the medial elbow's response to valgus loading and may help guide treatment options. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in assessing deltoid ligament injury in supination external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henari, Shwan

    2011-10-01

    The medial deltoid ligament is the primary stabilizing structure in the ankle joint following lateral malleolar fracture. However, medial deltoid ligament ruptures are difficult to diagnose using current imaging modalities. We hypothesized that ultrasonography can be used to accurately allow early clinical assessment of ankle fracture stability, thereby negating the need to perform plain film stress views of the acutely injured ankle. This prospective study included 12 patients (age range, 18-72) with supination external rotation fractures requiring operative fixation. Following induction of anesthesia, ultrasonography examination was performed, followed by an arthrogram under fluoroscopic screening. Radiographs, ultrasonography, and arthrographic findings were compared. There was 100% correlation between ultrasonography and arthrogram findings. Ultrasonography accurately diagnosed medial deltoid rupture with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Plain film radiographs of the ankle had a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 60%. The difference between these was significant (χ(2)=.0091). This study demonstrates diagnostic ultrasonography to be an accurate diagnostic modality in assessing medial deltoid ligament integrity in patients with supination external rotation fractures. It offers the same sensitivity and specificity as arthrography without the need for additional invasive procedures. Its relative ease of use and lack of ionizing radiation make it a potentially useful tool, particularly in a busy trauma service.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli; Fridmann, Marcos William; Arbo, Rodrigo Di Mare; Vieira, Jose Francisco; Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga da; Pires, Luiz Antonio Simoes; Abreu, Armando; Abreu, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  18. Instrument-assisted cross-fiber massage accelerates knee ligament healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, M Terry; Warden, Stuart J

    2009-07-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To investigate the effects of instrument-assisted cross-fiber massage (IACFM) on tissue-level healing of knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries. Ligament injuries are common and significant clinical problems for which there are few established interventions. IACFM represents an intervention that may mediate tissue-level healing following ligament injury. Bilateral knee MCL injuries were created in 51 rodents, while 7 rodents were maintained as ligament-intact, control animals. IACFM was commenced 1 week following injury and introduced 3 sessions per week for 1 minute per session. IACFM was introduced unilaterally (IACFM-treated), with the contralateral, injured MCL serving as an internal control (nontreated). Thirty-one injured animals received 9 ACFM treatments, while the remaining 20 injured animals received 30 treatments. Ligament biomechanical properties and morphology were assessed at either 4 or 12 weeks postinjury. IACFM-treated ligaments were 43.1% stronger (P<.05), 39.7% stiffer (P<.01), and could absorb 57.1% more energy before failure (P<.05) than contralateral, injured, nontreated ligaments at 4 weeks postinjury. On histological and scanning electron microscopy assessment, IACFM-treated ligaments appeared to have improved collagen fiber bundle formation and orientation within the scar region than nontreated ligaments. There were minimal differences between IACFM-treated and contralateral, nontreated ligaments at 12 weeks postinjury, although IACFM-treated ligaments were 15.4% stiffer (P<.05). IACFM-accelerated ligament healing, possibly via favorable effects on collagen formation and organization, but had minimal effect on the final outcome of healing. These findings are clinically interesting, as there are few established interventions for ligament injuries, and IACFM is a simple and practical therapy technique. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2009;39(7):506-514, Epub 24 February 2009. doi:10.2519/jospt.2009.2997.

  19. Proximo-distal patellar position in three small dog breeds with medial patellar luxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdee, C; Theyse, L F H; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2015-01-01

    Medial patellar luxation is thought to be associated with a high proximal position of the patella in the trochlear groove. To determine whether the ratio of patellar ligament length and patellar length (L:P) is influenced by the stifle angle (75°, 96°, 113°, 130°, and 148°) in small dog breeds and to compare the L:P ratio in dogs of three small dog breeds with and without medial patellar luxation. A mediolateral radiograph of the stifle joint was used to measure the L:P ratio in the stifle joints of dogs of three small breeds with and without medial patellar luxation. The L:P ratio was evaluated at five stifle angles (75°, 96°, 113°, 130°, and 148°) in 14 cadavers (26 stifle joints) of small dog breeds in order to identify the best stifle angle to measure the L:P ratio. Then the mean ± SD L:P ratio was calculated for normal stifles and stifles with medial patellar luxation grades 1, 2, and 3 in 194 Pomeranians, 74 Chihuahuas, and 41 Toy or Standard Poodles. The L:P ratio was the same for all five stifle angles in the cadavers (p = 0.195). It was also not significantly different in the three breeds (p = 0.135), in normal and medial patellar luxation-affected stifles overall (p = 0.354), and in normal and medial patellar luxation-affected joints within each breed (p = 0.19). We conclude that a proximo-distal patellar position is not associated with medial patellar luxation in Pomeranians, Chihuahuas, and Toy or Standard Poodles. Thus a longer patellar ligament length does not play a role in the pathophysiology of medial patellar luxation in these small dog breeds.

  20. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Parellada, J.Antoni; Parker, Laurence; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Transsyndesmotic Fixation and Primary Deltoid Ligament Repair in Ankle Fractures With Suspected Combined Deltoid Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Lin, Jian; Huang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiugen

    2018-04-13

    The present prospective study examined the utility of the intraoperative tap test/technique for distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in the diagnosis of deltoid ligament rupture and compared the outcomes of transsyndesmotic fixation to deltoid ligament repair with suture anchor. This diagnostic technique was performed in 59 ankle fractures with suspected deltoid ligament injury. The width of the medial clear space of 59 cases was evaluated to assess the sensitivity and specificity. Those with deltoid ligament rupture were randomly assigned to 2 groups and treated with deltoid ligament repair with a suture anchor or with syndesmosis screw fixation. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, short-form 36-item questionnaire (SF-36), and visual analog scale (VAS). The tap test was positive in 53 cases. However, surgical exploration demonstrated that 51 cases (86.4%) had a combined deltoid ligament injury and fracture. The sensitivity and specificity of the tap test was 100.0% and 75.0%, respectively. Finally, 26 cases (96.3%) in the syndesmosis screw group and 22 (91.7%) in the deltoid repair group were followed up. No statistically significant differences were found in the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale score, SF-36 score, or VAS score between the 2 groups. The malreduction rate in the syndesmosis screw group was 34.6% and that in the deltoid repair group was 9.09%. The tap test is an intraoperative diagnostic method to use to evaluate for deltoid ligament injury. Deltoid ligament repair with a suture anchor had good functional and radiologic outcomes comparable to those with syndesmotic screw fixation but has a lower malreduction rate. We did not encounter the issue of internal fixation failure or implant removal. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Myung Chul; Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2018-03-20

    A case of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with meniscal repair in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient is reported. A 24-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1a suffered from a valgus extension injury resulting in tear of ACL and medial meniscus. She underwent an arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction and medial meniscus repair. Meniscal tear at the menisco-capsular junction of the posterior horn of medial meniscus was repaired with three absorbable sutures via inside-out technique. ACL reconstruction was then performed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. The patient was followed up for 1 year with intact ACL grafts and healed medial meniscus. This case report showed that successful ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair is possible in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient.Level of evidence V.

  3. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament with erosion of the lateral femoral condyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Yuguero, Mariano; Saez, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that produced osseous erosion of the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  4. The Efficacy of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Combined with Tibial Tuberosity Transfer in the Treatment of Patellofemoral Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downham, Christopher; Bassett, James; Thompson, Peter; Sprowson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction combined with tibial tuberosity transfer (TTT) in the treatment of patellofemoral instability. Using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, a systematic search was carried out to identify and review the published literature pertinent to MFPL reconstruction combined with TTT. Relevant studies were critically appraised with narrative data synthesis. Studies that met the eligibility criteria were suitable for appraisal and consisted of case series and therapeutic series (levels IV & III). All studies had inherent variations in outcomes reporting and limited follow-up. Combined treatment offers restoration of normal anatomy, thus adding clinical value to the currently recommended anatomic approach to MPFL reconstruction. Nevertheless, the current body of evidence does not determine the threshold at which patellofemoral axis requires the need for adjunctive distal realignment as opposed to MPFL reconstruction alone. This review highlighted numerous recurring limitations in the conduct and presentation of the studies, which inadvertently mitigated the interpretation of their results. Future priority should be awarded to larger randomised controlled trials utilising validated patient reported outcome measures. PMID:27274466

  5. Anatomic deltoid ligament repair with anchor-to-post suture reinforcement: technique tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, William; Phisitkul, Phinit; Femino, John E

    2012-01-01

    The deltoid ligament is the primary ligamentous stabilizer of the ankle joint. Both superficial and deep components of the ligament can be disrupted with a rotational ankle fracture, chronic ankle instability, or in late stage adult acquired flatfoot deformity. The role of deltoid ligament repair in these conditions has been limited and its contribution to arthritis is largely unknown. Neglect of the deltoid ligament in the treatment of ankle injuries may be due to difficulties in diagnosis and lack of an effective method for repair. Most acute repair techniques address the superficial deltoid ligament with direct end-to-end repair, fixation through bone tunnels, or suture anchor repair of avulsion injuries. Deep deltoid ligament repair has been described using direct end-to-end repair with sutures, as well as by autograft and allograft tendon reconstruction utilizing various techniques. Newer tenodesis techniques have been described for late reconstruction of both deep and superficial components in patients with stage 4 adult acquired flatfoot deformity. We describe a technique that provides anatomic ligament-to-bone repair of the superficial and deep bundles of the deltoid ligament while reducing the talus toward the medial malleolar facet of the tibiotalar joint with anchor-to-post reinforcement of the ligamentous repair. This technique may protect and allow the horizontally oriented fibers of the deep deltoid ligament to heal with the appropriate resting length while providing immediate stability of the construct.

  6. Clinical and radiological outcomes after a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament with gracilis tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monllau, Joan C; Masferrer-Pino, Àngel; Ginovart, Gerard; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Gelber, Pablo E; Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente

    2017-08-01

    To analyse the clinical and radiological outcomes of a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) with a gracilis tendon autograft. Patients with objective recurrent patellar instability that were operated on from 2006 to 2012 were included. A quasi-anatomical surgical technique was performed using a gracilis tendon autograft. It was anatomically attached at the patella, and the adductor magnus tendon was also used as a pulley for femoral fixation (non-anatomical reconstruction). The IKDC, Kujala and Lysholm scores as well as Tegner and VAS for pain were collected preoperatively and at final follow-up. Radiographic measurements of patellar position tilt and signs of osteoarthritis (OA) as well as trochlear dysplasia were also recorded. Thirty-six patients were included. The mean age at surgery was 25.6 years. After a minimum 27 months of follow-up, all functional scores significantly improved (p patellofemoral surfaces at the short term, as shown by the absence of radiological signs of OA in the CT scan. The procedure has been shown to be safe and suitable for the treatment of chronic patellar instability, including in adolescents with open physis. A new effective, inexpensive and easy-to-perform technique is described to reconstruct MPFL in the daily clinical practice. Therapeutic case series, Level IV.

  7. Large coronary intramural hematomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous coronary intramural hematoma is a unique subset of spontaneous coronary artery dissection that is characterized by a hemorrhage limited to the medial-adventitial layers, causing subsequent hematoma formation without visible intimal flaps. It is an infrequent and serious...... diagnostics and treatment strategy. Coronary intramural hematomas can also occur iatrogenically, as a complication to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coronary angiography (CAG) has limited diagnostic value in the absence of intimal dissections, and lesions are often angiographically ambiguous....... Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is an important diagnostic tool in establishing the correct diagnosis, as it provides a complete vessel wall assessment, and enables morphometric information regarding the magnitude and severity of the underlying hematoma. Due to the rarity of this clinical scenario...

  8. Anomalous Medial Branch of Radial Artery: A Rare Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Wadhwa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radial artery is an important consistent vessel of the upper limb. It is a useful vascular access site for coronary procedures and its reliable anatomy has resulted in an elevation of radial forearm flaps for reconstructive surgeries of head and neck. Technical failures, in both the procedures, are mainly due to anatomical variations, such as radial loops, ectopic radial arteries or tortuosity in the vessel. We present a rare and a unique anomalous medial branch of the radial artery spiraling around the flexor carpi radialis muscle in the forearm with a high rising superficial palmar branch of radial artery. Developmentally it probably is a remanent of the normal pattern of capillary vessel maintenance and regression. Such a case is of importance for reconstructive surgeons and coronary interventionists, especially in view of its unique medial and deep course.

  9. The anatomy and isometry of a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Capurro, Bruno; Gelber, Pablo E; Ginovart, Gerard; Reina, Francisco; Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Monllau, Joan C

    2017-08-01

    To describe the anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and its relationship to the Adductor Magnus (AM) tendon as well as the behaviour exhibited in length changes during knee flexion. Ten cadaveric knees were dissected. The length from the superior and inferior patellar origin of the MPFL to its femoral insertion was measured at different degrees of knee flexion (0°, 30°, 60°, 90° and 120°). The same measures were made from both patellar origins of the MPFL up to the femoral insertion of the AM. The distance between the insertion of the AM and the Hunter canal was also measured. In general, isometry up to 90° was seen in all measures of the MPFL and those of the AM. The most isometric behaviour was seen in 2 measures: the length of the AM femoral insertion up to the inferior origin of the MPFL on the patella and the length of the femoral insertion of the MPFL up to the inferior origin of the MPFL on the patella. Similar behaviour was seen regardless of the anatomical or quasi-anatomical femoral point of attachment (n.s.). The distance from the AM tendon to the Hunter canal had a mean value of 78.6 mm (SD 9.4 mm). The behaviour exhibited during the changes in the length of the anatomical femoral footprint of the MPFL and the AM is similar. Neurovascular structures were not seen at risk. This is relevant in the daily clinical practice since the AM tendon might be a suitable point of insertion for MPFL reconstruction.

  10. High-volume image-guided injection for recalcitrant medial collateral ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, O.; Chan, O.; Malliaras, P.; Morrissey, D.; Maffulli, N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel injection technique in the management of recalcitrant medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries of the knee. Materials and methods: The injection, comprising 10 ml local anaesthetic with 25–50 mg hydrocortisone, is directed beneath the periosteal attachment of the MCL. Twenty-eight patients who received the intervention were asked to complete a questionnaire, a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee form to quantify symptoms pre-injection and at follow-up. Data were assessed using descriptive statistics. Further analysis was conducted using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Sixty-eight percent (n = 19) of patients responded. Three patients were excluded according to the exclusion criteria. Of those studied, 37.5% (n = 6) were professional athletes. At follow-up, patients reported a mean improvement on the VAS of 75.5% (SD = 23.6). There was a significant improvement in IKDC scores (mean difference 42%, SD = 14.2) pre- and post-injection (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001). No residual symptoms were reported by 50% (n = 8) of patients, and a further 37.5% (n = 6) of patients had improved. Of those patients who played sport, two-thirds (n = 10) had returned to their previous level of sport at follow-up, including all of the professional athletes. Conclusion: Periosteal high-volume image-guided injection is a useful treatment for recalcitrant MCL injury. Results are encouraging, particularly amongst the professional athletes studied

  11. Elbow dislocation with intra-articular fracture: the results of operative treatment without repair of the medial collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthman, Christopher; Henket, Marjolijn; Ring, David C

    2007-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a protocol for the treatment of fracture-dislocations of the elbow based on the concept that, if dislocation of the elbow with associated fractures can be made to resemble a simple elbow dislocation by repairing or reconstructing the fractured structures, repair of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) will not be necessary. Over a 5-year period, a single surgeon operated on 34 patients with a posterior dislocation of the elbow associated with one or more intra-articular fractures. The mean age of these 19 men and 15 women was 48 years. Associated fractures included the capitellum, trochlea, and lateral epicondyle in 3 patients; the olecranon in 1 patient; and the radial head in 30 patients (with concomitant fracture of the coronoid process-the so-called "terrible triad" of the elbow-in 22 patients, and concomitant fracture of the coronoid and olecranon in 1 patient). Operative treatment consisted of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) or prosthetic replacement of all fractures and reattachment of the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) complex to the lateral epicondyle. The MCL was not repaired. Two patients (1 with a terrible triad injury and 1 with fracture of the capitellum and trochlea) had postoperative instability related to noncompliance, had reconstructive procedures, and were considered failures. An average of 32 months after injury, the remaining 32 patients regained an average of 120 degrees ulnohumeral motion and 142 degrees forearm rotation. Twenty-five of 34 patients (74%) had good or excellent results according to the system of Broberg and Morrey. Patients with terrible triad injuries had an average of 117 degrees ulnohumeral motion and 137 degrees forearm rotation, and 17 of 22 patients (77%) had good or excellent results. MCL repair is unnecessary in the treatment of dislocation of the elbow with associated intra-articular fractures, provided that the articular fractures and the LCL are repaired or

  12. The Influence of Interleukin-4 on Ligament Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S; Leiferman, Ellen M; Frisch, Kayt E; Wang, Sijian; Yang, Xipei; Brickson, Stacey L; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Despite a complex cascade of cellular events to reconstruct the damaged extracellular matrix, ligament healing results in a mechanically inferior scarred ligament. During normal healing, granulation tissue expands into any residual normal ligamentous tissue (creeping substitution), resulting in a larger region of healing, greater mechanical compromise, and an inefficient repair process. To control creeping substitution and possibly enhance the repair process, the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4) was administered to rats prior to and after rupture of their medial collateral ligaments. In vitro experiments demonstrated a time-dependent effect on fibroblast proliferation after interleukin-4 treatment. In vivo treatments with interleukin-4 (100 ng/ml i.v.) for 5 days resulted in decreased wound size and type III collagen and increased type I procollagen, indicating a more regenerative early healing in response to the interleukin-4 treatment. However, continued treatment of interleukin-4 to day 11 antagonized this early benefit and slowed healing. Together, these results suggest that interleukin-4 influences the macrophages and T-lymphocytes but also stimulates fibroblasts associated with the proliferative phase of healing in a dose-, cell-, and time-dependent manner. Although treatment significantly influenced healing in the first week after injury, interleukin-4 alone was unable to maintain this early regenerative response. PMID:21518087

  13. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Impact of Knee Flexion Angle During Graft Fixation on Dynamic Patellofemoral Contact Pressure-A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorbach, Olaf; Zumbansen, Nikolaus; Kieb, Matthias; Efe, Turgay; Pizanis, Antonius; Kohn, Dieter; Haupert, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    Objective evaluation of the optimal graft tension angle to fully restore patellofemoral contact pressure in reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in comparison to the native knee. Twelve cadaveric knee specimens were fixed in a custom-made fixation device. A sensitive pressure film (Tekscan) was fixed in the patellofemoral joint, and patellofemoral contact pressure was assessed during a dynamic flexion movement from 0° to 90°. The MPFL was cut and measurements were repeated. Reconstruction of the MPFL was performed with the gracilis tendon subsequently fixed in the femur at 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90° of knee flexion under controlled tension (2 N). The sequence of the flexion angles was alternated. Pressure measurements were repeated after every fixation of the graft. No significant differences were seen in the overall patellofemoral contact pressure compared to the native knee (P > .05). However, medial patellofemoral pressure showed a significant increased patellofemoral contact pressure after MPFL reconstruction at a knee flexion angle during graft fixation of 15° (P = .027), 45° (P = .050, P = .044), and 75° (P = .039). Moreover, proximal/distal patellofemoral contact pressure revealed a significantly reduced contact pressure at 15° (P = .003), 30° (P = .009), 45° (P = .025), 75° (P = .021), and 90° (P = .022) of flexion distal after MPFL reconstruction compared with the intact knee. Lateral patellofemoral contact pressure was significantly reduced in all performed reconstructions (P angle during graft fixation for MPFL reconstruction did not have a significant impact on the overall patellofemoral contact pressure. However, selective medial, proximal, distal, and lateral patellofemoral contact pressure was significantly altered for all reconstructions. Fixation of the MPFL graft at 60° of flexion was able to most closely restore patellofemoral contact pressure compared with the intact knee. Based on the

  14. An in vitro analysis of medial structures and a medial soft tissue reconstruction in a constrained condylar total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, Kiron K; El Daou, Hadi; Inderhaug, Eivind; Manning, William; Davies, Andrew J; Deehan, David J; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the medial soft tissue contributions to stability following constrained condylar (CC) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and determine whether a medial reconstruction could restore stability to a soft tissue-deficient, CC-TKA knee. Eight cadaveric knees were mounted in a robotic system and tested at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion with ±50 N anterior-posterior force, ±8 Nm varus-valgus, and ±5 Nm internal-external torque. The deep and superficial medial collateral ligaments (dMCL, sMCL) and posteromedial capsule (PMC) were transected and their relative contributions to stabilising the applied loads were quantified. After complete medial soft tissue transection, a reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon graft was performed, and the effect on kinematic behaviour under equivocal conditions was measured. In the CC-TKA knee, the sMCL was the major medial restraint in anterior drawer, internal-external, and valgus rotation. No significant differences were found between the rotational laxities of the reconstructed knee to the pre-deficient state for the arc of motion examined. The relative contribution of the reconstruction was higher in valgus rotation at 60° than the sMCL; otherwise, the contribution of the reconstruction was similar to that of the sMCL. There is contention whether a CC-TKA can function with medial deficiency or more constraint is required. This work has shown that a CC-TKA may not provide enough stability with an absent sMCL. However, in such cases, combining the CC-TKA with a medial soft tissue reconstruction may be considered as an alternative to a hinged implant.

  15. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  16. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  17. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2004-01-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p 0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion

  18. Centralization of extruded medial meniscus delays cartilage degeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kenichi; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Saito, Ryusuke; Udo, Mio; Yanagisawa, Katsuaki; Ohara, Toshiyuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    Meniscus extrusion often observed in knee osteoarthritis has a strong correlation with the progression of cartilage degeneration and symptom in the patients. We recently reported a novel procedure "arthroscopic centralization" in which the capsule was sutured to the edge of the tibial plateau to reduce meniscus extrusion in the human knee. However, there is no animal model to study the efficacy of this procedure. The purposes of this study were [1] to establish a model of centralization for the extruded medial meniscus in a rat model; and [2] to investigate the chondroprotective effect of this procedure. Medial meniscus extrusion was induced by the release of the anterior synovial capsule and the transection of the meniscotibial ligament. Centralization was performed by the pulled-out suture technique. Alternatively, control rats had only the medial meniscus extrusion surgery. Medial meniscus extrusion was evaluated by micro-CT and macroscopic findings. Cartilage degeneration of the medial tibial plateau was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. By micro-CT analysis, the medial meniscus extrusion was significantly improved in the centralization group in comparison to the extrusion group throughout the study. Both macroscopically and histologically, the cartilage lesion of the medial tibial plateau was prevented in the centralization group but was apparent in the control group. We developed medial meniscus extrusion in a rat model, and centralization of the extruded medial meniscus by the pull-out suture technique improved the medial meniscus extrusion and delayed cartilage degeneration, though the effect was limited. Centralization is a promising treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of the Nomenclature of the Retaining Ligaments of the Cheek: Frequently Confused Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeui Seok Seo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the time of its inception within facial anatomy, wide variability in the terminology as well as the location and extent of retaining ligaments has resulted in confusion over nomenclature. Confusion over nomenclature also arises with regard to the subcutaneous ligamentous attachments, and in the anatomic location and extent described, particularly for zygomatic and masseteric ligaments. Certain historical terms—McGregor’s patch, the platysma auricular ligament, parotid cutaneous ligament, platysma auricular fascia, temporoparotid fasica (Lore’s fascia, anterior platysma-cutaneous ligament, and platysma cutaneous ligament—delineate retaining ligaments of related anatomic structures that have been conceptualized in various ways. Confusion around the masseteric cutaneous ligaments arises from inconsistencies in their reported locations in the literature because the size and location of the parotid gland varies so much, and this affects the relationship between the parotid gland and the fascia of the masseter muscle. For the zygomatic ligaments, there is disagreement over how far they extend, with descriptions varying over whether they extend medially beyond the zygomaticus minor muscle. Even the ‘main’ zygomatic ligament’s denotation may vary depending on which subcutaneous plane is used as a reference for naming it. Recent popularity in procedures using threads or injectables has required not only an accurate understanding of the nomenclature of retaining ligaments, but also of their location and extent. The authors have here summarized each retaining ligament with a survey of the different nomenclature that has been introduced by different authors within the most commonly cited published papers.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  1. Effects of tibial plateau angle and spacer thickness applied during in vitro canine total knee replacement on three-dimensional kinematics and collateral ligament strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katherine M; Foutz, Timothy L; Johnsen, Kyle J; Budsberg, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    To quantify the 3-D kinematics and collateral ligament strain of stifle joints in cadaveric canine limbs before and after cranial cruciate ligament transection followed by total knee replacement (TKR) involving various tibial plateau angles and spacer thicknesses. 6 hemi-pelvises collected from clinically normal nonchondrodystrophic dogs (weight range, 25 to 35 kg). Hemi-pelvises were mounted on a modified Oxford knee rig that allowed 6 degrees of freedom of the stifle joint but prevented mechanical movement of the hip and tarsal joints. Kinematics and collateral ligament strain were measured continuously while stifle joints were flexed. Data were again collected after cranial cruciate ligament transection and TKR with combinations of 3 plateau angles (0°, 4°, and 8°) and spacer thicknesses (5, 7, and 9 mm). Presurgical (ie, normal) stifle joint rotations were comparable to those previously documented for live dogs. After TKR, kinematics recorded for the 8°, 5-mm implant most closely resembled those of unaltered stifle joints. Decreasing the plateau angle and increasing spacer thickness altered stifle joint adduction, internal rotation, and medial translation. Medial collateral ligament strain was minimal in unaltered stifle joints and was unaffected by TKR. Lateral collateral ligament strain decreased with steeper plateau angles but returned to a presurgical level at the flattest plateau angle. Among the constructs tested, greatest normalization of canine stifle joint kinematics in vitro was achieved with the steepest plateau angle paired with the thinnest spacer. Furthermore, results indicated that strain to the collateral ligaments was not negatively affected by TKR.

  2. Bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: meniscal intrusion rather than meniscal extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossberg, S.; Umans, H.; Flusser, G.; DiFelice, G.S.; Lerer, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of medial meniscal extrusion (MME) versus ''medial meniscal intrusion'' in the setting of bucket handle tears. Images were evaluated for previously reported risk factors for MME, including: medial meniscal root tear, radial tear, degenerative joint disease and joint effusion. Forty-one consecutive cases of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus were reviewed by consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 GE Signa MR unit. Patient age, gender, medial meniscal root integrity, MME, medial meniscal intrusion, degenerative joint disease, effusion and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear were recorded. Thirteen females and 27 males (age 12-62 years, median=30 years) were affected; one had bucket handle tear of each knee. Effusion was small in 13, moderate in 9 and large in 18. Degenerative joint disease was mild in three, moderate in two and severe in one. 26 ACL tears included three partial and three chronic. Medial meniscal root tear was complete in one case and partial thickness in two. None of the 40 cases with an intact or partially torn medial meniscal root demonstrated MME. MME of 3.1 mm was seen in the only full-thickness medial meniscal root tear, along with chronic ACL tear, moderate degenerative joint disease and large effusion. Medial meniscal intrusion of the central bucket handle fragment into the intercondylar notch was present in all 41 cases. Given an intact medial meniscal root in the setting of a ''pure'' bucket handle tear, there is no MME. (orig.)

  3. T2 mapping of the articular cartilage in the ankle: Correlation to the status of anterior talofibular ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Yoon, Y.C.; Kim, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate differences in T2 relaxation time of ankle cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the status of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Materials and methods: The talar trochlear cartilage (TTC) was evaluated in 52 patients with ankle pain that were categorized according to the status of ATFL; normal (NL; n = 23, mean age 40 years); partial tear (PT; n = 21, mean age 39 years); or complete tear (CT; n = 8, mean age 33 years). The TTC was divided into six compartments (medial anterior, medial centre, medial posterior, lateral anterior, lateral centre, and lateral posterior). The mean T2 value of each compartment was obtained using the multi-echo sequence. Data were analysed with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Results: The mean T2 values of the TTC showed significant differences between the three groups; NL, PT, and CT (p < 0.001). The T2 value between the three ligamentous groups were significantly different in the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments (p = 0.003, 0.002, 0.002, respectively). T2 values of the PT and CT groups were significantly higher than those of the NL group in the medial anterior compartment (p = 0.015, 0.002) and lateral anterior compartment (p = 0.026, <0.001). The T2 value of the CT group was significantly higher than that of NL and PT groups in the lateral centre compartment (p < 0.001, 0.031). Conclusion: The T2 value of the TTC in patients with ATFL injury increased at the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments

  4. CORONARY ARTERY FISTULA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MZ Chowdhury

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of congenital abnormalities of coronary artery is about 2% of general population. Of these abnormalities 5% were related to coronary artery fistulae (CAF. We report a case of 66 year old diabetic woman who presented with retrosternal chest pain. Her chest pain was associated with exercise and progressively deteriorated over the last 6 months. Electrocardiography showed right bundle branch block and Echo Color Doppler revealed hypo kinetic lateral wall. Coronary angiogram detected nothing abnormal except an aberrant tortuous branch of left circumflex. CT scan revealed a calcified sac medial to the descended thoracic aorta. A contrast enhancement was also done. All these imaging impressions were suggestive of coronary-to-pulmonary fistula. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2007; 1(1: 32-33

  5. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de; Shahabpour, Maryam [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest University, Department of Radiology, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Cattrysse, Erik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-12-04

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  6. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de; Shahabpour, Maryam; Lenchik, Leon; Cattrysse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu [Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng [Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, En-Miao [Jinan Third People' s Hospital, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  8. Clinical and Functional Outcomes following Primary Repair versus Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament for Recurrent Patellar Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Tompkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL repair or reconstruction. Methods. Fourteen knees that underwent MPFL repair and nine (F5, M4 knees that underwent reconstruction at our institution were evaluated for objective and subjective outcomes. The mean age at operation was 20.1 years for repair and 19.8 years for reconstruction. All patients had a minimum of 2 years of follow-up (range: 24–75 months. Patient subjective outcomes were obtained using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC and Kujala patellofemoral subjective evaluations, as well as Visual Analog (VAS and Tegner Activity Scales. Bilateral isometric quadriceps strength and vastus medialis obliquus (VMO and vastus lateralis (VL surface EMG were measured during maximal isometric quadriceps contractions at 30° and 60° of flexion. Results. There were no redislocations in either group. There was no difference in IKDC (P=0.16, Kujala (P=0.43, Tegner (P=0.12, or VAS (P=0.05 scores at follow-up. There were no differences between repair and reconstruction in torque generation of the involved side at 30° (P=0.96 and 60° (P=0.99. In addition, there was no side to side difference in torque generation or surface EMG activation of VL or VMO. Conclusions. There were minimal differences found between patients undergoing MPFL repair and MPFL reconstruction for the objective and subjective evaluations in this study.

  9. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu; Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng; Li, En-Miao; Shi, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  10. Clavicular bone tunnel malposition leads to early failures in coracoclavicular ligament reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jay B; Shaha, James S; Rowles, Douglas J; Bottoni, Craig R; Shaha, Steven H; Tokish, John M

    2013-01-01

    Modern techniques for the treatment of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations have largely centered on free tendon graft reconstructions. Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an anatomic reconstruction with 2 clavicular bone tunnels more closely matches the properties of native coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments than more traditional techniques. No study has analyzed tunnel position in regard to risk of early failure. To evaluate the effect of clavicular tunnel position in CC ligament reconstruction as a risk of early failure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of CC ligament reconstructions performed with 2 clavicular bone tunnels and a free tendon graft. The population was largely a young, active-duty military group of patients. Radiographs were analyzed for the maintenance of reduction and location of clavicular bone tunnels using a picture archiving and communication system. The distance from the lateral border of the clavicle to the center of each bone tunnel was divided by the total clavicular length to establish a ratio. Medical records were reviewed for operative details and functional outcome. Failure was defined as loss of intraoperative reduction. The overall failure rate was 28.6% (8/28) at an average of 7.4 weeks postoperatively. Comparison of bone tunnel position showed that medialized bone tunnels were a significant predictor for early loss of reduction for the conoid (a ratio of 0.292 vs 0.248; P = .012) and trapezoid bone tunnels (a ratio of 0.171 vs 0.128; P = .004); this correlated to an average of 7 to 9 mm more medial in the reconstructions that failed. Reconstructions performed with a conoid ratio of ≥0.30 were significantly more likely to fail (5/5, 100%) than were those performed lateral to a ratio of 0.30 (3/23, 13.0%) (P < .01). There were no failures when the conoid ratio was <0.25 (0/10, 0%). Conoid tunnel placement was also statistically significant for

  11. Distribution of lymphatic tissues and autonomic nerves in supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Feng, Lanlan; Lu, Yi; Guo, Dongxia; Xi, Tengteng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the distribution of lymphatic tissues and nerves in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri for their tomographical relationship, 9 adult female cadavers were used in this study. Following the incision of all supporting ligaments around the cervix, hematoxylin and esosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining of various sections of these ligaments was performed to enable the distribution of lymph tissues and autonomic nerves to be observed. Four lymph nodes were identified in three cadaver specimens. Three lymph nodes were present at a distance of 2.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the cardinal ligaments (CLs), and one lymph node was located at a distance of 4.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the uterosacral ligament (USL). The lymphatic vessels were dispersed in the CLs, scattered in the cervical side of the USLs, and occasionally distributed in the vesicouterine ligaments (VULs). In the CLs, parasympathetic nerves were located at the pelvic lateral wall and went downwards and medially into the cervix, while sympathetic fibers were located in the middle and lower parts of the ligaments. In the USLs, the autonomic nerves, which consisted primarily of sympathetic fibers, went downwards and laterally from the pelvic wall to the cervix. In the VULs, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves were located in the inner sides of the vesical veins in the deep layers of the ligaments. It is concluded that there are few lymphatic tissues in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri, and that nerve‑sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH) may be a safe method for the treatment of early‑stage cervical cancer.

  12. Intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Michael D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, B.M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shotts, Ezekiel E. [NEA Baptist Clinic, Jonesboro, AR (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Unlike with anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about the prevalence of intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury in the knee. The objectives of this study were to characterize and identify the frequency of meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries in these patients, and to see if management might be affected. Altogether, 48 knee MRI exams with isolated PCL tears were evaluated for the presence of: grade and location of PCL tear, meniscal tear, articular chondral lesion, bone bruise, and fracture. Comparisons between PCL tear grade and location, as well as mechanism of injury when known, with the presence of various intra-articular pathologies, were made using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. In all, 69 % of isolated PCL tears occur in the midsubstance, 27 % proximally. Meniscal tears were seen in 25 % of knees, involving all segments of both menisci, except for the anterior horn medial meniscus. Altogether, 23 % had focal cartilage lesions, usually affecting the central third medial femoral condyle and medial trochlea, while 12.5 % of knees had fractures, and 48 % demonstrated bone bruises, usually involving the central to anterior tibiofemoral joint. The presence of a fracture (p = 0.0123) and proximal location of PCL tear (p = 0.0016) were both associated with the hyperextension mechanism of injury. There were no statistically significant associations between PCL tear grade and presence of intra-articular abnormality. Potentially treatable meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries are relatively prevalent, and demonstrable on MRI in patients with isolated acute PCL injury of the knee. (orig.)

  13. Optimal Contrast Agent Staining of Ligaments and Tendons for X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Lowe, Tristan; Shearer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography has become an important tool for studying the microstructures of biological soft tissues, such as ligaments and tendons. Due to the low X-ray attenuation of such tissues, chemical contrast agents are often necessary to enhance contrast during scanning. In this article, the effects of using three different contrast agents--iodine potassium iodide solution, phosphotungstic acid and phosphomolybdic acid--are evaluated and compared. Porcine anterior cruciate ligaments, patellar tendons, medial collateral ligaments and lateral collateral ligaments were used as the basis of the study. Three samples of each of the four ligament/tendon types were each assigned a different contrast agent (giving a total of twelve samples), and the progression of that agent through the tissue was monitored by performing a scan every day for a total period of five days (giving a total of sixty scans). Since the samples were unstained on day one, they had been stained for a total of four days by the time of the final scans. The relative contrast enhancement and tissue deformation were measured. It was observed that the iodine potassium iodide solution penetrated the samples fastest and caused the least sample shrinkage on average (although significant deformation was observed by the time of the final scans), whereas the phosphomolybdic acid caused the greatest sample shrinkage. Equations describing the observed behaviour of the contrast agents, which can be used to predict optimal staining times for ligament and tendon X-ray computed tomography, are presented.

  14. Medial patellar ossification after patellar instability: a radiographic finding indicative of prior patella subluxation/dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerabek, Seth A. [Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program, Boston, MA (United States); Asnis, Peter D.; Poon, Steven K.; Gill, Thomas J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A.; Ouellette, Hugue A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the correlation between medial patellar ossification and prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. A retrospective billing database search identified 544 patients who had been diagnosed with patellar instability over a 13-year period. One hundred twenty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. After review by a staff orthopedic surgeon and two musculoskeletal radiologists, 28 patients were found to have medial patellar ossification. The size and location of medial patellar ossification was recorded. Of the 28 patients (20 males, eight females, age 13-66 years, mean 28 years) who were found to have medial patellar ossification, 22 had radiographs, 16 had magnetic resonance imaging, and ten had both. The medial patellar ossification ranged in size from 2 to 18 mm with an average of 6.8 mm. Twelve were located in the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), 14 in the medial joint capsule, and two in both the MPFL and joint capsule. Twenty-seven of 28 patients had a single ossification, and one patient had two ossifications. The timing from injury to first imaging of the lesion ranged from 10 days to a chronic history ({>=}35 years) of patellar instability. Medial patellar ossification correlates with a history of prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. The medial ossification can be seen within the MPFL or the medial joint capsule, suggesting remote injury to these structures. The presence of this lesion will prompt physicians to evaluate for patellar instability. (orig.)

  15. Medial patellar ossification after patellar instability: a radiographic finding indicative of prior patella subluxation/dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerabek, Seth A.; Asnis, Peter D.; Poon, Steven K.; Gill, Thomas J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ouellette, Hugue A.

    2009-01-01

    To describe the correlation between medial patellar ossification and prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. A retrospective billing database search identified 544 patients who had been diagnosed with patellar instability over a 13-year period. One hundred twenty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. After review by a staff orthopedic surgeon and two musculoskeletal radiologists, 28 patients were found to have medial patellar ossification. The size and location of medial patellar ossification was recorded. Of the 28 patients (20 males, eight females, age 13-66 years, mean 28 years) who were found to have medial patellar ossification, 22 had radiographs, 16 had magnetic resonance imaging, and ten had both. The medial patellar ossification ranged in size from 2 to 18 mm with an average of 6.8 mm. Twelve were located in the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), 14 in the medial joint capsule, and two in both the MPFL and joint capsule. Twenty-seven of 28 patients had a single ossification, and one patient had two ossifications. The timing from injury to first imaging of the lesion ranged from 10 days to a chronic history (≥35 years) of patellar instability. Medial patellar ossification correlates with a history of prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. The medial ossification can be seen within the MPFL or the medial joint capsule, suggesting remote injury to these structures. The presence of this lesion will prompt physicians to evaluate for patellar instability. (orig.)

  16. T2 -Mapping evaluation of early cartilage alteration of talus for chronic lateral ankle instability with isolated anterior talofibular ligament tear or combined with calcaneofibular ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hongyue; Hu, Yiwen; Qiao, Yang; Ma, Kui; Yan, Xu; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the cartilage alteration of talus for chronic lateral ankle instability (LAI) with isolated anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tear and combined ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) tear using T 2 -mapping at 3.0T. In all, 27 patients including 17 with isolated ATFL tear and 10 with ATFL+CFL tear, and 21 healthy subjects were recruited. All participants underwent T 2 -mapping scan at 3T and patients completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. The total talar cartilage (TTC) was segmented into six compartments: medial anterior (MA), medial center (MC), medial posterior (MP), lateral anterior (LA), lateral center (LC), and lateral posterior (LP). The T 2 value of each compartment was measured from T 2 -mapping images. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. The T 2 values of MA, MC, MP, TTC in the ATFL group and MA, MC, MP, LC, LP, TTC in the ATFL+CFL group were higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the T 2 values of MC, MP, LC, and TTC in the ATFL+CFL group were higher than those in the ATFL group (P < 0.05). The T 2 values of MA in both patient groups were negatively correlated with AOFAS scores (r = -0.596, r = -0.690, P < 0.05). Chronic LAI with ATFL tear had a trend of increasing cartilage T 2 values in talar trochlea, mainly involving medial cartilage compartments. Chronic LAI with ATFL+CFL tear might result in higher T 2 values in a much larger cartilage region than with ATFL tear. MA could be the main cartilage compartment that may affect the patient's clinical symptoms. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:69-77. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. How Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury was averted during Knee Collapse in a NBA Point Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilaty, Nathan D; Bates, Nathaniel A; Krych, Aaron J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-01-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur with rapid decelerations and pivoting. A recent injury to a high-level National Basketball Association (NBA) player demonstrated neuromuscular control and injury-sparing mechanisms that resulted in only minor ligament injury to the medial collateral ligament. We analyzed biomechanical mechanisms via publically available orthogonal 2-D video to demonstrate how this potential ACL injury was averted. Analysis of the knee injury mechanism demonstrated that the NBA player experienced low ground reaction force, high sagittal plane flexion, and maintenance of frontal plane stability with neuromuscular control. The outcome of these factors inhibited dynamic valgus collapse of the knee throughout the fall, avoiding ACL injury - a potentially career-altering injury. Many athletes, professional and recreational, will be subjected to similar mechanisms of injury and will have improved outcomes if they can successfully utilize preventive strategies of neuromuscular control to limit injury mechanisms.

  18. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  19. Nonreconstruction Options for Treating Medial Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Elbow in Overhead Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nicholas J; Desai, Vishal S; Dines, Joshua D; Morrey, Mark E; Camp, Christopher L

    2018-03-01

    This review aims to describe the nonreconstructive options for treating ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries ranging from nonoperative measures, including physical therapy and biologic injections, to ligament repair with and without augmentation. Nonoperative options for UCL injuries include guided physical therapy and biologic augmentation with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). In some patients, repair of the UCL has shown promising return to sport rates by using modern suture and suture anchor techniques. Proximal avulsion injuries have shown the best results after repair. Currently, there is growing interest in augmentation of UCL repair with an internal brace. The treatment of UCL injuries involves complex decision making. UCL reconstruction remains the gold standard for attritional injuries and complete tears, which occur commonly in professional athletes. However, nonreconstructive options have shown promising results for simple avulsion or partial thickness UCL injuries. Future research comparing reconstructive versus nonreconstructive options is necessary.

  20. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Using the Hamstring Tendon for Patellofemoral Joint Instability in an 81-Year-Old Female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuneari; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic patellofemoral instability occurs mainly in adolescent females and can also be induced by medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) injury. There are no case reports of MPFL reconstruction for chronic patellofemoral instability due to MPFL injury in aged populations. 81-year-old female presented with left knee pain, giving way, and patellar instability while climbing stairs, which continued for 18 months. Patellar apprehension test was positive, and roentgenogram showed lateral patellar subluxation. Conservative therapy was not successful; hence, we performed a lateral release and MPFL reconstruction surgery. After arthroscopic lateral release, the hamstring tendon was harvested, and a graft composite made of doubled hamstring tendon and polyester tape with a suspensory fixation device was prepared. Then, a femoral bone tunnel was constructed in a socket shape at the anatomical footprint of the MPFL. The graft was passed through the femoral tunnel, and free ends of the graft composite were sutured to the periosteum of the patella, using two suture anchors at 60° of knee flexion with patellar reduction. Physiotherapy was gradually started using a patella-stabilizing orthosis on the first postoperative day. Her Kujala score improved from 66 to 97 points, and Barthel index score improved from 70 to 100 points at 1 year after surgery. She neither developed patellofemoral joint OA nor had any recurrence of symptoms at the 5-year postoperative follow up. MPFL reconstruction using the hamstring tendon is an effective procedure for patients with chronic patellofemoral instability even after the age of 80 years.

  1. Passive Anterior Tibial Subluxation in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: A Comparative Analysis of Ligament-Deficient States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lucas S; van der List, Jelle P; Jones, Kristofer J; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Nguyen, Joseph T; Potter, Hollis G; Pearle, Andrew D

    2017-06-01

    Static anterior tibial subluxation after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury highlights the abnormal relationship between the tibia and femur in patients with ACL insufficiency, although causal factors including injuries to secondary stabilizers or the time from injury to reconstruction have not been examined. To determine static relationships between the tibia and femur in patients with various states of ACL deficiency and to identify factors associated with anterior tibial subluxation. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients treated for ACL injuries were identified from an institutional registry and assigned to 1 of 4 cohorts: intact ACL, acute ACL disruption, chronic ACL disruption, and failed ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Anterior tibial subluxation of the medial and lateral compartments relative to the femoral condyles were measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and an MRI evaluation for meniscal tears, chondral defects, and injuries to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) was performed. One hundred eighty-six ACL-insufficient knees met inclusion criteria, with 26 patients without an ACL injury utilized as a control group. In the lateral compartment, the mean anterior tibial subluxation measured 0.78 mm for the control group (n = 26), 2.81 mm for the acute ACL injury group (n = 74), 3.64 mm for the chronic ACL injury group (n = 40), and 4.91 mm for the failed ACLR group (n = 72). In the failed ACLR group, 37.5% of patients demonstrated lateral compartment anterior subluxation ≥6 mm, and 11.1% of this group had anterior subluxation of the lateral compartment ≥10 mm. Multivariate regression revealed that the presence of both medial and lateral chondral defects was associated with a mean 1.09-mm increase in subluxation of the medial compartment ( P = .013). The combination of medial and lateral meniscal tears was an independent predictor of increased lateral tibia subluxation by 1.611 mm ( P = .0022). Additionally, across all knee states

  2. Treatment of chronic deltoid ligament injury using suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Xin; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-zhang

    2014-08-01

    To explore the efficacy of overlapping suture-anchor fixation for treatment of chronic deltoid ligament injury. Seventeen patients (11 men, 6 women of mean age 32.1 years [range, 18-58 years]) who had undergone surgery for chronic deltoid ligament injury from January 2007 to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperatively, they had undergone bilateral weight-bearing posterior-anterior radiographs, (MRI) and ultrasound examinations of the ankle. Ankle arthroscopy was performed to confirm the diagnosis, followed by surgery to clear intra-articular proliferating synovial tissues and remove cartilage debris and scar tissue. The deep layer of the deltoid ligament was sutured onto the tip of the medial malleolus and its superficial layer sutured onto its periosteum and fixed with suture anchors. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring system for the ankle-hindfoot was used to evaluate the ankles pre- and post-operatively. The 17 patients were followed up for 12-34 months (mean 20.1 months). The angle between the long axes of the talus and first metatarsal and the hindfoot angle measured in a hindfoot alignment view (as described by Saltzman) were reduced from 5.4° ± 1.8° and 8.2° ± 2.6° preoperatively to 4.0° ± 0.9° and 5.3° ± 1.3° postoperatively, respectively. The mean AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 76.8 ± 7.0 preoperatively and 94.1 ± 3.3 at the last follow-up visit. Ten patients were scored as excellent, six as good, and one as fair. Pain was relieved in all patients and no patients had recurrent deltoid ligament injury. Using suture anchors to treat chronic deltoid ligament injury has relatively satisfactory outcomes. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Radiographic landmarks for locating the femoral origin of the superficial medial collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Timothy; Otarodifard, Karimdad; White, Eric A; Hatch, George F Rick

    2013-11-01

    Little has been written about the use of radiographic landmarks for locating the origin of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL). A standardized radiographic landmark for the sMCL origin using intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging may be of value in aiding the surgeon in accurate femoral tunnel placement in the setting of extensive soft tissue disruption and bony attrition. To determine a reproducible radiographic landmark that will assist in correct femoral tunnel placement in sMCL repair and reconstruction. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen unmatched human cadaveric knees were dissected, and the origin of the sMCL was exposed. A 2-mm metallic marker was then placed at the center of the femoral origin of the sMCL. True lateral fluoroscopically assisted digital radiographs were obtained of the knee with the posterior and distal femoral condyles overlapping in a standardized fashion. With the use of computer software, reference lines were drawn on the images, creating 4 quadrants. Two independent examiners performed quantitative measurements of the sMCL origin in relation to this axis and to the Blumensaat line. Mean measurements showed the sMCL origin to be closely related to the intersection point of the Blumensaat line and a line drawn distally from the posterior femoral cortex on a true lateral radiograph. The sMCL origin was found at a mean point 1.6 ± 4.3 mm posterior and 4.9 ± 2.1 mm proximal to the intersection of a line paralleling the posterior femoral cortex and a line drawn perpendicular to the posterior femoral cortical line, where it intersects the Blumensaat line. In 5 of 10 specimens, the center of the sMCL origin fell precisely on the Blumensaat line. The remaining specimens had sMCL origins anterior to the Blumensaat line. The femoral origin of the sMCL was found in the proximal and posterior quadrants in 8 of 10 specimens. With a relatively small amount of deviation, the sMCL origin can be consistently identified on a true

  4. Injuries to the cranial cruciate ligament and associated structures: summary of clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings from 10 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, M.; Grant, B.D.; Turner, T.A.; Nixon, A.J.; Brown, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings of 10 horses with injury to the cranial cruciate ligament are presented. The most consistent clinical signs included moderate to severe distension of the femoropatellar joint and a Grade III to a Grade V out of V lameness. Craniocaudal instability could be elicited in five horses under general anaesthesia and in one conscious horse. Radiographic evaluation of the stifles revealed that avulsion fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence was the most common finding in six out of 10 horses. Arthroscopic examination of the affected femorotibial joints were performed in five horses. This confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament injury or rupture. Post mortem examinations were performed on two horses which documented partial tears of the cranial cruciate ligament

  5. Chronic medial knee pain without history of prior trauma: correlation of pain at rest and during exercise using bone scintigraphy and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Florian M.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Hofer, Bernhard; Allgayer, Bernhard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate chronic medial knee pain at rest and during exercise with bone scintigraphic uptake, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP), cartilage lesions, meniscal tears, and collateral ligament pathologies on magnetic resonance MR imaging (MRI). Fifty consecutive patients with chronic medial knee pain seen at our institute were included in our study. Pain level at rest and during exercise was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). On MR images, BMEP volume was measured, and the integrity of femoro-tibial cartilage, medial meniscus, and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were assessed. Semiquantitative scintigraphic tracer uptake was measured. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. At the day of examination, 40 patients reported medial knee pain at rest, 49 when climbing stairs (at rest mean VAS 33 mm, range 0-80 mm; climbing stairs mean VAS, 60 mm, range 20-100 mm). Bone scintigraphy showed increased tracer uptake in 36 patients (uptake factor, average 3.7, range 2.4-18.0). MRI showed BMEP in 31 studies (mean volume, 4,070 mm 3 ; range, 1,200-39,200 mm 3 ). All patients with BMEP had abnormal bone scintigraphy. Ten percent of patients with pain at rest and 8% of patients with pain during exercise showed no BMEP but tracer uptake in scintigraphy. Tracer uptake and signal change around MCL predicted pain at rest significantly (tracer uptake p=0.004; MCL signal changes p=0.002). Only MCL signal changes predicted pain during exercise significantly (p=0.001). In chronic medial knee pain, increased tracer uptake in bone scintigraphy is more sensitive for medial knee pain than BMEP on MRI. Pain levels at rest and during exercise correlate with signal changes in and around the MCL. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Koo

    Full Text Available The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs. Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8 in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4 in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years and 30 years (range: 14-62 years in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001, and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001. A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001. LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001. Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001. Meniscal extrusion is

  7. Collagenolytic activity is produced by rabbit ligaments and tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Amiel, D.; Harper, E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the patellar tendon (PT), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) from normal rabbits for collagenase activity. All three connective tissues contain large amounts of collagen and the catabolism of this structural protein is important to their integrity. The authors cultured each tissue in serum free medium for 14 days. Collagenase was produced by all three connective tissues after a lag period of up to 7 days, as detected by the 14 C-glycine peptide-release assay. Culture media that did not express enzyme the authors found to contain inhibitory activity. The collagenases and inhibitors from each tissue have been quantitated and characterized. After 9 days the collagenase activity for the rabbit periarticular tissues was 6.1 (PT), 4.4 (MCL) and 8.6 (ACL) units per milligram of secreted protein. The cleavage site of all three collagenases was found to be similar to that observed for rabbit skin collagenase, and generation of reaction products TC/sup A/ and TC/sup B/ was demonstrated by collagenases from PT, MCL and ACL. These results suggest that the metabolism of ligaments and tendon is regulated by the production of zymogen, active collagenase and inhibitor, similar to other connective tissues. The role of these components in joint injury and joint diseases is currently being investigated

  8. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  9. Quantitative Measurement of Dissection Resistance in Intimal and Medial Layers of Human Coronary Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ying; Johnson, John A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Sutton, Michael A.; Lessner, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery is the most frequently involved vessel in coronary artery dissection, a cause of acute coronary syndrome or sudden cardiac death. The biomechanical mechanisms underlying arterial dissection are not well understood. This study investigated the dissection properties of LAD specimens harvested from explanted hearts at the time of cardiac transplantation, from patients with primary dilated cardiomyopathy (n=12). Using a previously validated appro...

  10. 3-Tesla MRI: Beneficial visualization of the meniscofemoral ligaments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Johanna; Krasny, Andrej; Hartmann, Dinah Maria; Rückbeil, Marcia Viviane; Ritz, Thomas; Prescher, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Recent investigations have confirmed an important stabilizing and protective function of the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) to the knee joint and suggest a clinical relevance. Concerning their incidences, however, there have been discrepancies between data acquired from cadaveric studies and MRI data using 0.3- to 1.5-Tesla field strengths probably due to lower resolution. This study aims to investigate whether imaging with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) is beneficial in gaining information regarding the ligaments' incidence, length, width and anatomic variation. 3-T MRI images of 448 patients (224 males, 224 females, with, respectively, 32 patients of each sex in the age groups: 0-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, >70years) were retrospectively reviewed. The influence of the parameters 'sex' and 'age' was determined. Whereas 71% of the patients had at least one MFL, 22% had an anterior MFL (aMFL), 53% had a posterior MFL (pMFL) and five percent had coexisting ligaments. The pMFLs were more likely to be present in female patients (P<0.05) but if so, they were longer in the males (P<0.05). The pMFL was categorized according to its insertion on the medial femoral condyle. 3-T MRI enables an excellent illustration of the anatomic variations of pMFLs. By modifying an anatomic classification for radiological use we measured lengths and widths of the MFLs without any difficulties. Despite its increased resolution, 3-T MRI lends no diagnostic benefit in visualizing the course of the aMFL or filigree coexisting ligaments as compared to MRI at lower field strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The relationship of lateral anatomic structures to exiting guide pins during femoral tunnel preparation utilizing an accessory medial portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Lutul D; Parker, Richard D

    2010-06-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament through an accessory medial portal has become increasingly popular. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship of guide pin exit points to the lateral anatomic structures when preparing the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel through an accessory medial portal. We utilized seven fresh frozen cadaveric knees. Utilizing an anteromedial approach, a guide wire was placed into the center of each bundle's footprint. Each guide wire was advanced through the lateral femoral cortex. The guide pins were passed at 90, 110, and 130 degrees of knee flexion. The distances from each guide pin to the closest relevant structures on the lateral side of the knee were measured. At 90 degrees the posterolateral bundle guide pin was closest to the lateral condyle articular cartilage (mean 5.4 +/- 2.2 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 5.7 +/- 2.1 mm). At 110 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 4.5 +/- 3.4 mm). At 130 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 7.2 +/- 5.5 mm) and lateral collateral ligament (mean 6.8 +/- 2.1 mm). At 90 degrees the anteromedial bundle guide pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 2.0 +/- 2.0 mm). At 110 degrees the anteromedial bundle pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 7.4 +/- 3.5 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 12.3 +/- 3.1 mm). At 130 degrees the AM bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 8.2 +/- 3.2 mm) and LCL (mean 15.1 +/- 2.9 mm). Neither guide pin (anteromedial or posterolateral bundle) put the peroneal nerve at risk at any knee flexion angle. At low knee flexion angles the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle guide pins closely approximated multiple lateral structures when using an accessory medial arthroscopic portal. Utilizing higher flexion angles increases the margin of error when preparing both femoral tunnels. During preparation of

  12. Avaliação artroscópica e macroscópica da faceta medial do semilunar Arthroscopic and macroscopic evaluation of the lunate medial facet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard de Novaes França Bisneto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a correlação entre a presença de uma faceta medial do semilunar e a incidência de lesões ligamentares e artrose do pólo proximal do hamato. MÉTODOS: Avaliação artroscópica e dissecação dos punhos foram efetuados em cadáveres. RESULTADOS: Houve uma correlação clara, estatisticamente significativa entre artrose do pólo proximal do hamato e a presença da faceta medial do semilunar. CONCLUSÃO: Artrose do pólo proximal do hamato está correlacionada com a presença do tipo II semilunar. Nível de Evidência III, Estudo de pacientes nãoconsecutivos; sem padrão de referência "ouro" aplicado uniformementeOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between the presence of a lunate medial facet and the incidence of ligament lesions of the wrist and arthrosis of the proximal pole of the hamate. This study was carried out on cadavers. METHODS: Arthroscopic evaluation and dissection were performed on cadaver wrists. RESULTS: There was a clear, statistically significant correlation between arthrosis of the proximal pole of the hamate and the presence of a medial facet on the lunate. CONCLUSION: Arthrosis of the proximal pole of the hamate is correlated with the presence of a type II lunate. Level of Evidence III, Study of nonconsecutive patients; without consistently applied reference ''gold'' standard.

  13. The Anatomic Midpoint of the Attachment of the Medial Patellofemoral Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miho J; Voss, Andreas; Fulkerson, John P

    2016-07-20

    The medial patellofemoral ligament varies in attachment of its fibers to the patella and vastus intermedius tendon. Our aim was to identify and describe its anatomic midpoint. To account for the variability of the attachment site, we refer to it as the medial patellofemoral complex. Using AutoCAD software, we identified the midpoint of the medial patellofemoral complex attachment on photographs of 31 cadaveric knee dissections. The midpoint was referenced relative to the superior articular surface of the patella (P1) and was described in terms of the percentage of the patellar articular length distal to this point. A second point, at the junction of the medial border of the vastus intermedius tendon with the superior articular border of the patella, was identified (P2). The distances of the midpoint to P1 and P2 were calculated and were compared using paired t tests. Twenty-five images had appropriate quality and landmarks for digital analysis. The midpoint of the medial patellofemoral complex was located a mean (and standard deviation) of 2.3% ± 15.8% of the patellar articular length distal to the superior pole and was at or proximal to P1 in 12 knees. In all knees, the midpoint was at or proximal to P2. After exclusion of 2 knees with vastus intermedius tendon attachments only, the medial patellofemoral complex midpoint was closer to P2 (5.3% ± 8.6% of the patellar articular length) than to P1 (9.3% ± 8.5% of the patellar articular length) (p = 0.06). The midpoint of the medial patellofemoral complex was 2.3% of the articular length distal to the superior pole of the patella. Additionally, we describe an anatomic landmark at the junction of the medial border of the vastus intermedius tendon and the articular border of the patella that approximates the midpoint of this complex. Our study shows that the anatomic midpoint of the attachment of the medial patellofemoral complex is proximal to the junction of the medial vastus intermedius tendon and the articular

  14. Tissue-engineered collateral ligament composite allografts for scapholunate ligament reconstruction: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, Ryan; Woon, Colin Y L; Farnebo, Simon J; Behn, Anthony; Bronstein, Joel; Pham, Hung; Yan, Xinrui; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chang, James

    2012-08-01

    In patients with chronic scapholunate (SL) dissociation or dynamic instability, ligament repair is often not possible, and surgical reconstruction is indicated. The ideal graft ligament would recreate both anatomical and biomechanical properties of the dorsal scapholunate ligament (dorsal SLIL). The finger proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP joint) collateral ligament could possibly be a substitute ligament. We harvested human PIP joint collateral ligaments and SL ligaments from 15 cadaveric limbs. We recorded ligament length, width, and thickness, and measured the biomechanical properties (ultimate load, stiffness, and displacement to failure) of native dorsal SLIL, untreated collateral ligaments, decellularized collateral ligaments, and SL repairs with bone-collateral ligament-bone composite collateral ligament grafts. As proof of concept, we then reseeded decellularized bone-collateral ligament-bone composite grafts with green fluorescent protein-labeled adipo-derived mesenchymal stem cells and evaluated them histologically. There was no difference in ultimate load, stiffness, and displacement to failure among native dorsal SLIL, untreated and decellularized collateral ligaments, and SL repairs with tissue-engineered collateral ligament grafts. With pair-matched untreated and decellularized scaffolds, there was no difference in ultimate load or stiffness. However, decellularized ligaments revealed lower displacement to failure compared with untreated ligaments. There was no difference in displacement between decellularized ligaments and native dorsal SLIL. We successfully decellularized grafts with recently described techniques, and they could be similarly reseeded. Proximal interphalangeal joint collateral ligament-based bone-collateral ligament-bone composite allografts had biomechanical properties similar to those of native dorsal SLIL. Decellularization did not adversely affect material properties. These tissue-engineered grafts may offer surgeons another

  15. Ligament Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Wasim Sardar

    2016-01-01

    Ligaments are commonly injured in the knee joint, and have a poor capacity for healing due to their relative avascularity. Ligament reconstruction is well established for injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, however the use of autografts and allografts for ligament reconstruction are associated with complications, and outcomes are variable. Ligament tissue engineering using stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds is a novel technique that has the potential to provide an unlim...

  16. Enhancing uncertainty tolerance in the modelling creep of ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, M M Reda; Lucero, J

    2006-01-01

    The difficulty in performing biomechanical tests and the scarcity of biomechanical experimental databases necessitate extending the current knowledge base to allow efficient modelling using limited data sets. This study suggests a framework to reduce uncertainties in biomechanical systems using limited data sets. The study also shows how sparse data and epistemic input can be exploited using fuzzy logic to represent biomechanical relations. An example application to model collagen fibre recruitment in the medial collateral ligaments during time-dependent deformation under cyclic loading (creep) is presented. The study suggests a quality metric that can be employed to observe and enhance uncertainty tolerance in the modelling process

  17. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Knee Collateral Ligament Injuries With Proximal Tibia Fractures: A Study of 32,441 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Andre M; Diaz-Collado, Pablo J; Szolomayer, Lauren K; Wiznia, Daniel H; Chan, Wayne W; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Basques, Bryce A; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2018-03-01

    Proximal tibia fractures are associated with concurrent collateral ligament injuries. Failure to recognize these injuries may lead to chronic knee instability. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for concurrent collateral ligament injuries with proximal tibia fractures and their association with inpatient outcomes. A total of 32,441 patients with proximal tibia fractures were identified in the 2011-2012 National Trauma Data Bank. A total of 1445 (4.5%) had collateral ligament injuries, 794 (2.4%) had injuries to both collateral ligaments, 456 (1.4%) had a medial collateral ligament injury only, and 195 (0.6%) had a lateral collateral ligament injury only. On multivariate analysis, risk factors found to be associated with collateral ligament injuries included distal femur fracture (odds ratio, 2.1), pedestrian struck by motor vehicle (odds ratio, 2.0), obesity (odds ratio, 1.6), young age (odds ratio, 1.9 for 18 to 29 years vs 40 to 49 years), motorcycle accident (odds ratio, 1.5), and Injury Severity Score of 20 or higher (odds ratio, 1.4). In addition, patients with simultaneous injuries to both collateral ligaments had higher odds of inpatient adverse events (odds ratio, 1.51) and longer hospital stay (mean, 2.27 days longer). The risk factors reported by this study can be used to identify patients with proximal tibia fractures who may warrant more careful and thorough evaluation and imaging of their knee collateral ligaments. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(2):e268-e276.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Ultrasonography of ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peetrons, P.A.; Silvestre, A.; Cohen, M.; Creteur, V.

    2002-01-01

    The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle is a complex of 3 ligaments: The anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments and the calcaneofibular ligament; these ligaments work together to support the lateral aspect of the ankle. The anterior talofibular (ATF) ligament (Fig. 1) runs from the anterior of the talus. The probe is placed in a slightly oblique position from the malleolus toward the forefoot. The ligament is hyperechoic when its fibres are perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (anisotropy artifact is present in ligaments as well as in tendons). It is approximately 2 mm thick and, during examination, must be straight and tight from one insertion point to the other, as seen in Fig. 2. The posterior talofibular (PTF) ligament, which runs from the posterior part of the malleolus to the posterior part of the talus, is difficult to see on US, being partially or sometimes completely hidden by the malleolus. The calcaneofibular ligament forms the middle portion of the lateral collateral ligament. It is tight between the inferior part of the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus, and runs in a slightly posterior oblique direction toward the heel (Fig. 3). The ligament lies on the deep surface of the fibular tendons, forming a hammock to fall deep on the calcaneus surface (Fig. 4). The calcaneofibular ligament is approximately 2-3 nun thick and is hyperechoic in the distal two-thirds only because of the obliquity of the proximal part. When examining this ligament, it is mandatory that the ankle be flexed dorsally; this stretches the ligament so that it can be seen clearly. (author)

  19. Disadvantages and advantages of transtibial technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Brett N; Lubowitz, James H

    2014-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) femoral socket techniques have distinct advantages and disadvantages when considering the following techniques: transtibial, anteromedial portal, outside-in, and outside-in retroconstruction. There is no one perfect technique and we have an incomplete understanding of anatomical, biomechanical, isometry, stability, and clinical outcomes. Our primary focus is transtibial technique for creating the ACL femoral socket. Advantages include less invasive, isometric graft placement, stable Lachman exam, and minimal graft impingement with the tunnel and notch. Disadvantages include nonanatomic vertical graft placement that can cause rotational instability and positive pivot shift, interference screw divergence, graft-tunnel length mismatch, femoral socket constraint, posterior cruciate ligament impingement, and a short, oblique tibial tunnel that may undermine the medial plateau in an attempt to achieve anatomic ACL reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Does well maintained graft provide consistent return to play after medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow joint in elite baseball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Bahng, Seung-Chul; Chung, Seok-Won; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have reported the clinical outcomes of medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) reconstruction of the elbow joint in throwing athletes, including the rate of return to sports. However, little has been known about the imaging outcomes after MUCL reconstruction. The aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging outcomes after MUCL reconstruction using figure of eight fashion in the elite and professional baseball players. This study included 17 baseball players, who underwent MUCL reconstruction between July 2007 and May 2010. The average follow-up period was 48.6 months. Imaging assessment consisted of preoperative plain and stress radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and postoperative serial ultrasonography. The clinical assessments were composed of visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion, and the Conway scale. The mean VAS score was 6.4 (range, 3 to 8) preoperatively and 2.2 (range, 0 to 4) postoperatively (p returned to sports at the same or higher level compared to preinjury. Serial ultrasonography revealed well-maintained grafts at 3 and 12 months in all of the players. Five out of 17 players showed decreased echogenecity in the common flexor tendon at 3 months, which was considered as remaining tissue swelling and resolved completely at 12 months. All grafts are well-maintained until 12-months based on the ultrasonographic findings, although only 53% of the players returned to preinjury level.

  1. MR imaging of the anatomy of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Tineke; Vanrietvelde, Frederik; Seynaeve, Patrick; Verdonk, Peter; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-04-01

    Background In cadaveric and arthroscopic studies different insertion locations of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus (AHMM) have been described. Purpose To investigate if the different insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, can be determined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods MR images of 100 patients without meniscal tears on MRI were retrospectively evaluated. Two observers classified the AHMM insertion based on its position relative to the anterior tibial edge and the medial tibial spine. The association between AHMM insertion and tibial plateau slope, meniscal radial displacement, and anterior intermeniscal ligament (AIL) presence was investigated. Results The AHMM inserted posterior to the anterior tibial edge in 93 knees and anterior to the tibial edge in seven knees (= type III). Of the 93 knees with AHMM insertion posterior to the anterior tibial edge, 63 inserted lateral to the medial tibial spine (= type I) and 30 medial (= type II). The AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge had a significantly ( P  0.05). A strong inter- and intra-observer agreement was observed. Conclusion Three different bony insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, could be identified on MRI. All AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge displayed an AIL. Whether there is a clinical correlation with these insertion patterns remains unclear.

  2. Quantitative T2-Mapping and T2⁎-Mapping Evaluation of Changes in Cartilage Matrix after Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture and the Correlation between the Results of Both Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyue Tao; Yang Qiao; Yiwen Hu; Yuxue Xie; Rong Lu; Xu Yan; Shuang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Objectives. To quantitatively assess changes in cartilage matrix after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture using T2- and T2⁎-mapping and analyze the correlation between the results of both methods. Methods. Twenty-three patients and 23 healthy controls were enrolled and underwent quantitative MRI examination. The knee cartilage was segmented into six compartments, including lateral femur (LF), lateral tibia (LT), medial femur (MF), medial tibia (MT), trochlea (Tr), and patella (Pa)...

  3. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella: current perspectives and trends in Brazil1,

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    Gustavo Gonçalves Arliani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating medial patellofemoral lesions (MPFL of the knee in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella.Materials and methods:A questionnaire comprising 15 closed questions on topics relating to treating MPFL of the knee following acute dislocation of the patella was used. It was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 44th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2012.Results:106 knee surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them were from the southeastern region of Brazil. The majority (57% reported that they perform fewer than five MPFL reconstruction procedures per year. Indication of non-surgical treatment after a first episode of acute dislocation of the patella was preferred and done by 93.4% of the sample. Only 9.1% of the participants reported that they had never observed postoperative complications. Intraoperative radioscopy was used routinely by 48%. The professionals who did not use this tool to determine the point of ligament fixation in the femur did not have a statistically greater number of postoperative complications than those who used it (p > 0.05.Conclusions:There are clear evolutionary trends in treatments and rehabilitation for acute dislocation of the patella due to MPFL, in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends.

  4. Hip joint biomechanics in those with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, E; Zeni, J A; Axe, M J; Snyder-Mackler, L

    2017-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury results in altered kinematics and kinetics in the knee and hip joints that persist despite surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation. Abnormal movement patterns and a history of osteoarthritis are risk factors for articular cartilage degeneration in additional joints. The purpose of this study was to determine if hip joint biomechanics early after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction differ between patients with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis 5years after reconstruction. The study's rationale was that individuals who develop knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury may also demonstrate large alterations in hip joint biomechanics. Nineteen athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury completed standard gait analysis before (baseline) and after (post-training) extended pre-operative rehabilitation and at 6months, 1year, and 2years after reconstruction. Weightbearing knee radiographs were completed 5years after reconstruction to identify medial compartment osteoarthritis. Five of 19 patients had knee osteoarthritis at 5years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patients with knee osteoarthritis at 5years walked with smaller sagittal plane hip angles (P: 0.043) and lower sagittal (P: 0.021) and frontal plane (P: 0.042) external hip moments in the injured limb before and after reconstruction compared to those without knee osteoarthritis. The current findings suggest hip joint biomechanics may be altered in patients who develop post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Further study is needed to confirm whether the risk of non-traumatic hip pathology is increased after anterior cruciate ligament injury and if hip joint biomechanics influence its development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament after acute lateral patellar dislocation in children: Correlation analysis with anatomical variants and articular cartilage lesion of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-ying; Ding, Hong-yu; Zheng, Lei; Ji, Bing-jun; Shi, Hao; Feng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    To assess the relationship between injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and anatomical variants and patellar cartilage lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) in children. MR images were obtained in 140 children with acute LPD. Images were acquired and evaluated using standardised protocols. Fifty-eight cases of partial MPFL tear and 75 cases of complete MPFL tear were identified. Injuries occurred at an isolated patellar insertion (PAT) in 52 cases, an isolated femoral attachment (FEM) in 42 cases and an isolated mid-substance (MID) in five cases. More than one site of injury was identified in 34 cases. Compared with Wiberg patellar type C, Wiberg patellar type B predisposed to complete MPFL tear (P = 0.042). No correlations were identified between injury patterns of MPFL and trochlear dysplasia, patellar height and tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (P > 0.05). Compared with partial MPFL tear, complete MPFL tear predisposed to Grade-IV and Grade-V patellar chondral lesion (P = 0.02). There were no correlations between incidence of patellar cartilage lesion and injury locational-subgroups of MPFL (P = 0.543). MPFL is most easily injured at the PAT in children. Wiberg patellar type B predisposes to complete MPFL tear. Complete MPFL tear predisposes to a higher grade of patellar chondral lesion. (orig.)

  6. Injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament after acute lateral patellar dislocation in children: Correlation analysis with anatomical variants and articular cartilage lesion of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-ying; Ding, Hong-yu [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Ji, Bing-jun [Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Feng, Yan [Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical College, Department of Radiology, Binzhou (China)

    2017-03-15

    To assess the relationship between injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and anatomical variants and patellar cartilage lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) in children. MR images were obtained in 140 children with acute LPD. Images were acquired and evaluated using standardised protocols. Fifty-eight cases of partial MPFL tear and 75 cases of complete MPFL tear were identified. Injuries occurred at an isolated patellar insertion (PAT) in 52 cases, an isolated femoral attachment (FEM) in 42 cases and an isolated mid-substance (MID) in five cases. More than one site of injury was identified in 34 cases. Compared with Wiberg patellar type C, Wiberg patellar type B predisposed to complete MPFL tear (P = 0.042). No correlations were identified between injury patterns of MPFL and trochlear dysplasia, patellar height and tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (P > 0.05). Compared with partial MPFL tear, complete MPFL tear predisposed to Grade-IV and Grade-V patellar chondral lesion (P = 0.02). There were no correlations between incidence of patellar cartilage lesion and injury locational-subgroups of MPFL (P = 0.543). MPFL is most easily injured at the PAT in children. Wiberg patellar type B predisposes to complete MPFL tear. Complete MPFL tear predisposes to a higher grade of patellar chondral lesion. (orig.)

  7. MRI appearance of surgically proven abnormal accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhas, Naveen; Vinson, Emily N.; Cothran, R.L.; Helms, Clyde A.; Santangelo, James R.; Nunley, James A.

    2008-01-01

    A thickened accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament) of the ankle can be a cause of ankle impingement. Its imaging appearance is not well described. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ligament could be identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to determine associated abnormalities, and to determine if MRI could be used to differentiate normal from abnormal. Eighteen patients with a preoperative ankle MRI and an abnormal Bassett's ligament reported at surgery were found retrospectively. A separate cohort of 18 patients was selected as a control population. The presence of Bassett's ligament and its thickness were noted. The integrity and appearance of the lateral ankle ligaments, talar dome cartilage, and anterolateral gutter were also noted. In 34 of the 36 cases (94%), Bassett's ligament was identified on MRI. The ligament was seen in all three imaging planes and most frequently in the axial plane. The mean thickness of the ligament in the surgically abnormal cases was 2.37 mm, compared with 1.87 mm in the control with a p value = 0.015 (t test). Nine of the 18 abnormal cases (50%) had talar dome cartilage lesions as a result of contact with the ligament at surgery, with only 3 cases of high-grade defects seen on MRI. Fourteen of the 18 abnormal cases (78%) had of synovitis or scarring in the lateral gutter at surgery, with only 5 cases with scarring seen on MRI. The anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament was abnormal or torn in 8 of the 18 abnormal cases (44%) by MRI and confirmed in only 3 cases at surgery. Bassett's ligament can be routinely identified on MRI and was significantly thicker in patients who had it resected at surgery. An abnormal Bassett's ligament is often present in the setting of a normal anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament. The cartilage abnormalities and synovitis associated with an abnormal Bassett's ligament are poorly detected by conventional MRI. (orig.)

  8. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement of ligamentous injuries on conventional MRI after simple elbow dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schnetzke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to assess the interobserver and intraobserver agreement on ligamentous injuries on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in acute simple elbow dislocation. The secondary objectives were to determine the interobserver agreement on the assessment of joint congruity, joint effusion, loose bodies and chondral lesions on conventional MRI. Methods Conventional MRIs (1.5 Tesla, elbow specific surface coil of 30 patients (40.7 years; range 14–72 with simple elbow dislocations were evaluated by four blinded examiners. An analysis of the interobserver agreement of all raters and for several subgroups (radiologists, orthopaedics, experienced, non-experienced was performed. The examiners assessed the integrity (intact, partial tear, complete tear of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL, medial collateral ligament (MCL, extensor and flexor tendons, as well as the presence of joint congruity, joint effusion, loose bodies and chondral lesions. Agreement strength, correlation and proportion of exact agreement were determined for interobserver agreement, and intraobserver agreement analyses. Results Interobserver agreement of all examiners was fair to moderate for collateral ligaments (LCL: 0.441, MCL: 0.275. Exact agreement of all raters was found in 33.3% for the LCL and in 26.7% for the MCL. The both experienced examiners showed highest agreement strength for the LCL (0.619 and the radiologists showed highest agreement strength for the MCL (0.627, the proportion of exact agreement was 60.0% in both categories. A high proportion of exact agreement regarding joint congruity (90%, joint effusion (100%, loose bodies (96.7% and chondral lesion (80% was found among the radiologists. The evaluation of the intraobserver agreement revealed slight to substantial agreement (0.227 to 0.718 for the collateral ligaments. Conclusions This study shows difficulties in the evaluation of ligaments by

  9. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  10. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to

  11. Valgus osteotomy of the tibia with a Puddu plate combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albuquerque Roberto Freire da Mota e

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior knee instability associated with a varus deformity is a complex condition with several treatment possibilities. Among these, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL associated to a simultaneous valgus tibial osteotomy is a increasing indication. This simultaneous procedure adds technical issues to those related to the isolated surgeries. Thus, the osteotomy plane and location of fixation hardware shouldn?t conflict with tibial tunnel and ACL graft fixation. Authors analyze the relations between a opening tibial valgus osteotomy stabilized with a Puddu plate and ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon graft fixated with interference screws in 10 human cadaver knees. A straight oblique tibial osteotomy starting on the medial tibial cortex and oriented laterally and proximally was performed on all knees with a 10mm opening medially and stabilized with a Puddu plate on the most posterior aspect of the medial tibia, and a tibial tunnel drilled 50° to tibial plateau. With this technique there was no intersection between tibial tunnel or interference screw and the osteotomy or the plate fixation screws.

  12. The appearance of a lurking ligament in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy; Posterior Gastric Ligament

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    Mutlu Ünver

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to demonstrate a lurking ligament and its various formation types and to mention the importance of this ligament in Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy Methods: One hundred and twelve patients had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG procedure in our clinic between March 2011 and September 2013. All procedures were performed with a standard operative technique. Only difference for the last 50 patients was to avoid the excessive dissection of posterior gastric wall. The existence of posterior gastric ligament was recorded and different types of posterior gastric ligament was demonstrated. Results: Posterior gastric ligament was observed in all of the cases in different formation types. Three types of ligament; complete, partial and skippy, was demonstrated. 53(47.3% of the patients had skippy, while 41 (36.6% had partial and 18 (16.1% had complete type of posterior gastric ligament. Conclusion: A ligament named as ‘posterior gastric ligament’ and its various forms were defined in the third dimensional plane of stomach. Posterior gastric ligament remains as the only structure in LSG for preventing the mobility and ability of the stomach to rotate. The excessive dissection of the posterior gastric ligament should be avoided to prevent complications such as kinking and volvulus

  13. Anatomical study of the posterior cruciate ligament with the knee flexed at 90°,

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    Daniel Kyubin Cho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To study the anatomy of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL and define anatomical parameters with the knee flexed at 90°.Methods:Eight knees from cadavers were dissected in order to make measurements from the center of the anterolateral band to the roof (AL1, from the center of the anterolateral band to the anterior cartilage (AL2, from the center of the posteromedial band to the roof (PM1, from the center of the posteromedial band to the anterior cartilage (PM2, from the center of the tibial insertion to the medial region of the tibia (TIM, from the center of the tibial insertion to the lateral region of the tibia (TIL, from the center of the medial insertion to the medial meniscus (IMM and the width of the origin of the PCL (WO. To obtain the results from each anatomical structure, the means and standard deviations of the measurements were calculated.Results:The measurements in millimeters that were found were AL1, 6.2; AL2, 4.9; PM1, 11.7; PM2, 5.5; TIM, 32.5; TIL, 40.6; IMM, 9.4; and WO, 32.5.Conclusions:The PCL has an extensive origin. The center of the anterolateral band is 6 mm from the roof and 5 mm from the anterior cartilage of the knee. The tibial insertion is slightly medial and 10 mm distal to the posterior cornu of the medial meniscus.

  14. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

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    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  15. High-resolution MRI of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Wu, Wei Der; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Rafijah, Gregory; Yang, Lily; Hitt, Dave; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of injuries to the collateral ligaments of the wrist is technically challenging on MRI. Purpose To investigate usefulness of high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for identifying and classifying the morphology of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments (UCL and RCL) of the wrist. Material and Methods Thirty-seven participants were evaluated using 3T coronal 2D and isotropic 3D images by two radiologists independently. The UCL was classified into four types: 1a, narrow attachment to the tip of the ulnar styloid (Tip); 1b, broad attachment to the Tip; 2a, narrow attachment to the medial base of the ulnar styloid (Base); and 2b, broad attachment to the Base. The RCL was also classified into four types: 1a, separate radioscaphoid and scaphotrapezial ligaments (RS + ST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; 1b, RS + ST with broad scaphoid attachment; 2a, continuous radio-scapho-trapezial ligaments (RST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; and 2b, RST with broad scaphoid attachment. The inter-observer reliability of these classifications was calculated. Results Type 1a was the most common of both collateral ligaments. Of UCL classifications, 31.4% were revised after additional review of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images from isotropic data. The inter-observer reliability of UCL classification was substantial (k = 0.62) without MPR, and almost perfect (k = 0.84) with MPR. The inter-observer reliability of RCL classification was almost perfect (k = 0.89). Anatomic delineation between the two sequences was not statistically different. Conclusion The UCL and RCL were each identified on high-resolution 2D and isotropic 3D MRI equally well. MPR allows accurate identification of the UCL attachment to the ulnar styloid.

  16. Surgical treatment of subacute and chronic valgus instability in multiligament-injured knees with superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction using Achilles allografts: a quantitative analysis with a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Hong, Lei; Wang, Xue Song; Zhang, Jin; Shen, Jie Wei

    2013-05-01

    Symptomatic medial collateral ligament (MCL) instability is rare, and it is frequently associated with multiligament injuries. Most clinical investigations have failed to clearly define the specific objective outcome measures assessing the stability of the MCL quantitatively before and after the reconstruction procedure. To quantitatively evaluate the early clinical outcomes of patients with valgus instability of knee joints who had undergone superficial MCL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allografts. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From August 2005 to December 2010, 19 consecutive patients with MCL injuries were included in this study. The inclusion criteria were (1) a subacute or chronic MCL injury, with a time from initial injury to surgery of longer than 3 weeks, and (2) valgus laxity graded C or D according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC). All patients underwent superficial MCL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allografts. To evaluate the laxity of the MCL preoperatively and postoperatively, valgus stress radiographs using a Telos device were used. Other assessments included the IKDC subjective functional evaluation and Lysholm score estimation. Sixteen of the 19 patients (12 men and 4 women) were available for final follow-up. The median age of the patients was 37 years (range, 19-53 years); mean body mass index (BMI) was 26.4 (range, 21.7-29.4). The mean time from injury to surgery was 15.9 months (range, 24 days to 84 months), and median follow-up period was 34 months (range, 24-67 months). The mean medial knee laxity (side-to-side difference) was 8.9 ± 3.2 mm (range, 6-15.9 mm) preoperatively and 1.1 ± 0.9 mm (range, -1.1 to 3.2 mm) postoperatively (P < .001). The preoperative mean IKDC subjective knee functional score was 49.8 ± 6.9 (range, 31-57.5), while the postoperative functional score was 84.3 ± 6.0 (range, 71.3-93.1) (P < .001). The mean Lysholm score was 69.3 ± 5.9 (range, 55-78) preoperatively and 88.6

  17. Impact of Partial and complete rupture of anterior cruciate ligament on medial meniscus: A cadavaric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Similar to complete rupture, partial rupture of ACL can also trigger strain concentration on medial meniscus, especially posterior horn, which may be a more critical reason for meniscus injury associated with chronic ACL deficiency.

  18. Canine stifle stability following cranial cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscal release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, T.; Kristiansen, S.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    stifle stability was evaluated in right pelvic limbs from canine cadavers under three different test situations (intact, CrCL deficient and medial meniscal release (MMR)). Dogs were euthanized for reasons unrelated to the study, owner approval given for research use and institutional ethical approval...... to an intact stifle PTA between 95.5° and 97°. The mean maximal CTS in CrCL deficient stifles was 52.8% of intact marker separation distance, occurring at an average joint angle of 130°, equivalent to an intact PTA of 109°.After MMR, CTS initiated significantly earlier in extension, at a joint angle of 65...... meniscus, but did not cause a significant change in the maximal amount of CTS....

  19. CT appearance of pulmonary ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Chin, Soo Yil [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Pulmonary ligament consists of 2 serosal of pleura that connect the lower to the mediastinum. Author analyse and present CT appearance of pulmonary ligament of the 40 normal and abnormal patients on the basis of anatomic knowledge from the cross section of cadaver. Left pulmonary ligament is more frequency visualized than the right. The most important CT landmark in localizing pulmonary ligament is the esophagus where the ligament attaches on its lateral wall. Pitfalls in CT identification of pulmonary ligament are right phrenic nerve and right pericardiacophrenic vessels which emerge from lateral wall of the IVC and wall of the emphysematous bulla in the region of the pulmonary ligament.

  20. CT appearance of pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Chin, Soo Yil

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary ligament consists of 2 serosal of pleura that connect the lower to the mediastinum. Author analyse and present CT appearance of pulmonary ligament of the 40 normal and abnormal patients on the basis of anatomic knowledge from the cross section of cadaver. Left pulmonary ligament is more frequency visualized than the right. The most important CT landmark in localizing pulmonary ligament is the esophagus where the ligament attaches on its lateral wall. Pitfalls in CT identification of pulmonary ligament are right phrenic nerve and right pericardiacophrenic vessels which emerge from lateral wall of the IVC and wall of the emphysematous bulla in the region of the pulmonary ligament

  1. Collateral Ligament Knee Injuries in Pediatric and Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Dennis E; Miller, Patricia E; Berrahou, Iman K; Yen, Yi-Meng; Heyworth, Benton E

    2017-12-08

    The majority of research on medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligament injuries has focused on adults and combined collateral/cruciate injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine characteristics associated with isolated collateral ligament injuries in adolescents, and assess timing for return to sports. Electronic medical records were queried to identify patients aged below 17 years who sustained a magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed isolated MCL or LCL injury over an 8-year period. Retrospective review then documented patient and injury characteristics and clinical course. General linear modeling was used to analyze risk factors for prolonged return to sports, continued pain or reinjury. Fifty-one knees (33 in males, 65%), mean age 13.8 years (range, 5 to 17), were identified, of which 40 (78%) had MCL injuries. Over half (29, 57%) of knees had an open distal femoral physis including all 5 bony avulsion injuries. Eleven (22%) had LCL injuries of which 3 (6%) had concurrent posterolateral corner injuries. Forty-two (82%) knees had injuries that occurred during sports. Eleven knees (28%) with MCL tears had a simultaneous patellar instability episode. Knee injuries that occurred during sports had 37% shorter recovery time (P=0.02). Eight knees (16%) experienced a reinjury and 12 (24%) were followed over an extended period of time for various knee issues. Football injuries were more likely to be grade 3 (P=0.03), and football and soccer accounted for all grade III injuries. The mean return to sports was 2.2 months, with grade III cases returning at 2.4 months, and 95% of cases within 4 months. Isolated collateral ligament injuries are rare in adolescent athletes. MCL injuries, one-quarter of which occurred in conjunction with patellar instability events, were 4 times more common than LCL injuries, one quarter of which have other posterolateral corner structures involved. Grade III injuries represent 20% to 25% of collateral ligament injuries and

  2. MRI assessment of the alar ligaments in the late stage of whiplash injury - a study of structural abnormalities and observer agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakenes, J.; Moen, G.; Nordli, H. [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen Medical School (Norway); Kaale, B.R. [Firda Medical Centre, Sandane (Norway); Gilhus, N.E. [Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen Medical School (Norway); Rorvik, J. [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen Medical School (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    Our aim was to characterise and classify structural changes in the alar ligaments in the late stage of whiplash injuries by use of a new MRI protocol, and to evaluate the reliability and the validity of this classification. We studied 92 whiplash-injured and 30 uninjured individuals who underwent proton density-weighted MRI of the craniovertebral junction in three orthogonal planes. Changes in the alar ligaments (grades 0-3) based on the ratio between the high signal area and the total cross-sectional area were rated twice at a 4-month interval, independently by three radiologists. Inter- and intraobserver statistics were calculated by ordinary and weighted kappa. Cases classified differently were reviewed to identify potential causes for disagreement. The alar ligaments were satisfactorily demonstrated in all cases (244 ligaments in 122 individuals). The lesions, 2-9 years after the injury, varied from small high-signal spots to high signal throughout the cross-sectional area. Signal was highest near the condylar insertion in 82 of 94 ligaments, indicating a lesion near that insertion, and near the dental insertion in eight, indicating a medial lesion. No grade 2 or 3 lesion was found in the control group. At least two observers assigned the same grade to 214 ligaments (87.7%) on the second occasion. In 30 ligaments (12.3%) this agreement was not obtained. Pair-wise interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was fair to moderate (0.31-0.54) in the first grading, improving to moderate (0.49-0.57) in the second. Intraobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was moderate to good (0.43-0.70). Whiplash trauma can cause permanent damage to the alar ligaments, which can be shown by high-resolution proton density-weighted MRI. Reliability of classification of alar ligament lesions needs to be improved. (orig.)

  3. MRI assessment of the alar ligaments in the late stage of whiplash injury - a study of structural abnormalities and observer agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakenes, J.; Moen, G.; Nordli, H.; Kaale, B.R.; Gilhus, N.E.; Rorvik, J.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to characterise and classify structural changes in the alar ligaments in the late stage of whiplash injuries by use of a new MRI protocol, and to evaluate the reliability and the validity of this classification. We studied 92 whiplash-injured and 30 uninjured individuals who underwent proton density-weighted MRI of the craniovertebral junction in three orthogonal planes. Changes in the alar ligaments (grades 0-3) based on the ratio between the high signal area and the total cross-sectional area were rated twice at a 4-month interval, independently by three radiologists. Inter- and intraobserver statistics were calculated by ordinary and weighted kappa. Cases classified differently were reviewed to identify potential causes for disagreement. The alar ligaments were satisfactorily demonstrated in all cases (244 ligaments in 122 individuals). The lesions, 2-9 years after the injury, varied from small high-signal spots to high signal throughout the cross-sectional area. Signal was highest near the condylar insertion in 82 of 94 ligaments, indicating a lesion near that insertion, and near the dental insertion in eight, indicating a medial lesion. No grade 2 or 3 lesion was found in the control group. At least two observers assigned the same grade to 214 ligaments (87.7%) on the second occasion. In 30 ligaments (12.3%) this agreement was not obtained. Pair-wise interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was fair to moderate (0.31-0.54) in the first grading, improving to moderate (0.49-0.57) in the second. Intraobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was moderate to good (0.43-0.70). Whiplash trauma can cause permanent damage to the alar ligaments, which can be shown by high-resolution proton density-weighted MRI. Reliability of classification of alar ligament lesions needs to be improved. (orig.)

  4. Fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence of the tibia in horses treated by arthroscopic fragment removal (21 horses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Martínez, L M; Redding, W R; Bladon, B; Wilderjans, H; Payne, R J; Tessier, C; Geffroy, O; Parker, R; Bell, C; Collingwood, F A

    2018-01-01

    Fractures of the medial intercondylar eminence of the tibia (MICET) are scarcely reported in horses. To report the clinical and diagnostic findings, surgical treatment and outcome in a series of horses presented with MICET fracture and treated with arthroscopic fragment removal. Multicentre retrospective case series. Case records of horses diagnosed with MICET fractures that had undergone surgical treatment were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained from re-examination visits and/or owners. Twenty-one cases were identified at 9 equine hospitals between 2004 and 2016. A history of trauma and acute onset of lameness was reported in 12 horses. All cases underwent fracture removal via arthroscopy of the medial femorotibial joint. The cranial cruciate ligament was intact in 6 horses and damaged in 15 horses (damage was ≤25% [n = 9], 25-50% [n = 4] or ≥50% [n = 2] of the cross-sectional area). The cranial ligament of the medial meniscus was damaged in 11 horses (≤25% [n = 8], 25-50% [n = 3]). The medial meniscus was damaged in 5 horses and articular cartilage damage was identified in 14 horses (mild [n = 8], moderate [n = 6]). Follow-up information (median 14 months; 4 months-6 years) was available for 20 cases; 2 horses were sound but convalescing; 13 horses were sound and returned to their previous or expected use. Of the 4 horses with the most severe changes to the articular soft tissue structures, 2 remained lame and 2 were subjected to euthanasia because of persistent lameness. The retrospective, multicentre nature of this study and the limited number of horses are the main limitations. Fractures of the MICET are commonly associated with a traumatic event. Prompt diagnosis and early arthroscopic removal of the fracture are recommended. © 2017 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of EVJ Ltd.

  5. Endogenous testosterone attenuates neointima formation after moderate coronary balloon injury in male swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Darla L; Masseau, Isabelle; Ivey, Jan; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Bowles, Douglas K

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that testosterone increases coronary smooth muscle protein kinase C delta (PKC delta) both in vivo and in vitro and inhibits coronary smooth muscle proliferation by inducing G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest in a PKC delta-dependent manner. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether endogenous testosterone limits coronary neointima (NI) formation in a porcine model of post-angioplasty restenosis. Sexually mature, male Yucatan miniature swine were either left intact (IM), castrated (CM), or castrated with testosterone replacement (CMT; Androgel, 10 mg/day). Angioplasty was performed in both the left anterior descending and left circumflex coronary arteries with balloon catheter overinflation to induce either moderate (1.25-1.3 x diameter; 3 x 30 s) or severe (1.4x diameter; 3 x 30 s) injury, and animals were allowed to recover for either 10 or 28 days. Injured coronary sections were dissected, fixed, stained (Verheoff-Van Gieson, Ki67, PKC delta, p27), and analysed. Vessels without internal elastic laminal rupture were excluded. Following moderate injury, intimal area, intima-to-media ratio (I/M), and I/M normalized to rupture index (RI) were increased in CM compared with IM and CMT. RI, medial area, and intimal/medial thickness (IMT) were not different between groups. NI formation was inversely related to serum testosterone concentration. Conversely, following severe injury, there were no significant differences between the groups. Testosterone inhibited proliferation and stimulated PKC delta and p27(kip1) expression during NI formation (10 days post-injury). These findings demonstrate that endogenous testosterone limits coronary NI formation in male swine and provides support for a protective role for testosterone in coronary vasculoproliferative diseases, such as restenosis and atherosclerosis.

  6. Molecular changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Ya; Hayami Tadashi; Pickarski Maureen; Duong Le T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating, progressive joint disease. Methods Similar to the disease progression in humans, sequential events of early cartilage degradation, subchondral osteopenia followed by sclerosis, and late osteophyte formation were demonstrated in the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) or ACLT with partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx) rat OA models. We describe a reliable and consistent method to examine the time dependent changes in the g...

  7. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  8. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Mori, Atsushi; Sato, Akiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  9. MR Imaging findings of avulsion fracture of the tibial spine of the knee, focusing of cruciate ligament tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook

    2003-01-01

    To determine the presence of cruciate ligament tears following avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL, and to correlate the findings with those of surgery. Between March 1997 and May 2002, avulsion injury involving the ACL and PCL was diagnosed in 19 patients. Ten of these [8 males and 2 females aged 10-51 (avergae, 27.7) years] were included in this study. We assessed the presence of cruciate ligament tears at MR imaging, correlating the findings with those of surgery. Associated intra-articular injuries, treatment methods and follow-up results were also evaluated. Among seven patients with ACL avulsion injury, this was assessed at MR imaging as complete tear (n=1), partial tear (n=5), or intact (n=1), while all MR images of PCL avulsion injury (n=3) showed that this was partial teat. All imaging findings corresponded with the surgical findings. In four patients there was associated knee injury involving, respectively, teats of the medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, PCL and MCL, and popliteal ligament. Our findings showed that with one exception, patients with avulsion injury of the ACL or PCL had suffered either a partial or complete tear. MR imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of tears of the cruciate ligament which have not been noticed at surgery or arthroscopy in avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL

  10. Ipsilateral Medial and Lateral Discoid Meniscus with Medial Meniscus Tear

    OpenAIRE

    Shimozaki, Kengo; Nakase, Junsuke; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Discoid meniscus is a well-documented knee pathology, and there are many cases of medial or lateral discoid meniscus reported in the literature. However, ipsilateral concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus. Case Report: A 27-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on medial joint space in his right knee that was diagnosed as a complete medial ...

  11. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the thumb carpometacarpal ligaments: a cadaveric study of ligament anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy L; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-08-15

    Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p histologic appearance of capsular tissue with low cellularity. The dorsal deltoid ligament complex is uniformly stout and robust; this ligament complex is the thickest morphometrically, has the highest cellularity histologically, and shows the greatest degree of sensory nerve endings. The hypocellular anterior oblique ligament is thin, is variable in its location, and

  12. Graft fixation in cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J; Weiler, A; Caborn, D N; Brown, C H; Johnson, D L

    2000-01-01

    Cruciate ligament reconstruction has progressed dramatically in the last 20 years. Anatomic placement of ligament substitutes has fostered rehabilitation efforts that stress immediate and full range of motion, immediate weightbearing, neuromuscular strength and coordination, and early return to athletic competition (3 months). This has placed extreme importance on secure graft fixation at the time of ligament reconstruction. Current ligament substitutes require a bony or soft tissue component to be fixed within a bone tunnel or on the periosteum at a distance from the normal ligament attachment site. Fixation devices have progressed from metal to biodegradable and from far to near-normal native ligament attachment sites. Ideally, the biomechanical properties of the entire graft construct would approach those of the native ligament and facilitate biologic incorporation of the graft. Fixation should be done at the normal anatomic attachment site of the native ligament (aperture fixation) and, over time, allow the biologic return of the histologic transition zone from ligament to fibrocartilage, to calcified fibrocartilage, to bone. The purpose of this article is to review current fixation devices and techniques in cruciate ligament surgery.

  13. Reconstruction of ACL Ligament rupture: results of 96 operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmasebi MN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL is one of the main knee stabilizing ligaments. Because of high incidence of ACL tearing especially in young athletes its reconstruction is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term results of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures using four strand hamstring auto graft and Bone patellar tendon autograph. "nMethods: The study group included 96 patients (3 female and 93 male with ACL teared who had been referred to our center in 5 years period (2002-2007. The subject which were Accessed in this study included meniscal injury concomitant chondral injury, determine the most common cause of ACL tearing, comparision of IKDC and lysholm score in all patients before and after surgery, and limitation of rang of motion of knee post operation. "nResults: Involvement was in the right knee in 38 patients and in the left knee in 58 patients. Mean age of patients was 27.6 years (19-48. Mean surgical delay was 18 month (1-77. The most common cause of tear was playing soccer. Meniscal injury was in 78 patients. (Medial meniscus in 63 patients, lateral meniscus in 29 patients Concommitent chondral injury was in 54 patients (56.25%. 68% of patients returned to preoperative functions sport activity. There was no limitation in extension and there was 6 patients limitation in flexion about 20º. In last visit of patients IKDS in class A and B was 96. "nConclusion: It is seem that arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL is a safe and good method in treatment of Knee stability. Use of IKDC and lysholm score for comparision of patients before and after surgery is helpful. The operation should be done early after injury. Reconstruction of ACL in older patients in the abscense of DJD is effective.

  14. Relative contributions of plantar fascia and ligaments on the arch static stability: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Ji, Wen-Ting; Wang, Dong-Mei; Wang, Cheng-Tao; Wang, Xu

    2010-10-01

    The plantar fascia (PF) and major ligaments play important roles in keeping the static foot arch structure. Their functions and relative contributions to the arch stability have not been well studied. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was created based on the reconstruction of magnetic resonance images. During balanced standing, four cases after individual releases of the PF, spring ligament (SL), and long and short plantar ligaments (LPL and SPL) were simulated, to compare their biomechanical consequences with the normal predictions under the intact structure. Although the predictions showed the arch did not collapse obviously after each structure sectioning, the internal mechanical behaviors changed considerably. The PF release resulted in the maximal increases of approximately 91%, 65% and 47% in the tensions of the LPF, SPL and SL, produced the largest changes in all bone rotations, and brought an obvious shift of high stress from the medial metatarsals to the lateral metatarsals. The SL release mainly enhanced bone rotation angles and weakened the joint stability of the arch structure. The LPL and the SPL performed the roles of mutual compensation as either one was released. The influence of the LPL on the load distribution among metatarsals was greater than for the SPL and the SL.

  15. Extrinsic wrist ligaments: prevalence of injury by magnetic resonance imaging and association with intrinsic ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Atul K; Bredella, Miriam A; Chang, Connie Y; Joseph Simeone, F; Kattapuram, Susan V; Torriani, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of extrinsic wrist ligament injury by magnetic resonance imaging and its association with intrinsic ligament tears. We reviewed conventional magnetic resonance images performed over a 5-year period from adult patients in the setting of wrist trauma. Two musculoskeletal radiologists examined the integrity of wrist ligaments and presence of bone abnormalities. In a cohort of 75 subjects, extrinsic ligament injury was present in 75%, with radiolunotriquetral being most frequently affected (45%). Intrinsic ligament injury was present in 60%. Almost half of subjects had combined intrinsic and extrinsic ligament injury. Bone abnormalities were seen in 69%. The rate of extrinsic injury was higher in subjects with bone injury (P = 0.008). There is high prevalence of extrinsic ligament injury in the setting of wrist trauma, especially in the presence of bone abnormalities, with combined injury of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments in about half of cases.

  16. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  17. Rupture of the meniscofibular ligament

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    Poyanli Oguz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The meniscofibular ligament is an anatomically defined ligament of the knee in humans. However, there are no data regarding the prognosis following injury to this ligament. Our case was a 42-year-old man who presented at our clinic with pain of the lateral side of his left knee. MRI of his left knee revealed the rupture of the meniscofibular ligament. The mechanism of injury was consistent with anatomical and mechanical studies of the meniscofibular ligament. The patient was treated conservatively for 1 year, but his pain did not resolve completely. A case series of patients with the same injury is required to establish an effective treatment for this rare injury.

  18. Relationship between peri-incisional dysesthesia and the vertical and oblique incisions on the hamstrings harvest in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Laube Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of peri-incisional dysesthesia according to the skin incision technique for hamstring tendon graft harvest in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with ACL rupture were separated in two groups: group 1, with 19 patients submitted to the oblique skin incision to access the hamstrings and group 2-14 patients operated by vertical skin incision technique. The selected patients were assessed after surgery. Demographic data and prevalence of dysesthesia was measured by digital pressure around the skin incision and classified according to the Highet scale. RESULTS: The total rate of dysesthesia was 42% (14 patients. Five patients (26% on the oblique incision group reported dysesthesia symptoms. On the group submitted to the vertical incision technique, the involvement was 64% (nine patients. On the 33 knees evaluated, the superior lateral area was the most affected skin region, while the superior medial and inferior medial regions were affected in only one patient (7.1%. No statistical differences between both groups were observed regarding patients' weight, age, and height¸ as well as skin incision length. CONCLUSION: Patients who underwent reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the oblique access technique had five times lower incidence of peri-incisional dysesthesia when compared with those in whom the vertical access technique was used.

  19. Complex Medial Meniscus Tears Are Associated With a Biconcave Medial Tibial Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H; Berry, Kathy L

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether an association exists between a biconcave medial tibial plateau and complex medial meniscus tears. A consecutive series of stable knees undergoing arthroscopy were evaluated retrospectively with the use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs, and arthroscopy documented by intraoperative videos. Investigators independently performed blinded reviews of the MRI or videos. Based on the arthroscopy findings, medial tibial plateaus were classified as either biconcave or not biconcave. A transverse coronal plane ridge, separating the front of the tibial plateau from the back near the inner margin of the posterior body of the medial meniscus, was defined as biconcave. The medial plateau slope was calculated with MRI sagittal views. General demographic information, body mass index, and arthroscopically confirmed knee pathology were recorded. A total of 179 consecutive knees were studied from July 2014 through August 2015; 49 (27.2%) biconcave medial tibial plateaus and 130 (72.8%) controls were identified at arthroscopy. Complex medial meniscus tears were found in 103. Patients with a biconcave medial tibial plateau were found to have more complex medial meniscus tears (69.4%) than those without a biconcavity (53.1%) (P = .049) despite having lower body mass index (P = .020). No difference in medial tibial plateau slope was observed for biconcavities involving both cartilage and bone, bone only, or an indeterminate group (P = .47). Biconcave medial tibial plateaus were present in 27.4% of a consecutive series of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. A biconcave medial tibial plateau was more frequently associated with a complex medial meniscus tear. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  20. Trends in primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction among National Basketball Association team physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Nathan A; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Azar, Frederick M; Traina, Steve M; Allen, Answorth A; Parker, Richard; Cole, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common in athletes. Techniques and methods of treatment for these injuries continue to vary among surgeons. Thirty National Basketball Association (NBA) team physicians were surveyed during the NBA Pre-Draft Combine. Survey questions involved current and previous practice methods of primary and revision ACL reconstruction, including technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and treatment of combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injuries. Descriptive parametric statistics, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used, and significance was set at α = 0.05. All 30 team physicians completed the survey. Eighty-seven percent indicated they use autograft (81% bone-patellar tendon-bone) for primary ACL reconstruction in NBA athletes, and 43% indicated they use autograft for revision cases. Fourteen surgeons (47%) indicated they use an anteromedial portal (AMP) for femoral tunnel drilling, whereas 5 years earlier only 4 (13%) used this technique. There was a significant (P = .009) positive correlation between fewer years in practice and AMP use. NBA team physicians' use of an AMP for femoral tunnel drilling has increased over the past 5 years.

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Dissection Resistance in Intimal and Medial Layers of Human Coronary Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Johnson, John A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Sutton, Michael A.; Lessner, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery is the most frequently involved vessel in coronary artery dissection, a cause of acute coronary syndrome or sudden cardiac death. The biomechanical mechanisms underlying arterial dissection are not well understood. This study investigated the dissection properties of LAD specimens harvested from explanted hearts at the time of cardiac transplantation, from patients with primary dilated cardiomyopathy (n=12). Using a previously validated approach uniquely modified for these human LAD specimens, we quantified the local energy release rate, G, within different arterial layers during experimental dissection events (tissue tearing). Results show that the mean values of G during arterial dissection within the intima and within the media in human LADs are 20.7±16.5 J/m2 and 10.3±5.0 J/m2, respectively. The difference in dissection resistance between tearing events occurring within the intima and within the media is statistically significant. Our data fall in the same order of magnitude as most previous measurements of adhesive strength in other human arteries, with the differences in measured values of G within the layers most likely due to histologically observed differences in the structure and composition of arterial layers. PMID:24729631

  2. Relationship between patellar mobility and patellofemoral joint cartilage degeneration after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Susumu; Kurokouchi, Kazutoshi; Takahashi, Shigeo; Yoda, Masaki; Yamamoto, Ryuichiro; Sakai, Tadahiro

    2017-11-01

    Patellofemoral cartilage degeneration is a potential complication of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgery. Hypomobility of the patella in the coronal plane is often observed after ACLR. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between cartilage degeneration in the patellofemoral joint and mobility after ACLR. The present study investigated 1) the coronal mobility of the patella after ACLR, 2) the relationship between patellar mobility and cartilage degeneration of the patellofemoral joint, and 3) the relationship between patellar mobility and knee joint function after ACLR. Forty patients who underwent medial hamstring-based ACLR participated in the study. Lateral and medial patellar displacements were assessed with a modified patellofemoral arthrometer, and the absolute values of the displacements were normalized to patient height. The International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) cartilage injury classification of the patellar and femoral (trochlear) surfaces, and the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were used to evaluate knee function. Lateral and medial patellar displacements were reduced compared with the non-operated knee at the second-look arthroscopy and bone staple extraction operation (second operation; 24.4 ± 7.9 months after ACLR, Ppatellofemoral joint (patella and trochlea) were significantly worse than those pre-ACLR. Neither lateral nor medial patellar mobility, however, were significantly correlated with the ICRS grade or the Lysholm score. Although patellar mobility at approximately 2 years after ACLR was decreased compared to the non-operated knee, small displacement of the patella was not related to cartilage degeneration or knee joint function at the time of the second operation.

  3. Comparative study on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: determination of isometric points with and without navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio J. Angelini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot. An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1 posterior cruciate ligament, 2 anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3 medial tibial spine; 4 distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5 femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6 variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments.

  4. Ruptura do ligamento cruzado em cães: estudo retrospectivo da reconstituição com fascia lata Managment of cruciate ligament rupture in dogs: a retrospective study fascia lata autograft

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    Paulo Iamaguti

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo de 35 casos de ruptura de ligamento cruzado atendidos pelo Serviço de Cirurgia de Pequenos Animais da FMVZ-UNESP-Campus de Botucatu, no período janeiro de 1991 a junho de 1997. Os cães foram submetidos à técnica de PAATSAMA (1952, modificada para reconstituição do ligamento cruzado, que consistiu na passagem do retalho de fascia lata através da articulação do joelho e fixação no côndilo medial da tíbia e epicôndilo medial do fêmur. Pelos resultados obtidos, concluiu-se que esta técnica permite boa estabilização das superfícies articulares, com trans e pós operatório sem complicações, e permite recuperação completa da capacidade funcional do membro afetado.This is a retrospectivo study of 35 cases of cruciate ligament rupture, submitted to Small Animal Surgery Service at FMVZ - UNESP - Compus de Botucatu, from January, 1991 to June, 1997. The dogs underwent a modifica techniquefor reconstitution of the cruciate ligament. A flap of fascia lata was placed through the stifle joint andfixed at the medial condyle ofthe tíbia and the medial condyle of the femur. Results showed that this technique was simple and satisfactory, with no trans and post operative complications. The dogs totally recovered the function of the limbs in ali cases submitted to surgery.

  5. Tears of anterior cruciate ligament and associated injury in the knee joint: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Jin Whan; Yoon, Yup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the characteristic findings in tears of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and associated injury at MR imaging. We reviewed the findings of MR images and the corresponding arthroscopic results of 32 patients with ACL tears. We evaluated the signal intensity and contour of ACL surrounding bony structures, menisci and associated injury of the knee joint. Complete ACL tears were present in 25 patients and partial ACL tears were in 7 patients. Complete ACL tears showed heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of the ACL in 14 patients (56%) and without bulging or absence in 11 patients(44%). Most patients torn ACL with contour bulging(12/14) had bone bruise, but only one patient torn ACL without bulging contour had bone bruise. ACL with thin continuous low signal band surrounding heterogenously increased signal intensity suggests partial tear which was seen in three patients of seven proved partial ACL tears. Combined bone injury in ACL tear were in 23 patients (73%) and most of these(22/23) were at midportion of lateral notch of femur and/or posterior portion of lateral tibial plateu. Deepening of lateral notch of femur were noted in 17 patients(53%). Associated injuries of the other ligaments of knee joint were buckling of the posterior cruciate ligament(16/32, 50%) and tears of the medial collateral ligament(11/32, 34%). Posterior horns of menisci were more frequent site of combined injury within menisci in patients with ACL tear. Acute tearing of ACL in MRI is seen as heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of ACL and combined bone bruises. Patients with torn ACL frequently have various combined injury. In patient with knee injury, these associated or ancillary findings suggest that ACL tear is present

  6. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures

  7. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  8. Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy

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    Tsai HC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Chien Tsai,1–3 Ta-Liang Chen,2–4 Yu-Pin Chen,5 Ruei-Ming Chen1,3,6 1Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Anesthesiology and Health Policy Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Comprehensive Cancer Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain.Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks.Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant

  9. Biomechanics of an orthosis-managed cranial cruciate ligament-deficient canine stifle joint predicted by use of a computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, Gina E; Brown, Nathan P; Mich, Patrice M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of an orthosis on biomechanics of a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint by use of a 3-D quasistatic rigid-body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to investigate influences of orthosis hinge stiffness (durometer). SAMPLE A previously developed computer simulation model for a healthy 33-kg 5-year-old neutered Golden Retriever. PROCEDURES A custom stifle joint orthosis was implemented in the CrCL-deficient pelvic limb computer simulation model. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation in the orthosis-stabilized stifle joint (baseline scenario; high-durometer hinge]) were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of orthosis hinge stiffness on model outcome measures. RESULTS The orthosis decreased loads placed on the caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments and increased load placed on the medial collateral ligament, compared with loads for the CrCL-intact stifle joint. Ligament loads were decreased in the orthosis-managed CrCL-deficient stifle joint, compared with loads for the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial translation and rotation decreased but were not eliminated after orthosis management. Increased orthosis hinge stiffness reduced tibial translation and rotation, whereas decreased hinge stiffness increased internal tibial rotation, compared with values for the baseline scenario. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Stifle joint biomechanics were improved following orthosis implementation, compared with biomechanics of the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Orthosis hinge stiffness influenced stifle joint biomechanics. An orthosis may be a viable option to stabilize a CrCL-deficient canine stifle joint.

  10. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Thumb

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of thumb ulnar collateral ligament disruption has been based on joint angulation during valgus stress testing. This report describes a definitive method of distinguishing between complete and partial ulnar collateral ligament injuries by quantifying translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head during valgus stress testing. Methods: Sixty-two cadaveric thumbs underwent standardized valgus stress testing under fluoroscopy with the ulnar collateral ligament intact, following an isolated release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament, and following a combined release of both the proper and the accessory ulnar collateral ligament (complete ulnar collateral ligament release). Following complete ulnar collateral ligament release, the final thirty-seven thumbs were also analyzed after the application of a valgus force sufficient to cause 45° of valgus angulation at the metacarpophalangeal joint to model more severe soft-tissue injury. Two independent reviewers measured coronal plane joint angulation (in degrees), ulnar joint line gap formation (in millimeters), and radial translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head (in millimeters) on digital fluoroscopic images that had been randomized. Results: Coronal angulation across the stressed metacarpophalangeal joint progressively increased through the stages of the testing protocol: ulnar collateral ligament intact (average [and standard deviation], 20° ± 8.1°), release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament (average, 23° ± 8.3°), and complete ulnar collateral ligament release (average, 30° ± 8.9°) (p collateral ligament release (5.7 ± 1.5 mm), to that following complete ulnar collateral ligament release (7.2 ± 1.5 mm) (p collateral ligament (1.6 ± 0.8 mm vs. 1.5 ± 0.9 mm in the intact state). There was a significant increase in translation following release of the complete ulnar collateral ligament complex (3.0 ± 0.9 mm; p collateral ligament

  11. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W.; Lloyd, David G.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a s...

  12. Quantitative histological grading methods to assess subchondral bone and synovium changes subsequent to medial meniscus transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    The importance of the medial meniscus to knee health is demonstrated by studies which show meniscus injuries significantly increase the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis (OA), and knee OA can be modeled in rodents using simulated meniscus injuries. Traditionally, histological assessments of OA in these models have focused on damage to the articular cartilage; however, OA is now viewed as a disease of the entire joint as an organ system. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative histological measures of bone and synovial changes in a rat medial meniscus injury model of knee OA. To initiate OA, a medial meniscus transection (MMT) and a medial collateral ligament transection (MCLT) were performed in 32 male Lewis rats (MMT group). MCLT alone served as the sham procedure in 32 additional rats (MCLT sham group). At weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 post-surgery, histological assessment of subchondral bone and synovium was performed (n = 8 per group per time point). Trabecular bone area and the ossification width at the osteochondral interface increased in both the MMT and MCLT groups. Subintimal synovial cell morphology also changed in MMT and MCLT groups relative to naïve animals. OA affects the joint as an organ system, and quantifying changes throughout an entire joint can improve our understanding of the relationship between joint destruction and painful OA symptoms following meniscus injury.

  13. Anatomic ligament consolidation of the superior acromioclavicular ligament and the coracoclavicular ligament complex after acute arthroscopically assisted double coracoclavicular bundle stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobmann, S; Buckup, J; Colcuc, C; Roessler, P P; Zimmermann, E; Schüttler, K F; Hoffmann, R; Welsch, F; Stein, T

    2017-09-18

    The consolidation of the acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament complex after arthroscopically assisted stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) separation is still under consideration. Fifty-five consecutive patients after arthroscopically assisted double-CC-bundle stabilization within 14 days after acute high-grade ACJ separation were studied prospectively. All patients were clinically analysed preoperatively (FU0) and post-operatively (FU1 = 6 months; FU2 = 12 months). The structural MRI assessments were performed at FU0 (injured ACJ) and at FU2 bilateral (radiologic control group) and assessed separately the ligament thickness and length at defined regions for the conoid, trapezoid and the superior AC ligament. Thirty-seven patients were assessed after 6.5 months and after 16.0 months. The 16-month MRI analysis revealed for all patients continuous ligament healing for the CC-complex and the superior AC ligament with in the average hypertrophic consolidation compared to the control side. Separate conoid and trapezoid strands (double-strand configuration) were detected in 27 of 37 (73%) patients, and a single-strand configuration was detected in 10 of 37 (27%) patients; both configurations showed similar CCD data. The ligament healing was not influenced by the point of surgery, age at surgery and heterotopic ossification. The clinical outcome was increased (FU0-FU2): Rowe, 47.7-97.0 pts.; TAFT, 3.9-10.6 pts.; NAS pain , 8.9-1.4 pts. (all P < 0.05). The arthroscopically assisted double-CC-bundle stabilization within 14 days after acute high-grade ACJ separation showed 16 months after surgery sufficient consolidations of the AC and double-CC ligament complex in 73%. III, Case series.

  14. Bioreactor design for tendon/ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W; Lloyd, David G; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-04-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments.

  15. Morphology of the dorsal and lateral calcaneocuboid ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn-Lange, Nadja V; Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Arentz, Sabine; Konerding, Moritz A

    2008-09-01

    The dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligaments have different configurations. In the literature they are only described as either the dorsal or lateral calcaneocuboid ligament. However, recent reconstructive surgical techniques may benefit from a better understanding of the anatomy. The aims of this study were to classify the morphology and attachments of the dorso-lateral calcaneocuboid ligaments and to determine their dimensions. The dorso-lateral aspects of the calcaneocuboid joint of 30 cadaver feet were dissected to expose the associated ligaments. Further, we evaluated possible bony landmarks of the calcaneus that could imply which shape or course the ligament would have in a specific individual. Our findings showed a wide variety of configurations in shape, number, and attachment sites. A constant dorsal ligament and an additional narrower lateral ligament was detectable in half of the cases. The majority of the dorso-lateral calcaneocuboid ligament-complex had an upward course and fanning out from proximal to distal. No bony predictor for the ligaments' shape or course was found. The dorso-lateral ligament-complex of the calcaneocuboid joint revealed a wide variety of configurations. Better understanding of the anatomy of these ligaments may aid in the anatomic reconstruction of these ligaments.

  16. Lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lateral collateral ligament connects the end of the femur (thigh) to the top of the fibula (the thin bone that runs next to the shin bone). The lateral collateral ligament provides stability against varus stress. Varus stress ...

  17. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  18. Image-anatomic research of the alar ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Caixian; Liu Jun; Jin Ying; Wang Jian; Zhong Jin; Wang Jinyue; Zhu Miao; Cheng Jinbao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect position and morphous as well as coursing of the alar ligament, and to further investigate the sectional anatomy and CT and MRI imaging of the alar ligament. Methods: Twelve formalin fixed specimens including head and neck utilized, three of the twelve were observed in gross anatomy, nine of them were dissectioned. Fifty- one healthy volunteers from each group were selected to perform CT and MRI examination respectively. By combining gross and sectional anatomy. CT and MRI manifestations of the alar ligament were analyzed, the alar ligament width was measured. Results: Location and shape, as well as coursing of the alar ligament could be demonstrated clearly in gross and sectional anatomy. The transverse plane across the upper dens and the coronal plane by the middle dens were the optimal planes for demonstrating the alar ligament. The display ratio of the alar ligament was even 100% (51/51) in both images of CT and MRI. MRI had better advantages than CT in respect of demonstrating the alar ligament, PDWI (proton density weighted imaging, PDWI) is the most optimal sequence for the alar ligament. There were no significant differences of the alar ligament width between male and female and between the right and the left side (P>0.05). Conclusion: In combination with gross and sectional anatomy. CT and MRI could both provide an imageo-anatomic basis for diagnosis of the alar ligament trauma and malformation as well as infection. (authors)

  19. Medial Elbow Joint Space Increases With Valgus Stress and Decreases When Cued to Perform A Maximal Grip Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pexa, Brett S; Ryan, Eric D; Myers, Joseph B

    2018-04-01

    Previous research indicates that the amount of valgus torque placed on the elbow joint during overhead throwing is higher than the medial ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) can tolerate. Wrist and finger flexor muscle activity is hypothesized to make up for this difference, and in vitro studies that simulated activity of upper extremity musculature, specifically the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi ulnaris, support this hypothesis. To assess the medial elbow joint space at rest, under valgus stress, and under valgus stress with finger and forearm flexor contraction by use of ultrasonography in vivo. Controlled laboratory study. Participants were 22 healthy males with no history of elbow dislocation or UCL injury (age, 21.25 ± 1.58 years; height, 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight, 79.43 ± 18.50 kg). Medial elbow joint space was measured by use of ultrasonography during 3 separate conditions: at rest (unloaded), under valgus load (loaded), and with a maximal grip contraction under a valgus load (loaded-contracted) in both limbs. Participants lay supine with their arm abducted 90° and elbow flexed 30° with the forearm in full supination. A handgrip dynamometer was placed in the participants' hand to grip against during the contracted condition. Images were reduced in ImageJ to assess medial elbow joint space. A 2-way (condition × limb) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Cohen's d effect sizes were used to assess changes in medial elbow joint space. Post hoc testing was performed with a Bonferroni adjustment to assess changes within limb and condition. The medial elbow joint space was significantly larger in the loaded condition (4.91 ± 1.16 mm) compared with the unloaded condition (4.26 ± 1.23 mm, P space increases under a valgus load and then decreases when a maximal grip contraction is performed. This indicates that wrist and finger flexor muscle contraction may assist in limiting medial elbow joint space, a result similar to findings of previous

  20. Sacroiliac part of the iliolumbar ligament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Kleinrensink, G.J.; Snijders, C.; Stoeckart, R.

    1999-01-01

    The iliolumbar ligament has been described as the most important ligament for restraining movement at the lumbosacral junction. In addition, it may play an important role in restraining movement in the sacroiliac joints. To help understand its presumed restraining effect, the anatomy of the ligament

  1. Medial Canthoplasty Combined with Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy for the Treatment of Delayed Medial Telecanthal Deformity

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    Hua Sun

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Medial canthoplasty combined with CDCR is an effective surgical method for treatment of patients with medial telecanthal deformity and lacrimal drainage system obstruction. The study indicates that medial canthoplasty combined with CDCR surgery rebuilds normal appearance of eyelid and contour of the medial canthus and successfully repairs the function of the lacrimal drainage system.

  2. Ligament regeneration using an absorbable stent-shaped poly-L-lactic acid scaffold in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Hanako; Kokubu, Takeshi; Inui, Atsuyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Nishida, Kotaro; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Kumiko; Hiwa, Chiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Ligaments are frequently damaged in sports activities and trauma, and severe ligament injury can lead to joint instability and osteoarthritis. In this study, we aimed to regenerate the medial collateral ligament (MCL) using an absorbable stent-shaped poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffold in a rabbit model to examine the biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Twenty-three Japanese white rabbits were used in this study. MCL defects were surgically created in the knee joints and then reconstructed using stent-shaped PLLA scaffolds. As controls, flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons were implanted into the contralateral knees. Seven rabbits were sacrificed at three time points, conducted four, eight and 16 weeks after the operation. The regenerated tissues were histologically evaluated using fibre alignment scoring, morphology of fibroblast scoring and immunohistochemical analysis of types I and III collagen. The regenerated tissues were also biomechanically evaluated by measuring the ultimate failure load and stiffness. At four weeks post-operation, spindle-shaped cells were observed on the inside of the scaffolds. At eight weeks, maturation of the regenerated tissues and collagen fibre alignment parallel to the ligaments was observed. At 16 weeks, the fibre alignment had become denser. The fibre alignment and morphology of fibroblast scores significantly increased in a time-dependent manner. Expression of type I collagen was more strongly observed in the scaffold group at eight and 16 weeks post-operation than at four weeks. Type III collagen was also observed at four, eight and 16 weeks post-operation. A thin layer of fibrocartilage was observed at the ligament-bone junction at eight and 16 weeks. The ultimate failure load of the scaffold group was 46.7 ± 20.7 N, 66.5 ± 11.0 N and 74.3 ± 11.5 N at four, eight and 16 weeks post-operation, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the normal MCL and the scaffold group at 16 weeks post

  3. A History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction at the National Football League Combine Results in Inferior Early National Football League Career Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Matthew T; Bradley, James P; Chahla, Jorge; Sanchez, Anthony; Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; Arner, Justin W; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Sanchez, George; Kennedy, Mitchell I; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cinque, Mark E; LaPrade, Robert F

    2018-05-19

    To evaluate whether players with a history of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) before the National Football League (NFL) Combine played or started fewer games and/or participated in fewer eligible snaps compared with NFL Combine participants without a history of knee injury or surgery. We performed a retrospective review of all players who participated in the NFL Combine between 2009 and 2015 and who had a history of an ACLR. NFL Combine participants were included if they had a previous ACLR or combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and nonoperatively managed medial collateral ligament injury. The number of games started, number of games played, draft number, overall draft pick, and snap percentage for each position were determined. The mean value of each outcome metric was compared between case and control players. We identified 110 players who had an ACL injury (n = 76) or a combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injury (n = 34). Players in the ACLR group had a significantly worse mean draft pick number (difference of 30.2, P = .002) and mean draft round (difference of 0.8, P = .019) versus controls. Compared with control players, players in the ACLR group started and played significantly fewer games in both season 1 (difference of 2.7 games started, P < .001; difference of 2.7 games played, P < .001) and season 2 (difference of 7.4 games started, P < .001; difference of 3.0 games played, P = .003) and had a significantly lower snap percentage in both season 1 (difference of 23.1%, P < .001) and season 2 (difference of 24.0%, P < .001). Athletes at the NFL Combine who previously underwent an ACLR had significantly lower early-career NFL player metrics, including fewer games started, fewer games played, and a lower snap percentage, than uninjured controls. Defensive linemen, defensive backs, and linebackers were the 3 most affected positions. Players with a prior ACLR and combined meniscal-chondral pathology had

  4. Prediction of medial and lateral contact force of the knee joint during normal and turning gait after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    The computational modeling approach has commonly been used to predict knee joint contact forces, muscle forces, and ligament loads during activities of daily living. Knowledge of these forces has several potential applications, for example, within design of equipment to protect the knee joint from injury and to plan adequate rehabilitation protocols, although clinical applications of computational models are still evolving and one of the limiting factors is model validation. The objective of this study was to extend previous modeling technique and to improve the validity of the model prediction using publicly available data set of the fifth "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads." A two-stage modeling approach, which combines conventional inverse dynamic analysis (the first stage) with a multi-body subject-specific lower limb model (the second stage), was used to calculate medial and lateral compartment contact forces. The validation was performed by direct comparison of model predictions and experimental measurement of medial and lateral compartment contact forces during normal and turning gait. The model predictions of both medial and lateral contact forces showed strong correlations with experimental measurements in normal gait (r = 0.75 and 0.71) and in turning gait trials (r = 0.86 and 0.72), even though the current technique over-estimated medial compartment contact forces in swing phase. The correlation coefficient, Sprague and Geers metrics, and root mean squared error indicated that the lateral contact forces were predicted better than medial contact forces in comparison with the experimental measurements during both normal and turning gait trials. © IMechE 2016.

  5. Injerto libre braquial medial Free medial arm graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martos Díaz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Entre las reconstrucciones de defectos titulares de cabeza y cuello, el injerto libre microvascularizado braquial medial no ha adquirido mucha popularidad debido a las variaciones anatómicas que se reflejan en la vascularización de éste. Nuestro objetivo es realizar una descripción de la anatomía y técnica quirúrgica, así como una revisión de la literatura describiendo las ventajas y desventajas de este tipo de injerto. Material y método. Presentamos el caso de una paciente con carcinoma epidermoide de mucosa yugal izquierda con afectación ganglionar ipsilateral. Se procedió a su resección con márgenes más disección cervical funcional. La reconstrucción del defecto se llevó a cabo mediante un injerto libre microvascularizado braquial medial de brazo izquierdo. Discusión. Pensamos que el injerto libre braquial medial de brazo se trata de una opción más segura a la hora de la reconstrucción de defectos cervicofaciales, aportando una serie de ventajas entre las que destacan: no sacrificio de una arteria terminal, cierre primario de la zona donante, mínimo defecto estético, y poseer una piel fina, elástica y sin vello.Introduction. Free medial microvascularized arm grafts have not become very popular for the reconstruction of head and neck defects due to anatomic variations in their vascularization. Our objective was to describe the anatomy and surgical technique and to review the literature on the advantages and disadvantages of free medial arm grafts. Material and methods. We report the case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the left jugal mucosa with same-side lymph node involvement. The tumor was resected with margins and a functional cervical dissection was performed. The defect was reconstructed using a free medial microvascularized graft from the left arm. Discussion. We believe that free medial arm grafts are a safer option for the reconstruction of cervicofacial defects and that they offer

  6. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

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    Rubin Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1 were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95 mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash

  7. MR imaging of posttraumatic spinal ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathria, M.N.; Emery, S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Wilber, R.G.; Bohlman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of MR imaging in the detection of ligamentous injury was evaluated in 29 patients (24 male, five female) with spinal injury resulting in fractures (n=27), evidence of instability (n=11), or neurologic deficit (n=2). MR examinations were performed acutely (average, 7.5 days posttrauma) with T1- and T2-weighted imaging and were blindly evaluated. Subsequently, plain films (n=27), tomograms (n=10), and CT scans (n=22) were evaluated. Eighteen patients underwent surgery. Fourteen patients had torn ligaments as indicated by clinical and surgical findings. MR imaging demonstrated ligament damage in 13. One case imaged 40 days following trauma was not detected. No patients with intact ligaments had evidence of ligamentous damage on MR images. MR imaging demonstrated retropulsed fractures in six patients in whom the posterior longitudinal ligament was intact but displaced from the vertebra. MR imaging was more reliable than radiography and CT for detection of ligamentous injury, and T2- weighted sequences are essential in such cases

  8. MR imaging of alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echigoya, Naoki; Harata, Seiko; Ueyama, Kazumasa (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine); Nakano, Keisuke

    1992-06-01

    Autopsy findings of ligaments of the upper cervical spine were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Ligaments were clearly shown as hypointensity on T1-weighted images and proton density images. Transverse images were useful in diagnosing alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries. When there is a bilateral difference in the alar ligaments, ruptured ligament is suspected. Transverse ligament rupture was shown on interrupted hypointensity and as hyperintensity. MRI was capable of diagnosing alar ligament rupture in 8 of 11 patients, and transverse ligament rupture in all 3 patients. In 2 patients having Jefferson's fracture and injuried atlanoaxial subluxation encountered in the clinical practice, transverse ligament rupture was similarly observed as that in autopsy cases on MR images. Hyperintensity in the transverse ligament rupture area was seen even one year after injury. Injured transverse ligament was seen as swollen hyperintensity on sagittal images; and the hyperintensity was gradually decreased with the process of healing. (N.K.).

  9. Image-based multiscale mechanical modeling shows the importance of structural heterogeneity in the human lumbar facet capsular ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Vahhab; Liu, Chao J; Claeson, Amy A; Akkin, Taner; Barocas, Victor H

    2017-08-01

    The lumbar facet capsular ligament (FCL) primarily consists of aligned type I collagen fibers that are mainly oriented across the joint. The aim of this study was to characterize and incorporate in-plane local fiber structure into a multiscale finite element model to predict the mechanical response of the FCL during in vitro mechanical tests, accounting for the heterogeneity in different scales. Characterization was accomplished by using entire-domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to measure the fiber structure of cadaveric lumbar FCLs ([Formula: see text]). Our imaging results showed that fibers in the lumbar FCL have a highly heterogeneous distribution and are neither isotropic nor completely aligned. The averaged fiber orientation was [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] in the inferior region and [Formula: see text] in the middle and superior regions), with respect to lateral-medial direction (superior-medial to inferior-lateral). These imaging data were used to construct heterogeneous structural models, which were then used to predict experimental gross force-strain behavior and the strain distribution during equibiaxial and strip biaxial tests. For equibiaxial loading, the structural model fit the experimental data well but underestimated the lateral-medial forces by [Formula: see text]16% on average. We also observed pronounced heterogeneity in the strain field, with stretch ratios for different elements along the lateral-medial axis of sample typically ranging from about 0.95 to 1.25 during a 12% strip biaxial stretch in the lateral-medial direction. This work highlights the multiscale structural and mechanical heterogeneity of the lumbar FCL, which is significant both in terms of injury prediction and microstructural constituents' (e.g., neurons) behavior.

  10. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L.; Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G.

    2009-10-01

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of 60 Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of 60 Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  11. Chronic injuries of the cruciate ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pricca, P.; Cecchini, A.; Vecchioni, G.; Mariani, P.M.; Tansini, A.; Ferrario, A.

    1988-01-01

    The high incidence of cruciate ligament injuries as a result of acute knee trauma with hemartrosis and abuse of diagnostic arthroscopies call for a suitable radiological imaging of the central pivot. Computed Arthrotomography (CAT) was used to examine the knee joint in 20 cases of clinically suspected chronic cruciate ligament injury. The images were correlated with arthroscopic and/or arthrotomic findings. Thirteen lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (65%) were found, plus 1 lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) (5%), 2 associated lesions of ACL + PCL (10%), and 4 normal cases. Confirmation of pathology was available in all cases but one by arthroscopy and/or surgery. The central pivot diseases were classified as follows: absence, detachement, partial or complete tear. CAT findings of cruciate ligament injuries are emphasized and the role of the technique as compared to arthroscopy is discussed. CAT is useful in 3-D evaluation of central pivot and detection of different cruciate ligament injuries, with high sensitivity-specifity for ACL and high specifity-moderate sensitivity for PCL. In the evaluation of the chronic unstable knee, CAT is highly accurate and gives the surgeon useful information towards the planning of therapeutic procedures. CAT is almost non-invasive, well tolerated and easy to perform in out-patients, which make it a first-choice procedure in the screening of chronic ligament injuries

  12. Estudo prospectivo randomizado sobre a luxação traumática de patela: tratamento conservador versus reconstrução do ligamento femoropatelar medial com tendão patelar - mínimo de dois anos de seguimento Randomized prospective study on traumatic patellar dislocation: conservative treatment versus reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the patellar tendon, with a minimum of two years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Carneiro Bitar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar os resultados da cirurgia (reconstrução do ligamento femoropatelar medial; LFPM com os resultados do tratamento conservador da luxação primária de patela. MÉTODOS: Trinta e nove pacientes (41 joelhos com luxação de patela foram randomizados em dois grupos (um grupo foi tratado conservadoramente - imobilização e fisioterapia - e o outro cirurgicamente com a reconstrução do LFPM e foram avaliados com um seguimento mínimo de dois anos. O questionário de Kujala foi aplicado para avaliar dor e qualidade de vida e as recidivas foram avaliadas. Os testes do Qui-quadrado de Pearson e exato de Fisher foram utilizados na avaliação estatística. RESULTADOS: A análise estatística mostrou que a média do escore de Kujala foi significativamente mais baixa no grupo conservador (70,8 quando comparada à média do grupo cirúrgico (88,9, com p = 0,001. O grupo cirúrgico apresentou maior porcentagem de resultados bom/excelente (71,43% no escore de Kujala quando comparados ao grupo conservador (25% com p = 0,003. O grupo conservador apresentou um número maior de recorrências (35% dos casos, enquanto que no grupo cirúrgico não houve relatos de recorrências e/ou subluxações. CONCLUSÕES: O tratamento com a reconstrução do ligamento femoropatelar medial com o tendão patelar produziu melhores resultados, com base na análise das recorrências pós-tratamento e nos resultados finais melhores no questionário de Kujala após um seguimento mínimo de dois anos.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the surgical results from reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL with non-operative treatment of primary patellar dislocation. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients (41 knees with patellar dislocation were randomized into two groups. One group was treated conservatively (immobilization and physiotherapy and other was treated surgically with reconstruction of the MPFL, and the

  13. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  14. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  15. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  16. Trends in Materials Science for Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Oana Roxana; Sava, Daniel Florin; Radulescu, Marius; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Ficai, Denisa; Veloz-Castillo, Maria Fernanda; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel Angel; Ficai, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The number of ligament injuries increases every year and concomitantly the need for materials or systems that can reconstruct the ligament. Limitations imposed by autografts and allografts in ligament reconstruction together with the advances in materials science and biology have attracted a lot of interest for developing systems and materials for ligament replacement or reconstruction. This review intends to synthesize the major steps taken in the development of polymer-based materials for anterior cruciate ligament, their advantages and drawbacks and the results of different in vitro and in vivo tests. Until present, there is no successful polymer system for ligament reconstruction implanted in humans. The developing field of synthetic polymers for ligament reconstruction still has a lot of potential. In addition, several nano-structured materials, made of nanofibers or in the form of ceramic/polymeric nanocomposites, are attracting the interest of several groups due to their potential use as engineered scaffolds that mimic the native environment of cells, increasing the chances for tissue regeneration. Here, we review the last 15 years of literature in order to obtain a better understanding on the state-of-the-art that includes the usage of nano- and poly-meric materials for ligament reconstruction, and to draw perspectives on the future development of the field. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

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    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  18. The transverse ligament as a landmark for tibial sagittal insertions of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongcharoensombat, Wirat; Ochi, Mitsuo; Abouheif, Mohamed; Adachi, Nobuo; Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Goki; Okuhara, Atushi; Shibuya, Hoyatoshi; Niimoto, Takuya; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Deie, Masataka

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between the position of the transverse ligament, the anterior edge of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial footprint, and the center of the ACL tibial insertion. We used arthroscopy for localization of the anatomic landmarks, followed by insertions of guide pins under direct visualization, and then the position of these guide pins was checked on plain lateral radiographs. The transverse ligament and the anterior aspect of the ACL tibial footprint were identified by arthroscopy in 20 unpaired cadaveric knees (10 left and 10 right). Guide pins were inserted with tibial ACL adapter drill guides under direct observation at the transverse ligament, the anterior aspect of the tibial footprint, and the center of tibial insertion of the ACL. Then, plain lateral radiographs of specimens were taken. The Amis and Jakob line was used to define the attachment of the ACL tibial insertion and the transverse ligament. A sagittal percentage of the location of the insertion point was determined and calculated from the anterior margin of the tibia in the anteroposterior direction. The transverse ligament averaged 21.20% ± 4.1%, the anterior edge of the ACL tibial insertion averaged 21.60% ± 4.0%, and the center of the ACL tibial insertion averaged 40.30% ± 4.8%. There were similar percent variations between the transverse ligament and the anterior edge of the ACL tibial insertion, with no significant difference between them (P = .38). Intraobserver and interobserver reliability was high, with small standard errors of measurement. This study shows that the transverse ligament coincides with the anterior edge of the ACL tibial footprint in the sagittal plane. The transverse ligament can be considered as a new landmark for tibial tunnel positioning during anatomic ACL reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, E. W.; Rupani, A.; Foley, G. T.; Khan, W. S.; Cartmell, S.; Anand, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging discipline that combines the principle of science and engineering. It offers an unlimited source of natural tissue substitutes and by using appropriate cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and advanced bioreactors, it is possible that tissue engineering could be implemented in the repair and regeneration of tissue such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Whilst repair and regeneration of ligament tissue has been demonstrated in animal studies, further research ...

  20. On the behavior of crack surface ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Staahle, P.; Sundin, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    Small ligaments connecting the fracture surfaces just behind a moving crack front are assumed to exist under certain conditions. The ligaments are rapidly torn as the crack advances. Inelastic straining of such ligaments influences the energy balance in the fracture process. The rapid tearing of a single ligament is studied both numerically and experimentally. An elastic visco-plastic material model is adopted for finite-element calculations. The results show that relatively large amounts of energy are dissipated during the tearing process. Further, the energy needed to tear a ligament increases rapidly with increasing tearing rate. The computed behavior is partly verified in a few preliminary experiments. The implications for slow stable crack tip speeds during dynamic fracture are discussed. (orig.)

  1. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN KNEE MENISCI AND LIGAMENTOUS INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of clinical diagnosis compared to MRI findings in ligamentous and meniscal injuries with respect to arthroscopic confirmation as a gold standard. METHODS 485 patients with knee injuries were prospectively assessed by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging and correlated after therapeutic arthroscopy. The overall accuracy, clinically productive values of sensitivity and specificity was derived. The actual value of the test with respect to positive predictive and negative predictive value was also derived, taking arthroscopic findings as confirmatory. The overall partial and total agreement among the clinical, MRI and arthroscopy was documented. RESULTS The overall accuracy for clinical examination was 85, 92, 100 and 100 and accuracy for MRI was 90, 97, 97 and 97 for detecting medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, ACL and PCL tears respectively. Clinically lateral meniscus tears are difficult to diagnose clinically with negative predictive value (90 whereas ACL injuries do not need MRI for diagnosis as evident by a high negative predictive value (100 of clinical examination. Total agreement with the clinical findings confirmed by arthroscopy was 64.40% which was relatively high as compared to total agreement of MRI findings which was only 31.50%. We found similar total agreement versus total disagreement of both clinical and MRI to be only 2.74% indicating very high accuracy in clinical diagnosis of meniscal and ligamentous injuries combined. CONCLUSION The clinical evaluation alone is sufficient to diagnose meniscal and ACL/PCL pathologies and MRI should be considered only as a powerful negative diagnostic tool. The arthroscopy decision should not be heavily dependent on MRI for ligamentous injuries but reverse is true for meniscal lesions. MR evaluation functions as a powerful negative diagnostic tool to rule out doubtful and complex knee injuries.

  2. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  3. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, J P

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved.

  4. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walmsley, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  5. The efficacy of two electrodes radiofrequency technique: comparison study using a cadaveric interspinous ligament and temperature measurement using egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyung; Derby, Richard; Choi, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Sang-Heon; Kim, Se Hoon; Kang, Yoon Kyu

    2010-01-01

    One technique in radiofrequency neurotomies uses 2 electrodes that are simultaneously placed to lie parallel to one another. Comparing lesions on cadaveric interspinous ligament tissue and measuring the temperature change in egg white allows us to accurately measure quantitatively the area of the lesion. Fresh cadaver spinal tissue and egg white tissue were used. A series of samples were prepared with the electrodes placed 1 to 7 mm apart. Using radiofrequency, the needle electrodes were heated in sequential or simultaneous order and the distance of the escaped lesion area and temperature were measured. Samples of cadaver interspinous ligament showed sequential heating of the needles limits the placement of the needle electrodes up to 2 mm apart from each other and up to 4 mm apart when heated simultaneously. The temperature at the escaped lesion area decreased according to the distance for egg white. There was a significant difference in temperature at the escaped lesion area up to 6 mm apart and the temperature was above 50 degrees celsius up to 5 mm in simultaneous lesion and 3 mm in the sequential lesion. The limitations of this study include cadaveric experimentation and use of intraspinous ligament rather than medial branch of the dorsal ramus which is difficult to identify. Heating the 2 electrodes simultaneously appears to coagulate a wider area and potentially produce better results in less time.

  6. The spinoglenoid ligament. Anatomy, morphology, and histological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, Kevin D; Peterson, Robert K; Johnston, Jack C; Luke, Timothy A

    2005-02-01

    Dysfunction of the distal branch of the suprascapular nerve has been reported in athletes involved in throwing or overhead sports. The consistent presence of a dynamic anatomic structure, the spinoglenoid ligament, overlying the nerve in the spinoglenoid notch may be a contributing factor to the dysfunction of this nerve. The purpose of this study was to report the anatomy, morphology, and histological characteristics of the spinoglenoid ligament. The spinoglenoid ligaments of fifty-eight fresh-frozen cadaver shoulders were dissected to evaluate their anatomic dimensions, histological characteristics, and relationship to the suprascapular nerve, the posterior part of the capsule, and the glenoid rim. The spinoglenoid ligament was harvested, with its insertions on the scapular spine and on the capsule and glenoid left intact, for the histological analysis. Dissection revealed that a spinoglenoid ligament was present in all specimens. The ligament was found to form an irregular quadrangular shape. On gross examination, the deep fibers of the ligament extended from the lateral aspect of the scapular spine to the posterior part of the glenoid and the superficial fibers blended with the posterior aspect of the shoulder capsule. Histological sections demonstrated Sharpey fibers inserting into bone at the scapular spine and blending with the posterior aspect of the shoulder capsule to insert into the posterior surface of the glenoid, findings that confirmed the ligamentous nature of this structure. This study revealed the presence of the spinoglenoid ligament in all of the shoulders that were examined, with some variation in the size of the ligament.

  7. Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Vibration Fails to Accelerate Ligament Healing but Stimulates Collagen Synthesis in the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William R; Keller, Benjamin V; Davis, Matthew L; Dahners, Laurence E; Weinhold, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration accelerates fracture and wound healing and prevents disuse atrophy in musculoskeletal tissues. To investigate the role of low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration as a treatment to accelerate healing of an acute ligament injury and to examine gene expression in the intact Achilles tendon of the injured limb after low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration. Controlled laboratory study. Complete surgical transection of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) was performed in 32 Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into control and low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration groups. Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration started on postoperative day 2, and rats received vibration for 30 minutes a day for 12 days. All rats were sacrificed 2 weeks after the operation, and their intact and injured MCLs were biomechanically tested or used for histological analysis. Intact Achilles tendons from the injured limb were evaluated for differences in gene expression. Mechanical testing revealed no differences in the ultimate tensile load or the structural stiffness between the control and vibration groups for either the injured or intact MCL. Vibration exposure increased gene expression of collagen 1 alpha (3-fold), interleukin 6 (7-fold), cyclooxygenase 2 (5-fold), and bone morphogenetic protein 12 (4-fold) in the intact Achilles tendon when compared with control tendons ( P frequency vibration treatment, significant enhancements in gene expression were observed in the intact Achilles tendon. These included collagen, several inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors critical for tendons. As low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration had no negative effects on ligament healing, vibration therapy may be a useful tool to accelerate healing of other tissues (bone) in multitrauma injuries without inhibiting ligament healing. Additionally, the enhanced gene expression in response to low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration in the intact Achilles tendon suggests the

  8. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yilgor, Caglar; Yilgor Huri, Pinar; Huri, Gazi

    2011-01-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue eng...

  9. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  10. Posterior longitudinal ligament status in cervical spine bilateral facet dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrino, John A.; Manton, Geoffrey L.; Morrison, William B.; Flanders, Adam E.; Vaccaro, Alex R.; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cervical spine bilateral facet dislocation results in complete disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The goal of this study was to evaluate the integrity of numerous spine-stabilizing structures by MRI, and to determine if any associations between injury patterns exist with respect to the posterior longitudinal ligament status. Retrospective case series. A retrospective review was performed of 30 cervical spine injury subjects with bilateral facet dislocation. Assessment of 1.5T MRI images was carried out for: intervertebral disc disruption, facet fracture, and ligamentous disruption. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between various injury patterns and posterior longitudinal ligament status. The frequency of MRI abnormalities was: anterior longitudinal ligament disruption (26.7%), disc herniation or disruption (90%), posterior longitudinal ligament disruption (40%), facet fracture (63.3%) and disruption of the posterior column ligament complex (97%). There were no significant associations between injury to the posterior longitudinal ligament and other structures. Compared to surgical reports, MRI was accurate for determining the status for 24 of 26 ligaments (three of three anterior longitudinal ligament, seven of nine posterior longitudinal ligament, and 14 of 14 posterior column ligament complex) but generated false negatives in two instances (in both MRI showed an intact posterior longitudinal ligament that was torn at surgery). (orig.)

  11. Meniscofemoral ligaments: patterns of tears and pseudotears of the menisci using cadaveric and clinical material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, PPG Clinica Medica, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debbra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the different types of pseudotears of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus caused by the nearby meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs), and to correlate the presence of these ligaments with patterns of meniscal tear. Retrospective clinical study with patients and prospective observatory study with cadaveric material. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of the knee in 49 patients who had subsequent arthroscopy of the knee performed over a 1-year period at a single institution were reviewed by two readers in consensus for the presence and morphology of the MFLs of Humphry (LH) and Wrisberg (LW). Ten cadaveric knee specimens were used for MRI, anatomic, and histologic study. The LH was present in 55% of patients, the LW in 94%, and both were present in 44.9%. The thickness of the LH and LW ranged from 1-3 mm (mean 1.9, SD 0.61), and from 1-3.8 mm (mean 1.8, SD 0.65) respectively (p > 0.05). A pseudotear in the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus was present in 63% of patients. In 13% the pseudotear was vertically oriented, and in 87% the pseudotear had an anterosuperior to posteroinferior orientation, ranging from 37 to 87 . There was no association between the presence of one or both MFLs and the occurrence of medial or lateral meniscal tears (p > 0.05). Meniscofemoral ligaments are frequent anatomical structures that are found in the majority of knees with MRI. They commonly cause a pseudotear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus that can be simple, double, or complex in appearance, with vertical or anterosuperior to posteroinferior orientation. (orig.)

  12. Whiplash causes increased laxity of cervical capsular ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C.; Ito, Shigeki; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Rubin, Wolfgang; Coe, Marcus P.; Ndu, Anthony B.; Carlson, Erik J.; Panjabi, Manohar M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous clinical studies have identified the cervical facet joint, including the capsular ligaments, as sources of pain in whiplash patients. The goal of this study was to determine whether whiplash caused increased capsular ligament laxity by applying quasi-static loading to whiplash-exposed and control capsular ligaments. Methods A total of 66 capsular ligament specimens (C2/3 to C7/T1) were prepared from 12 cervical spines (6 whiplash-exposed and 6 control). The whiplash-exposed spines had been previously rear impacted at a maximum peak T1 horizontal acceleration of 8 g. Capsular ligaments were elongated at 1 mm/s in increments of 0.05 mm until a tensile force of 5 N was achieved and subsequently returned to neutral position. Four pre-conditioning cycles were performed and data from the load phase of the fifth cycle were used for subsequent analyses. Ligament elongation was computed at tensile forces of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 N. Two factor, non-repeated measures ANOVA (Pwhiplash-exposed and control groups and between spinal levels. Findings Average elongation of the whiplash-exposed capsular ligaments was significantly greater than that of the control ligaments at tensile forces of 0 and 5 N. No significant differences between spinal levels were observed. Interpretation Capsular ligament injuries, in the form of increased laxity, may be one component perpetuating chronic pain and clinical instability in whiplash patients. PMID:17959284

  13. Whiplash causes increased laxity of cervical capsular ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Rubin, Wolfgang; Coe, Marcus P; Ndu, Anthony B; Carlson, Erik J; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2008-02-01

    Previous clinical studies have identified the cervical facet joint, including the capsular ligaments, as sources of pain in whiplash patients. The goal of this study was to determine whether whiplash caused increased capsular ligament laxity by applying quasi-static loading to whiplash-exposed and control capsular ligaments. A total of 66 capsular ligament specimens (C2/3 to C7/T1) were prepared from 12 cervical spines (6 whiplash-exposed and 6 control). The whiplash-exposed spines had been previously rear impacted at a maximum peak T1 horizontal acceleration of 8 g. Capsular ligaments were elongated at 1mm/s in increments of 0.05 mm until a tensile force of 5 N was achieved and subsequently returned to neutral position. Four pre-conditioning cycles were performed and data from the load phase of the fifth cycle were used for subsequent analyses. Ligament elongation was computed at tensile forces of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 N. Two factor, non-repeated measures ANOVA (Pwhiplash-exposed and control groups and between spinal levels. Average elongation of the whiplash-exposed capsular ligaments was significantly greater than that of the control ligaments at tensile forces of 0 and 5 N. No significant differences between spinal levels were observed. Capsular ligament injuries, in the form of increased laxity, may be one component perpetuating chronic pain and clinical instability in whiplash patients.

  14. Recruitment of knee joint ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Lange, de A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of earlier reported data on the in vitro kinematics of passive knee-joint motions of four knee specimens, the length changes of ligament fiber bundles were determined by using the points of insertion on the tibia and femur. The kinematic data and the insertions of the ligaments were

  15. Satisfactory outcomes following combined unicompartmental knee replacement and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, S G; Meuffels, D E

    2017-03-31

    There exist limited options for treatment of patients with combined medial compartment arthritis and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. Ideal treatment is one that offers lasting relief of symptoms not compromising any future surgery. Unicompartmental knee replacement has shown consistently good results in the relatively young and active population, but there is a high reported incidence of failure up to 20%, if performed in ACL-deficient knees. One of the recognized treatment modality is combined ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental arthroplasty. A systematic review was conducted looking at the demographics, techniques, complications and outcome of combined ACL reconstruction with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. A systematic literature search within the online Medline, PubMed Database, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar was carried out until October 2016 to identify relevant articles. A study was defined eligible if it met the following inclusion criteria: the surgical procedure combined unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; patient's clinical and/or functional outcomes were reported; any complications intra-operatively and post-operatively were reported; and the full-text articles, written in English, German, Italian, Dutch or Spanish, were available. Quality and risk of bias assessments were done using standardized criteria set. A total of 8 studies met the inclusion criteria encompassing 186 patients who were treated with simultaneous ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. The mean age was 50.5 years (range from 44 to 56) with a mean follow-up of 37.6 months (range from 24 to 60). There was an improvement in mean Oxford Score from 27.5 to 36.8. Complications reported included tibial inlay dislocation (n = 3), conversion to a total knee arthroplasty (n = 1), infection requiring two-stage revision (n = 2), deep-vein thrombosis (n = 1), stiffness requiring

  16. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Little

    Full Text Available Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+ macrophages, CD3(+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p0.34, p0.31, p<0.05. Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  17. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (ppairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  18. Ultrasonographic evaluation of normal extrinsic and intrinsic carpal ligaments: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Lapegue, Franck; Demondion, Xavier; Masi, Laetitia; Cotten, Anne; Claret, Antoine

    2005-01-01

    To determine normal anatomy of extrinsic and intrinsic carpal ligaments at ultrasonography (US). In the first part of the study, two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus the photographs of anatomic sections and dissections derived from 20 cadaveric wrists. This cadaveric study gave the two readers the opportunity to learn the anatomy and orientation of the various extrinsic and intrinsic carpal ligaments and, thus, to develop a US protocol to facilitate the recognition of each carpal ligament. In the second part of the study, these two radiologists prospectively and independently evaluated the visibility of extrinsic and intrinsic carpal ligaments in 30 wrists of volunteers, using the same US protocol. With regard to extrinsic carpal ligaments, the radioscaphocapitate ligament (partially visible, 38%; completely visible, 62%), the radiolunotriquetral ligament (partially visible, 27%; completely visible, 73%), the palmar ulnotriquetral ligament (partially visible, 12%; completely visible, 88%), and the dorsal radiotriquetral ligament (partially visible, 7%; completely visible, 93%) were visualized at US. The dorsal ulnotriquetral ligament (partially visible, 21%; completely visible, 74%), the ulnolunate ligament (partially visible, 5%; completely visible, 70%), and the radial collateral ligament (partially visible, 18%; completely visible, 12%) were more difficult to recognize. The radioscapholunate ligament was never seen. With regard to intrinsic carpal ligaments, the dorsal (partially visible, 11%; completely visible, 89%) and palmar (partially visible, 38%; completely visible, 62%) scaphotriquetral ligaments as well as the dorsal scapholunate ligament (partially visible, 3%; completely visible, 97%) were visualized at US. The dorsal lunotriquetral ligament (partially visible, 39%; completely visible, 61%) and the palmar scapholunate ligaments (partially visible, 12%; completely visible, 81%) were more difficult to recognize. US may

  19. Ligament-induced sacral fractures of the pelvis are possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hanno; Hammer, Niels; Lingslebe, Uwe; Höch, Andreas; Klink, Thomas; Böhme, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    Pelvic ring stability is maintained passively by both the osseous and the ligamentous apparatus. Therapeutic approaches focus mainly on fracture patterns, so ligaments are often neglected. When they rupture along with the bone after pelvic ring fractures, disrupting stability, ligaments need to be considered during reconstruction and rehabilitation. Our aim was to determine the influence of ligaments on open-book injury using two experimental models with body donors. Mechanisms of bone avulsion related to open-book injury were investigated. Open-book injuries were induced in human pelves and subsequently investigated by anatomical dissection and endoscopy. The findings were compared to CT and MRI scans of open-book injuries. Relevant structures were further analyzed using plastinated cross-sections of the posterior pelvic ring. A fragment of the distal sacrum was observed, related to open-book injury. Two ligaments were found to be responsible for this avulsion phenomenon: the caudal portion of the anterior sacroiliac ligament and another ligament running along the ventral surface of the third sacral vertebra. The sacral fragment remained attached to the coxal bone by this second ligament after open-book injury. These results were validated using plastination and the structures were identified. Pelvic ligaments are probably involved in sacral avulsion caused by lateral traction. Therefore, ligaments should to be taken into account in diagnosis of open-book injury and subsequent therapy. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MR imaging features of chronically torn anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Kuramochi, Masashi; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 knee joints with arthroscopically proved chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears were retrospectively evaluated. MRI demonstrated various features of chronic ACL tears: 19 knees revealed with no identifiable ligamentous structure, and 21 had residual ligamentous structures. These pseudoligaments, 14 discontinuous bands and seven continuous bands with elongation, were residual torn ligamentous fibers and/or synovial tissues. All the discontinuous bands were disrupted from the femoral attachment and were likely to traverse the lower intercondylar space. Six disrupted ligaments were attached to the lateral aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Coronal T2 * -weighted gradient echo images showed better delineation of the disrupted femoral attachment and adhesion to the PCL. A chronic ACL tear with minimal elongation or with PCL attachment at a higher position may occasionally be difficult to distinguish from an intact ligament. (author)

  1. The fibre bundle anatomy of human cruciate ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommersteeg, T. J.; Kooloos, J. G.; Blankevoort, L.; Kauer, J. M.; Huiskes, R.; Roeling, F. Q.

    1995-01-01

    The cruciate ligaments of the knee consist of numerous fascicles, groups of which comprise fibre bundles. The stabilising function of these ligaments is established by changes in the lengths and orientations of the fascicles. Understanding the function of knee ligaments thus requires an

  2. Lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Vaesel, M T; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1996-01-01

    The structure and kinematics of the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint were investigated in 10 cadaveric specimens. The lateral collateral ligament was observed to be a distinct part of the lateral collateral ligament complex. It contains posterior fibers that pass through the annular....... Division of the posterolateral capsule caused no further laxity. Cutting the lateral collateral ligament induced a maximum laxity of 11.8 degrees at 110 degrees of flexion in forced varus and a maximum laxity of 20.6 degrees at 110 degrees of flexion in forced external rotation. The corresponding maximal...... posterior radial head translation was observed at 80 degrees to 100 degrees of flexion and was 5.7 mm in forced varus and 8.1 mm in forced external rotation. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be an important stabilizer of the humeroulnar joint and the radial head in forced varus...

  3. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament mechanics and allow for new tissue regeneration. Key words: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), tissue engineering, cells, tensile, stress relaxation, polymer, allograft, xenograft. INTRODUCTION. The anterior cruciate ligament ...

  4. Syndesmosis and deltoid ligament injuries in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCollum, Graham A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Injury to the syndesmosis and deltoid ligament is less common than lateral ligament trauma but can lead to significant time away from sport and prolonged rehabilitation. This literature review will discuss both syndesmotic and deltoid ligament injuries without fracture in the professional athlete. A

  5. Radiographic and pathologic characterization of lateral palmar intercarpal ligament avulsion fractures in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, Christopher P; Nixon, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the radiographic and histologic appearance of lateral palmar intercarpal ligament (LPICL) avulsion in the horse was characterized. Thirty-seven horses with radiographic evidence of avulsion fragments originating from the medial palmar aspect of the ulnar carpal bone were examined. The dorsolateral to palmaromedial projection was useful for evaluating the size and shape of the avulsed bone fragment, and the dorsopalmar projection added information on the relative proximity of the fragment to its fracture bed. Radiographic features that differentiated LPICL avulsion from subchondral cystic lesions of the ulnar carpal bone included a variable-sized osseous opacity adjacent to the lucent concavity of the fracture bed and the consistent location within the palmar transition zone at the confluence of LPICL insertion and hyaline cartilage on the palmar surface of the ulnar carpal bone. All 26 horses having surgical removal of the fragments had arthroscopic confirmation that the fragment was within the LPICL. Histologic examination confirmed the fragments were fracture related rather than developmental or the result of dystrophic mineralization. Many of the fragments had attached remnants of a ligament. This study describes the radiographic, surgical, and histologic features in 37 horses which better characterize LPICL avulsion fracture in the carpus and provide differentiating features to assist in separating this syndrome from true osseous cyst-like lesions within the ulnar carpal bone.

  6. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan (Inventor); Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  7. Does severity of femoral trochlear dysplasia affect outcome in patellofemoral instability treated by medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction and anterior tibial tuberosity transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitrel, G; Roumazeille, T; Arnould, A; Migaud, H; Putman, S; Ramdane, N; Pasquier, G

    2015-10-01

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction associated to anterior tibial tuberosity transfer (ATTT) is recommended in objective patellofemoral instability (PFI). Efficacy, however, has not been precisely determined in trochlear dysplasia with spur. A case-control study was performed in a PFI population, comparing groups with trochlear dysplasia with and without spur (S+ vs. S-) to assess the impact of trochlear dysplasia on (1) patellofemoral stability, (2) functional results and complications, and (3) patellofemoral cartilage status on MRI. Trochlear spur does not affect outcome in PFI managed by MPFL reconstruction and ATTT. Twenty-eight knees (26 patients) with PFI were analyzed retrospectively and divided into 2 groups of 14 knees each according to presence of trochlear spur (S+ vs. S-). All 28 knees had undergone ATTT and MPFL reconstruction by semitendinosus autograft. Results were assessed on Lille and IKDC functional scores, and cartilage status was determined on MRI at last follow-up. At a mean 24 months' follow-up (range, 12-52 months), there was no recurrence of dislocation. IKDC and Lille scores tended to improve in both groups, although the only significant improvement was in IKDC score (S- gain, 21.3±16; S+ gain, 18.1±14) (P=0.01). IKDC scores at last follow-up were better in the S+ than S- group (79±19 [range, 21-92] vs. 68±13 [range, 35-84], respectively; P=0.012). Lille scores showed no significant inter-group differences in mean gain (P=0.492) or mean value (P=0.381). The S+ group showed more cartilage lesions (n=14/14 knees, including 12/14 with grade≥2 lesions) than the S- group (n=9/14 knees, all grade≤2). MPFL reconstruction with ATTT provided good short-term patellofemoral stability independently of the severity of trochlear dysplasia. Functional results and gain on IKDC, however, were poorer in case of dysplasia with trochlear spur. This is probably due to cartilage lesions, observed more frequently pre- and post

  8. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Shows Variable Anatomy in Pediatric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Milewski, Matthew D; Cannamela, Peter C; Ganley, Theodore J; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Styhl, Alexandra C; Anderson, Allen F; Polousky, John D

    2017-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure rates are highest in youth athletes. The role of the anterolateral ligament in rotational knee stability is of increasing interest, and several centers are exploring combined ACL and anterolateral ligament reconstruction for these young patients. Literature on the anterolateral ligament of the knee is sparse in regard to the pediatric population. A single study on specimens younger than age 5 years demonstrated the presence of the anterolateral ligament in only one of eight specimens; therefore, much about the prevalence and anatomy of the anterolateral ligament in pediatric specimens remains unknown. We sought to (1) investigate the presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament in prepubescent anatomic specimens; (2) describe the anatomic relationship of the anterolateral ligament to the lateral collateral ligament; and (3) describe the anatomic relationship between the anterolateral ligament and the physis. Fourteen skeletally immature knee specimens (median age, 8 years; range, 7-11 years) were dissected (12 male, two female specimens). The posterolateral structures were identified in all specimens, including the lateral collateral ligament and popliteus tendon. The presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament was documented in each specimen, along with origin, insertion, and dimensions, when applicable. The relationship of the anterolateral ligament origin to the lateral collateral ligament origin was recorded. The anterolateral ligament was identified in nine of 14 specimens. The tibial attachment point was consistently located in the same region on the proximal tibia, between the fibular head and Gerdy's tubercle; however, the femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament showed considerable variation with respect to the lateral collateral ligament origin. The median femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament was 10 mm (first interquartile 6 mm, third interquartile 13) distal to the distal

  9. Shelbourne's update of the O'Donoghue knee triad in a 17-year-old male Rugby player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan

    2013-01-23

    Acute athletic knee injuries are often caused by a combination of valgus impact with external rotation of the tibia leading to a triad of injuries involving medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament disruption with associated meniscal damage. This injury pattern has been greatly discussed in the literature with conflicts of opinion and evidence as to whether medial or lateral meniscal pathology has a higher incidence. This case report introduces a 17-year-old male athlete with this unhappy triad It will evaluate the clinical assessment which suggested a medial meniscal lesion follow the patient through arthroscopy revealing a lateral meniscal tear in addition to complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and grade 2 medial collateral ligament tear. It will go on to look at the evidence base for the relative incidence of lateral and medial meniscal injuries and will evaluate the role of MRI in assessing acute athletic knee injuries.

  10. Round Ligament Varicosities During Pregnancy: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Chang Kyu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul

    2011-01-01

    There are various causes of a painful palpable mass in the groin during pregnancy. The differential diagnoses of an inguinal mass include hernia, lymphadenopathy, mesothelial cyst, cystic lymphangioma, neoplasms (lipoma, leiomyoma and sarcoma), endometriosis, embryonic remnants and round ligament varicosities. Among them, round ligament varicosities can be easily misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia in a pregnant woman. These lesions should be managed conservatively because they resolve spontaneously during the postpartum period. Ultrasonography can help make the diagnosis of round ligament varicosities and so prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and the associated morbidity. Herein we report on a case of round ligament varicosities that presented during pregnancy and this condition was readily diagnosed via Doppler sonography

  11. Round Ligament Varicosities During Pregnancy: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Chang Kyu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    There are various causes of a painful palpable mass in the groin during pregnancy. The differential diagnoses of an inguinal mass include hernia, lymphadenopathy, mesothelial cyst, cystic lymphangioma, neoplasms (lipoma, leiomyoma and sarcoma), endometriosis, embryonic remnants and round ligament varicosities. Among them, round ligament varicosities can be easily misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia in a pregnant woman. These lesions should be managed conservatively because they resolve spontaneously during the postpartum period. Ultrasonography can help make the diagnosis of round ligament varicosities and so prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and the associated morbidity. Herein we report on a case of round ligament varicosities that presented during pregnancy and this condition was readily diagnosed via Doppler sonography

  12. Tissue engineering of ligaments: a comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eijk, F; Saris, D B F; Riesle, J; Willems, W J; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Verbout, A J; Dhert, W J A

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of ligaments. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of the anterior cruciate ligament. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), ACL, and skin fibroblasts were seeded onto a resorbable suture material [poly(L-lactide/glycolide) multifilaments] at five different seeding densities, and cultured for up to 12 days. All cell types tested attached to the suture material, proliferated, and synthesized extracellular matrix rich in collagen type I. On day 12 the scaffolds seeded with BMSCs showed the highest DNA content (p engineered ligament.

  13. MRI assessment of mid-urethral ligament changes in female stress urinary incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Mei; Liu Hongyi; Han Yue; Xu Guoping; Fang Ping; Zhao Yang; Li Jingjin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MRI value in changes of mid-urethral ligament injury of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: Comparison of MRI changes of mid-urethral ligament on 30 healthy female volunteers and 20 female SUI patients. Chi-square test was used to compare the form of SUI patient's mid-urethral support ligaments. Results: The female mid-urethral support ligaments were composed of 4 groups of ligaments, including the periurethral ligament and pubourethral ligaments (1 pair), and at both sides of the urethra's paraurethral ligaments (1 pair) and suburethral ligament lying dorsal urethra, connecting the urethra and pelvic arcus tendinous fasciae. In normal MRI, ligament was a thin strip and showed low signal on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, T 2 WI sagittal and cross-section scan was the best combination to show the middle urethral support ligaments changes, with tension; 6 patients (20%) in the 30 patients normal control group could be seen tortuously and slack like around the urethra ligaments. Twenty SUI patients mid-urethral support ligaments were performance laxity or rupture,rates were 39% (47/120) and 42% (50/120) (χ 2 =43.191, P<0.05). On T 2 WI, the ligamentous laxity was floating,and loss tension, also could performance one side extension and thinner than the other side. The ligament rupture was performance of the signal interruption, ligament contracture and one end of ligament attachment points separation. Conclusion: MRI can objective effective evaluate the mid-urethral support ligaments' pathological changes in stress urinary incontinence patients. (authors)

  14. Characterization and role of the immune response during ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.

    Scar formation of ligaments after rupture remains a great challenge. Ligament healing involves a complex, coordinated series of events that form a neo-ligament, which is more disorganized and fibrotic in character than the native tissue. The repair process may extend from months to years, and the injured ligament never fully recovers its original mechanical properties. With little intrinsic healing potential, ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually reconstructed. The "healed" tissues, however, do not regenerate native tissues or recapitulate their mechanical function. ACL grafts often lengthen (incidents range from 40-100%) and their strength can drop by ˜50% after remodeling. Reconstructed knees are often less stable and fail to restore normal joint kinematics. Our overall goal is to improve healing, making ligaments more regenerative. The first 2 studies characterized ligament healing in a spatial and temporal manner over 28 days. The experiments demonstrated creeping substitution and the potential role of the immune system to control the repair and/or regenerative process. From these studies, macrophages were identified as significant players during healing. Macrophages paralleled creeping substitution, were abundant within the healing ligament, and potentially played a destructive role via matrix phagocytosis. The role of macrophages during early ligament healing was then evaluated using liposome-encapsulated clodronate to inhibit phagocytosing macrophages. Clodronate attenuated the early infiltration of macrophages, resulting in delayed structural and functional healing. Macrophage re-infiltration into the wound resulted in continued ligament healing. These results suggested that early inhibition of phagocytosing macrophages is detrimental to ligament healing. The final experiment evaluated the effects of interleukin-4 on ligament healing. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is reported to stimulate the Th2 lymphocyte/M2 macrophage pathway, reducing

  15. Morphometric study of suprascapular notch in Indian dry scapulae with specific reference to the incidence of completely ossified superior transverse scapular ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Usha; Kannan, N S; Anbalagan, J; Rao, Sudha

    2014-03-01

    The suprascapular notch, a depression on the lateral part of the superior border of the scapula, medial to the coracoid process, is bridged by the superior transverse scapular ligament, which is sometimes ossified and the foramen which is thus completed, transmits the suprascapular nerve to the supraspinatus fossa. Variations in the morphology of suprascapular notch have been identified as one of the causes of suprascapular nerve entrapment. Rengachary et al. classified this notch into six types, based on its shape. To study morphological variations of suprascapular notch in Indian dry scapulae and to analyze the incidence of completely ossified superior transverse scapular ligament with other ethnic populations which have been cited earlier. A total of 400 human dry scapulae which were obtained from the Department of Anatomy of selected eight medical colleges were analyzed. The type of suprascapular notch was noted and it was recorded as per the description given by Rengachary et al. The results of the present study were compared with the results of previous authors in different populations. In our study, out of 400 scapulae, 40 (10%), were identified to have completely ossified superior transverse scapular ligaments. The frequencies of various types of suprascapular notches were: Type I -20%, Type II -10%, Type III -52%, Type IV -4%, Type V -4%, Type VI -10%. Since the suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome might be caused by complete ossification of superior transverse scapular ligament with formation of suprascapular foramen and other morphometric variations of suprascapular notch, the knowledge on such variations is essential for clinicians, for making a proper diagnosis and for planning the most suitable surgical intervention.

  16. COMPARISON OF FOOT TAPING VERSUS CUSTOM-MADE MEDIAL ARCH SUPPORT ON PRONATED FLATFOOT IN SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vadivelan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flatfoot may exist as an isolated pathology or as part of a larger clinical entity. These entities include generalized ligamentous laxity, neurologic and muscular abnormalities, genetic conditions, collagen disorders and structural disorder. Flat foot is found to be associated with pronated foot. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of foot taping versus custom-made medial arch support on pronated flatfoot in school going children. Methods: 60 students out of 130, aged 10 to 12 years were selected on the basis of inclusion criteria and divided into three groups from two different higher secondary schools at Srikalahasti, in Chittoor district, Andhra Pradesh. Group-A received custom-made medial arch support and foot strengthening exercises, Group-B received kinesio taping and foot strengthening exercises , Group-C received foot strengthening exercises for 4 weeks. The values of navicular drop test were taken after 4 weeks of study. The pre and post-test values were compared and results were tabulated. Results: All three groups showed significant improvement in navicular drop separately. No significant difference was found in the post-test values of group-A, group-B, group-C (p>0.05. However, the reduction of navicular drop was slightly more in group-B subjects treated with kinesio tape and foot strengthening exercises when compared with other two interventions. Conclusion: The study concluded that foot taping, custom-made medial arch support and foot strengthening exercises were found to be effective on pronated flatfoot in school going children aged 10 to 12 years.

  17. Medial epiphyseal fracture-detachment of the sternoclavicular joint with posterior displacement in a judo athlete - equivalent of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pimenta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior sternoclavicular dislocation is a rare traumatic injury that presents a potential risk of injury to mediastinal structures. The diagnosis is fundamentally clinical and treatment is done on an emergency basis. The authors report the clinical case of a young judo athlete with post-traumatic medial epiphyseal fracture-detachment, with posterior displacement (lesion equivalent to posterior sternoclavicular dislocation at pediatric ages. He underwent open reduction and ligament repair by means of a mini-anchor.The radiological and clinical outcome was excellent, and the athlete returned to his sports activity without limitations. We discuss the particular features of this pathological condition, along with the different therapeutic approaches and their complications

  18. Thermographic and microscopic evaluation of LARS knee ligament tearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pătraşcu, Jenel Marian; Amarandei, Mihaela; Kun, Karla Noemy; Borugă, Ovidiu; Totorean, Alina; Andor, Bogdan; Florescu, Sorin

    2014-01-01

    Damage to knee articular ligaments causes important functional problems and adversely affects particularly the stability of the knee joint. Several methods were developed in order to repair damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which employ autografts, allografts, as well as synthetic ligaments. One such synthetic scaffold, the ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) synthetic ligament is made of non-absorbing polyethylene terephthalate fibers whose structure allow tissue ingrowths in the intra-articular part, improving the stability of the joint. The LARS ligament is nowadays widely used in modern knee surgery in the Europe, Canada, China or Japan. This paper evaluates LARS ligament from two perspectives. The first regards a study done by the Orthopedics Clinic II, Timisoara, Romania, which compared results obtained by employing two techniques of ACL repair - the Bone-Tendon-Bone (BTB) or LARS arthroscopic, intra-articular techniques. This study found that patients treated with the BTB technique presented with an IKDC score of 45.82±1.14 units preoperative, with increasing values in the first nine months after each implant post-surgical ligament restoration, reaching an average value of 75.92 ± 2.88 units postoperative. Patients treated with the LARS technique presented with an IKDC score of 43.64 ± 1.11 units preoperative, and a score of 77.32 ± 2.71 units postoperative. The second perspective describes the thermographic and microscopic analysis of an artificial knee ligament tearing or loosening. The objective of the study was to obtain information regarding the design of artificial ligaments in order to expand their lifespan and avoid complications such as recurring synovitis, osteoarthritis and trauma of the knee joint. Thermographic data has shown that tearing begins from the inside out, thus improving the inner design of the ligament would probably enhance its durability. An optical microscope was employed to obtain images of structural

  19. [Studies on the mechanical properties of the knee ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubotera, D

    1987-04-01

    To study mechanical properties of the knee ligaments, tension tests at various speeds were performed on the knee of a dog with only the collateral ligament. The results showed that the tensile force was greater in high speed than in low speed test. The difference may be caused in a viscous property of the ligament. The mechanical properties of ligaments can therefore be treated as those of viscoelastic materials and expressed by a modified Voigt model consisting of a non-linear spring element and a dash pot component. Observations regarding the ultrastructure of human knee ligaments using an electron scanning microscope revealed wavy bundles of collagen fiber connected with coarse fibers like network running in parallel with the long axis as the main structure. The above structure and properties were considered to be the decisive factors in the mechanical actions of the knee ligament.

  20. Strain Distribution in the Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, and Interosseous Membrane Using Digital Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Daorong; Wang, Yibei; Jiang, Chunyu; Fu, Maoqing; Li, Shiqi; Qian, Lei; Sun, Peidong; Ouyang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ligament repair and augmentation techniques can stabilize syndesmosis injuries. However, little is known about the mechanical behavior of syndesmotic ligaments. The aim of this study was to analyze full-field strain, strain trend under foot rotation, and subregional strain differences of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL), posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL), and interosseous membrane (IOM). Eleven fresh-frozen lower limbs were dissected to expose the AITFL, PITFL, and IOM. The foot underwent rotation from 0° to 25° internal and 35° external, with 3 ankle positions (neutral, 15° dorsiflexion, and 25° plantarflexion) and a vertical load of 430 N. Ligament strain was recorded using digital image correlation. The mean strain on the AITFL with 35° external rotation was greater in the proximal portion compared with distal portion in the neutral position ( P = .009) and dorsiflexion ( P = .003). The mean strain in the tibial insertion and midsubstance near tibial insertion were greater when compared with other regions ( P = .018 and P = .009). The subregions of mean strain in the PITFL and IOM groups were not significantly different. The strain trend of AITFL, PITFL, and IOM showed common transformation, just when the foot was externally rotated. The findings of this study show that a significantly high strain was observed on the proximal part and the midsubstance near the Chaput tubercle of the AITFL when the ankle was externally rotated. All 3 ligaments resisted the torque in the syndesmosis by external rotation of the foot. This study allows for better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the syndesmosis ligaments, which could influence the repair technique and AITFL augmentation techniques.

  1. Pellegrini-Stieda disease: a heterogeneous disorder not synonymous with ossification/calcification of the tibial collateral ligament - anatomic and imaging investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Luiz F.A.; Cho, Jae H.; Garcia, Glenn M.; Resnick, Donald L.; Chung, Christine B.; Pretterklieber, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Ossification/calcification around the medial femoral condyle has been known as Pellegrini-Stieda (PS) disease for almost 100 years. Little attention has been given to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. Our purpose is to demonstrate the anatomy in the medial femoral compartment and imaging findings of PS disease, determining the sites and patterns of ossification. In a cadaveric study seven specimens were dissected to show the anatomic relations of the tibial collateral ligament (TCL) and the tendon of the ischiocondylar part of the adductor magnus muscle, in the medial femoral epicondyle. In order to determine the nature of ossification/calcification in PS disease, MR imaging and radiographic findings in nine patients were analyzed by two observers with attention to the specific site, shape, and orientation of the ossification and its relationship to the tibial collateral ligament (TCL) and adductor magnus tendon. Available clinical history was recorded. A classification system addressing different sites and patterns of ossification was developed. The anatomic study showed that the TCL and the adductor magnus tendon insert at different sites in the medial femoral condyle and there is no continuation; however, some fibers of the posterior bundle of the TCL overlap the anterior aspect of the adductor magnus tendon. The imaging study showed that shape, orientation, and location of the abnormal calcification and ossification were similar on radiographic and MR imaging analysis. Ossification had an inferior orientation in six cases, a superior orientation in two cases, and both in one case. Four patterns of ossification were noted: (I) a beak-like appearance with an inferior orientation and femoral attachment was present in five cases; (II) a drop-like appearance with an inferior orientation, parallel to the femur, was evident in one case; (III) an elongated appearance with a superior orientation, parallel to the femur, was seen in two cases; and (IV) a

  2. Pellegrini-Stieda disease: a heterogeneous disorder not synonymous with ossification/calcification of the tibial collateral ligament - anatomic and imaging investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Luiz F.A.; Cho, Jae H.; Garcia, Glenn M.; Resnick, Donald L.; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Pretterklieber, Michael L. [Department of Applied Anatomy, Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    Ossification/calcification around the medial femoral condyle has been known as Pellegrini-Stieda (PS) disease for almost 100 years. Little attention has been given to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. Our purpose is to demonstrate the anatomy in the medial femoral compartment and imaging findings of PS disease, determining the sites and patterns of ossification. In a cadaveric study seven specimens were dissected to show the anatomic relations of the tibial collateral ligament (TCL) and the tendon of the ischiocondylar part of the adductor magnus muscle, in the medial femoral epicondyle. In order to determine the nature of ossification/calcification in PS disease, MR imaging and radiographic findings in nine patients were analyzed by two observers with attention to the specific site, shape, and orientation of the ossification and its relationship to the tibial collateral ligament (TCL) and adductor magnus tendon. Available clinical history was recorded. A classification system addressing different sites and patterns of ossification was developed. The anatomic study showed that the TCL and the adductor magnus tendon insert at different sites in the medial femoral condyle and there is no continuation; however, some fibers of the posterior bundle of the TCL overlap the anterior aspect of the adductor magnus tendon. The imaging study showed that shape, orientation, and location of the abnormal calcification and ossification were similar on radiographic and MR imaging analysis. Ossification had an inferior orientation in six cases, a superior orientation in two cases, and both in one case. Four patterns of ossification were noted: (I) a beak-like appearance with an inferior orientation and femoral attachment was present in five cases; (II) a drop-like appearance with an inferior orientation, parallel to the femur, was evident in one case; (III) an elongated appearance with a superior orientation, parallel to the femur, was seen in two cases; and (IV) a

  3. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  4. The Consequence of a Medial Ankle Sprain on Physical and Self-reported Functional Limitations: A Case Study Over a 5-Month Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C; Pietrosimone, Brian; Hiller, Claire E; Bowker, Samantha; Gribble, Phillip A

    2015-10-01

    Case report. Little evidence exists about impairments and perceived disability following eversion injury to the deltoid ligament. This case study prospectively examined the neuromuscular, biomechanical, and psychological consequences of a case of a medial ankle sprain. A recreationally active man with a history of a lateral ankle sprain (grade I) was participating in a university Institutional Review Board-approved research study examining the neuromuscular and mechanical characteristics associated with chronic ankle instability. Twenty-two days after the testing session, the participant sustained an eversion injury to his left ankle while playing basketball. Outcomes The outcomes of this case are presented using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model. Outcome variables were assessed at preinjury (medial ankle sprain), 3 months postinjury, and 5 months postinjury. Measurements included neural excitability of the soleus, balance assessment, joint stability, and psychological assessments. Data from this case study revealed that a medial ankle sprain reduces joint mobility and alters neural excitability of the soleus, with concurrent deficits in balance and self-reported function. These impairments forced the participant to downgrade his physical activity lifestyle up to 5 months postinjury. These data suggest the need for the development of intervention strategies to address impairments in neural excitability and joint mobility at the ankle to help patients meet the goal of maintaining long-term joint health. Prognosis, level 4.

  5. Radiographic evaluation of the canine elbow joint with special reference to the medial humeral condyle and the medial coronoid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhout, G.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of radiographic examination of clinically affected elbow joints in 14 young, large-breed dogs, including standard and oblique projections and linear tomography, were compared with the findings of medial arthrotomy. Radiographs revealed arthrosis (13 dogs), osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle (2 dogs), fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (5 dogs), and a combination of osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle and fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (2 dogs). In one dog fissures in the medial coronoid process and in another dog a linear radiopacity along the articular surface of the medial coronoid process were found. In three dogs both medial humeral condyle and medial coronoid process appeared normal. The radiographic findings were confirmed during surgery in 11 dogs. Cartilage erosion of the medial humeral condyle in two dogs and of the medial coronoid process in one dog had not resulted in radiographically visible abnormalities. Radiographic examination of the elbow joints in young, large-breed dogs should include standard mediolateral and craniocaudal projections, a mediolateral projection with the joint maximally extended and the leg supinated 15°, and a craniolateral-to-caudomedial projection

  6. MRI of the lateral ankle ligaments: value of three-dimensional orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the three-dimensional orientation of the lateral ankle ligaments with MRI. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers without previous injury to the ankle were included in the study. With the right ankle in the normal anatomic position stabilized in a splint, coronal T2-weighted spin-echo sequences (TSE) were obtained. The three-dimensional orientation was determined by placing paths through the ligaments and by measuring the angles between corresponding tangents and the three main imaging planes. Results: Using the calculated angles, full-length visualization of the lateral ligaments of the ankle was achieved. The angles deviating from the axial imaging plane were 18.0 degrees for the anterior talofibular ligament, 52.3 degrees for the calcaneofibular ligament and 28.2 degrees for the posterior talofibular ligament. Conclusion: MRI enables the exact determination of the three-dimensional orientation of the lateral ankle ligaments. Orienting the imaging planes according to the calculated angular deviation allows the full-length visualization of the ligaments and is the basis for optimal imaging of the lateral ankle ligaments. (orig.) [de

  7. PCL tibial avulsion with an associated medial meniscal tear in a child: a case report on diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries from tibial avulsions are rare in the paediatric setting. One would need a high index of suspicion as clinical examination may be difficult, especially in the early period. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic modality for this condition and other associated injuries within the knee. We report a rare case in which the patient had a PCL avulsion off the tibial insertion site with an associated posterior horn medial meniscal tear off the posterior capsule. He was treated through open reduction and internal fixation of the avulsed fragment with suture repair of the meniscal tear. We emphasize the importance of diagnosing and managing associated intra-articular injuries when dealing with the rare condition of PCL tibial avulsion in the paediatric setting.

  8. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [de

  9. Stiffness of the ligaments of the human wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelberg, H.H.C.M.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Kauer, J.M.G.

    1992-01-01

    The stiffnesses of the superficial ligaments of 14 human cadaver wrist joints have been determined. In these experiments the tested, fresh-frozen carpal joints are divided into a number of bone-ligament-bone complexes, which are loaded in a tensile testing machine at a rate of 66% of the ligaments'

  10. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  11. Foot medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait in subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Boysen, Lisbeth; Haugaard, Stine

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate (1) if subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome demonstrate increased navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait compared with healthy subjects, and (2) the relationship between medial longitudinal-arch ...

  12. The sacroiliac part of the iliolumbar ligament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Pool-Goudzwaard (Annelies); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); C.J. Snijders (Chris); C.A. Entius; R. Stoeckart (Rob)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe iliolumbar ligament has been described as the most important ligament for restraining movement at the lumbosacral junction. In addition, it may play an important role in restraining movement in the sacroiliac joints. To help understand its presumed restraining

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Daebler, C.; Helbich, T.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [de

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. DESIGN...

  15. Tissue engineering of ligaments for reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, MaCalus V; Kawakami, Yohei; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-05-01

    The use of musculoskeletal bioengineering and regenerative medicine applications in orthopaedic surgery has continued to evolve. The aim of this systematic review was to address tissue-engineering strategies for knee ligament reconstruction. A systematic review of PubMed/Medline using the terms "knee AND ligament" AND "tissue engineering" OR "regenerative medicine" was performed. Two authors performed the search, independently assessed the studies for inclusion, and extracted the data for inclusion in the review. Both preclinical and clinical studies were reviewed, and the articles deemed most relevant were included in this article to provide relevant basic science and recent clinical translational knowledge concerning "tissue-engineering" strategies currently used in knee ligament reconstruction. A total of 224 articles were reviewed in our initial PubMed search. Non-English-language studies were excluded. Clinical and preclinical studies were identified, and those with a focus on knee ligament tissue-engineering strategies including stem cell-based therapies, growth factor administration, hybrid biomaterial, and scaffold development, as well as mechanical stimulation modalities, were reviewed. The body of knowledge surrounding tissue-engineering strategies for ligament reconstruction continues to expand. Presently, various tissue-engineering techniques have some potential advantages, including faster recovery, better ligamentization, and possibly, a reduction of recurrence. Preclinical research of these novel therapies continues to provide promising results. There remains a need for well-designed, high-powered comparative clinical studies to serve as a foundation for successful translation into the clinical setting going forward. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraarterial beta irradiation induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis and reduces medial cellularity in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit restenosis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verin, Vitali; Popowski, Youri; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Belenger, Jacques; Urban, Philip; Neuville, Pascal; Redard, Mireille; Costa, Manuel; Celetta, Giuseppe; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation has been shown to be a powerful inhibitor of neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury in several animal models of post-percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (post-PTCA) restenosis. This was previously shown to be associated with a reduction in smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitotic activity. This study evaluated the effect of intraarterial beta irradiation on the arterial wall SMC density and apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five carotid and 7 iliac arteries of hypercholesterolemic New Zealand white rabbits were injured using the Baumgartner technique. The impact of an 18 Gy beta radiation dose administered after balloon injury was studied and compared to a nonirradiated injured control group. The medial SMC density as well as the percentage of apoptotic cells were determined at 8 days, 21 days, and 6 weeks after injury using an automated computer-based software. Apoptotic cells were identified using in situ end-labeling of fragmented DNA. Results: The values for medial apoptosis in control vs. irradiated arteries were: 0.014 ± 0.023 vs. 0.23 ± 0.28%, p = NS, at 8 days; 0.012 ± 0.018 vs. 0.07 ± 0.07%, p = 0.05, at 21 days; and 0 ± 0 vs. 0.16 ± 0.11%, p = 0.03, at 6 weeks. The overall incidence of medial apoptotic cells at all time points was 0.01 ± 0.017 vs. 0.13 ± 0.14% in controls and irradiated arteries respectively, p = 0.004. Medial SMC density was significantly decreased in irradiated arteries in comparison with controls (p < 0.01 at all time-points). Conclusions: Intraarterial beta irradiation stimulates medial SMC apoptosis in balloon-injured arteries. This, together with a decrease in SMC mitotic activity, contributes to a decrease in the arterial wall cellularity

  17. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with coracoacromial ligament transfer using the docking technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobezie Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic Acromioclavicular (AC dislocations have historically been surgically treated with Coracoclavicular (CC ligament reconstruction with transfer of the Coracoacromial (CA ligament. Tensioning the CA ligament is the key to success. Methods Seventeen patients with chronic, symptomatic Type III AC joint or acute Type IV and V injuries were treated surgically. The distal clavicle was resected and stabilized with CC ligament reconstruction using the CA ligament. The CA ligament was passed into the medullary canal and tensioned, using a modified 'docking' technique. Average follow-up was 29 months (range 12–57. Results Postoperative ASES and pain significantly improved in all patients (p = 0.001. Radiographically, 16 (94% maintained reduction, and only 1 (6% had a recurrent dislocation when he returned to karate 3 months postoperatively. His ultimate clinical outcome was excellent. Conclusion The docking procedure allows for tensioning of the transferred CA ligament and healing of the ligament in an intramedullary bone tunnel. Excellent clinical results were achieved, decreasing the risk of recurrent distal clavicle instability.

  18. UMAPRM: Uniformly sampling the medial axis

    KAUST Repository

    Yeh, Hsin-Yi Cindy

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Maintaining clearance, or distance from obstacles, is a vital component of successful motion planning algorithms. Maintaining high clearance often creates safer paths for robots. Contemporary sampling-based planning algorithms That utilize The medial axis, or The set of all points equidistant To Two or more obstacles, produce higher clearance paths. However, They are biased heavily Toward certain portions of The medial axis, sometimes ignoring parts critical To planning, e.g., specific Types of narrow passages. We introduce Uniform Medial Axis Probabilistic RoadMap (UMAPRM), a novel planning variant That generates samples uniformly on The medial axis of The free portion of Cspace. We Theoretically analyze The distribution generated by UMAPRM and show its uniformity. Our results show That UMAPRM\\'s distribution of samples along The medial axis is not only uniform but also preferable To other medial axis samplers in certain planning problems. We demonstrate That UMAPRM has negligible computational overhead over other sampling Techniques and can solve problems The others could not, e.g., a bug Trap. Finally, we demonstrate UMAPRM successfully generates higher clearance paths in The examples.

  19. A real-time computational model for estimating kinematics of ankle ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Zhang, Yanxin; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2016-01-01

    An accurate assessment of ankle ligament kinematics is crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms and can help to improve the treatment of an injured ankle, especially when used in conjunction with robot-assisted therapy. A number of computational models have been developed and validated for assessing the kinematics of ankle ligaments. However, few of them can do real-time assessment to allow for an input into robotic rehabilitation programs. An ankle computational model was proposed and validated to quantify the kinematics of ankle ligaments as the foot moves in real-time. This model consists of three bone segments with three rotational degrees of freedom (DOFs) and 12 ankle ligaments. This model uses inputs for three position variables that can be measured from sensors in many ankle robotic devices that detect postures within the foot-ankle environment and outputs the kinematics of ankle ligaments. Validation of this model in terms of ligament length and strain was conducted by comparing it with published data on cadaver anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging. The model based on ligament lengths and strains is in concurrence with those from the published studies but is sensitive to ligament attachment positions. This ankle computational model has the potential to be used in robot-assisted therapy for real-time assessment of ligament kinematics. The results provide information regarding the quantification of kinematics associated with ankle ligaments related to the disability level and can be used for optimizing the robotic training trajectory.

  20. O'Donoghue's triad: magnetic resonance imaging evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staron, R.B.; Haramati, N.; Feldman, F.; Kiernan, H.A.; Pfaff, H.C.; Rubin, S.J.; Zwass, A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to search for magnetic resonance imaging evidence of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in knees with proven tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial meniscus; the three abnormalities that make up O'Donoghue's triad. Although the MCL injury can be unapparent clinically, knee joint stability may be compromised. The superficial portion of the MCL was evaluated on 19 MR studies of 16 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL and medial meniscal tears. MCL thicknesses were compared to those on MR images of 19 normal knees. The injured knees were of 13 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 19 to 56 years; the normal knees were of 10 men and 9 women, ranging in age from 19 to 55 years. The medial collateral ligaments of all injured knees were abnormal, and, as a group, they had greater thicknesses and more intraligamentous thickness variability than normal knees. The MR appearance of both ACL and medial meniscal tears served as indirect evidence of MCL injury, with irregular MCL thickening indicative of prior injury. (orig.)

  1. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  2. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize ... players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to different .... Road Success 2010;8:70. 5.

  3. Medial structure generation for registration of anatomical structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vera, Sergio; Gil, Debora; Kjer, Hans Martin

    2017-01-01

    structures. Methods for generation of medial structures, however, are prone to the generation of medial artifacts (spurious branches) that traditionally need to be pruned before the medial structure can be used for further computations. The act of pruning can affect main sections of the medial surface......Medial structures (skeletons and medial manifolds) have shown capacity to describe shape in a compact way. In the field of medical imaging, they have been employed to enrich the description of organ anatomy, to improve segmentation, or to describe the organ position in relation to surrounding...

  4. Return to National Basketball Association Competition Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Fibular Collateral Ligament Injuries: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; O'Brien, Luke; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Cinque, Mark E; Chahla, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Numerous outcome studies regarding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction demonstrate the ability of athletes to return to a high level of play. However, to our knowledge, there is limited literature regarding return to play following injury to both the ACL and the fibular collateral ligament (FCL). We describe the case of a National Basketball Association (NBA) player who sustained a combined ACL and FCL knee injury and subsequently underwent surgical reconstruction of both affected ligaments. He was able to return to a preinjury level of competition at 9 months postoperatively. It is possible for athletes to return to competitive basketball and maintain a high production level following a single-staged reconstruction of both the ACL and the FCL.

  5. A-B Hourglass Technique in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuhamella, Tamer M.; Batterjee, Khaled A.

    2006-01-01

    Within a period of 2 years starting from April 2000 to November 2002, fifty (50) cases of torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated and followed up using our simple modified technique in a retrospective non-randomized study conducted in Saudi-German Hospital, Saudi Arabia. All of which had torn ACL either isolated or associated with meniscal tear. Some of our study group was subjected arthroscopic interference in the same knee before either in the form of ACL reconstruction using P-T-B graft or for menisectomy. During this study per-operative evaluation, intra-operative technique and post-operative follow-up were standardized, with maximum follow-up period of 19 months and minimum follow-up period of 9 month. The final outcome was graded according to Lyshom knee score (1982). The mean age at surgery was 26.5 (from 17 to 36 years). The study group included 11 isolated torn ACL, 29 torn ACL with tear in the medial meniscus, 4 torn ACL with lateral meniscus tear and 6 cases with torn ACL associated with tear in both menisci. All of the cases were treated using the same technique. (author)

  6. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance ima...

  7. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impact activities like swimming, bike riding, or protected running. Talk to your doctor about what you can do. Some of these activities might even work as rehab therapy. Coping With an MCL Injury Being told that you can't do the ...

  8. [Ligament-controlled positioning of the knee prosthesis components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, K-H; Zich, A

    2015-04-01

    There are at least two predominant goals in total knee replacement: first, the surgeon aims to achieve an optimal postoperative kinematic motion close to the patient's physiological range, and second, he aims for concurrent high ligament stability to establish pain-free movement for the entire range of motion. A number of prosthetic designs and surgical techniques have been developed in recent years to achieve both of these targets. This study presents another modified surgical procedure for total knee implantation. As in common practice the osteotomies are planned preoperatively, referencing well-defined bony landmarks, but their placement and orientation are also controlled intraoperatively in a stepwise sequence via ligamentous linkages. This method is open to all surgical approaches and can be applied for PCL-conserving or -sacrificing techniques. The anterior femoral osteotomy is carried out first, followed by the distal femoral osteotomy. Then, the extension gap is finalized by tensioning the ligaments and "top-down" referencing at the level of the tibial osteotomy, followed by finishing the flexion gap in the same way, except that the osteotomy of the posterior condyles is referenced in a "bottom-up" fashion. Hence, this technique relies on both bony and ligament-controlled procedures. Thus, it respects the modified ligamentous framework and drives the prosthetic components into the new ligamentous envelope. Further improvement may be achieved by additional control of the kinematics during surgery by applying modern computer navigation technology.

  9. Biomechanical properties of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament under stress Propriedades biomecânicas da banda anterior do ligamento glenoumeral inferior submetido a estresse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Atualpa Pinheiro Júnior

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at studying the behavior of the band of inferior glenohumeral ligament subjected to uniaxial traction. Twenty ligaments were distributed in two groups: Group I ( ligaments with bony origin and insertion and Group II ( medial portion of the ligament. Uniaxial traction was applied to all tendons utilizing a traction machine develop in the Department of Physics of UFC. Hooke's Law was used for evaluation of ligament behavior during elastic phase and the Exponential stress-strain Law, for rigidity phase. All ligaments had the same behavior, presenting a phase of elasticity , followed by one of rigidity. After evaluation of the elastic phase , applying Hooke's Law, ligaments constants were 10.507 N/mm ( group I and 13.80 N/mm ( group II, suffering a straining of 2.83% and 2.84%,respectively, until the ligament became rigid. During rigidity phase, the constants were 511.56% N/mm (group I and 156.84% N/mm (group II. It is concluded that the ligament submitted to traction suffers a small elongation until becoming rigid along with an important increase in force constants during rigidity phase.Com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento da banda anterior do ligamento glenoumeral inferior quando submetido a tração uniaxial, estudaram-se 20 ligamentos glenoumerais, especificamente sua banda anterior, divididos em dois grupos: Grupo I, ligamento com origem e inserção óssea e Grupo II, parte média do ligamento. Realizou-se tração uniaxial em máquina desenvolvida no Departamento de Física da Universidade Federal do Ceará, sendo utilizada a Lei de Hooke para avaliação do comportamento do ligamento na fase elástica e a Lei Exponencial stress-strain, para fase de rigidez . Todos os ligamentos tiveram o mesmo comportamento, tendo apresentado uma fase de elasticidade, seguida de uma de rigidez. Após avaliação da fase elástica, utilizando a Lei de Hooke, os ligamentos apresentaram as constantes de 10,507 N/mm para o grupo I e de

  10. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  11. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  12. Artificial ligamentous joints:Methods, materials and characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Hockings, Nick; Iravani, Pejman; Bowen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for making ligamentous articulations for robots. Ligamentous joints are widely found in animals, but they have been of limited appli- cation in robotics due to lack of analogous synthetic materials. The method presented combines 3D printing, tow laying and thermoplastic welding which enables manufacturing of this type of structure.

  13. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  14. A Systematic Review of Clinical Functional Outcomes After Medial Stabilized Versus Non-Medial Stabilized Total Knee Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Young

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Medial stabilized total knee joint replacement (TKJR construct is designed to closely replicate the kinematics of the knee. Little is known regarding comparison of clinical functional outcomes of patients utilising validated patient reported outcome measures (PROM after medial stabilized TKJR and other construct designs.PurposeTo perform a systematic review of the available literature related to the assessment of clinical functional outcomes following a TKJR employing a medial stabilized construct design.MethodsThe review was performed with a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA algorithm. The literature search was performed using variouscombinations of keywords. The statistical analysis was completed using Review Manager (RevMan, Version 5.3.ResultsIn the nineteen unique studies identified, there were 2,448 medial stabilized TKJRs implanted in 2,195 participants, there were 1,777 TKJRs with non-medial stabilized design constructs implanted in 1,734 subjects. The final mean Knee Society Score (KSS value in the medial stabilized group was 89.92 compared to 90.76 in the non-medial stabilized group, with the final KSS mean value difference between the two groups was statistically significant and favored the non-medial stabilized group (SMD 0.21; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.41; p = 004. The mean difference in the final WOMAC values between the two groups was also statistically significant and favored the medial stabilized group (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.47 to −0.07; p = 0.009. Moderate to high values (I2 of heterogeneity were observed during the statistical comparison of these functional outcomes.ConclusionBased on the small number of studies with appropriate statistical analysis, we are unable to reach a clear conclusion in the clinical performance of medial stabilized knee replacement construct.Level of EvidenceLevel II

  15. Subfailure injury of the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Yoldas, E; Oxland, T R; Crisco, J J

    1996-03-01

    Ligamentous injuries range in severity from a simple sprain to a complete rupture. Although sprains occur more frequently than complete failures, only a few studies have investigated the phenomena of these subfailure injuries. The purpose of our study was to document the changes in the load-deformation curve until the failure point, after the ligament has been subjected to an 80% subfailure stretch. Thirteen paired fresh rabbit bone-anterior cruciate ligament-bone preparations were used. One of the pairs (control) was stretched until failure; the other (experimental) was first stretched to 80% of the failure deformation of the control and then stretched to failure. Comparisons were made between the load-deformation curves of the experimental and control specimens. The nonlinear load-deformation curves were characterized by eight parameters: failure load (Ffail), failure deformation (Dfail), energy until failure (Efail), deformations measured at 5, 10, 25, and 50% of the failure load (D5, D10, D25, and D50, respectively), and stiffness measured at 50% of the failure force (K50). There were no significant differences in the values for Ffail, Dfail, and Efail between the experimental and control ligaments (p > 0.33). In contrast, the deformation values were all larger for the experimental than the control ligaments (p > 0.01). The deformations D5, D10, D25, and D50 (mean +/- SD) for the control were 0.36 +/- 0.13, 0.49 +/- 0.23, 0.81 +/- 0.35, and 1.23 +/- 0.41 mm. The corresponding deformations for the experimental ligaments were, respectively, 209, 186, 153, and 130% of the control values. K50 was also greater for the experimental ligament (125.0 +/- 41.7 N/mm compared with 108.7 +/- 31.4 N/mm, p < 0.03). These findings indicate that even though the strength of the ligament did not change due to a subfailure injury, the shape of the load-displacement curve, especially at low loads, was significantly altered. Under the dynamic in vivo loading conditions of daily

  16. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue

  17. Calcified Plaque of Coronary Artery: Factors Influencing Overestimation of Coronary Artery Stenosis on Coronary CT Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mok Hee; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Choi, Song; Seon, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Ko, Joon Seok

    2010-01-01

    To assess the influence of calcified plaque characteristics on the overestimation of coronary arterial stenosis on a coronary CT angiography (CCTA). The study included 271 coronary arteries with calcified plaques identified by CCTA, and based on 928 coronary arteries from 232 patients who underwent both CCTA and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Individual coronary arteries were classified into two groups by agreement based on the degree of stenosis from each CCTA and ICA: 1) group A includes patients with concordant CCTA and ICA results and, 2) group B includes patients with an overestimation of CCTA compared to ICA. Parameters including total calcium score, calcium score of an individual coronary artery, calcium burden number of an individual coronary artery, and the density of each calcified plaque (calcium score / number of calcium burden) for each individual coronary artery were compared between the two groups. Of the 271 coronary arteries, 164 (60.5%) were overestimated on CCTA. The left anterior descending artery (LAD) had a significantly low rate of overestimation (47.1%) compared to the other coronary arteries (p=0.001). No significant differences for total calcium score, calcium score of individual coronary artery, and the density of each calcified plaque from individual coronary arteries between two groups was observed. However, a decreasing tendency for the rate of overestimation on CCTA was observed with an increase in calcium burden of individual coronary arteries (p<0.05). The evaluation of coronary arteries suggests that the degree of coronary arterial stenosis had a tendency to be overestimated by calcified plaques on CCTA. However, the rate of overestimation for the degree of coronary arterial stenosis by calcified plaques was not significantly influenced by total calcium score, calcium score of individual coronary artery, and density of each calcified plaque

  18. An osteogenesis/angiogenesis-stimulation artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Jinyan; Jiang, Jia; Lv, Fang; Chang, Jiang; Chen, Shiyi; Wu, Chengtie

    2017-05-01

    To solve the poor healing of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament in bone tunnel, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial ligaments were successfully prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It was hypothesized that Cu-BG coated PET (Cu-BG/PET) grafts could enhance the in vitro osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) and in vivo graft-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a goat model. Scanning electron microscope and EDS mapping analysis revealed that the prepared nanocoatings had uniform element distribution (Cu, Ca, Si and P) and nanostructure. The surface hydrophilicity of PET grafts was significantly improved after depositing Cu-BG nanocoatings. The in vitro study displayed that the Cu-BG/PET grafts supported the attachment and proliferation of rBMSCs, and significantly promoted the expression of HIF-1α gene, which up-regulated the osteogenesis-related genes (S100A10, BMP2, OCN) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGF) in comparison with PET or BG coated PET (BG/PET) grafts which do not contain Cu element. Meanwhile, Cu-BG/PET grafts promoted the bone regeneration at the graft-host bone interface and decreased graft-bone interface width, thus enhancing the bonding strength as well as angiogenesis (as indicated by CD31 expression) in the goat model as compared with BG/PET and pure PET grafts. The study demonstrates that the Cu-containing biomaterials significantly promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in the repair of bone defects of large animals and thus offering a promising method for ACL reconstruction by using Cu-containing nanobioglass modified PET grafts. It remains a significant challenge to develop an artificial graft with distinct osteogenetic/angiogenetic activity to enhance graft-bone healing for ligament reconstruction. To solve these problems, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial

  19. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Staelens, Barbara; Scheerlinck, Thierry [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Brussels (Belgium); Overstraeten, Luc van [Hand and Foot Surgery Unit (HFSU), Tournai (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies. (orig.)

  20. Telomere length of anterior crucial ligament after rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsot, Elodie; Langberg, Henning; Krogsgaard, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    The regeneration of ligaments following injury is a slow process compared to the healing of many other tissues and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the proliferative potential of ligaments by assessing telomere length within three distinct parts...... of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) obtained during ACL reconstruction: the macroscopically injured proximal part and macroscopically noninjured mid- and distal portions in eight subjects (age 28 ± 8 years). The mean telomere length in ACL was within normal range of values usually reported for other...... tissues indicating that the endogenous machinery responsible for the proliferative potential of ligament is not implicated in its poor healing capacity. The three ACL parts showed similar mean TRF lengths (distal part: 11.5 ± 0.8 kbp, mid-portion: 11.8 ± 1.2 kbp, proximal part: 11.9 ± 1.6 kbp...

  1. A Review on Biomechanics of Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Materials for Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marieswaran, M.; Jain, Ishita; Garg, Bhavuk; Sharma, Vijay

    2018-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the six ligaments in the human knee joint that provides stability during articulations. It is relatively prone to acute and chronic injuries as compared to other ligaments. Repair and self-healing of an injured anterior cruciate ligament are time-consuming processes. For personnel resuming an active sports life, surgical repair or replacement is essential. Untreated anterior cruciate ligament tear results frequently in osteoarthritis. Therefore, understanding of the biomechanics of injury and properties of the native ligament is crucial. An abridged summary of the prominent literature with a focus on key topics on kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint and various loads acting on the anterior cruciate ligament as a function of flexion angle is presented here with an emphasis on the gaps. Briefly, we also review mechanical characterization composition and anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as graft materials used for replacement/reconstruction surgeries. The key conclusions of this review are as follows: (a) the highest shear forces on the anterior cruciate ligament occur during hyperextension/low flexion angles of the knee joint; (b) the characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament at variable strain rates is critical to model a viscoelastic behavior; however, studies on human anterior cruciate ligament on variable strain rates are yet to be reported; (c) a significant disparity on maximum stress/strain pattern of the anterior cruciate ligament was observed in the earlier works; (d) nearly all synthetic grafts have been recalled from the market; and (e) bridge-enhanced repair developed by Murray is a promising technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, currently in clinical trials. It is important to note that full extension of the knee is not feasible in the case of most animals and hence the loading pattern of human ACL is different from animal models. Many of the published reviews on

  2. Knee ligament injuries associated with long bone fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaseb M.H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial and femoral fractures, commonly seen in emergency departments, may be associated with various knee ligament injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of such fracture-associated knee ligament problems, with especial attention to rapid diagnosis. Methods: This study was carried out in patients with femoral or tibial fractures who were operated on in Imam Khomeini Medical Center from March 2003 to March 2005. All patients underwent surgical repair immediately after acute fracture, followed by a thorough knee examination. Patients with positive clinical findings were further evaluated using the stress view and arthroscopy. Results: We enrolled 470 cases in this study, of which 266 were tibial and 204 were femoral fractures. There were 404 men and 67 women, with an average age of tibial fracture patients was 34.5 and 44.6 years for those with femoral fractures. Of all fractures, 66% were due to car accidents, 16% to industrial accidents and 8% due to falling. The overall prevalence of ligament injuries in tibial fractures was as follows: 6.58% ACL tearing, 2.5% PCL, 21.95% MCL and 14.63% LCL. The overall prevalence of ligament injuries in femoral fractures was as follows: 6% ACL tearing, 3% PCL, 14% MCL and 8% LCL. Conclusion: The prevalence of ligament injuries of the knee was highest in distal femoral and tibial plateau fractures. It is prudent to perform a thorough knee examination once the fracture is stabilized in the operating room for the early detection of ligament injuries and prevention of further complications.

  3. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential, severe damage warrants surgical intervention including complete replacement. Ligaments are longitudinally arranged, complex tissues; the mechanical properties of ligaments are a direct result of their components and the arrangement of these components in the tissue. It is these mechanics that have made ...

  4. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue engineering.

  5. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  6. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans. PMID:24128114

  7. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine: imaging findings and clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Mochida, J.; Toh, E. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan); Saito, Ikuo; Matui, Sizuka [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odawara Hospital, Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, Sakawa, Odawara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Ligamentous calcification of the cervical spine has been reported in the yellow ligament, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments and interspinous ligament. Calcification in the upper cervical spine is rare, although some cases with calcification of the transverse ligament of the atlas have been reported. Two patients with calcification of the alar ligament with an unusual clinical presentation and course are described. Examination by tomography and computed tomography (CT) showed calcification of the alar ligament and the transverse ligament of the atlas. CT documented decreased calcification as symptoms resolved. There may be a role for CT in the search for calcifications in the upper cervical spine in patients presenting with neck pain and pharyngodynia if radiographs are normal. (orig.)

  8. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine: imaging findings and clinical course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Mochida, J.; Toh, E.; Saito, Ikuo; Matui, Sizuka

    2001-01-01

    Ligamentous calcification of the cervical spine has been reported in the yellow ligament, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments and interspinous ligament. Calcification in the upper cervical spine is rare, although some cases with calcification of the transverse ligament of the atlas have been reported. Two patients with calcification of the alar ligament with an unusual clinical presentation and course are described. Examination by tomography and computed tomography (CT) showed calcification of the alar ligament and the transverse ligament of the atlas. CT documented decreased calcification as symptoms resolved. There may be a role for CT in the search for calcifications in the upper cervical spine in patients presenting with neck pain and pharyngodynia if radiographs are normal. (orig.)

  9. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  10. Anterolateral Ligament (ALL — Myth or Reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Mihai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the anterolateral ligament (ALL was described a long time ago, recent research shows a lot of interest regarding this structure. There is a high variability concerning its anatomy, especially its capsular/extracapsular situation and insertion sites. There is also some controversy about its ligamentous structure. It seems that it has a biomechanical role in restricting anterior tibial translation and internal rotation. The ALL complex seems to have a clinical significance, and a relationship with the pivot shift has been described. Although there are promising results recently, the surgical techniques of ALL reconstruction, in addition to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, have to be further investigated. A precise indication algorithm and patient selection criteria need to be established.

  11. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron; Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki; Padron, Mario; Mota, Javier; Beltran, Luis; Sundaram, Murali

    2003-01-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  12. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 Tenth Avenue, NY 11219, Brooklyn (United States); Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Padron, Mario [Department of Radiology, Clinica CEMTRO, Madrid (Spain); Mota, Javier [Department of Radiology, Instituto Clinica Corachan, Barcelona (Spain); Beltran, Luis [New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2003-08-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  13. Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcia K; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Mitchell, Karen J; Levin, Yael

    2009-12-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity associated with self-reflection in depressed [current major depressive episode (MDE)] and healthy control participants, focusing on medial cortex areas previously shown to be associated with self-reflection. Both the MDE and healthy control groups showed greater activity in anterior medial cortex (medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus) when cued to think about hopes and aspirations compared with duties and obligations, and greater activity in posterior medial cortex (precuneus, posterior cingulate) when cued to think about duties and obligations (Experiment 1). However, the MDE group showed less activity than controls in the same area of medial frontal cortex when self-referential cues were more ambiguous with respect to valence (Experiment 2), and less deactivation in a non-self-referential condition in both experiments. Furthermore, individual differences in rumination were positively correlated with activity in both anterior and posterior medial cortex during non-self-referential conditions. These results provide converging evidence for a dissociation of anterior and posterior medial cortex depending on the focus of self-relevant thought. They also provide neural evidence consistent with behavioral findings that depression is associated with disruption of positively valenced thoughts in response to ambiguous cues, and difficulty disengaging from self-reflection when it is appropriate to do so.

  14. Occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury: imaging by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, A.I.; Neeman, Z.; Floman, Y.; Gomori, J.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1996-01-01

    The true incidence of fracture of the occipital condyles is unknown. It may be associated with instability at the craniocervical joint. CT is the modality of choice for the demonstration of these fractures, but its use for imaging of the associated ligament injury has not been reported. In order to demonstrate normal anatomy, occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury, and to estimate the incidence of this lesion, 21 children and young adults with high-energy blunt craniocervical injury were examined prospectively. Thin-slice, axial, contiguous, CT was performed from the base of C2 to above the foramen magnum. Bone and soft tissue windows and coronal, sagittal, and curvilinear 2D reconstructions were performed. Five occipital condyle fractures were identified in four patients (19 %), with demonstration of alar ligament injury in two cases and local hematoma in one. In four, artifacts or rotation precluded assessment of ligaments. In all remaining cases normal bone and ligament anatomy was demonstrated. Fracture of the occipital condyles following craniocervical injury is not uncommon in children and young adults. Normal bone and ligament anatomy and pathology can be safely and clearly demonstrated in seriously injured patients and others using this CT technique. Increased awareness of this entity and a low threshold for performing CT should avoid the potentially serious consequences of a missed diagnosis. (orig.). With 8 figs., 2 tabs

  15. The minimum coronary artery diameter in which coronary spasm can be identified by synchrotron radiation coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Shonosuke; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Imazuru, Tomohiro; Tokunaga, Chiho; Sato, Fujio; Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Sakakibara, Yuzuru

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coronary vasospasm is defined as a temporary, intense narrowing of the coronary conduit artery. It brings about ischemic chest pain and becomes one of the causes of myocardial infarction. Coronary spasms are divided into two categories. One is the coronary spasm of the conduit artery and the other is the coronary microvascular spasm. Although coronary spasms are diagnosed with the images of coronary angiography, microvascular spasms cannot be diagnosed because of the limitations of conventional angiographic systems. However, synchrotron radiation coronary angiography (SRCA) can identify coronary arteries down to 100 μm in diameter in the beating heart and 50 μm in arrested heart. Aim: The purpose of this study was to confirm whether microvascular spasms could be identified or not using SRCA, and then down that size identification was possible. Methods: The Langendorff perfusion system with isolated rat hearts was employed. Krebs-Henseleit solution (KH solution) was used as a perfusate. 10 mM of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP: a voltage-gated potassium channel blocker; spasm inducer) was added to the KH solution and maintained for 5 min. SRCA was performed at pre-, during and 10 min after cessation of the KH solution with 4-AP. Coronary spasms were defined as a temporal 75% reduction of coronary arterial diameter. Results and conclusion: Multiple sizes of coronary arteries showed coronary spasms. The minimum stenosed coronary artery size was 100 μm. Since coronary microvascular spasms are seen in the arterioles (50-400 μm), coronary microvascular spasms may be diagnosed with the use of synchrotron radiation coronary angiography

  16. Marker of cemento-periodontal ligament junction associated with periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohko; Wato, Masahiro; Tanaka, Akio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors promoting formation of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction. Regeneration of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction is an important factor in recovery of the connective tissue attachment to the cementum and it is important to identify all specific substances that promote its formation. To clarify the substances involved in cemento-periodontal ligament junction formation, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to human cemento-periodontal ligament junction (designated as the anti-TAP mAb) and examined its immunostaining properties and reactive antigen. Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibody against human cemento-periodontal ligament junction antigens were established by fusing P3U1 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with homogenized human cemento-periodontal ligament junction. The mAb, the anti-TAP mAb for cemento-periodontal ligament junction, was then isolated. The immunoglobulin class and light chain of the mAb were examined using an isotyping kit. Before immunostaining, antigen determination using an enzymatic method or heating was conducted. Human teeth, hard tissue-forming lesions, and animal tissues were immunostained by the anti-TAP mAb. The anti-TAP mAb was positive in human cemento-periodontal ligament junction and predentin but negative in all other human and animal tissues examined. In the cemento-osseous lesions, the anti-TAP mAb was positive in the peripheral area of the cementum and cementum-like hard tissues and not in the bone and bone-like tissues. The anti-TAP mAb showed IgM (kappa) and recognized phosphoprotein. The anti-TAP mAb is potentially useful for developing new agents promoting cementogenesis and periodontal regeneration.

  17. Ultrasonographic assessment of the proximal digital annular ligament in the equine forelimb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.; Boroffka, S.; Stolk, P.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonography was used with 6 normal cadaver forelimbs of Dutch Warmblood horses to delineate the ultrasonographic anatomy of the palmar pastern region, with emphasis on the proximal digital annular ligament. Using a 5.5 MHz sector scanner, the thin proximal digital annular ligament was not visible on offset sonograms. Only if the digital sheath in the normal limb was distended was the distal border of this ligament outlined. In all normal limbs the palmarodistal thickness of the combined skin-proximal digital annular ligament layer in the mid-pastern region was 2 mm. The flexor tendons and distal sesamoidean ligaments were easily identified as hyperechoic structures. Distension of the digital sheath in the normal limbs clearly outlined the anechoic digital sheath pouches. In 4 lame horses ultrasonography aided the diagnosis of functional proximal digital annular ligament constriction. In all 4 diseased forelimbs ultrasonography demonstrated thickening of the skin-proximal digital annular ligament layer and distension of the digital sheath. In one of these limbs the distended digital sheath was also thickened. The flexor tendons and distal sesamoidean ligaments were normal. There was no radiographic evidence of additional bone or joint lesions

  18. Ultrasonographic assessment of the proximal digital annular ligament in the equine forelimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, K J; Boroffka, S; Stolk, P

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonography was used with 6 normal cadaver forelimbs of Dutch Warmblood horses to delineate the ultrasonographic anatomy of the palmar pastern region, with emphasis on the proximal digital annular ligament. Using a 5.5 MHz sector scanner, the thin proximal digital annular ligament was not visible on offset sonograms. Only if the digital sheath in the normal limb was distended was the distal border of this ligament outlined. In all normal limbs the palmarodistal thickness of the combined skin-proximal digital annular ligament layer in the mid-pastern region was 2 mm. The flexor tendons and distal sesamoidean ligaments were easily identified as hyperechoic structures. Distension of the digital sheath in the normal limbs clearly outlined the anechoic digital sheath pouches. In 4 lame horses ultrasonography aided the diagnosis of functional proximal digital annular ligament constriction. In all 4 diseased forelimbs ultrasonography demonstrated thickening of the skin-proximal digital annular ligament layer and distension of the digital sheath. In one of these limbs the distended digital sheath was also thickened. The flexor tendons and distal sesamoidean ligaments were normal. There was no radiographic evidence of additional bone or joint lesions.

  19. Postural stability in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    6 Abstract Title: Postural stability in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objectives: The aim of this thesis was to find out if the postural stability is differed in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury and in the control group after the "4 steps - one leg stance" test had been performed. Methods: This study compared a group with anterior cruciate ligament injury and a control group on the basis of the "4 steps - one leg stance" test. Methods of comparison and analys...

  20. Craniocervical junction in dogs revisited--new ligaments and confirmed presence of enthesis fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynska, M; Wieladek, A; Janczyk, P

    2012-06-01

    The study was performed to investigate and to describe features of gross and microscopic morphology of craniocervical junction (CCJ) in dogs. Seventy mature dogs (38 females, 32 males) of different body weight, representing small, medium and large breeds of dolicho-, mesati-, and brachycephalic morphotype were dissected. Morphological details were localised using an operating microscope with integrated video channel. Occurrence and distribution of fibrocartilage in the ligaments from 10 dogs was analysed histologically. Three new pairs of ligaments were described and named: dorsal ligaments of atlas, cranial internal collateral ligaments of atlas, and caudal internal collateral ligaments of atlas. Several new findings in the course of the known ligaments were found relating to breed and body weight. For the first time enthesis fibrocartilage was identified in ligaments of CCJ in dogs. Sesamoidal fibrocartilage was identified in the transversal ligament of atlas in large dogs. The findings are discussed for clinical importance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament ... other during the application of strain, leading to viscous dissipation of stress at low ... low strains without straining the collagen molecules and plastically ..... anterior cruciate ligament: current and future concepts. New York:.

  2. Ligament-bone interaction in a three-dimensional model of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, H.W.J.

    1991-01-01

    In mathematical knee-joint models, the ligaments are usually represented by straight-line elements, connecting the insertions of the femur and tibia. Such a model may not be valid if a ligament is bent in its course over bony surfaces, particularly not if the resulting redirection of the ligament

  3. Ligament-bone interaction in a three-dimensional model of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, R.

    1991-01-01

    In mathematical knee-joint models, the ligaments are usually represented by straight-line elements, connecting the insertions of the femur and tibia. Such a model may not be valid if a ligament is bent in its course over bony-surfaces, particularly not if the resulting redirection of the ligament

  4. A Review on Biomechanics of Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Materials for Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marieswaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the six ligaments in the human knee joint that provides stability during articulations. It is relatively prone to acute and chronic injuries as compared to other ligaments. Repair and self-healing of an injured anterior cruciate ligament are time-consuming processes. For personnel resuming an active sports life, surgical repair or replacement is essential. Untreated anterior cruciate ligament tear results frequently in osteoarthritis. Therefore, understanding of the biomechanics of injury and properties of the native ligament is crucial. An abridged summary of the prominent literature with a focus on key topics on kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint and various loads acting on the anterior cruciate ligament as a function of flexion angle is presented here with an emphasis on the gaps. Briefly, we also review mechanical characterization composition and anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as graft materials used for replacement/reconstruction surgeries. The key conclusions of this review are as follows: (a the highest shear forces on the anterior cruciate ligament occur during hyperextension/low flexion angles of the knee joint; (b the characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament at variable strain rates is critical to model a viscoelastic behavior; however, studies on human anterior cruciate ligament on variable strain rates are yet to be reported; (c a significant disparity on maximum stress/strain pattern of the anterior cruciate ligament was observed in the earlier works; (d nearly all synthetic grafts have been recalled from the market; and (e bridge-enhanced repair developed by Murray is a promising technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, currently in clinical trials. It is important to note that full extension of the knee is not feasible in the case of most animals and hence the loading pattern of human ACL is different from animal models. Many of the

  5. Mechanisms of Action of an Intraarticular 2.5% Polyacrylamide Hydrogel (Arthramid Vet) in a Goat Model of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tnibar, Aziz; Persson, Ann Britt; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2017-01-01

    A 2.5% Polyacrylamide Hydrogel (PAAG)a was tested for treatment of Osteoarthritis (OA) in a goat model (transection of medial collateral ligament, bisection of medial meniscus and partial-thickness cartilage incisions of medial tibial plateau) with highly encouraging results. The objective...

  6. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Lee Kwen, Peterkin

    2015-10-08

    Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of midbrain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy.

  7. The concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan in canine articular cartilage, meniscus, and anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments: a new molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage in the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Mort, John S; McDevitt, Cahir A

    2005-01-01

    The concentration, spatial distribution, and gene expression of aggrecan in meniscus, articular cartilage, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL) was determined in the knee joints of five mature dogs. An anti-serum against peptide sequences specific to the G1 domain of aggrecan was employed in competitive-inhibition ELISA of guanidine HCl extracts and immunofluorescence microscopy. Gene expression was determined by Taqman real-time PCR. The concentration of aggrecan in articular cartilage (240.1 +/- 32 nMol/g dry weight) was higher than that in meniscus (medial meniscus: 33.4 +/- 4.3 nMol/g) and ligaments (ACL: 6.8 +/- 0.9 nMol/g). Aggrecan was more concentrated in the inner than the outer zone of the meniscus. Aggrecan in meniscus showed an organized, spatial network, in contrast to its diffuse distribution in articular cartilage. Thus, differences in the concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan constitute another molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage of the knee.

  8. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  9. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M.; Runkel, M.; Berger, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.)

  10. MR imaging of normal extrinsic wrist ligaments using thin slices with clinical and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, M., E-mail: maryam.shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Maeseneer, M., E-mail: michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Pouders, C. [Department of Experimental Anatomy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium); Van Overstraeten, L. [Department of Foot and Hand Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Regional de Wallonie Picarde, Tournai (Belgium); Ceuterick, P. [Department of Hand Surgery, Europa Ziekenhuizen, Brussels (Belgium); Fierens, Y. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Goubau, J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Mey, J. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-02-15

    Eighty-nine MR examinations of the wrist were retrospectively analyzed. MRI results were compared with clinical findings and/or arthroscopy. Thin proton density and T2 weighted sequences and 3D DESS weighted sequences were applied on a 1.5 T scanner. On the palmar side three radiocarpal ligaments are recognized including the radioscaphocapitate, radiolunotriquetral, radioscapholunate, and midcarpal triquetroscaphoidal ligaments. Ulnocarpal ligaments include the ulnolunate ligament and the ulnotriquetral ligament. On the dorsal side three ligaments are recognized: the dorsal radiolunotriquetral, and the midcarpal triquetroscaphoidal and triquetro-trapezoido-trapezial. The collateral ligaments include the radial and ulnar collateral ligament. MR is a valuable technique in the assessment of the extrinsic and midcarpal ligaments. Depiction of the extrinsic ligaments can best be accomplished with coronal 3D DESS sequences and sagittal and transverse proton density and T2 weighted sequences with thin slices.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Piyush; Horriat, Saman; Anand, Bobby S

    2018-06-15

    This article provides a detailed narrative review on the history and current concepts surrounding ligamentous repair techniques in athletic patients. In particular, we will focus on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as a case study in ligament injury and ligamentous repair techniques. PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases for papers relating to primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were searched by all participating authors. All relevant historical papers were included for analysis. Additional searches of the same databases were made for papers relating to biological enhancement of ligament healing. The poor capacity of the ACL to heal is one of the main reasons why the current gold standard surgical treatment for an ACL injury in an athletic patient is ACL reconstruction with autograft from either the hamstrings or patella tendon. It is hypothesised that by preserving and repairing native tissues and negating the need for autograft that primary ACL repair may represent a key step change in the treatment of ACL injuries. The history of primary ACL repair will be discussed and the circumstances that led to the near-abandonment of primary ACL repair techniques will be reviewed. There has been a recent resurgence in interest with regards to primary ACL repair. Improvements in imaging now allow for identification of tear location, with femoral-sided injuries, being more suitable for repair. We will discuss in details strategies for improving the mechanical and biological environment in order to allow primary healing to occur. In particular, we will explain mechanical supplementation such as Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation and Dynamic Intraligamentary Stabilisation techniques. These are novel techniques that aim to protect the primary repair by providing a stabilising construct that connects the femur and the tibia, thus bridging the repair. In addition, biological supplementation is being investigated as an adjunct and we will

  12. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  13. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the Talar Cartilage in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability with Lateral Ligament Injury Using Biochemical T2* Mapping: Correlation with Clinical Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiwen; Tao, Hongyue; Qiao, Yang; Ma, Kui; Hua, Yinghui; Yan, Xu; Chen, Shuang

    2018-06-19

    This study aims to quantitatively compare T2* measurements of the talar cartilage between chronic lateral ankle instability (LAI) patients with lateral ligament injury and healthy volunteers, and to assess the association of T2* value with American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Nineteen consecutive patients with chronic LAI (LAI group) and 19 healthy individuals (control group) were enrolled. Biochemical magnetic resonance examination of the ankle was performed in all participants using three-dimensional gradient-echo T2* mapping. Total talar cartilage was divided into six subcompartments, including medial anterior (MA), central medial, medial posterior, lateral anterior, central lateral (LC), and lateral posterior regions. T2* values of respective cartilage areas were measured and compared between the two groups using Student t test. AOFAS scoring was performed for clinical evaluation. Then, the association of T2* value with AOFAS score was evaluated by Pearson correlation. The T2* values of total talar cartilage, as well as MA and LC cartilage compartments, in the chronic LAI group were significantly higher than control values (P T2* value of MA in the chronic LAI group was negatively correlated with AOFAS score (r =-0.8089, P T2* measurements. The clinical score correlates highly with T2* value of the MA cartilage compartment, indicating that MA may be the principal cartilage area conferring clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative MRI T2 relaxation time evaluation of knee cartilage: comparison of meniscus-intact and -injured knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    Associated meniscal injury is well recognized at anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and it is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of articular cartilage after different meniscal treatment in ACL-reconstructed knees using T2 relaxation time evaluation on MRI. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 62 consecutive patients who under ACL reconstruction were recruited in this study, including 23 patients undergoing partial meniscectomy (MS group), 21 patients undergoing meniscal repair (MR group), and 18 patients with intact menisci (MI group) at time of surgery. Clinical evaluation, including subjective functional scores and physical examination, was performed on the same day as the MRI examination and at follow-up times ranging from 2 to 4.2 years. The MRI multiecho sagittal images were segmented to determine the T2 relaxation time value of each meniscus and articular cartilage plate. Differences in each measurement were compared among groups. No patient had joint-line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test or instability. There were also no statistically significant differences in functional scores or medial or lateral meniscus T2 values among the 3 groups (P > .05 for both). There was a significantly higher articular cartilage T2 value in the medial femorotibial articular cartilage for the MS group (P T2 value between the MS and MR groups (P > .05) in each articular cartilage plate. The medial tibial articular cartilage T2 value had a significant positive correlation with medial meniscus T2 value (r = 0.287; P = .024) CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that knees with meniscectomy or meniscal repair had articular cartilage degeneration at 2 to 4 years postoperatively, with higher articular cartilage T2 relaxation time values compared with the knees with an intact meniscus. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  17. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  18. Estrogen inhibits lysyl oxidase and decreases mechanical function in engineered ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cassandra A; Lee-Barthel, Ann; Marquino, Louise; Sandoval, Natalie; Marcotte, George R; Baar, Keith

    2015-05-15

    Women are more likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture than men, and the incidence of ACL rupture in women rises with increasing estrogen levels. We used an engineered ligament model to determine how an acute rise in estrogen decreases the mechanical properties of ligaments. Using fibroblasts isolated from human ACLs from male or female donors, we engineered ligaments and determined that ligaments made from female ACL cells had more collagen and were equal in strength to those made from male ACL cells. We then treated engineered ligaments for 14 days with low (5 pg/ml), medium (50 pg/ml), or high (500 pg/ml) estrogen, corresponding to the range of in vivo serum estrogen concentrations and found that collagen within the grafts increased without a commensurate increase in mechanical strength. Mimicking the menstrual cycle, with 12 days of low estrogen followed by 2 days of physiologically high estrogen, resulted in a decrease in engineered ligament mechanical function with no change in the amount of collagen in the graft. The decrease in mechanical stiffness corresponded with a 61.7 and 76.9% decrease in the activity of collagen cross-linker lysyl oxidase with 24 and 48 h of high estrogen, respectively. Similarly, grafts treated with the lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) for 24 h showed a significant decrease in ligament mechanical strength [control (CON) = 1.58 ± 0.06 N; BAPN = 1.06 ± 0.13 N] and stiffness (CON = 7.7 ± 0.46 MPa; BAPN = 6.1 ± 0.71 MPa) without changing overall collagen levels (CON = 396 ± 11.5 μg; BAPN = 382 ± 11.6 μg). Together, these data suggest that the rise in estrogen during the follicular phase decreases lysyl oxidase activity in our engineered ligament model and if this occurs in vivo may decrease the stiffness of ligaments and contribute to the elevated rate of ACL rupture in women. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. STUDY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tummala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament is the weaker of the two cruciate ligaments stabilizing the knee joint, and therefore gets torn easier than the posterior cruciate ligament. OBJECTIVE To determine pattern of anterior cruciate ligament injury and its management in a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out for two years, 28 patients with ACL injury were included. A detailed history regarding the pattern of injury was noted and ACL reconstruction was done using BT Bautograft with mini-arthrotomy and arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The mean age of the study subjects was 30.6±7.3 years & majority were males. Majority of the ACL injury was sports related & was on the right knee. 64% underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction & majority of them had normal range of motion of the knee. CONCLUSION Our present study concludes that most common age group involved was 20-30 years & ACL injury was more common among males. Patients with an early ACL reconstruction were more satisfied with the end result. Also, ACL reconstruction techniques using BTB auto graft leads to good ligamentous stability and function of the knee.

  20. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Schnyder, P.; Meuli, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Favarger, N. [Clinique Longeraie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  1. Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary-artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); A. Colombo (Antonio); D.R. Holmes Jr (David); M.J. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); E.J. Bass (Eric); N. van Dyck (Nic); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) involving drug-eluting stents is increasingly used to treat complex coronary artery disease, although coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been the treatment of choice historically. Our trial compared PCI and CABG for treating

  2. Strengthening exercises for old cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, Y; Lysholm, J; Lysholm, M; Gillquist, J

    1986-04-01

    Fifty-three consecutive patients with troublesome old cruciate ligament lesions underwent a 3-month thigh and calf muscle training program. Before training, the diagnosis was established by arthroscopy and clinical examination under anesthesia. Significant improvement in strength, performance, knee score, and activity level took place; the majority were improved and declined surgery. A period of strength training is recommended before the decision to undertake surgery for cruciate ligament injury.

  3. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  4. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy breaking new frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjeev; Gopinath, M

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopy has changed the perspective of rhinologist towards the nose. It has revolutionised the surgical management of sinonasal disorders. Sinus surgeries were the first to get the benefit of endoscope. Gradually the domain of endoscopic surgery extended to the management of sino nasal tumours. Traditionally medial maxillectomy was performed through lateral rhinotomy or mid facial degloving approach. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy has been advocated by a number of authors in the management of benign sino-nasal tumours. We present our experience of endoscopic medial maxillectomy in the management of sinonasal pathologies.

  5. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  6. Effects of mechanical strain on human mesenchymal stem cells and ligament fibroblasts in a textured poly(L-lactide) scaffold for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Schlenker, Heiter; Brenner, Rolf E; Fiedler, Jörg; Friemert, Benedikt; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the effect of cyclic uniaxial intermittent strain on the mRNA expression of ligament-specific marker genes in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and anterior cruciate ligament-derived fibroblasts (ACL-fibroblasts) seeded onto a novel textured poly(L-lactide) scaffold (PLA scaffold). Cell-seeded scaffolds were mechanically stimulated by cyclic uniaxial stretching. The expression of ligament matrix gene markers: collagen types I and III, fibronectin, tenascin C and decorin, as well as the proteolytic enzymes matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 and MMP-2 and their tissue specific inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 was investigated by analysing the mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and related to the static control. In ACL-fibroblasts seeded on PLA, mechanical load induced up-regulation of collagen types I and III, fibronectin and tenascin C. No effect of mechanical stimulation on the expression of ligament marker genes was found in undifferentiated MSC seeded on PLA. The results indicated that the new textured PLA scaffold could transfer the mechanical load to the ACL-fibroblasts and improved their ligament phenotype. This scaffold might be suitable as a cell-carrying component of ACL prostheses.

  7. Role of periodontal ligament fibroblasts in osteoclastogenesis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokos, D.; Everts, V.; de Vries, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade it has become clear that periodontal ligament fibroblasts may contribute to the in vitro differentiation of osteoclasts. We surveyed the current findings regarding their osteoclastogenesis potential. Periodontal ligament fibroblasts have the capacity to select and attract

  8. Reversed double PCL sign: unusual location of a meniscal fragment of the knee observed by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    A 36-year-old woman with tears of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus received a meniscectomy. The MR images obtained prior to the partial meniscectomy showed a bucket-handle meniscal tear with centrally displaced fragment lying anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), representing a ''double PCL sign''; however, after the meniscectomy, MR images demonstrated a fragment in the space posterior to the PCL where no structure is generally recognized except for the ligament of wrisberg. This article reports a ''reversed'' double PCL sign, caused by inadequate surgical clearance of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. (orig.)

  9. CT coronary angiography vs. invasive coronary angiography in CHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Hagen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Various diagnostic tests including conventional invasive coronary angiography and non-invasive computed tomography (CT coronary angiography are used in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD. Research questions: The present report aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy, diagnostic accuracy, prognostic value cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal implications of CT coronary angiography versus invasive coronary angiography in the diagnosis of CHD. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic data bases (MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. in October 2010 and was completed with a manual search. The literature search was restricted to articles published from 2006 in German or English. Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of the relevant publications. The medical evaluation was based on systematic reviews of diagnostic studies with invasive coronary angiography as the reference standard and on diagnostic studies with intracoronary pressure measurement as the reference standard. Study results were combined in a meta-analysis with 95 % confidence intervals (CI. Additionally, data on radiation doses from current non-systematic reviews were taken into account. A health economic evaluation was performed by modelling from the social perspective with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economic assumptions derived from contemporary German sources. Data on special indications (bypass or in-stent-restenosis were not included in the evaluation. Only data obtained using CT scanners with at least 64 slices were considered. Results: No studies were found regarding the clinical efficacy or prognostic value of CT coronary angiography versus conventional invasive coronary angiography in the diagnosis of CHD. Overall, 15 systematic reviews with data from 44 diagnostic studies using invasive coronary angiography as the reference standard (identification of obstructive

  10. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Facet Joints and Interspinous Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-01-01

    A descriptive in vitro study on isolation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments. To isolate cells from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments and investigate their surface marker profile and differentiation potentials. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament are progressive conditions characterized by the hypertrophy and ossification of ligaments and joints within the spinal canal. MSCs are believed to play a role in the advancement of these diseases and the existence of MSCs has been demonstrated within the ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these cells could also be found within facet joints and interspinous ligaments. Samples were harvested from 10 patients undergoing spinal surgery. The MSCs from facet joints and interspinous ligaments were isolated using direct tissue explant technique. Cell surface antigen profilings were performed via flow cytometry. Their lineage differentiation potentials were analyzed. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs have the tri-lineage potential to be differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells under appropriate inductions. Flow cytometry analysis revealed both cell lines expressed MSCs markers. Both facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs expressed marker genes for osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments may provide alternative sources of MSCs for tissue engineering applications. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs are part of the microenvironment of the human ligaments of the spinal column and might play a crucial role in the development and progression of degenerative spine conditions.

  12. The role of mechanical loading in ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhardt, Hugh A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2009-12-01

    Tissue-engineered ligaments have received growing interest as a promising alternative for ligament reconstruction when traditional transplants are unavailable or fail. Mechanical stimulation was recently identified as a critical component in engineering load-bearing tissues. It is well established that living tissue responds to altered loads through endogenous changes in cellular behavior, tissue organization, and bulk mechanical properties. Without the appropriate biomechanical cues, new tissue formation lacks the necessary collagenous organization and alignment for sufficient load-bearing capacity. Therefore, tissue engineers utilize mechanical conditioning to guide tissue remodeling and improve the performance of ligament grafts. This review provides a comparative analysis of the response of ligament and tendon fibroblasts to mechanical loading in current bioreactor studies. The differential effect of mechanical stimulation on cellular processes such as protease production, matrix protein synthesis, and cell proliferation is examined in the context of tissue engineering design.

  13. The Gore-Tex prosthetic ligament as a salvage procedure in deficient knees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolker, W.; Patt, T. W.; van Dijk, C. N.; Vegter, M.; Marti, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of prosthetic ligament replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with the Gore-Tex polytetrafluorethyene prosthesis (W.L. Gore and Co., Flagstaff, Ariz. ) in 52 patients (54 knees). All patients

  14. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  15. Integral diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis by coronary multidetector computed tomography and by invasive coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Llerena Rojas, Lorenzo D; Mendoza Rodriguez, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Coronary angiography by multidetector computed tomography (CMDCT) visualizes the wall and lumen of coronary arteries. Invasive coronary angiography (INVCA) only visualizes the arterial lumen but with better resolution

  16. Biomechanical analysis of ankle ligamentous sprain injury cases from televised basketball games: Understanding when, how and why ligament failure occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakis, Emmanouil; Mok, Kam-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Bull, Anthony M J

    2017-12-01

    Ankle sprains due to landing on an opponent's foot are common in basketball. There is no analysis to date that provides a quantification of this injury mechanism. The aim of this study was to quantify the kinematics of this specific injury mechanism and relate this to lateral ankle ligament biomechanics. Case series. The model-based image-matching technique was used to quantify calcaneo-fibular-talar kinematics during four ankle inversion sprain injury incidents in televised NBA basketball games. The four incidents follow the same injury pattern in which the players of interest step onto an opponent's foot with significant inversion and a diagnosed ankle injury. A geometric analysis was performed to calculate the in vivo ligament strains and strain rates for the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). Despite the controlled selection of cases, the results show that there are two distinct injury mechanisms: sudden inversion and internal rotation with low levels of plantarflexion; and a similar mechanism without internal rotation. The first of these mechanisms results in high ATFL and CFL strains, whereas the second of these strains the CFL in isolation. The injury mechanism combined with measures of the ligament injury in terms of percentage of strain to failure correlate directly with the severity of the injury quantified by return-to-sport. The opportunity to control excessive internal rotation through proprioceptive training and/or prophylactic footwear or bracing could be utilised to reduce the severity of common ankle injuries in basketball. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CT anatomy of right phrenic nerve and pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkmen, Y.M.; Kazam, E.; Auh, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the right phrenic nerve and the right pulmonary ligament was studied in eight cadavers and 100 computed tomographic (CT) examinations. The pulmonary ligament originates below the inferior pulmonary vein and is constantly posterior to the inferior vena cava. The lower end of the right phrenic nerve, on the other hand, descends over the lateral surface of the inferior vena cava, accompanied by the right cardiophrenic artery. The nerve spreads over the diaphragm within a thick parietal pleural fold, wrapped in a fatty tissue, and this should not be confused with pulmonary ligament on CT

  18. [Case-control study on two suturing methods for the repairing of complete rupture of the deltoid ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wan, Chun-you; Ma, Bao-tong; Xu, Wei-guo; Mei, Xiao-long; Jia, Peng; Liu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    To compare clinical outcomes between two suturing methods using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone and suturing anchors for the treatment of complete rupture of the deltoid ligament. From January 2009 to January 2013, 58 hospitalized patients with ankle fracture combined with complete rupture of the deltoid ligament were treated with suturing using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone or suturing anchors. There were 29 patients who received suturing treatments using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone (Group A), including 18 males and 11 females, with an average age of (39.76 +/- 11.81) years old. According to the Lauge-Hansen classification, 12 patients had supination external rotation (SER) injuries with IV degree, 5 patients had pronation external rotation (PER) injuries with III degree, 10 patients had PER injuries with IV degrss, and 2 patients had pronation abduction injuries with III degree. There were 29 patients who received treatments with suturing using anchors (Group B), including 14 males and 15 females, with an average age of (41.79 +/- 13.28) years old. According to the Lauge-Hansen classification,9 patients had SER injuries with IV degree, 6 patients had PER injuries with III degree,13 patients had PER injuries with IV degree, and 1 patient had pronation abduction injuries with III degree. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, as well as reconstruction of deltoid ligaments to restore the stability of the medial ankle structures. The clinical examination, imaging evaluation, American society for ankle surgery (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the clinical results after operation, and the results of the two groups were compared and analyzed statistically. The follow-up duration of the 58 patients ranged from 23 to 40 months,with an average of 27.3 months. All the patients had fracture union, and the mean healing time was 12

  19. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has great potential in promoting early stage of ligament-bone healing after ACL reconstruction.

  20. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  1. Coracoid Process Avulsion Fracture at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Attachment Site in an Osteoporotic Patient with Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Onada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP, and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and complained of pain in her shoulder. Radiographs revealed an ACJ dislocation with a distal clavicle fracture. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT reconstruction showed a small bone fragment at the medial apex of the CP. She was treated conservatively and achieved a satisfactory outcome. CP avulsion fractures at the CCL attachment can occur in osteoporotic patients with ACJ dislocations. Three-dimensional computed tomography is useful for identifying this fracture type. CP avulsion fractures should be suspected in patients with ACJ dislocations and risk factors for osteoporosis or osteopenia.

  2. Keratinocyte growth factor mRNA expression in periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, S; Wandall, H H; Grøn, B

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF mRNA is expres......Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF m......RNA is expressed in periodontal ligament fibroblasts, and that the expression is increased upon serum stimulation. Fibroblasts from human periodontal ligament, from buccal mucosa, from gingiva, and from skin were established from explants. Alkaline phosphatase activity was used as an indicator of the periodontal...

  3. Visualization of Penile Suspensory Ligamentous System Based on Visible Human Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianzhuo; Wu, Yi; Tao, Ling; Yan, Yan; Pang, Jun; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Shirong

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to use a three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology to illustrate and describe the anatomical features of the penile suspensory ligamentous system based on the Visible Human data sets and to explore the suspensory mechanism of the penis for the further improvement of the penis-lengthening surgery. Material/Methods Cross-sectional images retrieved from the first Chinese Visible Human (CVH-1), third Chinese Visible Human (CVH-3), and Visible Human Male (VHM) data sets were used to segment the suspensory ligamentous system and its adjacent structures. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of this system were studied and compared with those from the Visible Human data sets. The 3D models reconstructed from the Visible Human data sets were used to provide morphological features of the penile suspensory ligamentous system and its related structures. Results The fundiform ligament was a superficial, loose, fibro-fatty tissue which originated from Scarpa’s fascia superiorly and continued to the scrotal septum inferiorly. The suspensory ligament and arcuate pubic ligament were dense fibrous connective tissues which started from the pubic symphysis and terminated by attaching to the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa. Furthermore, the arcuate pubic ligament attached to the inferior rami of the pubis laterally. Conclusions The 3D model based on Visible Human data sets can be used to clarify the anatomical features of the suspensory ligamentous system, thereby contributing to the improvement of penis-lengthening surgery. PMID:28530218

  4. Biomechanical properties of interosseous proximal carpal row ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Fotios; Apergis, Emmanuel; Kefalas, Vassilios; Zoubos, Aristides; Soucacos, Panayiotis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2011-05-01

    The Scapholunate (S-L) and Lunotriquetrum (L-Tr) ligaments have been extensively studied in the literature. A wide range of measurements has been reported for ultimate load and stiffness with different mechanical protocols. In this study, we examined the mechanical properties of both ligaments harvested from the same wrist. Fifteen fresh cadaver wrists were used to harvest eight S-L and four L-Tr. Testing was performed in quasi-static loading in a well defined direction for each ligament system. The ultimate load for S-L was 68-210 N with a mean value of 147 ± 54 N and a stiffness of 35.7 ± 9.6 N/mm. For L-Tr the ultimate load was 122-179 N with a mean value of 150 ± 24 N and a stiffness of 192 ± 60 N/mm. The two ligaments had nearly the same ultimate load, but the L-Tr had a higher stiffness (p = 0.05). These findings could be useful to assess the appropriate autologous autografts for reconstruction of the S-L and L-Tr. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  5. Anatomy and histology of the transverse humeral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brian J; Narvy, Steven J; Omid, Reza; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The classic literature describes the transverse humeral ligament (THL) as a distinct anatomic structure with a role in biceps tendon stability; however, recent literature suggests that it is not a distinct anatomic structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gross and microscopic anatomy of the THL, including a specific investigation of the histology of this ligament. Thirty frozen, embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to determine the gross anatomy of the THL. Seven specimens were evaluated histologically for the presence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings. Two tissue layers were identified in the area described as the THL. In the deep layer, fibers of the subscapularis tendon were found to span the bicipital groove with contributions from the coracohumeral ligament and the supraspinatus tendon. Superficial to this layer was a fibrous fascial covering consisting of distinct bands of tissue. Neurohistology staining revealed the presence of free nerve endings but no mechanoreceptors. This study's findings demonstrate that the THL is a distinct structure continuous with the rotator cuff tendons and the coracohumeral ligament. The finding of free nerve endings in the THL suggests a potential role as a shoulder pain generator. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. The anatomy of the coracohumeral ligament and its relation to the subscapularis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuzo; Nimura, Akimoto; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Hideya; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Saji, Takahiko; Matsuda, Shuichi; Akita, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Only a few reports describe the extension of the coracohumeral ligament to the subscapularis muscle. The purposes of this study were to histo-anatomically examine the structure between the ligament and subscapularis and to discuss the function of the ligament. Nineteen intact embalmed shoulders were used. In 9 shoulders, the expansion of the ligament was anatomically observed, and in 6 of these 9, the muscular tissue of the supraspinatus and subscapularis was removed to carefully examine the attachments to the tendons of these muscles. Five shoulders were frozen and sagittally sectioned into 3-mm-thick slices. After observation, histologic analysis was performed on 3 of these shoulders. In the remaining 5 shoulders, the coracoid process was harvested to investigate the ligament origin. The coracohumeral ligament originated from the horizontal limb and base of the coracoid process and enveloped the cranial part of the subscapularis muscle. The superficial layer of the ligament covered a broad area of the anterior surface of the muscle. Laterally, it protruded between the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis and attached to the tendinous floor, which extended from the subscapularis insertion. Histologically, the ligament consisted of irregular and sparse fibers abundant in type III collagen. The coracohumeral ligament envelops the whole subscapularis muscle and insertion and seems to function as a kind of holder for the subscapularis and supraspinatus muscles. The ligament is composed of irregular and sparse fibers and contains relatively rich type III collagen, which would suggest flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MRI features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneja, Atul K.; Miranda, Frederico C.; Braga, Cesar A.P.; Hartmann, Luiz G.C.; Santos, Durval C.B.; Rosemberg, Laercio A.; Gill, Corey M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate the visibility and describe the anatomical features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the knee were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and assessed for the visibility of the anterolateral ligament under direct cross-referencing of axial and coronal images as complete, partial, or non-visible. Distal insertion site (tibial, meniscal), distance to lateral tibial plateau, measurements (length, width, thickness), and associated imaging findings were also tabulated. Clinical and surgical records were also reviewed. Seventy MRI scans from 60 consecutive subjects were included in the study. Mean age was 40 years, body mass 74.9 kg, and height 1.72 m. The subject population was 53 % male, most of the knees were from the left side (51 %), and chronic pain was the main clinical symptom (40 %). Nine knees (13 %) had undergone previous surgery. The anterolateral ligament was identified in 51 % of the knees: completely visible in 11 % and partially visible in 40 %. In all visible cases, the distal insertion site was identified on the tibia, with a mean distance of 5.7 mm to the plateau. A completely visible ligament had a mean length of 33.2 mm, thickness of 5.6 mm, and width of 1.9 mm. Inter-observer agreement for ligament presence was significant (κ = 0.7). Statistical analyses showed a trend to be more visible in men, with a longer length compared with women. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly identifies the anterolateral ligament of the knee in slightly more than half of cases, being partially visible in most of them. In all cases, a tibial insertion is characterized. (orig.)

  8. MRI features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital do Coracao (HCor), and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, Frederico C.; Braga, Cesar A.P.; Hartmann, Luiz G.C.; Santos, Durval C.B.; Rosemberg, Laercio A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gill, Corey M. [Department of Neurology and Cancer Center, Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-27

    Evaluate the visibility and describe the anatomical features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the knee were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and assessed for the visibility of the anterolateral ligament under direct cross-referencing of axial and coronal images as complete, partial, or non-visible. Distal insertion site (tibial, meniscal), distance to lateral tibial plateau, measurements (length, width, thickness), and associated imaging findings were also tabulated. Clinical and surgical records were also reviewed. Seventy MRI scans from 60 consecutive subjects were included in the study. Mean age was 40 years, body mass 74.9 kg, and height 1.72 m. The subject population was 53 % male, most of the knees were from the left side (51 %), and chronic pain was the main clinical symptom (40 %). Nine knees (13 %) had undergone previous surgery. The anterolateral ligament was identified in 51 % of the knees: completely visible in 11 % and partially visible in 40 %. In all visible cases, the distal insertion site was identified on the tibia, with a mean distance of 5.7 mm to the plateau. A completely visible ligament had a mean length of 33.2 mm, thickness of 5.6 mm, and width of 1.9 mm. Inter-observer agreement for ligament presence was significant (κ = 0.7). Statistical analyses showed a trend to be more visible in men, with a longer length compared with women. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly identifies the anterolateral ligament of the knee in slightly more than half of cases, being partially visible in most of them. In all cases, a tibial insertion is characterized. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional anatomical analysis of ligamentous attachments of the second through fifth carpometacarpal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Horiguchi, Gen; Ito, Hiromoto

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify, measure, and show the anatomic locations and areas of specific ligamentous attachments and paths of the second through fifth carpometacarpal (CMC) joints on a three-dimensional (3-D) surface model. Ten fresh-frozen cadaver wrists were used to dissect and identify the second through fifth CMC ligaments. The ligamentous attachments and whole bone surfaces were digitized three-dimensionally, and their areas were calculated. The attachments of each ligament were represented in a model in which their surfaces, as seen on computed tomography (CT), were overlaid with a digitized 3-D surface, and they were also visually demonstrated with a specific color on 3-D images of the bones. A total of 9 dorsal and 9 volar CMC ligaments and 1 CMC interosseous ligament were identified in the second through fifth CMC joints. An intra-articular ligament between the third and fourth metacarpals (MCs) and the capitate and hamate was also identified. In addition, 5 dorsal and 5 volar intermetacarpal ligaments and 3 intermetacarpal interosseous ligaments were also identified in the second through fifth intermetacarpal joints. A previously undescribed volar intermetacarpal ligament was found located between the third, fourth, and fifth MC bases. The anatomic 3-D attachment sites of the second through fifth CMC ligaments were visually depicted qualitatively, and their areas were quantified. This study has improved the knowledge and understanding of the normal anatomy and its impact on the mechanics of the second through fifth CMC joints. This 3-D information should facilitate the accurate assessment of radiographic images and the treatment of various injuries seen in the second through fifth CMC joints when performing ligament reconstruction, repair, osteochondral grafting, and arthroscopy. (author)

  10. Stress changes of lateral collateral ligament at different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHONG Yan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To create a 3-dimensional finite element model of knee ligaments and to analyse the stress changes of lateral collateral ligament (LCL with or without displaced movements at different knee flexion conditions. Methods: A four-major-ligament contained knee specimen from an adult died of skull injury was prepared for CT scanning with the detectable ligament insertion footprints, locations and orientations precisely marked in advance. The CT scanning images were converted to a 3-dimensional model of the knee with the 3-dimensional reconstruction technique and transformed into finite element model by the software of ANSYS. The model was validated using experimental and numerical results obtained by other scientists. The natural stress changes of LCL at five different knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and under various motions of anterior-posterior tibial translation, tibial varus rotation and internal-external tibial rotation were measured. Results: The maximum stress reached to 87%-113% versus natural stress in varus motion at early 30° of knee flexions. The stress values were smaller than the peak value of natural stress at 0° (knee full extension when knee bending was over 60° of flexion in anterior-posterior tibial translation and internal-external rotation. Conclusion: LCL is vulnerable to varus motion in almost all knee bending positions and susceptible to anterior- posterior tibial translation or internal-external rotation at early 30° of knee flexions. Key words: Knee joint; Collateral ligaments; Finite element analysis

  11. Artificial phrenoesophageal ligament. An experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, A A; Dantas, R O; Campos, A D; Evora, P R B

    2016-01-01

    This report deals with the preparation of a 'true' artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Sonoanatomy and injection technique of the iliolumbar ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The iliolumbar ligament plays an important biomechanic role in anchoring the spine to the pelvic ring and stabilizing the sacroiliac joint. Iliolumbar syndrome is a back pain condition caused by pathology of the iliolumbar ligament. History and physical examination are important in the assessment of back pain, but they lack sufficient specificity. Injection of small volumes of local anesthetic into the structure considered to be the source of the pain (i.e. the iliolumbar ligament) increases the specificity of the diagnostic workup. OBJECTIVE: To describe an ultrasound - guided technique for injecting the iliolumbar ligament. STUDY DESIGN: Case report based on knowledge of topographic anatomy and sonoanatomy. SETTING: Outpatient clinic. METHODS: A patient with a clinical picture suggestive of iliolumbar syndrome was selected. An ultrasound-guided injection of the iliolumbar ligament with local anesthetic was performed. We recorded the patient\\'s subjective assessment of pain and the change in range of movement and pain scores during provocative tests. RESULTS: Following the injection, the patient\\'s pain score decreased, provocation tests became negative, and the range of movement increased. LIMITATIONS: Case report. Target specificity and dispersion of local anesthetic spread not confirmed with an independent technique (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound guidance allows the selective deposition of small volumes of local anesthetic into structures believed to cause soft tissue back pain and thus to confirm or exclude the working diagnosis. Further studies are needed to confirm our conclusions and to prove the clinical feasibility of this technique.

  13. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-10-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  14. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei

    1998-01-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  15. In vivo structural and cellular remodeling of engineered bone-ligament-bone constructs used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida, Shelby E; VanDusen, Keith W; Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Schlientz, Aleesa J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures rank among the most prevalent and costly sports-related injuries. Current tendon grafts used for ACL reconstruction are limited by suboptimal biomechanical properties. We have addressed these issues by engineering multiphasic bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs that develop structural and mechanical properties similar to native ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute remodeling process that occurs as the BLB grafts advance toward the adult ligament phenotype in vivo. Thus, we implanted BLB constructs fabricated from male cells into female host sheep and allowed 3, 7, 14, or 28 days (n = 4 at each time point) for recovery. To address whether or not graft-derived cells were even necessary, a subset of BLB constructs (n = 3) were acellularized, implanted, and allowed 28 days for recovery. At each recovery time point, the following histological analyses were performed: picrosirius red staining to assess collagen alignment and immunohistochemistry to assess both graft development and host immune response. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, performed on every explanted BLB, was used to detect the presence of graft-derived male cells remaining in the constructs and/or migration into surrounding host tissue. The analysis of the PCR and histology samples revealed a rapid migration of host-derived macrophages and neutrophils into the graft at 3 days, followed by increased collagen density and alignment, vascularization, innervation, and near complete repopulation of the graft with host cells within 28 days. This study provides a greater understanding of the processes of ligament regeneration in our BLB constructs as they remodel toward the adult ligament phenotype.

  16. Early Articular Cartilage MRI T2 Changes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Correlate With Later Changes in T2 and Cartilage Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ashley; Winalski, Carl S.; Chu, Constance R.

    2018-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a known risk factor for future development of osteoarthritis (OA). This human clinical study seeks to determine if early changes to cartilage MRI T2 maps between baseline and 6 months following ACL reconstruction (ACLR) are associated with changes to cartilage T2 and cartilage thickness between baseline and 2 years after ACLR. Changes to T2 texture metrics and T2 mean values in medial knee cartilage of 17 human subjects 6 months after ACLR were compared to 2-year changes in T2 and in cartilage thickness of the same areas. T2 texture and mean assessments were also compared to that of 11 uninjured controls. In ACLR subjects, six-month changes in mean T2 correlated to 2-year changes in mean T2 (R = 0.80, p = 0.0001), and 6-month changes to T2 texture metrics, but not T2 mean, correlated with 2-year changes in medial femoral cartilage thickness in 9 of the 20 texture features assessed (R = 0.48–0.72, p ≤ 0.05). Both mean T2 and texture differed (p evaluation of T2 map and textural changes may provide early warning of cartilage at risk for progressive degeneration after ACL injury and reconstruction. PMID:27381512

  17. Vocal fold injection medialization laryngoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Vikash K

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) can cause glottic insufficiency that can result in hoarseness, chronic cough, dysphagia, and/or aspiration. In rare circumstances, UVFP can cause airway obstruction necessitating a tracheostomy. The treatment options for UVFP include observation, speech therapy, vocal fold injection medialization laryngoplasty, thyroplasty, and laryngeal reinnervation. In this chapter, the author will discuss the technique of vocal fold injection for medialization of a UVFP. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Mastication and the Postorbital Ligament: Dynamic Strain in Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Susan W.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Lemme, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although the FEED database focuses on muscle activity patterns, it is equally suitable for other physiological recording and especially for synthesizing different types of information. The present contribution addresses the interaction between muscle activity and ligamentary stretch during mastication. The postorbital ligament is the thickened edge of a septum dividing the orbital contents from the temporal fossa and is continuous with the temporal fascia. As a tensile element, this fascial complex could support the zygomatic arch against the pull of the masseter muscle. An ossified postorbital bar has evolved repeatedly in mammals, enabling resistance to compression and shear in addition to tension. Although such ossification clearly reinforces the skull against muscle pull, the most accepted explanation is that it helps isolate the orbital contents from contractions of the temporalis muscle. However, it has never been demonstrated that the contraction of jaw muscles deforms the unossified ligament. We examined linear deformation of the postorbital ligament in minipigs, Sus scrofa, along with electromyography of the jaw muscles and an assessment of changes in pressure and shape in the temporalis. During chewing, the ligament elongated (average 0.9%, maximum 2.8%) in synchrony with the contraction of the elevator muscles of the jaw. Although the temporalis bulged outward and created substantial pressure against the braincase, the superficial fibers usually retracted caudally, away from the postorbital ligament. In anesthetized animals, stimulating either the temporalis or the masseter muscle in isolation usually elongated the ligament (average 0.4–0.7%). These results confirm that contraction of the masticatory muscles can potentially distort the orbital contents and further suggest that the postorbital ligament does function as a tension member resisting the pull of the masseter on the zygomatic arch. PMID:21593142

  19. Cold experiments on ligament formation for blast furnace slag granulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junxiang; Yu Qingbo; Li Peng; Du Wenya

    2012-01-01

    Rotary cup atomization for molten slag granulation is an attractive alternative to water quenching. However, the mechanism of disintegration of molten slag must be assessed. In the present study, a glycerol/water mixture was substituted for molten slag, and the mechanism of ligament formation in a rotary cup was investigated using photos taken by a high-speed camera. The effects of the angular speed and inner depth of the rotary cup on ligament disintegration was investigated. The results showed that one state of disintegration may transform into another state as the angular speed of the rotary cup increases at a given liquid flow rate. During ligament formation, the number of ligaments increased with an increase in the angular speed of the rotary cup, and a decrease in the diameter of ligament and liquid drop was observed. Moreover, the initial point of disintegration of the ligament moved to the lip of the rotary cup as the angular speed increased. An equation describing the relationship between the diameter of the liquid drop and various factors was used to predict the diameter of the liquid drop. A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm was the best choice for granulation. The results of the present study will be useful for designing devices used in molten slag granulation. - Highlights: ►The results can be used in the granulation of molten blast furnace slag. ► The three different states of disintegration occur as the angular speed of rotary cup increases. ► The mechanism of ligament disintegration is analyzed. ► Eq. can be used to predict the diameter of liquid drop. ► A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm is optimal for granulation.

  20. Study on the nuchal ligament ossification on lateral cephalometric radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chang Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and radiographic characteristics of the nuchal ligament ossification on lateral cephalometric radiographs in Koreans. I review and interpreted the lateral cephalometric radiographs from 4,558 patients (1,857 males and 2,701 females, age range from 2 to 79 years) who visited the Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital from January 1, 2008 to February 3, 2009. I grouped the shapes of nuchal ligament ossification as round, rod-like, and segmented shape. And localized the ossification as the involvement of anterior cervical vertebral body. The data were analyzed by using chi-squared test with two-tailed and at a 5% significance level. Among those who showed the nuchal ligament ossification, the mean age of the 143 males was 51.1 and that of the 97 females was 48.0 years. It was not observed completely below teens, and was observed 1% in twenties, 6.1% in thirties, 18.6% in forties, and 26.3% over fifties. It was significantly prevalent in older age group (P<0.01) and in males than females among the same age group (P<0.05). The shapes of nuchal ligament ossification were as follows in order of frequency : rod-like (49.2%), round (30.4%), and segmented (20.4%). The highest involvement of ossification was found at the level of C5 (67.9%), C4 (29.2%), C6 (22.9%), C3 (3.3%), C7 (2.9%), C2 (0.8%), and C1 (0.4%). The nuchal ligament ossifications on lateral cephalometric radiographs were showed as round, rodlike, or segmented shape. The nuchal ligament ossification is often observed after the age of 40 and is observed more frequently in males than females. The highest shape of nuchal ligament ossification was rod-like shape and the highest involvement of cervical spine was C5.

  1. Distal coronary hemoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muinck, Ebo Derk de

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of passive and active coronary perfusion during coronary angioplasty are investigated. The autoperfusion balloon catheters that were evaluated are the Stack® and the RX-60® catheters (Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, inc., Santa Clara, California, U.S.A). The coronary

  2. Design and characterization of a biodegradable composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, James W S; Surrao, Denver C; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2010-03-15

    Herein we report on the development and characterization of a biodegradable composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering based on the fundamental morphological features of the native ligament. An aligned fibrous component was used to mimic the fibrous collagen network and a hydrogel component to mimic the proteoglycan-water matrix of the ligament. The composite scaffold was constructed from cell-adherent, base-etched, electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-D,L-lactide) (PCLDLLA) fibers embedded in a noncell-adherent photocrosslinked N-methacrylated glycol chitosan (MGC) hydrogel seeded with primary ligament fibroblasts. Base etching improved cellular adhesion to the PCLDLLA material. Cells within the MGC hydrogel remained viable (72 +/- 4%) during the 4-week culture period. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed ligament ECM markers collagen type I, collagen type III, and decorin organizing and accumulating along the PCLDLLA fibers within the composite scaffolds. On the basis of these results, it was determined that the composite scaffold design was a viable alternative to the current approaches used for ligament tissue engineering and merits further study. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Functional regeneration of ligament-bone interface using a triphasic silk-based graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongguo; Fan, Jiabing; Sun, Liguo; Liu, Xincheng; Cheng, Pengzhen; Fan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    The biodegradable silk-based scaffold with unique mechanical property and biocompatibility represents a favorable ligamentous graft for tissue-engineering anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the low efficiency of ligament-bone interface restoration barriers the isotropic silk graft to common ACL therapeutics. To enhance the regeneration of the silk-mediated interface, we developed a specialized stratification approach implementing a sequential modification on isotropic silk to constitute a triphasic silk-based graft in which three regions respectively referring to ligament, cartilage and bone layers of interface were divided, followed by respective biomaterial coating. Furthermore, three types of cells including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and osteoblasts were respectively seeded on the ligament, cartilage and bone region of the triphasic silk graft, and the cell/scaffold complex was rolled up as a multilayered graft mimicking the stratified structure of native ligament-bone interface. In vitro, the trilineage cells loaded on the triphasic silk scaffold revealed a high proliferative capacity as well as enhanced differentiation ability into their corresponding cell lineage. 24 weeks postoperatively after the construct was implanted to repair the ACL defect in rabbit model, the silk-based ligamentous graft exhibited the enhancement of osseointegration detected by a robust pullout force and formation of three-layered structure along with conspicuously corresponding matrix deposition via micro-CT and histological analysis. These findings potentially broaden the application of silk-based ligamentous graft for ACL reconstruction and further large animal study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolated partial tear and partial avulsion of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon presenting as posterior medial knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Ward, Anthony; Harries, William

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of medial head of gastrocnemius tendon tear. The type of injury widely reported in the literature is tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle or ‘tennis leg’. We previously reported an isolated partial tear and longitudinal split of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius at its musculotendinous junction. The case we now present has notable differences; the tear was interstitial and at the proximal (femoral attachment) part of the tendon, the patient’s symptoms...

  5. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application;Ligamentos humanos radioesterilizados y su aplicacion clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G., E-mail: daniel.luna@inin.gob.m [Centro Estatal de Trasplantes del Estado de Mexico, Pablo Sidar No. 602, Col. Universidad, 50130 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The ligaments are human t