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Sample records for mechanism mediates tempol-induced

  1. NO-independent mechanism mediates tempol-induced renal vasodilation in SHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Richelieu, Louise Tilma; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Salomonsson, Max

    2005-01-01

    effect and that it normalizes the increased renovascular ANG II sensitivity. As the effects of L-NAME are not greater in SHR-T rats, it is not likely that the elevated renal resistance and ANG II sensitivity in SHR are due to reactive oxygen species-induced quenching of nitric oxide....... whether the effects of tempol were due to a restored NO system, we used the NOS inhibitor N(w)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Renal blood flow (RBF) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured in vivo by electromagnetic flowmetry and arterial catheterization in 10- to 12-wk-old anesthetized...... used as controls. ANG II (1-4 ng) was administered as a bolus via a renal artery catheter. L-NAME was administered intravenously for 15-20 min. Renal vascular resistance (RVR) was elevated in SHR-C compared with SD-C. In SHR-T, baseline RVR was not different from SD-C and SD-T rats. Tempol had...

  2. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-04

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Lymphocyte-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zusen Fan; Qixiang Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Granule-mediated cytotoxicity is the major mechanism for lymphocytes to kill viruses, intracellular bacteria and tumors. The cytotoxic granules move to the immunological synapse by exocytosis after recognition of a killer cell.The contents of the granules are delivered into target cells with the help of perforin by endocytosis. A group of serine protease granzymes cleave their critical substrates to initiate DNA damage and cell death. The most abundant granzymes are granzyme A and B. They induce cell death through alternate and nonoverlapping pathways. The substrates and functions of the majority of the orphan granzymes have not yet been identified. It is possible that the diversity of granzymes provides fail-safe mechanisms for killing viruses and tumor cells.

  4. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  5. Mechanisms of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, S.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    Some of non-pathogenic rhizosphere bacteria reduce disease by activating a resistance mechanism in the plant called rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). Rhizobacteria-mediated ISR resembles classic pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in that both types of induced

  6. Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Mediating Mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, S.; Hartman, Y.A.W.; Holder, S.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopkins, N.D.

    2017-01-01

    Sedentary behavior has a strong association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, which may be independent of physical activity. To date, the mechanism(s) that mediate this relationship are poorly understood. We hypothesize that sedentary behavior modifies key hemodynamic, inflammatory, and

  7. Mediated attachment as a mechanism for growth of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shekatkar, Snehal M

    2014-01-01

    Connection topologies of many networked systems like human brain, biological cell, world wide web, power grids, human society and ecological food webs markedly deviate from that of completely random networks indicating the presence of organizing principles behind their evolution. The five important features that characterize such networks are scale-free topology, small average path length, high clustering, hierarchical community structure and assortative mixing. Till now the generic mechanisms underlying the existence of these properties are not well understood. Here we show that potentially a single mechanism, which we call "mediated attachment", where two nodes get connected through a mediator or common neighbor, could be responsible for the emergence of all important properties of real networks. The mediated attachment naturally unifies scale-free topology, high clustering, small world nature, hierarchical community structure and dissortative nature of networks. Further, with additional mixing by age, this...

  8. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  9. Novel TeV-scale seesaw mechanism with Dirac mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picek, Ivica, E-mail: picek@phy.h [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O.B. 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Radovcic, Branimir, E-mail: bradov@phy.h [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O.B. 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-04-19

    We propose novel tree level seesaw mechanism with TeV-scale vectorlike Dirac mediators that produce Majorana masses of the known neutrinos. The gauge quantum number assignment to the Dirac mediators allows them to belong to a weak triplet and a five-plet of non-zero hypercharge. The latter leads to new seesaw formula m{sub n}uapproxv{sup 6}/M{sup 5}, so that the empirical masses m{sub n}uapprox10{sup -1} eV can be achieved by MapproxTeV new states. There is a limited range of the parameter space with M<=a few100 GeV where the tree level contribution dominates over the respective loop contributions and the proposed mechanism is testable at the LHC. We discuss specific signatures for Dirac type heavy leptons produced by Drell-Yan fusion at the LHC.

  10. Polymeric mechanical amplifiers of immune cytokine-mediated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Webster, Jamie; Chung, Amanda; Guimarães, Pedro P. G.; Khan, Omar F.; Langer, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Physical forces affect tumour growth, progression and metastasis. Here, we develop polymeric mechanical amplifiers that exploit in vitro and in vivo physical forces to increase immune cytokine-mediated tumour cell apoptosis. Mechanical amplifiers, consisting of biodegradable polymeric particles tethered to the tumour cell surface via polyethylene glycol linkers, increase the apoptotic effect of an immune cytokine on tumour cells under fluid shear exposure by as much as 50% compared with treatment under static conditions. We show that targeted polymeric particles delivered to tumour cells in vivo amplify the apoptotic effect of a subsequent treatment of immune cytokine, reduce circulating tumour cells in blood and overall tumour cell burden by over 90% and reduce solid tumour growth in combination with the antioxidant resveratrol. The work introduces a potentially new application for a broad range of micro- and nanoparticles to maximize receptor-mediated signalling and function in the presence of physical forces.

  11. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  12. Separating monocular and binocular neural mechanisms mediating chromatic contextual interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, Anthony D; Christiansen, Jens H; Shevell, Steven K

    2014-04-17

    When seen in isolation, a light that varies in chromaticity over time is perceived to oscillate in color. Perception of that same time-varying light may be altered by a surrounding light that is also temporally varying in chromaticity. The neural mechanisms that mediate these contextual interactions are the focus of this article. Observers viewed a central test stimulus that varied in chromaticity over time within a larger surround that also varied in chromaticity at the same temporal frequency. Center and surround were presented either to the same eye (monocular condition) or to opposite eyes (dichoptic condition) at the same frequency (3.125, 6.25, or 9.375 Hz). Relative phase between center and surround modulation was varied. In both the monocular and dichoptic conditions, the perceived modulation depth of the central light depended on the relative phase of the surround. A simple model implementing a linear combination of center and surround modulation fit the measurements well. At the lowest temporal frequency (3.125 Hz), the surround's influence was virtually identical for monocular and dichoptic conditions, suggesting that at this frequency, the surround's influence is mediated primarily by a binocular neural mechanism. At higher frequencies, the surround's influence was greater for the monocular condition than for the dichoptic condition, and this difference increased with temporal frequency. Our findings show that two separate neural mechanisms mediate chromatic contextual interactions: one binocular and dominant at lower temporal frequencies and the other monocular and dominant at higher frequencies (6-10 Hz).

  13. Nongenomic mechanisms of physiological estrogen-mediated dopamine efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders that vary depending on female life stages suggest that sex hormones may influence the function of neurotransmitter regulatory machinery such as the dopamine transporter (DAT. Results In this study we tested the rapid nongenomic effects of several physiological estrogens [estradiol (E2, estrone (E1, and estriol (E3] on dopamine efflux via the DAT in a non-transfected, NGF-differentiated, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cell model that expresses membrane estrogen receptors (ERs α, β, and GPR30. We examined kinase, ionic, and physical interaction mechanisms involved in estrogenic regulation of the DAT function. E2-mediated dopamine efflux is DAT-specific and not dependent on extracellular Ca2+-mediated exocytotic release from vesicular monoamine transporter vesicles (VMATs. Using kinase inhibitors we also showed that E2-mediated dopamine efflux is dependent on protein kinase C and MEK activation, but not on PI3K or protein kinase A. In plasma membrane there are ligand-independent associations of ERα and ERβ (but not GPR30 with DAT. Conditions which cause efflux (a 9 min 10-9 M E2 treatment cause trafficking of ERα (stimulatory to the plasma membrane and trafficking of ERβ (inhibitory away from the plasma membrane. In contrast, E1 and E3 can inhibit efflux with a nonmonotonic dose pattern, and cause DAT to leave the plasma membrane. Conclusion Such mechanisms explain how gender biases in some DAT-dependent diseases can occur.

  14. Nongenomic mechanisms of physiological estrogen-mediated dopamine efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyea, Rebecca A; Watson, Cheryl S

    2009-06-16

    Neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders that vary depending on female life stages suggest that sex hormones may influence the function of neurotransmitter regulatory machinery such as the dopamine transporter (DAT). In this study we tested the rapid nongenomic effects of several physiological estrogens [estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and estriol (E3)] on dopamine efflux via the DAT in a non-transfected, NGF-differentiated, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell model that expresses membrane estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha, beta, and GPR30. We examined kinase, ionic, and physical interaction mechanisms involved in estrogenic regulation of the DAT function. E2-mediated dopamine efflux is DAT-specific and not dependent on extracellular Ca2+-mediated exocytotic release from vesicular monoamine transporter vesicles (VMATs). Using kinase inhibitors we also showed that E2-mediated dopamine efflux is dependent on protein kinase C and MEK activation, but not on PI3K or protein kinase A. In plasma membrane there are ligand-independent associations of ERalpha and ERbeta (but not GPR30) with DAT. Conditions which cause efflux (a 9 min 10(-9) M E2 treatment) cause trafficking of ERalpha (stimulatory) to the plasma membrane and trafficking of ERbeta (inhibitory) away from the plasma membrane. In contrast, E1 and E3 can inhibit efflux with a nonmonotonic dose pattern, and cause DAT to leave the plasma membrane. Such mechanisms explain how gender biases in some DAT-dependent diseases can occur.

  15. Immune-mediated mechanism for thrombocytopenia after Loxosceles spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Carina; Bonstein, Lilach; Lauterbach, Roy; Mader, Rivka; Rozemman, Dganit; Koren, Ariel

    2014-08-01

    Loxoscelism, characterized by high fever, vomiting, malaise, a dermonecrotic lesion, and thrombocytopenia, was diagnosed in a 3-year-old female. Clinical laboratory and dermatological signs are described. Blood test showed a transient hypercoagulable state and the presence of IgG antibodies against platelets, suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism for platelet destruction, in addition to the direct toxic effect of the spider venom. The finding of platelet antibodies after a Loxosceles spider bite has not been previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of Treg-mediated T cell suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eSchmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs prevent autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can avert immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells (APCs. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction and on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor (TCR-induced calcium (Ca2+, NFAT and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs.

  17. Receptor- and reactive intermediate-mediated mechanisms of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter G; Lee, Crystal J J; McCallum, Gordon P; Perstin, Julia; Harper, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely alter the development of the fetus at critical periods during pregnancy, resulting in death, or in structural and functional birth defects in the surviving offspring. This process of teratogenesis may not be evident until a decade or more after birth. Postnatal functional abnormalities include deficits in brain function, a variety of metabolic diseases, and cancer. Due to the high degree of fetal cellular division and differentiation, and to differences from the adult in many biochemical pathways, the fetus is highly susceptible to teratogens, typically at low exposure levels that do not harm the mother. Insights into the mechanisms of teratogenesis come primarily from animal models and in vitro systems, and involve either receptor-mediated or reactive intermediate-mediated processes. Receptor-mediated mechanisms involving the reversible binding of xenobiotic substrates to a specific receptor are exemplified herein by the interaction of the environmental chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or "dioxin") with the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which translocates to the nucleus and, in association with other proteins, binds to AH-responsive elements (AHREs) in numerous genes, initiating changes in gene transcription that can perturb development. Alternatively, many xenobiotics are bioactivated by fetal enzymes like the cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) to highly unstable electrophilic or free radical reactive intermediates. Electrophilic reactive intermediates can covalently (irreversibly) bind to and alter the function of essential cellular macromolecules (proteins, DNA), causing developmental anomalies. Free radical reactive intermediates can enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and/or altered signal transduction. The teratogenicity of reactive intermediates is determined to a large extent

  18. A possible mechanism in DHEA-mediated protection against osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Jun; Tang, Lu-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Xin-Die; Ding, Qian-Hai; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its ester form, DHEA-S, are the most abundant steroids in human plasma. Our previous studies showed that DHEA protects against osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this paper was to explore the possible mechanisms that underlie DHEA-mediated protection against OA. We tested the expression of β-catenin, it was increased significantly in OA. Rabbit cartilage was treated with various concentrations of DHEA in both IL-1β-induced rabbit chondrocytes and in rabbit cartilage from the anterior cruciate ligament transaction-induced OA model. We found DHEA decreased the expression of β-catenin. Then we further activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by β-catenin transfection and inactivated it by the inhibitor Dickkopf1 in chondrocytes to reveal its role in the pathogenesis of OA. It turns out the protective effect of DHEA was significantly decreased when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated, while inactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhanced the effects of DHEA. Therefore, we hypothesize that DHEA probably exerted its chondroprotective effect by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DHEA-mediated protection against OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K N

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid-mediated nitration of phenol occurs via unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

  20. [Mechanisms of Epstein-Barr Virus-Mediated Oncogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus(EBV), a ubiquitous human double-stranded DNA virus, is associated with a variety of malignancies including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and gastric carcinoma. Latent EBV infections have been discovered in cases of EBV -associated cancers, suggesting that EBV latent genes contribute to oncogenesis. Here, I describe mechanisms of oncogenesis associated with EBV, focusing on functions of EBV latent membrane protein(LMP)and EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER). LMP2A, which mimics B cell receptor signaling, and LMP1, which mimics CD40 signaling, collaboratively contribute to malignant lymphoma development. It has been reported that LMP2A-mediated intracellular signaling plays significant roles in epithelial carcinogenesis. However, it has also been demonstrated that EBER, which is expected to have a double-stranded RNA(dsRNA)structure, triggers signal transduction via host viral RNA sensors, RIG-I and TLR3, causing EBV-associated pathogenesis, including carcinogenesis.

  1. Continuing to illuminate the mechanisms underlying UV-mediated melanomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Ryan W; Liu-Smith, Feng; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-09-05

    The incidence of melanoma is one of the fastest growing of all tumor types in the United States and the number of cases worldwide has doubled in the past 30 years. Melanoma, which arises from melanocytes, is an extremely aggressive tumor that invades the vascular and lymphatic systems to establish tumors elsewhere in the body. Melanoma is a particularly resilient cancer and systemic therapy approaches have achieved minimal success against metastatic melanoma resulting in only a few FDA-approved treatments with limited benefit. Leading treatments offer minimal efficacy with response rates generally under 15% in the long term with no clear effect on melanoma-related mortality. Even the recent success of the specific BRAF mutant inhibitor vemurafenib has been tempered somewhat since acquired resistance is rapidly observed. Thus, understanding the mechanism(s) of melanoma carcinogenesis is paramount to combating this deadly disease. Not only for the treatment of melanoma but, ultimately, for prevention. In this report, we will summarize our work to date regarding the characterization of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-mediated melanomagenesis and highlight several promising avenues of ongoing research.

  2. Conceptual Conditioning: Mechanisms Mediating Conditioning Effects on Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Wager, Tor D

    2015-11-01

    Classical conditioning can profoundly modify subsequent pain responses, but the mechanisms that drive this effect are unresolved. In pain-conditioning studies, cues are typically conditioned to primary aversive reinforcers; hence, subsequent pain modulation could reflect learned precognitive associations (i.e., those involving neural plasticity independent of expectations and other forms of conceptual thought) or conceptual expectancies. We isolated conceptual contributions using a thermal pain-conditioning procedure in which different conditioned stimulus (CS) cues were repeatedly paired with symbolic representations of high and low noxious heat. In a subsequent test phase, identical noxious stimuli evoked larger skin conductance responses (SCRs) and pain ratings when preceded by CS cues associated with high temperature than by those associated with low temperature. These effects were mediated by participants' self-reported expectancies. CS cues associated with high temperature also evoked larger anticipatory SCRs than did CS cues associated with low temperature, but larger anticipatory SCRs predicted smaller subsequent heat-evoked SCRs. These results provide novel evidence that conditioned modulation of pain physiology can be acquired through purely conceptual processes, and that self-reported expectancies and physiological threat responses have opposing effects on pain.

  3. Statistical mechanics of DNA-mediated colloidal aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Nicholas A; Tkachenko, Alexei V

    2006-10-01

    We present a statistical mechanical model of aggregation in colloidal systems with DNA-mediated interactions. We obtain a general result for the two-particle binding energy in terms of the hybridization free energy DeltaG of DNA and two model-dependent properties: the average number of available DNA bridges and the effective DNA concentration c(eff). We calculate these parameters for a particular DNA bridging scheme. The fraction of all the n-mers, including the infinite aggregate, are shown to be universal functions of a single parameter directly related to the two-particle binding energy. We explicitly take into account the partial ergodicity of the problem resulting from the slow DNA binding-unbinding dynamics, and introduce the concept of angular localization of DNA linkers. In this way, we obtain a direct link between DNA thermodynamics and the global aggregation and melting properties in DNA-colloidal systems. The results of the theory are shown to be in quantitative agreement with two recent experiments with particles of micron and nanometer size.

  4. [Molecular mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus-mediated carcinogeneis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human double stranded DNA virus, is associated with a variety of malignancies including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and gastric carcinoma (GC). These EBV-associated cancers are characterized by the proliferation of monoclonal EBV-infected cells, and viral gene expression in these cells is limited to a subset of latent genes, indicating that EBV latent genes contribute to carcinogenesis. Here I describe the mechanisms of carcinogenesis by EBV, focusing on the function of two EBV latent gens, latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) and EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER). LMP2A, which is known to mimic the B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, has been reported to contribute to malignant lymphoma development through the modulation of immune signals. Also, it has been demonstrated that LMP2A-mediated intracellular signaling plays significant roles in epithelial carcinogenesis. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that EBER, which is expected to form double stranded RNA (dsRNA) structure, triggers a signal transduction from host viral RNA sensors RIG-I and TLR3. Activation of innate immune signals by EBER has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases, including cancers.

  5. Posttransplantation antibody mediated rejection: new insights into mechanism, treatment and protective strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO You-ying; CHEN Jiang-hua

    2011-01-01

    @@ Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is receiving more and more attention, which is mediated by different mechanisms from T cell mediated rejection, thereby requiring other approaches to prevention and treatment. Preexisting alloantibodies and pre-transplant sensitization are important risk factors for development of acute AMR early after renal transplantation.

  6. Mechanisms of conduction block in immune-mediated polyneuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straver, D.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are immune-mediated neuropathies. Despite treatment being available, patients suffer from disabling weakness of arm and leg muscles and fatigue. Pathogenesis of MMN and CIDP is unclear, but the development

  7. Examination of Mechanisms Responsible for Organic Dust-related Diseases: Mediator Release induced by Microorgansims. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend; Clementsen, Paul; Kristensen, K.S.;

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores......Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores...

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  9. Mechanisms of p53-mediated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugenia Morselli; Lorenzo Galluzzi; Guido Kroemer

    2008-01-01

    @@ The p53 protein is mutated or inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, underscoring its cardinal importance as an oncosuppressor, p53 is expressed in all nucleated cells and can be activated by a plethora of post-transcriptional modifications (in particular by the phosphorylation of critical serine residues), as well as by the inhibition of its degradation (mainly mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2).

  10. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzos, Helena F; Tandon, Tarun; Ouyang, Ann

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction. METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cis-dioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L). Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol. RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5 ± 0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2 ± 0.4 g/mm2 (P methocramine (M2) > pirenzepine (M1). CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the residual contractile response after the treatment with nifedipine, suggests that an additional pathway could mediate the

  11. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena F Wrzos; Tarun Tandon; Ann Ouyang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction.METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cisdioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L).Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine),M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol.RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as Well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5±0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2±0.4 g/mm2 (P<0.05). The doseresponse curves were shifted to the right by muscarinic antagonists in the following order of affinity: darifenacin(M3)>methocramine (M2)>pirenzepine (M1).CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the

  12. Mechanisms of ER Stress-Mediated Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    During apoptosis, the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents a point-of-no-return as it commits the cell to death. Here we have assessed the role of caspases, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore on ER stress-induced MOMP and subsequent cell death. Induction of ER stress leads to upregulation of several genes such as Grp78, Edem1, Erp72, Atf4, Wars, Herp, p58ipk, and ERdj4 and leads to caspase activation, release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins and dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from caspase-9, -2 and, -3 knock-out mice were resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis which correlated with decreased processing of pro-caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitors (Boc-D.fmk and DEVD.fmk) attenuated ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. However, only deficiency of caspase-9 and -2 could prevent ER stress-mediated loss of DeltaPsim. Bcl-2 overexpression or pretreatment of cells with the cell permeable BH4 domain (BH4-Tat) or the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors, bongkrekic acid or cyclosporine A, attenuated the ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. These data suggest a role for caspase-9 and -2, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  13. Mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are identified as a class of non-protein regulators and a new source for broad control of gene expression in eukaryotes. The past years have witnessed substantial progress in understanding miRNA functions and mechanisms, although a few controversies remain. Various hypotheses and models have been suggested for the mechanisms of miRNA repression, including translational inhibition at the level of initiation or elongation, rapid degradation of the nascent peptide, mRNA degradation, and mRNA sequestration into P bodies (processing bodies) and SGs (stress granules) for degradation or/and storage. Recently, some noncanonical miRNA regulation, such as miRNA activation and de-repression of miRNA inhibition, have been uncovered. This review discusses some recent advances about how miRNAs regulate their targets and various modes of miRNA function.

  14. Oxidative Stress-Mediated Atherosclerosis: Mechanisms and Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis, the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, is a complex process that involves several mechanisms, including endothelial dysfunction, neovascularization, vascular proliferation, apoptosis, matrix degradation, inflammation, and thrombosis. The pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis are explained differently by different scholars. One of the most common theories is the destruction of well-balanced homeostatic mechanisms, which incurs the oxidative stress. And oxidative stress is widely regarded as the redox status realized when an imbalance exists between antioxidant capability and activity species including reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and halogen species, non-radical as well as free radical species. This occurrence results in cell injury due to direct oxidation of cellular protein, lipid, and DNA or via cell death signaling pathways responsible for accelerating atherogenesis. This paper discusses inflammation, mitochondria, autophagy, apoptosis, and epigenetics as they induce oxidative stress in atherosclerosis, as well as various treatments for antioxidative stress that may prevent atherosclerosis.

  15. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  16. Dermographism (mechanical urticaria) mediated by IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiko, T; Aoki, T

    1984-11-01

    Sera of three patients with symptomatic mechanical urticaria caused an immediate weal and flare reaction when injected intracutaneously into related recipients, and serum of one patient caused the same reaction in his own skin. Pretreatment of test skin sites with Compound 48/80 abolished or greatly reduced the reaction. This weal-producing substance was found in the same fraction as IgM in Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, was stable to heat treatment (56 degrees C, 4 h) and labile to 2-mercaptoethanol treatment. An immunoadsorption study using anti-IgM serum identified this weal-producing substance as IgM.

  17. Intein-mediated purification system: mechanism and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarra setrerrahmane; Shuhua Tan

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of self-cleaving protein elements into a variety of fusion-based purification systems; has been an important development in the area of recombinant protein purification. The self-cleaving capability of these tags has recently been combined with additional purification tags to generate novel and convenient protein purification methods. This review elucidates the properties of intein, the mechanism of the intein-based protein splicing and the progress of intein-based protein purification procedures, and recent advances in the applications of intein.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of CRISPR-mediated microbial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Sinkunas, Tomas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) infect bacteria in order to replicate and burst out of the host, killing the cell, when reproduction is completed. Thus, from a bacterial perspective, phages pose a persistent lethal threat to bacterial populations. Not surprisingly, bacteria evolved multiple defense barriers to interfere with nearly every step of phage life cycles. Phages respond to this selection pressure by counter-evolving their genomes to evade bacterial resistance. The antagonistic interaction between bacteria and rapidly diversifying viruses promotes the evolution and dissemination of bacteriophage-resistance mechanisms in bacteria. Recently, an adaptive microbial immune system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and which provides acquired immunity against viruses and plasmids, has been identified. Unlike the restriction–modification anti-phage barrier that subjects to cleavage any foreign DNA lacking a protective methyl-tag in the target site, the CRISPR–Cas systems are invader-specific, adaptive, and heritable. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of interference/immunity provided by different CRISPR–Cas systems.

  19. Sensory and circuit mechanisms mediating lower urinary tract reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Zachary C; Grill, Warren M

    2016-10-01

    Neural control of continence and micturition is distributed over a network of interconnected reflexes. These reflexes integrate sensory information from the bladder and urethra and are modulated by descending influences to produce different physiological outcomes based on the information arriving from peripheral afferents. Therefore, the mode of activation of primary afferents is essential in understanding the action of spinal reflex pathways in the lower urinary tract. We present an overview of sensory mechanisms in the bladder and urethra focusing on their spinal integration, identify the cardinal spinal reflexes responsible for continence and micturition, and describe how their functional role is controlled via peripheral afferent activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor mediated tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24066765

  1. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review, we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics.

  2. New Insights into Mechanisms of Cardioprotection Mediated by Thyroid Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nicolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure represents the final common outcome in cardiovascular diseases. Despite significant therapeutic advances, morbidity and mortality of heart failure remain unacceptably high. Heart failure is preceded and sustained by a process of structural remodeling of the entire cardiac tissue architecture. Prevention or limitation of cardiac remodeling in the early stages of the process is a crucial step in order to ameliorate patient prognosis. Acquisition of novel pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling is therefore required to develop more efficacious therapeutic strategies. Among all neuroendocrine systems, thyroid hormone seems to play a major homeostatic role in cardiovascular system. In these years, accumulating evidence shows that the “low triiodothyronine” syndrome is a strong prognostic, independent predictor of death in patients affected by both acute and chronic heart disease. In experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, alterations in the thyroid hormone signaling, concerning cardiac mitochondrion, cardiac interstitium, and vasculature, have been suggested to be related to heart dysfunction. The aim of this brief paper is to highlight new developments in understanding the cardioprotective role of thyroid hormone in reverting regulatory networks involved in adverse cardiac remodeling. Furthermore, new recent advances on the role of specific miRNAs in thyroid hormone regulation at mitochondrion and interstitial level are also discussed.

  3. Toxin-mediated gene regulatory mechanism in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Soo Joo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dangerous human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus relies heavily on toxins to cause disease, but toxin production can put a strong burden on the bacteria’s energy balance. Thus, controlling the synthesis of proteins solely needed in times of toxin production represents a way for the bacteria to avoid wasting energy. One hypothetical manner to accomplish this sort of regulation is by gene regulatory functions of the toxins themselves. There have been several reports about gene regulation by toxins in S. aureus, but these were never verified on the molecular level. In our study published in MBio [Joo et al., 7(5. pii: e01579-16], we show that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs, important peptide toxins of S. aureus, release a repressor from the promoter of the operon encoding the toxin export system, thereby enabling toxin secretion. This study describes the first molecular regulatory mechanism exerted by an S. aureus toxin, setting a paradigmatic example of how S. aureus toxins may influence cell functions to adjust them to times of toxin production.

  4. The mechanism of OTUB1-mediated inhibition of ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Reuven; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wang, Tao; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU)

    2013-04-08

    Histones are ubiquitinated in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), promoting recruitment of repair proteins to chromatin. UBC13 (also known as UBE2N) is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) that heterodimerizes with UEV1A (also known as UBE2V1) and synthesizes K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63Ub) chains at DSB sites in concert with the ubiquitin ligase (E3), RNF168 (ref. 3). K63Ub synthesis is regulated in a non-canonical manner by the deubiquitinating enzyme, OTUB1 (OTU domain-containing ubiquitin aldehyde-binding protein 1), which binds preferentially to the UBC13-Ub thiolester. Residues amino-terminal to the OTU domain, which had been implicated in ubiquitin binding, are required for binding to UBC13-Ub and inhibition of K63Ub synthesis. Here we describe structural and biochemical studies elucidating how OTUB1 inhibits UBC13 and other E2 enzymes. We unexpectedly find that OTUB1 binding to UBC13-Ub is allosterically regulated by free ubiquitin, which binds to a second site in OTUB1 and increases its affinity for UBC13-Ub, while at the same time disrupting interactions with UEV1A in a manner that depends on the OTUB1 N terminus. Crystal structures of an OTUB1-UBC13 complex and of OTUB1 bound to ubiquitin aldehyde and a chemical UBC13-Ub conjugate show that binding of free ubiquitin to OTUB1 triggers conformational changes in the OTU domain and formation of a ubiquitin-binding helix in the N terminus, thus promoting binding of the conjugated donor ubiquitin in UBC13-Ub to OTUB1. The donor ubiquitin thus cannot interact with the E2 enzyme, which has been shown to be important for ubiquitin transfer. The N-terminal helix of OTUB1 is positioned to interfere with UEV1A binding to UBC13, as well as with attack on the thiolester by an acceptor ubiquitin, thereby inhibiting K63Ub synthesis. OTUB1 binding also occludes the RING E3 binding site on UBC13, thus providing a further component of inhibition. The general features of the inhibition mechanism explain how OTUB1

  5. Evaluation of the third-party mediation mechanism for medical disputes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min

    2011-09-01

    Medical disputes have been increasing in recent years in China, which cause growing tension between doctors and patients. In many locations, it has started as a practice of exploring diversified dispute settlement methods. Great importance has been attached to the non-lawsuit model through third-party mediation, which might have been led by professional organizations, insurance companies, People's Mediation Committees, or three-level governmental authorities. Those have contributed to a rapid effective resolution of medical disputes. However, there are some deficiencies that need to be addressed and fixed up, thus calling for improvement, such as the lack of a sustainable supporting mechanism, unclear legal status of the mediation institutions and mediation agreements, patching up a quarrel by only compensation.

  6. Another look at safety climate and safety behavior: deepening the cognitive and social mediator mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugas, Carla S; Silva, Sílvia A; Meliá, José L

    2012-03-01

    In this study, safety climate literature and the theory of planned behavior were combined to explore the cognitive and social mechanisms that mediate the relationship between organizational safety climate and compliance and proactive safety behaviors. The sample consisted of 356 workers from a transportation organization. Using a multiple mediation design, the results revealed that proactive and compliance safety behaviors are explained by different patterns of combinations of individual and situational factors related to safety. On the one hand, the relationship between organizational safety climate and proactive safety behaviors was mediated by coworkers' descriptive norms and attitudes toward safety. On the other hand, supervisors' injunctive safety norms and perceived behavioral control were the mediator variables between organizational safety climate and compliance safety behaviors. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. Receptor mechanisms of PAF mediated lymphatic constriction in the canine forelimb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Dobbins

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activating factor (PAF is a potent inflammatory lipid. In this study we assessed the ability of PAF to impact lymphatic vessel function by altering prenodal lymphatic resistance. Intralymphatic PAF (7.47 × 10−6, 7.47 × 10−5 and 7.47 × 10−4 M increased lymphatic perfusion pressure at the two highest infusion rates. PAF mediated lymphatic constriction was not altered by the intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine but was blocked by the intra-arterial infusion of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. These data indicate that in addition to PAF's effects on microvascular permeability, this agent may also impact the ability of the lymphatics to transport fluid through alterations in lymphatic smooth muscle tone. PAF mediated lymphatic constriction is not mediated by α-receptors but rather through PAF receptor mediated mechanism.

  8. Microwave-Mediated Synthesis of Lophine: Developing a Mechanism to Explain a Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, R. David; Howard, Jessica L.; Zile, Jennifer L.; Barker, Kathryn H.

    2006-01-01

    The microwave-mediated preparation of lophine (2,4,5-triphenylimidazole) is described. This experiment allows for an introduction to the emerging technology of microwave-assisted organic synthesis while providing an opportunity for students to employ the principles of carbonyl chemistry in devising a mechanism to explain the formation of the…

  9. The Mediated MIMIC Model for Understanding the Underlying Mechanism of DIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Shao, Can; Lathrop, Quinn N.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its flexibility, the multiple-indicator, multiple-causes (MIMIC) model has become an increasingly popular method for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF). In this article, we propose the mediated MIMIC model method to uncover the underlying mechanism of DIF. This method extends the usual MIMIC model by including one variable…

  10. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  11. p38 mediates mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN affects more than 25% of patients with type 2 diabetes; however, the pathogenesis remains unclear due to lack of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to PDN. In our current study, we use an animal model of type 2 diabetes in order to understand the roles of p38 in PDN. Previously, we have demonstrated that the C57BLK db/db (db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes that carries the loss-of-function leptin receptor mutant, develops mechanical allodynia in the hind paws during the early stage (6-12 wk of age of diabetes. Using this timeline of PDN, we can investigate the signaling mechanisms underlying mechanical allodynia in the db/db mouse. Results We studied the role of p38 in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (LDRG during the development of mechanical allodynia in db/db mice. p38 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblots at the early stage of mechanical allodynia in LDRG of diabetic mice. Phosphorylated p38 (pp38 immunoreactivity was detected mostly in the small- to medium-sized LDRG neurons during the time period of mechanical allodynia. Treatment with an antibody against nerve growth factor (NGF significantly inhibited p38 phosphorylation in LDRG of diabetic mice. In addition, we detected higher levels of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase (COX 2, inducible nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in LDRG neurons of db/db mice compared to non-diabetic db+ mice. Intrathecal delivery of SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia and the upregulation of COX2, iNOS and TNF-α. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NGF activated-p38 phosphorylation mediates mechanical allodynia in the db/db mouse by upregulation of multiple inflammatory mediators in LDRG.

  12. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole A Andreassen

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals, applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG, low density lipoproteins (LDL, high density lipoproteins (HDL] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88, LDL (n = 87 and HDL (n = 52. Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2 and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1. We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  13. Investigation of SNARE-Mediated Membrane Fusion Mechanism Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane fusion is driven by specialized proteins that reduce the free energy penalty for the fusion process. In neurons and secretory cells, soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs) mediate vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during vesicular content release. Although, SNAREs have been widely accepted as the minimal machinery for membrane fusion, the specific mechanism for SNARE-mediated membrane fusion remains an active area of research. Here, we summarize recent findings based on force measurements acquired in a novel experimental system that uses atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy to investigate the mechanism(s) of membrane fusion and the role of SNAREs in facilitating membrane hemifusion during SNARE-mediated fusion. In this system, protein-free and SNARE-reconstituted lipid bilayers are formed on opposite (trans) substrates and the forces required to induce membrane hemifusion and fusion or to unbind single v-/t-SNARE complexes are measured. The obtained results provide evidence for a mechanism by which the pulling force generated by interacting trans-SNAREs provides critical proximity between the membranes and destabilizes the bilayers at fusion sites by broadening the hemifusion energy barrier and consequently making the membranes more prone to fusion. PMID:20228892

  14. Neuraminidase-Mediated, NKp46-Dependent Immune-Evasion Mechanism of Influenza Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Bar-On

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an essential role in the defense against influenza virus, one of the deadliest respiratory viruses known today. The NKp46 receptor, expressed by NK cells, is critical for controlling influenza infections, as influenza-virus-infected cells are eliminated through the recognition of the viral hemagglutinin (HA protein by NKp46. Here, we describe an immune-evasion mechanism of influenza viruses that is mediated by the neuraminidase (NA protein. By using various NA blockers, we show that NA removes sialic acid residues from NKp46 and that this leads to reduced recognition of HA. Furthermore, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the existence of this NA-mediated, NKp46-dependent immune-evasion mechanism and demonstrate that NA inhibitors, which are commonly used for the treatment of influenza infections, are useful not only as blockers of virus budding but also as boosters of NKp46 recognition.

  15. Conservation of miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms across 600 million years of animal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Marta; Kirchner, Marieluise; Aharoni, Reuven; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; van den Bruck, David; Gutkovitch, Nadya; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Selbach, Matthias; Moran, Yehu; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay. Further, similarly to bilaterians, GW182 in Nematostella is recruited to the miRNA repression complex via interaction with Argonaute proteins, and functions downstream to repress mRNA. Thus, our work suggests that this mechanism of miRNA-mediated silencing was already active in the last common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria. PMID:27604873

  16. Vagal stimulation modulates inflammation through a ghrelin mediated mechanism in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, V; Ryu, SY; Lopez, N; Allexan, S; Krzyzaniak, M; Eliceiri, B; Baird, A.; Coimbra, R

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) releases a cascade of inflammatory cytokines. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and ghrelin have known anti-inflammatory effects; furthermore, ghrelin release is stimulated by acetylcholine. We hypothesized VNS decreases post-TBI inflammation through a ghrelin-mediated mechanism. TBI was created in five groups of mice: sham, TBI, TBI/ghrelin, TBI/VNS, and TBI/VNS/ghrelin receptor antagonist (GRa). Serum and tissue ghrelin, and serum TNF-αwere measured. Ghrelin increas...

  17. Cell-mediated BMP-2 liberation promotes bone formation in a mechanically unstable implant environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-05-01

    The flexible alloplastic materials that are used in bone-reconstruction surgery lack the mechanical stability that is necessary for sustained bone formation, even if this process is promoted by the application of an osteogenic agent, such as BMP-2. We hypothesize that if BMP-2 is delivered gradually, in a cell-mediated manner, to the surgical site, then the scaffolding material's lack of mechanical stability becomes a matter of indifference. Flexible discs of Ethisorb were functionalized with BMP-2, which was either adsorbed directly onto the material (rapid release kinetics) or incorporated into a calcium-phosphate coating (slow release kinetics). Unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized samples were implanted subcutaneously in rats and retrieved up to 14 days later for a histomorphometric analysis of bone and cartilage volumes. On day 14, the bone volume associated with titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2 was 10-fold higher than that associated with their mechanically unstabilized counterparts. The bone volume associated with discs bearing a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2 was similar in the mechanically unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized groups, and comparable to that associated with the titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2. Hence, if an osteogenic agent is delivered in a cell-mediated manner (via coating degradation), ossification can be promoted even within a mechanically unstable environment.

  18. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  19. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Brenes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG and inferior colliculus (IC, produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing. These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 μL, a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  20. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenes, J.C. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Broiz, A.C.; Bassi, G.S. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schwarting, R.K.W. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Brandão, M.L. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-09

    Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) and inferior colliculus (IC), produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing). These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by {sub Y}-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs) also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 µL), a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  1. An empirical review of potential mediators and mechanisms of prolonged exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew A; Clifton, Erin G; Feeny, Norah C

    2017-08-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) is an empirically-supported treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the precise mechanism(s) by which PE promotes symptom change are not well established. Understanding how PE works is critical to improving clinical outcomes, advancing dissemination efforts, and enhancing transdiagnostic models of psychopathology. However, mechanisms research conducted in clinical treatment settings is complex, and findings may be difficult to interpret without appropriate context. This is the first review of potential mechanisms of PE to provide such context, by rigorously evaluating empirical findings in line with essential criteria for effective research on mechanisms (or mediators). We begin by describing six putative mechanisms identified by emotional processing theory and contemporary models of fear extinction, before thoroughly reviewing empirical findings from clinical research on PE and similar PTSD treatments. We provide a detailed description of each study and mechanism test, as well as ratings of strength of evidence and quality of evaluation based on a novel rating scheme. We highlight variables with strong evidence (belief change and between-session habituation), intermediate evidence (inhibitory learning and emotional engagement), and minimal support (narrative organization and within-session habituation). After discussing limitations of the extant literature and this review, we summarize specific challenges for research on PE mechanisms and highlight directions for future study based on clinical and research implications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating dynamic structural and mechanical changes of neuroblastoma cells associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Iu, Catherine Y. Y.; Lui, Cathy N. P.; Zou, Yukai; Fung, Carmen K. M.; Li, Hung Wing; Xi, Ning; Yung, Ken K. L.; Lai, King W. C.

    2014-11-01

    Glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration resulting from excessive activation of glutamate receptors is recognized as one of the major causes of various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms in the neurodegenerative process remain unidentified. Here, we investigate the real-time dynamic structural and mechanical changes associated with the neurodegeneration induced by the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (a subtype of glutamate receptors) at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed to measure the three-dimensional (3-D) topography and mechanical properties of live SH-SY5Y cells under stimulus of NMDA receptors. A significant increase in surface roughness and stiffness of the cell is observed after NMDA treatment, which indicates the time-dependent neuronal cell behavior under NMDA-mediated neurodegeneration. The present AFM based study further advance our understanding of the neurodegenerative process to elucidate the pathways and mechanisms that govern NMDA induced neurodegeneration, so as to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  4. The mechanism underlying Ler-mediated alleviation of gene repression by H-NS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minsang

    2017-01-29

    Secretion of effector proteins in Enteropathogeneic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is mediated by a specialized type III secretion system, components of which are encoded in the LEE operons 1 to 5. H-NS, a global repressor in E. coli, silences the expression of LEE operons. Ler, a master regulator in LEE operons, shares 24% amnio acid identity and 44% amino acid similarity to H-NS. Interestingly, rather than a gene silencer, its main role has been characterized as an antagonizing protein that relieves H-NS-mediated transcriptional silencing. In the previous study we reported molecular mechanism for the repression of LEE5 promoter in EPEC and EHEC by H-NS as a protein interaction between upstream DNA-bound H-NS and the αCTD of promoter-bound RNA polymerase. The mechanism underlying Ler-mediated alleviation of the genes repression by H-NS is largely unknown. We examined regulatory effect of these proteins on LEE5p activity using various in vitro tools. Our results revealed that binding affinity of Ler to the LEE5p DNA is about 40 folds greater than that of H-NS as determined by surface plasmon resonance. We verified that Ler binding removed H-NS bound to the same stretch of DNA on LEE5 promoter resulting in a derepression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

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    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  6. Structural mechanism of nuclear transport mediated by importin β and flexible amphiphilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Kumeta, Masahiro; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-12-02

    Karyopherin β family proteins mediate the nuclear/cytoplasmic transport of various proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), although they are substantially larger than the size limit of the NPC.To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this paradoxical function, we focused on the unique structures called HEAT repeats, which consist of repetitive amphiphilic α helices. An in vitro transport assay and FRAP analyses demonstrated that not only karyopherin β family proteins but also other proteins with HEAT repeats could pass through the NPC by themselves, and serve as transport mediators for their binding partners. Biochemical and spectroscopic analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of purified HEAT-rich proteins revealed that they interact with hydrophobic groups, including phenyl and alkyl groups, and undergo reversible conformational changes in tertiary structures, but not in secondary structures. These results show that conformational changes in the flexible amphiphilic motifs play a critical role in translocation through the NPC.

  7. Cavity-mediated coupling of mechanical oscillators limited by quantum backaction

    CERN Document Server

    Spethmann, Nicolas; Schreppler, Sydney; Buchmann, Lukas; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2015-01-01

    A complex quantum system can be constructed by coupling simple quantum elements to one another. For example, trapped-ion or superconducting quantum bits may be coupled by Coulomb interactions, mediated by the exchange of virtual photons. Alternatively quantum objects can be coupled by the exchange of real photons, particularly when driven within resonators that amplify interactions with a single electro-magnetic mode. However, in such an open system, the capacity of a coupling channel to convey quantum information or generate entanglement may be compromised. Here, we realize phase-coherent interactions between two spatially separated, near-ground-state mechanical oscillators within a driven optical cavity. We observe also the noise imparted by the optical coupling, which results in correlated mechanical fluctuations of the two oscillators. Achieving the quantum backaction dominated regime opens the door to numerous applications of cavity optomechanics with a complex mechanical system. Our results thereby illu...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration mediated by dysfunctional subcellular organelles in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqi Song; Deming Zhao; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies refer to a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases with an entirely novel mechanism of transmission and pathophysiology including synaptic damage,dendritic atrophy,vacuolization,and microglial activation.Extensive neuronal loss is the main cause of chronic brain deterioration and fatal outcome of prion diseases.As the final outcome of pathological alterations,neuronal death is a prominent feature of all prion diseases.The mechanisms responsible for prion diseases are not well understood.A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of neuronal damage is essential for the development of an effective therapy for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and other neurodegenerative diseases sharing similar features.Here,we review the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated neuronal death,which play crucial roles in the pathogenisis of prion diseases.

  9. MAPK-Mediated YAP Activation Controls Mechanical-Tension-Induced Pulmonary Alveolar Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pulmonary alveolar epithelium undergoes extensive regeneration in response to lung injuries, including lung resection. In recent years, our understanding of cell lineage relationships in the pulmonary alveolar epithelium has improved significantly. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate pneumonectomy (PNX-induced alveolar regeneration remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that mechanical-tension-induced YAP activation in alveolar stem cells plays a major role in promoting post-PNX alveolar regeneration. Our results indicate that JNK and p38 MAPK signaling is critical for mediating actin-cytoskeleton-remodeling-induced nuclear YAP expression in alveolar stem cells. Moreover, we show that Cdc42-controlled actin remodeling is required for the activation of JNK, p38, and YAP in post-PNX lungs. Our findings together establish that the Cdc42/F-actin/MAPK/YAP signaling cascade is essential for promoting alveolar regeneration in response to mechanical tension in the lung.

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans is resistant to surfactant protein A mediated host defense mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven S Giles

    Full Text Available Initiation of a protective immune response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated in part by host factors that promote interactions between immune cells and C. neoformans yeast. Surfactant protein A (SP-A contributes positively to pulmonary host defenses against a variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in part by promoting the recognition and phagocytosis of these pathogens by alveolar macrophages. In the present study we investigated the role of SP-A as a mediator of host defense against the pulmonary pathogen, C. neoformans. Previous studies have shown that SP-A binds to acapsular and minimally encapsulated strains of C. neoformans. Using in vitro binding assays we confirmed that SP-A does not directly bind to a fully encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (H99. However, we observed that when C. neoformans was incubated in bronchoalveolar fluid, SP-A binding was detected, suggesting that another alveolar host factor may enable SP-A binding. Indeed, we discovered that SP-A binds encapsulated C. neoformans via a previously unknown IgG dependent mechanism. The consequence of this interaction was the inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis of C. neoformans by alveolar macrophages. Therefore, to assess the contribution of SP-A to the pulmonary host defenses we compared in vivo infections using SP-A null mice (SP-A-/- and wild-type mice in an intranasal infection model. We found that the immune response assessed by cellular counts, TNFalpha cytokine production, and fungal burden in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during early stages of infection were equivalent. Furthermore, the survival outcome of C. neoformans infection was equivalent in SP-A-/- and wild-type mice. Our results suggest that unlike a variety of bacteria, viruses, and other fungi, progression of disease with an inhalational challenge of C. neoformans does not appear to be negatively or positively affected by SP-A mediated mechanisms of

  11. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  12. A leg-local neural mechanism mediates the decision to search in stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Eva M; Hooper, Scott L; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    In many animals, individual legs can either function independently, as in behaviors such as scratching or searching, or be used in coordinated patterns with other legs, as in walking or climbing. While the control of walking has been extensively investigated, the mechanisms mediating the behavioral choice to activate individual legs independently are poorly understood. We examined this issue in stick insects, in which each leg can independently produce a rhythmic searching motor pattern if it doesn't find a foothold [1-4]. We show here that one non-spiking interneuron, I4, controls searching behavior in individual legs. One I4 is present in each hemi-segment of the three thoracic ganglia [5, 6]. Search-inducing sensory input depolarizes I4. I4 activity was necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain searching movements. When substrate contact was provided, I4 depolarization no longer induced searching. I4 therefore both integrates search-inducing sensory input and is gated out by other sensory input (substrate contact). Searching thus occurs only when it is behaviorally appropriate. I4 depolarization never elicited stepping. These data show that individual, locally activated neurons can mediate the behavioral choice to use individual legs independently. This mechanism may be particularly important in insects' front legs, which can function independently like vertebrate arms and hands [7]. Similar local command mechanisms that selectively activate the pattern generators controlling repeated functional units such as legs or body segments may be present in other systems.

  13. Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine-Mediated Anemia: Regarding Molecular Mechanisms of Erythropoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Morceau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases is a frequent complication affecting quality of life. For cancer patients it represents a particularly bad prognostic. Low level of erythropoietin is considered as one of the causes of anemia in these pathologies. The deficiency in erythropoietin production results from pro-inflammatory cytokines effect. However, few data is available concerning molecular mechanisms involved in cytokine-mediated anemia. Some recent publications have demonstrated the direct effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines on cell differentiation towards erythroid pathway, without erythropoietin defect. This suggested that pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signaling pathways affect erythropoietin activity. They could interfere with erythropoietin-mediated signaling pathways, inducing early apoptosis and perturbing the expression and regulation of specific transcription factors involved in the control of erythroid differentiation. In this review we summarize the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, and interferon (IFN-γ on erythropoiesis with a particular interest for molecular feature.

  14. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-07-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3'UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation.

  15. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  16. Social, institutional, and knowledge mechanisms mediate diverse ecosystem service benefits from coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Christina C; Cinner, Joshua E

    2014-12-16

    Ecosystem services are supplied by nature but, by definition, are received by people. Ecosystem service assessments, intended to influence the decisions people make regarding their interactions with nature, need to understand how people benefit from different ecosystem services. A critical question is therefore, What determines the distribution of ecosystem service benefits between different sections of society? Here, we use an entitlements approach to examine how people perceive ecosystem service benefits across 28 coral reef fishing communities in four countries. In doing so, we quantitatively show that bundles of benefits are mediated by key access mechanisms (e.g., rights-based, economic, knowledge, social, and institutional). We find that specific access mechanisms influence which ecosystem services people prioritize. Social, institutional, and knowledge mechanisms are associated with the largest number and diversity of benefits. However, local context strongly determines whether specific access mechanisms enable or constrain benefits. Local ecological knowledge enabled people to prioritize a habitat benefit in Kenya, but constrained people from prioritizing the same benefit in Madagascar. Ecosystem service assessments, and their resultant policies, need to include the broad suite of access mechanisms that enable different people to benefit from a supply of ecosystem services.

  17. Oxidative Stress-Mediated Skeletal Muscle Degeneration: Molecules, Mechanisms, and Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hee Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a loss of balance between the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and the mechanisms that clear these species to maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Increased oxidative stress has been associated with muscular dystrophy, and many studies have proposed mechanisms that bridge these two pathological conditions at the molecular level. In this review, the evidence indicating a causal role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various muscular dystrophies is revisited. In particular, the mediation of cellular redox status in dystrophic muscle by NF-κB pathway, autophagy, telomere shortening, and epigenetic regulation are discussed. Lastly, the current stance of targeting these pathways using antioxidant therapies in preclinical and clinical trials is examined.

  18. [Mechanisms underlying interferon-mediated host innate immunity during influenza A virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Chi, Xiaojuan; Bai, Qingling; Chen, Jilong

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus can create acute respiratory infection in humans and animals throughout the world, and it is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Numerous studies have shown that influenza A virus infection induces rapidly host innate immune response. Influenza A virus triggers the activation of signaling pathways that are dependent on host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including toll like receptors (TLRs) and RIG-I like receptors (RLRs). Using a variety of regulatory mechanisms, these signaling pathways activate downstream transcript factors that control expression of various interferons and cytokines, such as type I and type III interferons. Thus, these interferons stimulate the transcript of relevant interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and expression of the antiviral proteins, which are critical components of host innate immunity. In this review, we will highlight the mechanisms by which influenza A virus infection induces the interferon-mediated host innate immunity.

  19. Insulin induces long-term depression of VTA dopamine neurons via an endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Liu, Shuai; Dias, Carine; Zou, Haiyan; Wong, Jovi C.Y.; Karunakaran, Subashini; Clee, Susanne M.; Phillips, Anthony; Boutrel, Benjamin; Borgland, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has drastically increased over the last few decades. Exploration into how hunger and satiety signals influence the reward system can help us to understand non-homeostatic mechanisms of feeding. Evidence suggests that insulin may act in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a critical site for reward-seeking behavior, to suppress feeding. However, the neural mechanisms underlying insulin effects in the VTA remain unknown. We demonstrate that insulin, a circulating catabolic peptide that inhibits feeding, can induce a long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons. This effect requires endocannabinoid-mediated presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, after a sweetened high fat meal, which elevates endogenous insulin levels, insulin-induced LTD is occluded. Finally, insulin in the VTA reduces food anticipatory behavior and conditioned place preference for food. Taken together, these results suggest that insulin in the VTA suppresses excitatory synaptic transmission and reduces salience of food-related cues. PMID:23354329

  20. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  1. Mechanisms mediating nitroglycerin-induced delayed-onset hyperalgesia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D; Green, P G

    2016-03-11

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate, GTN) induces headache in migraineurs, an effect that has been used both diagnostically and in the study of the pathophysiology of this neurovascular pain syndrome. An important feature of this headache is a delay from the administration of GTN to headache onset that, because of GTN's very rapid metabolism, cannot be due to its pharmacokinetic profile. It has recently been suggested that activation of perivascular mast cells, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, may contribute to this delay. We reported that hyperalgesia induced by intradermal GTN has a delay to onset of ∼ 30 min in male and ∼ 45 min in female rats. This hyperalgesia was greater in females, was prevented by pretreatment with the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan, as well as by chronic pretreatment with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80. The acute administration of GTN and compound 48/80 both induced hyperalgesia that was prevented by pretreatment with octoxynol-9, which attenuates endothelial function, suggesting that GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia are endothelial cell-dependent. Furthermore, A-317491, a P2X3 antagonist, which inhibits endothelial cell-dependent hyperalgesia, also prevents GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia. We conclude that delayed-onset mechanical hyperalgesia induced by GTN is mediated by activation of mast cells, which in turn release mediators that stimulate endothelial cells to release ATP, to act on P2X3, a ligand-gated ion channel, in perivascular nociceptors. A role of the mast and endothelial cell in GTN-induced hyperalgesia suggests potential novel risk factors and targets for the treatment of migraine.

  2. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated protein nitration by tempol: Kinetics, mechanism, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sandra M; Augusto, Ohara

    2008-06-17

    Despite the therapeutic potential of tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-1-piperidinyloxy) and related nitroxides as antioxidants, their effects on peroxidase-mediated protein tyrosine nitration remain unexplored. This posttranslational protein modification is a biomarker of nitric oxide-derived oxidants, and, relevantly, it parallels tissue injury in animal models of inflammation and is attenuated by tempol treatment. Here, we examine tempol effects on ribonuclease (RNase) nitration mediated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), a mammalian enzyme that plays a central role in various inflammatory processes. Some experiments were also performed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We show that tempol efficiently inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration. For instance, 10 muM tempol was able to inhibit by 90% the yield of 290 muM 3-nitrotyrosine produced from 370 muM RNase. The effect of tempol was not completely catalytic because part of it was consumed by recombination with RNase-tyrosyl radicals. The second-order rate constant of the reaction of tempol with MPO compound I and II were determined by stopped-flow kinetics as 3.3 x 10(6) and 2.6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C); the corresponding HRP constants were orders of magnitude smaller. Time-dependent hydrogen peroxide and nitrite consumption and oxygen production in the incubations were quantified experimentally and modeled by kinetic simulations. The results indicate that tempol inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration mainly because of its reaction with nitrogen dioxide to produce the oxammonium cation, which, in turn, recycles back to tempol by reacting with hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical to produce oxygen and regenerate nitrite. The implications for nitroxide antioxidant mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Central mechanisms mediating the hypophagic effects of oleoylethanolamide and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines: different lipid signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eRomano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The spread of ‘obesity epidemic’ and the poor efficacy of many anti-obesity therapies in the long-term highlight the need to develop novel efficacious therapy. This necessity stimulates a large research effort to find novel mechanisms controlling feeding and energy balance. Among these mechanisms a great deal of attention has been attracted by a family of phospholipid-derived signaling molecules that play an important role in the regulation of food-intake. They include N-acylethanolamines (NAEs and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs. NAPEs have been considered for a long time simply as phospholipid precursors of the lipid mediator NAEs, but increasing body of evidence suggest a role in many physiological processes including the regulation of feeding behavior. Several observations demonstrated that among NAEs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA acts as a satiety signal, which is generated in the intestine, upon the ingestion of fat, and signals to the central nervous system. At this level different neuronal pathways, including oxytocinergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic neurons, seem to mediate its hypophagic action. Similarly to NAEs, NAPEs (with particular reference to the N16:0 species levels were shown to be regulated by the fed state and this finding was initially interpreted as fluctuations of NAE precursors. However, the observation that exogenously administered NAPEs are able to inhibit food intake, not only in normal rats and mice but also in mice lacking the enzyme that converts NAPEs into NAEs, supported the hypothesis of a role of NAPE in the regulation of feeding behavior. Indirect observations suggest that the hypophagic action of NAPEs might involve central mechanisms, although the molecular target remains unknown. The present paper reviews the role that OEA and NAPEs play in the mechanisms that control food intake, further supporting this group of phospholipids as optimal candidate for the development of novel anti

  4. Femtosecond plasma mediated laser ablation has advantages over mechanical osteotomy of cranial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, David D; Mackanos, Mark A; Chung, Michael T; Hyun, Jeong S; Montoro, Daniel T; Grova, Monica; Liu, Chunjun; Wang, Jenny; Palanker, Daniel; Connolly, Andrew J; Longaker, Michael T; Contag, Christopher H; Wan, Derrick C

    2012-12-01

    Although mechanical osteotomies are frequently made on the craniofacial skeleton, collateral thermal, and mechanical trauma to adjacent bone tissue causes cell death and may delay healing. The present study evaluated the use of plasma-mediated laser ablation using a femtosecond laser to circumvent thermal damage and improve bone regeneration. Critical-size circular calvarial defects were created with a trephine drill bit or with a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser. Healing was followed using micro-CT scans for 8 weeks. Calvaria were also harvested at various time points for histological analysis. Finally, scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the microstructure of bone tissue treated with the Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared to that treated with the trephine bur. Laser-created defects healed significantly faster than those created mechanically at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-surgery. However, at 8 weeks post-surgery, there was no significant difference. In the drill osteotomy treatment group, empty osteocyte lacunae were seen to extend 699 ± 27 µm away from the edge of the defect. In marked contrast, empty osteocyte lacunae were seen to extend only 182 ± 22 µm away from the edge of the laser-created craters. Significantly less ossification and formation of irregular woven bone was noted on histological analysis for drill defects. We demonstrate accelerated bone healing after femtosecond laser ablation in a calvarial defect model compared to traditional mechanical drilling techniques. Improved rates of early regeneration make plasma-mediated ablation of the craniofacial skeleton advantageous for applications to osteotomy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Insights into the molecular mechanism of RGL2-mediated inhibition of seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Petra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed germination is of immense significance for agriculture and has been studied for centuries. Yet, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of dormancy and germination is still in its infancy. Gibberellins are the key phytohormones that promote germination, and the DELLA protein RGL2 is the main signalling intermediate involved in this response. Germination is completely inhibited if functional RGL2 is overexpressed and/or stabilized; however, the molecular mechanisms of RGL2 function are still largely unknown. We therefore attempted to shed light onto some of the genetic events downstream of RGL2. Results Gene ontology of the transcriptome differentially regulated by RGL2, as well as extensive cross-comparison with other available microarray data indicates that RGL2-mediated inhibition of germination causes seeds to enter a state of dormancy. RGL2 also appears to differentially regulate a number of transcription factors, many of which are known to be involved in light- or phytohormone-mediated aspects of germination. A promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes identified an enrichment of several motifs that can be bound by specific transcription factors, for example GAMYB, ARF1, or Dof-type zinc fingers. We show that Dof-binding motifs indeed play a role in RGL2-mediated transcription. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP, we show that RGL2 directly downregulates at least one cell wall modifying enzyme, which is predicted to constrain cell growth thereby leading to inhibition of seed germination. Conclusions Our results reveal that RGL2 controls various aspects of germination. Through the repression of cell wall modifying enzymes, cell growth is directly constrained to inhibit germination. Furthermore, RGL2 likely interacts with various types of proteins to regulate transcription, and differentially regulates several transcription factors. Collectively, our data indicate that

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  7. Hepatocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and host defense mechanisms in the alcohol-injured liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Casey, Carol A

    2014-09-01

    The consumption of alcohol is associated with many health issues including alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The natural history of ALD involves the development of steatosis, inflammation (steatohepatitis), fibrosis and cirrhosis. During the stage of steatohepatitis, the combination of inflammation and cellular damage can progress to a severe condition termed alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Unfortunately, the pathogenesis of AH remains uncharacterized. Some modulations have been identified in host defense and liver immunity mechanisms during AH that highlight the role of intrahepatic lymphocyte accumulation and associated inflammatory cytokine responses. Also, it is hypothesized that alcohol-induced injury to liver cells may significantly contribute to the aberrant lymphocytic distribution that is seen in AH. In particular, the regulation of lymphocytes by hepatocytes may be disrupted in the alcoholic liver resulting in altered immunologic homeostasis and perpetuation of disease. In recent studies, it was demonstrated that the direct killing of activated T lymphocytes by hepatocytes is facilitated by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). The ASGPR is a well-characterized glycoprotein receptor that is exclusively expressed by hepatocytes. This hepatic receptor is known for its role in the clearance of desialylated glycoproteins or cells, yet neither its physiological function nor its role in disease states has been determined. Interestingly, alcohol markedly impairs ASGPR function; however, the effect alcohol has on ASGPR-mediated cytotoxicity of lymphocytes remains to be elucidated. This review discusses the contribution of hepatocytes in immunological regulation and, importantly, how pathological effects of ethanol disrupt hepatocellular-mediated defense mechanisms.

  8. Pili-mediated Interactions between Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Bacteria are the Driving Mechanism of Microcolony Merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph; Alzurqa, Khaled; Nasrollahi, Hadi; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Collective Dynamics of Cells Team; Mechano-Micro-Biology Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    During the early infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae the bacteria form microcolonies consisting of a few hundreds to a few thousands of cells. The formation of colonies is mediated by type IV pili, thin and long filaments that are also involved in the motion of single cells over a substrate. A related process causes attractive cell-cell-interactions. While the motion of single cells has been extensively studied during the past years, the physical principles driving the growth of these colonies are poorly understood. One key mechanism of colony growth is coalescence of smaller colonies. Therefore we experimentally examine the process of merging of two Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies. We develop a theoretical microscopic model of single cells interacting solely by their pili. The experimental data and the results obtained from our model are in excellent quantitative agreement. We observe a fast initial approach of the two merging colonies within a few minutes, that is followed by a slow relaxation of the colony shape with a characteristic time of several hours. These findings suggest that pili-mediated interactions are the primary driving mechanism of the microcolony merging process.

  9. Evidence for water-mediated mechanisms in coral-algal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, Hendrikje; Skinner, Christina; Osinga, Ronald; de Beer, Dirk; Nugues, Maggy M

    2016-08-17

    Although many coral reefs have shifted from coral-to-algal dominance, the consequence of such a transition for coral-algal interactions and their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. At the microscale, it is unclear how diffusive boundary layers (DBLs) and surface oxygen concentrations at the coral-algal interface vary with algal competitors and competitiveness. Using field observations and microsensor measurements in a flow chamber, we show that coral (massive Porites) interfaces with thick turf algae, macroalgae, and cyanobacteria, which are successful competitors against coral in the field, are characterized by a thick DBL and hypoxia at night. In contrast, coral interfaces with crustose coralline algae, conspecifics, and thin turf algae, which are poorer competitors, have a thin DBL and low hypoxia at night. Furthermore, DBL thickness and hypoxia at the interface with turf decreased with increasing flow speed, but not when thick turf was upstream. Our results support the importance of water-mediated transport mechanisms in coral-algal interactions. Shifts towards algal dominance, particularly dense assemblages, may lead to thicker DBLs, higher hypoxia, and higher concentrations of harmful metabolites and pathogens along coral borders, which in turn may facilitate algal overgrowth of live corals. These effects may be mediated by flow speed and orientation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens: mechanisms and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) reduction to Pd(0) nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens was explored under conditions of neutral pH, 30 °C and concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg of Pd(II)/L aiming to investigate the effect of solid species of palladium on their microbial reduction. The influence of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate was reported to enhance the palladium reaction rate in an average of 1.7-fold and its addition is determining to achieve the reduction of solid species of palladium. Based on the obtained results two mechanisms are proposed: (1) direct, which is fully described considering interactions of amide, sulfur, and phosphoryl groups associated to proteins from bacteria on palladium reduction reaction, and (2) quinone-mediated, which implies multiheme c-type cytochromes participation. Speciation analysis and kinetic results were considered and integrated into a model to fit the experimental data that explain both mechanisms. This work provides elements for a better understanding of direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by G. sulfurreducens, which could facilitate metal recovery with concomitant formation of valuable palladium nanoparticles in industrial processes.

  11. Novel antagonists of alcohol inhibition of l1-mediated cell adhesion: multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F; Menkari, Carrie E; Charness, Michael E

    2002-11-01

    1-Octanol antagonizes ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis in mouse whole embryo culture. Herein, we identify a new series of alcohol antagonists and study their mechanism of action. Cell aggregation assays were carried out in ethanol-sensitive, human L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells in the absence and presence of 100 mM ethanol or 2 mM 1-butanol and candidate antagonists. Antagonist potency for 1-alcohols increased progressively over 5 log orders from 1-pentanol (C5) to 1-dodecanol (C12). Antagonist potency declined from 1-dodecanol (C12) to 1-tridecanol (C13), and 1-tetradecanol (C14) and 1-pentadecanol (C15) were inactive. The presence and position of a double bond in the 1-butanol molecule determined whether a compound was a full agonist (1-butanol), a mixed agonist-antagonist (2-buten-1-ol), or an antagonist (3-buten-1-ol). Increasing the concentration of agonist (1-butanol or ethanol) overcame the antagonism of 3-buten-1-ol, benzyl alcohol, cyclopentanol, and 3-pentanol, but not that of 4-methyl-1-pentanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 1-octanol, and 2,6-di-isopropylphenol (propofol), suggesting that the mechanisms of antagonism may differ between these groups of compounds. These findings suggest that selective straight, branched, and cyclic alcohols may act at multiple, discrete sites to antagonize the actions of ethanol and 1-butanol on L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

  12. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5'-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism.

  13. MiR-206-mediated dynamic mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lianqi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a group of highly conserved small non-coding RNAs with a length of 21~23 nucleotides, microRNAs (miRNAs regulate the gene expression post-transcriptionally by base pairing with the partial or full complementary sequences in target mRNAs, thus resulting in the repression of mRNA translation and the acceleration of mRNA degradation. Recent work has revealed that miRNAs are essential for the development and functioning of the skeletal muscles where they are. In particular, miR-206 has not only been identified as the only miRNA expressed in skeletal muscles, but also exhibited crucial roles in regulation of the muscle development. Although miRNAs are known to regulate various biological processes ranging from development to cancer, much less is known about their role in the dynamic regulation of the mammalian circadian clock. Results A detailed dynamic model of miR-206-mediated mammalian circadian clock system was developed presently by using Hill-type terms, Michaelis-Menten type and mass action kinetics. Based on a system-theoretic approach, the model accurately predicts both the periodicity and the entrainment of the circadian clock. It also explores the dynamics properties of the oscillations mediated by miR-206 by means of sensitivity analysis and alterations of parameters. Our results show that miR-206 is an important regulator of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle, and thus by study of miR-206 the main features of its mediation on the clock may be captured. Simulations of these processes display that the amplitude and frequency of the oscillation can be significantly altered through the miR-206-mediated control. Conclusions MiR-206 has a profound effect on the dynamic mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock, both by control of the amplitude and control or alteration of the frequency to affect the level of the gene expression and to interfere with the temporal sequence of the gene production or delivery. This

  14. Cross-level effects of high-performance work practices on burnout: Two counteracting mediating mechanisms compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, F.C. van de; Kroon, B.; Veldhoven, M.J.P.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of management practices - specifically, high-performance work practices (HPWPs) - on employee burnout. Two potential mediating mechanisms that counterbalance each other in the development of burnout are compared: a critical mechanism that

  15. Molecular Mechanisms for Biliary Phospholipid and Drug Efflux Mediated by ABCB4 and Bile Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ya Morita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, several ABC transporters are responsible for the secretion of bile lipids. Among them, ABCB4, also called MDR3, is essential for the secretion of phospholipids from hepatocytes into bile. The biliary phospholipids are associated with bile salts and cholesterol in mixed micelles, thereby reducing the detergent activity and cytotoxicity of bile salts and preventing cholesterol crystallization. Mutations in the ABCB4 gene result in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo and cell culture studies have demonstrated that the secretion of biliary phospholipids depends on both ABCB4 expression and bile salts. In the presence of bile salts, ABCB4 located in nonraft membranes mediates the efflux of phospholipids, preferentially phosphatidylcholine. Despite high homology with ABCB1, ABCB4 expression cannot confer multidrug resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of ABCB4 functions and physiological relevance, and discusses the molecular mechanism for the ABCB4-mediated efflux of phospholipids.

  16. Potential mechanisms by which polyphenol-rich grapes prevent obesity-mediated inflammation and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Chi; McIntosh, Michael K

    2011-08-21

    Obesity and metabolic disease-related health problems (e.g., type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and hypertension) are the most prevalent nutrition-related issues in the United States. An emerging feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes is their linkage with chronic inflammation that begins in white adipose tissue and eventually becomes systemic. One potential strategy to reduce inflammation and insulin resistance is consumption of polyphenol-rich foods like grapes or their by-products, which have anti-inflammatory properties. Polyphenols commonly found in grape products have been reported to reduce inflammation by (a) acting as an antioxidant or increasing antioxidant gene or protein expression, (b) attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling, (c) blocking proinflammatory cytokines or endotoxin-mediated kinases and transcription factors involved in metabolic disease, (d) suppressing inflammatory- or inducing metabolic-gene expression via increasing histone deacetylase activity, or (e) activating transcription factors that antagonize chronic inflammation. Thus, polyphenol-rich grape products may reduce obesity-mediated chronic inflammation by multiple mechanisms, thereby preventing metabolic diseases.

  17. The PHLAME (Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects) firefighter study: testing mediating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranby, Krista W; MacKinnon, David P; Fairchild, Amanda J; Elliot, Diane L; Kuehl, Kerry S; Goldberg, Linn

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the mechanisms by which PHLAME (Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects), a health promotion intervention, improved healthy eating and exercise behavior among firefighters, a population at high risk for health problems due to occupational hazards. In a randomized trial, 397 firefighters participated in either the PHLAME team intervention with their work shift or a control condition. Intervention sessions taught benefits of a healthy diet and regular exercise, and sought to improve social norms and social support from coworkers for healthy behavior. At posttest, team intervention participants had increased their fruit and vegetable consumption as compared to control participants. An increase in knowledge of fruit and vegetable benefits and improved dietary coworker norms partially mediated these effects. Exercise habits and VO2 max were related to targeted mediators but were not significantly changed by the team intervention. Partial support was found for both the action and conceptual theories underlying the intervention. Our findings illustrate how an effective program's process can be deconstructed to understand the underpinnings of behavior change and refine interventions. Further, fire stations may improve the health of firefighters by emphasizing the benefits of healthy diet and exercise behaviors while also encouraging behavior change by coworkers as a whole. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. IFNγ Regulates Activated Vδ2+ T Cells through a Feedback Mechanism Mediated by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Karoline; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Jakobsson, Emma; Ferrin, Izaskun; Lang, Valérie; Sepulveda, Pilar; Pennington, Daniel J.; Trigueros, César

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells play a role in a wide range of diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. The majority of circulating human γδ T lymphocytes express a Vγ9Vδ2+ (Vδ2+) T cell receptor (TCR) and following activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we show that IFNγ, produced by Vδ2+ cells, activates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated immunosupression, which in turn exerts a negative feedback mechanism on γδ T cell function ranging from cytokine production to proliferation. Importantly, this modulatory effect is limited to a short period of time (cell activation, after which MSCs can no longer exert their immunoregulatory capacity. Using genetically modified MSCs with the IFNγ receptor 1 constitutively silenced, we demonstrate that IFNγ is essential to this process. Activated γδ T cells induce expression of several factors by MSCs that participate in the depletion of amino acids. In particular, we show that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme involved in L-tryptophan degradation, is responsible for MSC-mediated immunosuppression of Vδ2+ T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that γδ T cell responses can be immuno-modulated by different signals derived from MSC. PMID:28076364

  19. Continued Bullying Victimization in Adolescents: Maladaptive Schemas as a Mediational Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Esther; Fernández-González, Liria; González-Cabrera, Joaquín M; Gámez-Guadix, Manuel

    2017-04-22

    Bullying victimization in adolescence is a significant social problem that can become persistent over time for some victims. However, there is an overall paucity of research examining the factors that contribute to continued bullying victimization. Schema therapy proposes a model that can help us understand why bullying victimization can be persistent for some victims. This study examines the role of maladaptive schemas, the key concept in schema therapy, as a mechanism of continued bullying victimization. The hypothesis was that maladaptive schemas of rejection mediate the predictive association between victimization in both the family and at school and future bullying victimization. Social anxiety was also considered, as previous research suggests that it can increase the risk of victimization. The participants were 1328 adolescents (45% female) with a mean age of 15.05 years (SD = 1.37), who completed questionnaires at three time points with a 6-month interval between them. Time 2 maladaptive schemas of rejection significantly mediated the predictive association from Time 1 bullying victimization, family abuse and social anxiety to Time 3 bullying victimization. The findings pertaining to potentially malleable factors, such as maladaptive schemas that maintain continued interpersonal victimization, have important implications for prevention and treatment strategies with adolescents.

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Molnár, Elek

    2009-12-01

    The ability to modify synaptic transmission between neurons is a fundamental process of the nervous system that is involved in development, learning, and disease. Thus, synaptic plasticity is the ability to bidirectionally modify transmission, where long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) represent the best characterized forms of plasticity. In the hippocampus, two main forms of LTD coexist that are mediated by activation of either N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Compared with NMDAR-LTD, mGluR-LTD is less well understood, but recent advances have started to delineate the underlying mechanisms. mGluR-LTD at CA3:CA1 synapses in the hippocampus can be induced either by synaptic stimulation or by bath application of the group I selective agonist (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. Multiple signaling mechanisms have been implicated in mGluR-LTD, illustrating the complexity of this form of plasticity. This review provides an overview of recent studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying hippocampal mGluR-LTD. It highlights the role of key molecular components and signaling pathways that are involved in the induction and expression of mGluR-LTD and considers how the different signaling pathways may work together to elicit a persistent reduction in synaptic transmission.

  1. Replicative Homeostasis: A fundamental mechanism mediating selective viral replication and escape mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallie Richard

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C (HCV, hepatitis B (HBV, the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, and other viruses that replicate via RNA intermediaries, cause an enormous burden of disease and premature death worldwide. These viruses circulate within infected hosts as vast populations of closely related, but genetically diverse, molecules known as "quasispecies". The mechanism(s by which this extreme genetic and antigenic diversity is stably maintained are unclear, but are fundamental to understanding viral persistence and pathobiology. The persistence of HCV, an RNA virus, is especially problematic and HCV stability, maintained despite rapid genomic mutation, is highly paradoxical. This paper presents the hypothesis, and evidence, that viruses capable of persistent infection autoregulate replication and the likely mechanism mediating autoregulation – Replicative Homeostasis – is described. Replicative homeostasis causes formation of stable, but highly reactive, equilibria that drive quasispecies expansion and generates escape mutation. Replicative homeostasis explains both viral kinetics and the enigma of RNA quasispecies stability and provides a rational, mechanistic basis for all observed viral behaviours and host responses. More importantly, this paradigm has specific therapeutic implication and defines, precisely, new approaches to antiviral therapy. Replicative homeostasis may also modulate cellular gene expression.

  2. From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

    2014-01-16

    One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

  3. Opening the window to the cogenesis with Affleck–Dine mechanism in gravity mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Ayuki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Yamada, Masaki, E-mail: yamadam@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-02-12

    The observed baryon and dark matter densities are equal up to a factor of 5. This observation indicates that the baryon asymmetry and dark matter have the same origin. The Affleck–Dine baryogenesis is one of the most promising mechanisms in this context. Q balls, which are often formed in the early Universe associated with the Affleck–Dine baryogenesis, decay both into supersymmetric particles and into quarks. Recently, it was pointed out that annihilation of squarks into quarks gives a dominant contribution to the Q-ball decay rate and the branching ratio of Q-ball decay into supersymmetric particles changes from the previous estimate. In this Letter, the scenario of baryon and dark matter cogenesis from Q ball in gravity mediation is revisited in respect of the improved Q-ball decay rates. It is found that the successful cogenesis takes place when a wino with mass 400–600 GeV is dark matter.

  4. Opening the window to the cogenesis with Affleck-Dine mechanism in gravity mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, Ayuki; Yamada, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    The observed baryon and dark matter densities are equal up to a factor of 5. This observation indicates that the baryon asymmetry and dark matter have the same origin. The Affleck-Dine baryogenesis is one of the most promising mechanisms in this context. Q balls, which are often formed in the early Universe associated with the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, decay both into supersymmetric particles and into quarks. Recently, it was pointed out that annihilation of squarks into quarks gives a dominant contribution to the Q-ball decay rate and the branching ratio of Q-ball decay into supersymmetric particles changes from the previous estimate. In this paper, the scenario of baryon and dark matter cogenesis from Q ball in gravity mediation is revisited in respect of the improved Q-ball decay rates. It is found that the successful cogenesis takes place when a wino with mass 400-600 GeV is dark matter.

  5. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... of this signalling pathway. Specifically, recent evidence has suggested that PTP1B might be a key regulator of leptin signalling, based on the resistance to diet-induced obesity and increased leptin signalling observed in PTP1B-deficient mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  6. The mechanism of porosity formation during solvent-mediated phase transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Raufaste, Christophe; John, Timm; Meakin, Paul; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Solvent-mediated phase transformations often produce a porous product phase. We have studied replacement processes in the KBr-KCl-H2O system using both in situ and ex situ experiments. The replacement of a KBr crystal by a K(Br,Cl) solid solution in the presence of an aqueous solution is facilitated by the generation of a surprisingly stable, highly anisotropic and connected pore structure throughout the product phase. This pore structure ensures efficient transport from the bulk solution to the reacting KBr surface. The compositional profile of the K(Br,Cl) solid solution exhibits striking discontinuities across disc-like cavities in the product phase. Similar transformation mechanisms are probably important in controlling the rates of phase transformations in a variety of natural and man-made systems, on scales much larger than that of the crystals themselves.

  7. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K; Franklin, Matthew C; Goger, Michael; Wang, Xiaobo; Fries, Bettina C

    2015-03-13

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used to validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Finally structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations.

  8. 完善大调解机制论纲%The Outline of Improving Grand Mediation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于语和; 田学丽

    2014-01-01

    人民调解、行政调解、司法调解都存在一定的局限性,当前社会矛盾纠纷呈现多样化、复杂化、群体化的趋势,单一的调解方式已经无法满足现实生活中解决纠纷的需要。大调解机制具有缓解法院诉讼压力、整合资源、畅通诉求表达渠道等优势,其符合构建和谐社会的本质诉求。文章以福建莆田市、江苏南通市、上海杨浦区对大调解机制的探索为经验素材,分析了大调解中存在的问题,并最终提出了完善大调解机制的建议和措施。%Since there are some limitations in people's mediation, administrative mediation and judicial medi-ation, the current social conflicts and disputes show diversified, complex, population trend, so single mediation methods have been unable to meet the needs of resolving disputes in real life. There are several advantages in the grand mediation mechanism such as relieving pressure on the court proceedings, integration of resources and smoothing channels for expressing aspirations, which meets the needs of building a harmonious society. The authors, taking the practice of grand mediation mechanism in Putian City, Fujian, Nantong City, Jiangsu, and Yangpu District, Shanghai for reference, analyzed the existing problems in the grand mediation mecha-nism, and put forward suggestions and measures for improving the grand mediation mechanism.

  9. Distinct Terminal and Cell Body Mechanisms in the Nociceptor Mediate Hyperalgesic Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Araldi, Dioneia

    2015-01-01

    Hyperalgesic priming, a form of neuroplasticity in nociceptors, is a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain in the rat, which involves signaling from the site of an acute tissue insult in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of a nociceptor to its cell body that, in turn, induces a signal that travels back to the terminal to mediate a marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In the present experiments, we studied the underlying mechanisms in the cell body and compared them to the mechanisms in the nerve terminal. Injection of a cell-permeant cAMP analog, 8-bromo cAMP, into the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical hyperalgesia and priming with an onset more rapid than when induced at the peripheral terminal. Priming induced by intraganglion 8-bromo cAMP was prevented by an oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to mRNA for a transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and by an inhibitor of importin, which is required for activated CREB to get into the nucleus. While peripheral administration of 8-bromo cAMP also produced hyperalgesia, it did not produce priming. Conversely, interventions administered in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor that induces priming—PKCε activator, NGF, and TNF-α—when injected into the ganglion produce hyperalgesia but not priming. The protein translation inhibitor cordycepin, injected at the peripheral terminal but not into the ganglion, reverses priming induced at either the ganglion or peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. These data implicate different mechanisms in the soma and terminal in the transition to chronic pain. PMID:25878283

  10. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  11. Biomechanical, biochemical, and morphological mechanisms of heat shock-mediated germination in Carica papaya seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rachel E.; Waterworth, Wanda M.; Stuppy, Wolfgang; West, Christopher E.; Ennos, Roland; Bray, Clifford M.; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Carica papaya (papaya) seed germinate readily fresh from the fruit, but desiccation induces a dormant state. Dormancy can be released by exposure of the hydrated seed to a pulse of elevated temperature, typical of that encountered in its tropical habitat. Carica papaya is one of only a few species known to germinate in response to heat shock (HS) and we know little of the mechanisms that control germination in tropical ecosystems. Here we investigate the mechanisms that mediate HS-induced stimulation of germination in pre-dried and re-imbibed papaya seed. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA3 ≥250 µM) overcame the requirement for HS to initiate germination. However, HS did not sensitise seeds to GA3, indicative that it may act independently of GA biosynthesis. Seed coat removal also overcame desiccation-imposed dormancy, indicative that resistance to radicle emergence is coat-imposed. Morphological and biomechanical studies identified that neither desiccation nor HS alter the physical structure or the mechanical strength of the seed coat. However, cycloheximide prevented both seed coat weakening and germination, implicating a requirement for de novo protein synthesis in both processes. The germination antagonist abscisic acid prevented radicle emergence but had no effect on papaya seed coat weakening. Desiccation therefore appears to reduce embryo growth potential, which is reversed by HS, without physically altering the mechanical properties of the seed coat. The ability to germinate in response to a HS may confer a competitive advantage to C. papaya, an opportunistic pioneer species, through detection of canopy removal in tropical forests. PMID:27811004

  12. Insecticide resistance is mediated by multiple mechanisms in recently introduced Aedes aegypti from Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Gonçalo; Grigoraki, Linda; Weetman, David; Vicente, José Luís; Silva, Ana Clara; Pinto, João; Vontas, John; Sousa, Carla Alexandra

    2017-07-01

    Aedes aegypti is a major mosquito vector of arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya and Zika. In 2005, Ae. aegypti was identified for the first time in Madeira Island. Despite an initial insecticide-based vector control program, the species expanded throughout the Southern coast of the island, suggesting the presence of insecticide resistance. Here, we characterized the insecticide resistance status and the underlying mechanisms of two populations of Ae. aegypti from Madeira Island, Funchal and Paúl do Mar. WHO susceptibility bioassays indicated resistance to cyfluthrin, permethrin, fenitrothion and bendiocarb. Use of synergists significantly increased mortality rates, and biochemical assays indicated elevated activities of detoxification enzymes, suggesting the importance of metabolic resistance. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis detected significant upregulation in both populations of nine cytochrome P450 oxidase genes (including four known pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes), the organophosphate metabolizer CCEae3a, Glutathione-S-transferases, and multiple putative cuticle proteins. Genotyping of knockdown resistance loci linked to pyrethroid resistance revealed fixation of the 1534C mutation, and presence with moderate frequencies of the V1016I mutation in each population. Significant resistance to three major insecticide classes (pyrethroid, carbamate and organophosphate) is present in Ae. aegypti from Madeira Island, and appears to be mediated by multiple mechanisms. Implementation of appropriate resistance management strategies including rotation of insecticides with alternative modes of action, and methods other than chemical-based vector control are strongly advised to delay or reverse the spread of resistance and achieve efficient control.

  13. Enlightening the Mechanism of Copper Mediated PhotoRDRP via High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Elena; Anastasaki, Athina; Haddleton, David M; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-06-03

    The initiation mechanism of photochemically mediated Cu-based reversible-deactivation radical polymerization (photoRDRP) was investigated using pulsed-laser polymerization (PLP) and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The variation of the catalyst composition and ESI-MS analysis of the resulting products provided information on how initiator, ligand, copper species, and monomer are interacting upon irradiation with UV light. A discussion of the results allows for a new postulation of the mechanism of photoRDRP and-for the first time-the unambiguous identification of the initiating species and their interactions within the reaction mixture. One pathway for radical generation proceeds via UV light-induced C-Br bond scission of the initiator, giving rise to propagating radicals. The generation of copper(I) species from copper(II) can occur via several pathways, including, among others, via reduction by free amine ligand in its excited as well as from its ground state via the irradiation with UV light. The amine ligand serves as a strong reducing agent and is likely the main participant in the generation of copper(I) species.

  14. Protein kinases: mechanisms and downstream targets in inflammation-mediated obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-02-01

    Obesity-induced low-grade inflammation (metaflammation) impairs insulin receptor signaling. This has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in the target tissues is mediated by stress kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, inhibitor of NF-kB kinase complex β (IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase C, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase, and RNA-activated protein kinase. Most of these kinases phosphorylate several key regulators in glucose homeostasis. The phosphorylation of serine residues in the insulin receptor and IRS-1 molecule results in diminished enzymatic activity in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. This has been one of the key mechanisms observed in the tissues that are implicated in insulin resistance especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Identifying the specific protein kinases involved in obesity-induced chronic inflammation may help in developing the targeted drug therapies to minimize the insulin resistance. This review is focused on the protein kinases involved in the inflammatory cascade and molecular mechanisms and their downstream targets with special reference to obesity-induced T2-DM.

  15. Mechanical regulation of transcription controls Polycomb-mediated gene silencing during lineage commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huy Quang; Ghatak, Sushmita; Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Tellkamp, Frederik; Günschmann, Christian; Dieterich, Christoph; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Habermann, Bianca; Pombo, Ana; Niessen, Carien M; Wickström, Sara A

    2016-08-01

    Tissue mechanics drive morphogenesis, but how forces are sensed and transmitted to control stem cell fate and self-organization remains unclear. We show that a mechanosensory complex of emerin (Emd), non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) and actin controls gene silencing and chromatin compaction, thereby regulating lineage commitment. Force-driven enrichment of Emd at the outer nuclear membrane of epidermal stem cells leads to defective heterochromatin anchoring to the nuclear lamina and a switch from H3K9me2,3 to H3K27me3 occupancy at constitutive heterochromatin. Emd enrichment is accompanied by the recruitment of NMIIA to promote local actin polymerization that reduces nuclear actin levels, resulting in attenuation of transcription and subsequent accumulation of H3K27me3 at facultative heterochromatin. Perturbing this mechanosensory pathway by deleting NMIIA in mouse epidermis leads to attenuated H3K27me3-mediated silencing and precocious lineage commitment, abrogating morphogenesis. Our results reveal how mechanics integrate nuclear architecture and chromatin organization to control lineage commitment and tissue morphogenesis.

  16. Insecticide resistance is mediated by multiple mechanisms in recently introduced Aedes aegypti from Madeira Island (Portugal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Seixas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is a major mosquito vector of arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya and Zika. In 2005, Ae. aegypti was identified for the first time in Madeira Island. Despite an initial insecticide-based vector control program, the species expanded throughout the Southern coast of the island, suggesting the presence of insecticide resistance. Here, we characterized the insecticide resistance status and the underlying mechanisms of two populations of Ae. aegypti from Madeira Island, Funchal and Paúl do Mar.WHO susceptibility bioassays indicated resistance to cyfluthrin, permethrin, fenitrothion and bendiocarb. Use of synergists significantly increased mortality rates, and biochemical assays indicated elevated activities of detoxification enzymes, suggesting the importance of metabolic resistance. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis detected significant upregulation in both populations of nine cytochrome P450 oxidase genes (including four known pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, the organophosphate metabolizer CCEae3a, Glutathione-S-transferases, and multiple putative cuticle proteins. Genotyping of knockdown resistance loci linked to pyrethroid resistance revealed fixation of the 1534C mutation, and presence with moderate frequencies of the V1016I mutation in each population.Significant resistance to three major insecticide classes (pyrethroid, carbamate and organophosphate is present in Ae. aegypti from Madeira Island, and appears to be mediated by multiple mechanisms. Implementation of appropriate resistance management strategies including rotation of insecticides with alternative modes of action, and methods other than chemical-based vector control are strongly advised to delay or reverse the spread of resistance and achieve efficient control.

  17. Mechanisms of the ultrasound-mediated intracellular delivery of liposomes and dextrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afadzi, Mercy; Strand, Sabina P; Nilssen, Esben A; Måsøy, Svein-Erik; Johansen, Tonni F; Hansen, Rune; Angelsen, Bjørn A; de L Davies, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism involved in the ultrasoundenhanced intracellular delivery of fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (molecular weight 4 to 2000 kDa) and liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) was studied using HeLa cells and an ultrasound transducer at 300 kHz, varying the acoustic power. The cellular uptake and cell viability were measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The role of endocytosis was investigated by inhibiting clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, as well as macropinocytosis. Microbubbles were found to be required during ultrasound treatment to obtain enhanced cellular uptake. The percentage of cells internalizing Dox and dextran increased with increasing mechanical index. Confocal images and flow cytometric analysis indicated that the liposomes were disrupted extracellularly and that released Dox was taken up by the cells. The percentage of cells internalizing dextran was independent of the molecular weight of dextrans, but the amount of the small 4-kDa dextran molecules internalized per cell was higher than for the other dextrans. The inhibition of endocytosis during ultrasound exposure resulted in a significant decrease in cellular uptake of dextrans. Therefore, the improved uptake of Dox and dextrans may be a result of both sonoporation and endocytosis.

  18. Aire mediates thymic expression and tolerance of pancreatic antigens via an unconventional transcriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso-Abeam, Dina; Staats, Kim A; Franckaert, Dean; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Liston, Adrian; Gray, Daniel H D; Dooley, James

    2013-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire), mediates central tolerance of peripheral self. Its activity in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) directs the ectopic expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), causing the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating the breadth of transcriptional regulation by Aire remain unknown. One prominent model capable of explaining both the uniquely high number of Aire-dependent targets and their specificity posits that tissue-specific transcription factors induced by Aire directly activate their canonical targets, exponentially adding to the total number of Aire-dependent TRAs. To test this "Hierarchical Transcription" model, we analysed mice deficient in the pancreatic master transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1), specifically in TECs (Pdx1(ΔFoxn1) ), for the expression and tolerance of pancreatic TRAs. Surprisingly, we found that lack of Pdx1 in TECs did not reduce the transcription of insulin or somatostatin, or alter glucagon expression. Moreover, in a model of thymic deletion driven by a neo-TRA under the control of the insulin promoter, Pdx1 in TECs was not required to affect thymocyte deletion or the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. These findings suggest that the capacity of Aire to regulate expression of a huge array of TRAs relies solely on an unconventional transcriptional mechanism, without intermediary transcription factors. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tiam1 mediates Ras activation of Rac by a PI(3)K-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, John M; Lambert, Que T; Reuther, Gary W; Malliri, Angeliki; Siderovski, David P; Sondek, John; Collard, John G; Der, Channing J

    2002-08-01

    Rac is a member of the Ras superfamily of GTPases and functions as a GDP/GTP-regulated switch. Formation of active Rac-GTP is stimulated by Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), such as Tiam1 (ref. 2). Once activated, Rac stimulates signalling pathways that regulate actin organization, gene expression and cellular proliferation. Rac also functions downstream of the Ras oncoprotein in pathways that stimulate membrane ruffling, growth transformation, activation of the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase, activation of the NF-kappa B transcription factor and promotion of cell survival. Although recent studies support phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI(3)K)-dependent mechanisms through which Ras might activate Rac (refs 9,10), the precise mechanism remains to be determined. Here we demonstrate that Tiam1, a Rac-specific GEF, preferentially associates with activated GTP-bound Ras through a Ras-binding domain. Furthermore, activated Ras and Tiam1 cooperate to cause synergistic formation of Rac-GTP in a PI(3)K-independent manner. Thus, Tiam1 can function as an effector that directly mediates Ras activation of Rac.

  20. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-11-20

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7-20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground.

  1. Mechanism of arctigenin-mediated specific cytotoxicity against human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Siti; Iwasaki, Hironori; Inafuku, Masashi; Taira, Naoyuki; Oku, Hirosuke

    2013-12-15

    The lignan arctigenin (ARG) from the herb Arctium lappa L. possesses anti-cancer activity, however the mechanism of action of ARG has been found to vary among tissues and types of cancer cells. The current study aims to gain insight into the ARG mediated mechanism of action involved in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in lung adenocarcinoma cells. This study also delineates the cancer cell specificity of ARG by comparison with its effects on various normal cell lines. ARG selectively arrested the proliferation of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase through the down-regulation of NPAT protein expression. This down-regulation occurred via the suppression of either cyclin E/CDK2 or cyclin H/CDK7, while apoptosis was induced through the modulation of the Akt-1-related signaling pathway. Furthermore, a GSH synthase inhibitor specifically enhanced the cytotoxicity of ARG against cancer cells, suggesting that the intracellular GSH content was another factor influencing the susceptibility of cancer cells to ARG. These findings suggest that specific cytotoxicity of ARG against lung cancer cells was explained by its selective modulation of the expression of NPAT, which is involved in histone biosynthesis. The cytotoxicity of ARG appeared to be dependent on the intracellular GSH level.

  2. Generation of ROS mediated by mechanical waves (ultrasound) and its possible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duco, Walter; Grosso, Viviana; Zaccari, Daniel; Soltermann, Arnaldo T

    2016-10-15

    The thermal decomposition of 9,10 diphenylanthracene peroxide (DPAO2) generates DPA and a mix of triplet and singlet molecular oxygen. For DPAO2 the efficiency to produce singlet molecular oxygen is 0.35. On the other hand, it has shown that many thermal reactions can be carried out through the interaction of molecules with ultrasound. Ultrasound irradiation can create hydrodynamic stress (sonomechanical process), inertial cavitation (pyrolitic process) and long range effects mediated by radicals or ROS. Sonochemical reactions can be originated by pyrolytic like process, shock mechanical waves, thermal reactions and radical and ROS mediated reactions. Sonolysis of pure water can yield hydrogen or hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (ROS). When DPAO2 in 1,4 dioxane solution is treated with 20 or 24kHz and different power intensity the production of molecular singlet oxygen is observed. Specific scavengers like tetracyclone (TC) are used to demonstrate it. The efficiency now is 0.85 showing that the sonochemical process is much more efficient that the thermal one. Another endoperoxide, artemisinin was also studied. Unlike the concept of photosensitizer of photodynamic therapy, in spite of large amount of reported results in literature, the term sonosensitizer and the sonosensitization process are not well defined. We define sonosensitized reaction as one in which a chemical species decompose as consequence of cavitation phenomena producing ROS or other radicals and some other target species does undergo a chemical reaction. The concept could be reach rapidly other peroxides which are now under experimental studies. For artemisinin, an important antimalarian and anticancer drug, was established that ultrasound irradiation increases the effectiveness of the treatment but without any explanation. We show that artemisinin is an endoperoxide and behaves as a sonosensitizer in the sense of our definition.

  3. Mechanisms in the PVN mediating local and central sodium-induced hypertension in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2009-03-01

    Sympathoexcitatory and hypertensive responses to central infusion of Na(+)-rich artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) are enhanced by aldosterone and mediated by mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and benzamil-blockable Na(+) influx, leading to "ouabain" release and ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor stimulation. The present study evaluated the functional role of these mechanisms in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In conscious Wistar rats, Na(+)-rich aCSF was infused either directly into the PVN or intracerebroventricularly preceded by aldosterone and blockers. Infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF in the PVN caused gradual increases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Aldosterone and a subpressor dose of ouabain in the PVN alone did not affect BP and HR but enhanced responses to Na(+). Eplerenone, benzamil, and "ouabain"-binding Fab fragments only blocked the enhancement by aldosterone, whereas losartan blocked all responses to Na(+)-rich aCSF in the PVN. Increases in BP and HR by intracerebroventricular infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF were enhanced by aldosterone infused intracerebroventricularly, but not in the PVN. Telmisartan in the PVN again blocked all responses. In contrast, both eplerenone and benzamil in the PVN did not change the pressor responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of aldosterone and Na(+)-rich aCSF. These findings indicate that AT(1) receptors in the PVN mediate the responses to Na(+)-rich aCSF and their enhancement by aldosterone, both locally in the PVN or in the general CSF. MRs, benzamil-blockable Na(+) channels or transporters, and "ouabain" can be functionally active in the PVN, but in Wistar rats appear not to contribute to the pressor responses to short-term increases in CSF [Na(+)].

  4. A mechanism of hypoxia-mediated escape from adaptive immunity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Ivraym B; Smallwood, Chelsea A; Siemens, D Robert; Graham, Charles H

    2014-02-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer in which mechanistic knowledge is incomplete. Here, we describe a novel mechanism by which hypoxia contributes to tumoral immune escape from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Exposure of human or murine cancer cells to hypoxia for 24 hours led to upregulation of the immune inhibitory molecule programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1; also known as B7-H1), in a manner dependent on the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In vivo studies also demonstrated cellular colocalization of HIF-1α and PD-L1 in tumors. Hypoxia-induced expression of PD-L1 in cancer cells increased their resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Using glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), an agonist of nitric oxide (NO) signaling known to block HIF-1α accumulation in hypoxic cells, we prevented hypoxia-induced PD-L1 expression and diminished resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Moreover, transdermal administration of GTN attenuated tumor growth in mice. We found that higher expression of PD-L1 induced in tumor cells by exposure to hypoxia led to increased apoptosis of cocultured CTLs and Jurkat leukemia T cells. This increase in apoptosis was prevented by blocking the interaction of PD-L1 with PD-1, the PD-L1 receptor on T cells, or by addition of GTN. Our findings point to a role for hypoxia/HIF-1 in driving immune escape from CTL, and they suggest a novel cancer immunotherapy to block PD-L1 expression in hypoxic-tumor cells by administering NO mimetics.

  5. Mechanism of H2S-mediated protection against oxidative stress in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Alexander; Seregina, Tatyana; Nagornykh, Maxim; Luhachack, Lyly G; Korolkova, Natalya; Lopes, Liubov Errais; Kotova, Vera; Zavilgelsky, Gennady; Shakulov, Rustem; Shatalin, Konstantin; Nudler, Evgeny

    2017-06-06

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) renders bacteria highly resistant to oxidative stress, but its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report that 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) is the major source of endogenous H2S in Escherichia coli Cellular resistance to H2O2 strongly depends on the activity of mstA, a gene that encodes 3MST. Deletion of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) renders ∆mstA cells hypersensitive to H2O2 Conversely, induction of chromosomal mstA from a strong pLtetO-1 promoter (P tet -mstA) renders ∆fur cells fully resistant to H2O2 Furthermore, the endogenous level of H2S is reduced in ∆fur or ∆sodA ∆sodB cells but restored after the addition of an iron chelator dipyridyl. Using a highly sensitive reporter of the global response to DNA damage (SOS) and the TUNEL assay, we show that 3MST-derived H2S protects chromosomal DNA from oxidative damage. We also show that the induction of the CysB regulon in response to oxidative stress depends on 3MST, whereas the CysB-regulated l-cystine transporter, TcyP, plays the principle role in the 3MST-mediated generation of H2S. These findings led us to propose a model to explain the interplay between l-cysteine metabolism, H2S production, and oxidative stress, in which 3MST protects E. coli against oxidative stress via l-cysteine utilization and H2S-mediated sequestration of free iron necessary for the genotoxic Fenton reaction.

  6. Stabilization of dicentric translocations through secondary rearrangements mediated by multiple mechanisms in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pennaneach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs observed in S. cerevisiae mutants with increased rates of accumulating GCRs include predicted dicentric GCRs such as translocations, chromosome fusions and isoduplications. These GCRs resemble the genome rearrangements found as mutations underlying inherited diseases as well as in the karyotypes of many cancers exhibiting ongoing genome instability METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The structures of predicted dicentric GCRs were analyzed using multiple strategies including array-comparative genomic hybridization, pulse field gel electrophoresis, PCR amplification of predicted breakpoints and sequencing. The dicentric GCRs were found to be unstable and to have undergone secondary rearrangements to produce stable monocentric GCRs. The types of secondary rearrangements observed included: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ-dependent intramolecular deletion of centromeres; chromosome breakage followed by NHEJ-mediated circularization or broken-end fusion to another chromosome telomere; and homologous recombination (HR-dependent non-reciprocal translocations apparently mediated by break-induced replication. A number of these GCRs appeared to have undergone multiple bridge-fusion-breakage cycles. We also observed examples of chromosomes with extensive ongoing end decay in mec1 tlc1 mutants, suggesting that Mec1 protects chromosome ends from degradation and contributes to telomere maintenance by HR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HR between repeated sequences resulting in secondary rearrangements was the most prevalent pathway for resolution of dicentric GCRs regardless of the structure of the initial dicentric GCR, although at least three other resolution mechanisms were observed. The resolution of dicentric GCRs to stable rearranged chromosomes could in part account for the complex karyotypes seen in some cancers.

  7. Amine oxidation mediated by lysine-specific demethylase 1: quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics insights into mechanism and role of lysine 661.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-11

    We report classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the rate-determining amine oxidation step in the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)-catalyzed demethylation of the histone tail lysine (H3K4), with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) acting as cofactor. The oxidation of substrate lysine (sLys) involves the cleavage of an α-CH bond accompanied by the transfer of a hydride ion equivalent to FAD, leading to an imine intermediate. This hydride transfer pathway is shown to be clearly favored for sLys oxidation over other proposed mechanisms, including the radical (or single-electron transfer) route as well as carbanion and polar-nucleophilic mechanisms. MD simulations on six NVT ensembles (covering different protonation states of sLys and K661 as well as the K661M mutant) identify two possible orientations of the reacting sLys and FAD subunits (called "downward" and "upward"). Calculations at the QM(B3LYP-D/6-31G*)/CHARMM22 level provide molecular-level insights into the mechanism, helping to understand how LSD1 achieves the activation of the rather inert methyl-CH bond in a metal-free environment. Factors such as proper alignment of sLys (downward orientation), transition-state stabilization (due to the protein environment and favorable orbital interactions), and product stabilization via adduct formation are found to be crucial for facilitating the oxidative α-CH bond cleavage. The current study also sheds light on the role of important active-site residues (Y761, K661, and W695) and of the conserved water-bridge motif. The steric influence of Y761 helps to position the reaction partners properly, K661 is predicted to get deprotonated prior to substrate binding and to act as an active-site base that accepts a proton from sLys to enable the subsequent amine oxidation, and the water bridge that is stabilized by K661 and W695 mediates this proton

  8. Mechanisms of Cdc42-mediated rat MSC differentiation on micro/nano-textured topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwen; Song, Yanyan; Shi, Mengqi; Du, Yuanhong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yumei

    2017-02-01

    /nano-textured topography and the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. This study shows that the micropitted/nanotubular hierarchical topography produced by etching and anodic oxidation treatment drives fusiform cell morphology, cytoskeletal reorganization as well as better MSCs osteogenic differentiation. The cross-talk between Cdc42 pathway and Wnt/β-catenin pathway though GSK3β modulates the osteoinductive effect of the micro/nano-textured topography on MSCs. This finding sheds light on a novel mechanism involved in micro/nano-textured surface-mediated MSCs osteogenic differentiation and is a major step in the development of new surface modifications aiming to accelerate and enhance the process of osseointegration. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in anesthetized rats: are 5-HT5B receptors involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Maldonado, Carolina; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Terrón, José A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR-127935, inhibits hypotensive responses produced by the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and 5-HT5A/5B receptor ligand, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), in rats. This work further characterized the above mechanism using more selective 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. Also, expression of 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in blood vessels was searched by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Decreases in diastolic blood pressure induced by 5-CT (0.001-10 μg/kg, intravenously) were analyzed in anesthetized rats that had received intravenous vehicle (1 mL/kg), SB-224289 (5-HT1B antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), BRL15572 (5-HT1D antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each), or SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each) + GR-127935 (1 mg/kg). Because only the latter treatment inhibited 5-CT-induced hypotension, suggestive of a mechanism unrelated to 5-HT1B/1D receptors, the effects of antagonists/ligands at 5-HT5A (SB-699551, 1 mg/kg), 5-HT6 (SB-399885, 1 mg/kg), and 5-HT1B/1D/5A/5B/7 receptors (ergotamine, 0.1 mg/kg) on 5-CT-induced hypotension were tested. Interestingly, only ergotamine blocked 5-CT-induced responses; this effect closely paralleled that of SB-224289 + BRL-15572 + GR-127935. Neither did ergotamine nor GR-127935 inhibit hypotensive responses induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-44. Faint but clear bands corresponding to 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in aorta and mesenteric arteries were detected. Results suggest that the GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in rats is unrelated to 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. This mechanism, however, resembles putative 5-HT5B receptors.

  10. Repetition, Use of L1 and Reading Aloud as Mediational Mechanism during Collaborative Activity at the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganem-Gutierrez, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of semiotic mechanisms mediating collaborative activity during pair/group work interaction at the computer. The study is informed by sociocultural theory. The participants were university students of L2 Spanish performing three tasks in two modes of implementation: computer vs. paper-based. The questions…

  11. The molecular mechanisms of Curcuma Wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景钊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular mechanisms of Curcuma Wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells. Methods The Curcuma Wenyujin extract was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. TE-1 cells were divided into 4 groups after adherence.

  12. Uncovering molecular structural mechanisms of signaling mediated by the prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Sebastian A.; Linden, Rafael [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBCCF/UFRl), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho; Cordeiro, Yraima; Rocha e Lima, Luis M.T. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (FF/UFRl), RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia; Lopes, Marilene H. [Instituto Ludwig de Pesquisa de Cancer, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Jerson L.; Foguel, Debora [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBqM/UFRl), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Bioquimica Medica

    2009-07-01

    The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) - anchored prion protein (PrP{sup c}), usually associated with neurodegenerative diseases, modulates various cellular responses and may scaffold multiprotein cell surface signaling complexes. Engagement of PrP{sup c} with the secretable cochaperone hop/STI 1 induces neurotrophic transmembrane signals through unknown molecular mechanisms. We addressed whether interaction of Pr P{sup c} and hop STI 1 entails structural rearrangements relevant for signaling. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that PrP{sup c}:hop/STI 1 interaction triggers loss of PrP helical structures, involving at least a perturbation of the Pr P{sup c}{sub 143-153} beta-helix. Novel SAXS models revealed a significant C-terminal compaction of hop/STI 1 when bound to PrP{sup c}. Differing from a recent dimeric model of human hop/STI 1, both size exclusion chromatography and SAXS data support a monomeric form of free murine hop/STI 1. Changes in the Pr P{sup c}{sub 143-153} beta-helix may engage the transmembrane signaling protein laminin receptor precursor and neural cell adhesion molecule, both of which bind that domain of Pr P{sup c}, and further ligands may be engaged by the tertiary structural changes of hop/STI 1. These reciprocal structural modifications indicate a versatile mechanism for signaling mediated by Pr P{sup c}:hop/STI 1 interaction, consistent with the hypothesis that Pr P{sup c} scaffolds multiprotein signaling complexes at the cell surface. (author)

  13. A peripheral endocannabinoid mechanism contributes to glucocorticoid-mediated metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Nicole P; Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Li, Xiaosong; Vemuri, V Kiran; Wood, Jodi-Anne; Li, Zhiying; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Schwartz, Gary J; Makriyannis, Alexandros M; Kunos, George; Hillard, Cecilia J; McEwen, Bruce S; Hill, Matthew N

    2015-01-06

    Glucocorticoids are known to promote the development of metabolic syndrome through the modulation of both feeding pathways and metabolic processes; however, the precise mechanisms of these effects are not well-understood. Recent evidence shows that glucocorticoids possess the ability to increase endocannabinoid signaling, which is known to regulate appetite, energy balance, and metabolic processes through both central and peripheral pathways. The aim of this study was to determine the role of endocannabinoid signaling in glucocorticoid-mediated obesity and metabolic syndrome. Using a mouse model of excess corticosterone exposure, we found that the ability of glucocorticoids to increase adiposity, weight gain, hormonal dysregulation, hepatic steatosis, and dyslipidemia was reduced or reversed in mice lacking the cannabinoid CB1 receptor as well as mice treated with the global CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Similarly, a neutral, peripherally restricted CB1 receptor antagonist (AM6545) was able to attenuate the metabolic phenotype caused by chronic corticosterone, suggesting a peripheral mechanism for these effects. Biochemical analyses showed that chronic excess glucocorticoid exposure produced a significant increase in hepatic and circulating levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide, whereas no effect was observed in the hypothalamus. To test the role of the liver, specific and exclusive deletion of hepatic CB1 receptor resulted in a rescue of the dyslipidemic effects of glucocorticoid exposure, while not affecting the obesity phenotype or the elevations in insulin and leptin. Together, these data indicate that glucocorticoids recruit peripheral endocannabinoid signaling to promote metabolic dysregulation, with hepatic endocannabinoid signaling being especially important for changes in lipid metabolism.

  14. Pleiotropic action of aldosterone in epithelia mediated by transcription and post-transcription mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrey, F; Pearce, D; Pfeiffer, R; Spindler, B; Mastroberardino, L; Summa, V; Zecevic, M

    2000-04-01

    The aldosterone-induced increase in sodium reabsorption across tight epithelia can be divided schematically into two functional phases: an early regulatory phase starting after a lag period of 20 to 60 minutes, during which the pre-existing transport machinery is activated, and a late phase (>2.5 h), which can be viewed as an anabolic action leading to a further amplification/differentiation of the Na+ transport machinery. At the transcriptional level, both early and late responses are initiated during the lag period, but the functional impact of newly synthesized regulatory proteins is faster than that of the structural ones. K-Ras2 and SGK were identified as the first early aldosterone-induced regulatory proteins in A6 epithelia. Their mRNAs also were shown to be regulated in vivo by aldosterone, and their expression (constitutively active K-Ras2 and wild-type SGK) was shown to increase the function of ENaC coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes. Recently, aldosterone was also shown to act on transcription factors in A6 epithelia: It down-regulates the mRNAs of the proliferation-promoting c-Myc, c-Jun, and c-Fos by a post-transcriptional mechanism, whereas it up-regulates that of Fra-2 (c-Fos antagonist) at the transcriptional level. Together, these new data illustrate the complexity of the regulatory network controlled by aldosterone and support the view that its early action is mediated by the induction of key regulatory proteins such as K-Ras2 and SGK. These early induced proteins are sites of convergence for different regulatory inputs, and thus, their aldosterone-regulated expression level tunes the impact of other regulatory cascades on sodium transport. This suggests mechanisms for the escape from aldosterone action.

  15. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which basal ganglia neurons express acquired activities during and after behavioral learning, selective dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists were applied while recording the activity of striatal neurons in monkeys performing behavioral tasks. In experiment 1, a monkey was trained to associate a click sound with a drop of reward water. DA receptor antagonists were administered by micropressure using a stainless steel injection cannula (300 microm ID) through which a Teflon-coated tungsten wire for recording neuronal activity had been threaded. Responses to sound by tonically active neurons (TANs), a class of neurons in the primate striatum, were recorded through a tungsten wire electrode during the application of either D1- or D2-class DA receptor antagonists (total volume one of the surrounding barrels. SCH23390 (10 mM, pH 4.5) and (-)-sulpiride (10 mM, pH 4.5) were used. The effects of iontophoresis of both D1- and D2-class antagonists were examined in 40 TANs. Of 40 TANs from which recordings were made, responses were suppressed exclusively by the D2-class antagonist in 19 TANs, exclusively by the D1-class antagonist in 3 TANs, and by both D1- and D2-class antagonists in 7 TANs. When 0.9% NaCl, saline, was applied by pressure (<1 microl) or by iontophoresis (<30 nA) as a control, neither the background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  16. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and iron chloride (FeCl3). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V2O5, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl3 as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ( δR R × 100 ) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is 4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl3 and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from 4.5 to 11 % and 10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  17. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (India)

    2013-05-15

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and iron chloride (FeCl{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl{sub 3} as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ({Delta}R/Rx100) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is {approx}4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl{sub 3} and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from {approx}4.5 to 11 % and {approx}10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  18. Using hierarchical linear growth models to evaluate protective mechanisms that mediate science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Secker, Clare Elaine

    The study of students at risk is a major topic of science education policy and discussion. Much research has focused on describing conditions and problems associated with the statistical risk of low science achievement among individuals who are members of groups characterized by problems such as poverty and social disadvantage. But outcomes attributed to these factors do not explain the nature and extent of mechanisms that account for differences in performance among individuals at risk. There is ample theoretical and empirical evidence that demographic differences should be conceptualized as social contexts, or collections of variables, that alter the psychological significance and social demands of life events, and affect subsequent relationships between risk and resilience. The hierarchical linear growth models used in this dissertation provide greater specification of the role of social context and the protective effects of attitude, expectations, parenting practices, peer influences, and learning opportunities on science achievement. While the individual influences of these protective factors on science achievement were small, their cumulative effect was substantial. Meta-analysis conducted on the effects associated with psychological and environmental processes that mediate risk mechanisms in sixteen social contexts revealed twenty-two significant differences between groups of students. Positive attitudes, high expectations, and more intense science course-taking had positive effects on achievement of all students, although these factors were not equally protective in all social contexts. In general, effects associated with authoritative parenting and peer influences were negative, regardless of social context. An evaluation comparing the performance and stability of hierarchical linear growth models with traditional repeated measures models is included as well.

  19. Plasmid-Mediated OqxAB Is an Important Mechanism for Nitrofurantoin Resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Ng, Ka-Ying; Lo, Wai-U; Law, Pierra Y; Lai, Eileen Ling-Yi; Wang, Ya; Chow, Kin-Hung

    2015-11-09

    Increasing consumption of nitrofurantoin (NIT) for treatment of acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) highlights the need to monitor emerging NIT resistance mechanisms. This study investigated the molecular epidemiology of the multidrug-resistant efflux gene oqxAB and its contribution to nitrofurantoin resistance by using Escherichia coli isolates originating from patients with UTI (n = 205; collected in 2004 to 2013) and food-producing animals (n = 136; collected in 2012 to 2013) in Hong Kong. The oqxAB gene was highly prevalent among NIT-intermediate (11.5% to 45.5%) and -resistant (39.2% to 65.5%) isolates but rare (0% to 1.7%) among NIT-susceptible (NIT-S) isolates. In our isolates, the oqxAB gene was associated with IS26 and was carried by plasmids of diverse replicon types. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that the clones of oqxAB-positive E. coli were diverse. The combination of oqxAB and nfsA mutations was found to be sufficient for high-level NIT resistance. Curing of oqxAB-carrying plasmids from 20 NIT-intermediate/resistant UTI isolates markedly reduced the geometric mean MIC of NIT from 168.9 μg/ml to 34.3 μg/ml. In the plasmid-cured variants, 20% (1/5) of isolates with nfsA mutations were NIT-S, while 80% (12/15) of isolates without nfsA mutations were NIT-S (P = 0.015). The presence of plasmid-based oqxAB increased the mutation prevention concentration of NIT from 128 μg/ml to 256 μg/ml and facilitated the development of clinically important levels of nitrofurantoin resistance. In conclusion, plasmid-mediated oqxAB is an important nitrofurantoin resistance mechanism. There is a great need to monitor the dissemination of this transferable multidrug-resistant efflux pump.

  20. CHOLINERGIC NEURONS OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN MEDIATE BIOCHEMICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING SLEEP HOMEOSTASIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; McCarley, Robert W.; Basheer, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    The tight coordination of biochemical and electrophysiological mechanisms underlies the homeostatic sleep pressure (HSP) produced by sleep deprivation (SD). We have reported that during SD the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular nitric oxide (NO), adenosine [AD]ex, lactate [Lac]ex and pyruvate [Pyr]ex increase in the basal forebrain (BF). However, it is not clear whether all of them contribute to HSP leading to increased electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) recovery sleep (RS) following SD. Previously, we showed that NREM delta increase evident during RS depends on the presence of BF cholinergic (ChBF) neurons. Here, we investigated the role of ChBF cells in coordination of biochemical and EEG changes seen during SD and RS in the rat. Increases in low theta power (5–7Hz), but not high theta (7–9Hz), during SD correlated with the increase in NREM delta power during RS, and with the changes in nitrate/nitrite [NOx]ex and [AD]ex. Lesions of ChBF cells using IgG 192-saporin prevented increases in [NOx]ex, [AD]ex and low theta activity, during SD, but did not prevent increases in [Lac]ex and [Pyr]ex. Infusion of NO donor DETA NONOate into the saporin-treated BF failed to increase NREM RS and delta power, suggesting ChBF cells are important for mediating NO homeostatic effects. Finally, SD-induced iNOS was mostly expressed in ChBF cells, and the intensity of iNOS induction correlated with the increase in low theta activity. Together, our data indicate ChBF cells are important in regulating the biochemical and EEG mechanisms that contribute to HSP. PMID:25369989

  1. β-Arrestin mediates the Frank-Starling mechanism of cardiac contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Dennis M; Davis, Robert T; Warren, Chad M; Mao, Lan; Wolska, Beata M; Solaro, R John; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-12-13

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart is a physiological phenomenon that describes an intrinsic property of heart muscle in which increased cardiac filling leads to enhanced cardiac contractility. Identified more than a century ago, the Frank-Starling relationship is currently known to involve length-dependent enhancement of cardiac myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. However, the upstream molecular events that link cellular stretch to the length-dependent myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity are poorly understood. Because the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the multifunctional transducer protein β-arrestin have been shown to mediate mechanosensitive cellular signaling, we tested the hypothesis that these two proteins are involved in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. Using invasive hemodynamics, we found that mice lacking β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, or AT1R were unable to generate a Frank-Starling force in response to changes in cardiac volume. Although wild-type mice pretreated with the conventional AT1R blocker losartan were unable to enhance cardiac contractility with volume loading, treatment with a β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligand to selectively activate β-arrestin signaling preserved the Frank-Starling relationship. Importantly, in skinned muscle fiber preparations, we found markedly impaired length-dependent myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity in β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, and AT1R knockout mice. Our data reveal β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, and AT1R as key regulatory molecules in the Frank-Starling mechanism, which potentially can be targeted therapeutically with β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligands.

  2. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  3. Mechanisms Mediating Environmental Chemical-Induced Endocrine Disruption in the Adrenal Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to hundreds of man-made chemicals that pollute the environment in addition to multiple therapeutic drug treatments administered throughout life. Some of these chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors (EDs), mimic endogenous signals, thereby altering gene expression, influencing development, and promoting disease. Although EDs are eventually removed from the market or replaced with safer alternatives, new evidence suggests that early-life exposure leaves a fingerprint on the epigenome, which may increase the risk of disease later in life. Epigenetic changes occurring in early life in response to environmental toxicants have been shown to affect behavior, increase cancer risk, and modify the physiology of the cardiovascular system. Thus, exposure to an ED or combination of EDs may represent a first hit to the epigenome. Only limited information is available regarding the effect of ED exposure on adrenal function. The adrenal gland controls the stress response, blood pressure, and electrolyte homeostasis. This endocrine organ therefore has an important role in physiology and is a sensitive target of EDs. We review herein the effect of ED exposure on the adrenal gland with particular focus on in utero exposure to the plasticizer di(2-ethylehyl) phthalate. We discuss the challenges associated with identifying the mechanism mediating the epigenetic origins of disease and availability of biomarkers that may identify individual or population risks. PMID:25788893

  4. Mechanisms mediating environmental chemical-induced endocrine disruption in the adrenal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Martinez-Arguelles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans are continuously exposed to hundreds of man-made chemicals that pollute the environment in addition to multiple therapeutic drug treatments administered throughout life. Some of these chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors (EDs, mimic endogenous signals, thereby altering gene expression, influencing development, and promoting disease. Although EDs are eventually removed from the market or replaced with safer alternatives, new evidence suggests that early life exposure leaves a fingerprint on the epigenome, which may increase the risk of disease later in life. Epigenetic changes occurring in early life in response to environmental toxicants have been shown to affect behavior, increase cancer risk, and modify the physiology of the cardiovascular system. Thus, exposure to an ED or combination of EDs may represent a first hit to the epigenome. Only limited information is available regarding the effect of ED exposure on adrenal function. The adrenal gland controls the stress response, blood pressure, and electrolyte homeostasis. This endocrine organ therefore has an important role in physiology and is a sensitive target of EDs. We review herein the effect of ED exposure on the adrenal gland with particular focus on in utero exposure to the plasticizer di(2-ethylehyl phthalate. We discuss the challenges associated with identifying the mechanism mediating the epigenetic origins of disease and availability of biomarkers that may identify individual or population risks.

  5. Molecular Mechanism for p202-Mediated Specific Inhibition of AIM2 Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mouse p202 containing two hemopoietic expression, interferon inducibility, nuclear localization (HIN domains antagonizes AIM2 inflammasome signaling and potentially modifies lupus susceptibility. We found that only HIN1 of p202 binds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, while HIN2 forms a homotetramer. Crystal structures of HIN1 revealed that dsDNA is bound on face opposite the site used in AIM2 and IFI16. The structure of HIN2 revealed a dimer of dimers, the face analogous to the HIN1 dsDNA binding site being a dimerization interface. Electron microscopy imaging showed that HIN1 is flexibly linked to HIN2 in p202, and tetramerization provided enhanced avidity for dsDNA. Surprisingly, HIN2 of p202 interacts with the AIM HIN domain. We propose that this results in a spatial separation of the AIM2 pyrin domains, and indeed p202 prevented the dsDNA-dependent clustering of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase recruitment domain (ASC and AIM2 inflammasome activation. We hypothesize that while p202 was evolutionarily selected to limit AIM2-mediated inflammation in some mouse strains, the same mechanism contributes to increased interferon production and lupus susceptibility.

  6. Molecular mechanism and functional consequences of lansoprazole-mediated heme oxygenase-1 induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie Schulz-Geske; Kati Erdmann; Ronald J Wong; David K Stevenson; Henning Schr(o)der; Nina Grosser

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanism and functional consequences of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) activation by lansoprazole in endothelial cells and macrophages.METHODS: Expression of HO-1 mRNA was analyzed by Northern blotting. Western blotting was used to determine the HO-1 and ferritin protein levels. NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was measured with lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. HO-1 promoter activity in mouse fibroblasts, stably transfected with a 15-kb HO-1 gene that drives expression of the reporter gene luciferase, was assessed using in vivo bioluminescence imaging.RESULTS: Lansoprazole increased HO-1 mRNA levels in endothelial cells and HO-1 protein levelsin macrophages. In addition, lansoprazole-induced ferritin protein levels in both cell systems. Moreover, induction of the antioxidant proteins HO-1 and ferritin by lansoprazole was followed by a decrease in NADPH-mediated ROS formation. The radical scavenging properties of lansoprazole were diminished in the presence of the HO inhibitor, chromium mesoporphyrin IX. Induction of HO-1 gene expression by lansoprazole was not related to oxidative stress or to the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. However, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of HO-1 mRNA and promoter activity.CONCLUSION: Activation of HO-1 and ferritin may account for the gastric protection of lansoprazole and is dependent on a pathway blocked by LY294002.

  7. Mechanisms of TSC-mediated control of synapse assembly and axon guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knox

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex is a dominant genetic disorder produced by mutations in either of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2; it is characterized by hamartomatous tumors, and is associated with severe neurological and behavioral disturbances. Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 deregulate a conserved growth control pathway that includes Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb and Target of Rapamycin (TOR. To understand the function of this pathway in neural development, we have examined the contributions of multiple components of this pathway in both neuromuscular junction assembly and photoreceptor axon guidance in Drosophila. Expression of Rheb in the motoneuron, but not the muscle of the larval neuromuscular junction produced synaptic overgrowth and enhanced synaptic function, while reductions in Rheb function compromised synapse development. Synapse growth produced by Rheb is insensitive to rapamycin, an inhibitor of Tor complex 1, and requires wishful thinking, a bone morphogenetic protein receptor critical for functional synapse expansion. In the visual system, loss of Tsc1 in the developing retina disrupted axon guidance independently of cellular growth. Inhibiting Tor complex 1 with rapamycin or eliminating the Tor complex 1 effector, S6 kinase (S6k, did not rescue axon guidance abnormalities of Tsc1 mosaics, while reductions in Tor function suppressed those phenotypes. These findings show that Tsc-mediated control of axon guidance and synapse assembly occurs via growth-independent signaling mechanisms, and suggest that Tor complex 2, a regulator of actin organization, is critical in these aspects of neuronal development.

  8. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  9. Investigation on the mechanism of aminosilane-mediated bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2012-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the aminosilane-mediated room-temperature (RT) bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is presented. The plasma-activated thermoplastic or PDMS substrates were modified with alkoxy silanes having different organo functional groups, and their bonding characteristics were studied. Manual peeling tests revealed that strong bonding was realized only when the silane had a free amino group and at least two alkoxy groups on the silicon. Silanization was carried out in both aqueous and anhydrous conditions; bonding occurred readily at RT in the former case, but a longer incubation time or a higher temperature was needed for the latter. The presence of the silane on the surface was confirmed by contact-angle measurements and UV spectrophotometric, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopic (ATR-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses. In the case where the aminosilane was deposited from aqueous solution, the amino functionality of the silane-catalyzed siloxane bond formation between the silanol on the modified thermoplastic surface and the silanol of the plasma-activated PDMS. In the case of anhydrous phase deposition, the aminosilane first catalyzed the hydrolysis of the ethoxy groups on the silicon, and then, catalyzed the condensation between the silanol groups of both materials. Shelf life tests of the modified thermoplastics showed that the aminosilane was stable over 2 weeks, and that bonding occurred at RT when the substrates were soaked in water before bonding.

  10. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eGuseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  11. Mechanisms of RON-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MDCK cells through the MAPK pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xiangming

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is involved in neoplastic metastasis, and the RON protein may be involved. In the present study, we determined the role and the mechanisms of action of RON in EMT in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells by Western blot and cell migration analysis. Activation of RON by macrophage stimulating protein (MSP results in cell migration and initiates changes in the morphology of RON-cDNA-transfected MDCK cells. The absence of E-cadherin, the presence of vimentin and an increase in Snail were observed in RE7 cells, which were derived from MDCK cells transfected with wt-RON, compared with MDCK cells. Stimulation of RE7 cells with MSP resulted in increased migration (about 69% of the wounded areas were covered as well as increased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β; the percent of the activation ratio was 143.6/599.8% and 512.4%, respectively, which could be inhibited with an individual chemical inhibitor PD98059 (50 μM specific to MAPK/ERK kinase (the percent inhibition was 98.9 and 81.2%, respectively. Thus, the results indicated that RON protein could mediate EMT in MDCK cells via the Erk1/2 pathway. Furthermore, GSK-3β regulates the function of Snail in controlling EMT by this pathway.

  12. Photoperiodic regulation of testis function in rats: mediation by a circadian mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.J.; Bamat, M.K.; Zucker, I.

    1982-05-01

    Laboratory rats traditionally are classified as nonphotoperiodic because variations in daylength have little or no effect on their gonadal function. After olfactory bulbectomy, however, rats show clear evidence of photoperiodic regulation of the gonads. The present study demonstrates, by means of resonance experiments, that the testicular response to daylength in rats is mediated by a circadian photoperiodic time measurement system similar to that of photoperiodic rodents. Olfactory-bulbectomized rats were maintained in fixed photoperiods in which a 6 h light period was coupled with dark periods of 18, 30, 42, or 54 h; a fifth group was maintained in a 45L:10D photoperiod. Rats from the 6L:30D, 6L:54D and 14L:10D photoperiods had testes and seminal vesicle weights, plasma testosterone titers and spermatogenesis indices indicative of functional reproductive status. Rats exposed to the 6L:18D and 6L:42D photoperiods had reduced testicular and seminal vesicle weights, lower testosterone levels and reduced spermatogenesis. Researchers hypothesize that photo- and nonphotoperiodic rodent species use similar mechanisms for distinguishing long from short photoperiods, but differ in the extent to which discrimination of short daylengths is transduced into altered gonadal activity.

  13. Mechanisms of HO-1 mediated attenuation of renal immune injury: a gene profiling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    Using a mouse model of immune injury directed against the renal glomerular vasculature and resembling human forms of glomerulonephritis (GN), we assessed the effect of targeted expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. A human (h) HO-1 complementary DNAN (cDNA) sequence was targeted to glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) using a GEC-specific murine nephrin promoter. Injury by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) to transgenic (TG) mice with GEC-targeted hHO-1 was attenuated compared with wild-type (WT) controls. To explore changes in the expression of genes that could mediate this salutary effect, we performed gene expression profiling using a microarray analysis of RNA isolated from the renal cortex of WT or TG mice with or without anti-GBM antibody-induced injury. Significant increases in expression were detected in 9 major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II genes, 2 interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ases, and 3 genes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The increase in MHC-class II and proteasome gene expression in TG mice with injury was validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or Western blot analysis. The observations point to novel mechanisms underlying the cytoprotective effect of HO-1 in renal immune injury. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Th17 Pathway–Mediated Immunopathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Mechanisms and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly complex and severe neuropsychiatric disorder with an unknown etiopathology. Evidence for a dysregulated immune system in both the risk for and progression of schizophrenia has recently been overwhelming. Importantly, chronic low-grade inflammation both in the periphery and central nervous system has been shown to contribute predominantly to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in a subset of individuals. Inflammation in the central nervous system is mediated by a range of proinflammatory cytokines, resident immune cells such as microglia, and brain infiltrating peripheral immunocompetent cells, such as T lymphocytes. Recently, Th17 cells, a subset of T helper cells have emerged as crucial players in mucosal defense against infections. It is linked to atopic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. The risk factors/mechanisms leading to low-grade inflammation in schizophrenia are diverse and include infectious agents, stress, trauma, environmental toxins, genetic vulnerability, physical inactivity, obesity, poor diet, and sleep disruption. Herein, we propose that fetal programming of cellular immune components driven by intrauterine adversity can lead to the generation of long-lasting effector/memory Th17 cells. Th17 cells can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, infiltrate the central nervous system, and, along with other cytokines and microglia, lead to neuroprogression through neuroinflammation in schizophrenia. PMID:24711545

  15. Th17 pathway-mediated immunopathogenesis of schizophrenia: mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit; Berk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly complex and severe neuropsychiatric disorder with an unknown etiopathology. Evidence for a dysregulated immune system in both the risk for and progression of schizophrenia has recently been overwhelming. Importantly, chronic low-grade inflammation both in the periphery and central nervous system has been shown to contribute predominantly to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in a subset of individuals. Inflammation in the central nervous system is mediated by a range of proinflammatory cytokines, resident immune cells such as microglia, and brain infiltrating peripheral immunocompetent cells, such as T lymphocytes. Recently, Th17 cells, a subset of T helper cells have emerged as crucial players in mucosal defense against infections. It is linked to atopic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. The risk factors/mechanisms leading to low-grade inflammation in schizophrenia are diverse and include infectious agents, stress, trauma, environmental toxins, genetic vulnerability, physical inactivity, obesity, poor diet, and sleep disruption. Herein, we propose that fetal programming of cellular immune components driven by intrauterine adversity can lead to the generation of long-lasting effector/memory Th17 cells. Th17 cells can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, infiltrate the central nervous system, and, along with other cytokines and microglia, lead to neuroprogression through neuroinflammation in schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. TRF2-Mediated Control of Telomere DNA Topology as a Mechanism for Chromosome-End Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Pisano, Sabrina; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Lototska, Liudmyla; Kaur, Parminder; Bauwens, Serge; Djerbi, Nadir; Latrick, Chrysa M; Fraisier, Vincent; Pei, Bei; Gay, Alexandre; Jaune, Emilie; Foucher, Kevin; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Aeby, Eric; Miron, Simona; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ye, Jing; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Wang, Hong; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-21

    The shelterin proteins protect telomeres against activation of the DNA damage checkpoints and recombinational repair. We show here that a dimer of the shelterin subunit TRF2 wraps ∼ 90 bp of DNA through several lysine and arginine residues localized around its homodimerization domain. The expression of a wrapping-deficient TRF2 mutant, named Top-less, alters telomeric DNA topology, decreases the number of terminal loops (t-loops), and triggers the ATM checkpoint, while still protecting telomeres against non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In Top-less cells, the protection against NHEJ is alleviated if the expression of the TRF2-interacting protein RAP1 is reduced. We conclude that a distinctive topological state of telomeric DNA, controlled by the TRF2-dependent DNA wrapping and linked to t-loop formation, inhibits both ATM activation and NHEJ. The presence of RAP1 at telomeres appears as a backup mechanism to prevent NHEJ when topology-mediated telomere protection is impaired.

  17. Sugar-mediated chitosan/poly(ethylene glycol)-beta-dicalcium pyrophosphate composite: mechanical and microstructural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Wen; Hon, Min-Hsiung

    2003-02-01

    The microstructural and mechanical properties of sugar-mediated chitosan/poly(ethylene glycol)-based scaffolds and composites, which are composed of beta-dicalcium pyrophosphate (beta-DCP) and sugar-mediated scaffolds, were investigated. All of the scaffolds were prepared by various freeze-drying protocols. The differences in the freeze-drying process of the sugar-mediated chitosan/poly(ethylene glycol) scaffold for three types of sugar (sucrose, glucose, and D-fructose) were determined by scanning electron microscopic observation, water retention, density, and porosity analyses. The sugar-mediated scaffolds prepared by scheme I of the freeze-drying process show large pores, poorly connective interlayers, and disintegrated inner structures, different from the small pores and well-connective channel structures as shown in the scheme II freeze-drying process. The key factors for controlling pore structure and size in the scheme I freeze-drying process were formulation and composition, but for the scheme II freeze-drying process, the key factor was freeze protocol. The composite scaffolds were macroporous, and the microstructure changed considerably with added beta-DCP content. The incorporation of beta-DCP granules caused a significant enhancement of compressive modulus and yield strength. The increased mechanical strength may be attributable not only to the physical complexation between the sugar-mediated scaffold and beta-DCP, but also the chemical reaction to apatite formed on the cell wall.

  18. Determining the relative importance of the mechanisms of behavior change within Alcoholics Anonymous: a multiple mediator analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Hoeppner, Bettina; Stout, Robert L; Pagano, Maria

    2012-02-01

    Evidence indicates that Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) participation reduces relapse risk but less is known about the mechanisms through which AA confers this benefit. Initial studies indicate self-efficacy, negative affect, adaptive social networks and spiritual practices are mediators of this effect, but because these have been tested in isolation, their relative importance remains elusive. This study tested multiple mediators simultaneously to help determine the most influential pathways. Prospective, statistically controlled, naturalistic investigation examined the extent to which these previously identified mechanisms mediated AA attendance effects on alcohol outcomes controlling for baseline outcome values, mediators, treatment, and other confounders. Nine clinical sites within the United States. Adults (n = 1726) suffering from alcohol use disorder (AUD) initially enrolled in a randomized study with two arms: aftercare (n = 774); and out-patient (n = 952) comparing three out-patient treatments (Project MATCH). AA attendance during treatment; mediators at 9 months; and outcomes [percentage of days abstinent (PDA) and drinks per drinking day (DDD)] at 15 months. Among out-patients the effect of AA attendance on alcohol outcomes was explained primarily by adaptive social network changes and increases in social abstinence self-efficacy. Among more impaired aftercare patients, in addition to mediation through adaptive network changes and increases in social self-efficacy, AA lead to better outcomes through increasing spirituality/religiosity and by reducing negative affect. The degree to which mediators explained the relationship between AA and outcomes ranged from 43% to 67%. While Alcoholics Anonymous facilitates recovery by mobilizing several processes simultaneously, it is changes in social factors which appear to be of primary importance. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. trans-10,cis-12 CLA promotes osteoblastogenesis via SMAD mediated mechanism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonggun; Park, Yooheon; Park, Yeonhwa

    2014-05-01

    The inverse relationship between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells has been linked to overall bone mass. It has previously been reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits adipogenesis via a peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) mediated mechanism, while it increases osteoblastogenesis via a PPARγ-independent mechanism in mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests potential implication of CLA on improving bone mass. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine involvement of CLA on regulation of osteoblastogenesis in murine mesenchymal stem cells by focusing on the Mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD)-related family of molecules 8 (SMAD8), one of key regulators of osteoblastogenesis. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA, but not the cis-9,trans-11, significantly increased osteoblastogenesis via SMAD8, and inhibited adipogenesis independent of SMAD8, while inhibiting factors regulating osteoclastogenesis in this model. These suggest that CLA may help improve osteoblastogenesis via a SMAD8 mediated mechanism.

  20. 论民事立案调解机制%On the mediation mechanism of civil filing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹萍

    2011-01-01

    立案调解制度是为构建社会主义和谐社会,探索并实施的一项重要司法制度,在我国审判制度中有着极其重要的作用。加强立案调解,促进诉讼调解与社会矛盾纠纷的大调解机制相结合,对于和谐社会建设和保持社会稳定具有非常重要的意义。和谐司法只有起点,没有终点。目前民事调解制度的运行现状并不乐观,在今后的工作中,我们要继续完善立案调解的法律法规,加强对立案调解工作的重视,建立立案调解的激励机制,并且创新立案庭机构模式,进一步深化立案调解认识,主动站位,能动调解,深入推进大调解工作,为和谐社会构建做出积极贡献。%Filing mediation system is a major system of justice to explore and implement to build a socialist harmonious society, which has an extremely important role in our justice system.Strengthening the filing mediation and promoting the combination of the litigation conciliation and the mediation mechanism of social conflicts and disputes has very important significance for the construction of a harmonious society and maintaining social stability. Harmonious justice is only a starting point, not the end.The current status of the operation of civil mediation system is not optimistic,so in future work,we must continue to improve laws and regulations of filing mediation,enhance the importance of filing mediation,establish an incentive mechanism of filing mediation, innovate court filing agency model,further deepen understanding of filing mediation, actively station,dynamically mediate and further promote the work of mediation to make a positive contribution to build a harmonious society.

  1. Synthesis and Mechanism of Metal-Mediated Polymerization of Phenolic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin is a high performance adhesive, but has not been widely developed due to its slow curing rate and high curing temperature. To accelerate the curing rate and to lower the curing temperature of PF resin, four types of metal-mediated catalysts were employed in the synthesis of PF resin; namely, barium hydroxide (Ba(OH2, sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, lithium hydroxide (LiOH, and zinc acetate ((CH3COO2Zn. The cure-acceleration effects of these catalysts on the properties of PF resins were measured, and the chemical structures of the PF resins accelerated with the catalysts were investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and quantitative liquid carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR. The results showed that the accelerated efficiency of these catalysts to PF resin could be ordered in the following sequence: Na2CO3 > (CH3COO2Zn > Ba(OH2 > LiOH. The catalysts (CH3COO2Zn and Na2CO3 increased the reaction activity of the phenol ortho position and the condensation reaction of ortho methylol. The accelerating mechanism of (CH3COO2Zn on PF resin is probably different from that of Na2CO3, which can be confirmed by the differences in the differential thermogravimetric (DTG curve and thermogravimetric (TG data. Compared to the Na2CO3-accelerated PF resin, the (CH3COO2Zn-accelerated PF resin showed different peaks in the DTG curve and higher weight residues. In the synthesis process, the catalyst (CH3COO2Zn may form chelating compounds (containing a metal-ligand bond, which can promote the linkage of formaldehyde to the phenolic hydroxyl ortho position.

  2. Oxidative stress enhances Axl-mediated cell migration through an Akt1/Rac1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jhy-Shrian; Cho, Chun-Yu; Hong, Chih-Chen; Yan, Ming-De; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Lay, Jong-Ding; Lai, Gi-Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2013-12-01

    Persistent oxidative stress is common in cancer cells because of abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been associated with malignant phenotypes, such as chemotherapy resistance and metastasis. Both overexpression of Axl and abnormal ROS elevation have been linked to cell transformation and increased cell migration. However, the relationship between Axl and ROS in malignant cell migration has not been previously evaluated. Using an in vitro human lung cancer model, we examined the redox state of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines of low metastatic (CL1-0) and high metastatic (CL1-5) potentials. Here we report that Axl activation elicits ROS accumulation through the oxidase-coupled small GTPase Rac1. We also observed that oxidative stress could activate Axl phosphorylation to synergistically enhance cell migration. Further, Axl signaling activated by H2O2 treatment results in enhancement of cell migration via a PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway. The kinase activity of Axl is required for the Axl-mediated cell migration and prolongs the half-life of phospho-Akt under oxidative stress. Finally, downregulation of Akt1, but not Akt2, by RNAi in Axl-overexpressing cells inhibits the amount of activated Rac1 and the ability to migrate induced by H2O2 treatment. Together, these results show that a novel Axl-signaling cascade induced by H2O2 treatment triggers cell migration through the PI3K/Akt1/Rac1 pathway. Elucidation of redox regulation in Axl-related malignant migration may provide new molecular insights into the mechanisms underlying tumor progression.

  3. Signaling mechanisms mediated by G-protein coupled receptors in human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheikh Arshad SAEED; Huma RASHEED; Faisal A Wahed FECTO; Mohammad Ilyas ACHAKZAI; Rahmat ALI; John Dennis CONNOR; Anwar-ul-Hassan GILANI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The present study deals with the investigation of mechanisms involved in the synergistic interaction between epinephrine and arachidonic acid (AA). METHODS: Venous blood was taken from healthy human volunteers reported to be free of medications for one week. Platelet aggregation was monitored at 37 ℃ using Dual-channel Lumi-aggregometer. The resulting aggregation was recorded for 5 min by the measurement of light transmission as a function of time. RESULTS: The data show that a synergism in platelet aggregation mediated by subthreshold concentrations of epinephrine (1μmol/L) and AA (0.2μmol/L) was inhibited by the α2-receptor antagonist (yohimbine, IC50=0.6 μmol/L) and an inhibitor of AA-cyclooxygenase (COX), indomethacin (IC50=0.25 μmol/L).In examining receptor influence on intraplatelet signalling pathways, it was found that the synergistic effect was inhibited by calcium channel blockers, verapamil (IC50=0.4 μtmol/L) and diltiazem (IC50=2.5 μmol/L), as well as by low concentrations of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) (U73122; IC50=0.2 μmol/L) and mitogens activated protein kinase (MAPK) (PD 98059; IC50=3.8 μmol/L). Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine light chain kinase (TLCK), showed inhibition at IC50 value of 15 μmol/L, whereas chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC)inhibitor, had no effect up to 20 μmol/L. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that synergism between epinephrine and AA in platelet aggregation is triggered through receptors coupled to G-protein, which in turn, activate PLC,COX, and MAP kinase-signaling pathways.

  4. Chronic elevation of IL-1β induces diuresis via a cyclooxygenase 2-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, E I

    2013-07-15

    Chronic renal inflammation is an increasingly recognized phenomenon in multiple disease states, but the impact of specific cytokines on renal function is unclear. Previously, we found that 14-day interleukin-1β (IL-1β) infusion increased urine flow in mice. To determine the mechanism by which this occurs, the current study tested the possible involvement of three classical prodiuretic pathways. Chronic IL-1β infusion significantly increased urine flow (6.5 ± 1 ml/day at day 14 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3 ml/day in vehicle group; P < 0.05) and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, all three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, and endothelin (ET)-1 in the kidney (P < 0.05 in all cases). Urinary prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) excretion was also significantly increased at day 14 of IL-1β infusion (1.21 ± 0.26 vs. 0.29 ± 0.06 ng/day in vehicle-infused mice; P = 0.001). The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib markedly attenuated urinary PGEM excretion and abolished the diuretic response to chronic IL-1β infusion. In contrast, deletion of NOS3, or inhibition of NOS1 with L-VNIO, did not blunt the diuretic effect of IL-1β, nor did pharmacological blockade of endothelin ETA and ETB receptors with A-182086. Consistent with a primary effect on water transport, IL-1β infusion markedly reduced inner medullary aquaporin-2 expression (P < 0.05) and did not alter urinary Na⁺ or K⁺ excretion. These data indicate a critical role for COX-2 in mediating the effects of chronic IL-1β elevation on the kidney.

  5. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  6. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR-mediated

  7. Molecular mechanisms of AGE/RAGE-mediated fibrosis in the diabetic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Randive, Rushil; Stewart, James A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia is one of the main characteristics of diabetes. Persistent exposure to elevated glucose levels has been recognized as one of the major causal factors of diabetic complications. In pathologies, like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), mechanical and biochemical stimuli activate profibrotic signaling cascades resulting in myocardial fibrosis and subsequent impaired cardiac performance due to ventricular stiffness. High levels of glucose nonenzymatically react with long-lived proteins, such as collagen, to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE-modified collagen increase matrix stiffness making it resistant to hydrolytic turnover, resulting in an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. AGEs account for many of the diabetic cardiovascular complications through their engagement of the receptor for AGE (RAGE). AGE/RAGE activation stimulates the secretion of numerous profibrotic growth factors, promotes increased collagen deposition leading to tissue fibrosis, as well as increased RAGE expression. To date, the AGE/RAGE cascade is not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss one of the major fibrotic signaling pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade, as well as propose an alternate pathway via Rap1a that may offer insight into cardiovascular ECM remodeling in T2DM. In a series of studies, we demonstrate a role for Rap1a in the regulation of fibrosis and myofibroblast differentiation in isolated diabetic and non-diabetic fibroblasts. While these studies are still in a preliminary stage, inhibiting Rap1a protein expression appears to down-regulate the molecular switch used to activate the ζ isotype of protein kinase C thereby promote AGE/RAGE-mediated fibrosis. PMID:25512788

  8. Mechanisms of RhoGDI2 Mediated Lung Cancer Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Suppression

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    Huiyan Niu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of RhoGDI2 in lung cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process and to illustrate the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improvement of lung cancer treatment. Methods: The RhoGDI2 knock-down and overexpressing A549 cell lines were first constructed. The influence of RhoGDI2 on cytoskeleton in A549 cells was studied using two approaches: G-LISA-based Rac1 activity measurement and immunostaining-based F-actin distribution. The expression levels of key EMT genes were analyzed using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, western blot and immunostaining in untreated and RhoGDI2 knock-down or overexpressing A549 cells in both in vivo and in vitro experimental settings. Results: Our study showed that the activity of Rac1, a key gene that is crucial for the initiation and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma, causing the redistribution of F-actin with partial loss of cell-cell adhesions and stress fibers, was significantly suppressed by RhoGDI2. RhoGDI2 promoted the expression of EMT marker gene E-cadherin and repressed EMT promoting genes Slug, Snail, α-SMA in both A549 cells and lung and liver organs derived from the mouse models. Knocking-down RhoGDI2 induced abnormal morphology for lung organs. Conclusion: These findings indicate that RhoGDI2 repressed the activity of Rac1 and may be involved in the rearrangement of cytoskeleton in lung cancer cells. RhoGDI2 suppresses the metastasis of lung cancer mediated through EMT by regulating the expression of key genes such as E-cadherin, Slug, Snail and α-SMA in both in vivo and in vitro models.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of AGE/RAGE-mediated fibrosis in the diabetic heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia; Zhao; Rushil; Randive; James; A; Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia is one of the main characteristics of diabetes. Persistent exposure to elevated glucose levels has been recognized as one of the major causal factors of diabetic complications. In pathologies, like type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM), mechanical and biochemical stimuli activate profibrotic signaling cascades resulting in myocardial fibrosis and subsequent impaired cardiac performance due to ventricular stiffness. High levels of glucose nonenzymatically react with long-lived proteins, such as collagen, to form advanced glycation end products(AGEs). AGE-modified collagen increase matrix stiffness making it resistant to hydrolytic turnover, resulting in an accumulation of extracellular matrix(ECM) proteins. AGEs account for many of the diabetic cardiovascular complications through their engagement of the receptor for AGE(RAGE). AGE/RAGE activation stimulates the secretion of numerous profibrotic growth factors, promotes increased collagen deposition leading to tissue fibrosis, as well as increased RAGE expression. To date, the AGE/RAGE cascade is not fully understood. In this review, we willdiscuss one of the major fibrotic signaling pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade, as well as propose an alternate pathway via Rap1 a that may offer insight into cardiovascular ECM remodeling in T2 DM. In a series of studies, we demonstrate a role for Rap1 a in the regulation of fibrosis and myofibroblast differentiation in isolated diabetic and non-diabetic fibroblasts. While these studies are still in a preliminary stage, inhibiting Rap1 a protein expression appears to down-regulate the molecular switch used to activate the ζ isotype of protein kinase C thereby promote AGE/RAGE-mediated fibrosis.

  10. Emergence and Spread of A Plasmid-Mediated Polymyxin Resistance Mechanism, MCR-1: Are Bacteria Winning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The report of the emergence of mcr-1, the first plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance mechanism, in Enterobacteriaceae in November 2015 challenged our last psychological line of defense. However, we still trusted that this resistance factor had not spread globally. One month later, in December 2015, the detection of mcr-1 in an Escherichia coliisolate from a septicemic patient in Denmark and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat really defeated us. The worst news was that one of the chicken meat isolates belonged to ST131, a spreading epidemic sequence type. In China, 15%-21% of E. coli strains isolated from raw meat and animals carried mcr-1, and about 1% of patient isolates carried this gene, indicating that E. coli carrying this plasmid is not a rare phenomenon. This gene is transferable by conjugation and can be maintained in Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting the risk of transfer between different bacterial genera. The good news is that the strains carrying mcr-1 do not contain genes for pan-resistance profiles, although some Danish strains contain 15 different resistance genes, including genes for extended-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics, and gene mutations leading to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. If the mcr-1-bearing strains acquire multidrug resistance, extensive drug resistance, or pandrug resistance, no antibiotic drugs will be available with which clinicians can treat infected patients. Therefore, the use of antibiotics in both hospitals and the animal breeding industry must be strictly regulated. The origin of mcr-1 may be associated with the wide use of colistin in agriculture. There is no evidence that the Danish mcr-1 gene spread from China. Therefore, it is likely that mcr-1 genes originated in multiple sites simultaneously under the pressure of colistin use, because India and Denmark are the world’ s greatest users of this antibiotic. More surveys must be conducted in different

  11. Mechanisms of a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy involving atmospheric pressure plasma-mediated apoptosis and DNA strand break formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed for a variety of biomedical applications due to its chemically reactive components. Recently, the plasma has emerged as a promising novel cancer therapy based on its ability to selectively ablate cancer cells while leaving normal cells essentially unaffected. The therapeutic effect of plasma is attributed to intracellular generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway via severe DNA strand break formation. However, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for appropriate activation of these physiological events and which pathway is more crucial for plasma-mediated cytotoxicity have not been clarified. Understanding the molecular link between ROS/RNS-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage-involved chromosome instability is critical for the development of more efficacious therapeutic strategies for selective killing of diverse cancer cells.

  12. A phenomenological model for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, damage, and plasticity of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I; Gleason, Rudolph L

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios.

  13. Exploring the mechanisms of weight loss in the SHED-IT intervention for overweight men: a mediation analysis

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    Collins Clare E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical mediation analysis can be used to improve the design of obesity prevention and treatment programs by identifying the possible mechanisms through which an intervention achieved its effects. The aim of this study was to identify mediators of weight loss in an Internet-based weight-loss program specifically designed for overweight men. Methods The Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT program was a 3-month randomized controlled trial (Internet-based intervention group vs information only control group that was implemented in 2007 with baseline and 6-month follow-up assessment of weight, physical activity and dietary behaviors. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol mediation analyses were conducted using a product-of-coefficients test. Results Participants (N = 65 were overweight and obese male academic (n = 10 and non-academic (n = 27 staff and students (n = 28 from the University of Newcastle, Australia. Mean (SD age = 35.9 (11.1 years and mean (SD BMI = 30.6 (2.8. In the intention-to-treat analysis, both groups lost weight, but relative to the control group, the intervention did not have a statistically significant 'total effect' on weight, τ = -.507, p = .716 (95% CI = -3.277 to 2.263. In the per-protocol analysis, the intervention had a statistically significant 'total effect' on weight, τ = -4.487, p Conclusion Few studies have examined the mediators of weight loss in obesity treatment interventions. While none of the hypothesized mediators satisfied the criteria for mediation in the current study, there was some evidence to suggest that overweight men in the SHED-IT intervention reduced their fat intake over the study period. Future obesity treatment and prevention programs should explore behavioral mediators of weight loss using appropriate statistical methods. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ANZCTRN12607000481471.

  14. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  15. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

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    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  16. Mechanisms and mediation in survival analysis: towards an integrated analytical framework.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haase, Trutz

    2016-02-29

    A wide-ranging debate has taken place in recent years on mediation analysis and causal modelling, raising profound theoretical, philosophical and methodological questions. The authors build on the results of these discussions to work towards an integrated approach to the analysis of research questions that situate survival outcomes in relation to complex causal pathways with multiple mediators. The background to this contribution is the increasingly urgent need for policy-relevant research on the nature of inequalities in health and healthcare.

  17. Mechanism of supply chain coordination cased on dynamic capability framework-the mediating role of manufacturing capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Gao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A critical issue has been absent from the conversation on supply chain coordination: how supply chain coordination influence the enterprise performance. This research proposes a new vision to research the performance mechanism of supply chain coordination capability as a dynamic capability. Manufacturing capabilities are existed as mediating role. Design/methodology/approach: Data from International Manufacturing Strategy Survey in 2009 is used to verify the mediating model by hierarchical regression analysis. Findings: The results show that supply chain coordination impacts the enterprise performance positively and indirect impacts the enterprise performance through quality, cost, flexibility. Research implications: This study presents an overview of the impact of supply chain coordination and manufacturing capabilities on enterprise performance, giving grasp for further research of the relationships that exist between them. Originality/value: This finding integrates insights from previous research in dynamic capability framework and supply chain management into a generalization and extension of the performance mechanism in manufacturing enterprises.

  18. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells mediate anti-inflammatory responses to a gut commensal molecule via both innate and adaptive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Ochoa-Reparaz, Javier; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-04-09

    Polysaccharide A (PSA), the archetypical immunomodulatory molecule of the gut commensal Bacteroides fragilis, induces regulatory T cells to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). The cellular mediators of PSA's immunomodulatory properties are incompletely understood. In a mouse model of colitis, we find that PSA requires both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to generate protection. Plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) exposed to PSA do not produce proinflammatory cytokines, but instead they specifically stimulate IL-10 secretion by CD4+ T cells and efficiently mediate PSA-afforded immunoprotection. PSA induces and preferentially ligates Toll-like receptor 2 on PDCs but not on conventional DCs. Compared with other TLR2 ligands, PSA is better at enhancing PDC expression of costimulatory molecules required for protection against colitis. PDCs can thus orchestrate the beneficial immunoregulatory interaction of commensal microbial molecules, such as PSA, through both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Discrimination between platelet-mediated and coagulation-mediated mechanisms in a model of complex thrombus formation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadroy, Y.; Horbett, T.A.; Hanson, S.R.

    1989-04-01

    To study mechanisms of complex thrombus formation in vivo, and to compare the relative antithrombotic effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, a model was developed in baboons. Segments of collagen-coated tubing followed by two sequentially placed expansion chambers exhibiting disturbed flow patterns were exposed to native blood under laminar flow conditions. The device was incorporated for 1 hour into an exteriorized arteriovenous shunt in baboons under controlled blood flow (20 ml/min). Morphologic evaluation by scanning electron microscopy showed that thrombi associated with collagen were relatively rich in platelets but thrombi in the chambers were rich in fibrin and red cells. Deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets was continuously measured with a scintillation camera. Platelet deposition increased in a linear (collagen-coated segment) or exponential (chambers 1 and 2) fashion over time, with values after 40 minutes averaging 24.1 +/- 3.3 x 10(8) platelets (collagen segment), 16.7 +/- 3.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 1), and 8.4 +/- 2.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 2). Total fibrinogen deposition after 40 minutes was determined by using iodine 125-labeled baboon fibrinogen and averaged 0.58 +/- 0.14 mg in the collagen segment, 1.51 +/- 0.27 mg in chamber 1, and 0.95 +/- 0.25 mg in chamber 2. Plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG), platelet-factor 4 (PF4), and fibrinopeptide A (FPA) increased fourfold to fivefold after 60 minutes of blood exposure to the thrombotic device. Platelet deposition onto the collagen segment, chamber 1, and chamber 2 was linearly dependent on the circulating platelet count. Platelet accumulation in chamber 1 and chamber 2 was also dependent on the presence of the proximal collagen segment.

  20. Mechanism study of copper-mediated one-pot reductive amination of aryl halides using trimethylsilyl azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Toshihide; Ueda, Moriatsu; Nakano, Jun; Sawama, Yoshinari; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2013-09-20

    Reaction mechanisms of the copper-mediated amination of aryl halides with trimethylsilyl azide (TMSN3) were analyzed on the basis of the time-course study using reaction monitoring FT-IR, trapping an intermediary aryl azide by the Huisgen reaction, and the analysis of the generated N2 gas during the reaction. This amination would proceed through multiple pathways via aryl radicals and copper(I) azide.

  1. Mechanism of surface-mediated activation of bovine Factor XII and prekallikrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugo, T; Ohno, Y; Shimada, T; Kato, H; Iwanaga, S

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of kaolin-mediated activation of bovine Factor XII was studied in the presence of prekallikrein and HMW kininogen. The activated enzymes were assayed using fluorogenic peptides, Boc-Glu (OBzl)-Gly-Arg-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (MCA) for Factor XIIa and Z-Phe-Arg-MCA for plasma kallikrein. The rates of activation of the zymogens were separately measured by blocking either of the active enzymes with specific inhibitors, corn inhibitor for Factor XIIa (Ki = 6.7 nM) and Trasylol for plasma kallikrein (Ki = 3.9 nM). The result was as follows: (1) At the early stage of the activation reaction, kallikrein activity was first generated after short lag time, and then Factor XIIa activity was generated with a sigmoidal curve. In the presence of corn inhibitor, the activation of prekallikrein was observed, but in the presence of Trasylol, the activation of Factor XII was not observed. In the presence of high concentration of Ala-Phe-Arg-Ch2Cl, which inactivates immediately both of the active enzymes, the cleavage of a single chain prekallikrein into the two chain form by Factor XII was shown by SDS-PAGE, using nonlabelled and tritiated prekallikrein. (2) The incubation of Factor XII alone in a quartz cuvette or in the presence of kaolin and HMW kininogen did not result in the activation of Factor XII. The concave upward curve due to an autocatalytic activation was not observed even after the addition of Factor XIIa to Factor XII preparation. Moreover, no structural change of Factor XII during the incubation with kaolin and HMW kininogen was shown by SDS-PAGE, using 3H-Factor XII. (3) The rates of activation of prekallikrein by Factor XII and by Factor XIIa were approximately the same at higher concentration of prekallikrein. However, at lower concentration of prekallikrein the rate of activation of prekallikrein by Factor XII was shown to be a sigmoidal curve and slower than that by Factor XIIa. These results indicate that the activation of bovine Factor XII is

  2. Mechanisms of Subsurface Drip Irrigation-Mediated Suppression of Lettuce Drop Caused by Sclerotinia minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A A; Liu, L; Reidy, B; Davis, R M; Subbarao, K V

    1998-03-01

    ABSTRACT Subsurface drip irrigation and associated mandatory minimum tillage practices significantly reduced the incidence of lettuce drop (Sclerotinia minor) and the severity of corky root on lettuce compared with furrow irrigation and conventional tillage. Three possible mechanisms for the drip irrigation-mediated disease suppression were examined in this study: qualitative and quantitative differences in the soil microflora under furrow and subsurface drip irrigation; their antagonism and potential bio-control effects on S. minor; and the physical distribution of soil moisture and temperature relative to the two irrigation methods. To determine if the suppressive effects under subsurface drip irrigation were related to changes in soil microflora, soils were assayed for actinomycetes, bacteria, and fungi during the spring and fall seasons. The effects of the irrigation methods on microbial populations were nearly identical during both seasons. In the spring season, the total number of fungal colonies recovered on potato dextrose agar amended with rose Bengal generally was greater in soils under drip irrigation than under furrow irrigation, but no such differences were observed during the fall. Numbers of actinomycetes and bacteria were not significantly different between irrigation methods during either season. No interaction between sampling time and irrigation methods was observed for any of the microbial populations during both seasons. Thus, the significant effect of sampling time observed for actinomycete and bacterial populations during the spring was most likely not caused by the irrigation treatments. There were also no qualitative differences in the three groups of soil microflora between the irrigation treatments. Even though some fungal, actinomycete, and bacterial isolates suppressed mycelial growth of S. minor in in vitro assays, the isolates came from both subsurface drip- and furrow-irrigated soils. In in planta assays, selected isolates failed to

  3. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-06-30

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells.

  4. Interleukin-10-mediated heme oxygenase 1-induced underlying mechanism in inflammatory down-regulation by norfloxacin in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Zapater, Pedro; Bellot, Pablo; Pascual, Sonia; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2011-03-01

    Patients with cirrhosis receiving norfloxacin show a restored inflammatory balance that likely prevents clinical complications derived from an excessive proinflammatory response to bacterial product challenges. This study sought to investigate associated inflammatory control mechanisms established in patients with cirrhosis receiving norfloxacin. A total of 62 patients with cirrhosis and ascites in different clinical conditions were considered. Blood samples were collected and intracellular and serum norfloxacin were measured. Inflammatory mediators were evaluated at messenger RNA and protein levels. Neutrophils from all patients were cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and anti-interleukin-10 (anti-IL-10) monoclonal antibody in different conditions. IL-10 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were up-regulated in patients receiving norfloxacin and correlated with norfloxacin in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and nuclear factor-κB behaved inversely. Higher IL-10 levels correlated with lower white blood cell count and higher mean arterial pressure. No correlations were found between IL-10 and disease clinical scores or liver function markers in blood. Neutrophilic in vitro assays showed that the effect of LPS on proinflammatory mediator levels in the presence of norfloxacin was abrogated by significantly increasing IL-10 and HO-1 expression. After stimulation with LPS plus anti-IL-10, proinflammatory mediators were dramatically increased in patients receiving norfloxacin, and increasing intracellular norfloxacin concentrations did not decrease the expression levels of these proinflammatory molecules. Unblocking IL-10 restored proinflammatory mediator and HO-1 expression to previously observed levels in response to LPS stimulation. Although the described association does not necessarily mean causality, an IL-10-mediated HO-1-induced anti-inflammatory mechanism is present in patients with

  5. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders: from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory region. Expression QTL studies have shown that these variants affect disease mainly by regulating gene expression. We discuss recent findings on shared genetic loci between infectious and immune-mediated diseases and provide potential clues to explore genetic associations in the context of these infectious agents. We propose that the interdisciplinary studies (genetics-genomics-immunology-infection-bioinformatics) are the future post-GWAS approaches to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:25458995

  6. IgA-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: an uncommon mechanism of Goodpasture's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulis, Guillaume; Huart, Antoine; Guitard, Joëlle; Fortenfant, Françoise; Chauveau, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Goodpasture's (GP) disease is usually mediated by IgG autoantibodies. We describe a case of IgA-mediated GP, in a patient presenting with isolated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was established on kidney biopsy, since routine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeted at IgG circulating autoantibodies failed to detect the nephritogenic antibodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intense linear deposition of IgA along the glomerular capillary walls. An elevated titre (1:80) of circulating IgA anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies was retrospectively demonstrated by indirect fluorescence. Despite immunosuppressive regimen, the disease progressed to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Transplantation was not associated with recurrence in the kidney graft. We reviewed the 11 previously reported cases of IgA-mediated GP.

  7. PUVB-mediated prevention of luminal narrowing after arterial wall injury: modulation of mechanical arterial properties as a putative mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perree, Jop; Kerindongo, Raphaela P.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.

    2001-10-01

    In a previous study we have found that the photodynamic modality PUVB (8-methoxy-Psoralen + UVB) reduces luminal narrowing after arterial endovascular injury. We hypothesized that PUVB may modulate the arterial mechanical properties and tested this hypothesis by measuring the stress as a function of the strain in segments of carotid artery. Furthermore, we have investigated the potential for PUVB-induced cross-linking of extracellular matrix proteins by gel electrophoresis. It was found that both techniques were suitable for testing our hypotheses as evidenced by a statistically significant difference for the positive control. However, no differences between A) control, B) sensitizer only, C) light only and D) PUVB-treated samples could be found with respect to macro- and micro-mechanical properties. Therefore, the hypothesis that PUVB mediates its luminal narrowing reduction effect by directly changing the arterial mechanical properties should be rejected.

  8. A novel Netrin-1–sensitive mechanism promotes local SNARE-mediated exocytosis during axon branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Cortney C.; McClain, Leslie M.; Valtschanoff, Juli G.; Park, Charles S.; Maglione, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Developmental axon branching dramatically increases synaptic capacity and neuronal surface area. Netrin-1 promotes branching and synaptogenesis, but the mechanism by which Netrin-1 stimulates plasma membrane expansion is unknown. We demonstrate that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is a prerequisite for axon branching and identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a critical catalytic link between Netrin-1 and exocytic SNARE machinery in murine cortical neurons. TRIM9 ligase activity promotes SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion and axon branching in a Netrin-dependent manner. We identified a direct interaction between TRIM9 and the Netrin-1 receptor DCC as well as a Netrin-1–sensitive interaction between TRIM9 and the SNARE component SNAP25. The interaction with SNAP25 negatively regulates SNARE-mediated exocytosis and axon branching in the absence of Netrin-1. Deletion of TRIM9 elevated exocytosis in vitro and increased axon branching in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide a novel model for the spatial regulation of axon branching by Netrin-1, in which localized plasma membrane expansion occurs via TRIM9-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion. PMID:24778312

  9. Haemoglobin modulates salicylate and jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance mechanisms against pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Sivakumaran, Anushen; Mandon, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in defence against hemibiotrophic pathogens mediated by salicylate (SA) and also necrotrophic pathogens influenced by jasmonate/ethylene (JA/Et). This study examined how NO-oxidizing haemoglobins (Hb) encoded by GLB1, GLB2, and GLB3 in Arabidopsis could influence both...

  10. An epigenetic mechanism mediates developmental nicotine effects on neuronal structure and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yonwoo; Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Lee, Angela M.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Coman, Daniel; Heath, Christopher J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Mineur, Yann S.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David; Bordey, Angelique; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure causes persistent changes in cortical neuron morphology and in behavior. We used microarray screening to identify master transcriptional or epigenetic regulators mediating these effects of nicotine and discovered increases in Ash2l, a component of a histone methyltransferase complex. We therefore examined genome-wide changes in H3K4 tri-methylation, a mark induced by the Ash2l complex associated with increased gene transcription. A significant number of regulated promoter sites were involved in synapse maintenance. We found that Mef2c interacts with Ash2l and mediates changes in H3K4 tri-methylation. Knockdown of Ash2l or Mef2c abolishes nicotine-mediated alterations of dendritic complexity in vitro and in vivo, and attenuates nicotine-dependent changes in passive avoidance behavior. In contrast, overexpression mimics nicotine-mediated alterations of neuronal structure and passive avoidance behavior. These studies identify Ash2l as a novel target induced by nicotinic stimulation that couples developmental nicotine exposure to changes in brain epigenetic marks, neuronal structure and behavior. PMID:27239938

  11. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders : from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory

  12. Perilipin Promotes HSL-Mediated Adipocyte Lipolysis via Phosphorylation-dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is the predominant lipase effector of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes. HSL-dependent lipolysis, in response to catecholamines, is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of perilipin A (Peri A), an essential lipid droplet (LD)-ass...

  13. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen'kyi, V'yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-09-16

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway.

  14. Mechanisms of acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in systemic arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Catherine; Lekic, Mateja; Smith, Christina L; Pusec, Carolina M; Sweazea, Karen L

    2013-10-01

    For mammals, acetylcholine (ACh) promotes endothelium-dependent vasodilation primarily through nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-mediated pathways, with varying reliance on endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. Currently, no studies have been conducted on small systemic arteries from wild birds. We hypothesized that ACh-mediated vasodilation of isolated small arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) would likewise depend on endothelial-derived factors. Small resistance mesenteric and cranial tibial (c. tibial) arteries (80-150 μm, inner diameter) were cannulated and pre-constricted to 50 % of resting inner diameter with phenylephrine then exposed to increasing concentrations of ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) or the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10(-12)-10(-3) M). For mesenteric arteries, ACh-mediated vasodilation was significantly blunted with the potassium channel antagonist tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 10 mM); whereas responses were only moderately impaired with endothelial disruption or inhibition of prostaglandins (indomethacin, 10 μM). In contrast, endothelial disruption as well as exposure to TEA largely abolished vasodilatory responses to ACh in c. tibial arteries while no effect of prostaglandin inhibition was observed. For both vascular beds, responses to ACh were moderately dependent on the NO signaling pathway. Inhibition of NO synthase had no impact, despite complete reversal of phenylephrine-mediated tone with SNP, whereas inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) caused minor impairments. Endothelium-independent vasodilation also relied on potassium channels. In summary, ACh-mediated vasodilation of mesenteric and c. tibial arteries occurs through the activation of potassium channels to induce hyperpolarization with moderate reliance on sGC. Prostaglandins likewise play a small role in the vasodilatory response to ACh in mesenteric arteries.

  15. Spirituality in Recovery: A Lagged Mediational Analysis of Alcoholics Anonymous’ Principal Theoretical Mechanism of Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F.; Stout, Robert L.; Magill, Molly; Tonigan, J. Scott; Pagano, Maria E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) can play a valuable role in recovery from alcohol use disorder. While AA itself purports it aids recovery through “spiritual” practices and beliefs, this claim remains contentious and has been only rarely formally investigated. Using a lagged, mediational analysis, with a large clinical sample of adults with alcohol use disorder, this study examined the relationships among AA, spirituality/religiousness, and alcohol use, and tested whether the observed relation between AA and better alcohol outcomes can be explained by spiritual changes. Method Adults (N = 1,726) participating in a randomized controlled trial of psychosocial treatments for alcohol use disorder (Project MATCH) were assessed at treatment intake, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 months on their AA attendance, spiritual/religious practices, and alcohol use outcomes using validated measures. General linear modeling (GLM) and controlled lagged mediational analyses were utilized to test for mediational effects. Results Controlling for a variety of confounding variables, attending AA was associated with increases in spiritual practices, especially for those initially low on this measure at treatment intake. Results revealed AA was also consistently associated with better subsequent alcohol outcomes, which was partially mediated by increases in spirituality. This mediational effect was demonstrated across both outpatient and aftercare samples and both alcohol outcomes (proportion of abstinent days; drinks per drinking day). Conclusions Findings suggest that AA leads to better alcohol use outcomes, in part, by enhancing individuals’ spiritual practices and provides support for AA’s own emphasis on increasing spiritual practices to facilitate recovery from alcohol use disorder. PMID:21158876

  16. Spirituality in recovery: a lagged mediational analysis of alcoholics anonymous' principal theoretical mechanism of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Stout, Robert L; Magill, Molly; Tonigan, J Scott; Pagano, Maria E

    2011-03-01

    Evidence indicates Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) can play a valuable role in recovery from alcohol use disorder. While AA itself purports it aids recovery through "spiritual" practices and beliefs, this claim remains contentious and has been only rarely formally investigated. Using a lagged, mediational analysis, with a large, clinical sample of adults with alcohol use disorder, this study examined the relationships among AA, spirituality/religiousness, and alcohol use, and tested whether the observed relation between AA and better alcohol outcomes can be explained by spiritual changes. Adults (N = 1,726) participating in a randomized controlled trial of psychosocial treatments for alcohol use disorder (Project MATCH) were assessed at treatment intake, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 months on their AA attendance, spiritual/religious practices, and alcohol use outcomes using validated measures. General linear modeling (GLM) and controlled lagged mediational analyses were utilized to test for mediational effects. Controlling for a variety of confounding variables, attending AA was associated with increases in spiritual practices, especially for those initially low on this measure at treatment intake. Results revealed AA was also consistently associated with better subsequent alcohol outcomes, which was partially mediated by increases in spirituality. This mediational effect was demonstrated across both outpatient and aftercare samples and both alcohol outcomes (proportion of abstinent days; drinks per drinking day). Findings suggest that AA leads to better alcohol use outcomes, in part, by enhancing individuals' spiritual practices and provides support for AA's own emphasis on increasing spiritual practices to facilitate recovery from alcohol use disorder. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  17. Periodic Mechanical Stress INDUCES Chondrocyte Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis via CaMKII-Mediated Pyk2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenwei; Li, Zeng; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Jinchun; Song, Huanghe; Xu, Shun; Cui, Weiding; Wang, Qing; Chen, Zhefeng; Liu, Feng; Fan, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    Periodic mechanical stress can promote chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage. Although the integrin β1-ERK1/2 signal cascade has been implicated in periodic mechanical stress-induced mitogenic effects in chondrocytes, the precise mechanisms have not been fully established. The current study was designed to probe the roles of CaMKII and Pyk2 signaling in periodic mechanical stress-mediated chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. Chondrocytes were subjected to periodic mechanical stress, proliferation was assessed by direct cell counting and CCK-8 assay; gene expressions were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR, protein abundance by Western blotting. Mechanical stress, markedly enhanced the phosphorylation levels of Pyk2 at Tyr402 and CaMKII at Thr286. Both suppression of Pyk2 with Pyk2 inhibitor PF431396 or Pyk2 shRNA and suppression of CaMKII with CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 or CaMKII shRNA blocked periodic mechanical stress-induced chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. Additionally, either pretreatment with KN-93 or shRNA targeted to CaMKII prevented the activation of ERK1/2 and Pyk2 under conditions of periodic mechanical stress. Interestingly, in relation to periodic mechanical stress, in the context of Pyk2 inhibition with PF431396 or its targeted shRNA, only the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 were abrogated, while CaMKII signal activation was not affected. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of CaMKII- Thr286 and Pyk2- Tyr402 were abolished after pretreatment with blocking antibody against integrinβ1 exposed to periodic mechanical stress. Our results collectively indicate that periodic mechanical stress promotes chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis through the integrinβ1-CaMKII-Pyk2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Mechanisms and mediation in survival analysis: towards an integrated analytical framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Pratschke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide-ranging debate has taken place in recent years on mediation analysis and causal modelling, raising profound theoretical, philosophical and methodological questions. The authors build on the results of these discussions to work towards an integrated approach to the analysis of research questions that situate survival outcomes in relation to complex causal pathways with multiple mediators. The background to this contribution is the increasingly urgent need for policy-relevant research on the nature of inequalities in health and healthcare. Methods The authors begin by summarising debates on causal inference, mediated effects and statistical models, showing that these three strands of research have powerful synergies. They review a range of approaches which seek to extend existing survival models to obtain valid estimates of mediation effects. They then argue for an alternative strategy, which involves integrating survival outcomes within Structural Equation Models via the discrete-time survival model. This approach can provide an integrated framework for studying mediation effects in relation to survival outcomes, an issue of great relevance in applied health research. The authors provide an example of how these techniques can be used to explore whether the social class position of patients has a significant indirect effect on the hazard of death from colon cancer. Results The results suggest that the indirect effects of social class on survival are substantial and negative (-0.23 overall. In addition to the substantial direct effect of this variable (-0.60, its indirect effects account for more than one quarter of the total effect. The two main pathways for this indirect effect, via emergency admission (-0.12, on the one hand, and hospital caseload, on the other, (-0.10 are of similar size. Conclusions The discrete-time survival model provides an attractive way of integrating time-to-event data within the field of

  19. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E; Seymour, Colin B; Rainbow, Andrew J; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-01-01

    The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase. Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes. This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors.

  20. CRISPR-mediated defense mechanisms in the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Andrea; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-mediated virus defense based on small RNAs is a hallmark of archaea and also found in many bacteria. Archaeal genomes and, in particular, organisms of the extremely thermoacidophilic genus Sulfolobus, carry extensive CRISPR loci each with dozens of sequence signatures (spacers) able to mediate targeting and degradation of complementary invading nucleic acids. The diversity of CRISPR systems and their associated protein complexes indicates an extensive functional breadth and versatility of this adaptive immune system. Sulfolobus solfataricus and S. islandicus represent two of the best characterized genetic model organisms in the archaea not only with respect to the CRISPR system. Here we address and discuss in a broader context particularly recent progress made in understanding spacer recruitment from foreign DNA, production of small RNAs, in vitro activity of CRISPR-associated protein complexes and attack of viruses and plasmids in in vivo test systems. PMID:23535277

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Bcl10-Mediated NF-kB Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-08

    metabolizes lactose into glucose and galactose BinCARD (Bcl10-interacting protein with CARD): a CARD protein capable of inhibiting Bcl10-mediated... crystallized , so its complete structure is unknown. While it possesses an N-terminal CARD based on sequence homology, its C-terminus is of unknown...and function of Bcl10. These data could then be used to support the data gained from a crystallized Bcl10. Currently, this lab is collaborating

  2. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Long-Term Depression: Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Gladding, Clare M.; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Molnár, Elek

    2009-01-01

    The ability to modify synaptic transmission between neurons is a fundamental process of the nervous system that is involved in development, learning, and disease. Thus, synaptic plasticity is the ability to bidirectionally modify transmission, where long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) represent the best characterized forms of plasticity. In the hippocampus, two main forms of LTD coexist that are mediated by activation of either N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) or ...

  3. Molecular mechanism of Ena/VASP-mediated actin-filament elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Dennis; Kiesewetter, Antje K; Linkner, Joern; Vinzenz, Marlene; Stradal, Theresia E B; Small, John Victor; Curth, Ute; Dickinson, Richard B; Faix, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Ena/VASP proteins are implicated in a variety of fundamental cellular processes including axon guidance and cell migration. In vitro, they enhance elongation of actin filaments, but at rates differing in nearly an order of magnitude according to species, raising questions about the molecular determinants of rate control. Chimeras from fast and slow elongating VASP proteins were generated and their ability to promote actin polymerization and to bind G-actin was assessed. By in vitro TIRF microscopy as well as thermodynamic and kinetic analyses, we show that the velocity of VASP-mediated filament elongation depends on G-actin recruitment by the WASP homology 2 motif. Comparison of the experimentally observed elongation rates with a quantitative mathematical model moreover revealed that Ena/VASP-mediated filament elongation displays a saturation dependence on the actin monomer concentration, implying that Ena/VASP proteins, independent of species, are fully saturated with actin in vivo and generally act as potent filament elongators. Moreover, our data showed that spontaneous addition of monomers does not occur during processive VASP-mediated filament elongation on surfaces, suggesting that most filament formation in cells is actively controlled.

  4. Homer 1a gates the induction mechanism for endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Alan M; Anderson, Garret R; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Thayer, Stanley A

    2010-02-24

    At hippocampal excitatory synapses, endocannabinoids (eCBs) mediate two forms of retrograde synaptic inhibition that are induced by postsynaptic depolarization or activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). The homer family of molecular scaffolds provides spatial organization to regulate postsynaptic signaling cascades, including those activated by mGluRs. Expression of the homer 1a (H1a) immediate-early gene produces a short homer protein that lacks the domain required for homer oligomerization, enabling it to uncouple homer assemblies. Here, we report that H1a differentially modulates two forms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity, depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and metabotropic suppression of excitation (MSE). EPSCs were recorded from cultured hippocampal neurons and DSE evoked by a 15 s depolarization to 0 mV and MSE evoked by a type I mGluR agonist. Expression of H1a enhanced DSE and inhibited MSE at the same synapse. Many physiologically important stimuli initiate H1a expression including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Treating hippocampal cultures with BDNF increased transcription of H1a and uncoupled homer 1c-GFP (green fluorescent protein) clusters. BDNF treatment blocked MSE and enhanced DSE. Thus, physiological changes in H1a expression gate the induction pathway for eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity by uncoupling mGluR from eCB production.

  5. Mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for depression: An empirical update and evaluation of research aimed at identifying psychological mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Müller, Viola N L S; Arntz, Arnoud; Huibers, Marcus J H

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic empirical update and critical evaluation of the current status of research aimed at identifying a variety of psychological mediators in various forms of psychotherapy for depression. We summarize study characteristics and results of 35 relevant studies, and discuss the extent to which these studies meet several important requirements for mechanism research. Our review indicates that in spite of increased attention for the topic, advances in theoretical consensus about necessities for mechanism research, and sophistication of study designs, research in this field is still heterogeneous and unsatisfactory in methodological respect. Probably the biggest challenge in the field is demonstrating the causal relation between change in the mediator and change in depressive symptoms. The field would benefit from a further refinement of research methods to identify processes of therapeutic change. Recommendations for future research are discussed. However, even in the most optimal research designs, explaining psychotherapeutic change remains a challenge. Psychotherapy is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that might work through interplay of multiple mechanisms at several levels. As a result, it might be too complex to be explained in relatively simple causal models of psychological change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Luminance mechanisms mediate the motion of red-green isoluminant gratings: the role of "temporal chromatic aberration".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kathy T; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Baker, Curtis L

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we use a dynamic noise-masking paradigm to explore the nature of the mechanisms mediating the motion perception of drifting isoluminant red-green gratings. We compare contrast thresholds for the detection and direction discrimination of drifting gratings (1.5 cpd), over a range of temporal frequencies (0.5-9 Hz) in the presence of variable luminance or chromatic noise. In the first experiment, we used dynamic luminance noise to show that direction thresholds for red-green grating motion are masked by luminance noise over the entire temporal range tested, whereas detection thresholds are unaffected. This result indicates that the motion of nominally isoluminant red-green gratings is mediated by luminance signals. We suggest that stimulus-based luminance artifacts are not responsible for this effect because there is no masking of the detection thresholds. Instead we propose that chromatic motion thresholds for red-green isoluminant gratings are mediated by dynamic luminance artifacts that have an internal, physiological origin. We have termed these "temporal chromatic aberration". In the second experiment, we used dynamic chromatic noise masking to test for a chromatic contribution to red-green grating motion. We were unable to find conclusive evidence for a contribution of chromatic mechanisms to the chromatic grating motion, although a contribution at very high chromatic contrasts cannot be ruled out. Our results add to a growing body of evidence indicating the presence of dynamic, internal luminance artifacts in the motion of chromatic stimuli and we show that these occur even at very low temporal rates. Our results are compatible with our previous work indicating the absence of a chromatic mechanism for first order (quasi-linear) apparent motion [Vision Res. 40 (2000) 1993]. We conclude that previous conclusions based on the motion of chromatic red-green gratings should be reassessed to determine the contribution of dynamic luminance artifacts.

  7. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Deshotels, Matthew R.; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significan...

  8. Insight into the Mechanism of Human Herpesvirus 7 U21-mediated Diversion of Class I MHC Molecules to Lysosomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosson, Nicole L.; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Schneider, Christine L.; Ristow, Laura C.; Wang, Qiuhong; Hudson, Amy W.

    2010-01-01

    The U21 open reading frame from human herpesvirus-7 encodes a membrane protein that associates with and redirects class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which U21 accomplishes this trafficking excursion is unknown. Here we have examined the contribution of localization, glycosylation, domain structure, and the absence of substrate class I MHC molecules on the ability of U21 to traffic to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a cellular protein necessary for U21-mediated rerouting of class I MHC molecules. PMID:20833720

  9. Polyamine modification by acrolein exclusively produces 1,5-diazacyclooctanes: a previously unrecognized mechanism for acrolein-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Ayumi; Imamaki, Rie; Kitazume, Shinobu; Hanashima, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kaneda, Masato; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Kurbangalieva, Almira; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2014-07-28

    Acrolein, a toxic unsaturated aldehyde generated as a result of oxidative stress, readily reacts with a variety of nucleophilic biomolecules. Polyamines, which produced acrolein in the presence of amine oxidase, were then found to react with acrolein to produce 1,5-diazacyclooctane, a previously unrecognized but significant downstream product of oxidative stress. Although diazacyclooctane formation effectively neutralized acrolein toxicity, the diazacyclooctane hydrogel produced through a sequential diazacyclooctane polymerization reaction was highly cytotoxic. This study suggests that diazacyclooctane formation is involved in the mechanism underlying acrolein-mediated oxidative stress.

  10. SnCl2/Cu-Mediated Carbonyl Allylation Reaction in Water:Scope,Selectivity and Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN,Xiang-Hui(谭翔晖); HOU,Yong-Quan(侯永泉); LIU,Lei(刘磊); GUO,Qing-Xiang(郭庆祥)

    2004-01-01

    Copper was found to be able to promote the SnC12-mediated carbonyl allylation reactions in water,giving the corresponding homoallylic alcohol products in very high yields.Detailed studies showed that the reaction could be applied to a variety of carbonyl compounds including those with hydroxyl,amino and nitro groups.It was also found that this reaction showed good regioselectivities for some substrates.Furthermore,carefully controled experiments and in situ NMR measurements provided important insights into the mechanism of the newly developed reaction.

  11. Interactive and Lightweight Mechanisms to Coordinate Interpersonal Privacy in Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Natalia; Boer, Laurens; Markopoulos, Panos

    In this paper we describe three mechanisms that enable people to coordinate their interaction needs with others in their social network. The proposed designs are based on the Privacy Grounding Model [4] that argues the need for lightweight and interactive coordination mechanisms to support the dynamic and dialectic nature of interpersonal privacy coordination.

  12. DMPD: Mechanisms of selection mediated by interleukin-7, the preBCR, and hemokinin-1during B-cell development. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14962188 Mechanisms of selection mediated by interleukin-7, the preBCR, and hemokinin-1during B-cell develop...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Mechanisms of selection mediated by interleukin-7, the preBCR, and hemokinin-1during B-cell develop...ated by interleukin-7, the preBCR, and hemokinin-1during B-cell development. Authors Milne CD, Fleming HE, Z

  13. Mechanisms of pH-gradient driven transport mediated by organic anion polypeptide transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Simone; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Wagner, Carsten A; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2009-03-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (humans OATPs, rodents Oatps) are expressed in most mammalian tissues and mediate cellular uptake of a wide variety of amphipathic organic compounds such as bile salts, steroid conjugates, oligopeptides, and a large list of drugs, probably by acting as anion exchangers. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of the extracellular pH on the transport activity of nine human and four rat OATPs/Oatps. Furthermore, we aimed to test the concept that OATP/Oatp transport activity is accompanied by extrusion of bicarbonate. By using amphibian Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing OATPs/Oatps and mammalian cell lines stably transfected with OATPs/Oatps, we could demonstrate that in all OATPs/Oatps investigated, with the exception of OATP1C1, a low extracellular pH stimulated transport activity. This stimulation was accompanied by an increased substrate affinity as evidenced by lower apparent Michaelis-Menten constant values. OATP1C1 is lacking a highly conserved histidine in the third transmembrane domain, which was shown by site-directed mutagenesis to be critically involved in the pH dependency of OATPs/Oatps. Using online intracellular pH measurements in OATP/Oatp-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells, we could demonstrate the presence of a 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid-sensitive chloride/bicarbonate exchanger in CHO-K1 cells and that OATP/Oatp-mediated substrate transport is paralleled by bicarbonate efflux. We conclude that the pH dependency of OATPs/Oatps may lead to a stimulation of substrate transport in an acidic microenvironment and that the OATP/Oatp-mediated substrate transport into cells is generally compensated or accompanied by bicarbonate efflux.

  14. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3′UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation. PMID:24792925

  15. Potential Mechanisms Mediating Sustained Weight Loss Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaronidis, Janine M; Batterham, Rachel L

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for severe obesity. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG), the most commonly performed procedures, lead to sustained weight loss, improvements in obesity-related comorbidities and reduced mortality. In humans, the main driver for weight loss following RYGB and SG is reduced energy intake. Reduced appetite, changes in subjective taste and food preference, and altered neural response to food cues are thought to drive altered eating behavior. The biological mediators underlying these changes remain incompletely understood but changes in gut-derived signals, as a consequence of altered nutrient and/or biliary flow, are key candidates.

  16. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  17. Mechanism of colon cancer cell apoptosis mediated by pyropheophorbide-a methylester photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matroule, J Y; Carthy, C M; Granville, D J; Jolois, O; Hunt, D W; Piette, J

    2001-07-05

    Pyropheophorbide-a methylester (PPME) is a second generation of photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We demonstrated that PPME photosensitization triggered apoptosis of colon cancer cells as measured by using several classical parameters such as DNA laddering, PARP cleavage, caspase activation and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c. Preincubation of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) protected against apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization showing that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved as second messengers. On the other hand, photosensitization carried out in the presence of deuterium oxide (D2O) which enhances singlet oxygen (1O2) lifetime only increases necrosis without affecting apoptosis. Since PPME was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi system and lysosomes, other messengers than ROS were tested such as calcium, Bid, Bap31, phosphorylated Bcl-2 and caspase-12 but none was clearly identified as being involved in triggering cytochrome c release from mitochondria. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the transduction pathways leading to NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis were clearly independent although NF-kappaB was shown to counteract apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization.

  18. MUC16 contributes to the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through focal adhesion mediated signaling mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Seema; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Gupta, Suprit; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Smith, Lynette M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2016-01-01

    MUC16, a heavily glycosylated type-I transmembrane mucin is overexpressed in several cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previously, we have shown that MUC16 is significantly overexpressed in human PDAC tissues. However, the functional consequences and its role in PDAC is poorly understood. Here, we show that MUC16 knockdown decreases PDAC cell proliferation, colony formation and migration in vitro. Also, MUC16 knockdown decreases the tumor formation and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Mechanistically, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses confirms MUC16 interaction with galectin-3 and mesothelin in PDAC cells. Adhesion assay displayed decreased cell attachment of MUC16 knockdown cells with recombinant galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein. Further, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MUC16 knockout cells show decreased tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (T and Tn) in PDAC cells. Importantly, carbohydrate antigens were decreased in the region that corresponds to MUC16 and suggests for the decreased MUC16-galectin interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation also revealed a novel interaction between MUC16 and FAK in PDAC cells. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of mesenchymal and increased expression of epithelial markers in MUC16-silenced cells. Additionally, MUC16 loss showed a decreased FAK-mediated Akt and ERK/MAPK activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that MUC16-focal adhesion signaling may play a critical role in facilitating PDAC growth and metastasis. PMID:27382435

  19. Mechanism of the piRNA-mediated silencing of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpiz, Sergey; Olovnikov, Ivan; Sergeeva, Anna; Lavrov, Sergey; Abramov, Yuri; Savitsky, Mikhail; Kalmykova, Alla

    2011-11-01

    In the Drosophila germline, retrotransposons are silenced by the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway. Telomeric retroelements HeT-A, TART and TAHRE, which are involved in telomere maintenance in Drosophila, are also the targets of piRNA-mediated silencing. We have demonstrated that expression of reporter genes driven by the HeT-A promoter is under the control of the piRNA silencing pathway independent of the transgene location. In order to test directly whether piRNAs affect the transcriptional state of retrotransposons we performed a nuclear run-on (NRO) assay and revealed increased density of the active RNA polymerase complexes at the sequences of endogenous HeT-A and TART telomeric retroelements as well as HeT-A-containing constructs in the ovaries of spn-E mutants and in flies with piwi knockdown. This strongly correlates with enrichment of two histone H3 modifications (dimethylation of lysine 79 and dimethylation of lysine 4), which mark transcriptionally active chromatin, on the same sequences in the piRNA pathway mutants. spn-E mutation and piwi knockdown results in transcriptional activation of some other non-telomeric retrotransposons in the ovaries, such as I-element and HMS Beagle. Therefore piRNA-mediated transcriptional mode of silencing is involved in the control of retrotransposon expression in the Drosophila germline.

  20. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  1. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  2. Crystal Structure of the ERp44-Peroxiredoxin 4 Complex Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms of Thiol-Mediated Protein Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, De-Feng; Wang, Xi'e; Liang, Jinzhao; Sitia, Roberto; Wang, Chih-Chen; Wang, Xi

    2016-10-04

    ERp44 controls the localization and transport of diverse proteins in the early secretory pathway. The mechanisms that allow client recognition and the source of the oxidative power for forming intermolecular disulfides are as yet unknown. Here we present the structure of ERp44 bound to a client, peroxiredoxin 4. Our data reveal that ERp44 binds the oxidized form of peroxiredoxin 4 via thiol-disulfide interchange reactions. The structure explains the redox-dependent recognition and characterizes the essential non-covalent interactions at the interface. The ERp44-Prx4 covalent complexes can be reduced by glutathione and protein disulfide isomerase family members in the ER, allowing the two components to recycle. This work provides insights into the mechanisms of thiol-mediated protein retention and indicates the key roles of ERp44 in this biochemical cycle to optimize oxidative folding and redox homeostasis.

  3. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-09

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  4. A Fungal Endosymbiont Affects Host Plant Recruitment Through Seed- and Litter-mediated Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Many grass species are associated with maternally transmitted fungal endophytes. Increasing evidence shows that endophytes enhance host plant success under varied conditions, yet studies have rarely considered alternative mechanisms whereby these mutualistic symbionts may affect regeneration from...

  5. Pore-Forming Proteins as Mediators of Novel Epigenetic Mechanism of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surguchov, Andrei; Surgucheva, Irina; Sharma, Mukut; Sharma, Ram; Singh, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. In the last two decades, numerous gene defects underlying different forms of epilepsy have been identified with most of these genes encoding ion channel proteins. Despite these developments, the etiology of majority of non-familial epilepsies has no known associated genetic mutations and cannot be explained by defects in identified ion channels alone. We hypothesize that de novo formation of ion channels by naturally unfolded proteins (NUPs) increases neuronal excitability. Altered ionic homeostasis may initiate/contribute to cellular cascades related to epileptogenesis in susceptible individuals. Here, we consider two small proteins, namely, α-synuclein and stefin B, as prototypical candidates to illustrate the underlying mechanism(s). Previous work points to an association between epilepsy and α-synuclein or stefin B, but the mechanism(s) underlying such association remains elusive. We review the evidence to link the structure–function of these proteins with disease processes. Epigenetic mechanisms unrelated to altered DNA sequence(s) that may affect epileptogenesis include transcriptional or posttranscriptional regulation. Such epigenetic mechanisms or their combination(s) enhance the levels of these proteins and as a result the ability to form annular structures, which upon incorporation into membrane form novel ion channels and disturb intracellular ion homeostasis. Alternative epigenetic mechanisms may change amyloidogenic proteins by posttranslational modifications, thereby increasing their propensity to form channels. Further research elucidating the details about the formation of ion channels through these mechanisms and their role in epileptogenesis may define new molecular targets and guide the development of new drug targets.

  6. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Contrast adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, James M; Brainard, David H

    2007-08-01

    Are effects of background contrast on color appearance and sensitivity controlled by the same mechanism of adaptation? We examined the effects of background color contrast on color appearance and on color-difference sensitivity under well-matched conditions. We linked the data using Fechner's hypothesis that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to sensitivity and examined a family of parametric models of adaptation. Our results show that both appearance and discrimination are consistent with the same mechanism of adaptation.

  7. Exploration of a Novel Persistent Reversal of Pathological Pain: Mechanisms and Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    cultured glial cells blocked TNF and but not IL-10 production , suggesting that while PKA and PKC may play a role in A2AR agonist effects, there are also...models of neuropathic pain and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that result in the production of IL-10 and subsequent reversal of the allodynia. 15...translated to numerous animal models of neuropathic pain and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that result in the production of IL-10 and

  8. Mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer: a TDDFT electronic dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feizhi; Chapman, Craig T; Liang, Wenkel; Li, Xiaosong

    2012-12-14

    We present a time-dependent density functional theory approach for probing the dynamics of electron transfer on a donor-bridge-acceptor polyene dye scaffold. Two kinds of mechanisms, namely, the superexchange mechanism and the sequential mechanism, may be involved in the electron transfer process. In this work, we have focused on the crossover between these two charge transfer mechanisms on a series of donor-bridge-acceptor polyene dye systems with varying lengths of conjugated bridges. A number of methods and quantities are used to assist in the analysis, including the phase relationship of charge evolution and frequency domain spectra of the time-dependent dipole. Our simulations show that the superexchange mechanism plays a dominant role in the electron transfer from donor to acceptor when the bridge length is small, and the sequential mechanism becomes more important as the polyene bridge is lengthened. Full Ehrenfest dynamics with nuclear motion show that molecular vibrations play a very small role in such ultrafast charge transfer processes.

  9. Anxiety sensitivity and post-traumatic stress reactions: Evidence for intrusions and physiological arousal as mediating and moderating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Fan, Qianqian

    2015-08-01

    A growing body of research has implicated anxiety sensitivity (AS) and its dimensions in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanism(s) that may account for the association between AS and PTSD remains unclear. Using the "trauma film paradigm," which provides a prospective experimental tool for investigating analog intrusion development, the present study examines the extent to which intrusions mediate the association between AS and the development of posttraumatic stress reactions. After completing a measure of AS and state mood, unselected participants (n = 45) viewed a 10 min film of graphic scenes of fatal traffic accidents and then completed a second assessment of state mood. Participants then kept a daily diary to record intrusions about the film for a one-week period. Post-traumatic stress reactions about the film were then assessed after the one-week period. The results showed that general AS and physical and cognitive concerns AS predicted greater post-traumatic stress reactions about the film a week later. Furthermore, the number of intrusions the day after viewing the traumatic film, but not fear and disgust in response to the trauma film, mediated the association between general AS (and AS specifically for physical and cognitive concerns) and post-traumatic stress reactions a week later. Subsequent analysis also showed that physiological arousal during initial exposure to the traumatic film moderated the association between general AS and the number of intrusions reported the day after viewing the film. The implications of these analog findings for conceptualizing the mechanism(s) that may interact to explain the role of AS in the development of PTSD and its effective treatment are discussed.

  10. Psychological Mechanisms Mediating Effects Between Trauma and Psychotic Symptoms: The Role of Affect Regulation, Intrusive Trauma Memory, Beliefs, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Amy; Emsley, Richard; Freeman, Daniel; Bebbington, Paul; Garety, Philippa A; Kuipers, Elizabeth E; Dunn, Graham; Fowler, David

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests a causal role for trauma in psychosis, particularly for childhood victimization. However, the establishment of underlying trauma-related mechanisms would strengthen the causal argument. In a sample of people with relapsing psychosis (n = 228), we tested hypothesized mechanisms specifically related to impaired affect regulation, intrusive trauma memory, beliefs, and depression. The majority of participants (74.1%) reported victimization trauma, and a fifth (21.5%) met symptomatic criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. We found a specific link between childhood sexual abuse and auditory hallucinations (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.74, P = .018). This relationship was mediated by posttraumatic avoidance and numbing (OR = 1.48, SE = 0.19, P = .038) and hyperarousal (OR = 1.44, SE = 0.18, P = .045), but not intrusive trauma memory, negative beliefs or depression. In contrast, childhood emotional abuse was specifically associated with delusions, both persecutory (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.68, P = .009) and referential (adjusted OR = 2.43, SE = 0.74, P = .004). The link with persecutory delusions was mediated by negative-other beliefs (OR = 1.36, SE = 0.14, P = .024), but not posttraumatic stress symptoms, negative-self beliefs, or depression. There was no evidence of mediation for referential delusions. No relationships were identified between childhood physical abuse and psychosis. The findings underline the role of cognitive-affective processes in the relationship between trauma and symptoms, and the importance of assessing and treating victimization and its psychological consequences in people with psychosis.

  11. Cis and trans regulatory mechanisms control AP2-mediated B cell receptor endocytosis via select tyrosine-based motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Busman-Sahay

    Full Text Available Following antigen recognition, B cell receptor (BCR-mediated endocytosis is the first step of antigen processing and presentation to CD4+ T cells, a crucial component of the initiation and control of the humoral immune response. Despite this, the molecular mechanism of BCR internalization is poorly understood. Recently, studies of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL have shown that mutations within the BCR subunit CD79b leads to increased BCR surface expression, suggesting that CD79b may control BCR internalization. Adaptor protein 2 (AP2 is the major mediator of receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. The BCR contains five putative AP2-binding YxxØ motifs, including four that are present within two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs. Using a combination of in vitro and in situ approaches, we establish that the sole mediator of AP2-dependent BCR internalization is the membrane proximal ITAM YxxØ motif in CD79b, which is a major target of mutation in ABC DLBCL. In addition, we establish that BCR internalization can be regulated at a minimum of two different levels: regulation of YxxØ AP2 binding in cis by downstream ITAM-embedded DCSM and QTAT regulatory elements and regulation in trans by the partner cytoplasmic domain of the CD79 heterodimer. Beyond establishing the basic rules governing BCR internalization, these results illustrate an underappreciated role for ITAM residues in controlling clathrin-dependent endocytosis and highlight the complex mechanisms that control the activity of AP2 binding motifs in this receptor system.

  12. Enhancement of non-heme iron absorption by anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Zhu, Suqin; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Huang, Hai; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-08-27

    The mechanisms by which meat enhances human absorption of non-heme iron remain unknown. Recently, anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate (AMPH) was found to mediate the formation of nanosized ferric hydrolysis products in vitro. The current paper evaluates the effects of AMPH on the bioavailability and the intestinal speciation of non-heme iron in rats, followed by an investigation of cellular uptake pathways of in vitro-formed AMPH-stabilized nanosized ferric hydrolysis products (ANPs) by polarized human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies in anemic rats followed the order ferric citrate (9.79 ± 2.02%) iron in the groups of FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs were significantly lower than the corresponding hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies (P iron in intestinal iron absorption from FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs. Calcein-fluorescence measurements of the labile iron pool of polarized Caco-2 cells revealed the involvement of both divalent transporter 1 and endocytosis in apical uptake of ANPs, with endocytosis dominating at acidic extracellular pH. Overall, AMPH enhancement of non-heme iron absorption involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

  13. Ubiquitination mediates Kv1.3 endocytosis as a mechanism for protein kinase C-dependent modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Styrczewska, Katarzyna; Pérez-Verdaguer, Mireia; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Comes, Núria; Sorkin, Alexander; Felipe, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.3 plays essential physiological functions in the immune system. Kv1.3, regulating the membrane potential, facilitates downstream Ca2+ -dependent pathways and becomes concentrated in specific membrane microdomains that serve as signaling platforms. Increased and/or delocalized expression of the channel is observed at the onset of several autoimmune diseases. In this work, we show that adenosine (ADO), which is a potent endogenous modulator, stimulates PKC, thereby causing immunosuppression. PKC activation triggers down-regulation of Kv1.3 by inducing a clathrin-mediated endocytic event that targets the channel to lysosomal-degradative compartments. Therefore, the abundance of Kv1.3 at the cell surface decreases, which is clearly compatible with an effective anti-inflammatory response. This mechanism requires ubiquitination of Kv1.3, catalyzed by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), a member of the MAGUK family, recruits Kv1.3 into lipid-raft microdomains and protects the channel against ubiquitination and endocytosis. Therefore, the Kv1.3/PSD-95 association fine-tunes the anti-inflammatory response in leukocytes. Because Kv1.3 is a promising multi-therapeutic target against human pathologies, our results have physiological relevance. In addition, this work elucidates the ADO-dependent PKC-mediated molecular mechanism that triggers immunomodulation by targeting Kv1.3 in leukocytes. PMID:28186199

  14. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) promotes endurance capacity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ-mediated mechanism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Previously, it was reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with exercise training potentially improved endurance capacity via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ)-mediated mechanism in mice. This study determined the role of exercise and/or CLA in endurance capacity and PPARδ-associated regulators. Male 129Sv/J mice were fed either control (soybean oil) or CLA (0.5%) containing diets for 4 weeks and were further divided into sedentary or training regimes. CLA supplementation significantly reduced body weight and fat mass independent of exercise during the experimental period. Endurance capacity was significantly improved by CLA supplementation, while no effect of exercise was observed. Similarly, CLA treatment significantly increased expressions of sirtuin 1 and PPARγ coactivator-1α, up-stream regulators of PPARδ, in both sedentary and trained animals. With respect to downstream markers of PPARδ, CLA up-regulated the key biomarker needed to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, CLA supplementation significantly induced overall genes associated with muscle fibers, such as type I (slow-twitch) and type II (fast twitch). Taken together, it suggests that CLA improves endurance capacity independent of mild-intensity exercise via PPARδ-mediated mechanism.

  15. Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 mediates orofacial mechanical hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of the serine/threonine kinase family. This kinase plays an important role in neuronal development, and deregulation of its activity leads to neurodegenerative disorders. Cdk5 also serves an important function in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Our previous studies revealed that the expression of Cdk5 and its activator, p35, is upregulated in nociceptive neurons during peripheral inflammation. The aim of the present study was to characterize the involvement of Cdk5 in orofacial pain. Since mechanical hyperalgesia is the distinctive sign of many orofacial pain conditions, we adapted an existing orofacial stimulation test to assess the behavioral responses to mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal region of the transgenic mice with either reduced or increased Cdk5 activity. Results Mice overexpressing or lacking p35, an activator of Cdk5, showed altered phenotype in response to noxious mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal area. Mice with increased Cdk5 activity displayed aversive behavior to mechanical stimulation as indicated by a significant decrease in reward licking events and licking time. The number of reward licking/facial contact events was significantly decreased in these mice as the mechanical intensity increased. By contrast, mice deficient in Cdk5 activity displayed mechanical hypoalgesia. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time the important role of Cdk5 in orofacial mechanical nociception. Modulation of Cdk5 activity in primary sensory neurons makes it an attractive potential target for the development of novel analgesics that could be used to treat multiple orofacial pain conditions. PMID:24359609

  16. Water mediated hydrogen abstraction mechanism in the radical reaction between HOSO and NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Antonija; Tušar, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The effect of water molecules on the direct hydrogen abstraction from HOSO by NO2 was investigated for the first time. Stationary points were located at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) and CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory whereas energetics was further improved by CBS-QB3 and G4 composite methods. The fractions of hydrated radical complexes were estimated in order to assess atmospheric relevance of the title reaction. The energy barrier of the water mediated process becomes negligible. The formations of post-reactive complexes from pre-reactive complexes are energetically very favorable and the processes are spontaneous suggesting that they should be very feasible under atmospheric conditions.

  17. Targeting vascular NADPH oxidase 1 blocks tumor angiogenesis through a PPARα mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Jemelin, Stephane; Deffert, Christine; Carnesecchi, Stéphanie; Basset, Olivier; Szyndralewiez, Cédric; Heitz, Freddy; Page, Patrick; Montet, Xavier; Michalik, Liliane; Arbiser, Jack; Rüegg, Curzio; Krause, Karl Heinz; Imhof, Beat A; Imhof, Beat

    2011-02-07

    Reactive oxygen species, ROS, are regulators of endothelial cell migration, proliferation and survival, events critically involved in angiogenesis. Different isoforms of ROS-generating NOX enzymes are expressed in the vasculature and provide distinct signaling cues through differential localization and activation. We show that mice deficient in NOX1, but not NOX2 or NOX4, have impaired angiogenesis. NOX1 expression and activity is increased in primary mouse and human endothelial cells upon angiogenic stimulation. NOX1 silencing decreases endothelial cell migration and tube-like structure formation, through the inhibition of PPARα, a regulator of NF-κB. Administration of a novel NOX-specific inhibitor reduced angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo in a PPARα dependent manner. In conclusion, vascular NOX1 is a critical mediator of angiogenesis and an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  18. Targeting vascular NADPH oxidase 1 blocks tumor angiogenesis through a PPARα mediated mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Garrido-Urbani

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species, ROS, are regulators of endothelial cell migration, proliferation and survival, events critically involved in angiogenesis. Different isoforms of ROS-generating NOX enzymes are expressed in the vasculature and provide distinct signaling cues through differential localization and activation. We show that mice deficient in NOX1, but not NOX2 or NOX4, have impaired angiogenesis. NOX1 expression and activity is increased in primary mouse and human endothelial cells upon angiogenic stimulation. NOX1 silencing decreases endothelial cell migration and tube-like structure formation, through the inhibition of PPARα, a regulator of NF-κB. Administration of a novel NOX-specific inhibitor reduced angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo in a PPARα dependent manner. In conclusion, vascular NOX1 is a critical mediator of angiogenesis and an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  19. Imposing LHC constraints on the combined Anomaly and $Z^\\prime$ Mediation Mechanism of Supersymmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Combining anomaly with $Z^\\prime$ mediation allows us to solve the tachyonic problem of the former and avoid fine tuning in the latter. This model includes an extra $U(1)^\\prime$ gauge symmetry and extra singlet scalar $S$ which provides a solution to the `$\\mu$ problem' of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The low-energy particle spectrum is calculated from the UV inputs using the Renormalization Group Equations. The benchmark points considered in the original model, suggested before the Higgs discovery, predicted a Higgs mass heavier than the generic MSSM value. In 2012, the Higgs particle was discovered and found to have a mass of 125 GeV. Therefore, we can use that value and other current LHC data to scan the parameter space and update the predictions of the model, in particular the mass of the $Z^\\prime$ gauge boson.

  20. Pro-Resolving lipid mediators and Mechanisms in the resolution of acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Inflammatory responses, like all biological cascades, are shaped by a delicate balance between positive and negative feedback loops. It is now clear that in addition to positive and negative checkpoints, the inflammatory cascade rather unexpectedly boasts an additional checkpoint, a family of chemicals that actively promote resolution and tissue repair without compromising host defence. Indeed the resolution phase of inflammation is just as actively orchestrated and carefully choreographed as its induction and inhibition. In this review we explore the immunological consequences of these omega-3-derived specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) and discuss their place within what is currently understood of the role of the arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandins, lipoxins and their natural C15-epimers. We propose that treatment of inflammation should not be restricted to the use of inhibitors of the acute cascade (antagonism) but broadened to take account of the enormous therapeutic potential of inducers (agonists) of the resolution phase of inflammation. PMID:24656045

  1. Evidence for a DNA-based mechanism of intron-mediated enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan B. Rose

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many introns significantly increase gene expression through a process termed Intron-Mediated Enhancement (IME. Introns exist in the transcribed DNA and the nascent RNA, and could affect expression from either location. To determine which is more relevant to IME, hybrid introns were constructed that contain sequences from stimulating Arabidopsis thaliana introns either in their normal orientation or as the reverse complement. Both ends of each intron are from the non-stimulatory COR15a intron in their normal orientation to allow splicing. The inversions create major alterations to the sequence of the transcribed RNA with relatively minor changes to the DNA structure. Introns containing portions of either the UBQ10 or ATPK1 intron increased expression to a similar degree regardless of orientation. Also, computational predictions of IME improve when both intron strands are considered. These findings are more consistent with models of IME that act at the level of DNA rather than RNA.

  2. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  3. Mechanisms generating bistability and oscillations in microRNA-mediated motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peipei; Cai, Shuiming; Liu, Zengrong; Wang, Ruiqi

    2012-04-01

    The importance of post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) has recently been recognized in almost all cellular processes. When participating in cellular processes, miRNAs mainly mediate mRNA degradation or translational repression. Recently computational and experimental studies have identified an abundance of motifs involving miRNAs and transcriptional factors (TFs). The simplest motif is a two-node miRNA-mediated feedback loop (MFL) in which a TF regulates an miRNA and the TF itself is negatively regulated by the miRNA. In this paper we present a general computational model for the MFL based on biochemical regulations and explore its dynamics by using bifurcation analysis. Our results show that the MFL can behave either as switches or as oscillators, depending on the TF as a repressor or an activator. These functional features are consistent with the widespread appearance of miRNAs in fate decisions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis during development. We found that under the interplay of a TF and an miRNA, the MFL model can behave as switches for wide ranges of parameters even without cooperative binding of the TF. In addition, oscillations induced by the miRNA in the MFL model require neither an additional positive feedback loop, nor self-activation of the gene, nor cooperative binding of the TF, nor saturated degradation. Therefore, the MFL may provide a general network structure to induce bistability or oscillations. It is hoped that the results presented here will provide a new view on how gene expression is regulated by miRNAs and further guidance for experiments. Moreover, the insight gained from this study is also expected to provide a basis for the investigation of more complex networks assembled by simple building blocks.

  4. Specific cell RNA mediators and the mechanism of Fv-1 gene restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, R. W.; Yang, W. K.; Rascati, R. J.; Hsu, I. C.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Cells which are normally permissive for both N- and B-tropic viruses (Fv-1/sup -/) can be made resistant to these viruses by treatment with phenol-extracted fractions of mouse cells with the appropriate Fv-1 genotype (Fv-1/sup bb/ or Fv-1/sup nn/). The ability of RNase, but not DNase or pronase, to inhibit resistance transfer indicated that resistance is mediated by an RNA molecule. The assay for resistance transfer is based upon XC-plaque reduction in DEAE-dextran treated cells. By this assay method stored pools of cellular RNA have shown statistically significant specific activity at concentrations of 5 to 10 ..mu..g. However, the maximum plaque reduction is 60 to 80 percent and appears to be related to the ability of cells to incorporate RNA. Specific activity has been localized in the 18 to 22 S region of sucrose gradients. In addition, it can be detected in H/sub 2/O eluates from poly(U)Sepharose columns suggesting that the RNA is polyadenylated. The time course of resistance transfer indicates that the restriction mediated by RNA functions only if added within six hours after virus infection. By the technique of DNA transfection, high-molecular-weight DNA extracted from SC-1 cells infected with either N- or B-tropic virus have been found to infect cells of Fv-1/sup nn/ and Fv-1/sup bb/ genotypes equally well. Similar findings have been obtained with the Hirt extract supernatant DNA isolated from the infected SC-1 cells.

  5. Mechanisms of Sec61/SecY-mediated protein translocation across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyong; Rapoport, Tom A

    2012-01-01

    The Sec61 or SecY channel, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel, translocates proteins across and integrates proteins into the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and the prokaryotic plasma membrane. Depending on channel-binding partners, polypeptides are moved by different mechanisms. In cotranslational translocation, the ribosome feeds the polypeptide chain directly into the channel. In posttranslational translocation, a ratcheting mechanism is used by the ER-lumenal chaperone BiP in eukaryotes, and a pushing mechanism is utilized by the SecA ATPase in bacteria. In prokaryotes, posttranslational translocation is facilitated through the function of the SecD/F protein. Recent structural and biochemical data show how the channel opens during translocation, translocates soluble proteins, releases hydrophobic segments of membrane proteins into the lipid phase, and maintains the barrier for small molecules.

  6. In situ osteoblast mineralization mediates post-injection mechanical properties of osteoconductive material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialorucki, Callan; Subramanian, Gayathri; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the temporal relationship between in situ generated calcium content (mineralization) and the mechanical properties of an injectable orthobiologic bone-filler material. Murine derived osteoblast progenitor cells were differentiated using osteogenic factors and encapsulated within an injectable polycaprolactone nanofiber-collagen composite scaffold (PN-COL +osteo) to evaluate the effect of mineralization on the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. A comprehensive study was conducted using both an experimental and a predictive analytical mechanical analysis for mechanical property assessment as well as an extensive in vitro biological analysis for in situ mineralization. Cell proliferation was evaluated using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification assay and in situ mineralization was analyzed using both an alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and an Alizarin Red stain-based assay. Mineralized matrix formation was further evaluated using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and visualized using SEM and histological analyses. Compressive mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffolds were determined using a confined compression stress-relaxation protocol and the obtained data was fit to the standard linear solid viscoelastic material mathematical model to demonstrate a relationship between increased in situ mineralization and the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. Cell proliferation was constant over the 21 day period. ALP activity and calcium concentration significantly increased at day 14 and 21 as compared to PN-COL -osteo with undifferentiated osteoblast progenitor cells. Furthermore, at day 21 EDS, SEM and von Kossa histological staining confirmed mineralized matrix formation within the PN-COL scaffolds. After 21 days, compressive modulus, peak stress, and equilibrium stress demonstrate significant increases of 3.4-fold, 3.3-fold, and 4.0-fold respectively due to in situ mineralization. Viscoelastic

  7. Plant structural complexity and mechanical defenses mediate predator-prey interactions in an odonate-bird system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grof-Tisza, Patrick; LoPresti, Eric; Heath, Sacha K; Karban, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Habitat-forming species provide refuges for a variety of associating species; these refuges may mediate interactions between species differently depending on the functional traits of the habitat-forming species. We investigated refuge provisioning by plants with different functional traits for dragonfly and damselfly (Odonata: Anisoptera and Zygoptera) nymphs emerging from water bodies to molt into their adult stage. During this period, nymphs experience high levels of predation by birds. On the shores of a small pond, plants with mechanical defenses (e.g., thorns and prickles) and high structural complexity had higher abundances of odonate exuviae than nearby plants which lacked mechanical defenses and exhibited low structural complexity. To disentangle the relative effects of these two potentially important functional traits on nymph emergence-site preference and survival, we conducted two fully crossed factorial field experiments using artificial plants. Nymphs showed a strong preference for artificial plants with high structural complexity and to a lesser extent, mechanical defenses. Both functional traits increased nymph survival but through different mechanisms. We suggest that future investigations attempt to experimentally separate the elements contributing to structural complexity to elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of refuge provisioning.

  8. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW.; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  9. Mechanisms of ANCA-mediated leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolan, Sarah L.; Kalia, Neena; Nash, Gerard B.; Kamel, Dia; Heeringa, Peter; Savage, Caroline O. S.

    Anti-myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) antibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of small-vessel vasculitis, but the molecular mechanisms by which these antibodies contribute to disease are unknown. For determination of how anti-MPO antibodies affect inflammatory cell recruitment in small-vessel

  10. Mechanisms of silicon-mediated alleviation of heavy metal toxicity in plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat; Farid, Mujahid; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Irshad, Muhammad Kashif

    2015-09-01

    In present era, heavy metal pollution is rapidly increasing which present many environmental problems. These heavy metals are mainly accumulated in soil and are transferred to food chain through plants grown on these soils. Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the soil. It has been widely reported that Si can stimulate plant growth and alleviate various biotic and abiotic stresses, including heavy metal stress. Research to date has explored a number of mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants at both plant and soil levels. Here we reviewed the mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants. The key mechanisms evoked include reducing active heavy metal ions in growth media, reduced metal uptake and root-to-shoot translocation, chelation and stimulation of antioxidant systems in plants, complexation and co-precipitation of toxic metals with Si in different plant parts, compartmentation and structural alterations in plants and regulation of the expression of metal transport genes. However, these mechanisms might be associated with plant species, genotypes, metal elements, growth conditions, duration of the stress imposed and so on. Further research orientation is also discussed.

  11. Evidence for water-mediated mechanisms in coral–algal interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorissen, Hendrikje; Skinner, Christina; Osinga, Ronald; Beer, De Dirk; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2016-01-01

    Although many coral reefs have shifted from coral-to-algal dominance, the consequence of such a transition for coral–algal interactions and their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. At the microscale, it is unclear how diffusive boundary layers (DBLs) and surface oxygen concentrations

  12. Data from: Evidence for water-mediated mechanisms in coral–algal interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorissen, Hendrikje; Skinner, Christina; Osinga, R.; Beer, De Dirk; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2016-01-01

    Although many coral reefs have shifted from coral-to-algal dominance, the consequence of such a transition for coral–algal interactions and their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. At the microscale, it is unclear how diffusive boundary layers (DBLs) and surface oxygen concentrations at

  13. Evidence for a DNA-relay mechanism in ParABS-mediated chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoong Chuin; Surovtsev, Ivan Vladimirovich; Beltran, Bruno Gabriel; Huang, Fang; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-05-23

    The widely conserved ParABS system plays a major role in bacterial chromosome segregation. How the components of this system work together to generate translocation force and directional motion remains uncertain. Here, we combine biochemical approaches, quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling to examine the mechanism by which ParA drives the translocation of the ParB/parS partition complex in Caulobacter crescentus. Our experiments, together with simulations grounded on experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters, suggest a novel 'DNA-relay' mechanism in which the chromosome plays a mechanical function. In this model, DNA-bound ParA-ATP dimers serve as transient tethers that harness the elastic dynamics of the chromosome to relay the partition complex from one DNA region to another across a ParA-ATP dimer gradient. Since ParA-like proteins are implicated in the partitioning of various cytoplasmic cargos, the conservation of their DNA-binding activity suggests that the DNA-relay mechanism may be a general form of intracellular transport in bacteria.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02758.001.

  14. Transition in the mechanism of flow-mediated dilation with aging and development of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas M; Zinkevich, Natalya; Miller, Bradley; Liu, Yanping; Wittenburg, April L; Mitchell, Michael; Galdieri, Ralph; Sorokin, Andrey; Gutterman, David D

    2017-01-01

    In microvessels of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is largely dependent upon the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor H2O2. The goal of this study is to examine the influence of age and presence or absence of disease on the mechanism of FMD. Human coronary or adipose arterioles (~150 µm diameter) were prepared for videomicroscopy. The effect of inhibiting COX [indomethacin (Indo) or NOS (L-NAME), eliminating H2O2 (polyethylene glycol-catalase (PEG-CAT)] or targeting a reduction in mitochondrial ROS with scavengers/inhibitors [Vitamin E (mtVitamin E); phenylboronic acid (mtPBA)] was determined in children aged 0-18 years; young adults 19-55 years; older adults >55 years without CAD, and similarly aged adults with CAD. Indo eliminated FMD in children and reduced FMD in younger adults. This response was mediated mainly by PGI2, as the prostacyclin-synthase-inhibitor trans-2-phenyl cyclopropylamine reduced FMD in children and young adults. L-NAME attenuated dilation in children and younger adults and eliminated FMD in older adults without CAD, but had no effect on vessels from those with CAD, where mitochondria-derived H2O2 was the primary mediator. The magnitude of dilation was reduced in older compared to younger adults independent of CAD. Exogenous treatment with a sub-dilator dose of NO blocked FMD in vessels from subjects with CAD, while prolonged inhibition of NOS in young adults resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed in disease. The mediator of coronary arteriolar FMD evolves throughout life from prostacyclin in youth, to NO in adulthood. With the onset of CAD, NO-inhibitable release of H2O2 emerges as the exclusive mediator of FMD. These findings have implications for use of pharmacological agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents in children and the role of microvascular endothelium in cardiovascular health.

  15. Uncovering the Mechanism of Forkhead-Associated Domain-Mediated TIFA Oligomerization That Plays a Central Role in Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jui-Hung; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Huang, Chia-Chi Flora; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Lim, Liang-Hin; Chen, Yu-Hou; Ho, Meng-Ru; Wang, Iren; Huang, Kai-Fa; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2015-10-13

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is the only signaling domain that recognizes phosphothreonine (pThr) specifically. TRAF-interacting protein with an FHA domain (TIFA) was shown to be involved in immune responses by binding with TRAF2 and TRAF6. We recently reported that TIFA is a dimer in solution and that, upon stimulation by TNF-α, TIFA is phosphorylated at Thr9, which triggers TIFA oligomerization via pThr9-FHA domain binding and activates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the structural mechanism for the functionally important TIFA oligomerization remains to be established. While FHA domain-pThr binding is known to mediate protein dimerization, its role in oligomerization has not been demonstrated at the structural level. Here we report the crystal structures of TIFA (residues 1-150, with the unstructured C-terminal tail truncated) and its complex with the N-terminal pThr9 peptide (residues 1-15), which show unique features in the FHA structure (intrinsic dimer and extra β-strand) and in its interaction with the pThr peptide (with residues preceding rather than following pThr). These structural features support previous and additional functional analyses. Furthermore, the structure of the complex suggests that the pThr9-FHA domain interaction can occur only between different sets of dimers rather than between the two protomers within a dimer, providing the structural mechanism for TIFA oligomerization. Our results uncover the mechanism of FHA domain-mediated oligomerization in a key step of immune responses and expand the paradigm of FHA domain structure and function.

  16. Jadomycin breast cancer cytotoxicity is mediated by a copper-dependent, reactive oxygen species–inducing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven R; Blundon, Heather L; Ladda, Matthew A; Robertson, Andrew W; Martinez-Farina, Camilo F; Jakeman, David L; Goralski, Kerry B

    2015-01-01

    Jadomycins are natural products biosynthesized by the bacteria Streptomyces venezuelae which kill drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells in culture. Currently, the mechanisms of jadomycin cytotoxicity are poorly understood; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)–induced DNA cleavage is suggested based on bacterial plasmid DNA cleavage studies. The objective of this study was to determine if and how ROS contribute to jadomycin cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive MCF7 (MCF7-CON) and taxol-resistant MCF7 (MCF7-TXL) breast cancer cells. As determined using an intracellular, fluorescent, ROS-detecting probe, jadomycins B, S, SPhG, and F dose dependently increased intracellular ROS activity 2.5- to 5.9-fold. Cotreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine lowered ROS concentrations to below baseline levels and decreased the corresponding cytotoxic potency of the four jadomycins 1.9- to 3.3-fold, confirming a ROS-mediated mechanism. Addition of CuSO4 enhanced, whereas addition of the Cu(II)-chelator d-penicillamine reduced, the ROS generation and cytotoxicity of each jadomycin. Specific inhibitors of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase 1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase, but not catalase, enhanced jadomycin-mediated ROS generation and anticancer activity. In conclusion, the results indicate that jadomycin cytotoxicity involves the generation of cytosolic superoxide via a Cu(II)-jadomycin reaction, a mechanism common to all jadomycins tested and observed in MCF7-CON and drug-resistant MCF7-TXL cells. The superoxide dismutase 1, glutathione, and peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin cellular antioxidant enzyme pathways scavenged intracellular ROS generated by jadomycin treatment. Blocking these antioxidant pathways could serve as a strategy to enhance jadomycin cytotoxic potency in drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant breast cancers. PMID:25729577

  17. The Enemy Within: Innate Surveillance-mediated Cell Death, the common mechanism of neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ian Richards

    2016-05-01

    innate-mediated damage in neural tissues, and renders innate surveillance mediated cell death a plausible common pathogenic pathway responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, in both familial and sporadic forms. Here we have assembled evidence in favor of the hypothesis that neurodegenerative disease is the cumulative result of chronic activation of the innate surveillance pathway in a progressively expanding cascade.

  18. Aβ induces PUMA activation: a new mechanism for Aβ-mediated neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Meng, Chengbo; Xing, Da

    2015-02-01

    p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a promising tumor therapy target because it elicits apoptosis and profound sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy. However, inhibition of PUMA may be beneficial for curbing excessive apoptosis associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a representative neurodegenerative disease in which amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition causes neurotoxicity. The regulation of PUMA during Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis remains poorly understood. Here, we reported that PUMA expression was significantly increased in the hippocampus of transgenic mice models of AD and hippocampal neurons in response to Aβ. PUMA knockdown protected the neurons against Aβ-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, besides p53, PUMA transactivation was also regulated by forkhead box O3a through p53-independent manner following Aβ treatment. Notably, PUMA contributed to neuronal apoptosis through competitive binding of apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain to activate caspase-8 that cleaved Bid into tBid to accelerate Bax mitochondrial translocation, revealing a novel pathway of Bax activation by PUMA to mediate Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Together, we demonstrated that PUMA activation involved in Aβ-induced apoptosis, representing a drug target to antagonize AD progression.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C; Osborne, Andrew; Martin, Keith R

    2015-10-01

    A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long-term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft-induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM-MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis-mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft-induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM-MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM-MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell-induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation-based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve.

  20. Mechanisms of Chronic State of Inflammation as Mediators That Link Obese Adipose Tissue and Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Fuentes, Francisco; Badimon, Lina; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiometabolic alterations that include the presence of arterial hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and abdominal obesity. Obesity is associated with a chronic inflammatory response, characterized by abnormal adipokine production, and the activation of proinflammatory signalling pathways resulting in the induction of several biological markers of inflammation. Macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration in adipose tissue may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-mediated metabolic disorders. Adiponectin can either act directly on macrophages to shift polarization and/or prime human monocytes into alternative M2-macrophages with anti-inflammatory properties. Meanwhile, the chronic inflammation in adipose tissue is regulated by a series of transcription factors, mainly PPARs and C/EBPs, that in conjunction regulate the expression of hundreds of proteins that participate in the metabolism and storage of lipids and, as such, the secretion by adipocytes. Therefore, the management of the metabolic syndrome requires the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed to alter the main genetic pathways involved in the regulation of adipose tissue metabolism. PMID:23843680

  1. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping, E-mail: lishuping@njnu.edu.cn; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. - Highlights: • Surfactants could be used to modify the dispersing state of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • Surfactants have great effect on the morphology of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • MTX/LDHs with good monodisperse degree are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  2. Replisome-mediated Translesion Synthesis and Leading Strand Template Lesion Skipping Are Competing Bypass Mechanisms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbai, Carolina B.; Yeeles, Joseph T. P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of different enzymatic pathways have evolved to ensure that DNA replication can proceed past template base damage. These pathways include lesion skipping by the replisome, replication fork regression followed by either correction of the damage and origin-independent replication restart or homologous recombination-mediated restart of replication downstream of the lesion, and bypass of the damage by a translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. We report here that of two translesion synthesis polymerases tested, only DNA polymerase IV, not DNA polymerase II, could engage productively with the Escherichia coli replisome to bypass leading strand template damage, despite the fact that both enzymes are shown to be interacting with the replicase. Inactivation of the 3′ → 5′ proofreading exonuclease of DNA polymerase II did not enable bypass. Bypass by DNA polymerase IV required its ability to interact with the β clamp and act as a translesion polymerase but did not require its “little finger” domain, a secondary region of interaction with the β clamp. Bypass by DNA polymerase IV came at the expense of the inherent leading strand lesion skipping activity of the replisome, indicating that they are competing reactions. PMID:25301949

  3. Neuronal mechanisms mediating the variability of somatosensory evoked potentials during sleep oscillations in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanova, Mario; Timofeev, Igor

    2005-01-01

    The slow oscillation (SO) generated within the corticothalamic system is composed of active and silent states. The studies of response variability during active versus silent network states within thalamocortical system of human and animals provided inconsistent results. To investigate this inconsistency, we used electrophysiological recordings from the main structures of the somatosensory system in anaesthetized cats. Stimulation of the median nerve (MN) elicited cortical responses during all phases of SO. Cortical responses to stimulation of the medial lemniscus (ML) were virtually absent during silent periods. At the ventral-posterior lateral (VPL) level, ML stimuli elicited either EPSPs in isolation or EPSPs crowned by spikes, as a function of membrane potential. Response to MN stimuli elicited compound synaptic responses and spiked at any physiological level of membrane potential. The responses of dorsal column nuclei neurones to MN stimuli were of similar latency, but the latencies of antidromic responses to ML stimuli were variable. Thus, the variable conductance velocity of ascending prethalamic axons was the most likely cause of the barrages of synaptic events in VPL neurones mediating their firing at different level of the membrane potential. We conclude that the preserved ability of the somatosensory system to transmit the peripheral stimuli to the cerebral cortex during all the phases of sleep slow oscillation is based on the functional properties of the medial lemniscus and on the intrinsic properties of the thalamocortical cells. However the reduced firing ability of the cortical neurones during the silent state may contribute to impair sensory processing during sleep. PMID:15528249

  4. Exploring mechanisms of IgE-mediated autoimmunity through the lens of bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messingham, Kelly N; Randall, Grant; Fairley, Janet

    2016-04-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease characterized by pathogenic autoantibodies targeting collagen XVII (col XVII), a hemidesmosomal adhesion molecule. Early studies utilizing IgG were critical for establishing col XVII-specific antibodies as primary mediators of blister formation; however, these studies lacked key features of the disease, including urticarial erythema and eosinophilic infiltration, which are often associated with IgE. Although it was recognized that BP patients often had elevated circulating IgE, investigations into the pathogenicity of these antibodies was delayed until discovery of col XVII-specific IgE in BP sera. Since then, a variety of in-vivo and in-vitro studies have provided clear evidence that IgE autoantibodies are a key component of BP. Furthermore, studies utilizing IgE receptor blockade in BP patients were the first to confirm a pathogenic role of IgE autoantibodies in human autoimmunity. In this review we will utilize BP as a prototypical autoimmune disease to better understand how IgE autoantibodies participate in human autoimmunity.

  5. HO-1-mediated macroautophagy: a mechanism for unregulated iron deposition in aging and degenerating neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Liberman, Adrienne; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-05-01

    Oxidative stress, deposition of non-transferrin iron, and mitochondrial insufficiency occur in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). We previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is up-regulated in AD and PD brain and promotes the accumulation of non-transferrin iron in astroglial mitochondria. Herein, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and other techniques were employed to ascertain (i) the impact of HO-1 over-expression on astroglial mitochondrial morphology in vitro, (ii) the topography of aberrant iron sequestration in astrocytes over-expressing HO-1, and (iii) the role of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) in HO-1-mediated iron deposition. Astroglial hHO-1 over-expression induced cytoplasmic vacuolation, mitochondrial membrane damage, and macroautophagy. HO-1 promoted trapping of redox-active iron and sulfur within many cytopathological profiles without impacting ferroportin, transferrin receptor, ferritin, and IRP2 protein levels or IRP1 activity. Thus, HO-1 activity promotes mitochondrial macroautophagy and sequestration of redox-active iron in astroglia independently of classical iron mobilization pathways. Glial HO-1 may be a rational therapeutic target in AD, PD, and other human CNS conditions characterized by the unregulated deposition of brain iron.

  6. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards a hierarchy of mechanisms in CaMKII-mediated arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Vincent

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CaMKII activity has been shown to contribute to arrhythmogenesis in a remarkably broad range of cardiac pathologies. Several of these involve significant structural and electrophysiologic remodeling, whereas others are due to specific channelopathies, and are not typically associated with arrhythmogenic changes to protein expression or cellular and tissue structure. The ability of CaMKII to contribute to arrhythmia across such a broad range of phenotypes suggests one of two interpretations regarding the role of CaMKII in cardiac arrhythmia: (1 some CaMKII-dependent mechanism is a common driver of arrhythmia irrespective of the specific etiology of the disease, or (2 these different etiologies expose different mechanisms by which CaMKII is capable of promoting arrhythmia. In this review, we dissect the available mechanistic evidence to explore these two possibilities and discuss how the various molecular actions of CaMKII promote arrhythmia in different pathophysiologic contexts.

  8. Promoter competition as a mechanism of transcriptional interference mediated by retrotransposons

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Caroline; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2002-01-01

    Enhancers can function over great distances and interact with almost any kind of promoter, but insulators or promoter competition generally limit their effect to a single gene. We provide in vivo evidence that retroelements may establish promoter competition with their neighboring genes and restrict the range of action of an enhancer. We report that the retroelement Idefix from Drosophila melanogaster inhibits white gene expression in testes by a promoter competition mechanism that does not o...

  9. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Contrast adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Are effects of background contrast on color appearance and sensitivity controlled by the same mechanism of adaptation? We examined the effects of background color contrast on color appearance and on color-difference sensitivity under well-matched conditions. We linked the data using Fechner’s hypothesis that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to sensitivity and examined a family of parametric models of adaptation. Our results show that both appearance and discrimination are ...

  10. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of acrolein-mediated myelin destruction in CNS trauma and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Riyi; Page, Jessica; Tully, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a critical component of the nervous system facilitating efficient propagation of electrical signals and thus communication between the central and peripheral nervous systems and organ systems they innervate throughout the body. In instances of neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disease, injury to myelin is a prominent pathological feature responsible for conduction deficits and leaves axons vulnerable to damage from noxious compounds. Although the pathological mechanisms underlying m...

  12. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Blaber

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(−6.72, CSF2(−3.30, CD90(−3.33, PTPRC(−2.79, and GDF15(−2.45, but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow–blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  13. Effects of mechanical strain on the function of Gap junctions in osteocytes are mediated through the prostaglandin EP2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Priscilla P; Cheng, Benxu; Gu, Sumin; Sprague, Eugene; Bonewald, Lynda F; Jiang, Jean X

    2003-10-31

    Osteocytes embedded in the matrix of bone are thought to be mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical strain into biochemical signals that regulate bone modeling and remodeling. We have shown previously that fluid flow shear stress dramatically induces prostaglandin release and COX-2 mRNA expression in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells, and that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) released by these cells functions in an autocrine manner to regulate gap junction function and connexin 43 (Cx43) expression. Here we show that fluid flow regulates gap junctions through the PGE2 receptor EP2 activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The expression of the EP2 receptor, but not the subtypes EP1,EP3, and EP4, increased in response to fluid flow. Application of PGE2 or conditioned medium from fluid flow-treated cells to non-stressed MLO-Y4 cells increased expression of the EP2 receptor. The EP2 receptor antagonist, AH6809, suppressed the stimulatory effects of PGE2 and fluid flow-conditioned medium on the expression of the EP2 receptor, on Cx43 protein expression, and on gap junction-mediated intercellular coupling. In contrast, the EP2 receptor agonist butaprost, not the E1/E3 receptor agonist sulprostone, stimulated the expression of Cx43 and gap junction function. Fluid flow conditioned medium and PGE2 stimulated cAMP production and PKA activity suggesting that PGE2 released by mechanically stimulated cells is responsible for the activation of cAMP and PKA. The adenylate cyclase activators, forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP, enhanced intercellular connectivity, the number of functional gap junctions, and Cx43 protein expression, whereas the PKA inhibitor, H89, inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE2 on gap junctions. These studies suggest that the EP2 receptor mediates the effects of autocrine PGE2 on the osteocyte gap junction in response to fluid flow-induced shear stress. These data support the hypothesis that the EP2 receptor, cAMP, and PKA are critical components

  14. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  15. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Chang-Jiang; Li, Xiu; Mi, Wen-Li; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2012-05-20

    It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP), which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker) and OX-42 (microglia marker), and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol) or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg) has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t.) also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  16. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  18. Immunoregulatory mechanisms in Chagas disease: modulation of apoptosis in T-cell mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Ana Thereza; de Assis Silva Gomes Estanislau, Juliana; Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Guimarães, Pedro Henrique Gazzinelli; de Souza Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Morato, Maria José; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2016-04-30

    Chronic Chagas disease presents different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic (namely indeterminate) to severe cardiac and/or digestive. Previous results have shown that the immune response plays an important role, although no all mechanisms are understood. Immunoregulatory mechanisms such as apoptosis are important for the control of Chagas disease, possibly affecting the morbidity in chronic clinical forms. Apoptosis has been suggested to be an important mechanism of cellular response during T. cruzi infection. We aimed to further understand the putative role of apoptosis in Chagas disease and its relation to the clinical forms of the disease. Apoptosis of lymphocytes, under antigenic stimuli (soluble T. cruzi antigens - TcAg) where compared to that of non-stimulated cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using the expression of annexin and caspase 3(+) by T cells and the percentage of cells positive evaluated by flow cytometry. In addition activation and T cell markers were used for the identification of TCD4(+) and TCD8(+) subpopulations. The presence of intracellular and plasma cytokines were also evaluated. Analysis of the activation status of the peripheral blood cells showed that patients with Chagas disease presented higher levels of activation determined by the expression of activation markers, after TcAg stimulation. PCR array were used to evaluate the contribution of this mechanism in specific cell populations from patients with different clinical forms of human Chagas disease. Our results showed a reduced proliferative response associated a high expression of T CD4(+)CD62L(-) cells in CARD patients when compared with IND group and NI individuals. We also observed that both groups of patients presented a significant increase of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets in undergoing apoptosis after in vitro stimulation with T. cruzi antigens. In CARD patients, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing TNF-α were highly susceptible to undergo apoptosis

  19. Ceruloplasmin enhances smooth muscle cell- and endothelial cell-mediated low density lipoprotein oxidation by a superoxide-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Ehrenwald, E.; Fox, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC) stimulate low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radical-mediated, transition metal-dependent mechanisms. The physiological source(s) of metal ions is not known; however, purified ceruloplasmin, a plasma protein containing 7 coppers, oxidizes LDL in vitro. We now show that ceruloplasmin also increases LDL oxidation by vascular cells. In metal ion-free medium, human ceruloplasmin increased bovine aortic SMC- and EC-mediated LDL oxidation by up to 30- and 15-fold, respectively. The maximal response was at 100-300 microg ceruloplasmin/ml, a level at or below the unevoked physiological plasma concentration. Oxidant activity was dependent on protein structure as a specific proteolytic cleavage or removal of one of the seven ceruloplasmin copper atoms inhibited activity. Three lines of evidence indicated a critical role for cellular superoxide (O2.) in ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation. First, the rate of production of O2. by cells correlated with their rates of LDL oxidation. Second, superoxide dismutase effectively blocked ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation by both cell types. Finally, O2. production by SMC quantitatively accounted for the observed rate of LDL oxidation. To show this, the course of O2. production by SMC was simulated by repeated addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to culture medium under cell-free conditions. Neither ceruloplasmin nor O2. alone increased LDL oxidation, but together they completely reconstituted the oxidation rate of ceruloplasmin-stimulated SMC. These results are the first to show that ceruloplasmin stimulates EC- and SMC-mediated oxidation of LDL and that cell-derived O2. accounts quantitatively for metal-dependent, free radical-initiated oxidation of LDL by these cells.

  20. Natural products for treatment of osteoporosis: The effects and mechanisms on promoting osteoblast-mediated bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jing; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Cuicui; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Chen, Bo

    2016-02-15

    Osteoporosis is a systemic metabolic bone disease characterized by a reduction in bone mass, bone quality, and microarchitectural deterioration. An imbalance in bone remodeling that is caused by more osteoclast-mediated bone resorption than osteoblast-mediated bone formation results in such pathologic bone disorder. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have long been used to prevent and treat osteoporosis and have received extensive attentions and researches at home and abroad, because they have fewer adverse reactions and are more suitable for long-term use compared with chemically synthesized medicines. Here, we put the emphasis on osteoblasts, summarized the detailed research progress on the active compounds derived from TCM with potential anti-osteoporosis effects and their molecular mechanisms on promoting osteoblast-mediated bone formation. It could be concluded that TCM with kidney-tonifying, spleen-tonifying, and stasis-removing effects all have the potential effects on treating osteoporosis. The active ingredients derived from TCM that possess effects on promoting osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation include flavonoids, glycosides, coumarins, terpenoids (sesquiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, diterpenoids), phenolic acids, phenols and others (tetrameric stilbene, anthraquinones, diarylheptanoids). And it was confirmed that the bone formation effect induced by the above natural products was regulated by the expressions of bone specific matrix proteins (ALP, BSP, OCN, OPN, COL I), transcription factor (Runx2, Cbfa1, Osx), signal pathways (MAPK, BMP), local factors (ROS, NO), OPG/RANKL system of osteoblasts and estrogen-like biological activities. All the studies provided theoretical basis for clinical application, as well as new drug research and development on treating osteoporosis.

  1. Calcium sensing receptor as a novel mediator of adipose tissue dysfunction: mechanisms and potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bravo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. White adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Among the regulators of white adipose tissue physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor has arisen as a potential mediator of white adipose tissue dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that calcium-sensing receptor activation in the visceral (i.e. unhealthy white adipose tissue is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to calcium-sensing receptor activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in white adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of white adipose tissue dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that calcium-sensing receptor may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic.

  2. LDL oxidation by platelets propagates platelet activation via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Roberto; Bartimoccia, Simona; Nocella, Cristina; Di Santo, Serena; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Illuminati, Giulio; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Boz, Valentina; Del Ben, Maria; De Marco, Luigi; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Platelets generate oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) via NOX2-derived oxidative stress. We investigated if once generated by activated platelets ox-LDL can propagate platelet activation. Experiments were performed in platelets from healthy subjects (HS), hyper-cholesterolemic patients and patients with NOX2 hereditary deficiency. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with LDL were associated with a dose-dependent increase of reactive oxidant species and ox-LDL. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with a fixed dose of LDL (57.14 μmol/L) or added with homogenized human atherosclerotic plaque showed enhanced ox-LDL formation (approximately +50% and +30% respectively), which was lowered by a NOX2 inhibitor (approximately -35% and -25% respectively). Compared to HS, ox-LDL production was more pronounced in agonist-stimulated platelet rich plasma (PRP) from hyper-cholesterolemic patients but was almost absent in PRP from NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet aggregation and 8-iso-PGF2α-ΙΙΙ formation increased in LDL-treated washed platelets (+42% and +53% respectively) and PRP (+31% and +53% respectively). Also, LDL enhanced platelet-dependent thrombosis at arterial shear rate (+33%) but did not affect platelet activation in NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet activation by LDL was significantly inhibited by CD36 or LOX1 blocking peptides, two ox-LDL receptor antagonists, or by a NOX2 inhibitor. LDL-added platelets showed increased p38MAPK (+59%) and PKC (+51%) phosphorylation, p47(phox) translocation to platelet membrane (+34%) and NOX2 activation (+30%), which were inhibited by ox-LDL receptor antagonists. Platelets oxidize LDL, which in turn amplify platelet activation via specific ox-LDL receptors; both effects are mediated by NOX2 activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms of Lin28-Mediated miRNA and mRNA Regulation—A Structural and Functional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Florian; Heinemann, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Lin28 is an essential RNA-binding protein that is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic stem cells. Its physiological function has been linked to the regulation of differentiation, development, and oncogenesis as well as glucose metabolism. Lin28 mediates these pleiotropic functions by inhibiting let-7 miRNA biogenesis and by modulating the translation of target mRNAs. Both activities strongly depend on Lin28’s RNA-binding domains (RBDs), an N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD) and a C-terminal Zn-knuckle domain (ZKD). Recent biochemical and structural studies revealed the mechanisms of how Lin28 controls let-7 biogenesis. Lin28 binds to the terminal loop of pri- and pre-let-7 miRNA and represses their processing by Drosha and Dicer. Several biochemical and structural studies showed that the specificity of this interaction is mainly mediated by the ZKD with a conserved GGAGA or GGAGA-like motif. Further RNA crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) studies confirmed this binding motif and uncovered a large number of new mRNA binding sites. Here we review exciting recent progress in our understanding of how Lin28 binds structurally diverse RNAs and fulfills its pleiotropic functions. PMID:23939427

  4. Mechanisms of Lin28-mediated miRNA and mRNA regulation--a structural and functional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Florian; Heinemann, Udo

    2013-08-09

    Lin28 is an essential RNA-binding protein that is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic stem cells. Its physiological function has been linked to the regulation of differentiation, development, and oncogenesis as well as glucose metabolism. Lin28 mediates these pleiotropic functions by inhibiting let-7 miRNA biogenesis and by modulating the translation of target mRNAs. Both activities strongly depend on Lin28's RNA-binding domains (RBDs), an N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD) and a C-terminal Zn-knuckle domain (ZKD). Recent biochemical and structural studies revealed the mechanisms of how Lin28 controls let-7 biogenesis. Lin28 binds to the terminal loop of pri- and pre-let-7 miRNA and represses their processing by Drosha and Dicer. Several biochemical and structural studies showed that the specificity of this interaction is mainly mediated by the ZKD with a conserved GGAGA or GGAGA-like motif. Further RNA crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) studies confirmed this binding motif and uncovered a large number of new mRNA binding sites. Here we review exciting recent progress in our understanding of how Lin28 binds structurally diverse RNAs and fulfills its pleiotropic functions.

  5. Mechanisms of Lin28-Mediated miRNA and mRNA Regulation—A Structural and Functional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Heinemann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lin28 is an essential RNA-binding protein that is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic stem cells. Its physiological function has been linked to the regulation of differentiation, development, and oncogenesis as well as glucose metabolism. Lin28 mediates these pleiotropic functions by inhibiting let-7 miRNA biogenesis and by modulating the translation of target mRNAs. Both activities strongly depend on Lin28’s RNA-binding domains (RBDs, an N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD and a C-terminal Zn-knuckle domain (ZKD. Recent biochemical and structural studies revealed the mechanisms of how Lin28 controls let-7 biogenesis. Lin28 binds to the terminal loop of pri- and pre-let-7 miRNA and represses their processing by Drosha and Dicer. Several biochemical and structural studies showed that the specificity of this interaction is mainly mediated by the ZKD with a conserved GGAGA or GGAGA-like motif. Further RNA crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq studies confirmed this binding motif and uncovered a large number of new mRNA binding sites. Here we review exciting recent progress in our understanding of how Lin28 binds structurally diverse RNAs and fulfills its pleiotropic functions.

  6. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse spleen cells: a potential mechanism for cannabinoid-mediated immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, A R; Kessler, F K; Kaminski, N E

    1992-01-01

    The ability of delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) to modulate adenylate cyclase activity in mouse spleen cells was investigated. These studies were prompted by the recent identification and cloning of a G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor localized in certain regions of the brain and the potential for a common mechanism between cannabinoid-mediated CNS effects and immunosuppression. Temporal addition studies were initially performed to identify the period of time when spleen cells in culture were most susceptible to the inhibitory effects of delta 9-THC, as measured by the day 5 IgM antibody forming cell response. delta 9-THC was only inhibitory when added to spleen cell cultures during the first 2 hr following antigen sensitization. In light of this time course, adenylate cyclase activity was measured in spleen cells incubated in the presence of 22 microM delta 9-THC for 5 min and subsequently stimulated with forskolin. delta 9-THC treated spleen cells demonstrated a 33% inhibition and a 66% inhibition in intracellular cAMP after a 5 or 15 min stimulation with forskolin, respectively. These studies suggest that inhibition of immune function by delta 9-THC may be mediated through the inhibition of intracellular cAMP early after antigen stimulation.

  7. Gaseous Mediators Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Mechanism of Gastrointestinal Integrity, Protection and Ulcer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S are known as biological messengers; they play an important role in human organism and contribute to many physiological and pathophysiological processes. NO is produced from l-arginine by constitutive NO synthase (NOS and inducible NOS enzymatic pathways. This gaseous mediator inhibits platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and contributes to the vessel homeostasis. NO is known as a vasodilatory molecule involved in control of the gastric blood flow (GBF and the maintenance of gastric mucosal barrier integrity in either healthy gastric mucosa or that damaged by strong irritants. Biosynthesis of H2S in mammals depends upon two enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. This gaseous mediator, similarly to NO and carbon monoxide, is involved in neuromodulation, vascular contractility and anti-inflammatory activities. For decades, H2S has been known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and reduce cell energy production. Nowadays it is generally considered to act through vascular smooth muscle ATP-dependent K+ channels, interacting with intracellular transcription factors and promote sulfhydration of protein cysteine moieties within the cell, but the mechanism of potential gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties of H2S has not been fully explained. The aim of this review is to compare current results of the studies concerning the role of H2S and NO in gastric mucosa protection and outline areas that may pose new opportunities for further development of novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+ T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+ T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+ monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+ T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+ T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  9. Study on the Mechanism of the Annexin I -Mediated Co-Assembly of t-PA and Plasminogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓晖; 周华荣; 沈关心; 刘仲萍; 魏文宁; 宋善俊; 胡豫

    2002-01-01

    In order to further investigate the effect of annexin Ⅱ (Ann- Ⅱ ) on tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-dependent plasminogen (PLG) activation and its interactive mechanism, recombinant native Ann- Ⅱ bound t-PA, PLG and plasmin with high affinity was examined. The flow cytometric assay showed that the ann- Ⅱ expression rate was higher in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) (87. 65 %) than in the HL-60 cells as controls (35. 79 %). Two irrelevant proteins,bovine serum albumin (BSA) and equine IgG (EIG) had no effect on the production of plasmin.Ann- Ⅱ -mediated enhancement of t-PA-dependent PLG activation was inhibited by ε-aminocaproic acid or by pretreatment of Ann- Ⅱ with carboxypeptidase B with the inhibitive rate being 77.8 % and 77. 0 %, respectively. It was revealed that the effect of Ann- Ⅱ on PLG activation was specific for tPA. Urokinase didn't bind to Ann- Ⅱ , demonstrating the role of receptor-related lysine residues on activation of PLG, showing that the Ann- Ⅱ -PLG interaction was dependent upon carboxyl-terminal lysine residues. These findings suggest that annexin Ⅱ -mediated co-assembly of t-PA and PLG may promote plasmin generation and play a key role in modulating fibrinolysis on the endothelial surface.

  10. Uptake and phloem transport of glucose-fipronil conjugate in Ricinus communis involve a carrier-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han-Xiang; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Huang, Ting; Yao, Guang-Kai; Xu, Han-Hong

    2012-06-20

    Some compounds containing glucose are absorbed via the monosaccharide transporters of the plasma membrane. A glucose-fipronil conjugate, N-[3-cyano-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl]-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]-1-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-methanamine (GTF), has been synthesized in our previous work. GTF exhibits moderate phloem mobility in Ricinus communis. In the current paper, we demonstrate that the uptake of GTF by Ricinus seedling cotyledon discs is partly mediated by an active carrier system (K(m)1 = 0.17 mM; V(max)1 = 2.2 nmol cm(-2) h(-1)). Four compounds [d-glucose, sucrose, phloridzin, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP)] were examined for their effect on GTF uptake. Phloridzin as well as CCCP markedly inhibit GTF uptake, and d-glucose weakly competes with it. The phloem transport of GTF in Ricinus seedlings is found to involve an active carrier-mediated mechanism that effectively contributes to the GTF phloem loading. The results prove that adding a glucose core is a reasonable and feasible approach to confer phloem mobility to fipronil by utilizing plant monosaccharide transporters.

  11. Inhibition of different histone acetyltransferases (HATs) uncovers transcription-dependent and -independent acetylation-mediated mechanisms in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-02-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied garcinol, an inhibitor of the HATs of the p300 (EP300 binding protein)/CBP (CREB-binding protein) family, and the HATs of the PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor) family. As comparative agent we applied C646, a specific inhibitor that selectively blocks HATS of the p300/CBP family. Immunochemical analysis reveals differences in histone H3 acetylation in the honeybee brain, in response to the injection of either C646 or garcinol. Behavioral assessment reveals that the two drugs cause memory impairment of different nature when injected after associative conditioning: processes disturbed by garcinol are annihilated by the established transcription blocker actinomycin D and thus seem to require transcription processes. Actions of C646 are unaltered by actinomycin D, and thus seem to be independent of transcription. The outcome of our different approaches as summarized suggests that distinct HATs contribute to different acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation. We further deduce that the acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation comprise transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms.

  12. Mechanisms involved in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption and in non-classical actions of vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Ajibade, Dare; Benn, Bryan S; Feng, Jingjing; Joshi, Sneha S

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory using calbindin-D9k null mutant mice as well as mice lacking the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inducible epithelial calcium channel TRPV6 provide evidence for calbindin-D9k and TRPV6 independent regulation of active intestinal calcium absorption. These findings suggest that in the knock out (KO) mice there is compensation by another calcium channel or protein and that other novel factors are involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated active intestinal calcium absorption. In addition, 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated paracellular transport of calcium may have contributed to the normalization of serum calcium in the null mutant mice. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates cadherin-17 and upregulates claudin-2 and claudin-12 in the intestine, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3, by regulating these epithelial cell junction proteins, can route calcium through the paracellular path. With regard to non-classical actions, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of a number of malignant cells and to regulate adaptive as well as innate immunity. This article will review new developments related to the function and regulation of vitamin D target proteins in classical and non-classical vitamin D target tissues that have provided novel insight into mechanisms of vitamin D action.

  13. A single molecule detection method for understanding mechanisms of electric field-mediated interstitial transport of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Joshua W; Zaharoff, David A; Mossop, Brian J; Yuan, Fan

    2006-10-01

    The interstitial space is a rate limiting physiological barrier to non-viral gene delivery. External pulsed electric fields have been proposed to increase DNA transport in the interstitium, thereby improving non-viral gene delivery. In order to characterize and improve the interstitial transport, we developed a reproducible single molecule detection method to observe the electromobility of DNA in a range of pulsed, high field strength electric fields typically used during electric field-mediated gene delivery. Using agarose gel as an interstitium phantom, we investigated the dependence of DNA electromobility on field magnitude, pulse duration, pulse interval, and pore size in the interstitial space. We observed that the characteristic electromobility behavior, exhibited under most pulsing conditions, consisted of three distinct phases: stretching, reptation, and relaxation. Electromobility depended strongly on the field magnitude, pulse duration, and pulse interval of the applied pulse sequences, as well as the pore size of the fibrous matrix through which the DNA migrated. Our data also suggest the existence of a minimum pulse amplitude required to initiate electrophoretic transport. These results are useful for understanding the mechanisms of DNA electromobility and improving interstitial transport of genes during electric field-mediated gene delivery.

  14. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of adaptive immunity mediated by type I-E CRISPR/Cas system--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Qiu, Juanping

    2016-01-01

    To better adapt to the environment, prokaryocyte can take up exogenous genes (from bacteriophages, plasmids or genomes of other species) through horizontal gene transfer. Accompanied by the acquisition of exogenous genes, prokaryocyte is challenged by the invasion of 'selfish genes'. Therefore, to protect against the risk of gene transfer, prokaryocyte needs to establish mechanisms for selectively taking up or degrading exogenous DNA. In recent years, researchers discovered an adaptive immunity, which is mediated by the small RNA guided DNA degradation, prevents the invasion of exogenous genes in prokaryocyte. During the immune process, partial DNA fragments are firstly integrated.to the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) located within the genome DNA, and then the mature CRISPR RNA transcript and the CRISPR associated proteins (Cas) form a complex CRISPR/Cas for degrading exogenous DNA. In this review, we will first briefly describe the CRISPR/Cas systems and then mainly focus on the recent advances of the function mechanism and the regulation mechanism of the type I-E CRISPR/Cas system in Escherichia coli.

  15. Caffeine provokes adverse interactions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’) and related psychostimulants: mechanisms and mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanattou-Saïfoudine, N; McNamara, R; Harkin, A

    2012-01-01

    Concomitant consumption of caffeine with recreational psychostimulant drugs of abuse can provoke severe acute adverse reactions in addition to longer term consequences. The mechanisms by which caffeine increases the toxicity of psychostimulants include changes in body temperature regulation, cardiotoxicity and lowering of the seizure threshold. Caffeine also influences the stimulatory, discriminative and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs. In this review, we consider our current understanding of such caffeine-related drug interactions, placing a particular emphasis on an adverse interaction between caffeine and the substituted amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’), which has been most recently described and characterized. Co-administration of caffeine profoundly enhances the acute toxicity of MDMA in rats, as manifested by high core body temperature, tachycardia and increased mortality. In addition, co-administration of caffeine enhances the long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. Observations to date support an interactive model of drug-induced toxicity comprising MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release coupled to a caffeine-mediated antagonism of adenosine receptors in addition to inhibition of PDE. These experiments are reviewed together with reports of caffeine-related drug interactions with cocaine, d-amphetamine and ephedrine where similar mechanisms are implicated. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will guide appropriate intervention strategies for the management of severe reactions and potential for increased drug-related toxicity, resulting from concomitant caffeine consumption. PMID:22671762

  16. New animal model to study epigenetic mechanisms mediating altered gravity effects upon cell growth and morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Radugina, Elena A.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Almeida, Eduardo

    The gravitational field and its variations act as a major environmental factor that can impact morphogenesis developing through epigenetic molecular mechanisms. The mechanisms can be thoroughly investigated by using adequate animal models that reveal changes in the morpho-genesis of a growing organ as a function of gravitational effects. Two cooperative US/Russian experiments on Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) were the first to demonstrate differences in the shape of regenerating tails of space-flown and ground control newts. The space-flown and aquarium (simulated microgravity) animals developed lancet-shaped tails whereas 1 g con-trols (kept in space-type habitats) showed hook-like regenerates. These visual observations were supported by computer-aided processing of the images and statistical analysis of the results. Morphological examinations and cell proliferation measurements using BrdU demon-strated dorsal-ventral asymmetry as well as enhanced epithelial growth on the dorsal area of regenerating tails in 1 g newts. These findings were reproduced in laboratory tests on newts kept at 1 g and in large water tanks at cut g. The 1 g animals showed statistically significant deviations of the lancet-like tail shape typically seen in aquarium animals. Such modifications were found as early as regeneration stages III-IV and proved irreversible. The authors believe that the above phenomenon detected in newts used in many space experiments can serve as an adequate model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying gravitational effects upon animal morphogenesis.

  17. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Ying Qi-Liang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP, which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker and OX-42 (microglia marker, and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t. also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  18. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  19. Extrasynaptic exocytosis and its mechanisms: a source of molecules mediating volume transmission in the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlali eTrueta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the evidence of exocytosis from extrasynaptic sites in the soma, dendrites and axonal varicosities of central and peripheral neurons of vertebrates and invertebrates, and how it may contribute to signaling in the nervous system. The finding of secretory vesicles in extrasynaptic sites of neurons, the presence of transmitters in the extracellular space outside synaptic clefts, and the mismatch between exocytosis sites and the location of receptors for these molecules in neurons and glial cells, have long suggested that in addition to synaptic communication, transmitters are released and act extrasynaptically. The catalog of these molecules includes low molecular weight transmitters such as monoamines, acetylcholine, glutamate, GABA, ATP, and a list of peptides including substance P, BDNF, and oxytocin. By comparing the mechanisms of extrasynaptic exocytosis of different molecules in various neuron types we show that extrasynaptic exocytosis is a widespread mechanism for communication in the nervous system that uses certain common mechanisms, which are different from those of synaptic exocytosis but similar to those of exocytosis from excitable endocrine cells. Somatic exocytosis, which has been measured directly in different neuron types, starts after high-frequency electrical activity or long experimental depolarizations and may continue for several minutes after the end of stimulation. Activation of L-type calcium channels, calcium release from intracellular stores and vesicle transport couples excitation and exocytosis from small clear or large dense core vesicles in release sites lacking postsynaptic counterparts. The presence of synaptic and extrasynaptic exocytosis endows individual neurons with a wide variety of time- and space-dependent communication possibilities. Extrasynaptic exocytosis may be the major source of signaling molecules producing volume transmission and by doing so may be part of a long duration signaling mode in

  20. Reinforcing the membrane-mediated mechanism of action of the anti-tuberculosis candidate drug thioridazine with molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Thioridazine is a well-known dopamine-antagonist drug with a wide range of pharmacological properties ranging from neuroleptic to antimicrobial and even anticancer activity. Thioridazine is a critical component of a promising multi-drug therapy against M. tuberculosis. Amongst the various proposed...... mechanisms of action, the cell membrane-mediated one is peculiarly tempting due to the distinctive feature of phenothiazine drug family to accumulate in selected body tissues. In this study, we employ long-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions of three different concentrations...... for the negatively charged bilayer. We show that the origin of such changes is the drug induced decrease of the interfacial tension, which ultimately leads to the significant membrane expansion. Our findings support the hypothesis that the phenothiazines therapeutic activity may arise from the drug...

  1. Breast cancer prevention: lessons to be learned from mechanisms of early pregnancy-mediated breast cancer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Abt, Fabienne; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Rochlitz, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy at early, but not late age, has a strong and life-long protective effect against breast cancer. The expected overall increase in breast cancer incidence demands the development of a pharmaceutical mimicry of early-age pregnancy-mediated protection. Recently, converging results from rodent models and women on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effect of early-age pregnancy have opened the door for translational studies on pharmacologic prevention against breast cancer. In particular, alterations in Wnt and TGFβ signaling in mammary stem/progenitor cells reveal new potential targets for preventive interventions, and thus might help to significantly reduce the incidence of breast cancer in the future. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong

    2015-11-15

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

  3. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies.

  4. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Learning following Semantic Mediation Treatment in a case of Phonologic Alexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Cortes, Carlos R; Wilke, Marko; Sperling, Anne J; Lott, Susan N; Tagamets, Malle A; VanMeter, John; Friedman, Rhonda B

    2009-01-01

    Patients with phonologic alexia can be trained to read semantically impoverished words (e.g., functors) by pairing them with phonologically-related semantically rich words (e.g, nouns). What mechanisms underlie success in this cognitive re-training approach? Does the mechanism change if the skill is “overlearned”, i.e., practiced beyond criterion? We utilized fMRI pre- and post-treatment, and after overlearning, to assess treatment-related functional reorganization in a patient with phonologic alexia, two years post left temporoparietal stroke. Pre-treatment, there were no statistically significant differences in activation profiles across the sets of words. Post-treatment, accuracy on the two trained sets improved. Compared with untrained words, reading trained words recruited larger and more significant clusters of activation in the right hemisphere, including right inferior frontal and inferior parietal cortex. Post-overlearning, with near normal performance on overlearned words, predominant activation shifted to left hemisphere regions, including perilesional activation in superior parietal lobe, when reading overlearned vs. untrained words. PMID:20119495

  5. Delineating immune-mediated mechanisms underlying hair follicle destruction in the mouse mutant defolliculated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Fiona; Glavini, Aikaterini; Gallimore, Awen M; Richards, Hannah E; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Philpott, Michael P; Porter, Rebecca M

    2011-03-01

    Defolliculated (Gsdma3(Dfl)/+) mice have a hair loss phenotype that involves an aberrant hair cycle, altered sebaceous gland differentiation with reduced sebum production, chronic inflammation, and ultimately the loss of the hair follicle. Hair loss in these mice is similar to that seen in primary cicatricial, or scarring alopecias in which immune targeting of hair follicle stem cells has been proposed as a key factor resulting in permanent hair follicle destruction. In this study we examine the mechanism of hair loss in GsdmA3(Dfl)/+ mice. Aberrant expression patterns of stem cell markers during the hair cycle, in addition to aberrant behavior of the melanocytes leading to ectopic pigmentation of the hair follicle and epidermis, indicated the stem cell niche was not maintained. An autoimmune mechanism was excluded by crossing the mice with rag1-/- mice. However, large numbers of macrophages and increased expression of ICAM-1 were still present and may be involved either directly or indirectly in the hair loss. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry of sebaceous gland differentiation markers revealed reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a potential cause of reduced sebum production, as well as the potential involvement of the innate immune system in the hair loss. As reduced PPARγ expression has recently been implicated as a cause for lichen planopilaris, these mice may be useful for testing therapies.

  6. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies. PMID:28155918

  7. Promoter competition as a mechanism of transcriptional interference mediated by retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Caroline; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2002-07-15

    Enhancers can function over great distances and interact with almost any kind of promoter, but insulators or promoter competition generally limit their effect to a single gene. We provide in vivo evidence that retroelements may establish promoter competition with their neighboring genes and restrict the range of action of an enhancer. We report that the retroelement Idefix from Drosophila melanogaster inhibits white gene expression in testes by a promoter competition mechanism that does not occur in the eyes. The sequence specificity of the two TATA-less promoters of white and Idefix is a prime determinant in the competition that takes place in tissues where both are transcriptionally active. This study brings to light a novel mechanism whereby transcriptional interference by an active retrotransposon may perturb expression of neighboring genes. This capacity to interfere with the transcriptional regulation of their host, together with the facts that retroelements preferentially move within the germline and do not excise to replicate, suggest that these elements are cis-regulatory sequences able to imprint specific and heritable controls essential for eukaryotic gene regulation.

  8. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, James M; Brainard, David H

    2005-10-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discrimination experiments, a pedestal spot was presented in one interval and a pedestal + test in a second. Observers indicated which interval contained the test. In the appearance experiments, observers matched the appearance of test spots across a change in background. We analyzed the data using a variant of Fechner's proposal, that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to visual sensitivity. We found that saturating visual response functions together with a model of adaptation that included multiplicative gain control and a subtractive term accounted for data from both tasks. This result suggests that effects of the contexts we studied on color appearance and discriminability are controlled by the same underlying mechanism.

  9. Mechanism of Anti-glioblastoma Effect of Temzolomide Involved in ROS-Mediated SIRT 1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the new molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of temzolomide (TMZon glioblastoma cell strain. Methods: MTT methods and Hoechst 33342 staining method were applied to determine the effect of TMZ on the proliferation and apoptosis of glioblastoma cell strains U251 and SHG44, while flow cytometry was used to detect the impact of TMZ on cellular cycles. Additionally, DCFH-DA probe was adopted to test intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level while Real-time PCR and Western blot tests were applied to determine the influence of TMZ on SIRT1 expression. Results: TMZ in different concentrations added into glioblastoma cell strain for 72 h could concentration-dependently inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells, 100 μmol/L of which could also block cells in phase G2/M and improve cellular apoptosis. In addition, TMZ could evidently increase intracellular ROS level so as to activate SIRT1. Conclusion: The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of TMZ on glioblastoma may be associated with ROS-induced SIRT1 pathway, providing theoretical basis for the clinical efficacy of TMZ.

  10. Mechanism of Anti-glioblastoma Effect of Temzolomide Involved in ROS-Mediated SIRT 1 Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yuan; Sun Yan; Yuan Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the new molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of temzolomide (TMZ) on glioblastoma cell strain. Methods:MTT methods and Hoechst 33342 staining method were applied to determine the effect of TMZ on the proliferation and apoptosis of glioblastoma cell strains U251 and SHG44, while lfow cytometry was used to detect the impact of TMZ on cellular cycles. Additionally, DCFH-DA probe was adopted to test intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level while Real-time PCR and Western blot tests were applied to determine the inlfuence of TMZ on SIRT1 expression. Results: TMZ in different concentrations added into glioblastoma cell strain for 72 h could concentration-dependently inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells, 100 μmol/L of which could also block cells in phase G2/M and improve cellular apoptosis. In addition, TMZ could evidently increase intracellular ROS level so as to activate SIRT1. Conclusion: The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of TMZ on glioblastoma may be associated with ROS-induced SIRT1 pathway, providing theoretical basis for the clinical efifcacy of TMZ.

  11. Pi-pi Stacking Mediated Cooperative Mechanism for Human Cytochrome P450 3A4

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    Botao Fa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4 is an important member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily with responsibility for metabolizing ~50% of clinical drugs. Experimental evidence showed that CYP3A4 can adopt multiple substrates in its active site to form a cooperative binding model, accelerating substrate metabolism efficiency. In the current study, we constructed both normal and cooperative binding models of human CYP3A4 with antifungal drug ketoconazoles (KLN. Molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation were then carried out to study the cooperative binding mechanism. Our simulation showed that the second KLN in the cooperative binding model had a positive impact on the first one binding in the active site by two significant pi-pi stacking interactions. The first one was formed by Phe215, functioning to position the first KLN in a favorable orientation in the active site for further metabolism reactions. The second one was contributed by Phe304. This pi-pi stacking was enhanced in the cooperative binding model by the parallel conformation between the aromatic rings in Phe304 and the dioxolan moiety of the first KLN. These findings can provide an atomic insight into the cooperative binding in CYP3A4, revealing a novel pi-pi stacking mechanism for drug-drug interactions.

  12. Dynamic protein S-palmitoylation mediates parasite life cycle progression and diverse mechanisms of virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert W B; Sharma, Aabha I; Engman, David M

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic parasites possess complex life cycles and utilize an assortment of molecular mechanisms to overcome physical barriers, suppress and/or bypass the host immune response, including invading host cells where they can replicate in a protected intracellular niche. Protein S-palmitoylation is a dynamic post-translational modification in which the fatty acid palmitate is covalently linked to cysteine residues on proteins by the enzyme palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) and can be removed by lysosomal palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) or cytosolic acyl-protein thioesterase (APT). In addition to anchoring proteins to intracellular membranes, functions of dynamic palmitoylation include - targeting proteins to specific intracellular compartments via trafficking pathways, regulating the cycling of proteins between membranes, modulating protein function and regulating protein stability. Recent studies in the eukaryotic parasites - Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma brucei, Cryptococcus neoformans and Giardia lamblia - have identified large families of PATs and palmitoylated proteins. Many palmitoylated proteins are important for diverse aspects of pathogenesis, including differentiation into infective life cycle stages, biogenesis and tethering of secretory organelles, assembling the machinery powering motility and targeting virulence factors to the plasma membrane. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of palmitoylation in eukaryotic parasites, highlighting five exemplary mechanisms of parasite virulence dependent on palmitoylation.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of acrolein-mediated myelin destruction in CNS trauma and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, R; Page, J C; Tully, M

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a critical component of the nervous system facilitating efficient propagation of electrical signals and thus communication between the central and peripheral nervous systems and the organ systems that they innervate throughout the body. In instances of neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disease, injury to myelin is a prominent pathological feature responsible for conduction deficits, and leaves axons vulnerable to damage from noxious compounds. Although the pathological mechanisms underlying myelin loss have yet to be fully characterized, oxidative stress (OS) appears to play a prominent role. Specifically, acrolein, a neurotoxic aldehyde that is both a product and an instigator of OS, has been observed in studies to elicit demyelination through calcium-independent and -dependent mechanisms and also by affecting glutamate uptake and promoting excitotoxicity. Furthermore, pharmacological scavenging of acrolein has demonstrated a neuroprotective effect in animal disease models, by conserving myelin's structural integrity and alleviating functional deficits. This evidence indicates that acrolein may be a key culprit of myelin damage while acrolein scavenging could potentially be a promising therapeutic approach for patients suffering from nervous system trauma and disease.

  14. On the molecular mechanism of flippase- and scramblase-mediated phospholipid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montigny, Cédric; Lyons, Joseph; Champeil, Philippe; Nissen, Poul; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases are key regulators of transbilayer lipid asymmetry in eukaryotic cell membranes, critical to many trafficking and signaling pathways. P4-ATPases, in particular, are responsible for the uphill transport of phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane, as well as membranes of the late secretory/endocytic pathways, thereby establishing transbilayer asymmetry. Recent studies combining cell biology and biochemical approaches have improved our understanding of the path taken by lipids through P4-ATPases. Additionally, identification of several protein families catalyzing phospholipid 'scrambling', i.e. disruption of phospholipid asymmetry through energy-independent bi-directional phospholipid transport, as well as the recent report of the structure of such a scramblase, opens the way to a deeper characterization of their mechanism of action. Here, we discuss the molecular nature of the mechanism by which lipids may 'flip' across membranes, with an emphasis on active lipid transport catalyzed by P4-ATPases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  15. Mechanism of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V; Yu, Li-Rong; Lee, Insong J; Ye, Xiaoying; Eddington, Natalie D; Veenstra, Timothy D; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2008-09-01

    Despite numerous reports citing the acute hepatotoxicity caused by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. We hypothesized that key mitochondrial proteins are oxidatively modified and inactivated in MDMA-exposed tissues. The aim of this study was to identify and investigate the mechanism of inactivation of oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins, prior to the extensive mitochondrial dysfunction and liver damage following MDMA exposure. MDMA-treated rats showed abnormal liver histology with significant elevation in plasma transaminases, nitric oxide synthase, and the level of hydrogen peroxide. Oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats were labeled with biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins, purified with streptavidin-agarose, and resolved using 2-DE. Comparative 2-DE analysis of biotin-NM-labeled proteins revealed markedly increased levels of oxidatively modified proteins following MDMA exposure. Mass spectrometric analysis identified oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins involved in energy supply, fat metabolism, antioxidant defense, and chaperone activities. Among these, the activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases, and ATP synthase were significantly inhibited following MDMA exposure. Our data show for the first time that MDMA causes the oxidative inactivation of key mitochondrial enzymes which most likely contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent liver damage in MDMA-exposed animals.

  16. Platinum(0)-mediated C-O bond activation of ethers via an SN2 mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Manuel A; Jasim, Nasarella A; Whitwood, Adrian C; Lledós, Agustí; Perutz, Robin N

    2016-11-29

    A computational study of the C(methyl)-O bond activation of fluorinated aryl methyl ethers by a platinum(0) complex Pt(PCyp3)2 (Cyp = cyclopentyl) (N. A. Jasim, R. N. Perutz, B. Procacci and A. C. Whitwood, Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 3914) demonstrates that the reaction proceeds via an SN2 mechanism. Nucleophilic attack of Pt(0) generates an ion pair consisting of a T-shaped platinum cation with an agostic interaction with a cyclopentyl group and a fluoroaryloxy anion. This ion-pair is converted to a 4-coordinate Pt(ii) product trans-[PtMe(OAr(F))(PCyp3)2]. Structure-reactivity correlations are fully consistent with this mechanism. The Gibbs energy of activation is calculated to be substantially higher for aryl methyl ethers without fluorine substituents and higher still for alkyl methyl ethers. These conclusions are in accord with the experimental results. Further support was obtained in an experimental study of the reaction of Pt(PCy3)2 with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-4-allyloxypyridine yielding the salt of the Pt(η(3)-allyl) cation and the tetrafluoropyridinolate anion [Pt(PCy3)2(η(3)-allyl)][OC5NF4]. The calculated activation energy for this reaction is significantly lower than that for fluorinated aryl methyl ethers.

  17. Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis is regulated by mechanical properties of the target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beningo, Karen A.; Wang, Yu-li

    2002-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an actin-based process used by macrophages to clear particles greater than 0.5 microm in diameter. In addition to its role in immunological responses, phagocytosis is also necessary for tissue remodeling and repair. To prevent catastrophic autoimmune reactions, phagocytosis must be tightly regulated. It is commonly assumed that the recognition/selection of phagocytic targets is based solely upon receptor-ligand binding. Here we report an important new criterion, that mechanical parameters of the target can dramatically affect the efficiency of phagocytosis. When presented with particles of identical chemical properties but different rigidity, macrophages showed a strong preference to engulf rigid objects. Furthermore, phagocytosis of soft particles can be stimulated with the microinjection of constitutively active Rac1 but not RhoA, and with lysophosphatidic acid, an agent known to activate the small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family. These data suggest a Rac1-dependent mechanosensory mechanism for phagocytosis, which probably plays an important role in a number of physiological and pathological processes from embryonic development to autoimmune diseases.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

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    Bassam R Ali

    Full Text Available Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional

  19. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms.

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    Marie Mi Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R. It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability to recruit β-arrestins could lead to different cellular or in vivo outcomes than lack of ability to interact with G proteins, it is essential to distinguish between these two mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied five AT1R mutants previously published to display pathway separation: D74N, DRY/AAY, Y292F, N298A, and Y302F (Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering: 2.50, 3.49-3.51, 7.43, 7.49, and 7.53. We find that D74N, DRY/AAY, and N298A mutants are more prone to β-arrestin recruitment than WT. In contrast, receptor mutants Y292F and Y302F showed impaired ability to recruit β-arrestin in response to Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 (SII Ang II, a ligand solely activating the β-arrestin pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis reveals that the underlying conformations induced by these AT1R mutants most likely represent principally different mechanisms of uncoupling the G protein, which for some mutants may be due to their increased ability to recruit β-arrestin2. Hereby, these findings have important implications for drug discovery and 7TMR

  20. THE MECHANISMS OF MEN’S SELF-PRESENTATION IN ENGLISH COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION

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    Gukosyants Olga Yuryevna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article characterizes the peculiarities of verbal self-presentation of a masculine personality, analyzes the linguistic means differentiated by the degree of gender preferability, contains a number of traditional features of masculine speech and points out the gender markers in English chat communication and blogs. The author studies the male speech markers which have not been touched upon in scientific works: use of contraction (in chats, higher level of text cohesion (in blogs and chats. According to the obtained data, the author determines the mechanisms of men's self-presentation in blogs (distance determination; expressing aggression, scandal provocation; direct ordering; simplification of one's own speech perception by others and chats (expressing aggression, scandal provocation, simplification of one's own speech perception by others.

  1. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  2. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit ß-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or ß-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of ß-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  3. Gin-mediated DNA inversion: product structure and the mechanism of strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaar, R; van de Putte, P; Cozzarelli, N R

    1988-02-01

    Inversion of the G loop of bacteriophage Mu requires the phage-encoded Gin protein and a host factor. The topological changes in a supercoiled DNA substrate generated by the two purified proteins were analyzed. More than 99% of the inversion products were unknotted rings. This result excludes synapsis by way of a random collision of recombination sites, because the resulting entrapped supercoils would be converted into knots by recombination. Instead, the recombination sites must come together in the synaptic complex in an ordered fashion with a fixed number of supercoils between the sites. The linking number of the substrate DNA increases by four during recombination. Thus, in three successive rounds of inversion, the change in linking number was +4, +8, and +12, respectively. These results lead to a quantitative model for the mechanism of Gin recombination that includes the distribution of supercoils in the synaptic complex, their alteration by strand exchange, and specific roles for the two proteins needed for recombination.

  4. Immunological mechanisms underlying protection mediated by RTS,S: a review of the available data

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    Moorthy Vasee S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The RTS,S/AS candidate malaria vaccine has demonstrated efficacy against a variety of endpoints in Phase IIa and Phase IIb trials over more than a decade. A multi-country phase III trial of RTS,S/AS01 is now underway with submission as early as 2012, if vaccine safety and efficacy are confirmed. The immunologic basis for how the vaccine protects against both infection and disease remains uncertain. It is, therefore, timely to review the information currently available about the vaccine with regard to how it impacts the human-Plasmodium falciparum host-pathogen relationship. In this article, what is known about mechanisms involved in partial protection against malaria induced by RTS,S is reviewed.

  5. Molecular mechanisms that mediate colonization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a group of pathogens which cause gastrointestinal disease in humans and have been associated with numerous food-borne outbreaks worldwide. The intimin adhesin has been considered for many years to be the only colonization factor in these strains. However, the rapid progress in whole-genome sequencing of different STEC serotypes has accelerated the discovery of other adhesins (fimbrial and afimbrial), which have emerged as important contributors to the intestinal colonization occurring during STEC infection. This review summarizes recent progress to identify and characterize, at the molecular level, novel adhesion and colonization factors in STEC strains, with an emphasis on their contribution to virulence traits, their host-pathogen interactions, the regulatory mechanisms controlling their expression, and their role as targets eliciting immune responses in the host.

  6. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate mediates hyperalgesia via a neutrophil-dependent mechanism.

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    Amanda Finley

    Full Text Available Novel classes of pain-relieving molecules are needed to fill the void between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and narcotics. We have recently shown that intraplantar administration of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P in rats causes peripheral sensitization and hyperalgesia through the S1P(1 receptor subtype (S1PR(1: the mechanism(s involved are largely unknown and were thus explored in the present study. Intraplantar injection of carrageenan in rats led to a time-dependent development of thermal hyperalgesia that was associated with pronounced edema and infiltration of neutrophils in paw tissues. Inhibition of 1 S1P formation with SK-I, a sphingosine kinase inhibitor, 2 S1P bioavailability with the S1P blocking antibody Sphingomab, LT1002 (but not its negative control, LT1017 or 3 S1P actions through S1PR(1 with the selective S1PR(1 antagonist, W146 (but not its inactive enantiomer, W140 blocked thermal hyperalgesia and infiltration of neutrophils. Taken together, these findings identify S1P as an important contributor to inflammatory pain acting through S1PR(1 to elicit hyperalgesia in a neutrophil-dependant manner. In addition and in further support, we demonstrate that the development of thermal hyperalgesia following intraplantar injection of S1P or SEW2871 (an S1PR(1 agonist was also associated with neutrophilic infiltration in paw tissues as these events were attenuated by fucoidan, an inhibitor of neutrophilic infiltration. Importantly, FTY720, an FDA-approved S1P receptor modulator known to block S1P-S1PR(1 signaling, attenuated carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil infiltration. Targeting the S1P/S1PR(1 axis opens a therapeutic strategy for the development of novel non-narcotic anti-hyperalgesic agents.

  8. The HIV-1 transactivator factor (Tat induces enterocyte apoptosis through a redox-mediated mechanism.

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    Vittoria Buccigrossi

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is an important target of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. HIV virus induces CD4+ T cell loss and epithelial damage which results in increased intestinal permeability. The mechanisms involved in nutrient malabsorption and alterations of intestinal mucosal architecture are unknown. We previously demonstrated that HIV-1 transactivator factor (Tat induces an enterotoxic effect on intestinal epithelial cells that could be responsible for HIV-associated diarrhea. Since oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis and morbidity of HIV infection, we evaluated whether Tat induces apoptosis of human enterocytes through oxidative stress, and whether the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC could prevent it. Caco-2 and HT29 cells or human intestinal mucosa specimens were exposed to Tat alone or combined with NAC. In an in-vitro cell model, Tat increased the generation of reactive oxygen species and decreased antioxidant defenses as judged by a reduction in catalase activity and a reduced (GSH/oxidized (GSSG glutathione ratio. Tat also induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and caspase-3 activation. Rectal dialysis samples from HIV-infected patients were positive for the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. GSH/GSSG imbalance and apoptosis occurred in jejunal specimens from HIV-positive patients at baseline and from HIV-negative specimens exposed to Tat. Experiments with neutralizing anti-Tat antibodies showed that these effects were direct and specific. Pre-treatment with NAC prevented Tat-induced apoptosis and restored the glutathione balance in both the in-vitro and the ex-vivo model. These findings indicate that oxidative stress is one of the mechanism involved in HIV-intestinal disease.

  9. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  10. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

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    Saif Hameed

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  11. Cadherins mediate sequential roles through a hierarchy of mechanisms in the developing mammillary body

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    Nora eSzabo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of intricate combinations of cadherins (a family of adhesive membrane proteins is common in the developing central nervous system. On this basis, a combinatorial cadherin code has long been proposed to underlie neuronal sorting and to be ultimately responsible for the layers, columns and nuclei of the brain. However, experimental proof of this particular function of cadherins has proven difficult to obtain and the question is still not clear. Alternatively, non-specific, non-combinatorial, purely quantitative adhesive differentials have been proposed to explain neuronal sorting in the brain. Do cadherin combinations underlie brain cytoarchitecture? We approached this question using as model a well-defined forebrain nucleus, the mammillary body (MBO, which shows strong, homogeneous expression of one single cadherin (Cdh11 and patterned, combinatorial expression of Cdh6, -8 and -10.We found that, besides the known combinatorial Cdh pattern, MBO cells are organized into a second, non-overlapping pattern grouping neurons with the same date of neurogenesis. Abolition of Cdh11 expression in the entire MBO during development disrupted the combination-based as well as the birthdate-based sorting. In utero RNAi experiments knocking down Cdh11 in MBO-fated migrating neurons at one specific age showed that Cdh11 expression is required for chronological entrance in the MBO.Our results suggest that neuronal sorting in the developing MBO is caused by adhesion-based, non-combinatorial mechanisms that keep neurons sorted according to birthdate information (possibly matching them to target neurons chronologically sorted in the same manner. Non-specific adhesion mechanisms would also prevent cadherin combinations from altering the birthdate-based sorting. Cadherin combinations would presumably act later to support specific synaptogenesis through specific axonal fasciculation and final target recognition.

  12. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Signaling, Desensitization and Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia

    2013-01-08

    In 1994, the isolation of an opioid receptor-related clone soon led to the isolation and characterization of a novel neuropeptide, termed nociceptin or orphanin FQ (N/OFQ). This heptadecapeptide binds to the N/OFQ receptor (NOP) with high affinity, but does not interact directly with classical opioid receptors. The regional distribution of N/OFQ and of its receptor suggest any possible involvement of this neurotransmission system in motor and balance control, reinforcement and reward, nociception, stress response, sexual behavior, aggression and autonomic control of physiological processes as well as of immune functions. The actions of N/OFQ may also be uniquely dependent on contextual factors, both genetic and environmental. As for most of the G protein coupled receptors, NOP C-terminal sequences are believed to interact with proteins that are mandatory for anchoring receptor at the plasma membrane, internalization, recycling, or degradation after ligand binding. Increasing details of how NOP receptors are activated and removed from the plasma membrane have been elucidated in vitro, and more importantly in a physiological context. Details of how these receptors travel and recycle following internalization have also shed light on the importance of such mechanisms for any potential therapeutic use of NOP ligands. A picture of the pathways and proteins involved in these processes is beginning to emerge. This review will address molecular events contributing to NOP receptor signaling and trafficking.

  14. A curvature-mediated mechanism for localization of lipids to bacterial poles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerwyn Casey Huang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Subcellular protein localization is a universal feature of eukaryotic cells, and the ubiquity of protein localization in prokaryotic species is now acquiring greater appreciation. Though some targeting anchors are known, the origin of polar and division-site localization remains mysterious for a large fraction of bacterial proteins. Ultimately, the molecular components responsible for such symmetry breaking must employ a high degree of self-organization. Here we propose a novel physical mechanism, based on the two-dimensional curvature of the membrane, for spontaneous lipid targeting to the poles and division site of rod-shaped bacterial cells. If one of the membrane components has a large intrinsic curvature, the geometrical constraint of the plasma membrane by the more rigid bacterial cell wall naturally leads to lipid microphase separation. We find that the resulting clusters of high-curvature lipids are large enough to spontaneously and stably localize to the two cell poles. Recent evidence of localization of the phospholipid cardiolipin to the poles of bacterial cells suggests that polar targeting of some proteins may rely on the membrane's differential lipid content. More generally, aggregates of lipids, proteins, or lipid-protein complexes may localize in response to features of cell geometry incapable of localizing individual molecules.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of AHSP-Mediated Stabilization of Alpha-Hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng,L.; Gell, D.; Zhou, S.; Gu, L.; Kong, Y.; Li, J.; Hu, M.; Yan, N.; Lee, C.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin A (HbA), the oxygen delivery system in humans, comprises two alpha and two beta subunits. Free alpha-hemoglobin (alphaHb) is unstable, and its precipitation contributes to the pathophysiology of beta thalassemia. In erythrocytes, the alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds alphaHb and inhibits its precipitation. The crystal structure of AHSP bound to Fe(II)-alphaHb reveals that AHSP specifically recognizes the G and H helices of alphaHb through a hydrophobic interface that largely recapitulates the alpha1-beta1 interface of hemoglobin. The AHSP-alphaHb interactions are extensive but suboptimal, explaining why beta-hemoglobin can competitively displace AHSP to form HbA. Remarkably, the Fe(II)-heme group in AHSP bound alphaHb is coordinated by the distal but not the proximal histidine. Importantly, binding to AHSP facilitates the conversion of oxy-alphaHb to a deoxygenated, oxidized [Fe(III)], nonreactive form in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. These observations reveal the molecular mechanisms by which AHSP stabilizes free alphaHb.

  16. Distinct mechanisms mediate speed-accuracy adjustments in cortico-subthalamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brittain, John-Stuart; Fischer, Petra; Cheeran, Binith; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James; Aziz, Tipu Z; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Little, Simon; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Optimal decision-making requires balancing fast but error-prone and more accurate but slower decisions through adjustments of decision thresholds. Here, we demonstrate two distinct correlates of such speed-accuracy adjustments by recording subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity and electroencephalography in 11 Parkinson’s disease patients during a perceptual decision-making task; STN low-frequency oscillatory (LFO) activity (2–8 Hz), coupled to activity at prefrontal electrode Fz, and STN beta activity (13–30 Hz) coupled to electrodes C3/C4 close to motor cortex. These two correlates differed not only in their cortical topography and spectral characteristics but also in the relative timing of recruitment and in their precise relationship with decision thresholds. Increases of STN LFO power preceding the response predicted increased thresholds only after accuracy instructions, while cue-induced reductions of STN beta power decreased thresholds irrespective of instructions. These findings indicate that distinct neural mechanisms determine whether a decision will be made in haste or with caution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21481.001 PMID:28137358

  17. GroEL mediates protein folding with a two successive timer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Taguchi, Hideki; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Yoshida, Masasuke; Funatsu, Takashi

    2004-05-21

    GroEL encapsulates nonnative substrate proteins in a central cavity capped by GroES, providing a safe folding cage. Conventional models assume that a single timer lasting approximately 8 s governs the ATP hydrolysis-driven GroEL chaperonin cycle. We examine single molecule imaging of GFP folding within the cavity, binding release dynamics of GroEL-GroES, ensemble measurements of GroEL/substrate FRET, and the initial kinetics of GroEL ATPase activity. We conclude that the cycle consists of two successive timers of approximately 3 s and approximately 5 s duration. During the first timer, GroEL is bound to ATP, substrate protein, and GroES. When the first timer ends, the substrate protein is released into the central cavity and folding begins. ATP hydrolysis and phosphate release immediately follow this transition. ADP, GroES, and substrate depart GroEL after the second timer is complete. This mechanism explains how GroES binding to a GroEL-substrate complex encapsulates the substrate rather than allowing it to escape into solution.

  18. Structure-Based Mechanism for Early PLP-Mediated Steps of Rabbit Cytosolic Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino L. Di Salvo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzes the reversible interconversion of L-serine and glycine with transfer of one-carbon groups to and from tetrahydrofolate. Active site residue Thr254 is known to be involved in the transaldimination reaction, a crucial step in the catalytic mechanism of all pyridoxal 5′-phosphate- (PLP- dependent enzymes, which determines binding of substrates and release of products. In order to better understand the role of Thr254, we have expressed, characterized, and determined the crystal structures of rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase T254A and T254C mutant forms, in the absence and presence of substrates. These mutants accumulate a kinetically stable gem-diamine intermediate, and their crystal structures show differences in the active site with respect to wild type. The kinetic and crystallographic data acquired with mutant enzymes permit us to infer that conversion of gem-diamine to external aldimine is significantly slowed because intermediates are trapped into an anomalous position by a misorientation of the PLP ring, and a new energy barrier hampers the transaldimination reaction. This barrier likely arises from the loss of the stabilizing hydrogen bond between the hydroxymethyl group of Thr254 and the ε-amino group of active site Lys257, which stabilizes the external aldimine intermediate in wild type SHMTs.

  19. A complex mechanism for HDGF-mediated cell growth, migration, invasion, and TMZ chemosensitivity in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ye; Hu, Zheng; Long, Hao; Peng, Yuping; Zhang, Xi'an; Que, Tianshi; Zheng, Shihao; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Gang; Yi, Liu; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Weiyi; Qi, Songtao

    2014-09-01

    HDGF is overexpressed in gliomas as compared to normal brain. We therefore analyzed the molecular mechanisms of HDGF action in gliomas. HDGF was downregulated in normal brain tissue as compared to glioma specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. In glioma samples, increased HDGF expression was associated with disease progression. Knocking down HDGF expression not only significantly decreased cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, but also markedly enhanced TMZ-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in glioma cells. Mechanistic analyses revealed that CCND1, c-myc, and TGF-β were downregulated after stable HDGF knockdown in the U251 and U87 glioma cells. HDGF knockdown restored E-cadherin expression and suppressed mesenchymal cell markers such as vimentin, β-catenin, and N-cadherin. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 increased, while Bcl-2 decreased in each cell line following treatment with shHDGF and TMZ, as compared to TMZ alone. Furthermore, RNAi-based knockdown study revealed that HDGF is probably involved in the activation of both the PI3K/Akt and the TGF-β signaling pathways. Together, our data suggested that HDGF regulates glioma cell growth, apoptosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) probably through the Akt and the TGF-β signaling pathways. These results provide evidence that targeting HDGF or its downstream targets may lead to novel therapies for gliomas.

  20. Cetuximab Induces Eme1-Mediated DNA Repair: a Novel Mechanism for Cetuximab Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Weinandy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is observed in a large number of neoplasms. The monoclonal antibody cetuximab/Erbitux is frequently applied to treat EGFR-expressing tumors. However, the application of cetuximab alone or in combination with radio- and/or chemotherapy often yields only little benefit for patients. In the present study, we describe a mechanism that explains resistance of both tumor cell lines and cultured primary human glioma cells to cetuximab. Treatment of these cells with cetuximab promoted DNA synthesis in the absence of increased proliferation, suggesting that DNA repair pathways were activated. Indeed, we observed that cetuximab promoted the activation of the DNA damage response pathway and prevented the degradation of essential meiotic endonuclease 1 homolog 1 (Eme1, a heterodimeric endonuclease involved in DNA repair. The increased levels of Eme1 were necessary for enhanced DNA repair, and the knockdown of Eme1 was sufficient to prevent efficient DNA repair in response to ultraviolet-C light or megavoltage irradiation. These treatments reduced the survival of tumor cells, an effect that was reversed by cetuximab application. Again, this protection was dependent on Eme1. Taken together, these results suggest that cetuximab initiates pathways that result in the stabilization of Eme1, thereby resulting in enhanced DNA repair. Accordingly, cetuximab enhances DNA repair, reducing the effectiveness of DNA-damaging therapies. This aspect should be considered when using cetuximab as an antitumor agent and suggests that Eme1 is a negative predictive marker.

  1. Bacterial Exopolysaccharide mediated heavy metal removal: A Review on biosynthesis, mechanism and remediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Diwan, Batul

    2017-03-01

    Heavy metal contamination has been recognized as a major public health risk, particularly in developing countries and their toxicological manifestations are well known. Conventional remediation strategies are either expensive or they generate toxic by-products, which adversely affect the environment. Therefore, necessity for an environmentally safe strategy motivates interest towards biological techniques. One of such most profoundly driven approach in recent times is biosorption through microbial biomass and their products. Extracellular polymeric substances are such complex blend of high molecular weight microbial (prokaryotic and eukaryotic) biopolymers. They are mainly composed of proteins, polysaccharides, uronic acids, humic substances, lipids etc. One of its essential constituent is the exopolysaccharide (EPS) released out of self defense against harsh conditions of starvation, pH and temperature, hence it displays exemplary physiological, rheological and physio-chemical properties. Its net anionic makeup allows the biopolymer to effectively sequester positively charged heavy metal ions. The polysaccharide has been expounded deeply in this article with reference to its biosynthesis and emphasizes heavy metal sorption abilities of polymer in terms of mechanism of action and remediation. It reports current investigation and strategic advancements in dealing bacterial cells and their EPS in diverse forms - mixed culture EPS, single cell EPS, live, dead or immobilized EPS. A significant scrutiny is also involved highlighting the existing challenges that still lie in the path of commercialization. The article enlightens the potential of EPS to bring about bio-detoxification of heavy metal contaminated terrestrial and aquatic systems in highly sustainable, economic and eco-friendly manner.

  2. [The molecular mechanisms of curcuma wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhao; Zou, Hai-Zhou; Xu, Fang

    2012-09-01

    To study the molecular mechanisms of Curcuma Wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells. The Curcuma Wenyujin extract was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. TE-1 cells were divided into 4 groups after adherence. 100 microL RMPI-1640 culture medium containing 0.1% DMSO was added in Group 1 as the control group. 100 microL 25, 50, and 100 mg/L Curcuma Wenyujin extract complete culture medium was respectively added in the rest 3 groups as the low, middle, and high dose Curcuma Wenyujin extract groups. The effects of different doses of Curcuma Wenyujin extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/L) on the proliferation of human esophageal carcinoma cell line TE-1 in vitro were analyzed by MTT assay. The gene expression profile was identified by cDNA microarrays in esophageal carcinoma TE-1 cells exposed to Curcuma Wenyujin extract for 48 h. The differential expression genes were further analyzed by Gene Ontology function analysis. Compared with the control group, MTT results showed that Curcuma Wenyujin extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of TE-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner (PCurcuma Wenyujin extract could inhibit the growth of human esophageal carcinoma cell line TE-1 in vitro. The molecular mechanisms might be associated with regulating genes expressions at multi-levels.

  3. Nanofilled and/or toughened POM composites produced by water-mediated melt compounding: Structure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Binary and ternary composites composed of polyoxymethylene (POM, polyurethane (PU and synthetic boehmite alumina (AlO(OH were produced by water-mediated melt compounding technique. PU latex and/or aqueous alumina suspension were injected into the molten POM in a twin-screw extruder to prepare toughened and/or reinforced polymer composites. The dispersion of the alumina and PU was studied by transmission- and scanning electron microcopy techniques (TEM and SEM, respectively, and discussed. The crystallization of the POM-based systems was inspected by polarized optical microscopy (PLM. The mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the composites were determined in dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA, short-time creep tests (performed at various temperatures, uniaxial static tensile and notched Charpy impact tests. Incorporation of alumina increased the stiffness and resistance to creep and reduced the tensile strength, elongation at break and impact toughness. The change in the above parameters was opposite for the POM/PU binary blends. Additional incorporation of alumina in the POM/PU blend enhanced the resistance to creep, elongation at break and maintained the impact toughness compared to the POM/PU blend.

  4. Pathogenic Cx31 is un/misfolded to cause skin abnormality via a Fos/JunB-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengyuan; Chen, Xiang; Chi, Jingwei; Yang, Dawei; Liu, Shu; Liu, Mujun; Pan, Qian; Fan, Jianbing; Wang, Danling; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in connexin-31 (Cx31) are associated with multiple human diseases, including familial erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV). The pathogenic mechanism of EKV-associated Cx31 mutants remains largely elusive. Here, we show that EKV-pathogenic Cx31 mutants are un/misfolded and temperature sensitive. In Drosophila, expression of pathogenic Cx31, but not wild-type Cx31, causes depigmentation and degeneration of ommatidia that are rescued by expression of either dBip or dHsp70. Ectopic expression of Cx31 in mouse skin results in skin abnormalities resembling human EKV. The affected tissues show remarkable disrupted gap junction formation and significant upregulation of chaperones Bip and Hsp70 as well as AP-1 proteins c-Fos and JunB, in addition to molecular signatures of skin diseases. Consistently, c-Fos, JunB, Bip and Hsp70 are strikingly higher in keratinocytes of EKV patients than their matched control individuals. Furthermore, a druggable AP-1 inhibitory small molecule suppresses skin phenotype and pathological abnormalities of transgenic Cx31 mice. The study suggests that Cx31 mutant proteins are un/misfolded to cause EKV likely via an AP-1-mediated mechanism and identifies a small molecule with therapeutic potential of the disease.

  5. Controlling Solution-Mediated Reaction Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction Using Potential and Solvent for Aprotic Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwabi, David G; Tułodziecki, Michał; Pour, Nir; Itkis, Daniil M; Thompson, Carl V; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-04-07

    Fundamental understanding of growth mechanisms of Li2O2 in Li-O2 cells is critical for implementing batteries with high gravimetric energies. Li2O2 growth can occur first by 1e(-) transfer to O2, forming Li(+)-O2(-) and then either chemical disproportionation of Li(+)-O2(-), or a second electron transfer to Li(+)-O2(-). We demonstrate that Li2O2 growth is governed primarily by disproportionation of Li(+)-O2(-) at low overpotential, and surface-mediated electron transfer at high overpotential. We obtain evidence supporting this trend using the rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) technique, which shows that the fraction of oxygen reduction reaction charge attributable to soluble Li(+)-O2(-)-based intermediates increases as the discharge overpotential reduces. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements of oxygen reduction support this picture, and show that the dependence of the reaction mechanism on the applied potential explains the difference in Li2O2 morphologies observed at different discharge overpotentials: formation of large (∼250 nm-1 μm) toroids, and conformal coatings (<50 nm) at higher overpotentials. These results highlight that RRDE and EQCM can be used as complementary tools to gain new insights into the role of soluble and solid reaction intermediates in the growth of reaction products in metal-O2 batteries.

  6. VEGF and colon cancer growth beyond angiogenesis: does VEGF directly mediate colon cancer growth via a non-angiogenic mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer growth and the underlying mechanisms. Angiogenesis, the growth of new capillary blood vessels in the body, is critical for tissue injury healing and cancer growth. In 1971, Judah Folkman proposed the concept that tumor growth beyond 2 mm is critically dependent on angiogenesis. Tumors including colon cancers release angiogenic growth factors that stimulate blood vessels to grow into the tumors thus providing oxygen and nutrients that enable exponential growth. VEGF is the most potent angiogenic growth factor. Several studies have highlighted the role of VEGF in colon cancer, specifically in the stimulation of angiogenesis. This role of VEGF is strongly supported by studies showing that inhibition of VEGF using the blocking antibody, bevacizumab, results in decreased angiogenesis and abrogation of cancer growth. In the United States, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy is FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, the source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue, the mechanisms of VEGF generation in colon cancer cells and the molecular pathways involved in VEGF mediated angiogenesis in colon cancer are not fully known. The possibility that VEGF directly stimulates cancer cell growth in an autocrine manner has not been explored in depth.

  7. Induction of osteogenic differentiation of adipose derived stem cells by microstructured nitinol actuator-mediated mechanical stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Strauß

    Full Text Available The development of large tissue engineered bone remains a challenge in vitro, therefore the use of hybrid-implants might offer a bridge between tissue engineering and dense metal or ceramic implants. Especially the combination of the pseudoelastic implant material Nitinol (NiTi with adipose derived stem cells (ASCs opens new opportunities, as ASCs are able to differentiate osteogenically and therefore enhance osseointegration of implants. Due to limited knowledge about the effects of NiTi-structures manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM on ASCs the study started with an evaluation of cytocompatibility followed by the investigation of the use of SLM-generated 3-dimensional NiTi-structures preseeded with ASCs as osteoimplant model. In this study we could demonstrate for the first time that osteogenic differentiation of ASCs can be induced by implant-mediated mechanical stimulation without support of osteogenic cell culture media. By use of an innovative implant design and synthesis via SLM-technique we achieved high rates of vital cells, proper osteogenic differentiation and mechanically loadable NiTi-scaffolds could be achieved.

  8. Gαi2-PROTEIN MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION: A CNS MOLECULAR MECHANISM COUNTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF SODIUM-DEPENDENT HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainford, Richard D; Carmichael, Casey Y; Pascale, Crissey L; Kuwabara, Jill T

    2014-01-01

    Excess dietary salt-intake is an established cause of hypertension. At present our understanding of the neuro-pathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension is limited by a lack of identification of the central nervous system mechanisms that modulate sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in response to dietary salt-intake. We hypothesized that impairment of brain Gαi2 protein-gated signal transduction pathways would result in increased sympathetically mediated renal sodium retention, thus promoting the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. To test this hypothesis, naïve or renal denervated Dahl salt-resistant and Dahl salt-sensitive rats were assigned to receive a continuous intracerebroventricular control scrambled or a targeted Gαi2 oligodeoxynucleotide infusion, and naïve Brown Norway and 8-congenic Dahl salt-sensitive rats, were fed a 21-day normal or high-salt diet. High salt-intake did not alter blood pressure, suppressed plasma norepinephrine, and evoked a site-specific increase in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus Gαi2 protein levels in naïve Brown-Norway, Dahl salt-resistant and scrambled oligodeoxynucleotide-infused Dahl salt-resistant, but not Dahl salt-sensitive rats. In Dahl salt-resistant rats Gαi2 down-regulation evoked rapid renal nerve-dependent hypertension, sodium retention and sympathoexcitation. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, Gαi2 down-regulation exacerbated salt-sensitive hypertension via a renal nerve-dependent mechanism. Congenic-8 Dahl salt-sensitive rats exhibited sodium-evoked paraventricular nucleus specific Gαi2 protein up-regulation and attenuated hypertension, sodium retention and global sympathoexcitation compared to Dahl salt-sensitive rats. These data demonstrate that paraventricular nucleus Gαi2 protein-gated pathways represent a conserved central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal-nerve dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Impairment of this

  9. Bacterial Exopolysaccharide mediated heavy metal removal: A Review on biosynthesis, mechanism and remediation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Gupta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination has been recognized as a major public health risk, particularly in developing countries and their toxicological manifestations are well known. Conventional remediation strategies are either expensive or they generate toxic by-products, which adversely affect the environment. Therefore, necessity for an environmentally safe strategy motivates interest towards biological techniques. One of such most profoundly driven approach in recent times is biosorption through microbial biomass and their products. Extracellular polymeric substances are such complex blend of high molecular weight microbial (prokaryotic and eukaryotic biopolymers. They are mainly composed of proteins, polysaccharides, uronic acids, humic substances, lipids etc. One of its essential constituent is the exopolysaccharide (EPS released out of self defense against harsh conditions of starvation, pH and temperature, hence it displays exemplary physiological, rheological and physio-chemical properties. Its net anionic makeup allows the biopolymer to effectively sequester positively charged heavy metal ions. The polysaccharide has been expounded deeply in this article with reference to its biosynthesis and emphasizes heavy metal sorption abilities of polymer in terms of mechanism of action and remediation. It reports current investigation and strategic advancements in dealing bacterial cells and their EPS in diverse forms – mixed culture EPS, single cell EPS, live, dead or immobilized EPS. A significant scrutiny is also involved highlighting the existing challenges that still lie in the path of commercialization. The article enlightens the potential of EPS to bring about bio-detoxification of heavy metal contaminated terrestrial and aquatic systems in highly sustainable, economic and eco-friendly manner.

  10. Structural basis for Marburg virus VP35-mediated immune evasion mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Edwards, Megan R.; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Endlich-Frazier, Ariel C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Liu, Gai; Huh, Juyoung; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. [Sinai; (WU-MED); (UTSMC)

    2013-07-22

    Filoviruses, marburgvirus (MARV) and ebolavirus (EBOV), are causative agents of highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. MARV and EBOV share a common genome organization but show important differences in replication complex formation, cell entry, host tropism, transcriptional regulation, and immune evasion. Multifunctional filoviral viral protein (VP) 35 proteins inhibit innate immune responses. Recent studies suggest double-stranded (ds)RNA sequestration is a potential mechanism that allows EBOV VP35 to antagonize retinoic-acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLRs) that are activated by viral pathogen–associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as double-strandedness and dsRNA blunt ends. Here, we show that MARV VP35 can inhibit IFN production at multiple steps in the signaling pathways downstream of RLRs. The crystal structure of MARV VP35 IID in complex with 18-bp dsRNA reveals that despite the similar protein fold as EBOV VP35 IID, MARV VP35 IID interacts with the dsRNA backbone and not with blunt ends. Functional studies show that MARV VP35 can inhibit dsRNA-dependent RLR activation and interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation by IFN kinases TRAF family member-associated NFkb activator (TANK) binding kinase-1 (TBK-1) and IFN kB kinase e (IKKe) in cell-based studies. We also show that MARV VP35 can only inhibit RIG-I and melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5) activation by double strandedness of RNA PAMPs (coating backbone) but is unable to inhibit activation of RLRs by dsRNA blunt ends (end capping). In contrast, EBOV VP35 can inhibit activation by both PAMPs. Insights on differential PAMP recognition and inhibition of IFN induction by a similar filoviral VP35 fold, as shown here, reveal the structural and functional plasticity of a highly conserved virulence factor.

  11. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  12. Diversity of neural signals mediated by multiple, burst-firing mechanisms in rat olfactory tubercle neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Strowbridge, Ben W

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory information is processed by a diverse group of interconnected forebrain regions. Most efforts to define the cellular mechanisms involved in processing olfactory information have been focused on understanding the function of the olfactory bulb, the primary second-order olfactory region, and its principal target, the piriform cortex. However, the olfactory bulb also projects to other targets, including the rarely studied olfactory tubercle, a ventral brain region recently implicated in regulating cocaine-related reward behavior. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from rat tubercle slices to define the intrinsic properties of neurons in the dense and multiform cell layers. We find three common firing modes of tubercle neurons: regular-spiking, intermittent-discharging, and bursting. Regular-spiking neurons are typically spiny-dense-cell-layer cells with pyramidal-shaped, dendritic arborizations. Intermittently discharging and bursting neurons comprise the majority of the deeper multiform layer and share a common morphology: multipolar, sparsely spiny cells. Rather than generating all-or-none stereotyped discharges, as observed in many brain areas, bursting cells in the tubercle generate depolarizing plateau potentials that trigger graded but time-limited discharges. We find two distinct subclasses of bursting cells that respond similarly to step stimuli but differ in the role transmembrane Ca currents play in their intrinsic behavior. Calcium currents amplify depolarizing inputs and enhance excitability in regenerative bursting cells, whereas the primary action of Ca in nonregenerative bursting tubercle neurons appears to be to decrease excitability by triggering Ca-activated K currents. Nonregenerative bursting cells exhibit a prolonged refractory period after even short discharges suggesting that they may function to detect transient events.

  13. Molecular mechanism of inositol hexaphosphate-mediated apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2007-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Current therapies are mostly ineffective and new agents need to be explored for controlling this devastating disease. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a phytochemical that is widely found in corns, cereals, nuts, and high fiber-content foods. Previous studies demonstrated anti-cancer properties of IP6 in several in vitro and in vivo tumor models. However, therapeutic efficacy of IP6 has not yet been evaluated in glioblastoma. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism of action of IP6 in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells. The viability of T98G cells decreased following treatment with increasing doses of IP6. T98G cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM IP6 for 24 h showed morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Western blotting indicated changes in expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins resulting in an increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and upregulation of cytosolic levels of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, suggesting involvement of mitochondria-dependent caspase cascade in apoptosis. IP6 downregulated cell survival factors such as baculovirus inhibitor-of-apoptosis repeat containing-2 (BIRC-2) protein and telomerase to promote apoptosis. Upregulation of calpain and caspase-9 occurred in course of apoptosis. Increased activities of calpain and caspase-3 cleaved 270 kD alpha-spectrin at specific sites generating 145 kD spectrin break down product (SBDP) and 120 kD SBDP, respectively. Increased caspase-3 activity also cleaved inhibitor of caspase-3-activated DNase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Collectively, our results demonstrated that IP6 down regulated the survival factors BIRC-2 and telomerase and upregulated calpain and caspase-3 activities for apoptosis in T98G cells.

  14. Desiccation tolerance of Hymenophyllacea filmy ferns is mediated by constitutive and non-inducible cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés Cea, Marcelo; Claverol, Stephan; Alvear Castillo, Carla; Rabert Pinilla, Claudia; Bravo Ramírez, León

    2014-04-01

    desiccation takes place therefore precludes the induction of protective systems, suggesting a constitutive mechanism of cellular protection. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting p53-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo by ROS-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Gang; Pelicano, Helene; Liao, Jianwei; Huang, Jie; Feng, Li; Keating, Michael J; Huang, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia in Western countries. Loss of p53 function in CLL cells due to chromosome 17p deletion or p53 mutations often leads to a more malignant disease phenotype and is associated with drug resistance and poor clinical outcome. Thus, development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively target CLL cells with p53 deficiency is clinically important. Here we showed that p53-null CLL cells were highly sensitive to ROS-mediated cell killing due to their intrinsic ROS stress. We further demonstrated that a natural compound phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) was able to effectively kill CLL cells with loss of p53, even under the protection of stromal cells. In p53-defficient CLL cells, PEITC induced a rapid depletion of glutathione and a severe accumulation of ROS, leading to massive leukemia cell death in the stromal microenvironment. The drug-induced cell death was associated with a significant decrease of in MCL-1 survival molecule. We further showed that ROS-mediated cell death was the key mechanism by which PEITC induced cytotoxicity, since such cell death could be prevented by addition of antioxidant NAC. Importantly, in vivo study showed that PEITC was able to induce substantial leukemia cell death in mice. Treatment of CLL mice harboring TCL1-Tg:p53-/- genotype with PEITC significantly prolonged the median survival time of the animals. Our study identifies a vulnerability of p53-null CLL cells with high sensitivity to ROS-generating agents, and suggests that PEITC may potentially be useful for clinical treatment of CLL with 17p deletion and p53 mutations.

  16. Diallyl trisulfide protects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis via a hydrogen sulfide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian-Yun; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Kong, De-Song; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiang-Juan; Zheng, Shi-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Garlic is one natural source of organic sulfur containing compounds and has shown promise in the treatment of chronic liver disease. Dietary garlic consumption is inversely correlated with the progression of alcoholic fatty liver (AFL), although the exact underlying mechanisms are not clear. Our previous studies also have shown that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), the primary organosulfur compound from Allium sativum L, displayed anti-lipid deposition and antioxidant properties in AFL. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we used the intragastric infusion model of alcohol administration and human normal liver cell line LO2 cultured with suitable ethanol to mimic the pathological condition of AFL. We showed that accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was lowered significantly by the administration of DATS, but antioxidant capacity was increased by DATS. Additionally, DATS inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via down-regulating Bax expression and up-regulating Bcl-2 expression, and attenuated alcohol-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. More importantly, using iodoacetamide (IAM) to block hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production from DATS, we noted that IAM abolished all the above effects of DATS in ethanol-treated LO2 cells. Lastly, we found DATS could increase the expressions of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), the major H2S-producing enzymes. These results demonstrate that DATS protect against alcohol-induced fatty liver via a H2S-mediated mechanism. Therefore, targeting H2S may play a therapeutic role for AFL.

  17. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  18. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  19. Effect of dasatinib on EMT-mediated-mechanism of resistance against EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesumi, Yuichi; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Sato, Katsuaki; Chiba, Masato; Shimoji, Masaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in certain non-small cell lung cancers that harbor EGFR mutations. Because no currently available drugs specifically kill cancer cells via EMT, novel treatment strategies that overcome or prevent EMT are needed. A recent report suggested that dasatinib (an ABL/Src kinase inhibitor) inhibits EMT induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in lung cancer cells (Wilson et al., 2014). In this study, we analyzed effects of dasatinib on the resistance mechanism in HCC4006 cells, which tend to acquire resistance to EGFR-TKIs via EMT. Sensitivity to dasatinib in HCC4006 and HCC4006 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells with an EMT phenotype was analyzed. HCC4006 cells acquired resistance against the combination of erlotinib and dasatinib (HCC4006EDR) following chronic treatment with these drugs. The expression of EMT markers and the resistance mechanism were analyzed. Short-term or long-term treatment with dasatinib did not reverse EMT in HCC4006ER. In contrast, HCC4006EDR cells maintained an epithelial phenotype, and the mechanism underlying resistance to erlotinib plus dasatinib combination therapy was attributable to a T790M secondary mutation. HCC4006EDR cells, but not HCC4006ER cells, were highly sensitive to a third-generation EGFR-TKI, osimertinib. Although dasatinib monotherapy did not reverse EMT in HCC4006ER cells, preemptive combination treatment with erlotinib and dasatinib prevented the emergence of acquired resistance via EMT, and led to the emergence of T790M. Our results indicate that preemptive combination therapy may be a promising strategy to prevent the emergence of EMT-mediated resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MECHANISM AND REGULATION OF NONSENSE-MEDIATED MRNA DECAY (NMD, AN ESSENTIAL QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEM OF PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Silhavy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cell, various quality control mechanisms have evolved to ensure that only perfect mRNAs could be translated. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD is a quality control system that identifies and eliminates mRNAs containing premature termination codons, thereby preventing the accumulation of potentially harmful truncated proteins. While NMD is well-characterized in yeast, in invertebrates and in mammals, plant NMD is poorly understood. In yeast and in invertebrates unusually long 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs render an mRNA subject to NMD, while in mammals' 3'UTR located introns trigger NMD. UPF1, 2 and 3 are the key trans-acting NMD factors in yeast as well as in animals. However, in mammals, the core components of the Exon Junction Complex (Mago, Y14, eIF4A3 and MLN51 are also required for NMD. It was proposed that long 3’UTR-induced NMD is the ancient type and that it was changed to a more complex intron-based NMD in mammals. To better understand the evolution of eukaryotic NMD systems, we have studied the NMD machinery of plants, as plants are outgroup relative to fungi and animals. We have elaborated various transient assays to analyze plant NMD. Using these assays we defined the cis elements of plant NMD and characterized several trans-acting plant NMD factors. We demonstrated that two plant NMD pathways co-exist, one pathway, as yeast or invertebrate NMD systems, eliminates mRNAs with long 3'UTRs, while a distinct pathway, like mammalian NMD, degrades mRNAs harbouring 3'UTR-located introns. We showed that UPF1, UPF2, and SMG-7 are involved in both plant NMD pathways, whereas Mago and Y14 are required only for intron-based NMD. We also provide evidence that the molecular mechanism of long 3'UTR-based plant NMD resembles yeast NMD, while the intron-based NMD is similar to mammalian NMD. Moreover we have found that the SMG-7 component of plant NMD is targeted by NMD suggesting that plant NMD is autoregulated. We propose that in

  1. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  2. Ameliorative Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Action of Black Ginseng (Panax ginseng on Acetaminophen-Mediated Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Nan Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent overdosing of acetaminophen (APAP has become the major cause of acute liver injury (ALI. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential hepatoprotective effects of black ginseng (BG on APAP-induced mice liver injuries and the underlying mechanisms of action were further investigated for the first time. Methods: Mice were treated with BG (300, 600 mg/kg by oral gavage once a day for seven days. On the 7th day, all mice were treated with 250 mg/kg APAP which caused severe liver injury after 24 h and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Results: Our results showed that pretreatment with BG significantly decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST compared with the APAP group. Meanwhile, hepatic antioxidant including glutathione (GSH was elevated compared with the APAP group. In contrast, a significant decrease of the levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA was observed in the BG-treated groups compared with the APAP group. These effects were associated with significant increases of cytochrome P450 E1 (CYP2E1 and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE levels in liver tissues. Moreover, BG supplementation suppressed activation of apoptotic pathways through increasing Bcl-2 and decreasing Bax protein expression levels according to western blotting analysis. Histopathological examination revealed that BG pretreatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced necrosis and inflammatory infiltration in liver tissues. Biological indicators of nitrative stress like 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT were also inhibited after pretreatment with BG, compared with the APAP group. Conclusions: The results clearly suggest that the underlying molecular mechanisms of action of BG-mediated alleviation of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity may involve its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nitrative effects.

  3. Ameliorative Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Action of Black Ginseng (Panax ginseng) on Acetaminophen-Mediated Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun-Nan; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Zi; Li, Xin-Dian; Zhang, Lian-Xue; Li, Wei; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2017-04-21

    Background: Frequent overdosing of acetaminophen (APAP) has become the major cause of acute liver injury (ALI). The present study aimed to evaluate the potential hepatoprotective effects of black ginseng (BG) on APAP-induced mice liver injuries and the underlying mechanisms of action were further investigated for the first time. Methods: Mice were treated with BG (300, 600 mg/kg) by oral gavage once a day for seven days. On the 7th day, all mice were treated with 250 mg/kg APAP which caused severe liver injury after 24 h and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Results: Our results showed that pretreatment with BG significantly decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) compared with the APAP group. Meanwhile, hepatic antioxidant including glutathione (GSH) was elevated compared with the APAP group. In contrast, a significant decrease of the levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was observed in the BG-treated groups compared with the APAP group. These effects were associated with significant increases of cytochrome P450 E1 (CYP2E1) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels in liver tissues. Moreover, BG supplementation suppressed activation of apoptotic pathways through increasing Bcl-2 and decreasing Bax protein expression levels according to western blotting analysis. Histopathological examination revealed that BG pretreatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced necrosis and inflammatory infiltration in liver tissues. Biological indicators of nitrative stress like 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were also inhibited after pretreatment with BG, compared with the APAP group. Conclusions: The results clearly suggest that the underlying molecular mechanisms of action of BG-mediated alleviation of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity may involve its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nitrative effects.

  4. A new leptin-mediated mechanism for stimulating fatty acid oxidation: a pivotal role for sarcolemmal FAT/CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momken, Iman; Chabowski, Adrian; Dirkx, Ellen; Nabben, Miranda; Jain, Swati S; McFarlan, Jay T; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Bonen, Arend

    2017-01-01

    Leptin stimulates fatty acid oxidation in muscle and heart; but, the mechanism by which these tissues provide additional intracellular fatty acids for their oxidation remains unknown. We examined, in isolated muscle and cardiac myocytes, whether leptin, via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, stimulated fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36)-mediated fatty acid uptake to enhance fatty acid oxidation. In both mouse skeletal muscle and rat cardiomyocytes, leptin increased fatty acid oxidation, an effect that was blocked when AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside or Compound C. In wild-type mice, leptin induced the translocation of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane and increased fatty acid uptake into giant sarcolemmal vesicles and into cardiomyocytes. In muscles of FAT/CD36-KO mice, and in cardiomyocytes in which cell surface FAT/CD36 action was blocked by sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, the leptin-stimulated influx of fatty acids was inhibited; concomitantly, the normal leptin-stimulated increase in fatty acid oxidation was also prevented, despite the normal leptin-induced increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Conversely, in muscle of AMPK kinase-dead mice, leptin failed to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36, along with a failure to stimulate fatty acid uptake and oxidation. Similarly, when siRNA was used to reduce AMPK in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, leptin failed to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36. Our studies have revealed a novel mechanism of leptin-induced fatty acid oxidation in muscle tissue; namely, this process is dependent on the activation of AMPK to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane, thereby stimulating fatty acid uptake. Without increasing this leptin-stimulated, FAT/CD36-dependent fatty acid uptake process, leptin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation does not enhance fatty acid oxidation. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Microstructure analysis and formation mechanism of ZnO nanoporous film via the ultrasonic irradiation mediated SILAR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang-Dong; Li, Xiao-Min; Yu, Wei-Dong; Li, Lei; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Can-Yun

    2006-05-01

    Nanoporous ZnO film was prepared by the stepwise solution route: the ultrasonic irradiation mediated successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The growth of ZnO submicron particles in the film was arrested in the immature status by reducing the deposition cycle from 50 to 30. The morphology and microstructure of individual ZnO submicron particle was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron diffraction. Results reveal that ZnO submicron particle was constituted by numerous nanocrystallites with size of 3-10 nm, and exhibited ordered nanostructure preferably along (0 0 2) plane. The formation mechanism of specific submicron particle on the nanometer level was discussed, emphasizing the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the nucleation and growth of ZnO nanocrystals in zinc-ammonia aqueous system. In addition, effects of NH 3-Zn ratio and pH value in the precursor were examined, which has established the suitable chemical environment for the formation of dense ZnO submicron particles on substrate, and especially provided further experimental proof for the function of ultrasonic irradiation on promoting the nucleation on submicron particles.

  6. Reinforcing the membrane-mediated mechanism of action of the anti-tuberculosis candidate drug thioridazine with molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-02-01

    Thioridazine is a well-known dopamine-antagonist drug with a wide range of pharmacological properties ranging from neuroleptic to antimicrobial and even anticancer activity. Thioridazine is a critical component of a promising multi-drug therapy against M. tuberculosis. Amongst the various proposed mechanisms of action, the cell membrane-mediated one is peculiarly tempting due to the distinctive feature of phenothiazine drug family to accumulate in selected body tissues. In this study, we employ long-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions of three different concentrations of thioridazine with zwitterionic and negatively charged model lipid membranes. Thioridazine partitions into the interfacial region of membranes and modifies their structural and dynamic properties, however dissimilarly so at the highest membrane-occurring concentration, that appears to be obtainable only for the negatively charged bilayer. We show that the origin of such changes is the drug induced decrease of the interfacial tension, which ultimately leads to the significant membrane expansion. Our findings support the hypothesis that the phenothiazines therapeutic activity may arise from the drug-membrane interactions, and reinforce the wider, emerging view of action of many small, bioactive compounds.

  7. Transcriptome profiling reveals the regulatory mechanism underlying pollination dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set mainly mediated by auxin and gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Deng, Wei; Hu, Guojian; Hu, Nan; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Fruit set is a key process for crop production in tomato which occurs after successful pollination and fertilization naturally. However, parthenocarpic fruit development can be uncoupled from fertilization triggered by exogenous auxin or gibberellins (GAs). Global transcriptome knowledge during fruit initiation would help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these two hormones regulate pollination-dependent and -independent fruit set. In this work, digital gene expression tag profiling (DGE) technology was applied to compare the transcriptomes from pollinated and 2, 4-D/GA3-treated ovaries. Activation of carbohydrate metabolism, cell division and expansion as well as the down-regulation of MADS-box is a comprehensive regulatory pathway during pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set. The signaling cascades of auxin and GA are significantly modulated. The feedback regulations of Aux/IAAs and DELLA genes which functioned to fine-tune auxin and GA response respectively play fundamental roles in triggering fruit initiation. In addition, auxin regulates GA synthesis via up-regulation of GA20ox1 and down-regulation of KNOX. Accordingly, the effect of auxin on fruit set is mediated by GA via ARF2 and IAA9 down-regulation, suggesting that both pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set depend on the crosstalk between auxin and GA. This study characterizes the transcriptomic features of ovary development and more importantly unravels the integral roles of auxin and GA on pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set.

  8. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O

    2016-03-29

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, -550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pH(cathode), ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m² power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value.

  9. DAP10 contributes to CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxic effector mechanisms during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessmann, Manuela; Rausch, Alexandra; Rückerl, Dominik; Adams, Pamela Scott; Simon, Markus; Gilfillan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Ehlers, Stefan; Hölscher, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    The activating C-type lectin-like receptor NKG2D, which is expressed by mouse NK cells and activated CD8 T cells, was previously demonstrated to be involved in tumor rejection and as a defense mechanism against viral and bacterial infections. Because CD8 T cells are important for protective immune responses during chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and represent a promising target for new vaccine strategies to prevent human pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we studied the immune response in mice deficient for the NKG2D adapter molecule DAP10 during experimental TB. After aerosol infection, DAP10-defcient mice displayed an unimpaired recruitment, activation and development of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Whereas the frequency of interferon-gamma-producing CD8 T cells from Mtb-infected DAP10-defcient mice was not affected, CD8 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the absence of DAP10. The loss of cytotoxic activity in DAP10-deficient CD8 T cells was associated with an impaired release of cytotoxic granules. Together, our results suggest that during Mtb infection DAP10 is required for maximal cytolytic activity of CD8 T cells.

  10. Study on the Mechanism of mTOR-Mediated Autophagy during Electroacupuncture Pretreatment against Cerebral Ischemic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhou-Quan; Cui, Su-yang; Zhu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the association between the electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment-induced protective effect against early cerebral ischemic injury and autophagy. EA pretreatment can protect cerebral ischemic and reperfusion injuries, but whether the attenuation of early cerebral ischemic injury by EA pretreatment was associated with autophagy is not yet clear. This study used the middle cerebral artery occlusion model to monitor the process of ischemic injury. For rats in the EA pretreatment group, EA pretreatment was conducted at Baihui acupoint before ischemia for 30 min for 5 consecutive days. The results suggested that EA pretreatment significantly increased the expression of autophagy in the cerebral cortical area on the ischemic side of rats. But the EA pretreatment-induced protective effects on the brain could be reversed by the specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine of autophagy. Additionally, the Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the impact of EA pretreatment on p-mTOR (2481) was negatively correlated with its impact on autophagy. In conclusion, the mechanism of EA pretreatment at Baihui acupoint against cerebral ischemic injury is mainly associated with the upregulation of autophagy expression, and its regulation of autophagy may depend on mTOR-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:27547233

  11. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  12. 2-methoxyestradiol mediates apoptosis through caspase-dependent and independent mechanisms in ovarian cancer cells but not in normal counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Sumie; Sadarangani, Anil; Lange, Soledad; Delpiano, Ana M; Vargas, Macarena; Brañes, Jorge; Carvajal, Jorge; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Owen, Gareth I; Cuello, Mauricio A

    2008-11-01

    The estrogen metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol has shown antitumorigenic action in some epithelial tumors. In the present work we investigate its effects in ovarian cancer used alone or in combination with other apoptotic-inducing reagents such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. To assess the effect of 2-methoxyestradiol, dose response and time courses in ovarian cancer and normal cells were conducted. Apoptosis was confirmed through DNA laddering, by flow cytometry, and Western blotting of proteins involved in the apoptotic cascade. 2-Methoxyestradiol induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells but not in normal counterparts. 2-Methoxyestradiol activates both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. 2-Methoxyestradiol-mediated apoptosis involves reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mechanisms. We also demonstrate that 2-methoxyestradiol selectively induces an additive/synergistic apoptotic response in ovarian cancer cells when used in combination with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. 2-Methoxyestradiol, alone or in combination with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, should be considered as a potential treatment for ovarian cancer.

  13. From emotional abuse in childhood to psychopathology in adulthood: a path mediated by immature defense mechanisms and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi-Dottan, Ricky; Karu, Toby

    2006-08-01

    The present study examined the course traveled from childhood emotional abuse to adulthood psychopathology. One hundred ninety-six undergraduate students age 20 to 45 (M = 27; SD = 8.17), answered self-report questionnaires assessing emotional abuse in childhood (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire), parental attitudes (Parental Bonding Instrument), psychopathological symptomatology (Brief Symptom Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), and defense mechanism organization (Defense Style Questionnaire). Results indicated that reported psychopathological symptomatology highly exceeded the Israeli norm. Structure Equation Modeling provided a statistically significant explanation (52%) of the target variable of psychopathological symptomatology. According to the path model, emotional abuse in childhood and perceptions of controlling and noncaring parents had an indirect effect on the psychopathology. This was mediated by immature defenses and low self-esteem. We conclude that the manifest psychopathology among adults who suffered emotional abuse in childhood is produced by the detrimental effect of abuse on personality, and takes the form of immature defense organization and damaged self-representation.

  14. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses.

  15. Coleus forskohlii extract attenuates the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide in vivo via a hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokotani, Kaori; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Umegaki, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    This in vivo study in rats evaluated whether Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE) taken orally interacted with tolbutamide, a hypoglycemic drug metabolized by CYP2C enzymes. Rats were fed 0%, 0.3%, 1% (w/w) CFE diet for 2 weeks, followed by 0% CFE diet for 1 day. They were then given 40 mg/kg tolbutamide by intragastric gavage. Blood glucose level was determined up to 6 h after tolbutamide administration. CFE treatment increased total CYP content and various CYP subtypes in the liver. In particular, increases in activity and protein expression were noted for the CYP2B, CYP2C, and CYP3A subtypes. CFE treatment dose-dependently attenuated both the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide at 6 h and the plasma concentration of tolbutamide. The activity of (S)-warfarin 7-hydroxylase, a CYP2C enzyme was negatively correlated with plasma tolbutamide level, which also showed a negative correlation with the reduction of blood glucose level. These results indicate that CFE induced hepatic CYPs in rats and attenuated the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide via a hepatic CYP2C-mediated mechanism.

  16. Boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation modulates F/G-actin ratio and mechanical properties of human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Leonardo; das Neves, Ricardo Pires; Ciofani, Gianni; Canale, Claudio; Nitti, Simone; Mattoli, Virgilio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Ferreira, Lino; Menciassi, Arianna

    2014-02-01

    F/G-actin ratio modulation is known to have an important role in many cell functions and in the regulation of specific cell behaviors. Several attempts have been made in the latest decades to finely control actin production and polymerization, in order to promote certain cell responses. In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of modulating F/G-actin ratio and mechanical properties of normal human dermal fibroblasts by using boron nitride nanotubes dispersed in the culture medium and by stimulating them with ultrasound transducers. Increasing concentrations of nanotubes were tested with the cells, without any evidence of cytotoxicity up to 10 μg/ml concentration of nanoparticles. Cells treated with nanoparticles and ultrasound stimulation showed a significantly higher F/G-actin ratio in comparison with the controls, as well as a higher Young's modulus. Assessment of Cdc42 activity revealed that actin nucleation/polymerization pathways, involving Rho GTPases, are probably influenced by nanotube-mediated stimulation, but they do not play a primary role in the significant increase of F/G-actin ratio of treated cells, such effect being mainly due to actin overexpression.

  17. Microglial VPAC1R mediates a novel mechanism of neuroimmune-modulation of hippocampal precursor cells via IL-4 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Robert; Sivasathiaseelan, Harri; Khan, Damla; Zaben, Malik; Gray, William

    2014-08-01

    Neurogenesis, the production of new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), occurs throughout adulthood in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where it supports learning and memory. The innate and adaptive immune systems are increasingly recognized as important modulators of hippocampal neurogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates hippocampal neurogenesis are incompletely understood. In particular, the role of microglia, the brains resident immune cell is complex, as they have been reported to both positively and negatively regulate neurogenesis. Interestingly, neuronal activity can also regulate the function of the immune system. Here, we show that depleting microglia from hippocampal cultures reduces NSPC survival and proliferation. Furthermore, addition of purified hippocampal microglia, or their conditioned media, is trophic and proliferative to NSPCs. VIP, a neuropeptide released by dentate gyrus interneurons, enhances the proliferative and pro-neurogenic effect of microglia via the VPAC1 receptor. This VIP-induced enhancement is mediated by IL-4 release, which directly targets NSPCs. This demonstrates a potential neuro-immuno-neurogenic pathway, disruption of which may have significant implications in conditions where combined cognitive impairments, interneuron loss, and immune system activation occurs, such as temporal lobe epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Chromosomal Translocations in the Parasite Leishmania by a MRE11/RAD50-Independent Microhomology-Mediated End Joining Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffitte, Marie-Claude N; Leprohon, Philippe; Hainse, Maripier; Légaré, Danielle; Masson, Jean-Yves; Ouellette, Marc

    2016-06-01

    The parasite Leishmania often relies on gene rearrangements to survive stressful environments. However, safeguarding a minimum level of genome integrity is important for cell survival. We hypothesized that maintenance of genomic integrity in Leishmania would imply a leading role of the MRE11 and RAD50 proteins considering their role in DNA repair, chromosomal organization and protection of chromosomes ends in other organisms. Attempts to generate RAD50 null mutants in a wild-type background failed and we provide evidence that this gene is essential. Remarkably, inactivation of RAD50 was possible in a MRE11 null mutant that we had previously generated, providing good evidence that RAD50 may be dispensable in the absence of MRE11. Inactivation of the MRE11 and RAD50 genes led to a decreased frequency of homologous recombination and analysis of the null mutants by whole genome sequencing revealed several chromosomal translocations. Sequencing of the junction between translocated chromosomes highlighted microhomology sequences at the level of breakpoint regions. Sequencing data also showed a decreased coverage at subtelomeric locations in many chromosomes in the MRE11-/-RAD50-/- parasites. This study demonstrates an MRE11-independent microhomology-mediated end-joining mechanism and a prominent role for MRE11 and RAD50 in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Moreover, we suggest the possible involvement of RAD50 in subtelomeric regions stability.

  19. Chromosomal Translocations in the Parasite Leishmania by a MRE11/RAD50-Independent Microhomology-Mediated End Joining Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude N Laffitte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The parasite Leishmania often relies on gene rearrangements to survive stressful environments. However, safeguarding a minimum level of genome integrity is important for cell survival. We hypothesized that maintenance of genomic integrity in Leishmania would imply a leading role of the MRE11 and RAD50 proteins considering their role in DNA repair, chromosomal organization and protection of chromosomes ends in other organisms. Attempts to generate RAD50 null mutants in a wild-type background failed and we provide evidence that this gene is essential. Remarkably, inactivation of RAD50 was possible in a MRE11 null mutant that we had previously generated, providing good evidence that RAD50 may be dispensable in the absence of MRE11. Inactivation of the MRE11 and RAD50 genes led to a decreased frequency of homologous recombination and analysis of the null mutants by whole genome sequencing revealed several chromosomal translocations. Sequencing of the junction between translocated chromosomes highlighted microhomology sequences at the level of breakpoint regions. Sequencing data also showed a decreased coverage at subtelomeric locations in many chromosomes in the MRE11-/-RAD50-/- parasites. This study demonstrates an MRE11-independent microhomology-mediated end-joining mechanism and a prominent role for MRE11 and RAD50 in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Moreover, we suggest the possible involvement of RAD50 in subtelomeric regions stability.

  20. Structural, Mutagenic and In Silico Studies of Xyloglucan Fucosylation in Arabidopsis thaliana Suggest a Water-Mediated Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, Michael F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Alahuhta, Petri M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lunin, Vladimir V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bomble, Yannick J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Himmel, Michael E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Urbanowicz, Breeanna R. [Univerisity of Georgia; Bharadwaj, Vivek [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pena, Maria J. [University of Georgia; Wang, Shuo [University of Georgia; Yang, Jeong-Yeh [University of Georgia; Tuomivaara, Sami [University of Georgia; Moremen, Kelley W. [University of Georgia; York, William S. [University of Georgia

    2017-07-03

    The mechanistic underpinnings of the complex process of plant polysaccharide biosynthesis are poorly understood, largely due to the resistance of glycosyltransferase (GT) enzymes to structural characterization. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a glycosyl transferase family 37 (GT37) fucosyltransferase-1 (AtFUT1) catalyzes the regiospecific transfer of terminal 1,2-fucosyl residues to xyloglucan side chains - a key step in the biosynthesis of fucosylated sidechains of galactoxyloglucan. We unravel the mechanistic basis for fucosylation by AtFUT1 with a multipronged approach involving protein expression, X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis experiments and molecular simulations. Mammalian cell culture expressions enable sufficient production of the enzyme for X-ray crystallography, which reveals the structural architecture of AtFUT1 in complex with bound donor and acceptor substrate analogs. The lack of an appropriately positioned active site residue as a catalytic base leads us to propose an atypical water-mediated fucosylation mechanism facilitated by an H-bonded network, which is corroborated by mutagenesis experiments as well as detailed atomistic simulations.

  1. Mechanisms linking authentic leadership to emotional exhaustion: The role of procedural justice and emotional demands in a moderated mediation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampa, Judith; Rigotti, Thomas; Otto, Kathleen

    2017-04-07

    In order to gain more knowledge on how the positive leadership concept of authentic leadership impacts follower strain, this study tries to uncover procedural justice as an underlying mechanism. In contrast to previous work, we exclusively base our theoretical model on justice theories. Specifically, we hypothesize that authentic leadership negatively predicts emotional exhaustion through perceptions of procedural justice. We assume that this indirect effect is conditional on followers' amount of emotional demands, and that the procedural justice-emotional exhaustion relationship is stronger when emotional demands are high. This finally results in a stronger exhaustion-reducing effect of authentic leadership. The proposed moderated mediation model was tested in a sample of N=628 employees nested in 168 teams using lagged data from three waves. Results provide support for all hypotheses. Authentic leadership is critical to employees' well-being as it contributes to an elevated perception of positive work conditions (procedural justice), especially in contexts with high emotional demands. Limitations and practical implications on leadership development are discussed.

  2. The Frank-Starling mechanism is not mediated by changes in rate of cross-bridge detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannenburg, T; Janssen, P M; Fan, D; de Tombe, P P

    1997-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the Frank-Starling relationship is mediated by changes in the rate of cross-bridge detachment in cardiac muscle. We simultaneously measured isometric force development and the rate of ATP consumption at various levels of Ca2+ activation in skinned rat cardiac trabecular muscles at three sarcomere lengths (2.0, 2.1, and 2.2 microns). The maximum rate of ATP consumption was 1.5 nmol.s-1.microliter fiber vol-1, which represents an estimated adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) rate of approximately 10 s-1 per myosin head at 24 degrees C. The rate of ATP consumption was tightly and linearly coupled to the level of isometric force development, and changes in sarcomere length had no effect on the slope of the force-ATPase relationships. The average slope of the force-ATPase relationships was 15.5 pmol.mN-1.mm-1. These results suggest that the mechanisms that underlie the Frank-Starling relationship in cardiac muscle do not involve changes in the kinetics of the apparent detachment step in the cross-bridge cycle.

  3. Metabolic profiling reveals ethylene mediated metabolic changes and a coordinated adaptive mechanism of 'Jonagold' apple to low oxygen stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Elias A; Beshir, Wasiye F; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Nicolai, Bart M; Geeraerd, Annemie H

    2015-11-01

    Apples are predominantly stored in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage to delay ripening and prolong their storage life. Profiling the dynamics of metabolic changes during ripening and CA storage is vital for understanding the governing molecular mechanism. In this study, the dynamics of the primary metabolism of 'Jonagold' apples during ripening in regular air (RA) storage and initiation of CA storage was profiled. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) was exploited to block ethylene receptors and to get insight into ethylene mediated metabolic changes during ripening of the fruit and in response to hypoxic stress. Metabolic changes were quantified in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the Yang cycle and synthesis of the main amino acids branching from these metabolic pathways. Partial least square discriminant analysis of the metabolic profiles of 1-MCP treated and control apples revealed a metabolic divergence in ethylene, organic acid, sugar and amino acid metabolism. During RA storage at 18°C, most amino acids were higher in 1-MCP treated apples, whereas 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) was higher in the control apples. The initial response of the fruit to CA initiation was accompanied by an increase of alanine, succinate and glutamate, but a decline in aspartate. Furthermore, alanine and succinate accumulated to higher levels in control apples than 1-MCP treated apples. The observed metabolic changes in these interlinked metabolites may indicate a coordinated adaptive strategy to maximize energy production.

  4. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Heuer, Andreas; Wang, Gang; Mattsson, Bengt; Lundblad, Martin; Parmar, Malin; Björklund, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemogenetic (DREADD) approach, allowing either enhancement or reduction of the therapeutic effect. We show that exclusive activation of a cAMP-linked (Gs-coupled) DREADD or serotonin 5-HT6 receptor, located on the grafted DA neurons, is sufficient to induce GIDs. These findings establish a mechanistic link between the 5-HT6 receptor, intracellular cAMP, and GIDs in transplanted PD patients. This effect is thought to be mediated through counteraction of the D2 autoreceptor feedback inhibition, resulting in a dysplastic DA release from the transplant.

  5. The Bubble Transport Mechanism: Indications for a bubble-mediated transfer of microorganisms from the sediment into the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Leifer, Ira; Kießlich, Katrin; Krause, Stefan; Frahm, Andreas; Treude, Tina

    2015-04-01

    Gas releasing seep areas are known to impact the methane biogeochemistry in the surrounding sediment and water column. Due to microbial processes most of the methane is oxidized under anaerobic and aerobic conditions before the greenhouse gas can escape into the atmosphere. However, methane gas bubbles can largely bypass this microbial filter mechanism, enabling highly efficient transport of methane from the sediment towards the sea surface. Studies in the water column surrounding hydrocarbon seeps indicated an elevated abundance of methanotrophic microorganism in the near field of gas bubble plumes. The enhanced methane concentration in the seep-affected water column stimulates the activity of methane oxidizers and leads to a rapid rise in the abundance of methane-oxidizing microorganisms in the aging plume water. In our study we hypothesized that a bubble-mediated transport mechanisms between the benthic and pelagic habitats represents an exchange process, which transfers methanotrophic microorganisms from the sediment into the water column, a process we termed the "Bubble Transport Mechanism". This mechanism could eventually influence the pelagic methanotrophic community, thereby indirectly providing feedback mechanisms for dissolved methane concentrations in the water column and thus impacting the sea/atmosphere methane flux. To test our hypothesis, field studies were conducted at the "Rostocker Seep" site (Coal Oil Point seep area, California, USA). Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) analyzes were performed to determine the abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic microorganisms. Aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria were detected in the sediment and the water column, whereas anaerobic methanotrophs were detected exclusively in the sediment. The key device of the project was a newly developed "Bubble Catcher" used to collect naturally emanating gas bubbles at the sea floor together with particles attached to the

  6. Molecular mechanism of the qnrA gene-mediated quionlone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG SHENG XIAO; JIAN LU; WEI YUAN WU; CHUANG HONG WU; LI XIA WEN

    2007-01-01

    To explore the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene qnrA in Gramnegative bacteria and to investigate its molecular genetic background and resistance profile in isolates harboring this gene, a total of 629 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates of non-repetitive Gram-negative bacteria were collected from clinical specimens between April 2004 and April 2006 and these isolates were screened for qnrA gene by PCR using specific primers combined with DNA sequencing. The extended spectnan β-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC-producing isolates were distinguished by the phenotypic confirmatory test combined with DNA sequencing, and the antibiotics susceptibility test for qnrA-positive isolates was carried out by Kirby-Bauer and E-test method. To detect the location of the qnrA gene, plasmid conjugation and Southern hybridization were performed and the integron structure containing the qnrA gene was cloned by PCR strategy and sequenced by primer walking. It was demonstrated that the incidence of the qnrA-positive strains in nalidixic acid-resistant bacteria was 1.9% (12/629), in which the detection rates for Klebiesiella pneumoniae. Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes,Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella choeraesuis were 2.2% (3/138), 17. 1% (6/35), 9. 1%(1/11), 12.5% (1/8), and 14.3% (1/7), respectively. The qnrA gene was found to be embedded in the complex su/1-type integron located on plasmids with varied size (80-180 kb). Among them, 4qnrA-positive isolates carried integron In37 and 8 isolates carried a novel integron, temporarily designated as InX. All the qnrA-positive isolates were ESBL-producing and transferable for the multi-drug resistance. It is concluded that the plasmid-mediated drug-resistance mechanism exists in the quinolone resistant strains of isolates from hospitals in Guangdong area, but the incidence was rather low. Nevertheless, it is still possible that the horizontal transfer of the resistant qnrA gene might lead to the spreading of

  7. Age-related reduction in estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms of vascular relaxation in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Fanisha L; Payne, Jason A; Cain, Ashley E; Reckelhoff, Jane F; Khalil, Raouf A

    2004-02-01

    Hypertension increases with aging, and changes in vascular estrogen receptors (ERs) may play a role in age-related hypertension in women. We tested whether age-related increases in blood pressure in female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are associated with reduction in amount and/or vascular relaxation effects of estrogen and ER. Arterial pressure and plasma estradiol were measured in adult (12 weeks) and aging (16 months) female SHRs, and thoracic aorta was isolated for measurement of active stress, 45Ca2+ influx, and ERs. Arterial pressure was greater and plasma estradiol was less in aging females than in adult females. In aorta of adult females, Western blots revealed alpha- and beta-ERs that were slightly reduced in aging rats. In endothelium-intact vascular strips, phenylephrine (Phe; 10(-5) mol/L) caused greater active stress in aging rats (9.3+/-0.2) than in adult rats (6.2+/-0.3x10(4) N/m2). 17beta-estradiol (E2) caused relaxation of Phe contraction and stimulation of vascular nitrite/nitrate production, which was reduced in aging rats. In endothelium-denuded strips, E2 still caused relaxation of Phe contraction, which was smaller in aging rats than adult rats. KCl (51 mmol/L), which stimulates Ca2+ influx, produced greater active stress in aging rats (9.1+/-0.3) than in adult rats (5.9+/-0.2x10(4) N/m2). E2 caused relaxation of KCl contraction and inhibition of Phe- and KCl-induced 45Ca2+ influx, which were reduced in aging rats. Thus, aging in female SHR is associated with reduction in ER-mediated NO production from endothelial cells and decrease in inhibitory effects of estrogen on Ca2+ entry mechanisms of smooth muscle contraction. The age-related decrease in ER-mediated vascular relaxation may explain the increased vascular contraction and arterial pressure associated with aging in females.

  8. Mechanism of the Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction Mediated by [Pd(NHC)(allyl)Cl] Precatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Meconi, Giulia Magi

    2017-05-24

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the activation mechanism for the precatalyst series [Pd]-X-1–4 derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)X] species by substitutions at the terminal position of the allyl moiety ([Pd] = Pd(IPr); R = H (1), Me (2), gem-Me2 (3), Ph (4), X = Cl, Br). Next, we have investigated the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction for the active catalyst species IPr-Pd(0) using 4-chlorotoluene and phenylboronic acid as substrates and isopropyl alcohol as a solvent. Our theoretical findings predict an upper barrier trend, corresponding to the activation mechanism for the [Pd]-Cl-1–4 series, in good agreement with the experiments. They indeed provide a quantitative explanation of the low yield (12%) displayed by [Pd]-Cl-1 species (ΔG⧧ ≈ 30.0 kcal/mol) and of the high yields (≈90%) observed in the case of [Pd]-Cl-2–4 complexes (ΔG⧧ ≈ 20.0 kcal/mol). Additionally, the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction involving the IPr-Pd(0) species is calculated to be thermodynamically favorable and kinetically facile. Similar investigations for the [Pd]-Br-1–4 series, derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)Br], indicate that the oxidative addition step for IPr-Pd(0)-mediated catalysis with 4-bromotoluene is kinetically more favored than that with 4-chlorotoluene. Finally, we have explored the potential of Ni-based complexes [Ni((IPr)(R-allyl)X] (X = Cl, Br) as Suzuki–Miyaura reaction catalysts. Apart from a less endergonic reaction energy profile for both precatalyst activation and catalytic cycle, a steep increase in the predicted upper energy barriers (by 2.0–15.0 kcal/mol) is calculated in the activation mechanism for the [Ni]-X-1–4 series compared to the [Pd]-X-1–4 series. Overall, these results suggest that Ni-based precatalysts are expected to be less active than the Pd-based precatalysts for the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction.

  9. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or “Innate Hypersensitivity”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Spoerl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions. In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash due to mast cell degranulation, identification of the responsible mechanism is complicated. However, determination of the type of the underlying adverse drug reaction is of paramount interest for the decision of whether the culprit drug may be re-administered. Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA are among the most frequent cause of perioperative anaphylaxis. Recently, it has been shown that NMBA may activate mast cells independently from IgE antibodies via the human Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor member X2 (MRGPRX2. In light of this new insight into the patho-mechanism of pseudo-allergic adverse drug reactions, in which as drug-receptor interaction results in anaphylaxis like symptoms, we critically reviewed the literature on NMBA-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. We challenge the dogma that NMBA mainly cause IgE-mediated anaphylaxis via an IgE-mediated mechanism, which is based on studies that consider positive skin test to be specific for IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Finally, we discuss the question whether MRGPRX2 mediated pseudo-allergic reactions should be re-classified as type A adverse reactions.

  10. Capsaicin mimics mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events: involvement of TRPV1-mediated calcium signaling in induction of skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Naoki; Ruegg, Urs T; Kudo, Akira; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events are important for subsequent skeletal muscle hypertrophy. We previously showed that load-induced activation of the cation channel TRPV1 caused an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca ( 2+) ]i) and that this activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and promoted muscle hypertrophy. However, the link between mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events, and the TRPV1-mediated increases in [Ca ( 2+) ]i are not fully understood. Here we show that administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, induces phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not Akt, AMPK or GSK3β. Furthermore, the TRPV1-induced phosphorylation patterns resembled those induced by mechanical load. Our results continue to highlight the importance of TRPV1-mediated calcium signaling in load-induced intracellular signaling pathways.

  11. Cervical remodeling/ripening at term and preterm delivery: the same mechanism initiated by different mediators and different effector cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Premature cervical remodeling/ripening is believed to contribute to preterm delivery (PTD, the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Despite considerable research, the causes of term and PTD remain unclear, and there is no effective treatment for PTD. We previously demonstrated that complement activation plays a causative role in cervical remodeling that leads to PTD in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that complement activation is not required for the physiological process that leads to term delivery in mice. Neither increased C3 cervical deposition nor increased C3a and C5a serum levels were observed at term. In addition, macrophages infiltration was found in PTD in contrast to term delivery were no leukocytes were found. Despite the different role of complement and different cellular effector cells, PTD and term delivery share a common dowsntream pathway characterized by increased metalloproteinases (MMPs release and increased collagen degradation. However, different sources of MMPs were identified. Macrophages are the source of MMPs in PTD while cervical fibroblasts and columnar epithelial cells synthesize MMPs at term delivery. A dramatic diminution in serum progesterone levels precedes parturition at term but not in PTD, suggesting that progesterone withdrawal initiates cervical remodeling at term. On the other hand, MMPs release in PTD is triggered by C5a. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, preterm and term cervical remodeling occur through the same mechanism but they are initiated by different mediators and effector cells. That complement activation is required for PTD but not for the physiological process that leads to term delivery, suggests that complement is a potential specific biomarker and selective target to prevent PTD and thus avert neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  12. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain.

  13. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Menon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species—indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms—but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system.

  14. Internalization and recycling of 5-HT2A receptors activated by serotonin and protein kinase C-mediated mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Puri, Sapna; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2002-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a major neurotransmitter, has a large number of G protein-coupled receptors in mammals. On activation by exposure to their ligand, 5-HT2 receptor subtypes increase IP3 levels and undergo desensitization and internalization. To visualize the receptor in cells during these processes, we have constructed a 5-HT2A-enhanced GFP (SR2-GFP) fusion receptor. We show that this fusion receptor undergoes internalization on exposure to its natural ligand, 5-HT. Because 5-HT2A receptors activate the phospholipase C pathway, we studied the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the internalization process and found that activation of PKC by its specific activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, in the absence of 5-HT, leads to internalization of the receptor. Moreover, inhibition of PKC by its inhibitor sphingosine in the presence of 5-HT prevents the internalization process, suggesting that activation of PKC is sufficient and necessary for the internalization of 5-HT2A receptors. We also show that SR2-GFP recycles back to the plasma membrane after 5-HT-dependent internalization, suggesting a mechanism for resensitization. In addition, receptors that have been internalized on addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in the absence of 5-HT also recycle to the surface, with a time course similar to that seen after activation of the receptors by 5-HT. Our study suggests that 5-HT2A receptors internalize and return to the surface after both serotonin- and PKC-mediated processes. This study reveals a role for PKC in receptor internalization and also shows that 5-HT2A receptors are recycled. PMID:12388782

  15. Airborne agricultural particulate matter induces inflammatory cytokine secretion by respiratory epithelial cells: mechanisms of regulation by eicosanoid lipid signal mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malireddy, Smitha; Lawson, Courtney; Steinhour, Emily; Hart, Judy; Kotha, Sainath R; Patel, Rishi B; Zhao, Lingying; Wilkins, John R; Marsh, Clay B; Magalang, Ulysses J; Romberger, Debra; Wewers, Mark D; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the airborne poultry dust (particulate matter, PM)-induced respiratory tract inflammation, a common symptom in agricultural respiratory diseases. The study was based on the hypothesis that poultry PM would induce the release of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by respiratory epithelial cells under the upstream regulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activation and subsequent formation of cyclooxygenase (COX)- and lipoxygenase (LOX)-catalyzed arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites (eicosanoids). Human lung epithelial cells (A549) in culture were treated with the poultry PM (0.1-1.0 mg) for different lengths of time, following which PLA2 activity, release of eicosanoids and secretion of IL-8 in cells were determined. Poultry PM (1.0 mg/ml) caused a significant activation of PLA2 in a time-dependent manner (15-60 min), which was significantly attenuated by the calcium-chelating agents, cPLA2-specific inhibitor (AACOCF3) and antioxidant (vitamin C) in A549 cells. Poultry PM also significantly induced the release of COX- and LOX-catalyzed eicosanoids (prostaglandins, thromboxane A2 and leukotrienes B4 and C4) and upstream activation of AA LOX in the cells. Poultry PM also significantly induced release of IL-8 by the cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly attenuated by the calcium chelating agents, antioxidants and COX- and LOX-specific inhibitors. The current study for the first time revealed that the poultry PM-induced IL-8 release from the respiratory epithelial cells was regulated upstream by reactive oxygen species, cPLA2-, COX- and LOX-derived eicosanoid lipid signal mediators.

  16. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ramkumar; Mesiano, Sam; Taylor, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species-indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms-but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers) that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system.

  17. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ramkumar; Mesiano, Sam; Taylor, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species—indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms—but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers) that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system. PMID:28861041

  18. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: a comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kinnman, Nils; Tak, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investigated, and potential biomarkers associated with response to treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are identified. Most available data relate to B cell depletion using anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treatment leads to significant clinical benefit, but apparently fails to deplete long-lived plasma cells, and discontinuation is associated with relapse. Biomarkers commonly used in studies of B cell-targeted therapies include rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, and immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. More recently, there has been interest in markers such as B cell phenotype analysis, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), the latter particularly in studies of the IgG Fc-transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) fusion protein (atacicept) and anti-BLyS therapy (belimumab). Data from clinical trials of B cell-depleting agents in RA suggest that specific autoantibodies, BLyS, APRIL, and circulating and synovial B lineage cell levels may have potential as biomarkers predictive of response to treatment. Further trials validating these markers against clinical outcomes in RA are required. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Fc receptors and levels of circulating immune cells (including B cells and natural killer cells) may be relevant markers.

  19. Schwann Cell-Mediated Preservation of Vision in Retinal Degenerative Diseases via the Reduction of Oxidative Stress: A Possible Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAHMOUDZADEH, Raziyeh; HEIDARI-KESHEL, Saeed; LASHAY, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), regeneration is often inadequate, except in the case of remyelination. This remyelination capacity of the CNS is a good example of a stem/precursor cell-mediated renewal process. Schwann cells have been found to act as remyelinating agents in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but several studies have highlighted their potential role in remyelination in the CNS too. Schwann cells are able to protect and support retinal cells by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Retinal degenerative diseases can be highly debilitating, and they are a major concern in countries with an ageing populations. One of the leading causes of permanent loss of vision in the West is a retinal degenerative disease known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the United States, nearly 1.75 million people over the age of 40 have advanced AMD, and it is estimated that this number will increase to approximately 3 million people by 2020. One of the most common pathways involved in the initiation and development of retinal diseases is the oxidative stress pathway. In patients with diabetes, Schwann cells have been shown to be able to secrete large amounts of antioxidant enzymes that protect the PNS from the oxidative stress that results from fluctuations in blood glucose levels. This antioxidant ability may be involved in the mechanism by which Schwann cells are able to promote reconstruction in the CNS, especially in individuals with retinal injuries and degenerative diseases. PMID:28293647

  20. Mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated p38MAP kinase independently of angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor is known to mediate a variety of physiological actions of Ang II including autophagy. However, the role of AT1 receptor in cardiomyocyte autophagy triggered by mechanical stress still remains elusive. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether and how AT1 receptor participates in cardiomyocyte autophagy induced by mechanical stresses. A 48-hour mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aorta constriction (TAC were imposed to cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats and adult male C57B/L6 mice, respectively, to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy prior to the assessment of cardiomyocyte autophagy using LC3b-II. Losartan, an AT1 receptor blocker, but not PD123319, the AT2 inhibitor, was found to significantly reduce mechanical stretch-induced LC3b-II upregulation. Moreover, inhibition of p38MAP kinase attenuated not only mechanical stretch-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but also autophagy. To the contrary, inhibition of ERK and JNK suppressed cardiac hypertrophy but not autophagy. Intriguingly, mechanical stretch-induced autophagy was significantly inhibited by Losartan in the absence of Ang II. Taken together, our results indicate that mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through AT1 receptor-mediated activation of p38MAP kinase independently of Ang II.

  1. The mechanism underlying alpinetin-mediated alleviation of pancreatitis-associated lung injury through upregulating aquaporin-1

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    Liang XS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Xingsi Liang,1,2,* Bin Zhang,3,* Quan Chen,4,* Jing Zhang,1,5 Biao Lei,1,5 Bo Li,5 Yangchao Wei,1,5 Run Zhai,1,5 Zhiqing Liang,2 Songqing He,1,5 Bo Tang1,5 1Laboratory of Liver Injury and Repair Molecular Medicine, Guilin Medical University, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Guilin Medical University, Affiliated Hospital, Guilin, Guangxi, 3Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, 4Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 5Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Guilin Medical University, Affiliated Hospital, Guilin, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Characterized by its acute onset, critical condition, poor prognosis, and high mortality rate, severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause multiple organ failure at its early stage, particularly acute lung injury (ALI. The pathogenesis of ALI is diffuse alveolar damage, including an increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability, a decrease in compliance, and invasion of many inflammatory cells. Corticosteroids are the main treatment method for ALI; however, the associated high toxicity and side effects induce pain in patients. Recent studies show that the effective components in many traditional Chinese medicines can effectively inhibit inflammation with few side effects, which can decrease the complications caused by steroid consumption. Based on these observations, the main objective of the current study is to investigate the effect of alpinetin, which is a flavonoid extracted from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, on treating lung injury induced by SAP and to explore the mechanism underlying the alpinetin-mediated decrease in the extent of ALI. In this study, we have shown through in vitro experiments that a therapeutic dose of alpinetin can promote human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. We

  2. Adenoviral-mediated placental gene transfer of IGF-1 corrects placental insufficiency via enhanced placental glucose transport mechanisms.

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    Helen N Jones

    Full Text Available Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor -1 (hIGF-1 in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined glucose transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of IUGR and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line.At gestational day 18, animals were divided into four groups; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL, UABL+Ad-hIGF-1 (10(8 PFU, UABL+Ad-LacZ (10(8 PFU. At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. For human studies, BeWo choriocarcinoma cells were grown in F12 complete medium +10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 hours. MOIs of 10∶1 and 100∶1 were utilized. The RNA, protein expression and localization of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 8, and 9 were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry.In both the mouse placenta and BeWo, GLUT1 regulation was linked to altered protein localization. GLUT3, localized to the mouse fetal endothelial cells, was reduced in placental insufficiency but maintained with Ad-I GF-1 treatment. Interestingly, GLUT8 expression was reduced in the UABL placenta but up-regulated following Ad-IGF-1 in both mouse and human systems. GLUT9 expression in the mouse was increased by Ad-IGF-1 but this was not reflected in the BeWo, where Ad-IGF-1 caused moderate membrane relocalization.Enhanced GLUT isoform transporter expression and relocalization to the membrane may be an important mechanism in Ad-hIGF-1mediated correction of placental insufficiency.

  3. A Protective Mechanism of Visible Red Light in Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts: Enhancement of GADD45A-Mediated DNA Repair Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeo Jin; Kim, Hyoung-June; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook; Seo, Young Rok

    2017-02-01

    The phototherapeutic effects of visible red light on skin have been extensively investigated, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We aimed to elucidate the protective mechanism of visible red light in terms of DNA repair of UV-induced oxidative damage in normal human dermal fibroblasts. The protective effect of visible red light on UV-induced DNA damage was identified by several assays in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional cell culture systems. With regard to the protective mechanism of visible red light, our data showed alterations in base excision repair mediated by growth arrest and DNA damage inducible, alpha (GADD45A). We also observed an enhancement of the physical activity of GADD45A and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) by visible red light. Moreover, UV-induced DNA damages were diminished by visible red light in an APE1-dependent manner. On the basis of the decrease in GADD45A-APE1 interaction in the activating transcription factor-2 (ATF2)-knockdown system, we suggest a role for ATF2 modulation in GADD45A-mediated DNA repair upon visible red light exposure. Thus, the enhancement of GADD45A-mediated base excision repair modulated by ATF2 might be a potential protective mechanism of visible red light. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protection of HepG2 cells against acrolein toxicity by 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide via glutathione-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Halley; Speen, Adam M; Saunders, Christina; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Zhu, Hong; Li, Y Robert; Jia, Zhenquan

    2015-10-01

    Acrolein is an environmental toxicant, mainly found in smoke released from incomplete combustion of organic matter. Several studies showed that exposure to acrolein can lead to liver damage. The mechanisms involved in acrolein-induced hepatocellular toxicity, however, are not completely understood. This study examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of acrolein on HepG2 cells. Acrolein at pathophysiological concentrations was shown to cause apoptotic cell death and an increase in levels of protein carbonyl and thiobarbituric acid reactive acid substances. Acrolein also rapidly depleted intracellular glutathione (GSH), GSH-linked glutathione-S-transferases, and aldose reductase, three critical cellular defenses that detoxify reactive aldehydes. Results further showed that depletion of cellular GSH by acrolein preceded the loss of cell viability. To further determine the role of cellular GSH in acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit cellular GSH biosynthesis. It was observed that depletion of cellular GSH by BSO led to a marked potentiation of acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. To further assess the contribution of these events to acrolein-induced cytotoxicity, triterpenoid compound 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) was used for induction of GSH. Induction of GSH by CDDO-Im afforded cytoprotection against acrolein toxicity in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, BSO significantly inhibited CDDO-Im-mediated induction in cellular GSH levels and also reversed cytoprotective effects of CDDO-Im in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that GSH is a predominant mechanism underlying acrolein-induced cytotoxicity as well as CDDO-Im-mediated cytoprotection. This study may provide understanding on the molecular action of acrolein which may be important to develop novel strategies for the prevention of acrolein-mediated toxicity.

  5. Ionic channel mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Murata, Kaoru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kakuta, Eri; Tanemura, Saori; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Nakamura, Atsunao; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hasebe, Masaharu; Kosakai, Kumiko; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic neurons within the mushroom body of the insect brain, called Kenyon cells, play an important role in olfactory associative learning. In this study, we examined the ionic mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. A perforated whole-cell clamp study using β-escin indicated the existence of several inward and outward currents. Three types of inward currents (INaf, INaP, and ICa) were identified. The transient sodium current (INaf) activated at -40 mV, peaked at -26 mV, and half-inactivated at -46.7 mV. The persistent sodium current (INaP) activated at -51 mV, peaked at -23 mV, and half-inactivated at -30.7 mV. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 μM) completely blocked both INaf and INaP, but 10nM TTX blocked INaf more potently than INaP. Cd(2+) (50 μM) potently blocked INaP with little effect on INaf. Riluzole (>20 μM) nonselectively blocked both INaP and INaf. The voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) activated at -30 mV, peaked at -11.3 mV, and half-inactivated at -34 mV. The Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil (100 μM) blocked ICa in a use-dependent manner. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed the presence of a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel, and the activity of this channel was decreased by removing the extracellular Ca(2+) or adding verapamil or nifedipine, and increased by adding the Ca(2+) agonist Bay K8644, indicating that Ca(2+) entry via the L-type Ca(2+) channel regulates BK channel activity. Under the current-clamp condition, membrane depolarization generated membrane oscillations in the presence of 10nM TTX or 100 μM riluzole in the bath solution. These membrane oscillations disappeared with 1 μM TTX, 50 μM Cd(2+), replacement of external Na(+) with choline, and blockage of Na(+)-activated K(+) current (IKNa) with 50 μM quinidine, indicating that membrane oscillations are primarily mediated by INaP in cooperation with IKNa. The plateau potentials observed either in

  6. The efficacy and mechanism of apoptosis induction by hypericin-mediated sonodynamic therapy in THP-1 macrophages

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    Li XS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xuesong Li,1,* Lei Gao,2,* Longbin Zheng,1 Jiayuan Kou,1 Xing Zhu,1 Yueqing Jiang,1 Zhaoyu Zhong,1 Juhua Dan,1 Haobo Xu,3 Yang Yang,3 Hong Li,1 Sa Shi,1 Wenwu Cao,4,5 Yajun Zhao,1 Ye Tian,1,3 Liming Yang1 1Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 2Electron Microscopy Centre, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3Division of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 5Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the sonoactivity of hypericin (HY, together with its sonodynamic effect on THP-1 macrophages and the underlying mechanism.Materials and methods: CCK-8 was used to examine cell viability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to assess the localization of HY in cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP after different treatments. Apoptosis was analyzed using Hoechst–propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm collapse was detected via fluorescence microscopy. Lipoprotein oxidation was determined in malondialdehyde (MDA assays. Western blotting was conducted to determine the translocation of BAX and cytochrome C and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins.Results: HY was sublocalized among the nuclei and the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and lysosome in the cytosol of THP-1 macrophages. Under low-intensity ultrasound irradiation, HY significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, greater ROS generation, higher MDA levels, and greater ΔΨm loss were observed in the

  7. Securities industry disputes mediation mechanism research%证券纠纷行业调解机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李可

    2015-01-01

    Building industry securities dispute mediation mechanism, based on professional talents, conducive to contradiction be resolved in the early, shorten the cycle solution, maintain the interests of the parties, alleviate the pressure regulator of letters, save the judicial resources. At the same time, in the process of mediation, holes can be found in time system, provides effective way for the supervision and management, improve the industry has the ability to deal with contradictions, conducive to stability of the securities market. Securities market, many small and medium-sized investors by false statement, insider trading violations of listed companies, securities companies used margin behavior such as cheating, unfair treatment by the market in violation behavior, relative to the listed companies, securities intermediaries such as financial institutions are strong, they are weak, unable to compete with them on the resources, in a passive position. Securities civil disputes if not timely and effective treatment, will hurt the feelings of the broad masses of investors, make them lose confidence to the market, this will also affect the healthy development of the securities industry in our country.%建立证券纠纷行业调解机制,以专业人才为依托,利于矛盾在初期就得到化解,缩短了解决周期,维护了当事人的利益,缓解了监管部门信访压力,节约了司法资源。同时,在调解过程中,可以及时发现制度漏洞,为监督管理提供了有效方式,提高了行业自行处理矛盾的能力,利于证券市场稳定发展。证券市场中,众多中小投资者受到上市公司虚假陈述、内幕交易的侵害,受到证券公司私自挪用保证金等行为的欺骗,受到市场中违法违规行为的不公平待遇,相对于上市公司、证券中介机构等实力雄厚金融机构,他们是弱者,在财力物力上无法与之抗衡,处于被动地位。证券民事纠纷如

  8. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  9. The interleukin-6 and noradrenaline mediated inflammation-stress feedback mechanism is dysregulated in metabolic syndrome: Effect of exercise

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    Ortega Eduardo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MS is a metabolic disorder associated with obesity, type-II diabetes, and "low grade inflammation", with the concomitant increased risk of cardiovascular events. Removal of the inflammatory mediator signals is a promising strategy to protect against insulin resistance, obesity, and other problems associated with MS such as cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the "inflammatory and stress status" in an experimental model of MS, and to evaluate the effect of a program of habitual exercise and the resulting training-induced adaptation to the effects of a single bout of acute exercise. Methods Obese Zucker rats (fa/fa were used as the experimental model of MS, and lean Zucker rats (Fa/fa were used for reference values. The habitual exercise (performed by the obese rats consisted of treadmill running: 5 days/week for 14 weeks, at 35 cm/s for 35 min in the last month. The acute exercise consisted of a single session of 25-35 min at 35 cm/s. Circulating concentrations of IL-6 (a cytokine that regulates the inflammatory and metabolic responses, CRP (a systemic inflammatory marker, and corticosterone (CTC (the main glucocorticoid in rats were determined by ELISA, and that of noradrenaline (NA was determined by HPLC. Glucose was determined by standard methods. Results The genetically obese animals showed higher circulating levels of glucose, IL-6, PCR, and NA compared with the control lean animals. The habitual exercise program increased the concentration of IL-6, PCR, NA, and glucose, but decreased that of CTC. Acute exercise increased IL-6, CRP, and NA in the sedentary obese animals, but not in the trained obese animals. CTC was increased after the acute exercise in the trained animals only. Conclusion Animals with MS present a dysregulation in the feedback mechanism between IL-6 and NA which can contribute to the systemic low-grade inflammation and/or hyperglycaemia of MS

  10. Microhomology-mediated mechanisms underlie non-recurrent disease-causing microdeletions of the FOXL2 gene or its regulatory domain.

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    Hannah Verdin

    Full Text Available Genomic disorders are often caused by recurrent copy number variations (CNVs, with nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR as the underlying mechanism. Recently, several microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms--such as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ, fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS, microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR, serial replication slippage (SRS, and break-induced SRS (BISRS--were described in the etiology of non-recurrent CNVs in human disease. In addition, their formation may be stimulated by genomic architectural features. It is, however, largely unexplored to what extent these mechanisms contribute to rare, locus-specific pathogenic CNVs. Here, fine-mapping of 42 microdeletions of the FOXL2 locus, encompassing FOXL2 (32 or its regulatory domain (10, serves as a model for rare, locus-specific CNVs implicated in genetic disease. These deletions lead to blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES, a developmental condition affecting the eyelids and the ovary. For breakpoint mapping we used targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, quantitative PCR (qPCR, long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing of the junction products. Microhomology, ranging from 1 bp to 66 bp, was found in 91.7% of 24 characterized breakpoint junctions, being significantly enriched in comparison with a random control sample. Our results show that microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms underlie at least 50% of these microdeletions. Moreover, genomic architectural features, like sequence motifs, non-B DNA conformations, and repetitive elements, were found in all breakpoint regions. In conclusion, the majority of these microdeletions result from microhomology-mediated mechanisms like MMEJ, FoSTeS, MMBIR, SRS, or BISRS. Moreover, we hypothesize that the genomic architecture might drive their formation by increasing the susceptibility for DNA breakage or promote replication fork stalling. Finally, our locus-centered study

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates neuroprotection against Aβ-induced toxicity through a mechanism independent on adenosine 2A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerónimo-Santos, André; Fonseca-Gomes, João; Guimarães, Diogo Andrade; Tanqueiro, Sara Ramalho; Ramalho, Rita Mira; Ribeiro, Joaquim Alexandre; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Diógenes, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes neuronal survival through TrkB-FL activation. The activation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) is essential for most of BDNF-mediated synaptic actions, such as synaptic plasticity, transmission and neurotransmitter release. We now aimed at evaluating the A2AR influence upon BDNF-mediated neuroprotection against Aβ25-35 toxicity in cultured neurons. Results showed that BDNF increases cell survival and reduces the caspase-3 and calpain activation induced by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, in a mechanism probably dependent on PLCγ pathway. This BDNF-mediated neuroprotection is not affected by A2AR activation or inhibition. Moreover neither activation nor inhibition of A2AR, per se, significantly influenced Aβ-induced neuronal death on calpain-mediated cleavage of TrkB induced by Aβ. In conclusion, these results suggest that, in opposition to the fast synaptic actions of BDNF, the neuroprotective actions of this neurotrophin against a strong Aβ insult do not require the activation of A2AR.

  12. Multiple dimensions of spirituality in recovery: a lagged mediational analysis of Alcoholics Anonymous' principal theoretical mechanism of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentzman, Amy R; Cranford, James A; Robinson, Elizabeth A R

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) states that recovery is possible through spiritual experiences and spiritual awakenings. Research examining spirituality as a mediator of AA's effect on drinking has been mixed. It is unknown whether such findings are due to variations in the operationalization of key constructs, such as AA and spirituality. To answer these questions, the authors used a longitudinal model to test 2 dimensions of AA as focal predictors and 6 dimensions of spirituality as possible mediators of AA's association with drinking. Data from the first 18 months of a 3-year longitudinal study of 364 alcohol-dependent individuals were analyzed. Structural equation modeling was used to replicate the analyses of Kelly et al. (Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011;35:454-463) and to compare AA attendance and AA involvement as focal predictors. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine which spirituality dimensions changed as the result of AA participation. A trimmed, data-driven model was employed to test multiple mediation paths simultaneously. The findings of the Kelly et al. study were replicated. AA involvement was a stronger predictor of drinking outcomes than AA attendance. AA involvement predicted increases in private religious practices, daily spiritual experiences, and forgiveness of others. However, only private religious practices mediated the relationship between AA and drinking.

  13. DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 mediates a conserved coat-dormancy mechanism for the temperature- and gibberellin-dependent control of seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeber, Kai; Linkies, Ada; Steinbrecher, Tina; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Ignatz, Michael; Sperber, Katja; Voegele, Antje; de Jong, Hans; Urbanová, Terezie; Strnad, Miroslav; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Seed germination is an important life-cycle transition because it determines subsequent plant survival and reproductive success. To detect optimal spatiotemporal conditions for germination, seeds act as sophisticated environmental sensors integrating information such as ambient temperature. Here we show that the DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) gene, known for providing dormancy adaptation to distinct environments, determines the optimal temperature for seed germination. By reciprocal gene-swapping experiments between Brassicaceae species we show that the DOG1-mediated dormancy mechanism is conserved. Biomechanical analyses show that this mechanism regulates the material properties of the endosperm, a seed tissue layer acting as germination barrier to control coat dormancy. We found that DOG1 inhibits the expression of gibberellin (GA)-regulated genes encoding cell-wall remodeling proteins in a temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore we demonstrate that DOG1 causes temperature-dependent alterations in the seed GA metabolism. These alterations in hormone metabolism are brought about by the temperature-dependent differential expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the GA biosynthetic pathway. These effects of DOG1 lead to a temperature-dependent control of endosperm weakening and determine the optimal temperature for germination. The conserved DOG1-mediated coat-dormancy mechanism provides a highly adaptable temperature-sensing mechanism to control the timing of germination. PMID:25114251

  14. Direct evidence for a magnetic f-electron-mediated pairing mechanism of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeCoIn5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, John S; Massee, Freek; Allan, Milan P; Davis, J C Séamus; Petrovic, Cedomir; Morr, Dirk K

    2014-08-12

    To identify the microscopic mechanism of heavy-fermion Cooper pairing is an unresolved challenge in quantum matter studies; it may also relate closely to finding the pairing mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Magnetically mediated Cooper pairing has long been the conjectured basis of heavy-fermion superconductivity but no direct verification of this hypothesis was achievable. Here, we use a novel approach based on precision measurements of the heavy-fermion band structure using quasiparticle interference imaging to reveal quantitatively the momentum space (k-space) structure of the f-electron magnetic interactions of CeCoIn5. Then, by solving the superconducting gap equations on the two heavy-fermion bands Ek(α,β) with these magnetic interactions as mediators of the Cooper pairing, we derive a series of quantitative predictions about the superconductive state. The agreement found between these diverse predictions and the measured characteristics of superconducting CeCoIn5 then provides direct evidence that the heavy-fermion Cooper pairing is indeed mediated by f-electron magnetism.

  15. Acetaminophen increases the risk of arsenic-mediated development of hepatic damage in rats by enhancing redox-signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Chhaya Rani; Khan, Saleem; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Prawez, Shahid; Kumar, Amit; Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated whether the commonly used analgesic-antipyretic drug acetaminophen can modify the arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress and also whether withdrawal of acetaminophen administration during the course of long-term arsenic exposure can increase susceptibility of liver to arsenic toxicity. Acetaminophen was co-administered orally to rats for 3 days following 28 days of arsenic pre-exposure (Phase-I) and thereafter, acetaminophen was withdrawn, but arsenic exposure was continued for another 28 days (Phase-II). Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depleted glutathione (GSH), and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Acetaminophen caused exacerbation of arsenic-mediated lipid peroxidation and ROS generation and further enhancement of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In Phase-I, acetaminophen caused further GSH depletion and reduction in SOD, catalase, GPx and GR activities, but in Phase-II, only GPx and GR activities were more affected. Arsenic did not alter basal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production, but decreased constitutive NOS (cNOS)-mediated NO release. Arsenic reduced expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS genes. Acetaminophen up-regulated eNOS and iNOS expression and NO production in Phase-I, but reversed these effects in Phase-II. Results reveal that acetaminophen increased the risk of arsenic-mediated hepatic oxidative damage. Withdrawal of acetaminophen administration also increased susceptibility of liver to hepatotoxicity. Both ROS and NO appeared to mediate lipid peroxidation in Phase-I, whereas only ROS appeared responsible for peroxidative damage in Phase-II.

  16. Oxygen isotope effects in Ba1-xKxBiO3 high-temperature superconductors: Evidence for unconventional phonon-mediated pairing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derimow, Nicholas; Aguilar, Victor; Khodagulyan, Armond; Labry, Jacob; Zhao, Guo-Meng

    2014-03-01

    The microscopic pairing mechanism for high-temperature superconductivity in magnetic copper and iron-based superconductors remains elusive despite tremendous experimental and theoretical efforts. The electron-phonon coupling constants predicted from the local density approximation (LDA) are too small to explain high-temperature superconductivity. On the other hand, high-temperature superconductivity in non-magnetic bismuth-based superconductors is believed to be phonon-mediated while the electron-phonon coupling constant predicted from the LDA is also too small (about 0.30) to explain superconductivity. We report magnetic and thermal properties of the oxygen-isotope exchanged Ba1-xKxBiO3 (x = 0.37 and 0.40) high-temperature superconductors to elucidate the pairing mechanism of this material. The deduced thermodynamic critical fields, electronic specific heat anomalies, superconducting transition temperatures, and magnetic penetration depths of the 16O and 18O samples are consistent with a phonon-mediated pairing mechanism with the effective electron-phonon coupling constant of about 1.0. We also show that the enhanced electron-phonon coupling constant may arise from the lattice polaronic effect, which increases the density of states at Fermi level. This research is funded by NIH grant (R25 GM 061331).

  17. VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasisolid-solid) mechanism for the catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-eutectic syntheses of single-crystal nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2016-08-01

    Catalyst-free and catalyst-assisted nanowire (NW) syntheses are increasingly carried out by mechanism(s) other than the well-known VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) mechanism. Yet these growths are not fully understood. An in-depth investigation has been carried out to understand the mechanism of the catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-VLS NW growths. Various chemical and physical processes involved in these growths have been studied to formulate general principles. Phase transitions, synthesis routes, and the fundamentals underlying these routes have been explored. Nanoparticle surfaces conducive to NW syntheses have been examined. The role of surface treatment, such as oxidation, oxygenation, doping, acid treatment, plasma treatment, etc., in creating such surfaces has been elucidated. Surface treatment and phase transition under appropriate growth conditions (temperature, pressure, ambient, and the presence of contaminants) have been found to be important. They play a crucial role in creating diffusion paths for the diffusion of the growth species for NW growths. Interdiffusion of the catalyst and the growth species on the nanoparticle surface has been found also to add a new dimension to the growth kinetics. When integrated together, they create a unified platform versatile enough to explain essentially all catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-eutectic NW growths. The platform uncovers numerous growth-related problems never understood before. Available experiments extensively support this platform. These experiments suggest that it is based on solid foundation and has broad and probably universal appeal. It pertains to the vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasi-solid-solid mechanism proposed some six years ago.

  18. Nonsense-mediated decay mechanism is a possible modifying factor of clinical outcome in nonsense cd39 beta thalassemia genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Concetta Renda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD is a surveillance system to prevent the synthesis of non-functional proteins. In β-thalassemia, NMD may have a role in clinical outcome. An example of premature translation stop codons appearing for the first time is the β-globin cd39 mutation; when homozygous, this results in a severe phenotype. The aim of this study was to determine whether the homozygous nonsense cd39 may have a milder phenotype in comparison with IVS1,nt110/cd39 genotype. Genotypes have been identified from a cohort of 568 patients affected by β-thalassemia. These genotypes were compared with those found in 577 affected fetuses detected among 2292 prenatal diagnoses. The nine most common genotypes, each with an incidence rate of 1.5% or over, and together accounting for 80% of genotype frequencies, underwent statistical analysis. Genotype prevalence was calculated within the overall group. Results are expressed as proportions with 95% confidence intervals; P≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. A binomial distribution was assumed for each group; z-tests were used to compare genotype frequencies observed in the patient group with frequencies in the affected fetus group. In the absence of selecting factors, prevalence of these two genotypes was compared between a cohort of 568 β-thalassemia patients (PTS and 577 affected fetuses (FOET detected during the same period. IVS1,nt110/cd39 was significantly more prevalent in FOET than PTS (P<0.0001, while there was no significant difference in prevalence of cd39/cd39 in FOET compared with PTS (P=0.524. These results suggest a cd39 genotype NMD mechanism may be associated with improved clinical outcomes in thalassemia major. 无义介导的mRNA 降解(NMD) 是一种预防非功能性蛋白质合成的监控系统。在β地中海贫血中,NMD可能对临床结果有影响。第一次出现的过早终止密码子(PTC)为β珠蛋白cd39突变;若为纯合

  19. Analysis of Nonlinear Pharmacokinetics of a Highly Albumin-Bound Compound: Contribution of Albumin-Mediated Hepatic Uptake Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Yukina; Toshimoto, Kota; Mori, Takanori; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Tobe, Yoshifusa; Sawada, Takeshi; Asaumi, Ryuta; Iwata, Takeyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Nunoya, Ken-Ichi; Imawaka, Haruo; Miyauchi, Seiji; Sugiyam, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    The cause of nonlinear pharmacokinetics (PK) (more than dose-proportional increase in exposure) of a urea derivative under development (compound A: anionic compound [pKa: 4.4]; LogP: 6.5; and plasma protein binding: 99.95%) observed in a clinical trial was investigated. Compound A was metabolized by CYP3A4, UGT1A1, and UGT1A3 with unbound Km of 3.3-17.8 μmol/L. OATP1B3-mediated uptake of compound A determined in the presence of human serum albumin (HSA) showed that unbound Km and Vmax decreased with increased HSA concentration. A greater decrease in unbound Km than in Vmax resulted in increased uptake clearance (Vmax/unbound Km) with increased HSA concentration, the so-called albumin-mediated uptake. At 2% HSA concentration, unbound Km was 0.00657 μmol/L. A physiologically based PK model assuming saturable hepatic uptake nearly replicated clinical PK of compound A. Unbound Km for hepatic uptake estimated from the model was 0.000767 μmol/L, lower than the in vitro unbound Km at 2% HSA concentration, whereas decreased Km with increased concentration of HSA in vitro indicated lower Km at physiological HSA concentration (4%-5%). In addition, unbound Km values for metabolizing enzymes were much higher than unbound Km for OATP1B3, indicating that the nonlinear PK of compound A is primarily attributed to saturated OATP1B3-mediated hepatic uptake of compound A. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drosophila lipophorin receptors mediate the uptake of neutral lipids in oocytes and imaginal disc cells by an endocytosis-independent mechanism.

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    Esmeralda Parra-Peralbo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are constantly shuttled through the body to redistribute energy and metabolites between sites of absorption, storage, and catabolism in a complex homeostatic equilibrium. In Drosophila, lipids are transported through the hemolymph in the form of lipoprotein particles, known as lipophorins. The mechanisms by which cells interact with circulating lipophorins and acquire their lipidic cargo are poorly understood. We have found that lipophorin receptor 1 and 2 (lpr1 and lpr2, two partially redundant genes belonging to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR family, are essential for the efficient uptake and accumulation of neutral lipids by oocytes and cells of the imaginal discs. Females lacking the lpr2 gene lay eggs with low lipid content and have reduced fertility, revealing a central role for lpr2 in mediating Drosophila vitellogenesis. lpr1 and lpr2 are transcribed into multiple isoforms. Interestingly, only a subset of these isoforms containing a particular LDLR type A module mediate neutral lipid uptake. Expression of these isoforms induces the extracellular stabilization of lipophorins. Furthermore, our data indicate that endocytosis of the lipophorin receptors is not required to mediate the uptake of neutral lipids. These findings suggest a model where lipophorin receptors promote the extracellular lipolysis of lipophorins. This model is reminiscent of the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that occurs at the mammalian capillary endothelium, suggesting an ancient role for LDLR-like proteins in this process.

  1. Suppression of the humoral immune response by cannabinoids is partially mediated through inhibition of adenylate cyclase by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, N E; Koh, W S; Yang, K H; Lee, M; Kessler, F K

    1994-11-16

    Cannabinoid compounds, including the major psychoactive component of marihuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), have been widely established as being inhibitory on a broad array of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The presence of cannabinoid receptors has been identified recently on mouse spleen cells, which possess structural and functional characteristics similar to those of the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor originally identified in rat brain. These findings, together with those demonstrating that delta 9-THC inhibits adenylate cyclase in splenocytes, strongly suggest that certain aspects of immune inhibition by cannabinoids may be mediated through a cannabinoid receptor-associated mechanism. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether inhibition of adenylate cyclase is relevant to mouse spleen cell immune function and, if so, whether this inhibition is mediated through a Gi-protein coupled mechanism as previously described in neuronal tissue. Spleen cell activation by the phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), plus the calcium ionophore ionomycin, produced a rapid but transient increase in cytosolic cAMP, which was inhibited completely by immunosuppressive concentrations of delta 9-THC (22 microM) and the synthetic bicyclic cannabinoid CP-55940 (5.2 microM), which produced no effect on cell viability. Inhibition by cannabinoids of lymphocyte proliferative responses to PMA plus ionomycin and sheep erythrocyte (sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response, was abrogated completely by low concentrations of dibutyryl-cAMP (10-100 microM). Inhibition of the sRBC AFC response by both delta 9-THC (22 microM) and CP-55940 (5.2 microM) was also abrogated by preincubation of splenocytes for 24 hr with pertussis toxin (0.1-100 ng/mL). Pertussis toxin pretreatment of spleen cells was also found to directly abrogate cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase, as measured by forskolin-stimulated accumulation

  2. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  3. APOBEC3G-mediated G-to-A hypermutation of the HIV-1 genome: the missing link in antiviral molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Okada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a member of the cellular polynucleotide cytidine deaminases, which catalyze the deamination of cytosine (dC to uracil (dU in single-stranded DNA. These enzymes potently inhibit the replication of a variety of retroviruses and retrotransposons, including HIV-1. A3G is incorporated into vif-deficient HIV-1 virions and targets viral reverse transcripts, particularly minus-stranded DNA products, in newly infected cells. It is well established that the enzymatic activity of A3G is closely correlated with the potential to greatly inhibit HIV-1 replication in the absence of Vif. However, the details of the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. One potential mechanism of A3G antiviral activity is that the A3G-dependent deamination may trigger degradation of the dU-containing reverse transcripts by cellular uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs. More recently, another mechanism has been suggested, in which the virion-incorporated A3G generates lethal levels of the G-to-A hypermutation in the viral DNA genome, thus potentially driving the viruses into error catastrophe mode. In this mini review article, we summarize the deaminase-dependent and deaminase-independent molecular mechanisms of A3G and discuss how A3G-mediated deamination is linked to antiviral mechanisms.

  4. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Activity Is a Possible Mechanism by Which the Polyherbal Formulation Comprised of Nigella sativa (Seeds, Hemidesmus indicus (Root, and Smilax glabra (Rhizome Mediates Its Antihepatocarcinogenic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna B. Galhena

    2012-01-01

    oral administration of the decoction. As with the positive control, indomethacin (10 mg/kg b.w. the inhibitory effect was pronounced at 3rd and 4th h after carrageenan injection. A notable IKK α/β mediated hepatic NF-κB inactivation was associated with a significant hepatic TNFα downregulation among mice-bearing hepatocarcinogenic changes subjected to decoction treatment. Inhibition of NO production, leukocyte migration, and membrane stabilization are possible mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory effect is mediated by the decoction. Overall findings imply that anti-inflammatory activity could be one of the mechanisms by which the decoction mediates its antihepatocarcinogenic effects.

  6. Mobilization of Intracellular Copper by Gossypol and Apogossypolone Leads to Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cell Death: Putative Anticancer Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseeb Zubair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that serum, tissue and intracellular levels of copper are elevated in all types of cancer. Copper has been suggested as an important co-factor for angiogenesis. It is also a major metal ion present inside the nucleus, bound to DNA bases, particularly guanine. We have earlier proposed that the interaction of phenolic-antioxidants with intracellular copper leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that ultimately serve as DNA cleaving agents. To further validate our hypothesis we show here that the antioxidant gossypol and its semi-synthetic derivative apogossypolone induce copper-mediated apoptosis in breast MDA-MB-231, prostate PC3 and pancreatic BxPC-3 cancer cells, through the generation of ROS. MCF10A breast epithelial cells refractory to the cytotoxic property of these compounds become sensitized to treatment against gossypol, as well as apogossypolone, when pre-incubated with copper. Our present results confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that plant-derived antioxidants mobilize intracellular copper instigating ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. As cancer cells exist under significant oxidative stress, this increase in ROS-stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  7. Prospective associations between unforgiveness and physical health and positive mediating mechanisms in a nationally representative sample of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawell, Asani H; Toussaint, Loren L; Cheadle, Alyssa C D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prospective association between unforgiveness and self-reported physical health and potential positive psychological mediators of this association. Participants were a national sample of 1024 USA's adults of ages 66 years and older. Data were collected at two time points separated by three years. Measures of trait unforgiveness, self-rated physical health, socio-demographics, health behaviours and positive psychological traits (e.g. life satisfaction, self-esteem) were included in a comprehensive survey known as the 'Religion, Aging, and Health Survey.' The results indicated that unforgiveness was prospectively associated with declines in self-reported physical health three years later, and poor initial self-reported health status did not predict increases in unforgiveness across time. Furthermore, the prospective association of unforgiveness with self-reported health was mediated by a latent positive psychological traits variable. These results confirm cross-sectional findings suggesting that unforgiveness is related to health. The present study also suggests that unforgiveness has a prospective, but not reciprocal, association with self-reported physical health. Unforgiveness may have its association with self-reported physical health through its interruption of other positive traits that typically confer health benefits.

  8. Hepatic ATGL mediates PPAR-α signaling and fatty acid channeling through an L-FABP independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kuok Teong; Mashek, Mara T; Davidson, Nicholas O; Mashek, Douglas G

    2014-05-01

    Adipose TG lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in TG hydrolysis in most tissues. We have shown that hepatic ATGL preferentially channels hydrolyzed FAs to β-oxidation and induces PPAR-α signaling. Previous studies have suggested that liver FA binding protein (L-FABP) transports FAs from lipid droplets to the nucleus for ligand delivery and to the mitochondria for β-oxidation. To determine if L-FABP is involved in ATGL-mediated FA channeling, we used adenovirus-mediated suppression or overexpression of hepatic ATGL in either WT or L-FABP KO mice. Hepatic ATGL knockdown increased liver weight and TG content of overnight fasted mice regardless of genotype. L-FABP deletion did not impair the effects of ATGL overexpression on the oxidation of hydrolyzed FAs in primary hepatocyte cultures or on serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in vivo. Moreover, L-FABP deletion did not influence the effects of ATGL knockdown or overexpression on PPAR-α target gene expression. Taken together, we conclude that L-FABP is not required to channel ATGL-hydrolyzed FAs to mitochondria for β-oxidation or the nucleus for PPAR-α regulation.

  9. Experimental Study on the Mechanism of Protective Effect of Free Fu on Gut-derived Endotoxin-Mediated Lung Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道本; 杨胜兰; 陈瑞

    2004-01-01

    The effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on endotoxin (ET)-mediated lung damage caused by incomplete ligation of large intestine and the influence of free Fu on the expression of TNF-α mRNA were explored. Forty SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, model group, ligation group and treatment group (n=10 in each group). The models were made by the method of partly ligating the rectum outside the body. The plasma level of lipopolysaccaride was measured by dynamic nephelo metric method and the serum level of TNF-α was detected by the method of radioactive immunity. The expression of TNF-α mRNA in lung tissue was detected by RT-PCR method. The results were compared among the 4 groups. The results showed the plasma levels of ET and serum TNF-α in the model group and the expression of TNF-α mRNA in the lung tissues were remarkably higher than those in the normal control group (P<0.01). After the treatment of free Fu, all of the above indexes in the treatment group were all decreased as compared with model group (all P<0.01), and the damage to lung was alleviated. It was concluded that TNF-α might play a very important role in the ET-mediated lung damage caused by incomplete ligation of large intestine, free Fu could protect the lung from damage.

  10. An Analysis of Pathological Activities of CCN Proteins in Joint Disorders: Mechanical Stretch-Mediated CCN2 Expression in Cultured Meniscus Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor CYR61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) 2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, regulates cellular proliferation, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. Recent literatures have described important roles of CCN2 in the meniscus metabolism. However, the mechanical stress-mediated transcriptional regulation of CCN2 in the meniscus remains unclear. The meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue that controls complex biomechanics of the knee joint. Therefore, the injured unstable meniscus has a poor healing potential especially in the avascular inner region. In addition, dysfunction of the meniscus correlates with the progression of degenerative knee joint disorders and joint space narrowing. Here, we describe an experimental approach that investigates the distinct cellular behavior of inner and outer meniscus cells in response to mechanical stretch. Our experimental model can analyze the relationships between stretch-induced CCN2 expression and its functional role in the meniscus homeostasis.

  11. Embryopathic effects of thalidomide and its hydrolysis products in rabbit embryo culture: evidence for a prostaglandin H synthase (PHS)-dependent, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) causes birth defects in humans and rabbits via several potential mechanisms, including bioactivation by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) enzymes to a reactive intermediate that enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We show herein that TD in rabbit embryo culture produces relevant embryopathies, including decreases in head/brain development by 28% and limb bud growth by 71% (Pproducts, 2-phthalimidoglutaramic acid (PGMA) and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid (PGA), were similarly embryopathic, attenuating otic vesicle (ear) and limb bud formation by up to 36 and 77%, respectively (Pproducts, in a mammalian embryo culture model of a species susceptible to TD in vivo, indicating that all likely contribute to TD teratogenicity in vivo, in part through PHS-dependent, ROS-mediated mechanisms.

  12. Fucoidan extract induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via a mechanism involving the ROS-dependent JNK activation and mitochondria-mediated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fucoidan extract (FE, an enzymatically digested compound with a low molecular weight, is extracted from brown seaweed. As a natural compound with various actions, FE is attractive, especially in Asian countries, for improving the therapeutic efficacy and safety of cancer treatment. The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-tumor properties of FE in human carcinoma cells and further examine the underlying mechanisms of its activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: FE inhibits the growth of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and HT1080 cells. FE-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cancer cells is accompanied by DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. FE induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 family members. Release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF and cytochrome c precedes MMP. AIF release causes DNA fragmentation, the final stage of apoptosis, via a caspase-independent mitochondrial pathway. Additionally, FE was found to induce phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and apoptosis was found to be attenuated by inhibition of JNK. Furthermore, FE-mediated apoptosis was found to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for the decrease of ΔΨm and phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2 kinases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that FE activates a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway in MCF-7 cancer cells through activation of ROS-mediated MAP kinases and regulation of the Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pathway. They also provide evidence that FE deserves further investigation as a natural anticancer and cancer preventive agent.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 Regulates Its Own Inactivating Enzyme, 15-PGDH, by EP2 Receptor-Mediated Cervical Cell-Specific Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, A. Hari; Owens, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prostaglandins play important roles in parturition and have been used to induce cervical ripening and labor. Prior to cervical ripening at term, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is highly expressed in the cervix and metabolizes cyclooxygenase-2-mediated increases in active prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inactive 15-keto PGE2. At term, 15-PGDH gene expression decreases and PGE2 accumulates, leading to cervical ripening and labor. Previously, we found that the cervical isoform of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MiTF-CX) serves as a progestational transcription factor that represses IL-8 and hypoxia-mediated increases in cyclooxygenase-2. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that PGE2 regulates its own inactivation through MiTF-CX. Design: We used human cervical stromal cells to investigate the regulation of 15-PGDH. Setting: This was a laboratory-based study using cells from clinical tissue samples. Main Outcome Measures: We evaluated the mechanisms by which PGE2 regulates 15-PGDH in human cervical stromal cells. Results: PGE2 repressed MiTF-CX and 15-PGDH, whereas ectopic overexpression of MiTF-CX induced 15-PGDH expression levels. Stabilization of HIF-1α by deferoxamine resulted in concomitant down-regulation of MiTF-CX and 15-PGDH. Ectopic overexpression of MiTF-CX abrogated PGE2- and deferoxamine-mediated loss of MiTF-CX and 15-PGDH. PGE2-induced loss of MiTF-CX and 15-PGDH was mediated through prostaglandin E2 receptor (EP2) receptors (PTGER2), but not cAMP. Conclusions: The 15-PGDH gene is a MiTF-CX target gene in cervical stromal cells and is down-regulated by PGE2 through EP2 receptors. The findings suggest that EP2 receptor-specific antagonists may be used as an adjunct to present clinical management for the prevention of preterm cervical ripening and preterm labor. PMID:24471568

  14. TRPA1 mediates changes in heart rate variability and cardiac mechanical function in mice exposed to acrolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-term exposure to ambient air pollution is linked with adverse cardiovascular effects. While previous research focused primarily on particulate matter-induced responses, gaseous air pollutants also contribute to cause short-term cardiovascular effects. Mechanisms underlying ...

  15. Does a nonclassical signaling mechanism underlie an increase of estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding in ovine pituitary cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy L; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Cantlon, Jeremy D; Clay, Colin M; Nett, Terry M

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol-17beta (E2) is the major regulator of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) gene expression and number during the periovulatory period; however, the mechanisms underlying E2 regulation of the GNRHR gene remain undefined. Herein, we find that E2 conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) mimics the stimulatory effect of E2 on GnRH binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. The time course for maximal GnRH analog binding was similar for both E2 and E2-BSA. The ability of E2 and E2-BSA to increase GnRH analog binding was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Also, increased GnRH analog binding in response to E2 and the selective ESR1 agonist propylpyrazole triol was blocked by expression of a dominant-negative form of ESR1 (L540Q). Thus, membrane-associated ESR1 is the likely candidate for mediating E2 activation of the GNRHR gene. As cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is an established target for E2 activation in gonadotrophs, we next explored a potential role for this protein as an intracellular mediator of the E2 signal. Consistent with this possibility, adenoviral-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (A-CREB) completely abolished the ability of E2 to increase GnRH analog binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. Finally, the presence of membrane-associated E2 binding sites on ovine pituitary cells was demonstrated using a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate of E2-BSA. We suggest that E2 regulation of GnRHR number during the preovulatory period reflects a membrane site of action and may proceed through a nonclassical signaling mechanism, specifically a CREB-dependent pathway.

  16. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  17. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm2) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: −56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = −0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: −9 to +3 bpm, p mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = −0.62, p = 0.0066). These results suggest that cardiac sympathetic nerve activity regulates HR responses to muscle mechanical pressure stimulation and the direction of HR

  18. The relationship between employees' perceptions of human resource systems and organizational performance: examining mediating mechanisms and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piening, Erk P; Baluch, Alina M; Salge, Torsten Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Given the limited understanding of temporal issues in extant theorizing about the link between human resource management (HRM) and performance, in this study we aim to shed light on how, when, and why HR interventions affect organizational performance. On the basis of longitudinal, multi-informant and multisource data from public hospital services in England, we provide new insights into the complex interplay between employees' perceptions of HR systems, job satisfaction, and performance outcomes over time. The dynamic panel data analyses provide support for changes in employees' experience of an HR system being related to subsequent changes in customer satisfaction, as mediated by changes in job satisfaction, albeit these effects decrease over time. Moreover, our longitudinal analyses highlight the importance of feedback effects in the HRM-performance chain, which otherwise appears to evolve in a cyclical manner.

  19. Low prosocial attachment, involvement with drug-using peers, and adolescent drug use: a longitudinal examination of mediational mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L

    2008-06-01

    The process of disengagement from prosocial entities (e.g., family and school) and either simultaneous or subsequent engagement with antisocial entities (e.g., friends who use drugs) is a critical contributor to adolescent drug use and delinquency. This study provides a series of formal mediation tests to demonstrate the relationship between poor family attachment, poor school attachment, involvement with friends who use drugs, and a student's own use of drugs. Results indicate that poor family attachment exerts its effect on drug use through poor school attachment and involvement with friends who use drugs. In addition, poor school attachment exerts its effect on drug use through involvement with friends who use drugs. The results of this study corroborate theories that suggest disengagement from prosocial entities is associated with involvement with antisocial entities and eventual involvement in drug use. Implications for prevention strategies are discussed.

  20. Luminal and basal-like breast cancer cells show increased migration induced by hypoxia, mediated by an autocrine mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zänker Kurt S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some breast cancer patients receiving anti-angiogenic treatment show increased metastases, possibly as a result of induced hypoxia. The effect of hypoxia on tumor cell migration was assessed in selected luminal, post-EMT and basal-like breast carcinoma cell lines. Methods Migration was assessed in luminal (MCF-7, post-EMT (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435S, and basal-like (MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cell lines under normal and oxygen-deprived conditions, using a collagen-based assay. Cell proliferation was determined, secreted cytokine and chemokine levels were measured using flow-cytometry and a bead-based immunoassay, and the hypoxic genes HIF-1α and CA IX were assessed using PCR. The functional effect of tumor-cell conditioned medium on the migration of neutrophil granulocytes (NG was tested. Results Hypoxia caused increased migratory activity but not proliferation in all tumor cell lines, involving the release and autocrine action of soluble mediators. Conditioned medium (CM from hypoxic cells induced migration in normoxic cells. Hypoxia changed the profile of released inflammatory mediators according to cell type. Interleukin-8 was produced only by post-EMT and basal-like cell lines, regardless of hypoxia. MCP-1 was produced by MDA-MB-435 and -468 cells, whereas IL-6 was present only in MDA-MB-231. IL-2, TNF-α, and NGF production was stimulated by hypoxia in MCF-7 cells. CM from normoxic and hypoxic MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S cells and hypoxic MCF-7 cells, but not MDA-MB-468, induced NG migration. Conclusions Hypoxia increases migration by the autocrine action of released signal substances in selected luminal and basal-like breast carcinoma cell lines which might explain why anti-angiogenic treatment can worsen clinical outcome in some patients.

  1. Investigation of biophysical mechanisms in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation of cells using a multimodal holographic and fluorescence imaging setup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kalies

    Full Text Available Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy.

  2. Different mechanisms between copper and iron in catecholamines-mediated oxidative DNA damage and disruption of gene expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Yoshihiko; Ando, Motozumi; Makino, Rena; Ueda, Koji; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Kojima, Nakao

    2011-07-01

    Catechols produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative DNA damage through reduction-oxidation reactions with metals such as copper. Here, we examined oxidative DNA damage by neurotransmitter catecholamines in the presence of copper or iron and evaluated the effects of this damage on gene expression in vitro. Dopamine induced strand breaks and base oxidation in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II) or Fe(III)-NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid). The extent of this damage was greater for Cu(II) than for Fe(III)-NTA. For the DNA damage induced by dopamine, the responsible reactive species were hydrogen peroxide and Cu(I) for Cu(II) and hydroxyl radicals and Fe(II) for Fe(III)-NTA. Cu(II) induced DNA conformational changes, but Fe(III)-NTA did not in the presence of dopamine. These differences indicate different modes of action between Cu and Fe-NTA with regard to the induction of DNA damage. Expression of the lacZ gene coded on plasmid DNA was inhibited depending on the extent of the oxidative damage and strand breaks. Endogenous catecholamines (dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) were more potent than catechols (no aminoalkyl side chains) or 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (aminomethyl side chain). These results suggest that the metal-mediated DNA damage induced by dopamine disrupts gene expression, and leukoaminochromes (further oxidation products of O-quinones having aminoethyl side chain) are involved in the DNA damage. These findings indicate a possibility that metal (especially iron and copper)-mediated oxidation of catecholamines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease.

  3. Pore orientation mediated control of mechanical behavior of scaffolds and its application in cartilage-mimetic scaffold design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Aditya; Kothari, Anjaney; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2015-11-01

    Scaffolds with aligned pores are being explored in musculoskeletal tissue engineering due to their inherent structural anisotropy. However, influence of their structure on mechanical behavior remains poorly understood. In this work, we elucidate this dependence using chitosan-gelatin based random and aligned scaffolds. For this, scaffolds with horizontally or vertically aligned pores were fabricated using unidirectional freezing technique. Random, horizontal and vertical scaffolds were characterized for their mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile and shear loading regimes. The results revealed conserved trends in compressive, tensile and shear moduli, with horizontal scaffolds showing the least moduli, vertical showing the highest and random showing intermediate. Further, these scaffolds demonstrated a highly viscoelastic behavior under cyclic compressive loading, with a pore orientation dependent relative energy dissipation. These results established that mechanical behavior of porous scaffolds can be modulated by varying pore orientation alone. This finding paved the way to recreate the structural and consequent mechanical anisotropy of articular cartilage tissue using zonally varied pore orientation in scaffolds. To this end, monolithic multizonal scaffolds were fabricated using a novel sequential unidirectional freezing technique. The superficial zone of this scaffold had horizontally aligned pores while the deep zone consisted of vertically aligned pores, with a transition zone between the two having randomly oriented pores. This depth-dependent pore architecture closely mimicked the collagen alignment of native articular cartilage which translated into similar depth-dependent mechanical anisotropy as well. A facile fabrication technique, biomimetic pore architecture and associated mechanical anisotropy make this multizonal scaffold a promising candidate for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling mediate organic dust induction of IL-8 expression in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Koteswara R; Bandari, Shiva Kumar; Nonnenmann, Matthew W; Levin, Jeffrey L; Dooley, Gregory P; Reynolds, Stephen J; Boggaram, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the agricultural work environment is a risk factor for the development of respiratory symptoms and chronic lung diseases. Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of tissue injury and disease. Cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating lung inflammatory responses to agricultural dust are not yet fully understood. We studied the effects of poultry dust extract on molecular regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory cytokine, in A549 and Beas2B lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells. Our findings indicate that poultry dust extract potently induces IL-8 levels by increasing IL-8 gene transcription without altering IL-8 mRNA stability. Increase in IL-8 promoter activity was due to enhanced binding of activator protein 1 and NF-κB. IL-8 induction was associated with protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and inhibited by PKC and MAPK inhibitors. IL-8 increase was not inhibited by polymyxin B or l-nitroarginine methyl ester, indicating lack of involvement of lipopolysaccharide and nitric oxide in the induction. Lung epithelial and THP-1 cells share common mechanisms for induction of IL-8 levels. Our findings identify key roles for transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling pathways for IL-8 induction and provide insights into the mechanisms regulating lung inflammatory responses to organic dust exposure.

  5. Light quantity and photosystem function mediate host susceptibility to turnip mosaic virus via a salicylic acid-independent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence going as far back as the early part of the 20th century suggests that both light and chloroplast function may play key roles in host susceptibility to viruses. Despite the long history of such work, confirmation of these phenomena and a determination of the underlying mechanisms remain elu...

  6. A case study of the mechanism of alcohol-mediated Morita Baylis-Hillman reactions. The importance of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, R Erik; Singleton, Daniel A

    2015-03-25

    The mechanism of the Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction has been heavily studied in the literature, and a long series of computational studies have defined complete theoretical energy profiles in these reactions. We employ here a combination of mechanistic probes, including the observation of intermediates, the independent generation and partitioning of intermediates, thermodynamic and kinetic measurements on the main reaction and side reactions, isotopic incorporation from solvent, and kinetic isotope effects, to define the mechanism and an experimental mechanistic free-energy profile for a prototypical Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol. The results are then used to critically evaluate the ability of computations to predict the mechanism. The most notable prediction of the many computational studies, that of a proton-shuttle pathway, is refuted in favor of a simple but computationally intractable acid-base mechanism. Computational predictions vary vastly, and it is not clear that any significant accurate information that was not already apparent from experiment could have been garnered from computations. With care, entropy calculations are only a minor contributor to the larger computational error, while literature entropy-correction processes lead to absurd free-energy predictions. The computations aid in interpreting observations but fail utterly as a replacement for experiment.

  7. Mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis in bone defects via mechanical feedback and mediation of biochemical factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon R Moore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The link between mechanics and biology in the generation and the adaptation of bone has been well studied in context of skeletal development and fracture healing. Yet, the prediction of tissue genesis within - and the spatiotemporal healing of - postnatal defects, necessitates a quantitative evaluation of mechano-biological interactions using experimental and clinical parameters. To address this current gap in knowledge, this study aims to develop a mechanistic mathematical model of tissue genesis using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP to represent of a class of factors that may coordinate bone healing. Specifically, we developed a mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis by periosteal progenitor cells within a long bone defect surrounded by periosteum and stabilized via an intramedullary nail. The emergent material properties and mechanical environment associated with nascent tissue genesis influence the strain stimulus sensed by progenitor cells within the periosteum. Using a mechanical finite element model, periosteal surface strains are predicted as a function of emergent, nascent tissue properties. Strains are then input to a mechanistic mathematical model, where mechanical regulation of BMP-2 production mediates rates of cellular proliferation, differentiation and tissue production, to predict healing outcomes. A parametric approach enables the spatial and temporal prediction of endochondral tissue regeneration, assessed as areas of cartilage and mineralized bone, as functions of radial distance from the periosteum and time. Comparing model results to histological outcomes from two previous studies of periosteum-mediated bone regeneration in a common ovine model, it was shown that mechanistic models incorporating mechanical feedback successfully predict patterns (spatial and trends (temporal of bone tissue regeneration. The novel model framework presented here integrates a mechanistic feedback system based

  8. Gαi2-protein-mediated signal transduction: central nervous system molecular mechanism countering the development of sodium-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainford, Richard D; Carmichael, Casey Y; Pascale, Crissey L; Kuwabara, Jill T

    2015-01-01

    Excess dietary salt intake is an established cause of hypertension. At present, our understanding of the neuropathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension is limited by a lack of identification of the central nervous system mechanisms that modulate sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in response to dietary salt intake. We hypothesized that impairment of brain Gαi2-protein-gated signal transduction pathways would result in increased sympathetically mediated renal sodium retention, thus promoting the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. To test this hypothesis, naive or renal denervated Dahl salt-resistant and Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats were assigned to receive a continuous intracerebroventricular control scrambled or a targeted Gαi2-oligodeoxynucleotide infusion, and naive Brown Norway and 8-congenic DSS rats were fed a 21-day normal or high-salt diet. High salt intake did not alter blood pressure, suppressed plasma norepinephrine, and evoked a site-specific increase in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus Gαi2-protein levels in naive Brown Norway, Dahl salt-resistant, and scrambled oligodeoxynucleotide-infused Dahl salt-resistant but not DSS rats. In Dahl salt-resistant rats, Gαi2 downregulation evoked rapid renal nerve-dependent hypertension, sodium retention, and sympathoexcitation. In DSS rats, Gαi2 downregulation exacerbated salt-sensitive hypertension via a renal nerve-dependent mechanism. Congenic-8 DSS rats exhibited sodium-evoked paraventricular nucleus-specific Gαi2-protein upregulation and attenuated hypertension, sodium retention, and global sympathoexcitation compared with DSS rats. These data demonstrate that paraventricular nucleus Gαi2-protein-gated pathways represent a conserved central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal nerve-dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Impairment of this mechanism contributes to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  9. Neurons respond directly to mechanical deformation with pannexin-mediated ATP release and autostimulation of P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingsheng; Lim, Jason C; Lu, Wennan; Beckel, Jonathan M; Macarak, Edward J; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire H

    2012-05-15

    Mechanical deformation produces complex effects on neuronal systems, some of which can lead to dysfunction and neuronal death. While astrocytes are known to respond to mechanical forces, it is not clear whether neurons can also respond directly. We examined mechanosensitive ATP release and the physiological response to this release in isolated retinal ganglion cells. Purified ganglion cells released ATP upon swelling. Release was blocked by carbenoxolone, probenecid or peptide (10)panx, implicating pannexin channels as conduits. Mechanical stretch of retinal ganglion cells also triggered a pannexin-dependent ATP release. Whole cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that mild swelling induced the activation of an Ohmic cation current with linear kinetics. The current was inhibited by removal of extracellular ATP with apyrase, by inhibition of the P2X(7) receptor with A438079, zinc, or AZ 10606120, and by pannexin blockers carbenoxolone and probenecid. Probenecid also inhibited the regulatory volume decrease observed after swelling isolated neurons. Together, these observations indicate mechanical strain triggers ATP release directly from retinal ganglion cells and that this released ATP autostimulates P2X(7) receptors. Since extracellular ATP levels in the retina increase with elevated intraocular pressure, and stimulation of P2X(7) receptors on retinal ganglion cells can be lethal, this autocrine response may impact ganglion cells in glaucoma. It remains to be determined whether the autocrine stimulation of purinergic receptors is a general response to a mechanical deformation in neurons, or whether preventing ATP release through pannexin channels and blocking activation of the P2X(7) receptor, is neuroprotective for stretched neurons.

  10. Autonomous CaMKII Mediates Both LTP and LTD Using a Mechanism for Differential Substrate Site Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Coultrap

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic strength requires Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and other kinases, whereas long-term depression (LTD requires phosphatases. Here, we found that LTD also requires CaMKII and its phospho-T286-induced “autonomous” (Ca2+-independent activity. However, whereas LTP is known to induce phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR subunit GluA1 at S831, LTD instead induced CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation at S567, a site known to reduce synaptic GluA1 localization. GluA1 S831 phosphorylation by “autonomous” CaMKII was further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM, as expected for traditional substrates. By contrast, GluA1 S567 represents a distinct substrate class that is unaffected by such stimulation. This differential regulation caused GluA1 S831 to be favored by LTP-type stimuli (strong but brief, whereas GluA1 S567 was favored by LTD-type stimuli (weak but prolonged. Thus, requirement of autonomous CaMKII in opposing forms of plasticity involves distinct substrate classes that are differentially regulated to enable stimulus-dependent substrate-site preference.

  11. Cannabidiol and endogenous opioid peptide-mediated mechanisms modulate antinociception induced by transcutaneous electrostimulation of the peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Thais Cristina Teixeira; Londe, Anna Karla; Albano, Rafael Isaac Pires; de Araújo Júnior, Artur Teixeira; de Aguiar Azeredo, Mariana; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Vasconcellos, Thiago Henrique Ferreira; Dos Reis Ferreira, Célio Marcos; Teixeira, Dulcinéa Gonçalves; de Souza Crippa, José Alexandre; Vieira, Débora; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-12-15

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological therapy for the treatment of pain. The present work investigated the effect of cannabidiol, naloxone and diazepam in combination with 10 Hz and 150 Hz TENS. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the tail-flick test (baseline), and each rodent received an acute administration (intraperitoneal) of naloxone (3.0mg/kg), diazepam (1.5mg/kg) or cannabidiol (0.75 mg/kg, 1.5mg/kg, 3.0mg/kg, 4.5mg/kg, 6.0mg/kg and 12.0mg/kg); 10 min after the acute administration, 10 Hz or 150 Hz TENS or a sham procedure was performed for 30 min. Subsequently, tail-flick measures were recorded over a 90-min period, at 5-min intervals. 10 Hz TENS increased the nociceptive threshold during the 90-min period. This antinociceptive effect was reversed by naloxone pre-treatment, was not altered by diazepam pre-treatment and was abolished by cannabidiol pre-treatment (1.5mg/kg). Moreover, 150 Hz TENS increased tail-flick latencies by 35 min post-treatment, which was partially inhibited by naloxone pre-treatment and totally inhibited by cannabidiol (1.5mg/kg). These data suggest the involvement of the endogenous opioid system and the cannabinoid-mediated neuromodulation of the antinociception induced by transcutaneous electrostimulation at 10 Hz and 150 Hz TENS.

  12. IL-15 Mediates Mitochondrial Activity through a PPARδ-Dependent-PPARα-Independent Mechanism in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mediators of metabolic processes, to increase energy expenditure, have become a focus for therapies of obesity. The discovery of cytokines secreted from the skeletal muscle (SKM), termed “myokines,” has garnered attention due to their positive effects on metabolic processes. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a myokine that has numerous positive metabolic effects and is linked to the PPAR family of mitochondrial regulators. Here, we aimed to determine the importance of PPARα and/or PPARδ as targets of IL-15 signaling. C2C12 SKM cells were differentiated for 6 days and treated every other day with IL-15 (100 ng/mL), a PPARα inhibitor (GW-6471), a PPARδ inhibitor (GSK-3787), or both IL-15 and the inhibitors. IL-15 increased mitochondrial activity and induced PPARα, PPARδ, PGC1α, PGC1β, UCP2, and Nrf1 expression. There was no effect of inhibiting PPARα, in combination with IL-15, on the aforementioned mRNA levels except for PGC1β and Nrf1. However, with PPARδ inhibition, IL-15 failed to induce the expression levels of PGC1α, PGC1β, UCP2, and Nrf1. Further, inhibition of PPARδ abolished IL-15 induced increases in citrate synthase activity, ATP production, and overall mitochondrial activity. IL-15 had no effects on mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data indicates that PPARδ activity is required for the beneficial metabolic effects of IL-15 signaling in SKM.

  13. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  14. Vpu Mediates Depletion of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during HIV Infection by a Lysosome-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon ...

  15. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemog...

  16. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Carrillo-Munguía; Ma. Eva González-Trujano; Miguel Huerta; Xochitl Trujillo; M. Irene Díaz-Reval

    2015-01-01

    Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and...

  17. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  18. Insight into the molecular mechanism of P-glycoprotein mediated drug toxicity induced by bioflavonoids: an integrated computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongrattanakamon, Pathomwat; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Sirithunyalug, Busaban; Chansakaow, Sunee; Jiranusornkul, Supat

    2017-05-01

    In this work, molecular docking, pharmacophore modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were rendered for the mouse P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (code: 4Q9H) and bioflavonoids; amorphigenin, chrysin, epigallocatechin, formononetin and rotenone including a positive control; verapamil to identify protein-ligand interaction features including binding affinities, interaction characteristics, hot-spot amino acid residues and complex stabilities. These flavonoids occupied the same binding site with high binding affinities and shared the same key residues for their binding interactions and the binding region of the flavonoids was revealed that overlapped the ATP binding region with hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism of the compounds. Root mean square deviations (RMSDs) analysis of MD trajectories of the protein-ligand complexes and NBD2 residues, and ligands pointed out these residues were stable throughout the duration of MD simulations. Thus, the applied preliminary structure-based molecular modeling approach of interactions between NBD2 and flavonoids may be gainful to realize the intimate inhibition mechanism of P-gp at NBD2 level and on the basis of the obtained data, it can be concluded that these bioflavonoids have the potential to cause herb-drug interactions or be used as lead molecules for the inhibition of P-gp (as anti-multidrug resistance agents) via the NBD2 blocking mechanism in future.

  19. Mechanisms of cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer%阳离子脂质体介导的基因转移机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 张树彪; 周集体; 赵不凋; 杨宝灵; 崔绍辉; 赵轶男

    2011-01-01

    背景:与病毒载体相比,许多天然与合成的阳离子类脂以脂质体的形式用于基因转移,具有无免疫原性、易生产、质粒免受核酸酶降解和无致瘤性等优点,并且作为病毒载体的有效替代物,阳离子脂质体能用于细胞的体内和体外转染.目的:介绍阳离子脂质体介导的基因转移机制研究进展.方法:由第一作者用计算机检索中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI:1987/2010)和PubMed (1987/2010)数据库,检索词分别为"基因治疗、阳离子脂质体、基因转移、机制"和"gene therapy,cationic liposome,gene transfer,mechanism",语言分别设定为中文和英文.从阳离子脂质体基因转染和基因转移机制进行总结,综述了阳离子脂质体介导的基因转移机制.结果与结论:共检索到108篇,按纳入和排除标准对文献进行筛选,共纳入20篇文章.综述了阳离子脂质体介导的基因转移机制,包括阳离子脂质体/DNA复合物的形成、细胞吸收、内含体释放和复合物解体以及细胞核摄入等方面的研究内容.结果提示,对类脂构效关系和基因转移机制的研究,是提高阳离子脂质体转染效率和优化基因治疗的关键.%BACKGROUND: Compared with viral vector, many cationic lipids naturally occurred or synthesized have been used for gene transfer in the form of liposomes, which have the advantages of non-immunogenicity, simple production, plasmid protected against nuclease degradation and non-oncogenicity, etc. And cationic lipids as an effective alternative of viral vector, cationic liposomes can be used for cell transfection in vivo and in vitro.OBJECTIVE: To introduce research progress on mechanisms of cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer.METHODS: CNKl database from 1987 to 2010 and PubMed database from 1987 to 2010 were retrieved by the first author with computer. The index words were "gene therapy, cationic liposome, gene transfer, mechanism" in Chinese and English.Literatures were

  20. Mechanism of RPE cell death in α-crystallin deficient mice: a novel and critical role for MRP1-mediated GSH efflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran G Sreekumar

    Full Text Available Absence of α-crystallins (αA and αB in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells renders them susceptible to oxidant-induced cell death. We tested the hypothesis that the protective effect of α-crystallin is mediated by changes in cellular glutathione (GSH and elucidated the mechanism of GSH efflux. In α-crystallin overexpressing cells resistant to cell death, cellular GSH was >2 fold higher than vector control cells and this increase was seen particularly in mitochondria. The high GSH levels associated with α-crystallin overexpression were due to increased GSH biosynthesis. On the other hand, cellular GSH was decreased by 50% in murine retina lacking αA or αB crystallin. Multiple multidrug resistance protein (MRP family isoforms were expressed in RPE, among which MRP1 was the most abundant. MRP1 was localized to the plasma membrane and inhibition of MRP1 markedly decreased GSH efflux. MRP1-suppressed cells were resistant to cell death and contained elevated intracellular GSH and GSSG. Increased GSH in MRP1-supressed cells resulted from a higher conversion of GSSG to GSH by glutathione reductase. In contrast, GSH efflux was significantly higher in MRP1 overexpressing RPE cells which also contained lower levels of cellular GSH and GSSG. Oxidative stress further increased GSH efflux with a decrease in cellular GSH and rendered cells apoptosis-prone. In conclusion, our data reveal for the first time that 1 MRP1 mediates GSH and GSSG efflux in RPE cells; 2 MRP1 inhibition renders RPE cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced cell death while MRP1 overexpression makes them susceptible and 3 the antiapoptotic function of α-crystallin in oxidatively stressed cells is mediated in part by GSH and MRP1. Our findings suggest that MRP1 and α crystallin are potential therapeutic targets in pathological retinal degenerative disorders linked to oxidative stress.

  1. The Twelve Promises of Alcoholics Anonymous: psychometric measure validation and mediational testing as a 12-step specific mechanism of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Greene, M Claire

    2013-12-01

    Empirical support for the recovery utility of 12-step mutual-help organizations (MHOs) has led to increased investigation of how such organizations confer benefit. The Twelve Promises of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) feature prominently in 12-step philosophy and culture and are one of the few documented explications of the cognitive, affective, and behavioral benefits that members might accrue. This study investigated the psychometric properties of a measure of AA's Twelve Promises and examined whether it mediated the effect of 12-step participation on abstinence.